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EVENTS: GCVM FALL FEST, MAG “MEMORY THEATRE” 21 FILM: “DON JON,” “RUSH” 28 RESTAURANT REVIEW: BISTRO HAN 11 URBAN JOURNAL: THE FIGHTS DOWNTOWN

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 39

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THE SPITS

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 43 No 4

News. Music. Life.

It’s the original instrument, besides beating on stuff with sticks.” MUSIC FEATURE, PAGE 14

School board doesn’t trust suspension data. RCSD, PAGE 5

Conscience incorporated. NEWS, PAGE 6

Kiln time: Genesee Pottery’s “History in the Making.” ART REVIEW, PAGE 20

Best of Rochester 2013: voting continues. DETAILS, PAGE 31

JUSTICE | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 8 | PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Court of second chances Darryl Ballard (pictured) says he knows he’s lucky that he’s not in prison. Ballard cussed out a Rochester police officer two years ago while the officer was engaged in an altercation with Ballard’s best friend. Ballard was arrested, too, and charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. But it could have been much worse. “I could have been charged with a felony and I could have done real time,” he says.

And that might have been Ballard’s fate if not for the Rochester Teen Court. Ballard is one of more than 1,000 area teens who have participated in the court since it began 15 years ago. Ballard says that the court helped him get counseling to control his anger, and he credits it with giving him a second chance. “If it wasn’t for Teen Court, I don’t know where I’d be right now,” he says. “My life wasn’t going well.”

Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @ roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Where’s City’s anti-war voice?

I’ve been in the anti-war movement since the Vietnam days. One thing on which we could always rely was the loud and continuing support of liberals – until now. President Peace Prize has involved America in more foreign military adventures than any president in history, and your near-silence is deafening. Obama, Hillary Clinton, and John Kerry, formerly anti-war activists, have sold their souls for political power and today are among the most hawkish figures in public life. What’s City’s excuse?

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FRANK PAOLO

Warren can bring important change

You stated that “Richard’s withdrawal turns the focus to the changes ahead under a Warren or White administration – in schools and development” (“Theories and Questions for a Post-Richards Race”). I think City News misses the significance of Rochester’s first black woman mayor. Lovely Warren could be a game-changer on a spiritual level. She does not fit the mold of a city manager. We have problems that go deeper than simple fixing, with poverty, crime, racism, education, etc. Rochester needs change from within, but we the people seem unwilling to get involved. Maybe Rochesterians are just too conservative, too resistant to change for their own good. I am one who resists change. But maybe a Mayor Lovely Warren can awaken the spirit of change. This could be the beginning of a new era for the city and the region. Think of all the

ideas that need to be heard. Think of all the potential involvement of our people. Perhaps she can kindle a flame that can spread throughout Monroe County. HARRY S. PEARLE

The path to health care reform

“The discoveries of healing science must be the inheritance of all. That is clear. Disease must be attacked, whether it occurs in the poorest or the richest man or woman simply on the ground that it is the enemy; and it must be attacked just in the same way as the fire brigade will give its full assistance to the humblest cottage as readily as to the most important mansion. Our policy is to create a national health service in order to ensure that everybody in the country, irrespective of means, age, sex, or occupation, shall have equal opportunities to benefit from the best and most up-to-date medical and allied services available.” – Winston Churchill, 1947. Most European countries have national health services that cover all citizens and even residents. And they’ve done so for decades. I know: I’ve lived in England, Germany, Greece, and Portugal. What is our problem? Looks to me like it’s a combination of classism and racism: “if you’re not making enough to pay for medical care, it’s because you’re lazy – and besides, you’re probably African-American or Latino-American.” Surely it’s not an accident that the Tea Party is largely European-American. One solution would be an effective multi-party system – Tea Party, Republicans, Democrats, Socialists, etc. – that really worked, like, say Germany. Of course, neither of the two ruling parties would support that. If we can’t have that, how about elections where candidates don’t have to sell themselves to wealthy contributors and lobbying groups, then repay them with legislative favors? In Mexico, that counts as corruption. In the US, it’s legal – and has become essential if you want to get elected.

And if the rich can buy your vote, they might not want you to raise their taxes to support those lazy folks who don’t work hard enough to deserve health care. So what’s left? You might consider moving to Canada. Or Europe. If we don’t like the way things are going and want to stay in the US, we have to work to change the system. PACHO LANE

Behavior issues, in school and out

While responses with “aggression and defensiveness” might unfortunately be relevant to the culture of some students in their neighborhoods, it is not appropriate for schools, and when it becomes disruptive to the learning of other students it is unacceptable (“School Board Members Don’t Trust Suspension Data,” News Blog). [School Board member Cynthia] Elliot seems to justify behavior that is harming the ability of all students to learn. Inside a school building it is a pretty easy objective to measure, independent of racial/gender/ cultural factors, when behavior of some students creates a roadblock to the learning of the majority of students by disrupting learning and instruction. If Ms. Elliot is not aware of some of the ridiculous behavior that is displayed by some students on a regular basis that merits suspension, she might want to spend a little more time in school buildings to earn some of the $20K+ she’s earning yearly as a school board representative. RCSD PARENT

The mayor should call a press conference and call out the so-called black community (Richards Demands Plan to Stop Youth Fights,” News Blog). It’s a community issue (home, community, then all else), a “cultural crisis.” As an AfricanAmerican grassroots leadership advocate, I am disheartened, disgusted, and embarrassed over the so-called black community’s inability to manage its future. NEHAST KAWAIDA

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly October 2-8, 2013 Vol 43 No 4 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial interns: Trevor Lewis, Colin McCoy Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Photography intern: Larissa Coe Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales operations: Matt Walsh New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Christine Kubarycz, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Teenagers, fights, and downtown Rochester You’ve read the stories: As hundreds of teenagers change RTS buses downtown after school, fights erupt, crowds gather, chaos ensues, and the police try to restore order. The fights don’t happen every day. But they happen often enough to be a serious problem. And last week, the chaos had a new element: somebody fired a gun. Nobody was hurt, but that’s the only piece of good news out of this mess. Downtown office workers feel intimidated. Business owners, restaurateurs, rental agents, and developers are worried. Mayor Tom Richards issued a stern warning to school district officials: The district’s current student transportation system, which deposits several hundred high school students on Main Street every afternoon, is “unacceptable and cannot continue.” So school district officials are talking to transit officials, whose buses highschool students ride to and from school. Bus routes will change, presumably. The district will assign personnel to be present downtown during the transfer periods. And the Rochester Police Department will, in Richards’ words, “continue to deploy significant resources to deal with problems that may arise.” And everybody will cross their fingers, I guess. This is such a delicate time for downtown Rochester. You can see the little spurts of new life: more people living there, new businesses opening, new apartments and condos under way. And the arts and entertainment offerings downtown are simply exploding. This didn’t happen by accident. The city has offered strategic incentives, and developers have responded with major investments. But these are little steps forward – important steps, to be sure, but little steps. And it won’t take much to reverse them. Government officials, school district officials, transit officials, and business leaders will continue to huddle and try to figure out what to do about the convergence of crowds of teenagers downtown after school. I hope the conversation continues after the bus routes are changed. Because the bus routes aren’t the problem. They make it easier for the problem to break out, by depositing large numbers of people in one area, but they’re not the problem. Remember the Memorial Day when Seabreeze amusement park closed because of

Something’s going on among Rochester teenagers that we need to understand. And rerouting buses deals with the end result, not the cause. rumors that fights were being planned over social media? Remember the fights at this year’s Lilac Festival? Remember the fights last month at the Regal Cinema in Irondequoit? These had nothing to do with bus transfers on Main Street. (And then there was the day when police were alerted to a crowd of teenagers headed downtown, walking, from East High School.) Something’s going on among Rochester’s young people that we need to understand – and find a way to deal with. And rerouting buses simply deals with the end result, not the cause. The fights are like boils erupting. That doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t redo the bus routes. We should. The convergence of hundreds of teenagers on Main Street downtown has created a condition in which fights can not only break out but can make the area unsafe, for other students and for people who work, live, or visit downtown. Students have the same right as everyone else to be downtown. But no group of people can, by their numbers and their actions, so intimidate others that they take control of the space. The number of students involved in the fights is small. But the crowds that gather around them are not. That magnifies the intimidation, and the danger. This is a complex issue, but that hasn’t stopped people from pointing fingers and shifting responsibility: It’s the school district’s responsibility to fix this! It’s the cops’ responsibility! And, of course: It’s the parents’ fault! Heidi Zimmer-Meyer, president of the Rochester Downtown Development Corporation, took a different tack when I talked with her late last week. continues on page 7 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

County sued

The family of former Monroe Community Hospital patient Samuel Condello has filed a lawsuit against the county. Todd Spring, the hospital’s former chief administrator, allegedly took away Condello’s wheelchair as a disciplinary action. Spring was eventually terminated. The lawsuit seeks unspecified damages.

We’re No. 2

The state Comptroller’s Office released its list of fiscally stressed municipalities, and former list-topper Monroe County dropped to No. 2. The county was surpassed by Rockland County. The Comptroller’s Office’s scoring takes into account several factors, including debts, operating deficits, fixed costs, population demographics, employment base, and sales tax revenues.

Camera suit heard

A written decision in the lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the City of Rochester’s use of red light cameras is expected in November. Arguments were heard by State Supreme Court Justice Scott Odorisi last week. Local attorney Lawrence Krieger filed the suit, claiming that the cameras violate the Fifth Amendment right to due process.

Rochester General and Unity tie knot

News

The boards of directors for Rochester General Health System and Unity Health System approved plans to merge the two organizations into one system that will be managed by one board. The organizations will be equal partners in the merger. The agreement requires state and federal regulatory approvals.

Unemployment drops

Preliminary data indicates a nearly 8 percent drop in the Rochester area’s unemployment rate from August 2012 to August 2013. But the data also shows that Rochester lost about 800 jobs from a year ago.

Dems appoint new airport board member

Legislator Willie Joe Lightfoot resigned from the Monroe County Airport Authority board. Legislator and fellow Democrat Cynthia Kaleh will take his place, pending confirmation by the Legislature. Lightfoot has criticized the board, saying it doesn’t provide adequate oversight of the airport administration. But Republicans say that Lightfoot was chronically absent from meetings.

Brick-N-Motor was the impetus for the Town of Henrietta to consider permitting food trucks and carts. FILE PHOTO

FOOD TRUCKS | BY JEREMY MOULE

The hots for Henrietta A proposed law would clear the way for food trucks and carts to operate on private properties with industrial or commercial zoning in the town of Henrietta. But the law would also require permits for the owners of the “mobile food vehicles,” as well as for the property owners who host the vehicles. The latter permit would include specific areas on the sites where the vehicles can park. Any changes to the permits would have to be approved by the Town Board.

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Town Board member Bill Mulligan says that the dual permits are meant to keep the food trucks and carts from “bouncing around” the town. The Town Board will hold a public hearing on the proposal at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, October 2, at Town Hall, 475 Calkins Road. The impetus for the law was the Brick-N-Motor food truck, which started making lunchtime stops at Eagle’s Landing Business Park on Jefferson Road earlier this year. Paul Vroman, who co-owns and operates Brick-N-Motor, says that

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the proposed law is a good start, but that property owners shouldn’t have to get a permit. Food truck operators should be responsible for identifying potential sites and securing the necessary approvals, he says. “There are too many steps to be taken to get a spot,” he says. Vroman says he agrees that food truck and cart proprietors should get the owner’s permission to operate on a property. But the process of adding spots should be simpler, he says.

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Rochester school board member Cynthia Elliott questions whether teachers, who are largely white and female, fully understand and have been trained on how to respond to some student behaviors that may seem inappropriate, but are culturally relevant.

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Chardae Parr, 17, of Rochester

ROCHESTER TOTALS —

SOURCE: Rochester Police Department AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Suspension suspicion

Our fault

Rochester school board members got some good news recently about suspensions. According to a new report, short- and longterm suspensions in the school district have dropped significantly, from 11,000 in the 2007 to 2008 school year to 5,500 in 2012 to 2013. But most board members don’t trust the data. District officials concede that the way disciplinary problems are reported varies from school to school. And they say that even data from as recently as two years ago isn’t thorough. Board members are trying to determine if suspensions are effective or if they just remove students from classrooms and reduce instruction time. Board members Cynthia Elliott, Van White, and Mary Adams say that they are also concerned that the disciplinary actions are more severe for African American and Latino students than they are for other students. Elliott questions whether teachers, who are largely white and female, fully understand and have been trained on how to respond to some behaviors that may seem inappropriate, but are culturally relevant. Many city students respond with aggression or defensiveness, she says, because they need to protect themselves in the neighborhoods where they live. And she questions whether policies rooted in zero-tolerance ideology are actually contributing to problem behavior.

In a long-awaited report, the world’s top climate scientists say that there’s no longer room to doubt or deny that climate change is happening and that human activity is the largest contributing factor. | While scientists were already certain that human activity is driving global warming, the report concludes that “It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century.” | Since preindustrial times, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have increased by 40 percent, largely because of fossil fuel emissions and land-use changes. The oceans have absorbed about 30 percent of the emitted carbon dioxide, which is causing ocean acidification. | The report says that by the end of the century, global average temperatures will likely increase by 1.5 degrees Celsius, and a 2 degrees Celsius increase is more likely than not. Scientists consider a 2-degree increase to be the tipping point beyond which serious changes will happen on a global scale. | The report also says that Arctic sea ice will very likely continue to shrink. Increasing atmospheric carbon concentrations are also likely, the IPCC says, and that’ll lead to increasing ocean acidification.

White says that parents need to be better informed about their legal rights when it comes to school discipline. Most parents don’t appeal suspensions, he says, because they don’t Cynthia Elliott. know that’s an option. PHOTO PROVIDED And Adams says that she has requested more information from the Rochester Police Department about its contact with city students. Monroe, Wilson Commencement Academy, East, School of the Arts, Charlotte, and School 17 had the most suspensions last year. Most are short-term, in-school suspensions for incidents involving minor altercations, disruptive behavior, and assaults that caused physical injury. Bringing weapons to school, and possessing and selling drugs were other leading causes for suspensions. Suspensions occurred in nearly every grade last year, but the majority was clustered in grades 7 through 9. While Superintendent Bolgen Vargas has renewed emphasis on data collection, school officials say that it’s not easy. A fight, for example, could be reported a few different ways.

2,280 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,103 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to September 30. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from September 20 to September 26: -- Staff Sgt. Liam J. Nevins, 32, Denver, Colo. -- Staff Sgt. Timothy R. McGill, 30, Ramsey, N.J. -- Spc. Joshua J. Strickland, 23, Woodstock, Ga. -- Lt. Cmdr. Landon L. Jones, 35, Lompoc, Calif. -- Chief Warrant Officer Jonathan S. Gibson, 32, Aurora, Ore. -- Staff Sgt. Thomas A. Baysore, Jr., 31, Milton, Pa. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

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CITY 5

CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY | BY JEREMY MOULE

Conscience incorporated When Liz Brenna got serious about starting her own consulting firm, she decided it would be as focused on the greater good as it is on turning a profit. But she couldn’t find a suitable option under the state’s business laws. So Brenna worked to get her company, Socially Good Business, certified as a B Corporation. The nonprofit B Lab administers the certification, which requires companies to meet rigorous workplace, social, and environmental criteria. It also requires them to make ongoing improvements in those areas to retain their designation. “It’s basically saying that our ability to sustain ourselves as a business, to create a profit, is equal to our desire as a business to conduct ourselves in a way that benefits society and the planet,” Brenna says. Socially Good Business helps its clients integrate positive social and environmental practices into their companies’ cultures and branding. It was the first B Corp — the B stands for “Benefit” — in the Rochester area, though recently Staach and Brand Cool have also been certified. The three local businesses are part of a growing national movement of companies that place equal emphasis on profits and fulfilling social and environmental missions. Nationally, the B Corp ranks include Method, which makes non-toxic cleaning products; the Cabot dairy cooperative; the worker-owned King Arthur Flour Company; and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. To get certified, each company has to complete a detailed assessment of employee pay, benefits, and working conditions; energy conservation and renewable energy use; and community-focused efforts like employee volunteer programs. The assessment scores are listed at www.bcorporation.net. The companies also have to make sure that their legal documents include environmental and social commitments as part of their corporate structure. “It puts sustainability into the DNA of the company so that when it grows, brings in outside capital, plans secession, has new leadership or management, that core commitment remains,” says Katie Kerr, a spokesperson for B Lab. Brenna spent several years working in

marketing for Ben & Jerry’s and says she saw a company that integrates social and environmental values into everything it does. As a company, Ben & Jerry’s is known as much for its progressive campaigns on marriage equality, climate change, and election finance reform as it is for its ice cream. Brenna started Socially Good Business as a way to take the practices she learned at Ben & 6 CITY

OCTOBER 2-8, 2013

Jerry’s and to help other companies apply them. She calls her business a societal and environmental integrity development agency. Its staff helps companies set up and follow through with things like Fair Trade certification, employee volunteer programs, vendor social and environmental standards, and responsible sourcing initiatives. Brenna says that corporate social and environmental responsibility shouldn’t be a marketing gimmick. “To truly do it the right way you have to incorporate it into every nook and cranny of your business,” she says. Like Brenna, Brand Cool CEO Sue Kochan was looking for a better model of running a business — one where profits and doing “something good and valuable in the world” are on equal footing. So as the business went forward, Kochan says, the company made sure that there were policies and programs in place to benefit staff and the community. Brand Cool was certified as a B Corp in August. On its assessment, Brand Cool scored highest on the employee and community impact categories. Kochan says that was a welcome affirmation of the company’s values and practices. Brand Cool does pro-bono work, including an upcoming Ad Council of Rochester campaign meant to increase organ donor registrations. It also has programs for its employees to serve on volunteer boards and marketing committees. And each time it gets a new client, Kochan says, the company makes a donation to Foodlink. When it comes to taking on clients, Brand Cool sticks with companies that are in line with the Brand Cool’s social and community values, Kochan says. “We want to work with clients that are really making a difference in the world and really paying attention to how they do business, if they’ve adopted responsible business practices,” she says. One of the company’s clients is Sodexo, a massive global firm that provides everything from institutional

food and laundry services to employee benefits programs. Brand Cool is building a wastereduction toolkit for the company’s food, cleaning, landscaping, and janitorial services sites. The idea is to build an interactive, engaging program that encourages site managers to embrace waste reduction, not just do the bare minimum. Kochan says that the B Corp approach has worked well for Brand Cool. The company’s revenues are up, she says, and it is adding staff. Last year the company was No. 15 on the Rochester Top 100, a list of the region’s fastest-growing private businesses. Staach manufactures furniture, placing an emphasis on

environmentallyfriendly practices. Seth Eshelman, an RIT grad, founded Staach as a small design studio. He says he figured that he could design products and subcontract out the Liz Brenna owns Socially Good Business. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN manufacturing. But he says that he had difficulty finding someone to The company has a living wage standard produce the products to the quality and for employees, and when it’s looked for environmental standards he wanted. facilities, Sherman says, it’s tried to find places “I ended up realizing, ‘Well, OK, if I can’t find someone else to do it, I might as well just that are well-lit by daylight, because it creates a more pleasant work environment. try to do it myself,’” Eshelman says. But the idea for Staach to pursue B Corp One advantage of the B Corp certification is that it builds consumer and client certification came from Anne Sherman, the confidence, Sherman says. It shows that company’s director of sustainability. The the company is committed to socially and idea grew out of her master’s degree thesis environmentally beneficial practices, she says. on measuring sustainability in business; she “We think it’s really important to bring used Staach as the model for her thesis and ourselves to a higher standard and verify that also integrated the B Corps assessment into as well, which is what the certification is really her work. about,” Sherman says. Sherman says that almost all of the business Staach receives is because of its environmental standards. The company’s furniture is made from Forest Stewardship Council-certified wood, and Staach also uses water-based paints, which are less toxic than other paints, Sherman says, and healthier for the company’s employees.

