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EVENTS: “THE 39 STEPS,” “GAME OF THRONES” 23 FILM: “CAPTAIN PHILLIPS,” “ESCAPE FROM TOMORROW” 30 THEATER REVIEW: “THE LAST FIVE YEARS” @ JCC 26 URBAN JOURNAL: THE NEW, ‘MORE,’ D&C

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

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Vol 43 No 6

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 14

News. Music. Life.

Downtown is just a bunch of tall building with empty streets on the weekends.” FEEDBACK, PAGE 2

A look at elections in Irondequoit, Greece. ELECTIONS, PAGE 6

Gargoyles and spirit girls. HISTORY, PAGE 4 FOOD | BY DAYNA PAPALEO | PAGE 10 | PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Time piece: MAG’s “Memory Theatre.”

Cheap Eats 2013

ART REVIEW, PAGE 22

Would you like to get all gussied up and treat yourself to an expensive gastronomic feast, complete with wine pairings and decadent, show-stopping desserts? If so, you can take your top hat and monocle elsewhere. This rundown of Rochester’s cheap eats is for hungry people who don’t carry their money around in sacks with dollar signs on them. Whatever these places lack in caviar service and fingerbowls they make up for in value and nourishment, and usually that’s all you need.

Best of Rochester 2013: last chance to vote! DETAILS, PAGE 29

The only shared criteria among these establishments is that they have meals with a price point at or under $10; otherwise, this list is as random as can be. So if you have a favorite place to get tasty, inexpensive food, please share it with us by commenting on this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com, or hit us up on Facebook (facebook.com/CityNewspaper) or Twitter (@roccitynews).

Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @ roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Incentives for jobs

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We give tax breaks to companies to bring jobs here, but we can’t pay for education and therefore don’t develop our talent pool so companies have less reason to come to Rochester (“Mayoral Candidate White Talks About Education,” News Blog). The job creation that is put forth is in construction and housing development with a flatlined population growth. All of our projects are based on how to get in and out of Rochester – the marina, the ferry, the high-speed rail, the bus station – or they are there for transitional populations visiting our colleges that for the most part will not stay because of the crime and the lack of good work. I believe that transitioning to a fair tax system needs to be phased in over time, but the breaks are not keeping the companies here, because we’re not developing talent that was born in this area and has ties here. Finally, and most important: Are these tax breaks working to keep job-creating companies here? Because a lot of these tax breaks are going to companies developing residential properties. No jobs there outside of maintenance, which is on a contract basis and not permanent. MARK WILLIAMS

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Warren and the debates

Imagine if current mayor Tom Richards had refused to debate Warren during the Dem primary (“Warren Should Debate,” News Blog). After all, her campaign seemed hopeless. Or imagine if he’d continued campaigning on a minor party label (as he might’ve done after losing the primary). What would Warren have done then? I tend to think that we ought to be as expansive as possible. And so I agree with City

Newspaper on this. Lovely Warren should debate Alex White. Warren claims to be vaguely progressive. If that is vaguely accurate, she ought to be embracing public discussion of the many matters confronting the city. JIM JOHNSON

Must be why they call this the silly season! Lovely Warren didn’t start campaigning last month, she started campaigning last spring. And I know she has already debated Alex White in a public place, because I was there. Anyone who doesn’t know anything about her or her plans by this time has either been living under a rock or not paying attention. Don’t blame her; blame yourself. DARLING DYAN

If City Newspaper and the D&C would stop blindly endorsing Democrats every year for cityspecific races, candidates might actually be forced to debate and lay their cards on the table. RICH TYSON

The casino referendum

I have no interest in casinos (“New York’s Tough Call on Casinos,” News). I don’t find gambling fun, and I hate how they are designed to get you lost in the maze of slots. But honestly, how much would it hurt to put one down by High Falls? “Richards has said that he is opposed to a casino in downtown Rochester for the kind of statement it would make about the character of the area.” “I don’t know that putting a casino in the middle of downtown is necessarily what my vision of downtown is,” he said.” What is his vision of downtown? Does it have any character? To me, downtown is just a bunch of tall buildings with empty streets on the weekends. I live in the Park Ave area, and rarely find myself downtown (besides Jazz Fest and hockey games) since I don’t work there. I eat in the South Wedge, hang out on Monroe, go to the market, but downtown is just never on my radar as somewhere to go. Downtown, especially near Kodak, is pretty desolate. At least a casino would be something there. It would be better than losing yet another business to Henrietta. CULVER

Anyone who thinks casinos are a good idea should volunteer to pay more in taxes. It is insane to believe that an activity based on addiction is a good thing for the economy. Casinos, like fracking, show just how desperate our society is to make things happen... at any cost. TOM JANOWSKI

Cuomo isn’t doing anything to end corruption in government. In fact, he’s a perfect example of the problem, doing everything he can to benefit from the proposed referendum: 6/24/13 (Associated Press): “Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders have quietly deleted a proposed ban on accepting campaign contributions from casino operators.” 9/30/13: “Gov. Andrew Cuomo accused of manipulation of the ballot amendment wording on the casino gambling referendum.” 10/2/13 (Buffalo News): “A state judge next week will hear arguments in a lawsuit that contends the state has illegally expended funds promoting a casino expansion plan that the Cuomo administration is asking voters to approve next month in a statewide referendum.” 10/8/13 (AP): “Gov. Andrew Cuomo collected more than $361,000 and the Legislature has raked in over $1 million from gambling interests leading up to the Nov. 5 referendum.” The voters should send Cuomo a message and vote NO on the casino referendum. BART

Living with fracking

The so-called jobs will be filled by out-of-state-oil workers from Montana, Louisiana, and other states where they already have fracking established (“Unshackle Upstate Wants Fracking, Lower Taxes,” (News Blog). My hometown of Wheeling, West Virginia, has been overrun by the fracking industry, and it is horrible. You will not benefit from fracking. The roads will be cluttered with trucks day and night, and these out-of-state migrant workers will establish temporary housing with no regard or care for their temporary communities. NO FRACK

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly October 16-22, 2013 Vol 43 No 6 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com On the cover: Meatball sliders from Skylark Lounge. Photo by Mark Chamberlin Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial interns: Trevor Lewis, Colin McCoy Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Photography intern: Larissa Coe Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales operations: Matt Walsh New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Christine Kubarycz, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

The new, ‘more,’ D&C We’ve had just over a week of the new print version of the Democrat and Chronicle, with, as promised, more content than the old D&C. And I’m not loving it. Change is good. Communities change, readers’ interests change, style and taste change. If we had to read the newspapers that were published 100 years ago, we’d faint from boredom. So now we have the new D&C, with 60 more pages each week. We do have more local news, but so far, a lot of it is small stories graphically blown out of proportion. And some of it is not more news; it’s big photos, big ads, a big editorial floating in white space. I do applaud the D&C for expanding state news. The trend in newspapers has been to reduce state coverage: specifically, state-government coverage. But the D&C’s expanded state content has been mixed, some coming from its excellent Albany bureau, others along the line of last Wednesday’s “Hike the Appalachian Trail.” Some readers are enthusiastic about the USA Today insert, the short-news master that now provides all of the D&C’s national and international news. This is certainly not the only newspaper that leans heavily on short articles that appeal to people with short attention spans. But that brings me to my real concern about the new D&C. A key role of a newspaper – any newspaper – is to help readers learn enough about important issues that they can be good citizens. We do that not only by telling readers what happened yesterday but also why: by providing context and analysis. The D&C is giving us a few articles long enough to provide both, but I had hoped the expansion would provide more. I’m also troubled by the increased reliance on Gannett writers for national and international news. With a few exceptions over the past week, every news article in every section except Sports was written by a local, state, or national Gannett journalist. That means that only Gannett journalists scour the world for our news, and only Gannett journalists decide which news sources should be interviewed, and on which topics. Add to that the dramatic decrease in the number of syndicated opinion columns, and we get a narrower and – thanks to the Gannett style – blander view of the world. The D&C is certainly doing some positive things. Despite its cutbacks, it has a strong local and state news staff, and the D&C seems to be stepping up its investigative efforts. But on the whole, there doesn’t seem to be a lot more substance in the “more” that we’re getting.

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To be well-informed citizens, we need information, lots of it. And if newspapers don’t provide it, who will?” This is a time when the public needs more substance, not less. We live in an increasingly complicated world. To be well-informed citizens, we need information, lots of it. And if newspapers don’t provide it, who will? Readers can, of course, turn to other sources. That would be fine if readers were turning to outlets that provided substantive information. But more and more people – liberals as well as conservatives – are turning to online and television outlets that simply reinforce their own prejudices. And increasingly, the D&C seems to tailor its content to what readership surveys say the average person wants, as opposed to what people need. In journalism circles, it’s not politically correct to argue for the latter. It’s considered elitist. So call me an elitist. I like variety in media. I know that the public enjoys reading about food drives, principals who are retiring, old buildings, and school science projects. Those are nice stories about nice people, and they help create a sense of community in a diverse region. But newspapers also have a responsibility to be community leaders. A newspaper heavy with shallow stories about relatively insignificant events, a newspaper that aims for the lowest common denominator rather than helping readers broaden their horizons and deepen their knowledge, isn’t living up to its calling. (And by the way: What kind of newspaper do all those research scientists and technology whizzes moving to Rochester expect to find?)

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Big buzz around LDC probe

Two developments set off renewed speculation about a grand jury’s investigation into county-linked local development corporations. One is the resignation of Monroe County’s chief information officer, Nelson Rivera. And the Water Authority has hired a law firm with expertise in criminal proceedings. A county spokesperson says that the county does not know when the grand jury will report its findings.

Yudelson joins Dems

Henrietta Supervisor Michael Yudelson is now a Democrat. Yudelson, who is seeking re-election, lost September’s Republican primary to challenger Jack Moore, who sits on the Town Board. Yudelson blamed the Tea Party’s influence on the GOP for his switch.

Teamsters, Wegmans make deal

Wegmans and Teamsters Local 118 say that they’ve reached an agreement on a new union contract. Retirement benefits had been at the core of a dispute between the two. Neither side would release details of the new accord. The Teamsters, which still have

4 CITY

to vote on the contract, represent approximately 900 Wegmans truck drivers and warehouse employees.

News

SEC investigating Xerox division The Securities Exchange Commission is investigating Affiliated Computer Services, Inc., a division of Xerox Corporation. The investigation involves an ACS accounting practice — specifically how resale of equipment should have been reported.

HISTORY | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Gargoyles and spirit girls

Drug busting

Corn Hill’s new Historic Trail identifies 10 historic or cultural landmarks within the neighborhood, including a granite obelisk commemorating the old Plymouth Spiritualist Church and its famous parishioners, “spirit rappers” Kate and Margaret Fox. “It’s a wonderful piece of art that is important in our neighborhood,” says Rob Goodling, president of the Corn Hill Neighbors Association. “It is one of those 10 historic sites that will hopefully bring bikers and joggers and walkers through the neighborhood to learn about various historical aspects of Corn Hill.”

City Council member Adam McFadden introduced legislation to create drugfree zones in the city. The legislation would create a new section of City Code to prohibit loitering in defined areas for the purpose of selling drugs. McFadden said that he wanted to agitate dealers out of complacency, and to give police an added tool to combat open-air drug markets. Mayor Tom Richards said that he has serious questions about the legislation’s constitutionality.

Murphy is finalist

The Rochester school district’s number two in command, Anita Murphy, is one of two finalists for the superintendent position at the Oswego, NY, school district, according to a report by Oswego County Today.

OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

This obelisk in Corn Hill commemorates the old Plymouth Spiritualist Church and two famous Corn Hill residents, Kate and Margaret Fox. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

The Fox sisters lived on Troup Street in Corn Hill and claimed the ability to communicate with the dead. Sites or stops on the Historic Trail also include the Genesee River, Frederick Douglass Village on Tubman Way, and the former Rochester Orphan Asylum on the southeast corner of Greig Street and Hubbell Park. Clarissa Street’s marker commemorates the neighborhood’s contribution to the American jazz scene. People wanting to travel the trail can pick up a “passport” at East Avenue Wegmans or the CHNA office at 133 South Fitzhugh Street. You can make rubbings of all 10 trail makers and then drop off or mail the passport to

the CHNA office to be entered in an annual drawing for a $100 Wegmans gift certificate. The first drawing will be held at the 2014 Corn Hill Arts Festival. Speaking of Corn Hill art, the CHNA is also looking to move its gargoyle monument. The limestone monument on Exchange Boulevard at Fitzhugh Place is in an ideal place visually, Goodling says, but road salt has irreparably damaged the statue. It needs to be moved to prevent further damage, he says. “It’s too bad because that’s just the most perfect location,” Goodling says. “Darn that salt.”

The students will use the technology to collect and synthesize data from their surroundings. They might, for example, map cell-phone reception in a certain area, or create a map that shows the availability of electricity or clean water in an area.

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Jemel Lockhart, 21, Rochester.

ROCHESTER TOTALS —

SOURCE: Rochester Police Department AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

EDUCATION | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Mapping Rwanda Two RIT professors have equipped students in a couple of Rwanda high schools with smart phones and tablets to map their communities. Professors Brian Tomaszewski and Anthony Vodacek are leading a two-year pilot study funded by the United Kingdom Department for International Development. The students will use the equipment to collect and synthesize data from their surroundings. They might, for example, map cell-phone reception in a certain area, or create a map that shows the availability of electricity in an area. The project should improve students’ spatial thinking skills, Tomaszewski and Vodacek say, and may have benefits beyond the classroom. A detailed map showing areas lacking access to clean water, for example, could be used as a tool to advocate for government intervention, Tomaszewski and Vodacek say. “Maps are power,” Tomaszewski says. Two schools are participating in the pilot program, and a third is acting as a control group. The students in the first two schools will be evaluated three times over the course of the program to see how they’re progressing. “We will want to know, ‘Did this make an impact?’” Vodacek says. “Can we show that our intervention improved the students’ spatial thinking?”

Brian Tomaszewski (left) and Anthony Vodacek. PROVIDED PHOTOS

The National Research Council’s 2006 report, “Learn to Think Spatially,” talked about the lack of spatial thinking ability in U.S. students and recommended that spatial thinking become a central component of K to 12 education. Tomaszewski says that it makes sense that this deficit would be found in students universally. Spatial thinking uses the properties of space — such as scale, distance, and direction — to structure and solve problems. Tomaszewski uses the discovery of the DNA double helix by Francis Crick and James Watson as an example. “They really used good spatial thinking,” he says “They were able to sort of think in their minds how these molecules were spatially related to one another and hence made this groundbreaking discovery.”

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Apts. hearing Morgan Management’s proposal to build a 99-unit apartment building at 933 University Avenue will be heard by the city’s Planning Commission on Monday, October 21. The site is in the East Avenue Preservation District. | The controversial project has been through several design revisions. Originally, Morgan planned to demolish the 1920’s house on the northeast corner of the property, and the city seldom grants permission to demolish a structure in a preservation district. Morgan now says that it’s willing to save the original house and provide space in it for the building’s current owner, the Monroe Voiture veterans group. | Despite some lingering concerns about the project’s size and the planned removal of some older trees, most members of the city’s Preservation Board agree that the project would not have a significant negative impact on the surrounding area. A couple of board members have said that with proper screening, the view from nearby properties, including the George Eastman House, would be protected. | The Planning Commission meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. in City Council chambers at City Hall, 30 Church Street. There are several items on the agenda. If the commission signs off, the project goes back to the Preservation Board for final approval.

2,287 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,103 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to October 14. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from September 26 to October 5: -- Lance Cpl. Jeremiah M. Collins, Jr., 19, Milwaukee, Wis. -- 1st Lt. Jennifer M. Moreno, 25, San Diego, Calif. -- Sgt. Patrick C. Hawkins, 25, Carlisle, Pa. -- Sgt. Joseph M. Peters, 24, Springfield, Mo. -- Pfc. Cody J. Patterson, 24, Philomath, Ore. -- Spc. Angel L. Lopez, 27, Parma, Ohio iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

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CITY 5

ELECTIONS | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Dems hopeful for an upset in Greece For a community with a population of fewer than 100,000, Greece’s scandals rival those of much larger places. Over the last decade, the town has been mired in the kinds of controversies, investigations, wrongdoings, and high-profile court cases that are usually reserved for nighttime television drama. The Greece Police Department became an algae bloom of criminal transgressions, culminating in the town’s former police chief going to prison for tampering with evidence. And a former tax assessor was caught in a kickback scheme with an Eastman Kodak executive. An FBI investigation of the Town of Greece has been under way for months, though it’s not clear what the inquiry is about. Another police officer has been placed on involuntary leave. And a court case challenging the town’s practice of opening Town Board meetings with a Christian prayer has risen to the level of the US Supreme Court, with a decision expected in November. Not surprisingly, Greece Democrats see opportunity in all of this. Since many of the scandals have involved Republicans, Dems say that this could be the year that breaks the GOP’s longtime stranglehold on elected office in the town. But it won’t be easy. Voters will decide on four council seats this year: Democrat Timothy Holler is challenging Republican incumbent Mike Barry in Ward 1; Democrat Wendy Wright is challenging Republican incumbent Brett Granville in Ward 2; Democrat

Rita Garretson is challenging Republican incumbent Andrew Conlon in Ward 3; and Democrat Dick Beebe. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN Bill Reilich. FILE PHOTO Norma Cummings is challenging Republican incumbent Kirk Morris in citizen participation — something that he Residents are worried that the town’s Ward 4. diminished reputation is impacting small says has been sorely lacking. Its absence But the biggest prize up for grabs is town businesses, home values, and the town’s partly explains why Greece has endured so supervisor. Greece has been led by John once-comfortable lifestyle, he says. many scandals, he says. Auberger, a Republican, since the late 1990’s. “We’ve heard a lot of people say that Reilich says that he shares some of those But terms limits are forcing Auberger out. concerns, and that he’s the candidate best suited they’ve tried to get basic information or There are two contenders to fill the job: to address them. Reilich is a former business help from the supervisor’s office and they former Monroe County Legislator Dick owner, and says that his background is what’s were ignored,” Beebe says. Beebe, a Democrat, and State Assembly needed to face the town’s growing service and But more than anything else, he says, member Bill Reilich, who is also chair of the financial demands, without raising taxes. residents are concerned about Greece’s county Republican Committee. Both candidates say that Greece is reputation. fortunate to have a strong tax base, but “People don’t want to be embarrassed Beebe says that he’ll bring openness anymore to say they live here,” Beebe says. continues on page 8 to Greece’s government through robust

ELECTIONS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Monroe’s low-stakes Lej races County Legislature races are on the ballot for voters in parts of Greece and Irondequoit this year. In Greece’s 19th district, Democrat Mike Bertolone and Republican Kathleen Taylor are running for an open seat. In Irondequoit’s 17th district, Democratic incumbent Joe Morelle Jr. faces a challenge from Republican Ed McClenathan. It’s a relatively low-stakes election year for the Legislature. So much of the agenda depends on who controls the majority. And with only two seats in play, 6 CITY

OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

Republicans will retain their edge, even if they lose both seats. Morelle was appointed to office earlier this year to fill the vacancy left when Ted O’Brien was elected to the State Senate. Morelle says that his main goal is to bring jobs to the community, and he’s proposed a tax incentive for homeowners who make environmentally-minded improvements to their properties. Encouraging those investments would mean jobs, he says. His opponent, McClenathan, is an attorney focusing mainly on family law.

This is the second part in City’s general-election coverage, which continues in the October 23 issue. The general election is Tuesday, November 5.

He says that he wants to work with other legislators and the county administration to keep the tax rate “relatively flat,” and to keep the community attractive to residents and businesses. He says that he’s a critical thinker who’s focused more on policies and solutions than on political divisions. In Greece, Bertolone is a retired sheriff’s deputy who worked in the courts division. He says that he’s concerned about the county’s budget gap and that he wants to encourage small business development to help plug that gap. He also says that the

county needs a centralized point — or a point person — to help prospective business owners navigate the paperwork and legal requirements. Attempts to reach Kathleen Taylor were not successful. Her website says that she’s been Greece’s receiver of taxes for the past 28 years. It lists her priorities as keeping the tax rate flat, supporting job creation programs, and funding Greater Rochester Enterprise.