Teenagers, fights continues from page 3

“The adults in this community have failed these young people,” she said. And she means everybody: parents, schools, government, politicians, businesses, institutions…. Everybody has to take responsibility, Zimmer-Meyer said. “We can not run away from it.” As we talked about the fights, Zimmer-Meyer also brought up the low graduation rate in Rochester schools, most of whose students are black or Hispanic – and the high incarceration rate of black men… and poverty. Zimmer-Meyer is right: these are all related. We can’t talk about problems like graduation rates and Main Street fights in isolation. We have to address them all, and all at the same time. What should we do? Zimmer-Meyer cited the need for jobs, for job training, for the school district to do a better job…. But she also honed in on the key issue: the poverty that we have allowed to grow in the core of this community. Many of the city’s schools have student poverty rates of more than 90 percent. We can keep denying that this concentration has an effect, we can keep blaming teachers or police or city officials or parents – or we can take the gunshot downtown last week as a wake-up call. Obviously we have to stop the fights – on Main Street, in movie theaters, and elsewhere. But insisting that the school district and police bear the sole responsibility for doing it is a lazy bit of buck-passing. Where are the school parents’ groups? The ministers? The staffs of the settlement houses and rec centers? The neighborhood groups? And by the way: stopping the fights downtown will be futile if that’s all we do. The teenagers and young adults for whom violence is now part of the culture will find other venues for their score settling. It isn’t that we haven’t tried to do something for Rochester’s young people. Every time you turn around, you see news of another initiative: in education, in health care, in childhood development. We have to keep doing those things, and strengthen them. But what are we doing about the poverty and the culture it is breeding? That is a much harder thing to tackle – hard even to talk about. But until we start, we’ll keep treating eruptions of the boils, not the underlying cause.

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CITY 7

Court of second chances D JUSTICE | | | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | | |

Darryl Ballard says he knows he’s lucky that he’s not in prison. A short young man with a slight build and dreadlocks pulled back from his boyish face, Ballard says that, two years ago, he cussed out a Rochester police officer while the officer was engaged in an altercation with Ballard’s best friend. Things got out of hand, Ballard says, and he was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. “At first, I couldn’t believe it,” he says. “I had never been arrested before.” Ballard, who’d recently returned to Rochester, spent the night in jail because, he says, he father couldn’t afford bail. “It was frightening,” he says. “I was in there with all these older guys who’ve done all kinds of stuff. And I didn’t know what they were going to do. It was scary. I just stayed up all night.” But it could have been much worse, he says. His scuffle with the officer could have easily turned into a far more serious charge. “I could have been charged with a felony and I could have done real time,” he says. And that might’ve been Ballard’s fate if not for the Rochester Teen Court, which offers some young offenders an alternative to the traditional criminal justice system. Ballard’s misdemeanor charge and his clean record made him eligible for the court, and he got his second chance. “If it wasn’t for Teen Court, I don’t know where I’d be right now,” he says. “My life wasn’t going well.” Ballard is one of more than 1,000 area teens who have participated in the court since it began 15 years ago. Ballard says that the court helped him get counseling to control his anger. Though he’s good in math and technology, Ballard says that he wants to go to Monroe Community College to pursue music and art. He says that prior to his experience with Teen Court, going to college wasn’t a priority. Even though the Teen Court is highly regarded by local educators, law enforcement, social workers, and attorneys who work 8 CITY

OCTOBER 2-8, 2013

with youth and their families, it came close to being shut down this year due mainly to funding cuts. If Teen Court shut down, the impact would be felt most by teens like Ballard, who are among the area’s most vulnerable and at risk. The cost to taxpayers could climb, and an opportunity for many young people to become productive citizens would be lost.

Darryl Ballard went through Teen Court first as a defendant and later as a juror. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

T

The Rochester Teen Court was created under former mayor William Johnson. A small contingency of professionals involved with young people and Family Court traveled to Galveston, Texas to learn about that city’s teen court. The group was led by Van White, who was special counsel on crime initiatives in the Johnson administration and now sits on the Rochester school board, and US District Court Judge Frank Geraci. “Our response to crime was comprehensive,” White says. “It was a three-pronged approach: prevention, intervention, and interdiction. The teen court Rochester modeled after Galveston’s was about both prevention and intervention.” The concept of youth justice dates back to the late 1800’s, and the special courts are sometimes called “youth” or “peer” courts. Prior to the 19th century, children over the age of 5 were considered mature or miniature adults, writes DeMica Robinson, in a study for Wilson County, Tennessee concerning the effectiveness of teen courts. Back then, children who got into trouble were usually placed in work situations under apprenticeships or subjected to church discipline methods, where they often received public whippings and floggings. There are about 4,000 teen courts operating in cities throughout the US, and there are several different versions. The Rochester Teen Court is a voluntary option for youth ages 16 to 19 who have committed low-level, nonviolent, first-time offenses. It doesn’t cost them anything, but the offer comes with some rules.

CITY NEWSPAPER | COVER STORY

First, the court is a sentencing court. When a City Court judge offers a teen defendant the option of going through Teen Court, it’s with the clear understanding that the teen acknowledges guilt. The case is heard by the presiding judge, and the defendant’s attorney and a prosecutor are present for some training and technical guidance.

But the defendants are represented by peer attorneys, and it’s the job of peer prosecutors to seek the sentence they think is appropriate from a jury composed of the defendant’s peers. Some of the jurors and all of the peer attorneys are volunteers, often motivated by their interests in criminal justice or law. In exchange for completing the terms of the sentence, the defendant’s record is sealed.

(top) Kashii VanHook served as a teen attorney so she could learn more about the legal profession. PHOTO BY LARISSA COE

Sentencing might include community service, a presentation or written essay about the crime and its impact on others, and an apology to those who were hurt. Defendants may also be required to receive counseling for drug or alcohol dependency or anger management, and they have to agree to serve as teen jurors in at least three cases.

M

Most teens who qualify for Teen Court do

choose that option, says City Council member Elaine Spaull. Spaull is also director of the Center for Youth, where much of the Teen Court program is administered. “The goal here is to make this first offense the last one,” she says. “This is serious. This isn’t a game we’re playing here. If you don’t complete the sentence, you’ll go right back to the regular court. And that’s not going to be good. You’re not going to like what happens there.” When the program hit a financial hurdle this year due to severe budget cuts by the Rochester school district — one of its biggest funders — Spaull scrambled to fill the gap. “Ask anyone who knows about youth and criminal justice in this city and they’ll tell you this program works,” she says. The Rochester Police Department gave Spaull informal data showing that teenagers who go through the court have an approximate 15 percent recidivism rate. The data isn’t perfect because the RPD is unable to track teenagers who leave the area, Spaull says. But she says that’s a small number. That falls in line with recent studies on youth courts. A report funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and the Urban Institute followed 500 young people in four states who went through youth courts. A year later, the recidivism rate was in the single digits. That’s dramatically lower than it is for teenagers who go through the regular system, Spaull says. Recidivism for that group in most cities is roughly 39 percent, she says. The vast majority of the youth who go through Rochester’s Teen Court are city school students. But the court is seeing more students from the suburbs, Spaull says. And the students are a mix of males and females, she says.

(bottom) Rochester Teen Court proceedings are adjudicated by a City Court justice. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

The crimes are what you might expect from the average teenager, says Justice Frank Geraci, a big supporter of the Teen Court. Shoplifting, trespassing, stealing, drug possession, and minor fights and altercations make up the majority, he says. Sometimes called “gateway crimes,” they’re often symptoms of bigger problems in a young person’s life, Geraci says. “If we could deal with the underlying problems, we could reduce crimes overall,” he says. The judge or teen attorney may ask questions like, “What is your home life like? What is your GPA? How many days of school have you missed so far this year? Do you use marijuana? When was the last time you used it?” The idea is to slow the justice system down, Geraci says. Judges normally don’t have the opportunity to learn all of the extenuating circumstances that might be influencing a young defendant’s life, he says. As an example, Geraci cites a case that, he says is never far from his mind. “One young woman wasn’t going to school, and when she was, she would get into these fights,” he says. “But we found out that she was taking care of her two young siblings and dealing with a drug-addicted mother. We were able to identify the problem she was having — a lot for a young person her age to be dealing with. But we were able to hook her up to the resources to not only help her, but begin to address the problems her mother was having.” Studies show that the other reason youth courts work has to do with the teenage peers. Contrary to the impression that many people have — that youth courts are a slap on the wrist or “kiddie” courts — teenagers can be especially tough on their peers. And they understand, perhaps better than almost anyone else, what may be happening to the teenager sitting across from them, says city school board president Malik Evans. Evans was one of the first students to volunteer as a teen attorney. He says that there’s often a dynamic that happens between teens. They know when they’re being conned, he says, and they’re not afraid to call the person on it.

But they also know what questions to ask and where to look for problems, Evans says. They’re able to communicate with one another in ways that adults, including parents and family members, sometimes find too difficult, he says. And Teen Court offers an incredible educational opportunity for students, Evans says. “You learn how to speak in front of others and present your ideas to make your point,” he says. “And you learn about the judicial system.” Kashii VanHook just finished volunteering as a teen attorney. The 17-year-old senior at Greece Athena High School says that she is giving serious thought to going into law, and Teen Court gave her the opportunity to see how the criminal justice system works. “It’s a learning experience for everyone involved,” VanHook says. “I could see that it really helped them [teen defendants] to open their minds and turn themselves around. It helped me because I am interested in psychology, social work, and the law. And I learned that sometimes people deserve a second chance. I really don’t think most of them will make the same mistake again.”

Sometimes it takes an event like this for some young people to know that people care about them, she says. “When they’re there in the courtroom, they’re frightened because they don’t want to go to jail,” she says. “Nobody wants that. But sometimes it takes something like this for them to realize that people are trying to help them.” VanHook remembers one young girl who was caught shoplifting. “Her mother was there in court with her,” she says. “The mom really loved her child and was trying everything she could to help her. In fact, I never found one situation where the mom wasn’t there fighting for her child. When you see that, that’s powerful.”

I

It’s ironic that youth courts like Rochester

Teen Court fall prey to budget cuts because most research shows that they are one of the most cost-effective tools available in the criminal justice system, says former mayor William Johnson. This year’s budget for Rochester Teen Court is about $100,000. The adult attorneys and continues on page 10

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CITY 9

Court of second chances continues from page 9

Teen jurors are sworn in before hearing a case. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

judges involved with the court often donate their time. “This is a special court that doesn’t need a lot of money,” Johnson says. “Think about it. Incarcerating one teen for a year can cost up to $150,000. And all we’re trying to do is keep minor offenses from turning into major problems.” “Almost every college campus today has something comparable when issues come up,

And once they enter into the criminal justice system, even for minor offenses, they are passengers in what many sociologists and judicial experts call the “cradle to prison pipeline.” Each year, New York’s criminal courts see 16 and 17 year olds — as many as 50,000 — who face the possibility of prosecution as adults. And more than 74 percent of the time, according to the Children’s Defense Fund,

“I learned that sometimes people deserve a second chance. I really don’t think most of them will make the same mistake again.” like cheating or plagiarism,” he says. “They try to find a solution before this disrupts your whole college education and career. What good would that do any of us? And I look at Teen Court in a similar way.” But keeping young people out of the criminal justice system even for minor incidents is harder than you might think. Society’s attitude toward juvenile crime has changed over the last 30 years. Not long ago, if a young person got into minor trouble, he might have to work a couple of weekends to pay for the neighbor’s broken window, for example. That’s not the case today, particularly in urban environments where people often don’t know their neighbors well. Even a minor schoolyard fight can have unintended consequences. A 16-year-old can be tried as an adult in North Carolina and New York. Advocates of the “Raise the Age” program want the age limit raised to at least 18 because, they say, teens often can’t control their impulses and they make poor decisions as a result. 10 CITY OCTOBER 2-8, 2013

it’s for misdemeanors. Most of these young people are black and Latino. “What changed about a dozen or so years ago was we adopted programs with zero tolerance,” says Judith Kaye, former chief judge of the New York Court of Appeals. Most often these teenagers are from poor households, she says. They need guidance, Kaye says, and for a variety of reasons, they aren’t getting it. These are the same young people who get stopped and frisked, she says, and they’re also the ones most likely to drop out of school. Even a minor brush with the law can be a critical junction in the life of a young person, Kaye says. While there must be consequences for minor crimes, she says, the goal needs to be intervention that prevents escalation. “If we drop them, we’re putting them on a path to prison,” she says. “And our prisons are already filled.”

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Women’s group talk

Church Women United will present a Day of Reflection from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Friday, October 4. CWU, a racially diverse and inclusive Christian women’s group, will present the talk, “Well-behaved Women Seldom Make History,” which will be given by the Rev. Shirley Pudney-Eilers. Cost: $3. A light lunch will be provided, but call in advance for headcount purposes, 342-2790. The event will be held at Morganville United Church of Christ, 8466 Morganville Road, Stafford, NY.

Giffords at RIT

RIT will present “Endeavor to Succeed,” a talk by Mark Kelly and former Representative Gabrielle Giffords at 2 p.m. on

Saturday, October 12. Giffords was elected to Congress in 2006 and then re-elected in 2008 and 2010. But a gunman opened fire at an event in Tucson, Arizona and Gifford sustained a serious head wound. The event will be held at the Gordon Field House and Activities Center. Tickets: $25 for general public admission.

Film about religious life

The Lifetree Café will host “Only One Way to God? Can One Religion Really Have All the Answers?” a film and discussion about Valerie Winn at 7 p.m. on Monday, October 7. Winn describes her spiritual journey through many religions, and how they each shaped her life. The event will be held at 1301 Vintage Lane.

Peace workers report on wars

The Nazareth College Peace and Justice Center will host Kathy Kelly and

Buddy Bell of Creative Non-violence and Cathy Breen of New York Catholic Workers to talk about “Reports from War Zones” at 7 p.m. on Thursday, October 3, at the Nazareth Shults Center. They will make a second presentation on Friday, October 4, at the Flying Squirrel Community Center, 285 Clarissa Street. There will be a potluck at 6 p.m. and the talk will begin at 7 p.m. The three have traveled extensively to Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria and have talked with victims of drone attacks.

Penfield recycling

Penfield will host a one-day recycling event from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, October 5, at its public works complex, 1607 Jackson Road. Many different kinds of materials can be recycled: electronics, metals, paper documents for shredding, and brush and plant debris.

Dining pooling juices and melted fat on your plate for extra flavor. Scallion pancakes ($3) are lovely fried cakes, with layers that are crisp on the outside and chewy in the middle. I wish more of the oniony flavor came through, but the salt, fat, and acidic dipping sauce still hit the spot. Fried pork dumplings ($4 for six) are soft

Steamed pork belly buns (left) and mini cuttlefish small plate with szechuan peppercorn oil (right) from Han Bistro. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

A taste of Asia in the midst of Fairport Bistro Han PERINTON HILLS SHOPPING CENTER, FAIRPORT 223-7333, BISTROHAN.COM MONDAY-THURSDAY 11 A.M.-9 P.M., FRIDAY-SATURDAY 11 A.M.-9:30 P.M., SUNDAY 4-9 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY LAURA REBECCA KENYON

The first items arriving to our table from Bistro Han’s kitchen were the braised pork belly steamed buns ($5). Two to an order, perched on a small plate, these were fit-inthe-palm-of-your-hand-sized sandwiches: thick slabs of browned pork encased in snowy, white dough. The pork belly and the belly of the bun were painted lightly with hoisin sauce and topped with scallions and shards of peanuts. A burst of flavors and senses exploded with the first bite: Wonder Bread softness; unctuous and fatty pork; caramelized sweetness; sharp oniony greenness; salty, peanuty crunch. Conversation at the table halted. These were too good for us to keep talking, too good not to focus all our attention on the food.

We ordered some more. If the only delicious item on Bistro Han’s menu was the pork belly bun, it still would be worth the trip. Luckily, however, there are lots of dishes that beg to be sampled and savored -- the goal of the owners (who wish to remain publically anonymous). “We like to cook the food the way we eat it,” writes one of the co-owners and moderator of Bistro Han’s Facebook page in a private message. “It’s authentic and traditional cooking that we like to share.” It’s a little surprising to find such quality, and

dedication to quality, in a shopping plaza. Neighboring a nail-art studio, bank, and gym, Bistro Han is unassuming from the outside. But once inside, it becomes clear that the restaurant is serious about providing a good dining experience to its customers. The dining room is long and narrow. The palette is stark: charcoal grays and soft whites are punctuated by nail-polish-red Chinese characters translating to “Han.” Wispy paper chandeliers hang from the ceiling, drawing the eye up and around to a long chalkboard mural. Spare and abstract, the chalk lines suggest water and steam swirling around

a piping hot bowl of noodles. The effect is understated and calm, perhaps to help focus diners’ attention on the food. All your attention - and time and appetite - can be spent lingering over the small-plates menu. While there aren’t carts wheeled around the room as in a dim sum-only establishment, those flavors and that style can still be found at Bistro Han. The cumin beef ($5) marries plump hunks of flank steak with cumin and chili pepper. It’s like a deconstructed Tex-Mex chili, but with flavors that are purer and more evocative. Tidy squares of pepper flakes add heat and beauty to the beef, coloring the ends of wooden chopsticks a sunset orange. Mini cuttlefish ($5) are gingery with a spicy hit, thanks to Szechuan peppercorn oil. There’s a touch of smokiness, almost as if from a flame’s char, but there’s no visual evidence of fire applied to the fish. Legs are present — and dangle jauntily from the end of a fork. Roasted duck ($8) is finger-licking delicious. Chopped into two-inch pieces, the soft skin and yielding meat wrap around the bones, demanding full attention and dexterous fingers. Roll the each piece in the

with crisp bottoms, a mild pork filling, and a vinegary dipping sauces that balance out the dumplings’ slight sweetness. Even the crab rangoon ($4 for six), not something I typically like, is done well at Bistro Han. It’s light, crunchy, and creamy, and paired with a mango-chili dipping sauce that starts sweet but leaves a subtle tingle on the tongue. To cleanse the palate before moving on, eat the daikon radish ($3). It’s crunchy and fresh like a fall apple but is sweet and sour, not sweet and green. Elsewhere on the menu are larger plates, some with the familiar American take on Chinese cuisine, and others that remain truer to their origins. Spicy General Chicken ($11) falls firmly into the former camp but, like the crab rangoon, is prepared with more thought, care, and flavor than in many other Asian establishments. It’s made with chicken that manages to be both white and moist — not the easiest task to manage in the kitchen. The dish’s sauce, which coats each piece of chicken, is a little sweet, a little spicy, and pretty much everything you could want from a plate of General Tso’s chicken. The Tangy Sesame Chicken ($11) is similarly prepared, and tempting. It leaves the spice of the General Chicken behind, but the sesame seeds add a toasty nuttiness. More traditional items, made with an emphasis on offering “healthy, traditional Chinese meals” are found under the menu’s “House Specials.” They include gingerscallion cod ($13) and Spicy Chuan Jiao Pork ($9). The cod is mild and subtle, with a slightly spongy mouthfeel; carrots, snow peas, and mushrooms add depth. But it all takes a backseat to the occasional slices of thin ginger, which add pops of bracing freshness. The pork is fiery and fragrant, tender and smoky. Brightly colored carrots and peppers attract the eye and perk up the dish. My visits to Bistro Han only scratched the surface of what’s offered; even when I brought several guests, there was only so much we could taste at one sitting. There’s still crispy squid to eat, Tom Yum soup to sip, and Dan Dan noodles to slurp — and three other varieties of steamed buns to taste. I’ll be back.

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Upcoming [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Iron and Wine Friday, October 18. Strong Auditorium, University of Rochester River Campus. $13-$20. 9 p.m. urochestertickets.com.

Music

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Rich Homie Quan Saturday, November 30. Main Street Armory, 900 East Main St. $20-$50. 8 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com [ POP/ROCK ]

98 PXY Jingle Jam ft. Fall Out Boy Tuesday, December 3.

Blue Cross Arena. One War Memorial Square. 5 p.m. $38. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com

Bayside FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N. WATER STREET 8 P.M. | $18-$21 | WATERSTREEETMUSIC.COM [ PUNK ] Since its 2000 inception, this Queens-based

quartet has become a significant cog in the punk machine. After releasing its first four full-length albums on Chicagobased label, Victory Records, the band switched to Windup Records with the 2011 release of “Killing Time.” While the record continues to showcase the group’s alternative and pop foundation, it is definitely an expansion of musical horizons.  The collection includes everything from ballads, in-your-face thrashers, moments of operatic piano rock, and even songs with a sort of surf metal sensibility. It’s a seriously weird (in the best sense of the word) smorgasbord of sound. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Filthy Still SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 ABILENE BAR AND LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 9:30 P.M. | $6-$10 | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ FOLK-PUNK ] Filthy Still, a folk-punk band based out of Providence, combines traditional bluegrass music with punk vocals and that iconic punk attitude to create a sound that feels unprecedented.  While it has recently become commonplace to combine folk and punk aesthetics, a punk band that honors the bluegrass tradition so faithfully is a truly a rare occurrence.  With an energetic, raucous sound that excites merely through a recording, the band’s live show is sure to make for a good night. — BY LEAH CREARY

A N A RT S

&

C U LT U R A L QU I Z

Thanks to everyone who came out for CITY Newspaper’s first-ever trivia contest, held Wednesday, September 25 at the First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival! The winning teams were:

BUY - SELL

All Hail the Hypnotoad • Back from Belgium • J Squared FIRST PLACE

SECOND PLACE

FOR A BLOG RECAP & PHOTOS OF THE EVENT, CHECK OUT

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM/TRIVIACITY 12 CITY OCTOBER 2-8, 2013

THIRD PLACE

Sterling Silver, Flatware, Tea Sets, Broken Gold, Costume Jewelry

MIKE DEMING ANTIQUES 1458 Monroe Ave. formerly Stanley’s Flowers Tuesday-Saturday 11-6 PM

244-1999 • Theantiqueguy.com

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Clinton’s Ditch. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. Call for info. Free.

A Concert of Peace: Gandhi’s 144th Birthday. Bernunzio’s

Plymouth Brass Quintet SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 ROCHESTER AQUEDUCT (BROAD STREET BRIDGE) 2:30 P.M. | FREE CITYOFROCHESTER.GOV/RIVERROMANCE [ CLASSICAL ] In the ever-expanding concept of live classical music going everywhere, the Plymouth Brass Quintet from the Hochstein School of Music & Dance will be tooting its own horn in the Rochester Aqueduct as part of the 3-day Rochester River Romance weekend.  It’s the perfect opportunity to take a guided tour of the aqueduct, as well as hearing the Plymouth Brass Quintet concert. From canal to subway to cars to brass, let music spark your imagination of the setting in earlier times. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Tugboat SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 DUBLAND UNDERGROUND, 315 ALEXANDER STREET 6 P.M. | $5-$10 [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Like many of his hip-hop

contemporaries, Rochester’s own Anthony Hayward (MC Tugboat) tells hard-luck tales delivered with poise and ferocity. His solidly constructed rhymes lock together like Lego bricks. But, what truly distinguishes Tugboat is an open-hearted accessibility and an underdog spirit that you can’t help but root for. After toiling away in the dark recesses of the underground for years, his moment to shine is something you won’t want to miss. Tugboat headlines the bill with opening acts King 20/20, Mammoth, The Campaign, and Blumzki.  — BY JIM KEMPKES

Sangin’ and twangin’

Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 7 p.m. Free w/reservations. Call 224-3271. Jumbo Shrimp. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic . Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. Sons of Synergy. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-2925544. stickylipsbbq.com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

The Seabreezers performed Saturday, September 28, at Skylark Lounge. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

You ever see a show so good you lose track of time? Me too. And it happened Friday night. I missed The US OH! Show that was part of the Fringe Festival at MuCCC. Now, I know what you’re thinking: But Frank, there were burlesque dancers. Boobs and legs and come-hither and all that. What gives? Hillbilly boogie done right, that’s what gives. The plan was to poke my head in Abilene for a minute — just a minute — to check out Chuck Mead and his Grassy Knoll Boys. What I saw was a full-octane rockin’ hillbilly wingding to-do. Perched beneath a hat that looked like Junior Samples (saaa-lute!) had sat on it, Mead and his boys had the place boilin’ and hoppin’. The band swung and switched it up effortlessly from swing to two-step to an awesome flipped-time push beat that had the crowd going nuts and musicians like Dang’s Tim Clark vowing to go home and burn their instruments. It was about then that I realized it was 10:30

p.m. and there were women nearby bumping and grinding. And I wasn’t there to see them. Rochester is hopelessly land-locked, and when the surf is up, the waves… well, it’s a far cry from the opening to the original “Hawaii Five-O.” Don’t tell that to The Isotopes. Don’t tell that to The Tombstone Hands. And now, l don’t tell that to The Seabreezers, either. This relatively new surf band on the scene has built quite a following with its Ventures-infused fun-in-the sun, instrumental boogie. I caught the band at Skylark Saturday night and though I was on a pinball losing streak, the band kicked my ass with Dick Dale, Ventures, and Ramones selections. The band was tons of fun all around, though I think it should probably stick to instrumentals, or agree on a key when it comes to singing. So the sangin’ needs some work, but the twangin’ was righteous, rambunctious, and raunchy. Surf ’s up, land ho.

DJ Reign and Ladies Night. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Wild Out Wednesdays hosted by Kenney, ft. Legion of Doom.

Louie’s Cordial’s Lounge, 392 Lyell Ave. 254-2844. 10 p.m. 21+. $10. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. venurochester.com. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Andy Stobie & The Greater Finger Lakes Jazz Band.

Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. geneseelighthouse. org. 6 p.m. $2. continues on page 15

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2 FACULTY ARTIST SERIES – RUSSELL MILLER, PIANO, JULIA BROXHOLM, SOPRANO Music of Bach-Siloti, Schumann, and Lori Laitman’s The Soul Fox (NY premiere) Hatch Recital Hall, 8 PM Tickets $10 general public, free to U/R ID holders facebook.com/ConcertsAtEastman

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6 EASTMAN-RANLET SERIES –

ST. LAWRENCE STRING QUARTET Music of Haydn, Golijov, and Dvořák Kilbourn Hall, 3 PM Tickets $15-25, discounts to U/R ID holders THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10 BRASS CAVALCADE Featuring Tuba Mirum, Eastman Horn Choir, Trombone Choir, Brass Guild, and Trumpet Ensemble Kilbourn Hall, 8 PM Free

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13 A CELEBRATION OF THE LIFE AND WORK OF ZVI ZEITLIN Featuring pianists Jerome Lowenthal and Anna Gourfinkel; violinists Charles Castleman, Mikhail Kopelman, and Dylan Kennedy. Music of Ysayë, Rochberg, Dvořák, Block, and Brahms. Kilbourn Hall, 3 PM Free

MONDAY, OCTOBER 14 MUSICA NOVA Brad Lubman, director. Music of Francersoni, Chin, and Pesson Kilbourn Hall, 8 PM Free TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15 KILBOURN CONCERT SERIES – DETROIT CHAMBER WINDS AND STRINGS Music of Caplet, Ibert, Françaix and Bozza

Kilbourn Hall, 8 PM Tickets $15-25, discounts to U/R ID holders WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16 EASTMAN WIND ENSEMBLE, CINDI JOHNSTON-TURNER AND DONALD HUNSBERGER, CONDUCTORS Music of Gershwin, Lindberg, and McTee Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 PM Free

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13

Music “I think the rock stuff is a bit simpler than the stuff I was doing before,” he says. “Most people know me from a funk/ soul/jazz background, even though Filthy Funk did some rock stuff. And when I sat down to write songs for this, it kind of felt like a return to my roots, which was bands like Zeppelin, Cream, The Yardbirds, Hendrix. And I found myself feeling much more comfortable, writing songs with my guitar, playing a simple chord and just kind of going from there.”

Rochester musician John Viviani has left Filthy Funk behind and stepped to the mic for his new project, the pop/rock-leaning Blue Falcon. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

First f light Blue Falcon FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4 LOVIN’ CUP, 300 PARK POINT 9 P.M. | $5-$7 | LOVINCUP.COM REVERBNATION.COM/BLUEFALCON1 [ PROFILE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

John Viviani certainly knows his way around a fingerboard. You’ll blow out your eyeballs trying to get a bead on his fleet digits as the music expands your ears and mind. The Rochester guitarist is better known and responsible for the sophisticated drive behind the funked-up, jazzified jump of the now-disbanded Filthy Funk. Viviani led the band’s get-up-andget-down crusade for roughly 10 years, but found himself getting comfy, relaxed in his own talent and ability to challenge himself. “I’m known mainly as a guitar player,” Viviani says. “I’ve been playing around town for years. When Filthy Funk wrapped up, I wanted to do something different and I had always kept singing at arm’s length. I had always found someone else to do that. I had only focused on the guitar.” So he reached back into his initial rock roots for material and decided to sing, 14 CITY OCTOBER 2-8, 2013

not as a default, but as a trip to a frontier he hadn’t set foot on (or opened his mouth in) — and to get that old creative uneasiness and discomfort back. That led to Viviani’s new outfit, Blue Falcon, and its sterling debut EP, “First Flight.” “First Flight” bristles with an understated intensity clearly based around the guitar’s initial hook. The disc opens with the ominous laying-in-wait slow groove of “Slow Drag” before moving into the minor-keyed minimalism of “Telling Lies.” By the time “Growing Up American,” with its self-deprecating jingoistic lyricism, starts to spin, the band is hitting on all eight. “Internet Celebrity” is pure power pop and the closer “See Ya Self ” is a forgotten soul classic that never was. Vocally speaking, Viviani doesn’t sing like

the guy in the band who lost the coin toss. His vocal ease is a perfect fit, even for a newbie. “I was like, ‘Man, I gotta give this a try’. So I took a couple of vocal lessons. It was a new thing for me to explore, a new challenge,” he says. Often the voice gets dismissed with musicians in the band winding up with

mic duty by default. “It’s a different instrument,” says Viviani. “I have gained a lot of respect for it. There’s no doubt about it, it’s the original instrument, besides beating on stuff with sticks.” Viviani’s background being strapped to a guitar helped him translate, decipher, and adjust. “I think the guitar helped me a lot as far as melodies and having a sense of pitch, my intonation,” he says. “It definitely helped. There are so many aspects to the voice, the technique involved, and the aspects of tone and all the different shades. When you write a song you have to figure out how to sing it and how to get in character for that song.” Viviani’s still a bit bashful about it, even at home. “As long as no one’s around when I’m recording it, fine,” he says. “If the wife’s upstairs and I’m working on something, I tend to be more reserved. I like the fact that it makes me a little nervous, because with the guitar I was comfortable.” So Viviani, along with drummer Devon Tramell and bassist Ben Stephanus, set out on the Blue Falcon odyssey, clutching his guitar and a microphone while adjusting his approach and defining his identity without simplifying or dumbing down, as some might assume.

Blue Falcon clearly isn’t a dumbing down of Viviani’s extensive riff and chops vocabulary but rather the addition of a more immediate aggression and dynamic edge. It packs more of a direct wallop. Still, taking on this new project required a little letting go for the guitarist. “When you’ve been in a band for a long time,” he says, “you’ve got a network of people you’re really tight with and comfortable with, and you have a lot of chemistry, you can bounce ideas off them… This project came back down to me starting from scratch and having to rely on myself to some extent in order to finish these songs. I think that it’s been good for me.” For fans of Viviani’s work, there’s still plenty for them here. Blue Falcon isn’t a radical about-face departure or detour. Besides, Viviani still gets his funk fix in the cover band Shine. “I’m not looking at this as I’m not playing funk/soul music anymore,” he says. “This is exciting and interesting enough to me that I feel like I’m going to be doing this for a while. Even though this started out as a blues-rock thing, I think there’s going to be room for those other [funk/jazz] influences. Over time, once I’ve gotten more independence playing while singing, I think some those influences will come back. The people that were into Filthy Funk, I think there’s something for them here with Blue Falcon. And I think a lot of them are finding that. The people that were into the hip-hop end of Filthy Funk, that aspect of it, maybe can’t connect.” Perhaps they should embrace the pioneer wonder and un-ease that Blue Falcon preaches. “Anything you get comfortable with for too long, you get stagnant,” Viviani says. “It’s like eating the same cereal for breakfast every morning. I don’t want to have Chex ever morning.”

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2 Anthony Gianovola. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Roses & Revolutions. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. BLUES | CANDYE KANE [ POP/ROCK ]

The End of America w/Dream Girls, Kozy Soul, and Cammy Enaharo. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9.

FLCC HomeSpun Series: The Moho Collective, Whizzy’s Canvas. Finger Lakes Community

College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. flcc.edu. 7 p.m. $2.

The Mighty High & Dry Wednesday Night Ramble.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $2-$5. Ten Days of Rain. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 3255600. waterstreetmusic.com. 6:30 p.m. $5.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Ewert and The Two Dragons w/Trapper Schoepp, and Archimedes. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $10-$14.

How many performers have starred in a film like “Boobsville Cabaret” and recorded a Wanda Jackson tribute album? I’ll go out on a limb and say one: Candye Kane. Kane’s oeuvre is the stuff of which sitcoms are made. Before she was an actress in the Golden Age of Porn, Kane was accepted into the University of Southern California’s junior opera program. She quickly decided against this path and became a somewhat prominent figure in the early 80s punk scene, starting several country punk outfits. Kane eventually shed the dog collar after discovering the gritty blues of artists such as Etta James and Bessie Smith. Now she’s become one of the most recognizable voices (and faces) in blues and jazz today. Candye Kane performs Wednesday, October 9, 8 p.m. at Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way, $8-$10, abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit

Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Ken Snyder. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. titustavern.com. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Rochester Ukulele Support Group. Bernunzio’s Uptown

Music, 112 East Ave. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Fred Vine w/Brian Williams. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 585232-3906. littletheater.org/cafe. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Plymouth Brass Quintet.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 7 p.m. $5. [ JAZZ ]

Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s

Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. Night Trane. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free.