ELECTIONS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Medley looms over Irondequoit races To make sense of Irondequoit’s politics, it helps to think of the town as Monroe County’s swing state. Party affiliation doesn’t seem to mean much to Irondequoit voters. And they aren’t reluctant to bounce sitting officials out of office. As a result, town elections are often tough, hard-fought contests, and the 2013 races are no exception. On the Republican side, Supervisor Mary Joyce D’Aurizio and Town Board member Paul Marasco, both incumbents, are seeking re-election. They’re joined on the ticket by attorney Bill Brongo, who’s seeking the other open Town Board seat. Their Democratic challengers are supervisor candidate Adam Bello and Town Board candidates Dave Seeley and Lorie Barnum. Bello is the chief administrator of the county District Attorney’s Office, Barnum is director of development for the YWCA, and Seeley is an advisor to State Assembly member Joe Morelle. D’Aurizio and Marasco stress their roles in rebuilding the town’s finances. They both started their terms the same year that a state Comptroller’s Office issued an audit criticizing the previous administration’s budgeting. Between the end of 2006 and the end of 2009, the town’s reserves had dropped from $1.5 million to $297,000. By the end of 2009, then-supervisor Mary Ellen Heyman and the Town Board had adopted new fiscal policies and practices. And D’Aurizio says that the next few budgets, which were prepared under her administration, brought the town’s reserves up to $3.8 million, while keeping the tax rate flat. The rate stays flat in the proposed 2014 budget, she says. “That’s what prompted me to run in the first place in 2009 because I knew I could really straighten out the finances, really come up with balanced budgets,” D’Aurizio says. The Democratic slate has its own budget ideas. The candidates say that they want to implement participatory budgeting, where certain amounts of money are set aside and devoted to different projects in different neighborhoods. The idea makes sense, Bello says, because one neighborhood might need sidewalks repaired, for example, while another might need tougher code enforcement. Irondequoit has several high-profile, evolving issues. Town voters approved a

long-sought library consolidation plan this year, though opponents are passing

petitions to try to force another vote. And one night last month, fights broke out among a large group of young people at Regal Culver Ridge movie theater. Bello panned D’Aurizio for waiting several days to address the incident. In the Adam Bello. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN Mary Joyce D’Aurizio. PHOTO BY LARISSA COE end, security was added to the theater and the town has police patrolling the payment. But he cautions that Congel and he should clean up the graffiti on his parking lot. would probably sue. properties. Any other town property owner But the biggest issue in Irondequoit D’Aurizio says that the town’s hands have would be required to do the maintenance is Medley Centre. Candidates on both been tied on Medley Centre, largely because or face penalties, they say. sides say that there is widespread public of the way that the project’s tax agreement is Democrats say that it’s time for the dissatisfaction with the lack of progress at written. The agreement, which was drafted town to advocate for an end to the Medley Medley, and with developer Scott Congel. during the previous administration, doesn’t Centre tax agreement. (The decision is The residents see a project that’s getting give the town the same authority to assess ultimately up to the Monroe County significant tax breaks but showing few penalty payments as the school district and Industrial Development Agency, which has tangible signs of advancement. COMIDA have, she says. been reluctant to talk about terminating And recent circumstances haven’t Recently, however, D’Aurizio got the agreement.) helped. While Congel has made required Congel to demolish two buildings on the The Democratic slate contrasts the payments to the town, county, and East Medley property, though the buildings way that the town has handled Congel Irondequoit School District under a 2009 were supposed to have come down a and Medley Centre with officials’ tax agreement, he has failed to meet a $165 handling of the multi-use I-Square few years ago. D’Aurizio says that the million investment benchmark. He faces a demolition represents progress. Congel has project. Seeley says that the town seems large penalty payment in January. asked for changes to the tax agreement, but to be giving Congel a pass, but that The Democratic slate has used the dead D’Aurizio said that she wouldn’t negotiate officials stood in the way of I-Square. mall to make its argument for leadership The process was adversarial, they say, and until the buildings were down. change in town government. Bello has led “Right now, I think I’m holding the fraught with miscommunication. that charge, criticizing D’Aurizio for not The Democrats say that the town should aces,” D’Aurizio says. “I really feel we’re being more forceful, he says, in holding going to be able to push him.” have worked with I-Square developers Congel to his commitments. Brongo, a Republican Town Board Mike and Wendy Nolan to make sure that “There’s been little to no investment candidate, backs D’Aurizio’s approach. the project progressed. But when pressed, Negotiations will yield better results, on the property, and the town has been Democrats didn’t offer details on what he says, than trying to cancel the tax virtually silent on this issue for threetown officials could have done differently. agreement. The latter could result in and-a-half years,” Bello says. “That void The Nolans and the town did eventually lengthy, expensive litigation, he says, and of leadership has really allowed the reach an agreement, and the project is the focus should be on encouraging Congel developer to miss his milestones without under construction near the Titus Avenueto move ahead with a clear vision. repercussions.” Cooper Road intersection. As for I-Square, D’Aurizio and Marasco Bello and fellow Democrats Seeley and Marasco, a Republican Town Board say that they and the other Town Board Barnum also say that the town should be member who is seeking re-election, says members were being cautious. The Nolans more aggressive in holding Congel to town that he supports terminating Congel’s tax wanted a tax agreement that differed code requirements. Congel should keep agreement if Congel misses the January continues on page 8 Medley Centre’s grass mowed, they say, rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7

Greece continues from page 6

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OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

that there’s room for expansion by attracting new businesses. And they say that although Greece isn’t growing at the pace it once did, that easing traffic congestion and preventing commercial growth from encroaching into neighborhoods are issues that still concern voters. While Beebe and the Democratic lineup urge voters to dump incumbents to restore integrity to public service in Greece, Reilich flips that debate. He says that individual politicians, not the Republican Party, have been at fault in Greece. And he says that Democrats have credibility problems, too, pointing out the demise of top Democratic officials including former governor Eliot Spitzer and former Representative Anthony Weiner. But Beebe says that the problems for Republicans go deeper than the stains from former officials. He says that Republicans fail to recognize that the town is composed of a diverse set of communities ranging from older ethnic neighborhoods that border the city, to higher-income neighborhoods near the lake. And Democrats have a better record of uniting diverse communities, he says. Beebe says that the key to the race will be voter turnout. Although registered Republicans outnumber registered Democrats in the town, nearly one-third of Greece’s voters aren’t registered with any political party. Those residents will determine the outcome in November, Beebe says.

Irondequoit continues from page 7

from the standard agreement that the town offers new or growing business, D’Aurizio says. Since the community felt burned by Medley, she says, officials wanted to make sure that I-Square had detailed benchmarks, that the developers had a well thought-out business plan, and that they had the resources to live up to their promises. “We had to really balance it, and unfortunately it played out in the media that there was a dispute,” Marasco says. “At the end of the day, I think both sides were satisfied and, to the developer’s credit, he’s up and running.”

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Obamacare discussion

The League of Women Voters’ health care committee will present “The Affordable Care Act: Challenges in Local Implementation,” a panel discussion at 4 p.m. on Thursday, October 17. The panel members are Lynne Scalzo, vice president at Excellus BC/BS; Michelle Casey, director of CMMI and Finger Lakes Health Systems; Joseph Vasile, doctor and CEO of the Greater Rochester Independent Practice Association; and Kim Wynn, program manager at Coordinated Care

Services. The event will be held at Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Avenue.

mail to P.O. Box 17323, Rochester, NY, 14617. Information: 738-9900 or 314-8426.

Economic injustices unveiled

Film on drug addiction

Rochester Social Welfare Action Alliance will present “The Reality Tour” on Saturday, October 19. The bus tour is intended to showcase everyday economic injustices and to encourage economic human rights for everyone. The bus leaves from School No. 1, 85 Hillside Avenue, at 11:45 a.m. The bus returns at 3:15 p.m. Registration fee: $20 general public, $15 for students, and $10 for low-income participants. Make checks payable to SWAA Rochester “Reality Tour,” and

Charlotte Street Films and the Drug Policy Alliance in collaboration with the Rochester Central Library will present a showing of “The House I Live In,” an award-winning documentary film, at 2 p.m. on Sunday, October 20. Rochester Police Chief Jim Sheppard and Patricia Warth, co-director of Justice Strategies at the Center for Community Alternatives, will lead a discussion after the film. The film will be shown at the Central Library, 115 South Avenue.

Correcting ourselves

In the October 9 issue the choice article on “Ghost The Musical” was written by Trevor Lewis, not Colin McCoy.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

25 local restaurants where you can binge for $10 or less • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ould you like to get all gussied up and treat yourself to an expensive gastronomic feast, complete with wine pairings and decadent, showstopping desserts? If so, you can take your top hat and monocle elsewhere. This rundown of Rochester’s cheap eats is for hungry people who don’t carry their money around in sacks with dollar signs on them. Whatever these places lack in caviar service and fingerbowls they make up for in value and nourishment, and usually that’s all you need. The only shared criteria among these establishments is that they have meals with a price point at or under $10; otherwise, this list is as random as can be. So if you have a favorite place to get tasty, inexpensive food, please share it with us at rochestercitynewspaper.com, or hit us up on Facebook (facebook.com/ CityNewspaper) or Twitter (@roccitynews). • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • DINING FEATURE BY DAYNA PAPALEO

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Barry’s Old School Irish (2 W.

A trio of meatball sliders — pork sausage, chicken, and vegetarian — with sauces from Skylark Lounge. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

10 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

Main St., Webster, 545-4258, barrysoldschoolirish.com) is what you get when you cross a pub with a café and bakery, and it’s a cozy place to get traditional fare like bangers and mash ($8) and a full Irish breakfast ($6.50), along with a satisfying RochesterDublin hybrid like the Sheepdog ($8), which beds a Zweigle’s red hot in a bun and then blankets it with shepherd’s pie. (For dessert, the Guinness layer cake is outstanding.) And if you’re thirsty, Barry’s features the area’s largest selection of Irish whiskeys. It probably serves water, too, if you’re into that sort of thing. • • • • • •

Hopefully area vegans will forgive a mention of Natural Oasis Café (288 Monroe Ave., 325-1831, naturaloasisny.com), because you just can’t make a list of Cheap Eats in Rochester without including this wickedly creative eatery. There are typically 13 items on the dinner menu, each a different daily preparation of dishes like stew, pizza, gnocchi, and greens, plus an Ethiopian selection, a drink, and a couple desserts. One recent visit, for instance, featured a brown-rice risotto with roasted cauliflower, oven-dried tomatoes, pesto, and pine nuts, and a sublime salad of lettuces, roasted beets and carrots, pistachios, and truffle vinaigrette. You forget that you’re eating vegan,

• • • •

Soft chimichangas at Agave in Henrietta. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

A "Sheepdog" covers a Zweigle's red hot in shepherd's pie at Barry's Old School Irish in Webster. PHOTO BY THOMAS J. DOOLEY

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • and you don’t care anyway because each delicious dish is $4. FOUR FREAKING BUCKS. Really. • • • • • • Consistently reliable and seemingly always open, Ming’s Noodles and Cuisines of Asia (1038 S. Clinton Ave., 244-0985, mingsnoodle.com) has expanded its menu quite a bit over the years to include Vietnamese and Thai dishes, and nearly everything on it is under a 10 spot. The lunch combos will run you $5.25, with dinner clocking in at a couple of bucks more, and the customizable noodles are an excellent bet. I’m a longtime fan of the soba tofu noodle soup ($6.50), which includes buckwheat noodles, bright veggies, and big chunks of tofu: filling, warming, and quite guiltless. • • • • • • New on the Rochester food scene, Sultan Lebanese Restaurant & Bakery (1659 Mt. Hope Ave., 241-0081) is one of only a few places in town where you can get the vertical rotisserie meat shawarma, available in pita combos with chicken ($5.49) and beef ($5.99). You non-carnivores are covered, too; besides many differently topped versions of the popular Lebanese flatbread manakeesh (all less than $5), Sultan does a good-sized vegetarian combo ($9.99) with hummus, baba ghanoush, tabbouleh, falafel, and more. • • • • • • You’ll get some of the friendliest service in town at Calabresella’s (1386 Buffalo Road, 235-7860, nystyledeli.com), though who

wouldn’t be in a good mood around all that mouthwatering deli food? Calabresella’s is known for its subs, and the Colon Kicker ($7 for a large), with grilled capicola and steak, might be the most famous of all. Lots of people just hedge their bets with an Italian Assorted ($6), but if there were a Dayna, it would have roast beef, lettuce, onions, tomato, mayo, and hot peppers. It’d cost $6.50, and it’d kick your hangover to the curb. • • • • • • One of the awesome things about James Brown’s Place (1356 Culver Road, 2884250, jamesbrownsplace.com) is that you can get anything on the menu at any time, perfect for anyone craving a huge frittata or some French toast for lunch. But maybe you’re not the short-stack type; no one’s going to stop you from enjoying an early-morning po’ boy or a 9 a.m. Sandwich Bistec ($6.99), which is Spanish beef, fried egg, sautéed onions, swiss cheese, and garlic mayo on French bread. The menu is massive, with only a few items going past the $10 barrier, and fans of well-done fries will be thrilled to know that James Brown’s Place understands what that means. • • • • • • Agave (2820 W. Henrietta Road, 2704376) isn’t hard to find, but it doesn’t exactly jump out at you either, and lovers of Mexican food might be annoyed at me for spilling this well-kept secret. The cheap lunch combos are the midday way to go, and some still come in under $10 even

with the additional $1.99 tacked on after 2 p.m. At dinner, the soft chimichangas are a deal: $9.99 for two meat-stuffed burritos topped with guacamole, sour cream, lettuce, and tomato, served alongside beans. And since they’re not fried, you can feel free to honor your restraint with a topshelf margarita. • • • • • • The South Wedge’s loss was Gates’s gain when Rohrbach’s Brewpub (3859 Buffalo Road, 594-9800, rohrbachs.com) lit out for the west side, but that doesn’t mean you city folk have to go without its famous Seven-Lily Soup ($5.50) or German specialties like the Pork Schnitzel Sammie ($7.95), which tops a big plank of pork cutlet with sauerkraut and muenster then tucks it into a freshly baked roll. (German potato salad on the side? Sure!) Burgers, sandwiches, salads, and plates are all nicely priced as well. • • • • • • The catering arm of BBQ Fred HogginIt-Style (610 N. Greece Rd., Hilton, 392-7839, hogginitbbq.com) is in enough demand that the actual restaurant is currently only open Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings, so that should be a clue that this place knows ‘cue. If you’re anything like me, you always opt for a quarter rack of ribs with two sides ($8.99). But there are also $8.99 burger combos (the Fred, for instance, is gilded with smoked roast beef, while the Macn-Cheese is topped with...you know) and $7.99 plate options, with the usual suspects

all available, along with options like Cajun corn and sweet potato fries. • • • • • • At nearly every sub shop, you have the option to build your own, and DiPisa Old World Submarines (196 Court St., 2326220; 362 State St., 454-3850, dipisa.com) is no different. But these people are pros; why not let them guide you? DiPisa’s has a roster of interesting Italian-inspired subs like the Melanzane Vegetariano ($6.99), with grilled breaded eggplant, roasted red peppers, mozzarella, sautéed mushrooms, baby greens, tomatoes, and pesto mayo, and the Mondo Siciliano ($6.99), filled with prosciutto, capicola, hot soppressata, provolone, lettuce, tomatoes, onions, black olives, and vinaigrette. And all the sub rolls are baked in house, so you know DiPisa’s ain’t foolin’ around. • • • • • • Open since 1988, Tokyo (2930 W. Henrietta Road, 424-4166, tokyorestaurantrochesterny.com) might be the oldest sushi bar in town, and you can certainly score bento lunches, as well as many maki rolls, for under $10. And as much as I love sushi, Tokyo is my go-to place for ramen. The miso ramen ($8.25) is available on a scale from a nicely spicy 1 to a face-melting 7. My favorite is the shoyu ramen ($7.95), a sweet, salty, and rich broth loaded with pork, seaweed, fish cake, and noodles. Add three dumplings and make it a shoyu ramen combo for $9.95. • • • • • • continues on page 12

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

continues from page 11

A slice of lemonade cake from Kneel & Neal Southern Cuisine. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

(top) The Sandwich Bistec at James Brown's Place. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON (bottom) A chicken gyro pita at Mark's Texas Hots. PHOTO BY LARISSA COE

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Meatballs. That’s what Skylark Lounge (40 S. Union St., 270-8106, theskylarklounge.com) serves, in various styles and combinations, often with a side. You got your traditional balls, along with pork sausage, spicy chicken, and a veggie version made from eggplant. The sauces run the gamut as well, from marinara to alfredo to pesto and beyond. Get away super cheaply with a $2 slider, or live it up with three balls and one side for $7. Now, one of those sides could be the amazing deep-fried mashed-potato balls, but if you want to go a little less sleazy (and a lot less spherical), choose cole slaw, or roasted veggies, or whatever special Skylark has cooking. • • • • • • Outlaw Potato sounds like a really funny Halloween costume, but at Texas BBQ Joint (122 S. Union St., Spencerport, 352-4227, tbjny.com) it’s a genuine meal, a baked spud topped with butter, sour cream, bacon, cheese, chives, and a big pile of barbecue beef, pulled pork, or barbecue chicken for $7.99. The Wrangler platter is $8.99, allowing you to choose one of nine meats (think beef brisket, smoked turkey breast, etc.), plus two sides, including fried okra, hush puppies, and broccoli-n-cheese. The sandwiches are all priced at around $5, and adding 12 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

a pair of sides for $3 means you’re still cheap eating! • • • • • • Obviously a slice of pizza is the ultimate in value eating, and The Pizza Stop (123 State St., 546-7252, pizzastop1.com) does not disappoint on that front. The Pizza Stop has been holding it down on State Street since 1986, its New York-style, thincrust pies among Rochester’s best. A twotopping slice will run you a mere $2.50. Hell, you could even get a small pie with one topping for less than a Hamilton. • • • • • • Dogtown (691 Monroe Ave., 271-6620, dogtownhots.com) is a simple concept, brilliantly and dependably executed: hot dogs and fixings, with a startling number of vegetarian options. Start with a red or white Zweigle German frank and choose from more than 15 topping configurations, none more than four bucks. Dogtown also offers burgers, sausages, and other sandwiches, with meatless versions of nearly every menu item available. At $6.69, the Junkyard Plate is a good bargain; two dogs or burgers atop two sides, such as baked beans, macaroni salad, and crisp home fries that alone make the Dogtown version of the plate one of this city’s finest. • • • • • •

Natural Vibes Jerk Hut II (665 Culver

Road, 360-4434, naturalvibesjerkhut. com) is housed in a cute, wood-shingled building near the corner of Culver and Atlantic, and its rustic feel perfectly complements the long-braised meats that anchor the dinner combos. The small size ($9) is more than enough for one meal, with protein options like jerk chicken, curry goat, and a flavorful brown stew chicken, served with rice and peas, plus a salad. There are a few non-meat options, as well as Jamaican breakfast classics like callaloo and saltfish ($9), served with dumplings, yam, and plantains. • • • • • • Hidden back in a little strip mall across from Monroe Community College is Chopsticks (125 White Spruce Blvd., 427-8878), a cozy Chinese restaurant with a Cantonese bent, as evidenced by its many rice dishes. The majority of the menu is under $10, but for an economical whole-meal experience, you can’t go wrong with a combo (nothing costs more than $6.65 at lunch and $8.35 at dinner), which adds fried rice and a choice of soup or egg roll to a hearty entrée portion of favorites like beef with broccoli, spicy jo bo pork, or sesame tofu. • • • • • • “Oh, let’s just go to Mark’s,” my friends and I have been known to say when it’s time to

Fall for our

P um p k i n S c o n e s

745 Park Avenue 241-3120 • Open 7 days

The Colon Kicker sub, with capicola and steak, from Calabresella's. PHOTO BY LARISSA COE

(top) A vegetarian combo platter from Sultan Lebanese Restaurant & Bakery. PHOTO BY MARK (bottom) Pick up a slice from The Pizza Stop. FILE PHOTO

CHAMBERLIN

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • grub up, knowing that Mark’s Texas Hots (487 Monroe Ave., 473-1563) will make everyone happy and leave us a few bucks for whatever happens next. A 24-hour diner, Mark’s is a melting pot of locals, though you won’t have too much time for people watching thanks to the quick and efficient service. You know the drill here — omelets, tuna clubs, grilled cheese, hot turkey sandwiches, and much, much more. The chicken gyro pita is my favorite: thinly sliced meat, pillowy pita, lettuce, tomatoes, onions, and creamy tzatziki; with a side of fries (well done, of course) it’s $5.75. Oh, one more thing: Mark’s hot sauce rules. • • • • • • Named in honor of the year — and located on the site — that Susan B. Anthony was arrested for casting her then-illegal vote, 1872 Café (431 W. Main St., 730-7687, 1872cafe.com) is an airy, light-filled space whose walls pay tribute to crucial women in history. There’s coffee, of course, in its many manifestations — along with comfy seating on which to enjoy it — but 1872 Café also serves a rotating menu of soups, salads, sandwiches, and wraps like the Sonoma ($6.95), with roast turkey, swiss chard, and provolone, topped with sundried tomato and roasted corn pesto. Look for comfort-food lunch specials and fresh baked goods as well. • • • • • •

You’ll encounter some daily Costa Rican specials at Ticas with a Twist (280 Exchange Blvd., 319-3217), but the majority of the menu is Mediterranean, with starters like dolmades and tourlou, soups and salads, plus pita pockets ($6$7) and pita rolls ($6.25-$8). The platters are a good value as well, with pastitsio, moussaka, and vegetable lasagna combos each coming in under $10. Bonus: beautiful waterfront views. • • • • • • Family owned and operated since 1929, Fox’s (3450 Winton Place, 427-8200, foxsdeli.com) is a NYC-style deli with a good-sized menu of soups, salads, and sandwiches. Barely anything on the menu cracks a sawbuck, including the wildly popular Reuben ($8.79), which Fox’s claims is the best in town. You’ll also find builds like Bologna and the Beast ($7.79), which tops grilled bologna with hot pepperjack cheese and sautéed onions and serves it on rye, as well as the Sierrawich ($8.29), made of chicken salad topped with BBQ sauce, bacon, lettuce, tomato, and raw onion, and tucked into a hard roll. • • • • • • Opened this past July, Kneel & Neal Southern Cuisine (777 S. Plymouth Ave., 413-1943) serves down-home classics, like

a fried chicken leg-quarter dinner with two sides for $10. (Sides include collards, candied yams, and macaroni and cheese.) But if you walk in with $10 and get one of the $6 specials — that’s gizzards, rib tips, or four chicken wings plus a small side and a soda — then you’ll still have enough money for that heavenly lemonade cake ($3). Served in squares only slightly smaller than a paperback, the fluffy cake is soaked in so much lemony goodness that it oozes out when you begin chewing. Actually, now that I think about it, you could just get three pieces of lemonade cake and call it a meal. • • • • • • Expanded to two more suburbs after the success of its original Irondequoit location, Monte Alban Mexican Grill (845 E. Ridge Road, 697-0615; 2245 Empire Blvd., Webster, 787-4700; 2160 Penfield Road, Penfield, 586-4134; montealbangrill.com) showcases a serious selection of Mexican-food favorites, with a whopping 20 lunch and 26 dinner combinations all for less than a tenner. (And that’s not even including the halfdozen vegetarian combos.) I’m partial to Monte Alban’s tomatillo-based green sauce and tender pork; at $9.99 either the tacos carnitas or burritos tipico — the former served with rice and beans, the latter with continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13

Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ]

The Moistboyz Monday, December 9. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. $15. 9 p.m. 292-9940. lovincup.com [ POP/ROCK ]

Anthony Green Tuesday, December 10. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $17-$20. 8 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com

Music

[ POP/ROCK ]

The Fighting Jamesons Saturday, January 11. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. $10. 8 p.m. themontagemusichall.com

Iron & Wine

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER’S STRONG AUDITORIUM, RIVER CAMPUS, 500 WILSON BOULEVARD. 9 P.M. | $13-$20 | UROCHESTERTICKETS.COM [ FOLK ] Sam Beam, better known by the stage name Iron & Wine, is a folk artist whose music has been a constant in the indie folk scene for over a decade. Beam’s music is known for the simple, hushed quality that is present in every aspect of his sound — from the tender vocals, the sparse orchestrations, to the gentle, often arpeggiated guitar patterns. With the onset of his album “Kiss Each Other Clean” in 2010, Beam delved into a bigger, livelier sound, complete with a clear reexamination of all the musical aspects that have made him a noteworthy artist. On the recently released “Ghost on Ghost,” his sound only furthers that daring reexamination. — BY LEAH CREARY

Tim Reynolds WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23 DUB LAND UNDERGROUND, 315 ALEXANDER ST. 9 P.M. | $15 | 232-7550 [ POP/ROCK ] Tim Reynolds is probably more well known for his work as lead guitar slinger for Dave Matthews (in the band and as an acoustic duo), but his brilliance as an exploratory guitarist and multi-instrumentalist shines in his group, TR3. A globetrotting Army brat, Reynolds formed the band in Charlottesville, Virginia, in the early 1980’s. In TR3, Reynolds explores sonically, electrically, and multidimensionally sounds that skirt genres from jazz to world. See him live and you’ll realize his DMB work is just the tip. — BY FRANK DE BLASÉ

Classic Tracks Current Grooves Future Legends FOR REAL JAZZ IN ROCHESTER, TUNE TO 90.1 FM OR JAZZ901.ORG. 14 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

LISTEN UP! CITY + SPOTIFY We know you use Spotify. We know you read City Newspaper. So why not use both of them at the same time? Check out our FREE Spotify playlist to listen to full tracks from bands in our weekly top concert picks, updated every Wednesday! Listen on our site or grab links to the web & desktop versions of Spotify at ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM/SPOTIFY

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. Sparks & Yarms. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. Call for info.