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

B.A.L. w/Lucky Luciano, Nitty, and Blank. Nola’s Restaurant

& Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb.com. 7 p.m. $10. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Buddhahood. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Orange Iguanas. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. http://orangeiguanas.com/. Free. Rochester Indie Fest: RIT Battle of the Bands. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 10:30 p.m. Call for info.

Virgil Cain. BLU Bar & Grill,

250 Pixley Rd. 750-2980. blurochester.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. White Woods. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 9 p.m. $5.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Big Blue House. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Bush Mango Drum & Dance ft. Mohamed Diaby. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Dave North w/Mike Pepper. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub. com. 6 p.m. Free. David Wax Museum. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 3255600. waterstreetmusic.com. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

Unmasking Abilities: Al Sigl Mask Gallery Opening ft. Raintree. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup. com. 6:30 p.m. $5.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4 Younger Gang. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. 10 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Dirty Bourbon Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque. com. 10 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Selwyn Birchwood w/ The Womack Family Band.

PUNK | THE SPITS

[ CLASSICAL ]

In the spirit of angry and edgy punk, like The Buzzcocks, The Dickies, or even Stiff Little Fingers, The Spits play it classic, lean, and raw. Wallowing in visual absurdity; Reagan masks, ski masks, and toilet paper mummification, this Kalamazoo based outfit is a terrific release and reminder that punk ain’t dead, it just resides in Michigan now.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $10-$12.

Guest recital - Iktus Percussion. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000. esm. rochester.edu. 8 p.m. Ray Wright Room. $10. RPO: The Midtown Men: 4 Stars from the Original Cast of Jersey Boys. Kodak Hall at Eastman

Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Ron Spigelman, guest conductor. The Midtown Men, vocal quartet. $15-$105. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

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Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Make Em Sweat Fridays: Make Em Dance Edition ft. DJ 6:30, Nick Kage. Club Network, 420

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Central Ave. 232-1390. 10 p.m. Guys free until 10:30 p.m., girls free until 11:30 p.m. 21+. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. lacopaultralounge. com. 10 p.m. Free.

The Salad Bar Revue hosted by Ambrosia Salad, DJ Solid Bear. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140

Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex. com. 11:30 p.m. & 1 a.m. Call for info.

The Spits performs with Useless Eaters and Hollow Hills Saturday, October 5, at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Avenue, 9 p.m., $12-$14, bugjar.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE [ JAZZ ]

Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gian Carlo Cervone Trio. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. The Midnight City. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. tcrileysparkpoint.com. Call for info.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Prime Steakhouse,

42 E Main St. Webster. 265-4777. PrimeRochester. com. 6:30 p.m. http://www. PrimeRochester.com. Free.

[ REGGAE/JAM ] Lee “El Dub”. California Brew Haus, 402 W. Ridge Rd. 6211480. 9 p.m. $7. [ POP/ROCK ] Atlas. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Battle of the Bands. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Bayside w/Motion City Soundtrack. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $18-$21. The Beautiful Ending. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. $8-$12.

Blue Falcon EP Release Party w/The Capitals. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Double Shot. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Happy Hour: Patrick Jaouen. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 6 p.m. 21+. Free. Happy Hour with Jeff Cosco. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 5 p.m. Call for info.

The Lobby Presents: A Tribute to Neil Young. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $9.

MoChester. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke

Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-2925544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9:30 p.m. $5.

Pink Elephant, Limeworks, Jungle Heart. Monty’s Krown,

875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 9 p.m. $3. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Acoustic Saturdays. Rush Church, 6200 Rush Lima Rd. Rush. 568-2178. thecafearoma. com. First Saturday of every month, 7 p.m. Free.

David Rovics w/The Haymarket Singers. Flying Squirrel

Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. 6 p.m. $10. Ebb Tide. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 497-7010. flahertys.com. Call for info.

ADDICTIONS COUNSELOR

Eric Andersen w/Scott Regan. Cafe Veritas at First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. cafeveritas.org. 7:30 p.m. $10$18 Cafe Veritas at First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. Honest John & Super Sarah. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. 9 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Fazool’s Casual Italian Kitchen, 51 Market St. Brockport. 431-3072. 9 p.m. Call for info.

CREDENTIAL TRAINING

Rochester Area Animal Shelters Benefit ft. Joanne Shenandoah.

Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 2711050. 7 p.m. $20. Jon Akers. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 6710816. flahertys.com. Call for info. Ryan & Rayce. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free.

Songs of Legacy Women Concert. Rochester Academy of

Medicine, 1441 East Ave. 4421704. 7 p.m. $35. [ CLASSICAL ]

Ad Hoc Presents: Songs My Mum Used to Sing. Christ

Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. adhoc-music.org. 7:30 p.m. $5.

RPO: The Midtown Men: 4 Stars from the Original Cast of Jersey Boys. Kodak Hall at Eastman

Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Ron Spigelman, guest conductor. The Midtown Men, vocal quartet. $15-$105. [ COUNTRY ] Flint Creek. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Barstool Blackout Presents Foam. Main Street Armory,

900 E. Main St. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. 8 p.m. $35-$40.

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base.

Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.

AMERICANA | DAVID WAX MUSEUM

Boston-based duo David Wax Museum is not just an Americana band, but a Mexo-Americana band, borrowing heavily from the Mexican tradition. The duo cites folk legends such as Dylan, Cohen, and Tom Waits as major influences to its sound; while member Suz Slezak even cites classical and Irish music as having been part of her musical development. With the onset on the album “Knock Knock Get Up” this past year, the duo further developed its ability to explore and combine different, and even opposing, musical qualities. David Wax Museum performs on Friday, October 4, 7 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 North Water Street, $10$12, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY LEAH CREARY DJ Trancesend. Love

Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. $5. Upscale Saturdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. First Saturday of every month. 21+. Call for info. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Poke Dem Saturdays ft. Team Lion Paw, The Money Green Theme, Nick Kage, and Wavey.

Trinities Restaurant, 36 W. Main St. 319-4047. 10 p.m. $5-$10. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. blurochester.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Cousin Vinny. Salvatore’s Pizzeria & Pub, 1217 Bay Road. Webster. 585-671-9420. 9 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Norman Tibbils Duo. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. Webster. 216-1290. JasmineAsianFusion.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 6:30 p.m. Call for info.

DePaul’s National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence-Rochester Area has openings for its 2014-2015

Addictions Counselor Credential Training. Class size is limited. Deadline for registration is November 22, 2013.

Call

(585)719-3489

today!

All classes will be held at NCADD-RA at 1931 Buffalo Road, Rochester, NY 14624.

www.ncadd-ra.org

Wills Mckenna. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. https://soundcloud.com/willsmckenna-1. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Dope, Soil. Montage Music

Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall. com. 8 p.m. $18-$25.

Filthy Still w/The Recently Deceased, Reno Divorce.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 9:30 p.m. $6-$10. Mazarine Blue. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 10 p.m. Free.

Parktoberfest w/Teressa Wilcox Band. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 7 p.m. Free.

The Spits w/Useless Eaters, Hollow Hills. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $12-$14. Springer. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 18

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5

EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR GAMEDAY: Cut-to-order Meat, Craft Beer and Snacks

The Tombstone Hands Halloween Show. House of

Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 5443500. houseofguitars.com. 5 p.m. Free. Tryst. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. brickwoodgrill.com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Vulgar Display of Power w/Clyde, A Taste of Evil.

Also

Now taking pre-orders for Thanksgiving Turkeys from Jaindl Farms

Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. 9:30 p.m. $5. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 6 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

If they’re good enough for the White House House, they’re good eenough ough for your house

Easy in, easy out. Think outside the “Big Box” MON-SAT 9AM-8PM, SUN 9AM-6PM

2294 MONROE AVE. BRIGHTON | 271-8270 FIND US ON

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille. com. 7 p.m. Free. Celtic Music Sundays: Peg Dolan. Temple Bar and Grille,

109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 2714930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. [ CLASSICAL ]

Musicale: Joe Blackburn, Organ. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 3 p.m. Free w/ museum admission.

Peter Dubois, Organ, Compline. Christ Church,

141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 8:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Rochester Oratorio Society: Choral Masterworks.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 7 p.m. $10-$25. RPO: Music and Art. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 2 p.m. $25. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Ad Hoc presents “Songs My Mum Used to Sing.”  Doesn’t that just say it all?  The minute someone with any English or Irish connection hears “Mum,” we’re taken into a small, cozy kitchen, potatoes peeling, and a Cadbury’s biscuit jar to sneak into and get scolded. Ad Hoc’s new artistic directors Boon Hua Lien and Matt Osika have scheduled a lovely concert, complete with selections from Benjamin Britten’s “Folksong Arrangements” (with texts of the British Isles and W.B. Yeats) and “Lincolnshire Posy” by Percy Grainger.  Both works will feature wind/piano octet orchestration by Osika. Ad Hoc performs Saturday, October 5 (7:30 p.m.) at Christ Church, 141 East Ave, $5, and again on Wednesday, October 23 (noon) at Hochstein School of Music & Dance, 50 North Plymouth Avenue, free (also airing live on WXXI’s “Live from Hochstein” series), 474-2420, adhoc-music.org. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA [ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch). Woodcliff Hotel &

Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. Call for info. Free.

Clarissa’s Jam Night w/ Terrance Bruce. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 585-232-3430. clarissasjazz.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Aotearoa, Axis Armada, and The Mighty High and Dry.

California Brew Haus, 402 W. Ridge Rd. 621-1480. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Misconstruity w/Wooden Waves, Cavalcade. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Unraveler, Oklahoma Car Crash. Boulder Coffee Co.,

739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 7 [ JAZZ ]

Ship Wrecked Sunday’s ft. DJ Trancesend. Captain’s Attic, 37

Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

[ POP/ROCK ]

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CLASSICAL | AD HOC

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Art are exposed more and more to the untamed behavior of adults through their increased access to media. Here McCall has depicted the bust of her own child, defiantly poking his tongue out, chipped and painted in faded hues, atop a Doric column. The show includes a wide range of vessels

“All or Nothing” by Peter Pincus is part of the “History in the Making VII” exhibit, currently shown at Genesee Pottery’s Firehouse Gallery. PHOTO PROVIDED

Pot references “History in the Making VII: Ceramic Traditions, Contemporary Objects” THROUGH NOVEMBER 3 FIREHOUSE GALLERY AT GENESEE POTTERY, 713 MONROE AVE. 244-1730, GENESEEARTS.COM MONDAY-FRIDAY 10 A.M.-5 P.M., THURSDAY 10 A.M.-9:30 P.M., SATURDAY NOON-5 P.M. | FREE [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Creative work doesn’t exist in a vacuum, and artists often draw influence and inspiration from history and from the world around them. The work presented in the Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery’s current show, the 7th Annual “History in the Making” exhibit, offers a sample of contemporary vessels, figurative works, and decorative objects that were created with some influence from past ideas, aesthetics, and methods. Each year, the folks at Genesee Pottery place an ad with Ceramics Monthly to call for art for the “History in the Making” exhibit. This year, 26 entries were selected for the show by Jean Schallenbarger, associate 20 CITY OCTOBER 2-8, 2013

professor at School for American Crafts at RIT, who juried the show only from images of work sent in from all across the country with names and artist statements withheld. Genesee Center was proud to learn that works by two of its current artist residents, Sarah Heitmeyer and Katie Carey, as well as Genesee Pottery studio manager, Peter Pincus, were juried into the show. Each of the works is accompanied by an artist statement that explains influences and inspiration, and often includes images of sample objects that influenced their works. Pincus’ sleek work is represented here with two entries: “Cup Set” is a pair of colorblock-striped vessels, the painting contrasting with the organic slump at the bases, and “All or Nothing,” a duo of flattened bulb shapes standing upright and painted with a spectrum of grays on one side and colors on the other. The provided info states that the artist’s primary inspiration was the solid, bold works of color theorist and Bauhaus Professor Josef Albers. In particular, “Cup Set” was inspired by a wall drawing by Sol LeWitt, and “All or Nothing” was drawn from an Emilio Pucci dress, which were both influenced by Albers. Genesee Pottery director Kate Whorton says that the show always offers some

element from history that she hadn’t encountered before. This time, the gem of human culture came in the form of “Doctor’s Doll: Muscular System,” by Carrie Anne Parks of Alma, Michigan. Parks drew her influence from the Chinese “doctor dolls,” which served as patient surrogates in the 17th through 19th centuries, when decorum demanded that a female patient point out the source of an ailment to a doctor rather than allow him to examine her body directly. The full-grown female figure is perhaps the size of an infant, and reclining coyly on a wooden stand atop a pedestal. She is glazed white and marked all over in blue, detailed brushwork that denotes her muscular system, and coated with a hard, glossy glaze, “rendered safely decorative and impervious to touch,” per the artist statement. Another figurative work included in the mix is “Busted,” Elmira, New York, artist Colleen McCall’s child-high portrait of her son that borrows elements from a Greek image of “an idolized trophy child that appears among illustrations of force and destruction” in the Parthenon. The concept of forcing a child to learn self-control amid such uncivilized behavior is an ironic one, then, and especially now in an age where children

that vary vastly in style and purpose. Miami, Florida-based artist Daniel Listwan’s striking “Biohazard Jasperware: Black Basalt Edition” series is an homage Josiah Wedgwood’s Black Basalt line. Listwan’s set of seven vessels resemble the influence in their velvety black surfaces and detailed relief pictures. But instead of depicting the neoclassical scenes, the gods and heroes of Wedgwood’s wares, Listwan’s subjects are skulls and magnified, fearsome life forms, including ebola, anthrax, yersinia pestis (Black Death), H5N1, and other biohazards, and the vessels themselves are tools of scientific research that might be seen in a lab. Tony Wright, of Mobile, Alabama, created his “Olmec Face Jug” to demonstrate to his students a folk pottery tradition with roots in the Southeastern United States. The artist is also intrigued by stylized figurative sculptures of the Olmec culture in ancient Mexico, “several stone-carved figures depicting a shaman going through a process of transformation from human to jaguar,” says Wright in the provided statement. The resulting vessel is a highly glossy, bronze head with cat ears, ferocious fangs, and an expression that seems to say, “Go ahead…steal my whiskey.” Dallas, Texas-based artist Brian Molanphy’s “Bowl” nods to the delicately marbled clay wares developed by the French Moulin brothers in about 1776, which derived their decorative element not from the glaze but from the complex patterning worked into the clay body. Molanphy’s beautiful, simple vessel is crawling with swirls of brown and white clay, and finished with a transparent glaze. Pottery resident Katie Carey’s “105 Bowls” is not what it sounds like — enough stoneware for a small community takes up the space that one large punch bowl might. The artist’s statement says she wished to “strip the bowl of its inherent association in order to re-examine the simplistic form that has been passed down for nearly 10,000 years.” Carey created dozens of bowls on the wheel, squished them, and pressed them together into a rippling half-sphere mounted on the wall, almost resembling a sun-bleached sea anemone — or the potter’s equivalent of a writer’s balled-up and cast-away pages.

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Volo Calvariam: 1975’s Five Year Anniversary.” Through Nov 2. Reception Oct 5, 7-10 p.m. 1975ish.com. Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St. Paintings, Sculpture, & Drawings: Robert Ernst Marx Open Studio. Studio 211. 7499110. mail@roberternstmarx. com. andersonalleyartists.com. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. “Woman of Steel” featuring the work of Mary Taylor. Through Oct 28. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Oct 11, 5-8 p.m. 4734000 x206. artsrochester.org. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S. Main St. “As I See It” by Ted Wetherbee. 237-3517. artswyco.org. Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. “Picture This” A Collection of Mix Media Paintings in a Collage Form. Through Oct 31. Local Artist: Andrew Hakes, Debbie Ingerick, Joshua Lopez, and Richmond Futch Jr. Reception Oct 4, 6-9 p.m. Open painting, bring your own supplies. 729-9916. bethelcf.com/aviv. Black Radish Studio, 274 N Goodman. “Rays of Sunshine: A Look at Down Syndrome.” Through Oct 25. Reception Oct 4, 6-10 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Neil Young Harvest Dance. THE LOBBY’s 2 year anniversary with a harvest-themed group show, Oct 4 reception 8 p.m.-2 a.m. featuring Neil Young covers, The Good Food Collective, and live graffiti. $8. lobbydigital.com. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite 225. Pop Up ROC: “Meditative Stitches” by Stefani Tadio. 414-5643. catclay.com. Creative Wellness Coalition Gallery, 320 N Goodman St, Suite 201. “Painting Big” Group Show. Reception Oct 4, 6-9 p.m. 3253145 x144. mharochester.org. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. October Earth Ceramics Show. Through Oct 26. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Oct 11, 6-9 p.m. 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com. Gallery R, 100 College Ave. 82nd Print Club of Rochester Exhibition. Through Oct 27. Wed-Sun. 256-3312. galleryr99@ gmail.com. galleryr.cias.rit.edu. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. Art Wear: Featuring Wearable Art. thegrassrootsgallery@gmail.com. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Simply Myanmar. Through Oct 27. Works by Chris Kogut, Dick Bennet, Hope DellaStua, Bob Pierce, and Terri Sipone. Reception Oct 4, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. Al Sigl Community WalkAbout 2013 Mask Gallery Preview. Kick off the 2013 Al Sigl Community WalkAbout and be the first to check out this year’s Mask Gallery of over 50 original works designed by clients of Al Sigl Member Agencies and local artists. Live music by Raintree and happy hour specials. All tips earned by our guest bartenders benefit the Al Sigl Community, whose Member

ART | “MEMORY THEATRE”

The Memorial Art Gallery continues to celebrate its centennial with the new exhibit, “The Memory Theatre,” opening Wednesday, October 9. The exhibit examines the ways in which memory functions in the structuring of personal and cultural identities while also taking a look at the role of the museum as a repository for memory — a “memory theater.” A museum exhibit that examines the museum, you say? So meta. The exhibit will feature work by Barton Benes, David Maisel, Will Barnet, and others, and will run through December 29 in the MAG’s Grand Gallery. There is also a member’s opening party on Sunday, October 6, which will feature a lecture by Judith G. Levy, the creator of the exhibit’s “memory cloud” installation. Admission is the standard entrance fee for the MAG ($5$12). The museum is located at 500 University Ave. For more information visit mag.rochester.edu. — BY COLIN MCCOY Agencies serve tens of thousands with special needs each year. 4424102 x8944. alsigl.org. Main Street Artists’ Gallery & Studio, 1115 E. Main St. Main Street Artists’ First Friday open studio show and sale. Featured artist for October: Christine D. Norris and book signing by Margot Fass: “Froggy Family’s First Frolic.” 233-5645. suzizeftingkuhn@gmail.com. mainstreetartistsgallery.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “Memory Theatre.” Through Dec 29. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Albert Paley. Through Oct 19. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Opening and lecture Oct 9, 7-9 p.m. featuring never before exhibited Albert Paley maquette sculptures, steel and glass sculptures, candleholders, monoprints, and the WXXI video “Paley on Park Avenue.” Lecture Oct 10, 7 p.m. followed by a book signing of the new release “Albert Paley on Park Avenue.” Please RSVP to each event by October 6. 292-1430. info@ nanmillergallery.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. “signals_now_” Through Nov 10. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. Reception Oct 3, 6-9 p.m. and Oct 4, 6-10 p.m. Artists’ talk Oct 5, 1 p.m. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org.; “signals_now_” Through Nov 10. Reception Oct 3, 6-9 p.m. and Oct 4, 6-10 p.m. Artists’ talk Oct 5, 1 p.m. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. St John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. “Two Sides of a Story: Illustations by Shawnee Hill.” Laverly Library, lower level gallery, St. John Fisher College. Through Nov 25. Reception Oct 4, 6-9 p.m. coroflot.com/shawneehill.

Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. First Friday with Yum and Yuck. Meet authors Nannette Nocon and John Kastner. 770-1923. whatsupwithyuk.com. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. ImageArt: “I do?!” and “Wish You Were Queer” Postcard Show.. Through Oct 26. Reception Oct 4, 6-9 p.m. 4428676. imageout.org/imageart. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W Miller St. Newark. “Fifty Years” Photographs by Winston Vargas. Through Nov 1. Thu-Sat noon-3 p.m. Reception Oct 11, 5-7 p.m. 315-331-4593. waynearts.wordpress.com. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Artists’ Breakfast Group 25th Anniversary Exhibit. Through Nov 12. Reception Oct 4, 5-8 p.m. 978-2551. [ CONTINUING ] Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Frank Frazier and Friends. Frank Frazier, Minerva Diaz, Rory Tequan Morgan, Janice Thacker, Shenna Vaughn. thebaobab.org.; George K. Arthur Photographic exhibit. thebaobab.org. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible.” Through Dec 13. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-noon. 475-3961. rit.edu.; Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible, exhibition opening. Through Dec 13. 475-3961. skgtwc@rit.edu. library.rit.edu/cary. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Social Reportage: Raw.” Through Nov 2. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Photographic essays touching on poverty, homelessness, and social issues continues on page 22 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21

FESTIVAL | GCVM FALL FESTIVAL

Get ready to party like you’re on an episode of “Little House on the Prairie” (a happy episode, not the one with the typhus outbreak). The Genesee Country Village & Museum is holding its annual Fall Festival & Agricultural Fair this Saturday and Sunday, October 5 and 6. Summon your competitive spirit and get involved in or more of the 150-plus different judged contests. There are also more than 60 contests for the young’uns to compete in as well. There will also be a vintage baseball game to decide who wins the mayor’s cup, and baking contests, just like the good old days. And that is just scratching the surface of the plethora of activities to partake in at the festival. The festival runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. both days. Tickets cost $16.50, but you can get in for free one day if you enter in a contest. The museum is located at 1410 Flint Hill Road in Mumford. Visit gcv.org to find out more. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

Art Exhibits in an urban setting. By Arlene Hodge and students. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. The Artwork of Bethany Williams and Allie Hartley. 244-6787. xroadscoffeehouse.com. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. 6375494. adifferentpathgallery.com. Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. History in the Making VIII. Through Nov 3. Ceramic traditions, contemporary objects. 2441730. geneseearts.org. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “A Collection of Thoughts and Dreams” by Christine Sisak and Diane Tank. Through Dec 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 385-0298. friendlyhome.org. Geisel Gallery, Bausch & Lomb Place, One Bausch & Lomb Place. “Solos, Duetts, and Concertos,” paintings and sculpture by Daviid Chamberlain. Through Oct 29. Mon-Fri 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Oct 3, 5-7 p.m. davidchamberlainstudios. com. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road. Batavia. “Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War” from The National Library of Medicine.. Through Oct 26 in the Alfred C. O’Connell Library. 343-0055. genesee.edu. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. The Gender Show. Through Oct 13. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. 22 CITY OCTOBER 2-8, 2013

International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “In the Mood.” Through Oct 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Work by Malcolm Liepke and Jurgen Gorg. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “Our Hispanic Community.” Through Oct 21. Photographs from a 1983 project by artists Marilyn Anderson, Leslie Locketz, and Ira Srole, and art by Latino Youth from the Rochester City School District. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 3256669. gmoseson@rocheseter. rr.com. cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Jose Rivera. Through Oct 11. thelittle.org. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Mt. Morris. New Deal Gallery: “Under the Influence: New Deal Painters And Their Artistic Influences.” Through October 5. 243-6785. LuLuLemon Athletica, 3040 Monroe Ave. “Your Body” Anatomy Drawings by Carla Bartow. 271-1427. lululemon. com. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. “Landscape: Subject and Stimuli.” 315-4620210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Maplewood Family YMCA, 25 Driving Park Avenue. Irondequoit Art Club. Through Oct 31. Hours: weekdays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Reception and Maplewood Y Craft Show. Oct 12, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 64-3600. irondequoitartclub.org. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Creative Workshop Living Memory Alumni Show: Part 2. Through Oct 24. 276-8900. mag.rochester. edu.; “Connoisseurs Around the

Corner: Gifts of Art from MAG’s Founding Family.” Lockhart Gallery through Dec 13. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Alumni Show: Chris Mostyn and Rick Nickel. Through Oct 4. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 292-3121. monroecc.edu/go/ mercer/. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. “Paintings of Local Buildings” by Mitchell J. Lurye. Through Nov 9. millartcenter.com.; “Celebrate Our Surroundings.” Benefit for The Finger Lakes Museum. 6247740. millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Live in Joy With Color” by Charlotte Barnard. A display of heartfelt creations in watercolor, polymer and yarn. Through Oct 27. 546-8400. cotton@episcopalseniorlife.org. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “In Process: Emerging Artists in Metalsmithing and Jewelry.” Through Oct 25. Sun and TueThu, noon-5 p.m., Fri-Sat, noon8 p.m. 389-5073. artscenter. naz.edu. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Residuum.” Through Oct 25. Wed-Sun, noon-5 p.m. A collaboration between photographer Ann Lovett and artist/educator Mary Hafeli. 3895073. artscenter.naz.edu. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Wildroot Group 35th Anniversary Exhibition. Through Nov 8. Reception Oct 25, 6-8 p.m. 732-7197. nholowka@ rochester.rr.com. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Bird is the Word.” Through Oct 19. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Alan Singer, Arthur Singer, Kurt Feuerherm, Eunice Hur, Belinda Bryce, & Jerry Alonzo. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. Bradely Butler Art Opening. Reception Aug 12, 6 p.m. 3602920. owlhouserochester.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “Frame of Reference” Group Show. Through Nov 2. Reception Oct 28, 5:30-8 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Stormymade: Garden of Earthly Delights by Margaret Storms. recordarchive.com. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Kathleen Sherin: “Defying Gravity.” Through Nov 1. genesee.edu.; Kathleen Sherin: “Defying Gravity.” Through Nov 1. An exhibition of prints containing drypoint, collagraphic carborundum printing and monoprint techniques. genesee. edu/campuslife/arts/gallery/. Ross Gallery of the Skalny Welcome Center at St. John Fisher, 3690 East Ave. DRAW Presents “My Space.” Through Oct 4. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 385-8023. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Featuring artwork by local artists. Open First Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Second Saturdays, 12-4 p.m., and Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. 7320036. shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery, 100 College Ave. “Transmutations”

Photographic Works by Carl Chiarenza. Also at Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., Suite 303. Through Oct 12. 232-6030 x23, axomgallery.com or 461-4447, lumierephoto.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Sunrise to Moonset” by Valerie Berner. Through Nov 2. Open daily and nightly. 271-2630. starrynitescafe.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. Dudes Night Out Presents: Dudes on Tap. 473-0503. tapandmallet. com. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Department of Art Faculty Exhibition. Through Oct 13. 3952787. brockport.edu/finearts. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Memories, Observations, Experiences, Obsessions,” Toby Thompson Memorial Exhibit.. Through Dec 14. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Oct 11, 6-7:30 p.m. 475-2404. jleugs@rit.edu. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. “The Seneca Family Sculpture: History and Process.” Through Nov 11. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 785-1369. flcc.edu.

Brooks Avenue $10. 328-6000. jokefactorycomedyclub.com. Improv Comedy Battles. Fri 9:30 p.m., Sat 7:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com. [ SUN., OCTOBER 6 ] Boulder Comedy Open Mic. 8:30 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. Sign-Ups 7:45 p.m 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. Open Mic: Comedy. 8 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. Come a little early to sign up Free. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. [ TUE., OCTOBER 8 ] Comedy Open Mic. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East

Ave. 7 p.m. sign up. Host: Woody Battaglia 902-2010. woodybattaglia@gmail.com. acanthuscafe.com.

Dance Events [ FRI., OCTOBER 4 ] Bush Mango Drum & Dance featuring master artist Mohamed Diaby. 8 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. Free. 4547140. bouldercoffeeco.com. [ SAT., OCTOBER 5 ] Contra Dance. noon. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Free. 4288140. mfraser@libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. Cuban Infusion 2013. Oct. 5. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St.

Workshops 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., dance party 9 p.m.-1 a.m $20/ workshop, $85/full pass. 2714930. tangocafedance.com. Evening of South Indian Dance & Music by Jaan R Freeman & Pravin Venkatraman. 6 p.m. Atman Yoga Studio, 34 Elton St., 3rd floor $12-$20. 305-0406. director@dakshinapalli.org. atmanyogastudio.com. Inikori Dance Showcase and Dance Party. 5:30-11 p.m. Inikori Dance Studio, 1060 University Ave. $8-$13, kids 5 and under free 271-6840. inikoridance.com. [ MON., OCTOBER 7 ] Belly Dancing 101: Get Your Shimmy On. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034.

info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com.

Festivals [ FRI., OCTOBER 4-SUN., OCTOBER 6 ] Cohoctan Fall Foliage Festival. Oct. 4-6. Town of Cohoctan. Fireworks, football game, art shows, parade, more. Fri 4-10 p.m., Sat 7 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.-5 p.m fallfoliagefestival. com. Rochester River Romance Weekend. Oct. 4-6. Genesee River Corridor. Cruises, bike rides, walks, and nature hikes celebrating the river cityofrochester.gov/ riverromance.

[ SAT., OCTOBER 5 ] 26th Annual Weinfest. 2-9 p.m. Camp Lima, 2375 Pond Rd Hungarian goulash, homemade spaetzle, farm fresh red cabbage, dessert, and coffee. Dinner 2-5 p.m., music 3-7 p.m. by Paul Krueger $15, register. 301-8697. jem4733@aol.com. Autumn festival of Ales. noonmidnight. Honeoye Falls Fireman’s Field 624-4386. cbsbrewing.com. [ SAT., OCTOBER 5-SUN., OCTOBER 6 ] Fall Festival featuring Agricultural Society Fair. Oct. 5-6, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd continues on page 24

Art Events [ FRI., OCTOBER 4 ] First Friday City Wide Gallery Night. First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. firstfridayrochester.org. Hungerford First Friday Open Studios/Galleries. First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m thehungerford.com. Rochester Art Supply’s Landmark Event & Tent Sale. Oct. 4-5. 150 West Main St. Fri 8 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-6 p.m 546-6509. [ SAT., OCTOBER 5 ] 9th Annual Glass Pumpkin Sale. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Red Barn on the west side of the RIT campus. Glass pumpkins, gourds, vases and bowls made by the faculty and students of the RIT Glass Program. The proceeds benefit student scholarships and the visiting artist program Free admission. 733-5873. Naples Open Studio Trail. Oct. 5-6, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Many locations in Naples Free. naplesopenstudiotrail.com. Off The Walls Fundraiser. 7-10 p.m. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St Newark $15, $25 per couple, register. 315-331-4593. info@wayne-arts.

Comedy [ WED., OCTOBER 2 ] Comedy Improv. 8 p.m. Joke Factory Comedy Club, 911 Brooks Avenue (585( 328-6000. jokefactorycomedyclub.com. Open Mic: Comedy. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. Arrive a little early to sign up Free. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. [ THU., OCTOBER 3 ] Chas Elstner. Oct. 3-5. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., OCTOBER 4 ] Artie Fletcher. Oct. 4-5, 8 p.m. Joke Factory Comedy Club, 911 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23

Festivals Mumford $10.50-$16.50. 5386822. gcv.org. Fall Festival featuring the Agricultural Fair. Oct. 5-6, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford $10.50-$16.50. 538-6822. gcv.org. Hilton Apple Fest. Oct. 5-6. Hilton. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m hiltonapplefest. org Oct. 5-6, 10 a.m. 59 Henry Street, Hilton. Free. 392-7773. facebook.com/hiltonapplefest. [ SUN., OCTOBER 6 ] Neighborhood of the Arts Fest. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Street painting, music, dance, storytelling, food trucks notaba.org. Rochester Yoga Festival. 9 a.m.4:30 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave St. John Fisher College’s Varsity Gym, experience a fun day of yoga, meditation, camaraderie, music, and lots of healthy stuff. $119, register. director@rochesteryogafestival. com. rochesteryogafestival.com.

Kids Events [ FRI., OCTOBER 4 ] Costume Swap Drop Off. 1010:30 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Swap on Oct 12 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ SAT., OCTOBER 5 ] Aladdin and Other Enchantng Tales. 2 & 4 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. Auditions for Girls Pop Group “The Marigolds.” 9 a.m. Auditions for a girls group (ages 8-16) who will provide back up vocals/choreography for a Rochester-based up and coming female pop sensation on January 11, 2014 in a benefit concert for The Wounded Warriors Charity. Girls should come in age appropriate “pop star” attire and bring a current photo. Prepare one chorus of one of the

24 CITY OCTOBER 2-8, 2013

KIDS | MAGICAL CREATURES WEEKEND/“ALADDIN”

Ever wanted to get your picture taken with a mummy? How about journey to the land of the Wild Things? This weekend is your opportunity as the National Museum of Play is hosting their Magical Creatures Weekend on Saturday and Sunday, October 5-6. Come and take pictures with a wide array of mystical creatures and meet the artists whose imaginations’ spawned them. Make your very own fantastic creature out of pipe cleaners or transform yourself into one at the Monster Mash. The event will be held on Saturday 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday 1-4 p.m. and only costs the standard museum admission fee ($13 for non-members, members and those under age 2 are free). The museum is located at 1 Manhattan Square. For more information visit museumofplay.org. If you’re looking for more family-friendly entertainment, you can also check out the Enchantment Theatre Company’s production of “Aladdin and Other Enchanting Tales” Saturday, October 5, at the Nazareth College Arts Center. Dragons, wizards, princesses, and all manner of mythical creatures abound in this modern retelling of some of Scheherazade’s famous stories. Shows are at 2 & 4 p.m. The Arts Center is located at 4245 East Ave. Tickets cost $17-$20. For more information visit artcenter.naz.edu. — BY COLIN MCCOY following songs to sing acapella: The Start of Something New (HS Musical), Jar of Hearts (Christina Perri), Wings (Little Mix), Girls Just Wanna Have Fun (Cyndi Lauper), or Since You’ve Been Gone (Kelly Clarkson). No fee.

5 rehearsals only 802-8683. cdstudio124@gmail.com. Fall Family Fun. The Garden Factory, 2126 Buffalo Rd Through Oct 27. Animals, rides, games, crafts, more 247-6236. gardenfactoryny.com.

Instant Improv! With Julie Donofrio. 12-4 p.m. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Grades 5-10 $50, register. 935-7173. mjtstages.com. Monsters and Magival Creatures Weekend. Oct. 5-6. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m $13, free to members and kids under 2 2632700. museumofplay.org.

Center Building, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd $25, veterans free 347-1275. Stacey.Coons-Talbott@ cdsmonarch.org. monroecc.edu. “Seven Principles for Changing At-Risk Behavior and Cultivating Resiliency Among Youth” with Dr. Carl Bell. Oct. 2-3. Mt. Olivet Baptist Church, 141 Adams St. Community forum on Oct 2, 6-8 p.m., Provider workshop on Oct 3, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m mharochester.org.

[ MON., OCTOBER 7 ] Widget the Reading Dog and Her Pal Joey. 3-4 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org.

[ THU., OCTOBER 3 ] Designing with Freescale Seminar. 8:30 a.m. RIT Inn & Conference Center, 5257 W Henrietta Rd. Registration begins at 7:45 a.m Free 475-4954. Family Mediation in Japan. 6 p.m. Bausch & Lomb Public Library Building, 115 South Ave. Reception and presentation by Mrs. Hiroko Washizu, chairperson, Hamamatsu Rochester Sister Cities Friendship Committee Free 428-8350. rebecca.fuss@ libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. “The Fine Print: How Big Companies Use “Plain English” to Rob You Blind,” by David Cay Johnston. 4-5 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Book signing to follow Free. srothenberg@ saunders.rit.edu. In-Person: The Gender Show Artists’ Discussion. 6 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Vincent Cianni and Debbie Grossman Included in admission: $5-$12 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “Pumpkins, Pranks, and Poltergeists: Halloween’s History” with Chris Bensch. 7:30 p.m. Mendon Community Center, 167 N. Main St. 624-5655. townofmendon.org. “Reports From The War Zones” with Kathy Kelly, Buddy Bell and Cathy Breen. Oct. 3-4. Oct 3, 7 p.m. at the Forum Shults Center, Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Oct 4, 7 p.m. at the Flying Squirrel Community Center, 285 Clarissa St vcnv.org. Spotlight On Series Lectures: John Covach. 5 p.m. Rush Rhees

[ TUE., OCTOBER 8 ] Baby Sign Language. 10:15-10:45 a.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. The Heroes of Olympus: The House of Hades. 4 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Book release celebration. Grades 4-8 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org.