The Peculiar Pretzelmen WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 CALIFORNIA BREW HAUS, 402 WEST RIDGE RD. 9 P.M. | $5 | 621-1480 [ ALTERNATIVE ] The Peculiar Pretzelmen is the

sort of band that you could imagine drinking absinthe or traveling along the bowels of the carny circuit with. The LA-based duo draws its musical influences from Depression-era barn-burning blues, throwing in an edgy punk ethos. The Peculiar Pretzelmen churns out the devil’s blues as competently as Elmore Leonard cranked out “Pulp Fiction.” The pair infuses minimalist primal energy into its tunes and makes an occasionally stale genre sound gothic and spooky. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Phish TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 BLUE CROSS ARENA, 1 WAR MEMORIAL SQUARE 7:30 P.M. | $65 | BLUECROSSARENA.COM. [ JAM ] The last time I saw Phish, the band’s management granted me permission to photograph the band for the first three songs. Twenty minutes later I was still in the pit and Phish was still on its first song. These cats are the kings of the extrapolated jam. Phish emerged out of the fertile Vermont hippy scene in 1983 and soon claimed the crown previously worn by The Dead. Though the band — and primarily guitarist extraordinaire Trey Anastasio — mixes virtually every style imaginable, there still is a focused joy and ability to drive free of the clutter that bogs other jammers down. — BY FRANK DE BLASÉ

[ BLUES ] Harper. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9:30 p.m. Free.

So Last Year performed Friday, October 11, at Lovin’ Cup. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Song-centric wonderment

[ CLASSICAL ]

Live from Hochstein: L’Heure Exquise (The Exquisite Hour) in song.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

The faithful readers of my rants have been known to give me shit when I bounce around from venue to venue like a pinball. So this week, though there were multiple events on my radar (“Machete Kills” will have to wait until next week sometime), I decided to hit one show and dig it from load-in to load-out. It was So Last Year’s CD release show Friday night at Lovin’ Cup, with guests Adam Clark and Joe Percy. It was a night of song-centric wonderment from all three artists. Percy, of Sans Ego fame, took the stage with his guitar and his uncle — that would be Paul Morabito of Chesterfield Kings fame — on bass. Percy established his musicality and quirk by opening with Ween’s fun and falsetto’d “Freedom of 76” before launching into an otherwise totally original set. His guitar gently wept, and though electric, he played it Push Star/ Velvets style with a decidedly acoustic strum and attack. Morabito held the bottom end Longhorn-style and plodded about in a more of a freeform counterpoint than actual support. It twisted and mingled well with Percy’s gentle lyricism.

Reminding me of Ryan Adams sans the nicotine, Adam Clark took the stage with a set of music that can be viewed two ways. If he were an acoustic artist, the set would have seemed ramped and amped up. If he were an electric artist, then it would have come off reserved. Not knowing his plugged or unplugged roots, I had to focus on the music at hand. It was lovelorn lyrically with a percussive attack from the two acoustic guitars parked up front. It was quiet and the band had a little trouble getting the preoccupied crowd to turn an ear, but the audience eventually came around. Good music will do that. The star of the show, however, was Logan Van Epps, whose So Last Year was there to celebrate the release of its CD, “It’s Later Than You Think.” Manning the piano from center stage, Van Epps led his full band through some interesting, unbrandable pop. His voice is mighty flexible, though he spent most of the time flexing its upper register, its beauty only matched by the introduction of an abbreviated string section about halfway through the band’s short set.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Reign and Ladies Night.

Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 2325498. Third Wednesday of every month. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. venurochester.com. Call for info. continues on page 17

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENTS Eastman Theatre Box Office:

585-454-2100

facebook.com/ConcertsAtEastman

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 EASTMAN WIND ENSEMBLE, CINDI JOHNSTON-TURNER AND DONALD HUNSBERGER, CONDUCTORS Music of Gershwin, Lindberg, and McTee Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 PM Free THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 CHAMBER JAZZ, DAVE RIVELLO, DIRECTOR Featuring guest artist Bill Holman and

music of Bill Kirchner Kilbourn Hall, 8 PM, Free FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18 EASTMAN-ROCHESTER CHORUS AND EASTMAN PHILHARMONIA, NEIL VARON, CONDUCTOR Mahler Symphony No. 2 in C minor, “Resurrection” Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 PM Free

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 MORNING CHAMBER MUSIC A Morning Schubertiade Schubert Songs and “Trout” Quintet D. 667 Hatch Recital Hall, 11 AM, Free

THIRD SUNDAY CONCERT WITH THE ITALIAN BAROQUE ORGAN Featuring Italian virtuoso and Eastman Professor Edoardo Bellotti Memorial Art Gallery, 5:30 PM Free with Gallery admission

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 CANTATA ENSEMBLE, NILS KLYKKEN AND JENNIFER LEE, CONDUCTORS Music of J.S. Bach Lutheran Church of the Reformation, 3 PM, Free

MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 EASTMAN WIND ORCHESTRA, JARED CHASE, CONDUCTOR Music of Vaughn Williams, Danyew, Schwantner, Grainger, and Persichetti Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 PM Free

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 KILBOURN CONCERT SERIES TETZLAFF QUARTET, CHRISTIAN TETZLAFF ELIZABETH KUFFERATH, VIOLIN HANNA WEINMEISTER, VIOLA TANJA TETZLAFF, CELLO Haydn: String Quartet in C Major, Op. 20, No. 2 Bartok: String Quartet No. 4, Sz. 91 Beethoven: String Quartet No. 15 in A Minor, Op. 132 Kilbourn Hall, 8 PM Tickets $15-25 (discounts to U/R ID holders)

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

Music blues influences, just at a higher speed. If you listen to most heavy metal or hard-rock solos, you can break them down to blues basics. They’re just throwing more notes in there. There’s a ton of bends, a ton of double stops. I listen to everything from Coltrane to Satriani to death metal and anything in between. So as a new drummer, what concerned you in joining an already-established band with an established sound? Were you worried? Frank Madonia: I wasn’t up until now…

I just wanted to keep it high energy. All throughout the CD, it’s high intensity, no let-up start to finish, all killer, no filler. What excited you most about Heatseeker’s music? Madonia: The songs…they’re big anthems. Anthems that still fit in a beer joint. Webster: We fit in places like Monty’s

Local hard-rock group Heatseeker has been plugging along for more than a decade, unconcerned with whether its style is in vogue. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Chasing the perfect tone Heatseeker OPENS FOR NASHVILLE PUSSY TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $12-$16 | BUGJAR.COM REVERBNATION.COM/HEATSEEKERMUSIC [ INTERVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Let’s clear up a bit of confusion. In the hallowed halls of all things rock ’n’ roll, big often gets confused with loud. Any band can be loud; just turn the sucker up. Plug in and peel out. The reality is that the bands we love aren’t just loud, they’re big. Rochester’s Heatseeker is big. Yeah, it’s loud, too, but it’s the size and quality of any band’s tone that trumps simply going to 11 any day. Over the past 13 years, two LPs, and one EP — including the thundering new release “Heads Will Roll” — Heatseeker has played breakneck, fast, heavy, and, yes, big rock music. The band has seen itself fall in and out of popularity without compromising its principles to earn favor or fans. Heatseeker’s adherence to what it loves and believes in is admirable. I went through a labyrinth of electric gates and barbwire fences and deep into the 16 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

bowels of a west side industrial park to find Heatseeker — Brendan Willem (guitar and vocals), Seth “City” Webster (guitar), Buzz K. Hymen (bass), and new drummer Frank Madonia — hard at work, swilling suds, and seeking the heat. The band paused for a few silly questions. An edited transcript of the conversation follows. CITY: Heatseeker has been around for a while… Brendan Willem: I started it in the tail

end of 2000. Seth came on board in 2001 and has been on board ever since. Buzz came on about 2005, and he’s been with us on and off. Frank is brand new, this will be his first show. How did it all get started? Willem: It kind of evolved out of a

punk-rock band I was doing at the time called Street Razor. We played out a little bit and the songs I was writing were becoming a little more rock ’n’ roll. The guys slowly dropped off one by one, so I got new people to where it was a totally different band, changed the name, and started fresh. The idea was to do old-school rock ’n’ roll, a lot of 70’s

Krown because we’re normal dudes, we hang out there. We’re just guys who want to drink some beers and play music. We don’t put on airs, or act grandiose, or like something we’re not. We’re just here to kick ass and play some rock ’n’ roll. What kind of fan digs Heatseeker? Webster: It’s funny, but playing together

influences, guitar harmonies, high energy, that type of thing. Clearly you’re influenced by Thin Lizzy. Willem: That’s probably my favorite band. I knew it! In the whole menagerie of highspeed, loud bands — punk, metal, hard rock, whatever — where does Heatseeker fit? Seth Webster: I just think of us as hard rock.

And when people say “metal,” I say think metal like old-school G‘n’R, Metallica in the 80’s, or something. I grew up playing in punk rock and hardcore bands, so it was kind of like reaching back and getting stuff I missed out on when I was more focused on punk stuff. The punk-rock energy is definitely there, but we’re trying to add more of the classic influences, while still keeping the sound updated. OK. Lizzy, Motorhead, etc. We get it. But what are some influences that may not be apparent to listeners at first? Webster: I listen to a ton of old blues; 1920’s

wax pressings like Mississippi John Hurt and Robert Johnson. I started as a blues player and a jazz saxophonist. If you slow our shit down and listen to it, I think there’s a lot of

the last 13 years or so, we’ve seen where we’ve been completely out of vogue. Like the early 2000’s, what we were doing just wasn’t popular. It seemed like you needed a rapper in the band or you had to have heavy chugging. We had a huge following in Syracuse, but didn’t fit anywhere in Rochester. Willem: We were too metal for the rock crowd and too rock for the metal crowd. We never worried about fitting in, though. We always knew what we wanted to do and we did it whether it was popular or not. We wrote the songs we wanted to write, we played with the bands we wanted to play with. And that’s what we’ve always done regardless. Webster: And that’s all we‘ve ever wanted to be. We’ve never wavered from that and I think the audience is starting to come around. We’ve almost had a resurgence in popularity the last few years. I don’t know, I guess it’s just the cycles in music. I mean, disco was popular at one time…and may be again. Heetseeker: the disco album? Webster: Who knows? Probably not.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 [ JAZZ ]

Anthony Giannavola. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Charlie Mitchell Group. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Music Makers Big Band. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. geneseelighthouse.org. 6 p.m. $2. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Blackened Blues w/Garden Fresh. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9.

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Mighty High & Dry Wednesday Night Rambleaa.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $2-$5. Saint Vitus. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 7:30 p.m. $15-$17.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Arlo Guthrie. The German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. 4426880. upallnightpresents.com. 8 p.m. $45-$50. Beginner Bluegrass Jam. Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 7 p.m. Call for info.

The Blues Project ft. Gordon Munding and friends. The

Beale, 693 South Ave. 2714650. thebealegrille.com. Third Thursday of every month, 7 p.m. Free. CCE Open Jam Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub. com. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. John Akers. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. titustavern.com. 6 p.m. Call for info. Peg Dolan. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup. com. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Cold Sweat. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free. Fred Vine w/Brian Williams. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 585232-3906. littletheater.org/cafe. 7:30 p.m. Free. Nightfall. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 216-1070. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

CLASSICAL | ROCHESTER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Jonathan Biss handily disproves the notion that a pianist needs to be old and grizzled before tackling the core Germanic repertoire of Beethoven, Schumann, and Brahms. At 33, Biss is a highly regarded interpreter of all three in performance and in words. For his appearances with the Rochester Philharmonic, Biss will play Brahms’s “Piano Concerto No. 1,” a young man’s work (Brahms was 25 when he wrote it) performed by a young man. Guest conductor Bernhard Gueller also leads two outstanding orchestral show-off pieces, Jennifer Higdon’s “City Scape: Skyline” and Bartok’s classic “Concerto for Orchestra.” Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra performs Thursday, October 17, 7:30 p.m., and Saturday, October 19, 8 p.m., at Kodak Hall Kodak Hall at the Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St., $15-$92, rpo.org. — BY DAVID RAYMOND Son House Blues Night. The

Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

RPO: Brahms & Bartók. Kodak

Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m., Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$92. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Party Monster Thursdays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. tcrileysparkpoint.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11

W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3.

Triple Tap (DJ Rich Kishita, DJ Potent Sync). Love Nightclub, 45

Euclid St. 222-5683. 18+. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. The Food Bar at

Wegmans, 3195 Monroe Ave. 248-8685. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit & Workshops TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Where Pilates, Yoga, and Ballet meet.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncone’s, 232

No dancing involved, just fitness and fun. Work & tone your entire body in 60 minute classes.

Lyell Ave. 458-3090. ItalianRestaurantRochester.com. 6 p.m. Free.

Fall specials available now! rocthebarrerochester.com 585-851-1807

[ R&B ]

The Coupe De’ Villes. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. panevinoristorante. com. 8 p.m. Free.

THINKING ABOUT TAKING DANCE LESSONS?

The Ghost Peppers w/Steve West. The Rabbit Room, 61 N.

Main St. Honeoye Falls. 5821830. thelowermill.com. 6 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 18

Join us for our

OPEN HOUSE!

Thursday, October 17th @7:00pm. View a dance demonstration and attend Beginner Dance lesson! 3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17

AUDIO

SOUND

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17

SOLUTIONS

STEREO

FOR LESS AREA’S FASTEST REPAIR

Receivers • CD Players • Speakers Turntables • Tuners • Phono Cartridges Repair & Service • Vintage Records Equipment and lots more!

442-0890

402 W. Commercial St. East Rochester

AUDIOSOUNDSOLUTIONS.NET

[ POP/ROCK ]

Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse

WEEKEND

PLANNER

Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

P.R.O.B.L.E.M.S. w/SULK, I Can’t Stop Wondering, and SULK. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

THINGS TO DO! IN UR E-MAILZ! SENT EVERY THURSDAY! WOW!

OMG!

Ave. 8:30 p.m. $7-$9.

S I G N U P T O D AY ! G O T O

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Deborah Magone. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Frankie & Jewels. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation.net. 9 p.m. Call for info. Iron & Wine. University of Rochester Strong Auditorium, River Campus. 9 p.m. $13-$20.

R O C H E S T E R C I T Y N E W S PA P E R . C O M

AND CLICK ON THE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 18

Lovin Art ft. Bogs Visionary Orchestra. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park

Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup. com. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Pat Kane w/Mike Pepper. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub. com. 6 p.m. Free. The Prickers w/Boss Tweed. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. $7-$10. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. Vintage. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Johnny B and The MVPs. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 216-1070. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Salmon Creek Blues Boys. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Brighton Symphony Orchestra. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Joe Blackburn, organist: “In A Monastery Garden”. First

Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Rd. 244-2468. fbcrochester.net. 7:30 p.m. $5.

RPO w/Churchville-Chili High School Chorus. 8 p.m. CCPAC, 5786 Buffalo Rd., Churchville. $10. [ COUNTRY ]

Poison Whiskey. Nashvilles,

4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. 18 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

CLASSICAL | “THE RESURRECTION” IN MEMORY OF ESM DEAN DOUGLAS LOWRY

On October 2, Douglas Lowry, Dean Emeritus of the Eastman School of Music, passed away. He had only recently stepped down as Dean, a position he assumed in 2007. Lowry, also a composer and conductor, was only 62. Jamal Rossi succeeds Lowry as Dean. In memory of Lowry, a concert is being dedicated on Friday, October 18 at the Eastman Theater, presented by the Eastman Philharmonia and the Eastman Rochester Chorus, under conductor Neil Varon. Almost 300 instrumentalists and choral members will perform Mahler’s “The Resurrection.” Its first movement, “Todtenfeier” (“Funeral Rites”) is a symphonic poem, and, according to Mahler’s personal notes, the complete symphony poses a series of questions on the meaning of life and death, which he sought to answer. Eastman Philharmonia with the Eastman Rochester Chorus performs Friday, October 18, 8 p.m., Kodak Hall at the Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St., free, esm.rochester.edu, 274-1100. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

On the House Fridays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. 21+. Call for info.

Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. Conspirator w/RootsCollider. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. 9 p.m. $15-$20. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern. com. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Funkagenda. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. 9 p.m. $10-$15. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697-

9464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Make Em Sweat Fridays: Make Em Dance Edition Part 2: HipHop Vs. Reggae. Club Network,

420 Central Ave. 232-1390. 21+. Call for info. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. lacopaultralounge. com. 10 p.m. Free.

Rochester Skatepark Benefit ft. DJ Tim Tones, Benny Beyond, Drippers, M dot coop, Televisionaries, and Dreadful Operator. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $5-$7.

Sad Hour: All Sad Songs. All on Vinyl. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.

5 p.m. 21+. Free.

The Salad Bar Revue hosted by Ambrosia Salad, DJ Solid Bear. 140 Alex Bar & Grill,

140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 11:30 p.m. & 1 a.m. Call for info. Trancesend and Victor Gig. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 21+. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

AudioInFlux. Dinosaur Bar-B-

Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. Cousin Vinny. Manetti’s Restaurant, 726 South Main Street. Canandaigua. 394-3460. 6 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Friday Jazz at Immanuel: The Mambo Kings. Immanuel Baptist

Church, 815 Park Ave. 4737664. immanuelrochester.org. 7 p.m. $5-$10. Vanessa Mangione Quartet. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

Mitty & The Followers. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Sophistafunk. Zeppa Auditorium, German House, 315 Gregory St. 563-6241. 21+. $11. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Vinyl Orange Ottoman, The Buddhahood. V-Pub at the Villager, 245 South Main Street. Canandaigua. 3942890. 8 p.m. $5.00. [ POP/ROCK ]

Battle of the Bands. Firehouse

Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Haewa. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. Call for info. Hall Pass. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Happy Hour with Jeff Cosco. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 5 p.m. Call for info.

Mansfield Avenue Band w/ Mike Z. Johnny’s Irish Pub,

1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub.com. 5 p.m. Free. Mercy Howls. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 4547140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. The Midnight City. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. tcrileysparkpoint.com. Call for info. Orient Express Band. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info.

Raining Blood, Metal Militia. Pineapple Jack’s,

485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. rainingblood.net. 10 p.m. $5. Roc Fall Back ft. Pharmhouse. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 7 p.m. $7-$9. Two for the Road. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Violet Mary. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 9:30 p.m. $5.

POP/ROCK | FRIGHTENED RABBIT

Within the music of indie rockers Frightened Rabbit, singer Scott Hutchison’s Scottish brogue is likely the most immediate element that draws listeners in. His accented wails regarding love, drinking, and just about everything else in between certainly represent a strong balance of the band’s appeal, but so too do the other more complimentary instrumental elements and songwriting. Balancing subtly fierce drum work and driving guitars with wistful lyrics is a tried and true formula, but rarely is it so effective.  Frightened Rabbit plays at Saturday October 19, 9 p.m., at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St., $16-$20, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY DAVE LABARGE Women of Faith. Blue

Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19

Mike Pullano. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. Fairport. 5983820. 8 p.m. Call for info. Ryan & Rayce. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] B-Free. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 671-0816. flahertys.com. Call for info. Babak Elahi. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Beau. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free.

[ BLUES ]

Brian Coughlin’s Songwriters in the Round ft. Steve Gretz & Leslie Lee, Tom Smith. Tango

Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. 2 p.m. Free. Ezra & The Storm. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. JP Blues. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 9:30 p.m. $6-$9. The Mighty Dry and High. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 10 p.m. Free. continues on page 20

Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 8 p.m. $9. Candela. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177. com. 11 p.m. Free. The Dungree’s. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 3489091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. noon. Free. James Keelaghan and Jez Lowe. Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave. Penfield. rochestercrc.org. 7:30 p.m. $10-$22. Jim Lane. Brewery Pub & Grill, 8 W. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 624-7870. breweryatthefalls. com. 9 p.m. Free.

Big Mike & The Motivators.

Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Cold Sweat. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 216-1070. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Eric and the Bluesbirds w/ Paul Strowe. Johnny’s Irish

Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Kinloch Nelson. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 6 p.m. Free.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19 continues from page 13

[ CLASSICAL ]

Brighton Symphony Orchestra. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 1 p.m. Call for info. Morning Chamber Music. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 11 a.m. Free. RPO: Brahms & Bartók. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m., Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$92. [ COUNTRY ]

West of the Mark. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 4544830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info.

DeeDee’s Wild College Party.

The miso ramen from Tokyo in Henrietta. FILE PHOTO

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beans and guacamole salad — will typically do the trick. • • • • • • A meal all on its own, the Vietnamese sandwich known as banh mi really has it all: crusty bread, juicy meat, spicy jalapeño, grassy cilantro, sweet-tart carrot, unctuous mayo. And as you can tell by the name, Whatta Banh Mi (673 Monroe Ave., 319-4831) specializes in these creations, offering up hot options like grilled pork and grilled curry beef as well as the traditional meat called Vietnamese ham, each priced at $5. Inexpensive vermicelli and rice dishes are also on the menu, as is pho, the popular rice-noodle soup that you garnish to your liking. • • • • • • A Rochester institution since 1949, Rocky’s (190 Jay St., 232-9717, rockysonjaystreet.com) is an old-school red-sauce joint with zero frills. You probably won’t get a printed menu; just a rundown of the day’s offerings. And you may not even get a paper check; merely a total shouted to you from your busy server. In between, you’ll be treated to crazy-cheap Italian food done right. A large linguine with red or white clam sauce is $6.50. A large gnocchi is $6. It’s $7.50 for a large portion of homemade cheese ravioli. You get the picture? Check the website to see what Rocky’s is serving, and be sure to bring cash, otherwise you’re doing dishes.

Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 222-5683. 10 p.m. $5. Jameson Alexander, Rob Morley. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 222-5683. 21+. Call for info. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Poke Dem Saturdays ft. Team Lion Paw, The Money Green Theme, Nick Kage, and Wavey. Trinities Restaurant, 36 W. Main St. 319-4047. 10 p.m. $5-$10. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. blurochester.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Dupre on Krol. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 4547140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. The Fornieri Brothers. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Stephanie Trick. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free.

FOLK | MANDOLIN ORANGE

Chapel Hill has an extremely rich musical tradition. Jazz, gospel, the Piedmont blues, rock, metal, punk, and hiphop; it’s all been cradled there. What many people might not realize is how much country music owes to artists that hail from the area, and Mandolin Orange has a healthy respect for the old-time twang that its North Carolina homestead helped to nurture along in its embryonic stages. But this duo is no battling banjo act. While the band is definitely steeped in the long lineage of lyrical country, folk, and bluegrass, it adds a modern touch that makes it relevant in today’s musical landscape. Mandolin Orange performs Wednesday, October 23, 8:30 p.m. at Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way, $7-10, abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill,

Vision of Disorder. Montage

80s Hair Band. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb. com. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Contraband. California Brew Haus, 402 W. Ridge Rd. 6211480. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20

4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 6:30 p.m. Call for info.

Dive Naked, Random Order, and The Ghost Peppers. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

The Emersons, Lipstick Homicide, The Muderburgers, Boys, and Sexy Teenagers.

Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 9 p.m. 21+. $5. Frightened Rabbit w/Augustines. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. 9 p.m. $16-$20. The Front Bottoms. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic. com. 8 p.m. $12.50-$14. Mansfield Avenue Band. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 4977010. flahertys.com. Call for info.

Such Gold and The Flatliners w/ Green Dreams, The Curl & Drag, Hideout, and Ghost Righter.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $10-$12. Swamp Moose. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation.net. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall. com. 7:30 p.m. $12-$14. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille. com. 7 p.m. Free.

Celtic Music Sundays: Gerry Timlin. Temple Bar and Grille,

109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. [ CLASSICAL ]

Cantata! A Bach Cantata series. Lutheran Church of the

Reformation, 111 North Chestnut St. 454-3367. 3 p.m. Free. Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Genesee Symphony Orchestra. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road. Batavia. 5853430055. 4 p.m. $15.

Musicale: Performance Plus: The Eclectet, Wind Ensemble. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 3 p.m. Free w/ museum admission. Philip Aaberg, piano. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. flcc.edu. 4 p.m. $10-$15.

Third Sunday Concert with the Italian Baroque Organ. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. 5:30 p.m. $5-$10. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

ELECTRONIC | INFINITY SHRED

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

This NYC-based experimental outfit mixes the ethereality and ambience of the most meditative post-rock with a taste for super glitchy hip-hop beats. These shredders of futuristic space synth just released its first full-length album in September on Paracadute Records. “Sanctuary” is just that: a safe asylum for the reluctantly reverent. Each track is a long and winding spiritual paradox that begs the question: Do I fall into the Electric Slide or crouch down into classic Lotus position?

[ JAZZ ]

Infinity Shred performs Sunday, October 20, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., $7-$8, bugjar.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Infinity Shred w/Precious Kindred. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Ship Wrecked Sunday’s ft. DJ Trancesend. Captain’s Attic, 37

Charlotte St. 546-8885. 21+. Call for info.

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch). Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. Call for info. Free.

Clarissa’s Jam Night w/Terrance Bruce. Club Clarissas, 293

Clarissa St. 585-232-3430. clarissasjazz.com. 7 p.m. Free. Rhythm Dogs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

Leo Moran and Anthony Thistlethwaite. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 6 p.m. $25-$30.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Rochester Guitar Club: Song Circle. Asbury First United

Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 271-1050. Third Monday of every month, 7 p.m. Call for info. Teagan & Lou. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. titustavern.com. 5 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Penfield Symphony Orchestra: Revel in Rachmaninoff. 7:30

p.m. $12-$14.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Magic City Monday’s. Louie’s Cordial’s Lounge, 392 Lyell Ave. 254-2844. 7 p.m. $5 before 10 p.m. Manic Monday Retro Dance: DJ Cub, C. Darren. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. 21+. Free.

[ JAZZ ]

Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 5:30 p.m. Free. Nickel City Clippers. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. Fairport. 381-7603. 6:30 p.m. $12.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Don Christiano-The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 8 p.m. Free. Douglas Hazard. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam.

Roses & Revolutions. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Phish. Blue Cross Arena, One

War Memorial Square. 7585300. bluecrossarena.com. 7:30 p.m. $60. [ POP/ROCK ]

Johnny Bauer. The Titus

Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. titustavern.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. The London Souls. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic. com. 8 p.m. $10-$12.

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Nashville Pussy w/Jayke Orvis & The Broken Band, Barry Brothers Band, and Heatseeker. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $12-$16.

P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Kilbourn Concert Series: Tetzlaff Quartet. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Charlie Mitchell Group. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 288-3930. 8 p.m. Free. Kristopher Sullivan Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21

Art oppressively damp and gray atmosphere. Two women in the foreground look out at the viewer, a moment of weary grief distilled. Metaphors for memory abound and increase with time spent amid Levy’s installation. It can be tricky to relocate specific images among the masses of moments scattered in the ether. Many of the viewing vessels were too distant for me to pull toward my eye, and accepting that I couldn’t access some of these memories, I had to ask a taller gent what he saw there. While “Memory Theatre” as a whole

Installation view of Judith G. Levy’s “Memory Cloud,” which is part of the Memorial Art Gallery’s current exhibition, “Memory Theatre.” PHOTO PROVIDED

We come to pass “Memory Theatre” THROUGH DECEMBER 29 MEMORIAL ART GALLERY, 500 UNIVERSITY AVE. 276-8900, MAG.ROCHESTER.EDU WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY 11 A.M.-5 P.M., THURSDAY 11 A.M.-9 P.M.| $5-$12 [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

The Memorial Art Gallery’s new exhibit, “Memory Theatre,” opened on one of the recent bright and brisk autumn evenings, when the daylong sunshine was punctuated by evening temperature drops and the fragrant decay of leaves, dipping us into that wistful ache of another year’s departure. The show is a collection of works that speak of the passage of people and of time, of shifts in culture and of shifty memory. The works are gentle when sorrowful and ultimately a reminder of the bittersweet brevity of life, and the role of the museum as a central memory-keeper of human culture. In addition to the many contemporary works of art, “Memory Theatre” brings together works that span many different periods in history. It features a 1920’s Shoshone painting on an elk hide that was created to commemorate both tribal traditions being forcibly lost and as a memorial for the three artists’ uncle, Chief 22 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

Washakie. A case of commemorative medals includes historic figures both heroic and inglorious, and events both tragic and victorious, all depending upon your perspective. Represented in bronze are General Douglas MacArthur, Mark Twain, Charles Lindbergh, the flag raising at Iwo Jima, President Dwight Eisenhower, and the lot of them is tidily summed up by Berthold Nebel’s “World Unity or Oblivion Medal,” a disc preserving in relief a doomsday blast and mushroom cloud, the entire ground a horror-field of fallen bodies. Sneak a peek around the corner of the case to view the obverse: a soldier cradling the form of a wounded companion. Deeper into the exhibit is a section of wall

text with examples about the compulsion to deny memory through the destruction of physical evidence of people or events, which has manifested during revolutions and times of political turmoil. Statues are pulled down, individuals are burned from photographs, and histories are rewritten with the omission of certain names. This subject alone — of the efforts to control cultural memory, of censorship and the various reasons behind it — would make a fascinating exhibit. Near the entrance of the exhibit are two massive photographs from David Maisel’s “Library of Dust” series, which are enlarged

images the artist shot of the cremated remains of Oregon State Hospital patients not claimed by their next of kin. Maisel photographed 100 of the 5,121 copper canisters that hold the remains, which had been stored for decades underground in a chamber prone to flooding. The images are arrestingly beautiful. Chemical changes in the canisters brought out richly hued patinas, and blooms of what might be mold create the effect of sand paintings shaken up by that obstinate child, Time. Maisel’s works are sweet tributes to unnamed and forgotten strangers, and portraits of life inevitably arising, phoenixlike, from the ashes. Nearby, another collection of strangers floats like suspended snowdrops just overhead. Judy Levy’s “Memory Cloud” is a collection of 35mm photographic slides in hundreds of small, frosted white viewers, hanging at different heights by delicate ball chain. These bitty portals to the past tell us something of the specific decades through the faded tones of the images and the styles of clothing and hair. A woman forever pulls a turkey from the oven; a jubilant horsebackrider will never dismount an indifferent, grass-munching equine; and three small blond boys, presumably brothers, lean close together, squinting in the eternal sun. A crowd forms at what seems to be a funeral as people in dark garments exit a cluster of black cars in an

explores themes of recollection and loss that are common to us all, some of the works address the subject of death more intimately than we are wont to, and contain taboo triggers. Methods of coping with loss and commemoration that were once in vogue now seem alien and curious, even morbid, such as the elaborate Victorian jewelry and art made from the hair of loved ones, and a Victorian portrait of a deceased little boy propped up and posed as if reading a book. Yet, this may be the only image the parents ever had taken of their son, their last opportunity to solidify his precious presence in their own temporary lives. In times past, deaths and funerals took place largely at home, and people had fewer means to diminish its heavy presence. Arguments both for and against our tendency to buffer ourselves against the reality of death flow easily. In response to our culture’s commercial anaesthetizing of the ravages of AIDS, Barton Beneš created “Brenda,” a powerful installation of dozens of wallmounted AIDS ribbons coated with the cremated ashes of his friend, an addict who died of AIDS in 1989. Reclaimed from slick, numb exploitation, the almost-infinity symbol is represented here as gritty reality, gray and textured with fragments of bone. Elizabeth Siegfried’s “Termina” is a poignant look at childlessness, and focused specifically on the acute awareness of being the endpoint of a branch of the family tree. This is a weight that many women bear heavily, and a subject that is often framed as a feminist or female issue, but is in fact a genderless issue of denying (or being denied) life’s basic yet complicating compulsion to procreate. Siegfried’s installation of black-and-white photographs depict generations of her female kin, reveling in the company of family. Beneath each woman’s photographs are her name, lifespan, and details of generations of progeny. Last is the artist’s grid, with some happy memories, some somber self-portraits, and a lot of blank, black areas standing in for what will never be come to be.

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “#imhereyourethere: New Paintings by Jim DeLucia.” Through Nov 23. Reception Oct 26, 5-8 p.m. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. “Elements of Expression: Words & Images.” Through Nov 15. Tue-Thu noon-7 p.m., Fri-Sat noon-3 p.m. Reception Oct 18, 5-8 p.m. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. UR Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. “For the Brides of Ed.” URMC Edward G. Miner Library. Wed 2-8 p.m., Thu 1-4 p.m. An exhibit featuring works created as part of a unique healing process for women with eating disorders. NYC-based digital artist Nancy Gershman will lead tours through the exhibit to explain the integrated approach to treatment. 275-3361. [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Volo Calvariam: 1975’s Five Year Anniversary.” Through Nov 2. 1975ish.com. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. “Woman of Steel” featuring the work of Mary Taylor. Through Oct 28. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 4734000 x206. artsrochester.org. AsIs Gallery, Sage Art Center, Wilson Blvd. “Selfies: Portraiture Beyond Representation.” Through Oct 22. Mon-Thu 8 a.m.-midnight, Fri 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-10 p.m. sageartcenter.com. Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. “Picture This” A Collection of Mix Media Paintings in a Collage Form. Through Oct 31. Local Artist: Andrew Hakes, Debbie Ingerick, Joshua Lopez, and Richmond Futch Jr. 729-9916. bethelcf. com/aviv. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Frank Frazier and Friends. Frank Frazier, Minerva Diaz, Rory Tequan Morgan, Janice Thacker, Shenna Vaughn. thebaobab.org.; George K. Arthur Photographic exhibit. thebaobab.org. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. “Rays of Sunshine: A Look at Down Syndrome.” Through Oct 25. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Macedon. “End of Summer.” Through Nov 30. Work by Gretchen Schulz, D. Brent Walton and Gary Combs. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.org. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. “Play.” urmc. rochester.edu. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “Home Grown.” The Lobby’s 2 year anniversary group show. lobbydigital.com. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible.” Through Dec 13. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.noon. 475-3961. skgtwc@rit.edu. library.rit.edu/cary. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Social Reportage: Raw.” Through Nov 2. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Photographic essays touching on poverty,

COMEDY | JERRY SEINFELD

Whether you know him from his classic eponymous sitcom or for all the “What’s the deal with…” jokes he does, chances are you’re familiar with Jerry Seinfeld in one way or another. You’ll have a chance to get more familiar with him this Friday, October 18, as he performs stand-up at the Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.). One-half of the creative genius behind “Seinfeld,” one of the most successful sitcoms of all time, Seinfeld is known for his hilarious observations on many different aspects of everyday life. The show starts at 7 p.m. and tickets cost $89.50. As of press time only single seats were available. For more info visit rbtl.org or call 222-5000. — BY TREVOR LEWIS homelessness, and social issues in an urban setting. By Arlene Hodge and students. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Creative Wellness Coalition Gallery, 320 N Goodman St, Suite 201. “Painting Big” Group Show. 325-3145 x144. mharochester.org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. The Artwork of Bethany Williams and Allie Hartley. 244-6787. xroadscoffeehouse.com. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. “Unconventional Clay Forms.” Through Oct 26. Richard Harvey, Sharon Allen, Cheryl Hungerford, Sharon Jeter, Nancy Valley. 6375494. differentpathgallery.com. Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. History in the Making VIII. Through Nov 3. Ceramic traditions, contemporary objects. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “A Collection of Thoughts and Dreams” by Christine Sisak and Diane Tank. Through Dec 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 385-0298. friendlyhome.org. Gallery R, 100 College Ave. 82nd Print Club of Rochester Exhibition. Through Oct 27. Wed-Sun. 256-3312. galleryr99@gmail.com. galleryr. cias.rit.edu. Geisel Gallery, Bausch & Lomb Place, One Bausch & Lomb Place. “Solos, Duetts, and Concertos,” paintings and sculpture by Daviid Chamberlain. Through Oct 29. Mon-Fri 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 8 a.m.-2 p.m. davidchamberlainstudios.com.; The Tomte Series. Through Dec 12. Swedish-American acrylic paintings reflecting bold contemporary Scandinavian colors and Swedish traditions by Nils R. Caspersson. 3386617. jgeisel@frontier.com. thegeiselgallery.com.

Genesee Community College, 1 College Rd., Batavia. “Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War” from The National Library of Medicine.. Through Oct 26 in the Alfred C. O’Connell Library. 343-0055. genesee.edu. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Simply Myanmar. Through Oct 27. Works by Chris Kogut, Dick Bennet, Hope DellaStua, Bob Pierce, and Terri Sipone. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery. com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “In the Mood.” Through Oct 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Work by Malcolm Liepke and Jurgen Gorg. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Studio 34 Faculty Exhibit and Works in Progress. Through Oct 28. 319-5279. joebeanroasters.com. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “Our Hispanic Community.” Through Oct 21. Photographs from a 1983 project by artists Marilyn Anderson, Leslie Locketz, and Ira Srole, and art by Latino Youth from the Rochester City School District. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 325-6669. gmoseson@rocheseter.rr.com. cityofrochester.gov. LuLuLemon Athletica, 3040 Monroe Ave. “Your Body” Anatomy Drawings by Carla Bartow. 271-1427. lululemon. com. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. “Landscape: Subject and Stimuli.” 315-4620210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Maplewood Family YMCA, 25 Driving Park Avenue. Irondequoit Art Club. Through Oct 31. Weekdays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 643600. irondequoitartclub.org.

Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Grand Gallery through Dec 29: “Memory Theatre.” Creative Workshop through Oct 24: Living Memory Alumni Show: Part 2. Through Oct 24. Lockhart Gallery through Dec 13: “Connoisseurs Around the Corner: Gifts of Art from MAG’s Founding Family.” $5$12. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Ken Martin: Sculpture. Through Nov 8. MonThu 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.4 p.m. 292-3121. monroe.edu/ go/mercer/. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. “Paintings of Local Buildings” by Mitchell J. Lurye. Through Nov 9. millartcenter.com. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Live in Joy With Color” by Charlotte Barnard. A display of heartfelt creations in watercolor, polymer and yarn. Through Oct 27. 546-8400. cotton@episcopalseniorlife.org. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Albert Paley. Through Oct 19. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Featuring never before exhibited Albert Paley maquette sculptures, steel and glass sculptures, candleholders, monoprints, and the WXXI video “Paley on Park Avenue.” 292-1430. info@ nanmillergallery.com. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “In Process: Emerging Artists in Metalsmithing and Jewelry.” Through Oct 25. Sun and TueThu, noon-5 p.m., Fri-Sat, noon8 p.m. 389-5073. artscenter. naz.edu. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Residuum.” Through Oct 25. Wed-Sun, noon-5 p.m. A collaboration between photographer Ann Lovett and artist/educator Mary Hafeli. 3895073. artscenter.naz.edu. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Wildroot Group 35th Anniversary Exhibition. Through Nov 8. Reception Oct 25, 6-8 p.m. 732-7197. nholowka@ rochester.rr.com. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Bird is the Word.” Through Oct 19. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Alan Singer, Arthur Singer, Kurt Feuerherm, Eunice Hur, Belinda Bryce, & Jerry Alonzo. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “Frame of Reference” Group Show.. Through Nov 2. 2715885. oxfordgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Stormymade: Garden of Earthly Delights by Margaret Storms. recordarchive.com. RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr., Booth Building 7A. “In Retrospective: Selected Works from the Wallace Library Art Collection, 1972-2009.” Through Nov 9. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.4:30 p.m., Mon-Thu 7-9 p.m., Sat 1-4:30 p.m., Sun 2-4:30 p.m. 475-2646. rit.edu. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. “signals_ now_.” Through Nov 10. WedSun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 4612222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One

College Rd. Kathleen Sherin: “Defying Gravity.” Through Nov 1. An exhibition of prints containing drypoint, collagraphic carborundum printing and monoprint techniques. genesee. edu/campuslife/arts/gallery/. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Travel Stories: 19th Century--Present. Through Dec 27. 275-4477. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Featuring artwork by local artists. Open First Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Second Saturdays, 12-4 p.m., and Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. 7320036. shoefactoryarts.com. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. “Two Sides of a Story: Illustations by Shawnee Hill.” Laverly Library, lower level gallery, St. John Fisher College. Through Nov 25. coroflot.com/ shawneehill. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Sunrise to Moonset” by Valerie Berner. Through Nov 2. Open daily and nightly. 2712630. starrynitescafe.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. Dudes Night Out Presents: Dudes on Tap. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Memories, Observations, Experiences, Obsessions,” Toby Thompson Memorial Exhibit. Through Dec 14. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 4752404. jleugs@rit.edu. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. ImageArt: “I do?!” and “Wish You Were Queer” Postcard Show. Through Oct 26. 442-8676. imageout.org/ imageart. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. Newark. “Fifty Years” Photographs by Winston Vargas. Through Nov 1. Thu-Sat noon-3 p.m. 315-3314593. waynearts.wordpress.com. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Artists’ Breakfast Group 25th Anniversary Exhibit. Through Nov 12. 978-2551. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. “The Seneca Family Sculpture: History and Process.” Through Nov 11. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon5 p.m. 785-1369. flcc.edu.

Art Events [ THU., OCTOBER 17 ] Hologram Night Lecture with Dr. John Perry. 7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $2.50-$6. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. [ FRI., OCTOBER 18 ] 20th Annual Arts Festival. Oct. 18-19. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave Fri 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m townofbrighton.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 22 ] “The Art of Caricature” with Sam Villareale. 7:30 p.m. Chapel Oaks, St. Ann’s Community, 1550 Portland Ave Irondequoit Art Club meeting irondequoitartclub.org.

Comedy [ THU., OCTOBER 17 ] Greg Hahn. Oct. 17-19. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster

Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $12-$15 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., OCTOBER 18 ] Seinfeld Live! 7 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Prices vary. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com. [ SAT., OCTOBER 19 ] For Tomorrow We Die! 8 p.m. The Space Theater and Gallery, 1199 East Main Street Presented by Not 100% Normal and One Girl’s Giggle $6-$7 902-2010. facebook.com/ not100percentnormal. Multifaceted: The Rob Campbell Stand-Up Comedy and Variety Show. 7 p.m. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. A comedy and variety show featuring EtchA-Sketch Comedy Team and ROC Bottom Poetry Team. A portion of proceeds will benefit American Cancer Society’s Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk $10 371-2283. robleecamp1015@gmail.com. A Polite Company: All Hallow’s Eve. 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $10-$12. 866-811-4111. muccc.org. [ SUN., OCTOBER 20 ] Rage Against the Vageen. 7 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Hosted by: Madelein Smith. $7 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] Battle for the Belt. 8 p.m. Joke Factory Comedy Club, 911 Brooks Avenue Flower City Improv $5, 2 for 1 with any student ID (585( 328-6000. flowercityimprov@gmail.com. jokefactorycomedyclub.com/.

Dance Events [ WED., OCTOBER 16 ] Tassles & Treats Haloween Spooktacular Burlesque Show. 9 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St $5. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. [ THU., OCTOBER 17 ] Dance/Strasser. Oct. 17-19. Rose L. Strasser Studio, Hartwell Hall, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St., Brockport Thu-Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m $8.50-$16. brockport.edu. [ FRI., OCTOBER 18 ] LivingDance: LivingMusic Fundamentals. Third Friday of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Kinections, 718 University Ave. In-Depth: Following Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m Fri $35, Sat $40, both $70. Discounts for students, unemployed, and elders. Register 473-5050. kinections.com. Swing Dance with the Smugtown Stompers. 7-11 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St . Webster Traditional jazz and dixieland tunes played by Rochester’s own Smugtown Stompers. Free beginner lesson 7-8 p.m. Come with or without a partner; beginners are very welcome. Cash bar $10. 415-3714. info@groovejuiceswing.com. groovejuiceswing.com. [ SAT., OCTOBER 19 ] West African Drumming and Dance Classes with Fana Bangoura. Drumming: Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.-noon at the Baobab (728 University Ave.). Dance: continues on page 24

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23

Dance Events

support each other, and then go back into the world, ready to make a ruckus Free. 705-6581. TrendTalk: Challenges and Opportunities in the Rochester High-Tech Sector. 5 p.m. Radisson Hotel, 175 Jefferson Rd. A dinner and business panel discussion $30-$75 348-7142. rochesterconsultants.org.

Sundays, from 2-3:30 .p.m at DancEncounters (215 Tremont St.) $10-$15. 503-679-3372. kerfala.bangoura@gmail.com. mounafanyi.org. [ SUN., OCTOBER 20 ] Tap Dance Jam Session w/ Live Music. Third Sunday of every month, 2-4:30 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. All age/all level dancing participants and observers welcome to play $5. 271-4930. cheryljohnson@cjgroovin.com. tangocafedance.com. Tap Dance Jam Sessions. Third Sunday of every month, 2 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. $5. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com.

Festivals [ WED., OCTOBER 16-SUN., OCTOBER 20 ] ImageOut Film Festival. Through Oct. 20. Dryden, Theatre, Little Theatre, other venues. Upstate New York’s longest-running gay and lesbian film festival returns with LGBT features, shorts, and documentaries imageout.org. [ SAT., OCTOBER 19 ] Ellwanger Barry Nursery School’s Second Annual Harvest Festival. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. South Presbyterian Church and the adjoining parking lot located at 4 East Henrietta Road. Cider pressing, fall-themed kids games and activities, face painting and balloon animals, craft sale featuring the work of local artisans, local food trucks, live performances Free. ebnspublicity@gmail.com. ebns.org. PumpkinPalooza. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Celebrate the arrival of fall with craft and food vendors, games for the whole family, an antique show, a Rat-Rod show, music and entertainment, the famous Pumpkin Race down Pearl St (watch 200 pumpkins roll at top speed down a steep hill, see if yours will be the first to finish to win a $$ prize) and at 6pm the 2nd annual Lyons Zombie Walk. facebook.com/ LyonsZombieWalk. Come in full zombie costume and Help Feed the Hungry with your canned food/toiletry donations which will go to the Lyons Food Pantry (cash prizes for the best zombies!) End the night at Terror Field’s Haunted Taylor House! A real full sized haunted house like none have seen! 871-4220. lyonsny.com. [ SUN., OCTOBER 20 ] Fall Family Festival. 1-5 p.m. Ye Olde Willow Bend Inn, West Main St., Batavia $5 per adult, children free 343-4727. hollandlandoffice.com. Fall Festival. 12-3 & 3-6 p.m. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St Activities include pumpkin painting, cocktail demos, flights of seasonal beer and cider, and a hands-on pumpkin baking demo $25, register 394-7070. nywcc.com.

Kids Events [ THU., OCTOBER 17 ] Movie: “Bully.” 7 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org.

LIT | “GAME OF THRONES” DISCUSSION SERIES

Rally your bannermen: the “Game of Thrones” discussion series is here. Even if you missed the first session on Monday, October 7, there is still plenty of time to share your thoughts on the George R. R. Martin’s “Song of Ice and Fire” book series and its wildly popular television adaptation on HBO. The five-part series continues Monday, October 21, at Writers and Books (740 University Ave.). Whether you’re a casual or hardcore fan, a reader of the novels, watcher of the television series, or both, this is your chance to get in depth about the critically acclaimed fantasy series. For the readers of the series, the discussions will cover “A Game of Thrones” through “A Storm of Swords,” while seasons one through three of the television series will be covered. The series takes place every other Monday through December 2. Topics include “Whose Side Are YOU On?” (October 21), “The War of Roses & The War of the Five Kings” (November 4), “Magic and Religion in Westeros and Essos” (November 18), and “‘Game of Thrones’ The Graphic Novel” (December 2). All discussions run 7-8:30 p.m. and cost $3-$5. For more information visit wab.org or call 473-2590. — BY TREVOR LEWIS [ FRI., OCTOBER 18 ] Owl Prowl. 7-9 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $5-$7 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer. htm. [ SAT., OCTOBER 19 ] 3rd Annual TriMathlon. 8:30 a.m. Mathnasium of Penfield, 1802 Penfield Rd. The National TriMathlon is a math competition open to students in 2nd through 5th grade. Students compete in 3 different math exercises for local and national prizes. Every participant goes home with something. The competition is open to students of all math levels Free. 203-1717. penfield@mathnasium.com. Fall Family Fun. The Garden Factory, 2126 Buffalo Rd Through Oct 27. Animals, rides, games, crafts, more 247-6236. gardenfactoryny.com. Halloween Spooktacular. 6-9 p.m. Bay View Family YMCA, 1209 Bay Road, Webster $25 per family of up to 6 people rochesterymca.org. ZooBoo. 10 a.m.-4 p.m Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St $6$8. senecaparkzoo.org. [ MON., OCTOBER 21 ] Halloween Read to Shih-Tzu Annie. Oct. 21. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 3:30 p.m Free, register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org.

24 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

Teen Writing Group. 5-6:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Grades 7-12 Free, register. 359-7092. [ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] American Girl Club: Julie. 4:155 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Ages 7-12 Free, register. 359-7092.

Lectures [ WED., OCTOBER 16 ] “Ancestors in Peace and Pieces” by Derek Maxfield. 7 p.m. Genesee Community College, Conable Technology Building, 1 College Rd Batavia Free. 343-0055 x6616. dsutherland@genesee.edu. “Change One Thing, Change Everything” with Armando Nahum. 10-11 a.m. Unity Hospital, Education Center, 1555 Long Pond Road, Greece. National Speaker to Talk About the Importance of Infection Prevention nciao@ unityhealth.org. The Icarus Sessions. Third Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m. Hanlon-Fiske Studios, 34 Elton St. Ten or fifty or a hundred people come together and follow the simple rules of the Icarus Session. You have 140 seconds to talk about the art you are working on, what inspires you, what’s holding you back, whatever! You meet, connect,

[ THU., OCTOBER 17 ] “Beating the Odds: The Critical Role of Community Colleges in Preparing Students from All Backgrounds for Careers in STEM,” featuring Freeman A. Hrabowski III. Oct. 17. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd Continental breakfast 8:30 a.m., presentation 9:15 a.m Free, register. monroecc.edu/go/ hrabowski. History at Night: Jane Oakes on Wayne County Opera Houses. 7 p.m. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St 315946-4943. waynehistory.org. Liberal Kern Lecture Series: Margo Buchanan-Oliver.. 6 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, Eastman Hall, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rm. 3287 Brand pathologies: ‘Monstrous’ consumer relationships and the media brand, Twilight Free 4752057. cls3740@rit.edu. The Affordable Care Act: Challenges in Local Implementation. 4-6 p.m. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave 271-1050. lwvrma.org/healthcare.php. Two Icons Lecture: Dutchess Harris. 5 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Welles-Brown room rochester.edu/college/ wst/events. [ FRI., OCTOBER 18 ] Big Data Forum. 8:30 a.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Hawkins-Carlson room $75, register. rocdata@ cs.rochester.edu. Roberts Wesleyan Leadership Breakfast. 7:30 a.m. Hale Auditorium, Roberts Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr Keynote by President John A. Martin: “Reflections on Leadership and Education: Past, Present and Future.” rwcjohnmartin.eventbrite.com. [ SUN., OCTOBER 20 ] Alaska: Cruising the Inside Passage and Beyond. 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register 3408720. jmathis@libraryweb.org. penfieldlibrary.org. George M. Ewing series: Philip Aaber. 4 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr $10-$15 785-1421. gmeforum@flcc. edu. flcc.edu. Rochester’s Rich History: “Heroes in the Attic.” 2 p.m. Central Library of Rochester, Rundel Auditorium, 115 South Ave Free 428-8370. [ MON., OCTOBER 21 ] Parag P. Patel, MD, will speak about “Understanding & Living with Congestive Heart Failure.” 7:15 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Free. mendedheartsrochester.org. Pinterest For Small Businesses & Bloggers. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N

Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com.

artist Dane Kemp, and others $3-$8. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com.

[ TUE., OCTOBER 22 ] Dinosaurs, Teeth, and Trilobites! A Fossil Hunter’s Diary. 12-1 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. With Joseph DiDonato III, DDS Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Kitchen Tools Demo with Chris and Rebecca of Cook’s World. 7 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free, register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org.

[ SUN., OCTOBER 20 ] Book Discussion: “Motherless Child” by Marianne Langner Zeitlin. 3 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. jccrochester.org. Poetry Reading: Kitty Jospé and Alicia Hoffman. 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo. com. Rochester Poets Reading. 2 p.m. Ross Gallery of the Skalny Welcome Center at St. John Fisher, 3690 East Ave. Sun, Sep 22, 3rd annual “100 Thousand Poets for Change” Sun, Oct 20, poet JAE NEWMAN Sun, Nov 17, guitarist/singer/songwriter JED CURRAN Sun, Dec 8, TBA. Free. rochesterpoets@gmail. com.

[ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] Living with Alzheimer’s, Early Stage, Part 1. 6:30-8 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Women and War: the Lineage of Women. 7 p.m. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, 929 S. Plymouth Ave Suzanne will be speaking about heroic acts of nonviolence and will be sharing from her life experience about peacemaking By donation 4633266. kmiller@admin.rochester. edu. gandhiinstitute.org.

Literary Events [ WED., OCTOBER 16 ] Book Discussion: “Too Much Happiness” by Alice Munro. Through Oct. 16. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Tue 1:30-3 p.m., Wed 7-8:30 p.m 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Book Presentation and Signing: “Mad House: The Hidden History of Insane Asylums in 19th Century New York” by Michael Keene. 6 p.m. Sodus Point Village Hall, 8356 Bay Street, Sodus Point 315-483-4936. sodusbaylighthouse.org. Book Sale. Oct. 16-19. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Wed 6-9 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m.Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. [ THU., OCTOBER 17 ] An Afternoon with Janet Zandy. 2 p.m. Wallace Library, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Talk, reception, and book signing with Janet Zandy, author of “Unfinished Stories: The Narrative Photography of Hansel Mieth and Marion Palfi.” Free 475-6766. Poems for Lunch. noon. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Each week, local poet and teacher, Kitty Jospé will offer a selection of poems and guide the discussion Free. 428-8375. carol.moldt@libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. The RIT English Faculty/ Student Reading Series. 5 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Student Alumni Union Reading Room Free. rdggla@ rit.edu. Undergraduate/Faculty Readings. 5 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Student Alumni Reading Room. Gail Hosking, Trendt Hergenrader, Nathaniel Mathews rit.edu. [ SAT., OCTOBER 19 ] “Laughing” Larry Berger’s Birthday Bash. 2 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. Presenters include Larry Berger, Christian poet Cindy Blair, performance

[ MON., OCTOBER 21 ] The Sun Magazine Discussion Group. Third Monday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com. Whose side are YOU on? 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Game of Thrones discussion $3-$5 473-2590. wab.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 22 ] Book Reading & Signing: “Gods of Earth” by Craig DeLance. 7-10 p.m. Fairport Brewing Company, 99 South Main St., Fairport 678-6728. godsofearth.eventbrite.com. Books Sandwiched In. 12:1212:52 p.m Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Oct 22: “Good Prose: The Art of Nonfiction” by Tracy Kidder and Richard Todd. Reviewed by Anne Coon, PhD, Author and Professor Emerita, College of Liberal Arts, Rochester Institute of Technology. Oct 29: “Frankenstein’s Cat” by Emily Anthes. Reviewed by Louis DiVincenti, DVM, Chief of Large Animal Medicine and Research, University of Rochester and associate Veterinarian for Seneca Park Zoo Free. 428-8350. rebecca.fuss.libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. Introduction to Creative Writing. Oct. 22. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd 6:30-8:30 p.m Free, register. 359-7092. Lecture/book signing by Jack Garner. 7 p.m. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Free. 454-1260. bftix.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Writers Group Public Reading. 7-9 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St Canandaigua Free. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] An Autumn Reading with Kathryn Bonnez. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Free 473-2590. kathrynbonnez@ gmail.com. wab.org. Read with Seymour: “Wolf Hall” by Hilary Mantel. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Reading and Discussion: “A Lone Star in the Green Mountains” by Kathryn Bonnez. 7 p.m. Writers and Books,

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[ FRI., OCTOBER 18 ] Full Moon Over the Swamp. 6:30 p.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Some telescopes provided, personal telescopes and binoculars welcome. Bring flashlight Free. 773-8911. facebook.com/ thousandacreswamp.

LECTURE | NATIONAL ARCHAEOLOGY DAY

While my idea of a vacation includes some beach bumming with a good novel, I always want to geek out over what the local museums offer in terms of remnants of historic culture. On Saturday, October 19, the Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave.) and the Archaeological Institute of America Society of Rochester will host events and activities in honor of National Archaeology Day. The event takes place 11 a.m.-4 p.m., and includes kidfriendly activities such as coloring and stamping, artifact handling, and a shoebox dig. At 1 p.m., Michael Jarvis of the University of Rochester will give a lecture in the Bausch Auditorium on “Bermuda in Microcosm: History and Archaeology at Smiths Island, 1610-2013.” The event is included in admission to the museum, which is $13, $12 for senior and college students with ID, and $11 for ages 3-18. Kids ages 2 and under and members get in for free. For more information, call 271-4320, or visit rmsc.org. Future events hosted by AIA Society of Rochester include a lecture by Professor Marie-Henriette Gates in late January/early February on “Kinet Höyük (Turkey) and the Archaeology of Eastern Mediterranean Seaports,” a talk by Professor James Delgado on “The Great Museum of the Sea” on Thursday, February 27 at the Memorial Art Gallery, and Professor Sarah Nelson will speak on Thursday, April 3, on “The Gold Crowns of Silla (Korea) and the Tomb of a Queen.” — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY 740 University Ave Free 4732590. kathrynbonnez@gmail. com. wab.org.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., OCTOBER 16 ] Alien Worlds and Androids Exhibition. Through Dec. 22, 9 a.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Dec 22 $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. Little Builders. Through Jan. 5, 2014. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Through Jan 5. MonThu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Closed Nov 28 and Dec 25 $13, free to members and kids under 2 263-2700. museumofplay.org. “Off to the Theatre.” Through Nov. 15. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Through Nov 15. Preview night August 22, 7:30 p.m. Screening of the 1925 film “Phantom of the Opera” Free 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. [ SAT., OCTOBER 19 ] Celebrate National Chemistry Week. noon. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Ages 9-12. Celebrate National Chemistry

Week at the RMSC $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ SUN., OCTOBER 20 ] Lehigh Vallery Railroad Museum Open to the Public. 1-3 p.m. Lehigh Valley Railroad Historical Society Station Museum, 8 E. High St A large collection of historical artifacts from the Lehigh Valley Railroad is on display at the museum Free, donations accepted. 289-8022. lvrrhs. org.

Recreation [ WED., OCTOBER 16 ] Mount Hope Cemetery by TRAM. 12 & 2 p.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue $10, RSVP. 461-3494. fomh.org. [ THU., OCTOBER 17 ] Crepuscular Walk: Nearly Full Moon over the Pond. 6 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Bring flahslight $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Weekday Nature Walk: Lower Gorge Trail. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile $8 parking fee. 493-3625.

[ SAT., OCTOBER 19 ] Fall Foliage Tour. noon. Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gate, 791 Mt. Hope Ave. $7, free to members. 461-3494. fomh.org. Finger Lakes Trail Hike: St. Helena Section. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile $8 parking fee. 493-3625. GVHC Event. 7 a.m. I-390 exit 11 park and ride lot. Strenuous/ hilly 14 mile hike, Letchworth Park $4 carpool. 750-8937. gvhchikes.org. Halloween Phantom Express Trains. 5:30 p.m. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave. First Class: $52 / Coach: $35. 798-6106. office@ railroadmuseum.net. Happy Owl-ween. 6:30 p.m. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East $5/child, $7.50/adult, $20/family, register 315-365-3588. montezuma@ audubon.org. Rochester Birding Trip: Batavia Wastewater Treatment Plant. 9 a.m. Meet at parking lot of Sonoco Gas Station at junction of Routes 33 and 19 Free. 5032534. rochesterbirding.com. Run Like Hell 5K. 3 p.m. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. $22-$25, register. 2240990. active.com. Serendipity Walk. 9:30 a.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. $3, $10 per family. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Step Out Run/ Walk to Stop Diabetes. 9 a.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. 458-3040. diabetes.org/stepoutrochester. Tree Planting. 9-11 a.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive Join the Friends of Washington Grove in planting native trees to help replace invasive species. An unexpected gift of 10 potted local native trees have been donated to the City or Rochester. Please bring work gloves, dress for the weather, and a shovel if you have one. These are small potted trees so the digging will not be difficult. Meet at the Nunda Blvd. entrance to the Washington Grove off Cobb’s Hill Drive friendsofwashingtongrove@ gmail.com. Walk to End Alzheimer’s. 10 a.m. College at Brockport Alumni House, 142 Utica St., Brockport Registration at 9 a.m Raise funds. 760-5400.

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[ SUN., OCTOBER 20 ] Alien Pods. 2 p.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Free. 773-8911. facebook.com/ thousandacreswamp. GVHC Event. 8:30 a.m. I-390 exit 11, park and ride exit. Moderate 5-6 mile trail maintenance hike, Finger Lakes Trail Free. 6218794. gvhchikes.org. Monster Scramble: 5K/10K, or Family Trick-or-Treat Stroll. 10 a.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, continues on page 27 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25

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Carl Del Buono and Janine Mercandetti in “The Last Five Years.” PHOTO PROVIDED

Holding back the years “The Last Five Years” THROUGH OCTOBER 20 JCC CENTERSTAGE, 1200 EDGEWOOD AVE. $18-$26 | 461-2000, JCCCENTERSTAGE.COM [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

In his program notes for “The Last Five Years,” JCC Centerstage Artistic Director Ralph Meranto refers to the musical as “one of ‘those’ shows,” the type that people in the theater community get excited about working on, and one that becomes truly special to those who fall under its spell. It’s not the first time I’ve heard this show described in this way. Friends with a passion for musical theater, whose opinions I respect, have sung its praises for years. I admit that with all that build up, I had high expectations. So it’s with no small amount of disappointment to say that, outside of the outstanding performances from its two actors, “The Last Five Years” left me frustratingly cold. Granted, this isn’t an “easy” show. As I left the theater, I overheard at least one conversation between audience members remarking that they were thankful they’d read a plot summary beforehand or they’d have been lost completely. Written by Tony Award 26 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

winner Jason Robert Brown (“Parade”), “The Last Five Years” tells the story of the doomed five-year relationship between a young couple named Jamie and Cathy. They meet in Ohio, where she’s an aspiring actress and he’s a novelist whose career is just about to take off. He gets published and has to travel back and forth to New York City. She stays behind in Ohio, where she continues to try to find steady work. Over the years, the couple faces the challenges of maintaining a long-distance relationship, jealousy, and the strain placed on a romantic relationship when one partner finds success while the other struggles. It’s a fairly straightforward story, but what makes the show interesting is its structure. Jamie’s story is told chronologically, while Cathy’s is told in reverse, beginning with the end of their marriage. The audience is left to put the pieces together as we gradually get the full picture of their relationship together. If the show is challenging for the audience, it’s infinitely more so for the two actors who play Cathy and Jamie: they’re forced to carry the entire show on their own. Luckily, Janine Mercandetti and Carl Del Buono are more than up to the task. They both turn in heartfelt and moving performances that manage to wring every

ounce of emotion out of Brown’s songs. And the score is lovely, allowing the actors to demonstrate a wonderful range spanning a variety of musical genres. The catchiest song — and the one I came out of the theater still humming — was “The Schmuel Song,” a Klezmer-ish song sung by Jamie during the couple’s first Christmas together, and Del Buono sells the hell out of it. Mercandetti gets a few showcase numbers of her own, most notably “Climbing Uphill,” which takes place during one of Cathy’s auditions, as she wallows in her insecurities, both in her performance as well as with Jamie. Meranto’s direction of the performers allows for just enough of the characters’ personalities to shine through outside of the written words. There is a lot to like about “The Last Five Years.” While watching, I kept wondering exactly what was accounting for the distance I was feeling. I’m inclined to blame the non-linear structure, which both helps and hinders the show in many respects. It’s a clever bit of storytelling, and adds an extra dimension of emotional complexity to the material. But it also means that despite the fact that the actors are often on stage together, they only share the same emotional space for a few brief moments during one song, “The Next Ten Minutes,” when the couple meets in the middle of their stories, as Jamie proposes and they get married. We don’t get to see them truly happy at the same time at any other point. It makes for nice symmetry, but it also puts Cathy’s character at a disadvantage in terms of audience empathy, since she’s angry and bitter as soon as we meet her. The minimal, abstract set was also a source of a distraction. It consists of a series of circular platforms at varied heights made to look like clock faces, with several more hanging from the back of the stage. It’s clear what the scenic designer was going for, but its execution looked a little cheap considering what I know the JCC is capable of from previous productions. There’s a lot of ambition on display in “The Last Five Years,” and the musical has much it wants to say about relationships and how we relate to one another. But in the end, its ideas don’t coalesce in a way that’s dramatically satisfying. Similarly to the characters it depicts, whom I sympathized with but didn’t particularly like, it’s a show that I respected more than enjoyed.