Lectures [ WED., OCTOBER 2 ] Chiapas: Behind the Resistance. 7 p.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh St. Free. 325-4000. rocla.us. Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s War Career and Post War Career with Derek Maxfield and tom Schobert. 7 p.m. Genesee Community College, Conable Technology Building, 1 College Rd Batavia Free. 343-0055 x6616. dsutherland@genesee.edu. Dr. Carl Bell Presents Communitiy Forum and Provider Workshop. Oct. 2-3. Mt. Olivet Baptist Church, 141 Adams St. Forum Fri 6 p.m., workshop Sat 9:30 a.m Forum free, workshop $30. 585-325-3145 ext 128. erogers@mharochester.org. mharochester.org. Serve, Honor, Support Symposium. 8 a.m. R. Thomas Flynn Campus

Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Welles-Brown room 275-4461. “Talking With My Mouth Full: A Conversation With a Local Chocolatier.” 6:30-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd $2 supply charge 359-7092. [ SAT., OCTOBER 5 ] Fall Gardening Symposium. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St . Canandaigua Featuring “Natural Gardening” with Ken Druse. $75-$85 3944922. sonnenberg.org. [ SUN., OCTOBER 6 ] Artist Lecture: Judith G. Levy. 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Shanghai to Beiging by Train Travelogue. 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register. 340-8720. jmathis@libraryweb.org. penfieldlibrary.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 8 ] Family Development Class: “Parenting the ADD/ADHD Child (Part 4 of 4).” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org. Travelogue: Blue Danube Cruise. noon. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org.

Literary Events [ THU., OCTOBER 3 ] Poems for Lunch. noon. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Each week, local poet and teacher, Kitty Jospé will offer a selection of poems and guide the discussion Free. 428-8375. carol.moldt@ libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. [ FRI., OCTOBER 4 ] First Fridays/Wide Open Mic. First Friday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books,

740 University Ave. Rochester’s longest running open mic welcomes poets, performers, and writers of all kinds. wab.org. [ SAT., OCTOBER 5 ] Author Visit: Dorothy L. Abrams. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.org. Book Feast Fundraiser. 5 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr $125, register by 9/12. 785-1454. flcc. edu/bookfeast. [ MON., OCTOBER 7 ] “Conquering the Power of Death: A Vietnam Survival Story” with David Lee Foster. 7:30 p.m. The Geneva History Museum, Prouty-Chew House, 543 South Main St., Geneva 315-7895151. Game of Tropes. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Game of Thrones discussion series $3-5. 473-2590. wab.org. Moving Beyond Racism Book Group. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. October selection: The Round House by Louise Erdrich. Free. 288-8644. mbrbookinfo@aol.com. [ TUE., OCTOBER 8 ] Books Sandwiched In. 12:1212:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls” by David Sedaris, reviewed by Anne Panning, PhD. 4288350. libraryweb.org.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., OCTOBER 2 ] Alien Worlds and Androids Exhibition. Through Dec. 22, 9 a.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Dec 22. $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. Little Builders. Through Jan. 5, 2014. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Through Jan 5. MonThu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5

SPORTS | WWE LIVE!

If clotheslines, flying elbow drops, and steel chairs are your thing, then head down to the Blue Cross Arena this Saturday, October 5, to see the superstars from WWE duke it out in person. Names of wrestlers on hand include Dolph Ziggler, Ryback, Fandango, and the main event features Randy Orton vs. Daniel Bryan. Also at the event will be the Big Show, a wrestling legend of huge proportions (really, like HUGE proportions — he stands 7 feet tall and weighs in around 425 lbs.). This is an opportunity wrestling fans will not want to sleeper hold, err, I mean sleep on. The show starts at 7:30 p.m., and ticket prices range from $15 to $95. Visit bluecrossarena.com for more details. — BY TREVOR LEWIS p.m. $13, free to members and kids under 2 263-2700. museumofplay.org. “Off to the Theatre.” Through Nov. 15. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Through Nov 15. Free 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. [ FRI., OCTOBER 4 ] Sacred Relics. Oct. 4-6. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. Opening meditation Fri 7 p.m. Viewing hours Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-3 p.m 473-8731. assisi-institute.org.

Recreation [ WED., OCTOBER 2 ] Mushroom Walk: Trestle Woods. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile $8 parking fee. 493-3625. [ SAT., OCTOBER 5 ] Brush Hour. 10 a.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Free. 773-8911. facebook.com/ thousandacreswamp. Finger Lakes Trail Hike: Waterfalls Section. 10 a.m. Letchworth State

Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile $8 parking fee. 493-3625. GVHC Hike. Oct. 5. Oatka Creek Park, 9797 Union St. Moderate 5 mile hike. Free. Also 9:30 a.m. I-390 exit 11 park & ride lot. Moderate 5 mile hike, Letchworth Park. $4 carpool fee. 227-3180. gvhchikes.org. Highland Park tree tour with Brian Eshenaur, horticulturist with Cornell University. 9 a.m. Highland Park, 171 Reservoir Ave. Meet at Lamberton Conservatory Free. 244-2900. Local Birds of Winter. 10 a.m.noon. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd. Free, register. 359-7044. sites.google.com/site/ hansennaturecenter. Photo FInish 5K. 8 a.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Fundraiser for various charities 271-3361 x445. photofinish5k@ geh.org 8 a.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. $25-$30. 271-3361 x291. eastmanhouse. org. Public Tour of South Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Ave. Meet: Cemetery Office, South entrance opposite the Distillery restaurant.$5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Zumba Master Class. 7 p.m. Victory Community Center, 32 Wildbriar Rd $15 advance, $20 door 738-8720. therzepkas@ gmail.com. refitrev.com. [ SUN., OCTOBER 6 ] Flower City Down Syndrome’s 17th Annual Buddy Walk. 11 a.m. Webster Thomas High School, 800 Five Mile Line Rd Form a team, donate a prize or become a sponsor 662-9585. president@ fcdsn.com. GVHC Hike. 1 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road . Mendon Moderate 4 mile hike, East Esker trail Free 254-4047. gvhchikes.org. Highbanks Hike. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile $8 parking fee. 493-3625.

Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 8 ] Pacesetters Walk. 6:30 p.m. Meet at Hudson-Titus Mall on Titus Ave. side 249-9507. huggersskiclub. org.

Special Events [ WED., OCTOBER 2 ] Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Hitchcock on Stage & Screen. 6:30 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. WXXI and the Little team up with Geva for a Hitchcock Film Series followed by panel discussions. Films include “The 39 Steps” on 10/02, “The Birds” on 10/9, and ‘Rear Window” on 10/16. Each screening at 6:30 p.m $7 for one ticket or a $25 punch card for all four. thelittle.org. Holocaust Survivor Rochelle Dreeben. Through Oct. 3. Oct 1, 7 p.m. at The College at Brockport, Seymour Union Ballroom, and Oct 3, 6:30 p.m. at Temple Sinai, 363 Penfield Rd liftbridgebooks.com. [ THU., OCTOBER 3 ] The 2013 Citizen Heroes & Edification Dinner. 6:30 p.m. Glendoveers, 2328 Old Browncroft Rd $40, register. 4021109. fdfny.org. Max at the Gallery Tapas Night. 5-8 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Live music, wine, beer, tapas for purchase Included in admission: $2.50-$6. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Next to New Sale. Oct. 3-5. Blessed Sacrament auditorium at Monroe and Oxford. Thu-Fri 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-noon 271-7240. South Wedge Farmers’ Market. 4 p.m Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 4 p.m Free. 2698918. swfm.org.

Stammtisch. Every other Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Town of Perinton 55 Plus Open House and Wellness Fair. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. 1350 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport harthearing.com. [ FRI., OCTOBER 4 ] 2nd Annual Susan B. Anthony Women’s Conference. Oct. 4-5, 8 a.m. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave $59. 442-1704. emma@ legacywomeninstitute.org. Film: “American Made Movie.” 3 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr flcc.edu. Girls on the Run Sneaker Soiree. 6-9 p.m. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr Lace up your sneakers, put on your party clothes. $50/individual, $90/pair. 248-4825. molly. bailey@girlsontherun.org. woodcliffhotelspa.com. Landmark Society 2013 Inside Downtown Tour. Oct. 4-5. Fri 5:30-8:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Self-guided tour to various locations $22-$25. 546-7029 x11. landmarksociety.org. Mystery Night. 6:45 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Solves riddles, find blues, win prizes Free. 473-2590. wab.org. Oktoberfest Dinner. 5-7 p.m. Salem United Church of Christ, 60 Bittner St Complete German fare: homemade bratwurst, sauerkraut, veg, beverage, and dessert $4-$8, kids under 5 free with adult dinner 454-5973. River to Roof Tours of Rundel Memorial Building of the Rochester Public Library. 2 p.m. Central Library of Rochester, Rundel Auditorium, 115 South Ave Free, register 428-8350. rebecca.fuss@ libraryweb.org. Sacred Relics: Portals of Divine Grace. Oct. 4-6. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. Fri 7 p.m., Sat-Sun 10 a.m $5 continues on page 26

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SPECIAL EVENT | INSIDE DOWNTOWN TOUR

Come get an inside look at some old buildings in the Cascade District that are experiencing new life. The Landmark Society of Western New York’s Inside Downtown Tour takes place this Friday and Saturday, October 4 and 5, and it’s a good opportunity not only for those thinking about downtown living, but for those who appreciate history as well. See how long-standing buildings have been preserved and remodeled to keep up with modern times. Along with buildings in the Cascade District, the tour also makes stops at the Academy Building on South Fitzhugh Street and the newly opened lofts at 44 Exchange Boulevard. The tour runs Friday 5-9 p.m. and Saturday 11 a.m.4 p.m., and ticket prices range from $17 to $25. Visit landmarksociety.org/insidedowntowntour for more information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

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suggested donation. 585-4738731. assisi-institute.org. Spaghetti Opera XIV. 7-9 p.m. Inn on the Lake, 770 South Main St. $35, register. 394-5986. Theresa Caputo Live! The Experience. 7:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. From TLC’s “Long Island Medium” Sold out. 222-5000. rbtl.org. Wine Cruise onboard Sam Patch. 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesdays 6-7:30 p.m., Fridays 6:30-8 p.m. Meet at Schoen Place in Village of Pittsford $26, register. 662-5748. samandmary.org. [ SAT., OCTOBER 5 ] 2nd Annual Silent Auction/Evening of Jazz. 6-9 p.m. American Association of University Women, 494 East Ave Fundraiser for Jefferson Avenue Childhood Development Center, with Jimmie Highsmith $40, register. 7050310. jacdc.org. Canandaigua Farmer’s Market. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m Pavilion on Mill Street, one block east of Main St., Canandaigua canandaiguafarmersmarket.com. Celebration of Champions. 7 p.m. Center at High Falls, 60 Brown’s Race. An evening of art & music to benefit The Advocacy Center. Community Awards honor individuals and organizations making a difference in the lives of individuals with disabilities. $50, $30 student 546-1700 x265. brashear@advocacycenter.com. Community Pancake Breakfast. 8-10 a.m. United Methodist Church of North Chili, 2200 Westside Dr . North Chili $3$5. umcnorthchili@gmail.com. umcnorthchili.org. Connect & Breathe Fall Training. Oct. 5-12. An after-abortion nonjudgmental talkline.

Volunteers must be available for all classroom training sessions: 10/5, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., 10/8, 6-9 p.m., 10/10, 6-9 p.m., 10/12, 10 a.m.-4 p.m Free. connectandbreathe.org. Delta 5K Walk/Run for Education & Health. 9 a.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive A fun-filled day to raise funds for higher education scholarships and community service projects in Greater Rochester. Request group rate/ form or exhibitor information form through our event email $20. 2342200. 5kracdst@gmail.com. An Exhibit of Ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arranging. 10 a.m. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Demonstrations at 11 a.m., 1, & 2 p.m. by certified teachers Free 474-8562. granmoon2@gmail.com. Family Tours. 1 p.m Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St Tours especially for families with young children Free to $7. 315-789-5151. info@ genevahistoricalsociety.com. genevahistoricalsociety.com. Gala: A Celestial Centennial. 5 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8903. mag. rochester.edu. Genesee Trail Day. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Hyena Birthday Celebration: 1 to 3 p.m Included in zoo admission: $8-$11 senecaparkzoo.org. Local Lions Fundraiser. 1:30 p.m. ellison park, blossom rd, by hazelwood lodge . penfield Fundraiser catered by Sticky Lips BBQ. South Lodge $10.50. 281-1790. Marshall Street 3rd Anniversary. 7 p.m. Marshall Street Bar & Grill, 81 Marshall St Drink specials all night and tastings from our menu starting at 8 p.m. Prizes all night 325-2191. marshallstreetbarandgrill.com.

Medina Railroad Museum Wine Trains. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave. $45, $55 first class 798-6196. railroadmuseum.net. Mt. Hope Cemetery Celebrates 175 Years. 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gate, 791 Mt. Hope Ave. Congresswoman Louise Slaughter and Mayor Tom Richards will speak at 1:30 p.m at the rededication ceremony. Refreshments will follow 4613494. fomh.org. Pumpkin Chunkin’s Return. 11 a.m.-4 p.m Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 377-1982. grossmans.com. [ SUN., OCTOBER 6 ] Brighton Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S Brighton Green at the Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 242-5046. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Durand Eastman Park Arboretum Tours. Durand Eastman Park, Zoo Rd. Free. 261-1665. bob.bea@ gmail.com. Greatest Community Garage Sales and Super Fleas. Oct. 6. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 8 a.m.-2 p.m cityofrochester.gov/publicmarket. Mission Possible: Racial Reconciliation--How Soul Change Leads to Social Change. Oct. 6-7, 5 p.m. Christ Community Church, 36 Coleman Creek Rd. Given by Carolyn and Bishop Henry Joyner, of Christ Church of Rockville Ministries in Gaithersburg, Maryland Free admission 6373979. secretary@cccbrockport. orgcccbrockport.org. Movie Screening in Honor of Gandhi’s Birthday. 1:30 p.m. Central Library of Rochester, Rundel Auditorium, 115 South Ave See Ben Kingsley in his Academy Award-winning role Free. 428-8350. rebecca.fuss@ libraryweb.org. Penfield Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 3771982 x224. grossmans.com. “Perinton Historical Society’s 43rd Annual House Tour.” 1 p.m. Featuring American Craftsman Bungalows. Begins at Perinton Community Center, 1350 Turk Hill Rd., with a lecture by Alan Nowicki. Hisotrical Society members only; memberships available 223-3989. PerintonHistoricalSociety.org. Screening: “16 Photographs At Ohrdruf”. 7 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $9. thelittle.org. Tracking Fall Foliage by Trolley and Train. 11 a.m.-5 p.m New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd Departures every 30 minutes $8-$10. 5331113. nymtmuseum.org. Wildlife Festival. noon. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Formal presentations by Wildlife Defenders at 12 p.m. and 2 p.m $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ MON., OCTOBER 7 ] Mario’s Wine Spectator Tasting Event. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. $30, register. 271-1111. mariosviaabruzzi. com. Thinkin’ & Drinkin’: The Bug Jar’s Trivia Night. First Monday of every month, 8-9 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 21+. Doors at 7:30 p.m Free. bugjar.com.

[ TUE., OCTOBER 8 ] Rohrbach’s Food & Beer Pairing. Second Tuesday of every month, 6 p.m. Rohrbach’s Brewpub, 3859 Buffalo Rd $30, register. 594-9800. rohrbachs.com/ Rohrbachs-Brewpub.html. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail.com. templebarandgrille.com. Westside Farmers Market. 4-7:30 p.m Westside Farmers Market, 831 Genesee St. 436-8999. westsidemarketrochester@gmail. com. westsidemarketrochester. com. [ WED., OCTOBER 9 ] Film Event: “Hear the Crowd Roar: Dummy Hoy Story.” 7-10 p.m. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. $20, register ntid.rit.edu.

Sports [ SAT., OCTOBER 5 ] Logging Sport Competition. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr 785-1623. flcc.edu. WWE Live. 7:30 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$95. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

Theater “All Your Questions Answered.” Through Oct. 13. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Oct 13. Wed Oct 2-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. Tickets start at $19. 2324382. gevatheatre.org. “Almost, Maine.” Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $8.50-$16. 395-2787. brockport.edu/finearts. “Bun In The Oven: Contractions with the Calamari Sisters.” Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St Through Oct 6. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $31.50-$35 315-253-6669. auburnpublictheater.org. Ghost The Musical. Through Oct. 13. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Through Oct 13. Tue Oct 8-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 1 & 6:30 p.m $32.50-$67.50. (585) 222-5000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl.org. “Hank Williams: Lost Highway.” Merry-Go-Round Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd. Wed Oct 2, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m $22-$50. 315‑255‑1785. fingerlakesmtf. com. “The Last Five Years.” JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Thu 7 p.m $18-$26. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org. “Mrs. Warren’s Profession.” Through Oct. 12. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N. Goodman St., The Village Gate Square, Suite D313. Through Oct 12. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m $16-$20. blacksheeptheatre.org. “My Gal Patsy.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 p.m $29-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “On the Spectrum.” Through Oct. 20. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Through Oct 20. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun Oct 13 &

THEATER | “RACE”

The riveting drama “Race” comes from critically acclaimed writer David Mamet. The play tells the story of two white lawyers working to defend a wealthy white executive accused of raping a black woman. The racial tensions that lurk under the surface come to a boiling point over the course of the trial as the play investigates the still-volatile subject of interracial relations in America. Limelight Productions presents “Race” Thursday, October 3, through Saturday, October 12, at Multi-use Community Cultural Center (MuCCC), 142 Atlantic Ave. Shows take place Thursday-Saturday 8 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee on Sunday, October 6. Tickets can be purchased for $22 at the door or $18 if you buy ahead of time with special discount for senior citizens. For more information visit muccc.org. — BY COLIN MCCOY 20, 2 p.m $6-$12. 271-5523. breadandwatertheatre.org. “Race.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Through Oct 12. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun Oct 6, 2 p.m. Thu-Sat 8 p.m $16-$22. 866-811-4111. muccc.org. Thursdays at the Theatre: Pump Boys and Dinettes. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Evening Itinerary: 6-7 p.m.: Theatrical discussion with food (1/2 wrap, chips, drink) 7-7:30 p.m.: Break, 7:30-9:15 p.m.: Pump Boys & Dinettes play. $60. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com.