RECREATION | FULL MOON VISTA CYCLOCROSS

If you are in search of a fitness challenge, here’s one of monumental proportions: Cyclocross at Ellison Park (395 Rich’s Dugway Road). For those who don’t know, cyclocross is basically cycling with obstacles that require the cycler to dismount their bike, run on foot while carrying the bike, get back on the bike, rinse and repeat. This year’s event features four international races and 24 amateur races. The age groups range from kids 9 and under to adults 55 and older, so there are chances for everyone to compete and win prizes. If you don’t want to compete, get in for free as a spectator and enjoy barbecue by Good Smoke and have a drink at the beer garden. The event takes place Saturday and Sunday, October 1920. The first race begins at 9:35 a.m. each day. Check out ellisoncyclocross.com for full schedule and other event details. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

Recreation 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Join the National MS Society’s Halloween-themed race called the Monster Scramble to help and support those fighting MS. This is a 5k, 10k, and 1 mile family-fun stroll for all ages. Prizes will be given to the top male and female finishers. The 1 mile family-fun stroll allows families to take a walk while collecting Halloween treats along the way. $0-30. 271-0805 x70330. Kendra. Chamberlain@nmss.org. fomh. org. Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Except May 12 see Special Events. Meet: North Gatehouse opposite Robinson Dr. This tour consists of a two hour leisurely walk of approximately one mile on paved roads and uneven terrain. Subjects covered include local history, famous people (including Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass), horticulture, geology, architecture, symbolism, and more $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Rochester Academy of Science Life Sciences Hike. 2 p.m. Meet at Maplewood Rose Gardens. Free. 670-9709. Rochester Orienteering Club Meet. noon. Powder Mills Park, 154 Park Rd. $8 per entry/team, register roc.us.orienteering.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 22 ] Pacesetters Walk. 6:30 p.m. Meet in parking lot of Schoen Place 9, Pittsford. Bring flashlights 249-9507. huggersskiclub.org.

[ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] Things that Go Bump. 4-5:30 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $6-$8 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer.htm.

Special Events [ WED., OCTOBER 16 ] Action for a Better Community’s 10th Annual Signature Luncheon. 1:30 p.m. Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E. Main St The event recognizes outstanding contributions in community service to the Greater Rochester area and will feature a keynote address from Dr. Marvin McMickle, President of the Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School 325-5116 x 4554. abcinfo.org. Africa Video Series: “War Don Don.” 5 p.m. fdi@mail. rochester.edu. Empty Bowls Rochester 2013. 5:30 p.m. McQuaid Jesuit High School, 1800 S. Clinton Ave. Help end homelessness & hunger in Rochester. Join Catholic Family Center (CFC) on October 16 for a simple supper of soup & bread and your choice of a hand-crafted bowl created by local artists. All proceeds will benefit CFC’s programs & services, such as emergency shelters for women & children. Presented by the Turk Hill Craft School $30, register 262-7172. cmarshall@ cfcrochester.org. Exclusive U.S. Premiere of Orson Welles’s Lost Film “Too Much Johnson.” 8 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. $25, members only, register. 271-3361 x261. eastmanhouse.org. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187

Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. German-American Sports Club Organizational Meeting. 8 p.m. St. Paul Fireman’s Exempt, Thomas Avenue, Irondequoit joeburch11@gmail.co. Hitchcock on Stage & Screen. 6:30 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. WXXI and the Little team up with Geva for a Hitchcock Film Series followed by panel discussions. Remaining film 10/16: “Rear Window.” Each screening at 6:30 p.m $7 for one ticket or a $25 punch card for all four. thelittle.org. Rochester Fashion Week. Oct. 16-20. Various locations downtown. Fashion shows, a boutique crawl, clothing swap fashionweekofrochester.org. Rochester’s First Annual Anti Fashion Week. Oct. 16-20. Oct 16-20. Various events. Oct 16 Princess Party Drag Show at Tilt Nightclub. Oct 17 Local Artist Showcase at Amor Gallery on Monroe Ave. Oct 19 “Cut & Sew Collective Runway Show” at Zeppa Auditorium at German House. Oct 20 Shop Crawl in South Wedge, 11 a.m.-6 p.m rocafw@eventbrite.com. Screening: “Latino Art Link” with Norma Holland. 5:30-8 p.m. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. Free. 428-6755. cityofrochester.gov. Webster Library Fall Book Sale. Through Oct. 19. Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd Webster Mon 5 p.m., Tue-Sat 10 a.m. Bag sale and Fri and Sat or buy one book get one free 872-7075. madunmor@rochester.rr.com. websterlibrary.org. [ THU., OCTOBER 17 ] 111 On East Open House / Professional Organization Mixer. 6:30 p.m. 111 On East, 111 East Avenue Free. 232-1700. mdrouin@dhdventures.com. Candidate Forum on Disability Issues: General Election 2013. 6 p.m. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Learn more about the candidates’ views on disability issues as they pertain to healthcare, education, housing, transportation, and communication access Free. 546-7510. datias@cdrnys.org. museumofplay.org. Latte Art Throwdown. 7 p.m. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. $5, spectators free 319-5279. joebeanroasters.com. Lincoln Tours. 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-2521283. sewardhouse.org. Max at the Gallery Tapas Night. 5-8 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Live music, wine, beer, tapas for purchase Included in admission: $2.50-$6. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Painting with a Purpose Fundraiser. 7 p.m. Painting with a Twist, 1276 Fairport Rd., Fairport $35. 267-7002. South Wedge Farmers’ Market. 4 p.m Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 4 p.m Free. 2698918. swfm.org. Stammtisch. Every other Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail. com. rocbrewingco.com.

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Special Events Third Thursday at MAG. Third Thursday of every month, 5-8 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Half price museum admission, tapas, wine, beer, live music, more Included in admission: $2.50-$6. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Todd Huston “More Than Mountains” 21st Adventures in Education Series. 7 p.m. Rochester School for the Deaf, 1545 St. Paul Street Leg amputee Todd Huston is a world record climber and author of “More Than Mountains: The Todd Huston Story” $20-$45. 544-1240. adventures@rsdeaf.org. [ FRI., OCTOBER 18 ] 5th annual Penfield Historic Ghost Walk. Oct. 18. Oakwood Cemetery, Penfield. Tours will leave from Penfield Community Center every 20 minutes beginning at 6 p.m.; the last tour will leave at 7:40 p.m. This event is appropriate for ages 8 and up $5 340-8655. penfieldrec.org. Alternative Music Film Festival. 7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Daft Punk’s “Electoma,’ cash bar $10 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Fall Mansion Mysteries at Sonnenberg: “The Masquerade.” 7 p.m Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St . Canandaigua $20$24 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. Friday Happy Hour. 5-7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. 2-for-1 on wines by-the-glass and beers by-the-bottle!. 2622336. veritaswinebar.com. Haunted House Fundraiser. Through Oct. 20. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 Through Oct 30. SatSun noon, Fri Oct 18 & 25 at 6 p.m., Mon-Wed Oct 28-30 at 6 p.m. A devilishly good time to benefit Cobblestone Arts Center for persons with disabilities $10 ages 13+, $5 ages 12 & under. 398-0220. cobblestoneartscenter@gmail. com. cobblestoneartscenter. com. Heirloom Apple Picking at Stone-Tolan House. Oct. 18-19, 12-3 p.m. Stone-Tolan House Historic Site, 2370 East Ave. Minimum donation $5/bag landmarksociety.org. Public Forum with candidates for the Rochester City School District board of directors. 6:308:30 p.m. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. Candidates slated to attend are Howard Eagle, Ronald Hall, Lori Thomas, Van White. Other candidates include José Cruz, Cynthia Elliot, and Mia Hodgins 244-1730. geneseearts.org. RMSC After Dark: Sci-Fi. 7 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Must be 21 or older to attend $12-$15. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Rotary Harvest Dinner. 6 p.m. The Lower Mill, 61 N. Main St., Honeoye Falls. 6-7 p.m. cocktails, cash bar. 7 p.m. 5 course dinner with complimentary wine $75, register. 582-1830. thelowermill.com. Skate Park Benefit. 7 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Benny Beyond, Drippers, M Dot Coop, Televisionaries, DJ

SPECIAL EVENT | RMSC AFTER DARK

The past few times I’ve been to The Rochester Museum & Science Center (657 East Ave.), I’ve been in the manic company of nieces and nephews, pulled from what has caught my focus to engage with the little ones and what has captured their attention. The 21-and-over crowd will reclaim the museum on Friday, October 18, when RMSC will host a new event called RMSC After Dark, which is intended to be the first of many held throughout the year. The museum’s recent 1920’s-themed event, “Repeal!,” was so successful that organizers decided to create an RMSC After Dark brand. The science-fiction-themed event will be held 7-11 p.m. and include a “singing” Tesla coil lightning show in Electricity Theater, exhibits of wacky inventions from the RMSC collections, “alien-themed” food and out-of-this-world specialty drinks at a cash bar, access to the traveling exhibition, “Alien Worlds and Androids,” futuristic electro-dance music by GLITTERCVLT, sci-fi trivia, and classic sci-fi movies. Come dressed in your favorite sci-fi costume and participate in a contest for a chance to win prizes. Admission to the event is $15 for the general public or $12 for RMSC members, and tickets can be purchased at the RMSC Welcome Desk or by calling 697-1942 (use code #A676). Registration is encouraged. Visit rmsc.org more information. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Tim Tones, Golden Rd. Crew, giveaways $5. bugjar.com. Spirits of the Past Theatrical Tours. Oct. 18-19. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford All tours run 6-9:30 p.m., except October 24, which runs 7-9 p.m $14-$16. 294-8218. gcv.org. Wine & Dine with Marchesi Di Barolo Winery Owners. Oct. 18. Next Door Bar & Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. RSVP. 249-4575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. [ SAT., OCTOBER 19 ] 44th Annual Rochester Gem, Mineral, Jewelry & Fossil Show. Oct. 19-20, 10 a.m. Minett Hall, Monroe Co. Fair & Expo Center, 2695 E. Henrietta Rd Henrietta Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-5 p.m $3-$6, kids under 12 Free. 249-9038. showpublicity@rasny.org. rasny. org/show. Annual Torch Light Tours. Oct. 19. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Choose from 15 start times each night begining at 5:45 p.m $7-$10 461-3494. fomh.org. Canandaigua Farmer’s Market. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m Pavilion on Mill Street, one block east of Main St., Canandaigua canandaiguafarmersmarket. com. Family Tours. 1 p.m Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St Tours especially for

28 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

families with young children Free to $7. 315-789-5151. info@ genevahistoricalsociety.com. genevahistoricalsociety.com. First Annual Project Junkway. 10 a.m. Genesee Community College Dansville Campus Center, 31 Clara Barton Street . Dansville 343-0055 x6616. dsutherland@genesee.edu. Flashlight Tour of Johnston House. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Johnston House, 3523 East Lake Road, near Route 96A, Geneva $5 315-789-5151. Home Movie Day. 12-4 p.m. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. The public is invited bring in home movies (8mm, super 8mm, 16mm and VHS formats only) and student volunteers from The L. Jeffrey Selznick School of Film Preservation will inspect and project them homemovieday. com. Momwise Series: Raising Healthy Kids. 10 a.m. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Free, register 263-2700. momwiseseries.com. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Chili Taste Off. 12-3 p.m. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East 315-568-5987 x229. Tasha_Daniels@fws.gov. National Archaeology Day. 11 a.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave.

With archaeological activities for kids and a lecture from a local archaeologist Included in museum admission: $11-$13 271-4320. Pumpkin Chunkin’s Return. 11 a.m.-4 p.m Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 3771982. grossmans.com. Radiohead and Dave Matthews Laser Shows. 8 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Laser light shows featuring the music of Radiohead at 8 p.m. and Dave Matthews Band at 9:30 p.m $6$11. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Total Tap Takeover: Southern Tier vs. Founders. Oct. 19. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. All day event 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. [ SUN., OCTOBER 20 ] Basic Old-School Dungeons and Dragons Gaming Group. Third Sunday of every month. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St All ages and skill-levels welcome Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Brighton Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.1 p.m Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S. 242-5046. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Durand Eastman Park Arboretum Tours. Durand Eastman Park, Zoo Rd. Free. 261-1665. bob. bea@gmail.com. Henna Talk & Tattoos with Bharati Bhamare. 1:30-3:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free, register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Penfield Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 377-1982 x224. grossmans.com. Russian Conversation Hour. 1 p.m. Colie’s Cafe, 657 Park Ave. Meet for an informal Russian conversation for all levels from beginners to native speakers Free. 330-389-4983. facebook. com/coliescafe. Tracking Fall Foliage by Trolley and Train. 11 a.m.-5 p.m New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd Departures every 30 minutes $8-$10. 5331113. nymtmuseum.org. [ MON., OCTOBER 21 ] A Celebration of Community Change. Oct. 21. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St Breakfast 8:30-10:15 a.m.qq. $45-$55, RSVP. 442-0200 x202. beth@ adcouncilroch.org. No Passport Needed: A Visit to Cuba. 1-3 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Film “Buena Vista Social Club” and discussion with Jennifer Rosinsky-Wolfley 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 22 ] Cameron Community Ministries’ Open House. 5-7 p.m. Cameron Community Ministries, 48 Cameron St. 254-2697. ccmvolunteerc@gmail.com. Screening: “Letters to Jackie.” Oct. 22. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Tue 1 p.m., Sat 7 p.m 2580400. thelittle.org. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. Lots of giveaways, including hats, t-shirts, drinks, tacos - come alone or come with a team! $1.50 Beef Tacos, $2.50 Chicken Tacos, $2.50

Drafts except Guinness, $3 Bacardi Flavors 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail.com. templebarandgrille.com. [ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] City School Board Candidate Forum. 6:30-8 p.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street This forum is sponsored by the Greater Rochester Parent Leadership Training Institute in partnership with The League of Women Voters 325-4000. greaterrochesterplti@gmail.com. greaterrochesterplti.org.

Sports [ WED., OCTOBER 16 ] Bocce League. 6 p.m Highland Park, 171 Reservoir Ave. $50pp or $200per team (up to 6 players). esc@rochester.rr.com. bocceleagueofrochester.com. [ FRI., OCTOBER 18 ] Rochseter Americans. Oct. 1819, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square Fri vs Toronto Marlies, Sat vs Utica Comets $19-$23. 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com. [ SAT., OCTOBER 19 ] Full Moon Vista Cyclocross. Oct. 19-20, 9:45 a.m. ellison park, blossom rd, by hazelwood lodge . penfield Free for spectators. Food provided by Good Smoke BBQ $45 to participate 5464030. ellisoncyclocross.com.

Theater “The 39 Steps.” Through Nov. 17. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Nov 17. Previews Tue Oct 22-23, 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Aida.” RAPA, 727 E. Main St Through Oct 19. Fri Oct 18, 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m $20-$25 325-3366. raparocs@gmail.com. “Almost, Maine.” Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $8.50-$16. 3952787. brockport.edu/finearts. “Cinderella.” Todd Theatre, University of Rochester, River Campus. International Theatre. Adult re-envisioning of the beloved tale. Contains adult language. Wed Oct 16-Sat 8 p.m $7-$13. 275-4088. rochester. edu/theatre. An Evening of One Acts.” Dazzle School of Visual Performances, 112 Webster Ave. Everyone’s Theatre Company. Plays: “Edward Albee’s, The Zoo Story,” “Habit,” by John Patrick, and “Romeo and Juliet – Six Very Busy Days,” by Robert Wing. Thu Oct 17, 7:30 p.m., Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $5-$8. 7271373. everyonestheatre.com. “An Evening of Thrills and Chills.” Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313. Through Oct 27. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $16-$20 blacksheeptheatre.org. Festival of New Theatre 2013. Oct. 23-Nov. 3. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd True Home by Cass Morgan, Wednesday, October 23, 7 p.m. A Conversation with Nora Cole, Friday, October 25, 7 p.m. Theatre in Progress: Excerpts of New Plays, Monday, October 28. 8 p.m. Regional Writer: Galileo’s by Bill Capossere, Tuesday, October 29, 7 p.m. Love/Sick

by John Cariani, Wednesday, October 30, 7 p.m. Rochester “Bake-Off”: New Play Excerpts, Wednesday, October 3, 9 p.m. Young Writers Showcase: New Plays in Performance, Saturday, November 2, 2:30 p.m., and Sunday, November 3, 2:30 p.m. Free, register. 232- 4382. gevatheatre.org. “The Last Five Years.” JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Thu 7 p.m $18-$26. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org. “Me and Jezebel.” Through Nov. 2. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St. Through Nov 2. Fri Oct 18, 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $28.50-$36.50. 4541260. bftix.org. “My Gal Patsy.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. $29-$33 3254370. downstairscabaret.com. “On the Spectrum.” Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Through Oct 20. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $6-$12. 271-5523. breadandwatertheatre.org. “Pink Ribbons.” The Space Theater and Gallery, 1199 East Main St. Thu-Fri 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (ASL interpreted) $10 2090734. thespacerochester.com. “Radio Gals.” Christ the Good Shepherd Church, 1000 N Winton Rd. Out of Pocket Productions. Through Oct 20. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $10-$12. 279-4673. outofpocketproductions@ yahoo.com. outofpocketproductions.org. “ShakesBlood.” Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. Presented by Method Machine in Star Alley Park, next to Lux Lounge. BYOP (Bring Your Own Rain Pancho! There is going to be a lot of blood.) Free. 232-9030. methodmachine.org. “Urinetown, The Musical.” Nazareth College Arts Center Callahan Theater, 4245 East Ave. Through Oct 27. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $18-$20 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu.

Theater Audition [ WED., OCTOBER 16 ] “Love in the Style of Will.” Through Jan. 31, 2014. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Actors and directors wanted for Valentine’s show featuring romantic scenes from Shakespeare justin.rielly@ gmail.com.

Workshops [ WED., OCTOBER 16 ] After the Fire Class: Coffee & Chocolate. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Explore the roasting process and flavor profiles of cacao and coffee; class includes single origin chocolate & coffee pairings $25. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com. Family Development Class: “Improving Parent-Child Relationships (Part 6 of 6).” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of pre-school to preteen children Free, RSVP 3253245 x131. mharochester.org. Small Business Boot Camp #8: Top 10 IT Tips for Small Businesses. 7:45 a.m. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. Presented By: Bob Dunning & Justin

Copie, Innovative Solutions $25, SBC members free. 271-1111. rochestersbc.com. [ THU., OCTOBER 17 ] Fall Make-Up Trends. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Meaningful Activities. 6:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Gain insight into the experiences of a person with dementia and learn the challenges that personal care such as dressing and bathing can present. The class will also explore the importance of routine for people with dementia and the role of leisure activities in their quality of life Free 800-272-3900. lfernandez@alz.org. alz.org/ rochesterny. Nexus Nights. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Explorations in food and beverage with a splash of science Free Event. 319-5279. kturiano@ joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. Writing Your Personal Legacy with Author Susan Barocas. 12:30-2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free, register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org.

[ FRI., OCTOBER 18 ] Windows 8.1. 3-4:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St Canandaigua Free, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ SAT., OCTOBER 19 ] Cheese Making. 9 a.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford Ages 16 to adult $79$90. 538-6822. gcv.org 9 a.m.4 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford $79-$90, register. 294-8215. gcv.org. Italian Language Classes. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way For adults: beginning, intermediate, and advanced, and children: beginners and not so beginners Register. 7495346. iaccrochester.org. [ SUN., OCTOBER 20 ] Adults’ Pumpkin Painting Workshop. 2-4 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 PittsfordPalmyra Rd Free, register. 223-1222 x100. trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. waysidegardencenter.com. [ MON., OCTOBER 21 ] Culinary Class: Georges Vindigni of Il Posto Bistro Wine & Bar. 6-8:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $79, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com. Drawing is Seeings: An Introduction to Drawing. 6-7:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St Canandaigua Ages 12+. Free, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org.

[ WED., OCTOBER 23 ] Family Development Class: “Winning at Parenting.” 12:302:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Homemade Baby Food: Fun, Healthy, and Easy. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $22. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Succulent Gardens: Terrarium Workshop. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $30. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

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The show takes place at Geva Theatre Center Mainstage (75 Woodbury Blvd.) beginning with preview performances on Tuesday, October 22, with an opening on Saturday, October 26, continuing through November 17. Tickets start at $25. For reservations or more information, call 232-4382, or visit gevatheatre.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

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The espionage-thriller-meets-slapstick-comedy follows Englishman Richard Hannay’s encounters with dastardly murders, double-crossing secret agents, and of course, devastatingly beautiful women. Four dexterous actors will play more than 150 characters in this homage to film noir and theatrical stagecraft.

All HANDS ON DECK.

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When I think “Hitchcock,” I don’t think “hilarity.” I think suspense, intrigue, and sharp wit, but I don’t expect my sides to be in stitches. Starting next week, Geva Theatre Center will present “The 39 Steps,” a fast-paced, comedic whodunit adapted by Patrick Barlow, from the John Buchan novel and the 1935 film by Alfred Hitchcock.

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THEATER | “THE 39 STEPS”

[ TUE., OCTOBER 22 ] Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. 6-7 p.m. Harmony House, 58 E Main St. Webster 698-7784. Dispelling Shakespeare. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Family Development Class: “Active Parenting Now (Part 2 of 6).” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents for children ages 5-12 Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Home Brewing Techniques Class. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Discuss and practice in-depth techniques for pour-over and full-immersion coffee brewing methods $25. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters. com. joebeanroasters.com/ classes. Learn To Read Russian. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Seminars to understand the most recent Best Management Practices relating to ‘Risk Management.’ 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave $85, register 226-5466. mycce.org/.

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Family Development Class: “What Teens Need to Succeed.” 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of pre-teens and teens Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Filling In The Blanks To Understanding Your Apple iPhone Or iPad. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com.

FINAL BALLOT THOUSANDS of Rochesterians cast their votes in our online Primary Ballot to determine the Final 4 in each of the 113 categories that make up Best of Rochester 2013. PLEASE NOTE: City Newspaper had no say in the selection of the Final 4; these were determined solely by the people, places, and things that received the most votes in our Primary Ballot.

FINAL DAYS TO VOTE! ends

October 18

at 5pm!

TAKE THE SURVEY AT

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winners revealed in the October 30 issue of City Newspaper!

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Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16

Pirates of the Indian Ocean

2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

“Captain Phillips”

(PG-13), DIRECTED BY PAUL GREENGRASS NOW PLAYING

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres

[ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Based on an account by the title character and more important, on recent events, “Captain Phillips” confronts some compelling contemporary issues in both subject and method. To begin with, the picture belongs to that increasingly popular genre, the docudrama, which shows actual events in a somewhat fictionalized form, like the Iranian hostage crisis in “Argo” or the Bush administration’s

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

betrayal of the CIA operative Valerie Plame in “Fair Game.” Along with their close cousin, the documentary, such films serve to report on matters that the mainstream, allegedly liberal media neglect or even ignore. The new movie portrays the ordeal of Richard Phillips, captain of the cargo ship Maersk Alabama, boarded by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean in 2009. Aside from showing at some length his courage in the face of brutality, it also shows a cinematic version of the new face of piracy, no longer the swashbuckling adventures of Errol Flynn or the horror-film excesses of the Johnny Depp movies, but a violent, profitable, and decidedly unromantic endeavor practiced by desperate young men from the Horn of Africa. Presumably in the interests of fairness and even compassion, the director initially intercuts between Captain Phillips (Tom Hanks) and his captors. Phillips goes about his customary preparations for a command, packing, discussing problems with his wife, departing for the shipyard, checking out the condition of

Tom Hanks in “Captain Phillips.” PHOTO COURTESY COLUMBIA PICTURES

Film Previews on page 32

his ship, and so forth. In Somalia a warlord of some kind, with a gang of armed thugs, recruits some impoverished young men in a seaside village, really a group of hovels, for a raid on any ship they can find sailing alone and therefore susceptible to an attack. From that point, the movie proceeds according to a kind of implacable fate, as the crew of the Maersk Alabama discover the presence of two fast boats approaching their enormous vessel and attempt everything they can to repel the attackers. The audience understands and anticipates the course of a known series of events, which paradoxically in no way diminishes the suspense and tension of “Captain Phillips.” Sometimes, equally paradoxically, nothing is more surprising than the expected. Much of the picture proceeds like a documentary, grounding the action in innumerable details of the ship’s operation, as the camera traverses the length and depth of the huge ship, about the size of an apartment building, showing all the high-tech navigation and communication instruments, the various measures of defense, and yet the surprising vulnerability of the craft. In contrast, inhabitants of a terribly poor region, barely a nation, lacking the military equipment of the West, the pirates possess automatic weapons, communicate with their mother ship, a fishing trawler, via two-way radio, eavesdrop on the captain’s own messages, and even use radar to track their target. Most important, despite

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It’s a small world after all “Escape From Tomorrow” COMING SOON TO THE LITTLE

“Zero Charisma” NOW AVAILABLE ON VIDEO ON DEMAND [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

all the efforts of the captain and his crew, they succeed in their mission. The actors, all of them except the star unfamiliar names and faces, convey an entirely convincing authenticity, appropriate for the documentary feel of the movie; no one on the ship’s crew or the Somali gang seems to be acting. The rapid camera cuts, tight close-ups, and the incessant screaming of the pirates intensify the claustrophobic atmosphere of fear and desperation on the lifeboat that his captors use to escape with Captain Phillips. That lifeboat, incidentally, nicely underlines the advances in nautical technology — it’s a swift, nifty little craft crammed with survival gear, not the rubber raft of the World War II submarine flicks. Whatever his skills at light comedy and breezy dialogue, Tom Hanks demonstrates a genuine depth as the protagonist, an ordinary man trying to save his ship, his crew, and himself from a gang of heavily armed, irrational, and very jittery thugs. He tries to reason with them, endures mistreatment, all the while demonstrating credible courage without a hint of heroic posturing; it’s a powerful, controlled performance. It’s worth noting that the attack presented Barack Obama with his first foreign policy crisis and that the Navy SEALs responded brilliantly. It’s also worth noting that Rush Limbaugh, the GOP pope, reported that President Obama ordered the killing of three unarmed black teenagers who were trying to surrender, initiating the stream of hatred and falsehoods that sustains the opposition to this day.

When it premiered at Sundance last January, “Escape From Tomorrow” quickly gained notoriety based in large part on the unusual way in which it was filmed. To capture his unique vision of the corporate culture’s dark underbelly, director Randy Moore shot his movie without permission in the Walt Disney World and Disneyland theme parks. In a daring bit of guerilla filmmaking, his bare-bones crew snuck handheld cameras into the parks and filmed the actors amidst the actual crowds of vacationing families. Besides being filmed illegally, the film doesn’t exactly depict Disney in the best light, so naturally it wasn’t expected to have much of a life following its festival debut. Most predicted that Disney would threaten legal action if the film was ever released, and “Escape From Tomorrow” would be doomed to disappear and eventually fade into obscurity. But shockingly, the company has (thus far) remained completely silent about the movie, choosing instead to simply not acknowledge that it exists at all. And so for

A still from “Escape From Tomorrow.” PHOTO COURTESY MANKURT MEDIA

now, audiences are free to enjoy the utterly bizarre surrealist-sci-fi-horror-comedy without worrying that Mickey’s lawyers will come pounding at their door (though the film’s official website includes a counter ticking off the number of days that the filmmakers haven’t been sued). Currently available On Demand, “Escape From Tomorrow” will have a theatrical release in Rochester when it gets a brief run at the Little Theatre starting on October 26. Family man Jim White (Roy Abramsohn) begins the last day of his Florida family vacation by receiving a phone call from his boss kindly informing him that he no longer has a job. But with little time to fully process this development, Jim heads off to spend a day at the park with his wife (Elena Schuber) and two adorable children in tow. Once in the park, however, Jim starts to lose it. Demonic faces appear to him on “It’s a Small World,” he hallucinates his wife saying some less than loving things to him, and he starts obsessively following around a pair of teenage French girls. Jim’s losing his grip on reality, but it’s unclear whether he’s having a nervous breakdown, or there’s something insidious happening at the “Happiest Place on Earth”™. There’s a lot of ideas bouncing around amidst all the lunacy, from the danger in chasing after lost youth to the inescapable nature of our corporate-controlled culture, as well as a commendable commitment to being as trippy and weird as possible. These ideas are undermined slightly by the film’s inconsistent execution (perhaps unavoidable considering its production method) and sometimes juvenile tone. Also, its female characters are…not the best. Still, it’s totally worth seeing, if only for the sheer audacity of its conceit. “Escape From Tomorrow” is Moore’s first film, and with such an auspicious debut, it’s a safe bet we’ll be hearing a lot more from him in the years to come.

Also released on On Demand last week,

“Zero Charisma” is a dark, satirical sendup of nerd culture that deftly sidesteps stereotypes or passing judgment on its characters. From first-time directors Katie Graham and Andrew Matthews (who also wrote the screenplay), the film focuses on how geeky interests have become mainstream, and what it truly means to be a nerd. The story follows Scott (Sam Eidson, in a boldly unsympathetic performance), a burly, uptight, control freak who lives with his grandmother, and whose entire life revolves around his role as game master of a Dungeon & Dragonsesque tabletop RPG of his own design. His life, already held together by a very thin thread, begins to unravel, first when he’s forced to find a new player for his longrunning gaming group, and then when his estranged mother suddenly re-enters his life. Scott’s gaming problems at first seem to be solved when he recruits Miles (Garrett Graham), a “hipster” nerd who is handsome, charming, and has an interest in RPGs. But when Miles seems to be stealing Scott’s group of friends out from under him, Scott starts to see a scapegoat for everything that’s gone wrong in his life. Refusing to be undermined by what he sees as a tourist in the world of geekdom, a rivalry begins between the two men, which quickly spirals out of control. Scott and Miles each represent different sides of the nerd coin, and while Matthews’ script mostly avoids taking sides, this is definitely Scott’s story. Unfortunately, this means Miles’ character gets short shrift in the development department, making their battle of wills a little more one-sided than I would have liked. But Scott is a fantastic character; while the script often makes him as unlikeable as possible, it always makes sure we understand him, and Eidson never loses sight of his humanity. His story is funny, affectionate, and ultimately a little heartbreaking.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31

Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] AS IN A LOOKING GLASS (1913): This silent film about a victimized woman who has mysterious visions will be paired with “The Vampire.” Dryden (Tue, Oct 22, 8:40 p.m.) BLACK DIAMONDS (1932): A biopic about real-life coal miner Charles Hammer, who fought to bring attention the miner’s rights and expose their hazardous working conditions. Screens with “The Miners’ Hymns.” Dryden (Fri, Oct 18, 8 p.m.) THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI (1920): This expressionist silent film about the evil Dr. Caligari and the carnival somnambulist under his control is the reason all of Tim Burton’s films look the way they do. Dryden (Sun, Oct 20, 2 p.m.) CARRIE (R): Kimberly Peirce (“Boys Don’t Cry”) directs this “reimagining” of Stephen King’s novel, with Chloë Grace Moretz and Julianne Moore portraying the loveable mother-daughter duo at the heart of the tale. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Tinseltown, Webster ESCAPE PLAN (R): Wrongfully imprisoned in a futuristic, highsecurity jail, Sylvester Stallone must team up with fellow inmate Arnold Schwarzenegger to break out. So it’s pretty much a documentary. With Jim Caviezel and Vincent D’Onofrio. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview,

Geneseo, Greece, Tinseltown, Webster THE FIFTH ESTATE (R): Benedict Cumberbatch portrays Julian Assange in Bill Condon’s biopic of the Wikileaks founder. Also starring Laura Linney and Daniel Brühl (“Rush”). Eastview, Greece, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown I’M IN LOVE WITH A CHURCH GIRL (PG): When a man with a criminal past falls for a woman who’s committed to her faith, they each much choose between the life they know and the love they’ve found. Starring Ja Rule, Adrienne Bailon (“The Cheetah Girls”), Stephen Baldwin, and Michael Madsen. Henrietta INEQUALITY FOR ALL (NR): This documentary examines the everwidening economic gap in our country and what it means for our future. Little THE MINERS’ HYMNS (2010): Using rare archival film, found-footage filmmaker Bill Morrison explores the lives of coal miners in northeastern England. Screening with “Black Diamonds.” Dryden (Fri, Oct 18, 9 p.m.) REAR WINDOW (1954): Jimmy Stewart does some snooping on his neighbors, with deadly consequences in Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller. Little (Wed, Oct 16, 6:30 p.m.) THE SUMMIT (R): This documentary focuses on Himalayan mountain, K2, known as the most dangerous mountain on Earth, and the day 11 climbers disappeared while attempting to climb it. Little

THE TRIP (1967): Peter Fonda stars as a commercial director in the midst of a breakdown, who finds comfort in the drug LSD. Shown as a double feature with “The Wild Angels.” Dryden (Thu, Oct 17, 9:30 p.m.) TOO MUCH JOHNSON (1938): Alright, you can stop giggling at the title. This is the U.S. premiere of this recently uncovered lost film from Orson Welles, starring Joseph Cotten, Arlene Francis, and Ruth Ford. Tickets are available to Dryden members only. Dryden (Wed, Oct 16, 8 p.m.) THE VAMPIRE (1913): This silent film about the wild “Vampire Dance” screens on a double bill with “As In a Looking Glass.” Dryden (Tue, Oct 22, 8 p.m.) THE WILD ANGELS (1966): Peter Fonda also stars in this outlaw biker film following a gang on their quest to recover a stolen motorcycle. Screens as a double feature with “The Trip.” Dryden (Thu, Oct 17, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] BAGGAGE CLAIM (PG-13): Paula Patton plays a flight attendant who takes advantage of her job to fly across the country revisiting her exes and hunt for a date in time for her sister’s wedding. With Djimon Hounsou, Taye Diggs, Derek Luke, Adam Brody, and Tia Mowry. Greece, Tinseltown BLUE JASMINE (PG-13): In Woody Allen’s latest, Cate Blanchett stars as a NY socialite who returns to San Francisco to reconnect with her sister after going through a life

crisis. With Alec Baldwin, Peter Sarsgaard, and Louie C.K. Little CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG-13): See review on page 30. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG): The sequel to the animated adaptation of the popular children’s picture book, this time involving an island of food/animal hybrids. With the voices of Bill Hader, Anna Faris, James Caan, Kristen Schaal, Andy Samberg, and Neil Patrick Harris. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown DON JON (R): Joseph GordonLevitt makes his big screen debut as writer/director with this comedy about a ladies man who finds that real-life ladies have difficulty competing with the ones in his pornos. With Scarlett Johansson, Julianne Moore, and Tony Danza. Eastview, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown ENOUGH SAID (PG-13): Julia Louis Dreyfus plays a divorced woman who begins dating a new man (James Gandolfini), only to discover that he’s her new friend’s ex-husband in this romanticcomedy from Nicole Holofcener. With Catherine Keener and Toni Collette. Little, Pittsford THE FAMILY (R): This actioncomedy, from director Luc Besson, stars Robert De Niro as a former mafia boss who’s forced to go into witness protection with his family. Also starring Michelle Pfeiffer, Tommy Lee Jones, and Dianna Agron. Cinema

GRAVITY (PG-13): Sandra Bullock and George Clooney play astronauts who becomes stranded in space after a shuttle accident, in Alfonso Cuarón’s sci-fi thriller. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown IMAGEOUT FILM FESTIVAL: Now in its 21st year, ImageOut presents a lineup for narrative, documentary, and short films about the LGBT community. Runs from October 11-20. Little INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 (PG-13): Fresh off the success of “The Conjuring,” director James Wan returns to the saga of the haunted Lambert family. Starring Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, and Barbara Hershey. Canandaigua, Greece LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (PG13): Forest Whitaker stars in this true story, about a butler who served eight American presidents over the course of three decades. Also starring Oprah Winfrey, Terrence Howard, Alan Rickman, Jane Fonda, Robin Williams, and John Cusack. Canandaigua, Eastview MACHETE KILLS (R): The sequel to Robert Rodriguez’s grindhouse homage about the adventures of Mexican vigilante, Machete. Starring Danny Trejo, Michelle Rodriguez, Sofía Vergara, Charlie Sheen, and Lady Gaga. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Tinseltown PLANES (PG): An animated spinoff of “Cars,” this time about a little plane who dreams of being a racer. With the voices of Dane Cook, Teri Hatcher, Julia Louis-

Dreyfus, John Cleese, Anthony Edwards, and Val Kilmer. Cinema PRISONERS (R): An all-star cast heads up this thriller about a group of parents who take matters into their own hands after their daughters are kidnapped. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman, Viola Davis, Terrence Howard, Maria Bello, and Paul Dano. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown ROMEO & JULIET (PG-13): Never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo, here played by Hailee Steinfeld and Douglas Booth in an adaptation by Julian Fellowes (Downton Abbey). Eastview, Pittsford RUNNER RUNNER (R): Justin Timberlake stars as a poor college student who gets mixed up in the seedy world of online gambling. Also starring Ben Affleck, Gemma Arterton, and Anthony Mackie. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown RUSH (R): Ron Howard’s film about the true story of the 1970s rivalry between Formula One racers James Hunt and Niki Lauda. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Daniel Brühl, and Olivia Wilde. Canandaigua, Eastview, Pittsford, Tinseltown WE’RE THE MILLERS (R): A smalltime pot dealer hires strangers to pose as his family in order to not arouse suspicion while making his way across the Mexican border with a shipment. Starring Jason Sudeikis, Jennifer Aniston, Emma Roberts, and Ed Helms. Canandaigua, Cinema, Eastview

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

32 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

THE

M ILLS AND A NNEX AT H IGH F ALLS

HEAT INCLUDED • TOWNHOUSES AND FLATS

2012 WINNER OF DESIGN EXCELLENCE STOP BY 312 STATE STREET OR CALL 454-5710

www.themillsathighfalls.com

MON-FRI: 9AM-5PM SATURDAY: 9AM-1PM

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads parks and all major attractions. Don’t miss out! Beat the snowbird rush. Call now 1-877-3330272, x 136

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Adoption PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/ Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) HARLEY DAVIDSON 2006 ULTRA CLASSIC EXCELLENT CONDITION 15,000 miles asking $10,000 716-44008880

Events ****GUN SHOW**** Newstead Fire Hall**** 5691 Cummings Rd. Akron, NY 85 Tables! Saturday October 19th 9:00am4:00pm & Sunday October 20th 9:00am-3:00pm Next Show 10/25 & 10/26 JW Jones Hall. nfgshows.com

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

The Emporium 24” GAS RESTAURANT RANGE Southbend Model #S24E. Excellent condition. $1000. or B.O. 315-331-6999 PAINT: BENJAMIN MOORE 2 gallons interior, Ivory Porcelain #239 Eggshell finish, Location Charlotte 585-663-6983 $30 all WOODEN HANGERS FOR COATS: 12 wood hangers for coats. 12 wood, 2 plastic 1 for hanging pants. All $15 585880-2903

For Sale 13” TV, CONVERTER BOX antennna $47 585-752-1000 BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99

continues on page 34

CHECK OUT

CITY ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Faster, easier-to-use! • Find what you’re looking for with new categories! Clickable links to business websites • and many more improvements!

go to ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM and click on “CLASSIFIEDS”

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Canandaigua Lake; Newly renovated ranch with 25' feet of frontage and a dock. Turn key, everything is included! $219,900 Call Ryan @ 201-0724 or visit RochesterSells.com for more info. Re/Max Realty Group.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Charmer in Corn Hill

4 Greenwood Street Sometimes with smaller homes, the beauty of the exterior can hide unforeseen challenges within: cramped rooms, odd layouts, or poorly done renovations that take away from the home’s character and history. The key question with these properties is: Has the space been used wisely and not wasted? For the cozy house located at 4 Greenwood Street, in the heart of Corn Hill, recent renovations have answered that question with a resounding “yes.” Built in 1850, the house’s exterior features will bring you straight back in time. The windows, shutters and wood clapboards all are in pristine shape. Step through the welcoming side entrance and you will find a contemporary residence that boasts a welldesigned flow and layout. The downstairs has an airy open floor plan, made up of two large rooms, which makes the entire floor feel much larger than the actual square footage. The living room is bright with light, courtesy of four large picture windows and gleaming hardwood floors. Stay warm on cold nights with the updated gas fireplace framed by an artistic stone mantel. The eat-in kitchen is spacious and stunning. It is equipped with granite countertops, a breakfast bar island, and new appliances. The warm, welcoming space is large enough to be a center dining and entertaining area. Having a large gathering? No problem! You can easily take the party outdoors. A door in the kitchen leads to the ultra-private, enclosed backyard patio—perfect for outdoor entertaining!

A charming spiral staircase is the perfect portal from the main living space to the second floor. The exposed beams and a leaded-glass window viewable on the way up provide a reminder of the solid construction and craftsmanship of this venerable home. Partitioned into three distinct spaces are a large master bedroom, a full bath, and an open, airy office area. The highlight of the master bedroom is the exposed brick of the chimney, flanked by two large picture windows. Built-in storage wraps around the room. The bathroom is fully remodeled, with new tile floors, double sinks, and a spacious tiled shower. Return to the spiral staircase to descend down to the basement, where you’ll find a fully renovated room. With plenty of light flooding through the large windows, this bonus space can be put to good use as a family room or bedroom. This property offers approximately 1,016 square feet of living space and is listed at $145,000. Greenwood Street is located in the heart of Corn Hill, Rochester’s oldest residential neighborhood. It is a leafy, quiet neighborhood filled with history and character and walkable to downtown and Corn Hill Landing. Contact Dean Popoli of RE/MAX Plus at 585-738-0021 for more information. by Peter Smith Peter lives and works in Rochester and is a Landmark Society volunteer.

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

Search. Buy. Sell. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33

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Jam Section CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 CHRISTIAN ROCK - R & B Band is seeking a lead / rhythm guitarist 585-355-4449

USED TV FOR SALE —Sharp 13” Color with remote. 14 years young with remote. $20 cash and carry. Message phone Mary 585/413-0827

DRUMMER Experienced Young Drummer available. Influences are Led Zep, Rush, Pink Floyd, Foo Fighters. Looking for Guitar, Bass and Vocals. Contact through: http://www.youtube. com/user/Chaztize7

VARIOUS Shovel, rakes, brooms, heavy duty $3 ea, duffle bags $3 ea, Hand tools $2, Ramps (car) heavy duty $35, work shoe & boots $1,

NEEDED MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS Bass, guitars, keys, horns. Must have equipt. & transportation & be avail. evenings. Bobby 585-328-4121

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34 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

LARGE JEWELRY COLLECTION All kinds, old & new, retro, vintage, cameo’s, brooches, beads & more. Great pieces for jewelry designers too, 585-3602895

ATTENTION FLASH SOCCER FANS! The Western NY Flash Mob is gathering to prepare for the 2014 season. Join us! For more info find us on Facebook or contact us wnyflashfans@ gmail.com

Call Christine today to advertise

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637-3348

GRACO DOUBLE STROLLER $40 B/O 585-225-5526

Groups Forming

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS?