Theater Audition [ WED., OCTOBER 2 ] Christmas Carol High School. 4 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd Penfield Young Open & Honest Players 340-8664. [ MON., OCTOBER 7 ] “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Oct. 7-8, 6-8 p.m. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Auditions for Grades 5-12. Performances December 13-15 935-7173. mjtstages.com/wonderful-lifeaudition-instructions.html.

Workshops [ WED., OCTOBER 2 ] After the Fire Class: Coffee & Chocolate. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. $25. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com. Family Development Class: “Improving Parent-Child Relationships (Part 4 of 6)”. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of pre-school to preteen children Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org.

Introduction to Animation with Adobe After Effects. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $18. 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. Signs for All: American Sign Language Overview with Bonnie Reddy. 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free, register. 336-6060. [ THU., OCTOBER 3 ] EMT Information Session. 7 p.m. Brighton Volunteer Ambulance, 1551 South Winton Rd. Free. 271-2718 x4. brightonambulance.org. Financial Freedom through Network Marketing. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. Legacy Women Tours: Visit the historic homes of legendary women in Rochester. 8 a.m. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave. $99 Includes bus, tour guide, guest passes, box-lunch, movie passes to Iron-Jawed Angels, and Friday kick-off reception $99. 442-1704. emma@ legacywomeninstitute.org. Nexus Nights. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Free Event. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23. Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. [ SAT., OCTOBER 5 ] Home Composting. 9 a.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave $10, register. 461-1000 x225. mycce. org/monroe. Small Business Training for Minorities. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. New Visions Community Church,

[ SUN., OCTOBER 6 ] Basic Outdoor Mushroom Cultivation. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Held at Little Flower Collective, location at registration. Both workshops include vegetarian, gluten-free lunch. Dress for weather and prepare to get dirty $25, register. smugtownmushrooms.com. [ MON., OCTOBER 7 ] Culinary Class: Trish Asher of The Brown Hound. 6-8:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $79, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com. Family Development Class: “Who’s Listening?” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children ages 5 to 12 Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 8 ] Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Healing Homes: Replacing Chemicals with Essential Oils. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $22. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Home Brewing Techniques Class. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. $25. 319-5279. kturiano@ joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com/classes. Master Gardener Fall Program. 6-8 p.m. 9/24: “Arrangements from the Garden” 10/8: “Terrariums 101” 343-3040 x101. genesee.shutterfly.com. Measure Your Treasure. 9 a.m.noon. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. $40-$80, register. 473-4000 x206. artsrochester. org. Mushrooms & Beyond. Oct. 8. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St. smugtownmushrooms.com. Terrariums 101. 6-8 p.m. Kennedy Building Genesee County Fair Grounds, Route 5, Batavia $20, register 3433040 x101. facebook.com/ CCEofGenesee.

FIRST

FRIDAY

1270 Norton St. Lunch for $7 Register. 451-6982. “Soap Cents” for the Holidays. 1 p.m. Mooseberry Café, 2555 Baird Rd Penfield Create holiday bars in molds using holiday scents and colors, and give great gifts to friends and family $74. 348-9022. eastside.activities@rochester. rr.com. Winterizing Your Roses. 10 a.m. Maplewood Rose Garden, Corner of Lake Ave and Driving Park Free admission 428-6444. mycce.org/monroe.

First Friday

Sponsored by

Citywide Gallery Night

October 4 • 6-9pm FirstFridayRochester.org

A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe Picture This

M. Wendy Gwirtzman Studio A Watercolor Showcase

Anderson Arts Building Robert Ernst Marx

Military History Society Painted Helmets of WWI

AXOM Gallery Exhibition Space Carl Chiarenza's Transmutations

Our House Gallery The Strength of Iron Art: War Inspired Pieces

Beth Brown Art & Design Studio Open Studio

Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) signals_now_

Black Radish Studio Rays of Sunshine: A Look into Down Syndrome

Spectrum Gallery Carl Chiarenza’s Transmutations

Cat Clay Meditative Stitches

Visual Studies Workshop Gallery I do?!

Chartreuse Studios Of Beasts and Babies

T H I S M O N T H O N LY: Monroe Branch of the Rochester Public Library Onón:tá, (The Hill)

Constance Mauro Studio Open Studio Creative Wellness Coalition Painting Big Gallery r 82nd Print Club of Rochester Exhibition Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) Open Studios Image City Photography Gallery Simply Myanmar

OCTOBER HIGHLIGHTS:

• signals_now_ at RoCo • Painting Big at The Creative Wellness Gallery • Of Beasts and Babies at Chartreuse Studios • Open Studios at HUA • Meditative Stitches at Cat Clay • Carl Chiarenza's Transmutations at AXOM Gallery • The Strength of Iron Art: War Inspired Pieces at Our House Gallery • Onón:tá, (The Hill) at Monroe Branch of the Rochester Public Library • Picture This at A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe • I do?! at VSW Gallery

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27

Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16

Guy flick, chick flick, skin flick

2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

“Don Jon”

contemporary guy flick, but later becomes something quite different. (R), WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY In a voiceover accompanying a montage of JOSEPH GORDON-LEVITT the items, the actor tells the audience his major NOW PLAYING interests in life — his car, his apartment, his body, his family, his buddies, his church, and [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA pornography. The movie sticks faithfully to that list, showing numerous shots and scenes of the Joseph Gordon-Levitt might possibly regard protagonist, Jon, driving, cleaning his place, “Don Jon” as his Orson Welles achievement working out, dining with his Italian family, — after all, he wrote, directed, and stars in going to Mass on Sundays, and most important, the movie, a Hollywood trifecta. The picture watching pornography. Although a terrific success may perhaps rank somewhat below “Citizen with women — his victorious forays in nightclubs Kane” in quality, but we all know that earn him the sobriquet of the title — Jon standards everywhere have declined. Rather describes, in most graphic terms, exactly why he than an American epic, it begins as an ordinary needs the videos he watches on his computer, even directly after sex with one of his conquests. Jon confesses his sins weekly, enumerating how many times he masturbated since his last confession, and of course continuing the practice. Despite the movie’s extremely foul language and its outrageous subject, it manages quite a few laughs, most of them generated not by Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Scarlett Johansson in “Don Jon.” PHOTO COURTESY

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 30

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his addiction but by the weekly family dinners, where his father (Tony Danza) shouts and swears and his mother (Glenne Headly) constantly nags him about finding a girl and settling down. When to the amazement of his buddies, Jon actually falls in love with Barbara (Scarlett Johansson) a flashy, pneumatic blonde, his life changes. When she discovers him enjoying his pornography after they make love, he promises to abandon his practice, enroll in a night course, and become a better person. In the class, naturally, he breaks his promise and watches porn on his phone, capturing the attention of an older classmate, Esther (Julianne Moore), who explains the meaning of his addiction. Although Jon’s problem, which he does not regard as a problem, surely exists, his version of it seems entirely preposterous; surely pornography acts as a substitute for sex rather than something better than actual sex. The fact of his addiction nicely defines his utter narcissism but never suggests any particular reasons for it — when a healthy young man finds masturbation more satisfying than intercourse, something seems weirdly wrong, which even Esther never stresses in her analysis. With the entrance of Esther, ”Don Jon” changes from a guy flick to something very like a chick flick, presumably the intention of the writerdirector-star; the transformation hardly convinces, however, even when the cinematography moves from bright and hard-edged to soft and fuzzy

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On the right track “Rush” (R), DIRECTED BY RON HOWARD NOW PLAYING [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

and Jon’s narration moves from obscenities to emotional statements. The change strikes a false and sentimental note in the picture’s silly, raunchy tone, as unreal as most of the rest of the work. Although Jon drives a flashy muscle car, lives in a roomy, attractive apartment, spends most of his nights in clubs on search-anddestroy missions with his buddies, we never see him making the money to support his happy hedonism. He claims to earn his living as a bartender, a job the movie never shows at a place we never see, which somehow allows him to enjoy the rich activity of his night life. One of the several distasteful notes in “Don Jon,” the presentation of an Italian American workingclass family, here in New Jersey, echoes the familiar Hollywood stereotypes, following the exaggerations of gangster comedies and films like “Lovers and Other Strangers,” and “Saturday Night Fever.” The movie might entertain fans of the obnoxious television “reality” show, “Jersey Shore,” which incidentally never inspired the protests that followed the popularity of “The Sopranos.” Tony Danza provides most of the funny lines, most of which grow out of his simple, bad-tempered obscenities. Given its subject, its language, its graphic descriptions, the dozens of sex scenes both on Jon’s computer and in his bedroom, “Don Jon” richly deserves its R rating and actually qualifies as a kind of pornography itself. Its view of porn, oddly, amounts to its own kind of sentimentality, an odd thing in a purported guy flick.

I’ve always considered Ron Howard a talented director, but never one who gets me excited when I see his name attached to a movie. I think it’s because, while he is responsible for a lot of good movies (some, like “Apollo 13,” I’d even call great), he’s also responsible for cinematic travesties like “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” Now Howard reteams with his “Frost/Nixon” screenwriter Peter Morgan for the thrilling and stylish “Rush,” the story of the real-life 1970’s rivalry between British Formula One racer James Hunt and Austrian driver Niki Lauda, and delivers one of his best films. The film begins with the two men meeting early on in their careers while in the Formula Three racing division, and they take an instant dislike to one another. Hunt (Chris Hemsworth, “Thor”) is a preening, charismatic rock star of a driver who’s prone to taking risks on the track while boozing and womanizing his way through life off the track. Lauda (Daniel Brühl, “Inglourious Basterds”), on the other hand, is self-disciplined,

Chris Hemsworth in “Rush.” PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES

determined, and decidedly prickly (he’s described as an asshole by several characters throughout the course of the film). Despite his dangerous occupation, he avoids unnecessary risk at all costs. Both men are incredible drivers, and soon secure themselves high-profile sponsorships, Lauda with Ferrari and Hunt with British car manufacturer McLaren. They rise through the ranks, and it’s not long before they’re the top-seeded competitors in Formula One racing, ultimately leading up to the 1976 Japan Grand Prix where they compete against one another for the world championship title. Though I’m sure the film has exaggerated their differences for dramatic effect, Hunt and Lauda’s frequently antagonistic relationship ultimately pushing them both into greatness makes for a fantastically entertaining story. The actors playing the two men fully inhabit their roles, each turning in exceptional performances. If he hasn’t already, Chris Hemsworth proves he’s a movie star with this role. His magnetic screen presence comes in handy for Hunt’s larger-than-life personality, but he also finds the character’s hidden vulnerability. He’s also, as the archival footage at the end of the film proves, a dead ringer for the real James Hunt. Brühl has the more challenging role in the film, making us care about a character who is at times distinctly unlikable. The handsome actor is fitted with a prosthetic overbite to echo Lauda’s somewhat rat-like appearance, and despite these obstacles, he manages to win us over. Both actors’ work is crucial to the film, which spends just as much time with the men off the track as it does on. Lauda’s relationship with his wife, played by Alexandra Maria Lara, is handled quite well. Though she does inevitably end up worriedly looking on from the sidelines (though she never asks her husband to give up racing), their scenes together offer a unique depiction of the marriage that feels

true to the script’s depiction of Lauda: all business and serious-minded nearly to a fault. They clearly love one another, but it’s not a warm-and-fuzzy sort of love. Olivia Wilde plays Hunt’s wife, but unfortunately for the actress, her role doesn’t really add much of anything to the plot. Going into the film, I knew less than nothing about Formula One racing, so I admired the way Morgan’s script gives just enough information for the audience to understand and follow what’s happening without resorting to having a character actually sit down and provide an expository infodump about the rules of the sport. The film doesn’t spend a second on anything that’s unnecessary to the plot, so the pace never lags. There’s a confidence to Howard’s direction of “Rush” that feels unlike any of his previous work. He often has an impulse toward schmaltzy sentimentality, but outside of an occasional clunky moment, he manages to sidestep that tendency almost entirely. The film’s racing sequences are thrillingly staged and exhilarating to watch — when crashes occur, you truly feel them. The entire film looks fantastic. Anthony Dod Mantle’s stunning cinematography is equally as invaluable to the success of the film as either of its stars. Aping the visual style of 70’s film stock, with its overly saturated, high contrast, grainy look, the film appears as though it could have been filmed in the era it’s set. Mantle’s work, along with the Daniel P. Hanley and Mike Hill’s editing of the film, deserve to be remembered come Oscar time. I also appreciated that the film doesn’t overdo it on the period trappings, especially the soundtrack, which isn’t just a jukebox of 70’s rock nostalgia. A welcome change of pace for its director, “Rush” is a heart-pounding action film fused with a satisfying human drama that delivers on the sensation promised in its title.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29

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Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] THE 39 STEPS (1935): Alfred Hitchcock directs this tale about British man goes up against an organization of spies known as “The 39 Steps” and attempts to prevent them from stealing top secret information. Little (Wed, Oct 2, 6:30 p.m.) BERBERIAN SOUND STUDIO (2012): A British sound engineer (Toby Jones) goes to work designing sound effects for an Italian horror film, and finds that the job gets under his skin. Dryden (Sat, Oct 5, 8 p.m.; Sun, Oct 6, 11 a.m.) BESHARAM (NR): An unscrupulous car mechanic decides to change his ways and make right all the wrongs he’s done in his life. Henrietta BIRDMAN OF ALCATRAZ (1962): John Frankenheimer directs the true story of a convicted murderer who becomes a bird expert while in prison. Starring Burt Lancaster. Dryden (Sun, Oct 6, 2 p.m.) BLUE CAPRICE (R): This crime drama tells the real-life story behind the infamous 2002 Beltway sniper attacks. Starring Isaiah Washington, Tequan Richmond, and Tim Blake Nelson. Little A BUCKET OF BLOOD (1959): Roger Corman’s Beat culture satire, follows the exploits of an acclaimed artist with a deadly secret. Screening as a double feature with “Corman’s World.” Dryden (Thu, Oct 3, 9:30 p.m.) CORMAN’S WORLD: EXPLOITS OF A HOLLYWOOD REBEL (2011): This documentary examines the career of B-movie producer/ director Roger Corman. Featuring interviews with Jack Nicholson, Martin Scorsese, and Ron Howard, among others. Dryden (Thu, Oct 3, 8 p.m.) GRACE UNPLUGGED (PG): A young teen with a gift for singing finds her faith tested when she gets her big break in the music business. Henrietta GRAVITY (PG-13): Sandra Bullock and George Clooney play astronauts who becomes stranded in space after a shuttle accident, in Alfonso Cuarón’s sci-fi thriller. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage HAUTE CUISINE (PG-13): The true story of the woman who was appointed to be the personal chef to French President François Mitterrand. Pittsford THE KILLERS (1946): After two hit men successfully carry out an assignment, a life insurance investigator uncovers the dead man’s sordid past and connection to a beautiful, but deadly woman. Based on the Ernest Hemingway short story, and starring Burt Lancaster and Ava Gardner. Dryden (Wed, Oct 2, 8 p.m.) METALLICA: THROUGH THE NEVER 3D (R): Blending concert film and fantasy, a roadie for Metallica is sent out on a mission during one of the band’s concerts, and finds himself on a surreal adventure. Henrietta

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eight American presidents over the course of three decades. Also starring Oprah Winfrey, Terrence Howard, Alan Rickman, Jane Fonda, Robin Williams, and John Cusack. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS (PG): The continued epic adventures of Percy, the son of Poseidon, who now must journey across the sea of monsters to find the mythical Golden Fleece. Starring Logan Lerman, Stanley Tucci, Anthony Head, and Nathan Fillion. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece PRISONERS (R): An allstar cast heads up this thriller about a group of parents who take matters into their own hands after their daughters are kidnapped. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman, Viola Davis, Terrence Howard, Maria Bello, and Paul Dano. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage RIDDICK (R): Vin Diesel returns to his role as antihero convict Riddick, as he battles a planet full of alien predators. With Karl Urban and Katee Sackhoff. Culver, Henrietta, Tinseltown RUSH (R): Ron Howard’s film about the true story of the 1970s rivalry between Formula One racers James Hunt and Niki Lauda. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Daniel Brühl, and Olivia Wilde. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE WAY, WAY BACK (PG13): A coming-of-age story about an unhappy young boy on summer vacation with his family, who’s taken under the wing of the freespirited manager of the nearby water park. Starring Sam Rockwell, Steve Carell, Toni Collette, Maya Rudolph, Allison Janney, and Jim Rash. Cinema WE’RE THE MILLERS (R): A small-time pot dealer hires strangers to pose as his family in order to not arouse suspicion while making his way across the Mexican border with a shipment. Starring Jason Sudeikis, Jennifer Aniston, Emma Roberts, and Ed Helms. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage YOU’RE NEXT (R): Horror fans have been waiting for this film’s arrival in theaters for a while now. While it’s not the game-changing savior of the horror genre that early reviews hinted at (“Cabin in the Woods,” oddly also released by Lionsgate, was closer in that regard), it is an absolute blast. Vintage