ALL WASHED UP

Since 1968

DRIVEWAY GATES 8’ sections. All welded parts complete $49 per each 585-752-1000

wire cage for rabbit $25 585752-1000

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• Re-Roof and Complete Tear-off • Insurance Claims • Storm Damage • Installation & Repairs

DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (says, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903

Tear-offs • Flat Roofs • Re-Roofs • Ventilation & Repairs

We Will Beat any Legitimate Written Estimate

CANVASS CHAIR Fold up $5 585-383-0405

EVEN FLO Aura strooler & combo car seat $40 B/O 585225-5526

-since 1983-

Maintenance • Pruning • Design Robert L. Wilcox • 474-6584 gardens9@rochester.rr.com

> page 33 BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $15. 585-880-2903

RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST

Rent your apartment special third week is

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

FREE

THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org VOCALIST that can lead & background with other vocalists that do the same. Avail evenings, transportation, R & B, Funk, Jazz, Pop, Blues......Bobby 585-328-4121 Experienced please.

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958 & 585-512-6044 PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

Looking For... FREE YARN NEEDED! Please donate your yarn to Sunday Circle knitting hats scarves and mittens for the poor. Arrange pickup. Call and leave message 585/413-0827

Miscellaneous ARE YOU BORED OR LONELY, looking to start a new relationship or maybe just meet a new friend, then you should try Livewire. It’s fun, it’s FREE, it’s Livewire. No gimmicks, no subscription fees just a fun way

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

to meet new people. Call now. (585)333-3003 HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, NonStaining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES) SAWMILLS from only $4897.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:  www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800578-1363 Ext.300N

Mind Body Spirit EARN BIG $$’s while losing weight! We challenge you to lose up to 50 pounds and get paid for it! Special limited offer. Call Now! 1-800-973-3271 (AAN CAN)

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-9593419

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St.

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-2967093 CONTAINERPORT has frieght & we need trucks! Looking for owner operators servicing Newark, Albany to Buffalo & all points between. Excellent rates & Fuel Surcharge Tolls Paid. 800-959-2742 We are busy moving containers! CORREIA’S GENERAL CONTRACTING Sales & Project Manager. Average first year $55$60K. Recession proof industry. No experience necessary / Will train. Top rep in 2012 made over $200K TO APPLY CALL: 315-257-9104 or send resume to; athompson@roofally.com DRIVERS- HOME WEEKLY & BIWEEKLY EARN $900-$1200/ WK. Class A CDL & 6 Mos. Exp

Reg. No Canada, HAZMAT or NYC! SMITH TRANSPORT 877705-9261 EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. www. AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN) HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN)

MIND BODY SPIRIT

THINK MOVE BREATHE DANCE • HEAL • SEARCH STRETCH • STENGHTHEN •

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 See Page 17 of this week’s issue

SATTELLITE DISH INSTALLERS Subcontractor position - trucks and tools required - Excellent Pay- Call 888-313-8504 or 706-733-0988 To see if you quality

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000. BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science

Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www.rmsc.org/Support/ Volunteer Or call 585-6971948 BOOK LOVERS needed to sort and price donated books for resale at Downtown Library bookstore. Proceeds benefit library programs. Training

continues on page 36

Altec has TECHNICIAN OPENINGS to repair mobile hydraulic aerial equipment at customer sites. Work from home with company service vehicle. Exp required in same or related field (ex. aerials, tractors, cranes, dozers, GSE).

SERVICES

YOU DELIVER THE PACKAGES. WE DELIVER THE FUNDS. Who doesn’t love working in a dynamic environment while earning extra money? We’ve got both waiting for you in one great opportunity with an industry-leading company. Kelly Services ® is hiring temporary drivers for FedEx Ground®, a small-package ground delivery company serving business and residential customers across North America. You could be hired immediately if you meet these requirements: • 21 years or older • Strong customer service skills • Minimum of six months commercial driving experience within the last three years • One year commercial driving experience preferred though CDL not required As a Kelly® employee, you’ll receive weekly electronic pay, a service bonus plan, benefit options, and more. If you’ve got the drive, we want to hear from you. Don’t miss out. Inquire in Person: Mon-Fri 9am-4pm 225 Thruway Park, West Henrietta, NY resumes: tempupny@yahoo.com

NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

Volunteers

HELP WANTED!! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.processbrochures.com (AAN CAN)

Seasonal Drivers Needed!

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

An Equal Opportunity Employer

Stable company with 80+ years of success. Apply at www.altec.com or send resume to hrrecruiter@altec.com or call 205-307-2083.

TEACHERS NEEDED Welding Fabrication (2)

(Ellicottville & Belmont Centers)

Collision Repair Technology (Olean Center)

Advanced Manufacturing/Machining (Olean Center)

Cattaraugus Allegany BOCES CTE Division

See Website for Details Apply on-line at

WWW.CABOCES.ORG EOE/AA

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING > page 35 provided. 585-428-8322 or Kate.Antoniades@libraryweb.org.

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to

Start Your Career With ConServe!

Debt Counselor & Bilingual Debt Counselor Openings

Uncapped Bonus • Competitive Wages Unbeatable Benefits • Flexible Scheduling • Growth Potential

200 Cross Keys Office Park, Fairport 14450 For more information and to apply:

www.conserve-arm.com Click the “ConServe Careers” tab

foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare. org. HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of ownerless cats living outside. All training provided. 585-7874209 or habitat4cats@yahoo. com!

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 3402016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM is looking for

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS!

CITY

ConServe is an EOE & Drug-Free Workplace ce

Call Christine at

244-3329 ext. 23 today!

volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers for :Meal delivery. Clerical work and answering phones, scheduling volunteers to deliver routes. For more information visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 7878326. SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282

cleaning. This is FREE in exchange for your time! Contact Tina B. 585-902-8009 or emailtinahygiene@gmail.com

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

Career Training AIRLINE CAREERS- begin here - Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877492-3059 (AAN CAN)

SECOND YEAR MCC DENTAL STUDENT seeking patients who would like complimentary

Work In The Town of:

Clarkson, Hamlin, Brockport, and/or Greece

Come Join the TEAM at

DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL Work in a home where you can be a part of growth by supporting people in becoming independent in everyday life and much more! INTERVIEW APPOINTMENTS ARE BEING SCHEDULED FOR INTERVIEW DAY October 17th, 2013 • 9am-12am and 1pm-3pm The Brockport E.X.E.M.P.T. 248 West Avenue Brockport NY 14420 An employment application must be completed no later than 10/15/2013 for consideration Visit our website at: www.lifetimeassistance.org Lifetime Assistance is an equal opportunity employer

Our Employees Enjoy: Excellent Benefits, Competitive Wages Tuition Reimbursement, Employee Referral Bonus Programs, Generous Paid Time Off Considering joining the Lifetime Assistance family and make a difference in the life of an individual with developmental disabilities. 36 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013

Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] 18-20 RENTAL, LLC, a domestic LLC, currently known as 18-20 J2, LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisovski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] APA NEW YORK LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 9/23/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8509 Mass Pointe Trl. N., Jacksonville, FL 32244, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] BERKELEY ASSOCIATES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/24/02. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC PO Box 10282 Rochester, NY 14610 Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Community Forensic Interventions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/4/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at P.O. Box 391, Penfield, NY 14526. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-9970 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Christopher M. Vanhall, a/k/a Christopher Vanhall; Karon Lewis; NY Financial Services, LLC; Arrow Financial Services, LLC; Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 17, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on October 30, 2013 at 11:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York,

known as 94 Clearview Avenue, Hilton, NY 14468; Tax Account No. 009.673-8.1 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9345 of Deeds, page 287. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $54,256.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: September 2013 Vincent E. Merante, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] KD Granite and Cabinets, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/26/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 76 Louise St., Rochester, NY 14606. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1) Name: Blueprint Educational Consulting Services, LLC. 2) Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on November 5, 2012. 3) County: Monroe. 4) The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5) the Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which the process shall be mailed: 62 Notre Dame Drive. Rochester, NY 14623. 6) Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] MELMAR LAND HOLDINGS, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Mark Freemesser, 1405 Long Pond Rd., Rochester, NY 14626. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] MLA CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/16/13. Office location: Monroe County.

SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 524 Hamlin Parma Townline Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Genesee Energy Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 7/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 15 Babcock Farms Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Valley Energy Services, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 7/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 15 Babcock Farms Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name: POST THIS IS ROCHESTER LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/3/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O POST THIS IS ROCHESTER LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of City View Equestrian, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 4310 Union St, North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of NORTHGATE CAR WASH LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 07/09/2013.County: Monroe.SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 50 Dobson Rd. Rochester NY 14616,Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number 3153987, for Beer, Wine & Liquor has been applied for the undersigned to sell Liquor at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage

Control at 390 Elmridge Center Dr., Rochester, NY 14626 for on-premise consumption. Chinatown Restaurant of Greece Inc.

60 Almay Road, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activities.

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Notice of Formation of AFFORDABLEFURNITUREROCHESTER LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) May 9th, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Legal Zoom, 101 N. Bland Blvd., 11th Floor, Glendale, CA 911203. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a beer & wine license has been applied for by Greece Ridge Family Restaurant Inc. dba, Greece Ridge Family Restaurant, 3400 West Ridge Rd, Rochester, NY 14626, County of Monroe, Town of Greece for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a restaurant beer & wine license has been applied for by Triple Crown Sports Bar & Grill LLC dba, Triple Crown Sports Bar & Grill, 1733 Norton Street, Rochester, NY 14609, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Conversion of Lehigh Station Associates, a partnership, to Lehigh Station Associates, LLC. Certificate filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: Lecesse Development Corp., 75 Thruway Park Dr., West Henrietta, NY 14586, Attn: Salvador Lecesse. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of SEVEN EXPRESS LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 08/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 132 Country Manor Way, Apt 19, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Analusis LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 176 Montpelier Cir, Rochester NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KJN Health & Fitness LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) Nov. 21, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to

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[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of C & D Fitness, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1942 West Ridge Rd., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of COLEMAN ASSOCIATES INTERNATIONAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Course Gems, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o the LLC, Damon Morey LLP, Attn: William F. Savino, Esq., 200 Delaware Ave., Ste. 1200, Buffalo, NY 14202. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CSB Solutions LLC Articles of Organization filed Secretary of State (SSNY) 7/15/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY Designated as agent of LLC upon who process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 35 Wenham Lane Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities.

of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 53 Karlan Dr., Rochester, NY,14617. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Dutton and Company Real Estate Services, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 Capron St, 5C, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities.

County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Grizzly Construction LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Secy. of State (SSNY) 9/23/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: 537 Averill ave. APT 1, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

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Notice of Formation of EAST MOUNTAIN SUNRISE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 25 Farm Field Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of Grovetown Associates LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State (SSNY) 08/30/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 121 University Avenue, Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI 1908 West Ridge Road LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI Boonville LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI Buell Road LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity.

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Notice of Formation of DKNS Express LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 08/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent

Notice of Formation of FSI Sandy Creek Limited Liability Company. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/9/13. Office location: Monroe

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HARVEST MOON PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 359 San Gabriel Dr., Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of J Mazur Consulting LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on 08/30/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 7 Turning Leaf Dr, Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Liberty Recovery Associates LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/28/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is the designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to P.O. Box 30051, Rochester, NY 14603. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability

company (LLC). Name: J. GILLESPIE CARPENTRY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on September 18, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 64 Pannell Road, Fairport,New York 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: FLORAL EXPRESSIONS BY JENNI, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 243 Ogden-Parma Town Line Road, Spencerport, New York 14559. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MANZLER COTTAGE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 14 Eden Field Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MT. HOPE OPS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 21 Vineyard Hill, Fairpoint, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Nearpass Acupuncture, PLLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 9/25/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 800 Ayrault Rd., STE 220, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of NORTH AMERICAN REALTY TRUST LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process

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Legal Ads > page 37 against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Don Trooien at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PITTSFORD OPS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 21 Vineyard Hill, Fairpoint, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ROC CITY ROYALS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/19/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 16778, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of S&J Carthage Properties

LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/02/2013. Office location: Monroe County. Principal office of LLC: 95 Belmont St., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the address of its principal office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SPS FIRE AND SECURITY ROCHESTER, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/24/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 362 COURTLY CIRCLE ROCHESTER, NY 14615. Purpose: LIMIT LIABILITY [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tap Semiotic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 186 Raeburn Avenue, Rochester, NY 14619. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may

be served and shall mail process to: Adam Rains at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Lost Borough Brewing LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 Capri Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of YP & YL ROCHESTER 2, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation: Invenio Recruiting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State of NY (SSNY) on

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8/19/2013. Office Location: Monroe County SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 263 Village Lane, Rochester, NY 14610 Purpose: Any lawful activity.

80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Insurance brokerage.

Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 3484 Monroe Av, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity

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Notice of Qualification of ACC OP (Park Point) LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/9/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Notice of Qualification of My Doggie, LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 9/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Utah on 9/9/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the principal office address of LLC: 33 Arthur St., Rochester, NY 14621. Arts. of Org. filed with Utah Div. of Corps., P.O. Box 146705, Salt Lake City, Utah 84114 . Purpose: real estate investments.

Six GC LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/5/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at c/o Sherm Levey, 145 Culver Rd. Ste. 100, Rochester, NY 14620. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of COLE TAYLOR MORTGAGE, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/20/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of EPM Equipment, LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/20/11. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc. (CSI), 1218 Central Ave., Ste. 100, Albany, NY 12205. DE address of LLC: c/o CSI, 1675 South State St., Ste. B, Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of GALLAGHER VOLUNTARY BENEFITS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/04/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/30/13. Princ. office of LLC: 295 Woodcliff Dr., Ste. 101, Fairport, NY 14450. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co.,

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[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of SWITCH IT COMMUNICATIONS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 05/08/09. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Woods Cove III, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/1/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] SB JOHNSON PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 7/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 21 Davy Dr., Ste. 200, Rochester, NY 14624. General Purpose [ NOTICE ] SHJJ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 8/26/2013.

[ NOTICE ] Stringers, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/19/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 80 Topspin Dr., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] XLNQ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 04/30/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at 85 Friel Road, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] ZBJQ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 6/13/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at PO BOX 676 Henrietta NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] ZJ HEALTHY FOOT CARE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 9/16/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 1694 PENFIELD RD PENFIELD NY 14625 . Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] 2014 Titan Holdings LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on July 8, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 1880 Manitou Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. The purpose of the Company is Real Estate Management

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Victor Asset Acquisition, LLC filed Application for Authority with the New York Department of State on August 29, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 230 Crosskeys Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the LLC is Blue Sky Media Solutions LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on September 9, 2013. The LLC’s office is located in Monroe County, New York State. Process may be serviced on the NY Secretary of State. A copy of the process served shall be mailed to 919 S. Winton Rd, Suite 314, Rochester NY 14618. The LLC is manager-managed. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] EH LEHIGH CORNER PROPERTIES, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on August 20, 2013 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Company Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is 3115 EAST HENRIETTA ROAD, HENRIETTA, NY 14467. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law. [ SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] Index No. 2013-864 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT MONROE COUNTY AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. LAMONT ANTHONY BARTON, JR.; SHEILA GRIFFIN; LINDA BARTON, if living, or if she be dead, her husband, heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successors-in interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said LINDA BARTON, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the

complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective husbands, or widowers of hers, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to plaintiff; CATHERINE GRIFFIN;MARY GRIFFIN; JAMES O. BARTON, JR.; THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; DAIMLERCHRYSLER SERVICES NORTH AMERICA LLC D/B/A DAIMLERCHRYSLER SERVICES NORTH AMERICA D/B/A CHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES; JACOBSTEIN FOOD SERVICE, LLC; EMPIRE PORTFOLIOS, INC.; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC D/B/A IN NEW YORK AS MIDLAND FUNDING OF DELAWARE LLC; COUNTY OF MONROE and “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in the above-entitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: August 28, 2013 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Richard Dollinger, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated September 4, 2013, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose tax liens covering the premises known as 229 Elmdorf Avenue, City of Rochester, New York and identified as Tax Account Number: 120.81-2-54 (“Tax Parcel”). The relief sought is the sale of the subject property at public auction in satisfaction of the tax liens. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $5,884.65, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorneys’ fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Tax Parcel. Anthony J. Iacchetta Phillips Lytle LLP Office and Post Office Address 1400 First Federal Plaza Rochester, New York 14614 Tel. No. (585) 238-2000

Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Recurring Themes

— News of the Weird first reported successful “stool implants” among family members in 2007 (to cure infections such as C. difficile by introducing the donor’s “good” microbes to overcome an imbalance of “bad” bacteria in a relative’s intestine). In 2012, however, two University of California, Davis, neurosurgeons boldly extended the cutting-edge treatment for three patients with a highly malignant brain tumor unresponsive to treatment. The doctors tried infusing bowel bacteria directly into the tumor, but the patients died, nonetheless. Although the patients had given fully informed consent, the school in August 2013 pressured Drs. J. Paul Muizelaar and Rudolph Schrot to resign for having violated internal and FDA procedures. — It is well known that hospitals charge for medical supplies far in excess of what the products would cost at drugstores, but an August New York Times investigation of “saline drips” vividly demonstrated the disconnect. Though Medicare reimburses $1.07 for a 1-liter plastic bag of saltwater (supplied by a subsidiary of Morton Salt), White Plains (N.Y.) Hospital charged patients’ insurance companies like Aetna $91 per bag. Other hospitals decline to charge per-bag, listing only “IV therapy” of, for example, $787 for hooking up the drip. — From the world’s cosmetic-surgery capital (South Korea, where one woman in five has had at least one procedure) comes the “Smile Lipt” offered by Aone Plastic Surgery in the city of Yongin, designed to produce a permanent smile (associated with success). The Smile Lipt turns downward-drooping lip corners upward, to

allow a persistent smile resembling that of Batman’s nemesis, The Joker. — Among the more repugnant paraphilias covered in News of the Weird is toilet-peeping -- men who set up underneath the seats in public outhouses (sometimes wearing a raincoat) and wait for a user to answer nature’s call. In August, Kenneth Enlow, 52, pleaded guilty after a woman found him the month before in a privy in White Water Park in Tulsa County, Okla., “standing with his head and shoulders out of the hole ... covered in feces,” according to a deputy. Enlow’s initial explanation was that his girlfriend had knocked him unconscious with a tire iron and dumped him there. — Another Hard-Working Lawyer: The Dayton Daily News reported in September that an audit of Dayton lawyer Ben Swift (the highest-paid court-appointed public defender in Ohio, at $142,900 in a recent year) revealed several invoices demanding government payment for workdays of more than 20 hours, and in one case, 29. Swift’s attorney said his client was guilty only of bad record-keeping. — Patients with gargantuan tumors, but intimidated by the cost of treatment, create the possibility that by the time they can afford an operation, the tumor itself will be heavier than the post-surgery patient. A 63-year-old man in Bakersfield, Calif., finally had surgery in August, after 14 years’ waiting during which his set of tumors grew to 200 pounds. Bakersfield surgeon Vip Dev noted that the sprawled tumors dragged the floor when the man sat and that the surgery was complicated by the patient’s shape, which could not be accommodated by the hospital’s MRI and CT scan machines.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 34 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’ll attract a diverse range of partners. Engage in pastimes you find exhilarating and keep any suitor you meet guessing for the time being. Taking a moment to enjoy life and to see what each individual you meet has to offer will lead to the best long-term partner. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A mental connection will be what counts. If you cannot relate to someone or you don’t have the same values and life goals, it’s best to take a pass and move on to someone new. Passion is highlighted, but physical chemistry alone won’t bring you closer to a commitment.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Keep it real in the bedroom and honest when you are talking about long-term commitment. Venturing down a path that is destined to be a disaster is likely if you don’t play fair and lay down your ground rules right from the beginning. Share your true feelings. CANCER (June 21-July 22): A change of heart and plans is apparent if you are overly possessive. Giving the person you love space will create a healthy relationship with the potential to go the distance. If you cannot trust the one you are with, you are with the wrong one.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll find plenty of action if you get out and socialize. Don’t let anyone restrict your freedom. Be prepared to jump ship and move on to someone who shares your values and can relate to your flirtatious and outgoing personality. Choose someone who has as much charisma as you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Lean on your friends for help. Don’t believe everything someone looking for a quick adventure has to say. You are better off to protect your heart and rely on the people who care about you most for advice when it comes to a fast-talking lover taking advantage of you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Easy does it. When it comes to love, you will attract all sorts of partners. Expect to encounter someone who is aggressive and persistent. You may be attracted to the attention you are receiving, but let caution be your guide. Protect your reputation. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t rule out someone who differs from you. An unusual relationship is likely to develop with someone you least expect. Follow through and see where it leads, and you will not be disappointed. Don’t question your differences -- embrace what you have to offer each other.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Explore new venues, avenues, people, places and pastimes. It’s the element of surprise and the need for something different that will lead you in totally unique directions when it comes to love. Enjoy the moment, but be aware of the obstacles involved. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Past lovers will surface and should be granted a second chance. Don’t let a stubborn attitude stand between you and your happiness. Use your experience and expertise, and you can control the situation and the future. Don’t turn down a chance to be with someone special.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t expect friends or family to be happy with your choice of partners. You’ll be attracted to someone who lives life on the edge. Excitement is within reach, as is an experimental look at love and making a rather unusual but fulfilling life with someone unique. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Look at the long-term possibilities and make your romantic choice based on what you can accomplish with your partner, not your physical attraction to someone. Being swept off your feet is fun, but it doesn’t usually end in laughter. Focus on what’s actually being offered.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39

40 CITY OCTOBER 16-22, 2013


October 16-22, 2013 - City Newspaper