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[ CONTINUING ] 2 GUNS (R): Based on the graphic novel by Steven Grant the film centers around partners in crime, Bobby (Denzel Washington) and Stig (Mark Wahlberg). Culver BAGGAGE CLAIM (PG13): Paula Patton plays a flight attendant who takes advantage of her job to fly across the country revisiting her exes and hunt for a date in time for her sister’s wedding. With Djimon Hounsou, Taye Diggs, Derek Luke, Adam Brody, and Tia Mowry. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Tinseltown BATTLE OF THE YEAR (PG-13): Josh Holloway (“Lost”) plays a former basketball coach who accepts a job coaching a dance crew hoping to win an international dance tournament. Culver BLUE JASMINE (PG-13): Woody Allen employs a situation that initially resembles Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire,” and filters it through his own imagination, creating a sad, only occasionally

comic story out of some familiar material. Little CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG): The sequel to the animated adaptation of the popular children’s picture book, this time involving an island of food/animal hybrids. With the voices of Bill Hader, Anna Faris, James Caan, Kristen Schaal, Andy Samberg, and Neil Patrick Harris. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG): A former supervillain is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to spy on a dangerous new super criminal in this animated sequel. With the voice talents of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig, Russell Brand, and Ken Jeong. Canandaigua, Culver DON JON (R): Joseph Gordon-Levitt makes his big screen debut as writer/ director with this comedy about a ladies man who finds that real-life ladies have difficulty competing with the ones in his pornos. With Scarlett Johansson, Julianne Moore, and Tony Danza. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown ENOUGH SAID (PG-13): Julia Louis Dreyfus plays a divorced woman who begins dating a new man (James Gandolfini), only to discover that he’s her new friend’s ex-husband in this romantic-comedy from Nicole Holofcener. With Catherine Keener and Toni Collette. Little, Pittsford THE FAMILY (R): This actioncomedy, from director Luc Besson, stars Robert De Niro as a former mafia boss who’s forced to go into witness protection with his family. Also starring Michelle Pfeiffer, Tommy Lee Jones, and Dianna Agron. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage GROWN UPS 2 (PG-13): Adam Sandler, Chris Rock, Kevin James, and David Spade all return in this sequel about a group of overgrown man-children. Also starring Salma Hayek and Maya Rudolph. Vintage IN A WORLD… (R): A female vocal coach attempts to break into the cutthroat movietrailer voice-over business in this satirical comedy. Cinema INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 (PG13): Fresh off the success of “The Conjuring,” director James Wan returns to the saga of the haunted Lambert family. Starring Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, and Barbara Hershey. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (PG-13): Forest Whitaker stars in this true story, about a butler who served

| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |

PARKLAND (PG-13): This film follows the events at Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963: the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Starring Paul Giamatti, Zac Efron, Tom Welling, Marcia Gay Harden, and Billy Bob Thornton. Little POPULAIRE (R): A young woman applying for a secretarial job in 1958 Normandy reveals a unique gift for speed typing. Little RUNNER RUNNER (R): Justin Timberlake stars as a poor college student who gets mixed up in the seedy world of online gambling. Also starring Ben Affleck, Gemma Arterton, and Anthony Mackie. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster SEARCHING FOR ANGELA SHELTON (2004): Filmmaker Angela Shelton travels across the country interviewing other Angela Sheltons as a way of documenting the situation of women in the United States. Little (Thu, Oct 3, 6:30 p.m.) TAXI (1932): James Cagney stars as a young cab driver who forms a resistance movement after a veteran driver is imprisoned for retaliating against the mob destroys his car. Also starring Loretta Young. Dryden (Fri, Oct 4, 8 p.m.) TERMS AND CONDITION MAY APPLY (NR): This documentary examines what corporations and the government can learn about us through our internet and cell phone usage. Little (Tue, Oct 8, 7 p.m.) THE WHITE HELL OF PITZ PALU (1929): A mountain climbing couple agree to assist a distraught man climb a 12,000 foot mountain to find his missing wife. Dryden (Tue, Oct 8, 8 p.m.)

FINAL BALLOT THOUSANDS of Rochesterians cast their votes in our online Primary Ballot to determine the Final 4 in each of the 113 categories that make up Best of Rochester 2013. PLEASE NOTE: City Newspaper had no say in the selection of the Final 4; these were determined solely by the people, places, and things that received the most votes in our Primary Ballot.

vote now through friday,

October 18 TAKE THE SURVEY AT

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31

Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547. $450 per month includes all. Gates area. Call Joe 585-2471335

Shared Housing

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. LOOKING FOR HONEST responsible, white male, ages 35-55 to share quiet single family home, non-smoker, nondrinker, no drugs Inc cable, off-street parking with garage.

Real Estate Auctions CITY OF LOCKPORT Tax Auction October 8th at 6pm Selling Single and Multi-Family Homes Lockport City Hall, 1 Locks Plaza AuctionsInternational.com or CALL: 800-536-1401 REAL ESTATE AUCTION Self-Storage Business, Heavy

Equipment, Sunday, Oct 27, 11 AM. 907 Buisness Route 6, Mayfield PA 18433. Open House: Thurs, Oct 3, 11AM4PM Legacy Auction & Realty. Rich Coccodrilli, AU005571 BidLegacy.com 570-656-3299

Land for Sale LENDER MUST SELL SHORT! HISTORIC CATSKILL MOUNTAIN FARM 10/5-10/6. Over 1,000 acres inn JUST 32 Parcels! 5-147 acres tracts 50% Below Market Prices! 2-1/2 hours NYC, Gorgeous Views, Farmhouses, Springs & Ponds! Call (888)9058847 register at www. newyorklandandlakes.com take virtual tour NOW! NY STATE LAND LARGE ACREAGE FOR SPORTSMEN 80 Acres w/Stream, Timber & State Land: $74,995 60 Acres w/ Rustic Hunting Cabin: $79,995 51 Acres, No. Tier Hunting, Salmon River Region: $59,995 Choose from Over 100 Affordable Properties! Financing Available. Call 800-229-7843 www.landandcamps.com

Vacation Property BIG HUNTING LODGE: House, 8 acres, hunt adjoining 500 acre Deer Creek Forest. Bass ponds, brooks, fruit woods. Was $129,900, now $99,900. www. LandFirstNY.com Call 888-6832626

Home Services

Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Adoption PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) HARLEY DAVIDSON 2006 ULTRA CLASSIC EXCELLENT CONDITION 15,000 miles asking $10,000 716-44008880

The Emporium WOODEN HANGERS FOR COATS: 12 wood hangers for coats. 12 wood, 2 plastic 1 for hanging pants. All $15 585880-2903

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32 CITY OCTOBER 2-8, 2013

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $15. 585-880-2903 CANVASS CHAIR Fold up $5 585-383-0405 DRIVEWAY GATES 8’ sections. All welded parts complete $49 per each 585-752-1000 EVEN FLO Aura strooler & combo car seat $40 B/O 585225-5526 GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (says, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903 GRACO DOUBLE STROLLER $40 B/O 585-225-5526 KITCHEN TABLE 3/8 Thick round glass top table. 40” diameter. 41” high. $49 585490-5870 LARGE JEWELRY COLLECTION All kinds, old & new, retro, vintage, cameo’s, brooches, beads & more. Great pieces for jewelry designers too, 585-360-2895 OLD FASHIONED GUM BALL MACHINE. Works $10 585383-0405

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****GUN-SHOW -Alexander Fireman’s’ Rec Hall*** 10708 Alexander Rd. Rte 98. Alexander, NY 100 Tables! Sunday October 6th Only! 8:00am- 3:00pm. Next Show Akron NY 10/19-10/20. Nfgshows.com

USED TV FOR SALE —Sharp 13” Color with remote. 14 years young with remote. $20 cash and carry. Message phone Mary 585/413-0827

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Fast and easy-to-use! • Find what you’re looking for with new categories! • Clickable links to business websites • and many more features!

Events

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Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 CHRISTIAN ROCK - R & B Band is seeking a lead / rhythm guitarist 585-355-4449 DRUMMER Experienced Young Drummer available. Influences are Led Zep, Rush, Pink Floyd, Foo Fighters. Looking for Guitar, Bass and Vocals. Contact through: http://www.youtube. com/user/Chaztize7 KEYBOARD PLAYER needed to play with one of Rochester’s finest Big Bands. Great charts able to rehearse a few Weds. during the months of (April-November) effective 04/15/2014 585-442-7480 NEEDED MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS Bass, guitars, keys, horns. Must have equipt. & transportation & be avail. evenings. Bobby 585-3284121 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org VOCALIST that can lead & background with other vocalists that do the same. Avail evenings, transportation, R & B, Funk, Jazz, Pop, Blues......Bobby 585-328-4121 Experienced please.

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958 & 585-512-6044 PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

Miscellaneous HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county” KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, NonStaining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES) SAWMILLS from only $4897.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/ DVD:  www.NorwoodSawmills. com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Looking For... FREE YARN NEEDED! Please donate your yarn to Sunday Circle knitting hats scarves and mittens for the poor. Arrange pickup. Call and leave message 585/413-0827

Mind Body Spirit CAN’T LOSE WEIGHT? Always tired? NutritionalGain.com has the top three weight-loss supplements in the industry. Go to NutritionalGain.com to order your life changing bottle today! ELLEN SINGLETON God-Gifted Psychic. Helps relationships, stops divorce, cheating,solves

severe problems. Free 15-minute reading. (832) 8849714 (AAN CAN) NEED TO LOSE WEIGHT? Need more energy? Go herbal! Herbalife uses desert botanicals! all natural products for weight loss, healthy aging, heart health, energy and much more! visit herbapeace.com for more info and to order or call (585)880-2726 for your personal wellness coach

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

VIAGRA 100MG 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Save Big Now, Discreet shipping. Call 1-800374-2619 Today! (AAN CAN)

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-959-3419

Next-to-New Sale

BLESSED SACRAMENT AUDITORIUM MONROE AVENUE AT OXFORD STREET

Thursday & Friday, Oct. 3 & 4, 9am-8pm Saturday, Oct. 5, 9am-12noon ROCHESTER’S ORIGINAL NEXT-TO-NEW SALE: Clothing, furniture, appliances, kitchen items, jewelry, books, games, toys, numerous other items. Home-made chili, sauerkraut and baked goods for sale. Come for lunch or supper! www.SouthEastRochesterCatholics.org

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Canandaigua Lake; Newly renovated ranch with 25' feet of frontage and a dock. Turn key, everything is included! $219,900 Call Ryan @ 201-0724 or visit RochesterSells.com for more info. Re/Max Realty Group.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Parkside Living in Highland 80 Reservoir Avenue Looking for a secluded, park-like environment that also features all the conveniences of city living? You’ll find it here in the charming Dutch Colonial Revival house located at 80 Reservoir Avenue in the city’s Mt. Hope/Highland neighborhood. With Highland Park and Warner Castle’s “Sunken Garden” as its next door neighbor, this distinctive 1911 residence boasts a spacious, three-story interior that is enhanced by many architect-designed features. Constructed during the early 20th century, this brick-and-shingle- clad house reflects the era from the 1880s to 1920s, when Americans celebrated “all things Dutch.” Nicknamed “Holland Mania,” this movement featured art and architecture that took many of its cues from historic Dutch design. The distinctive gambrel roof of this house reflects details found on early Dutch houses from the 17th century in the Hudson Valley. From the large and inviting front porch, step into the spacious entry hall, with elegant staircase, leaded glass windows, inglenook bench, and arched entrances into the living room and kitchen. Hardwood oak floors and extensive wood trim and crown moldings are immediately evident throughout the interior. The gracious living room includes a Colonial Revival style mantel and fireplace, with tile hearth, built-in bookshelves and large picture window. With ample windows and distinctive details, the dining room features a built-in corner cabinet and breakfast nook, which overlooks the backyard. The spacious, eat-in kitchen retains the original pantry area, wood cabinetry, and rear porch overlooking the backyard.

Upstairs are three bedrooms, each with generously sized closets. The master bedroom extends across the front of the house and has two large closets. A door from the master bedroom leads out onto the open sleeping porch, which is located above the front porch. A full bath completes the second-floor layout. Continuing upstairs to the third floor reveals a huge living space that features ample storage areas and a high-ceilinged, finished room with leaded glass doors, which could be used as a fourth bedroom, playroom, home office, or studio. The large basement of the house features utilitarian areas for washer, dryer, storage and workspace, as well as a large recreation room with tile floor and knotty pine walls. Located adjacent to Highland Park, this lovely, early 20th century house is remarkable for the many original details that remain and that await a new owner whose rehabilitation will reveal the outstanding beauty of this singular property. The tree shaded lot includes numerous deciduous and coniferous shrubs and trees, which afford many opportunities for an enthusiastic gardener. With 2,368 square feet, the house at 80 Reservoir Ave. is listed at $179,900. For more information, contact Richard Sarkis at Nothnagle Realtors at 585-756-7281. by Cynthia Howk Cynthia is the Architectural Research Coordinator at The Landmark Society.

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

Search. Buy. Sell. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33

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BRIEF SYNOPSIS OF DETERMINATION AND FINDINGS PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 2 OF THE NEW YORK STATE EMINENT DOMAIN PROCEDURE LAW The Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority (“RGRTA”) shall acquire certain parcels of real property by eminent domain for the construction and operation of the Main Street Campus Improvement Project (the “Project”), a development project that will improve RGRTA’s operations at its existing campus in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York. Copies of the determination and findings will be forwarded upon written request without cost. PROPERTY TO BE ACQUIRED RGRTA is proposing to improve operations at its existing Campus. The Project will include renovations to and expansion of the existing Operations Building; construction of a new Maintenance Warehouse Building; developing new indoor and outdoor bus parking spaces and staging areas for buses waiting for maintenance; construction of a new Service Building; providing a new employee parking area to replace the parking displaced by the new Maintenance Warehouse Building and Service Building; and other site improvements. The Project will require RGRTA to acquire twenty-one (21) parcels of private property on Hayward Avenue and Chamberlain Street and will require the City of Rochester to de-map a portion of Hayward Avenue. The properties which shall be acquired or condemned are identified by the following Tax Map Parcel Numbers: 107.61-3-37 107.69-1-32 107.69-1-33

107.69-1-34 107.69-1-36.001 107.61-3-36 107.61-3-35 107.69-1-19 107.69-1-20 107.61-3-34 107.61-3-33 107.69-1-21 107.69-1-37 107.69-1-22 107.61-3-32 107.69-1-23 107.61-3-31 107.61-3-30 107.61-3-29 107.69-1-38 107.69-1-39. PROCEDURAL HISTORY Section 1299-ii of the Public Authorities Law authorizes RGRTA to acquire or condemn real property to carry out its purposes pursuant to the Eminent Domain Procedure Law (“EDPL”). In accordance with Article 2 of the EDPL, RGRTA conducted a public hearing on May 29, 2013 to determine the need to obtain the necessary real property interests required for the construction and operation of the Project. Notices of the public hearing were published as required under the EDPL. Property owners and other interested parties also were given advance notice of the hearing by mail. At the hearing site, copies of the maps of the property interests to be acquired by RGRTA were posted and made available to the public. All oral and written comments received during the public hearing, and in the written submission period, have been reviewed, made part of the record and given due consideration. PUBLIC NEED, USE AND PURPOSE The current configuration of RGRTA’s campus, which was constructed in 1974, results in a number of challenges to RGRTA’s operations, primarily related to inadequate bus storage and staging space and bus servicing capacity. These parking and servicecapacity constraints in turn result in inefficient operations at the campus that also adversely affect the nearby residential neighborhood. Moreover, RGRTA is aiming to increase ridership each year, which will require a larger fleet over the long term. With anticipated future growth, RGRTA will have further difficulties accommodating additional fleet at its Campus in its current configuration. Therefore, RGRTA is proposing an overall reconfiguration of the East Main Street Campus to facilitate more efficient and safe operations currently and in the future. RGRTA finds that the Project will greatly improve bus servicing and maintenance capabilities at the campus with the new Service and Maintenance Buildings and

cont. on page 36

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-296-7093 COOKS WANTED Part time cook wanted who has the experience working for a catering company. Catering weddings, receptions, and many other special events.. Please send your resume to sjplunkett@gmail.com CORREIA’S GENERAL CONTRACTING Sales & Project Manager. Average first year $55$60K. Recession proof industry. No experience necessary / Will train. Top rep in 2012 made over $200K. TO APPLY CALL: 315257-9104 or send resume to; athompson@roofally.com CRST offers the Best Lease Purchase Program! SIGN-ON BONUS. No Down Payment or Credit Check. Great Pay. Class-A CDL required. Owner Operators Welcome! Call 866-239-0292 DRIVERS HOME WEEKLY & BIWEEKLY EARN $900- $1200/WK BC/BS Med & Major Benefits. No Canada, HAZMAT or NYC! SMITH TRANSPORT 877-705-9261 HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes

valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) SATTELLITE DISH INSTALLERS Subcontractor position - trucks and tools required - Excellent PayCall 888-313-8504 or 706-7330988 To see if you quality THE LIMITED In Eastview Mall is hiring a Part Time Management Associate with flexible availabilty including weekends. Responsibilities include Leadership and Direction to 20+ associates, Selling, Operational and Financial compliance. To apply visit: www.thelimited.com/ careers THE LIMITED Is hiring Floorset/Visual Associates for Eastview/Marketplace Malls. Responsibilities include executing floorset/merchandise standards. Required Availability: Mon/Tues 7pm-3am and Flexible Wed-Sun. To apply visit: www.thelimited/ careers.

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000.

BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http:// www.rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948 BOOK LOVERS needed to sort and price donated books for resale at Downtown Library bookstore. Proceeds benefit library programs. Training provided. 585-428-8322 or Kate.Antoniades@libraryweb.org. BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s The Senior Connection program needs people 55+ to volunteer to make 2 friendly phone calls / 2 visits each month to an older adult Call Katie 585-244-8400 x 152 FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-787-4209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com! HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is

looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM is looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers for :Meal delivery. Clerical work and answering phones, scheduling volunteers to deliver routes. For more information visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 7878326. SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 SECOND YEAR MCC DENTAL STUDENT eeking patients who would like complimentary cleaning. This is FREE in exchange for your time! Contact

Tina B. 585-902-8009 or emailtinahygiene@gmail.com

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AIRLINE CAREERS- begin here - Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35

Legal Ads > page 34 expanded Operations Building. It will also greatly improve bus parking and storage at the campus by providing an adequate number of designated bus parking spaces for the fleet and by substantially increasing the number of parking spaces located indoors. These changes will improve operational efficiencies and decrease operational costs by eliminating the need to search for and shift buses from undesignated parking spaces throughout the day. Designated parking spaces will also reduce the risk of bus-to-bus and car-to-bus accidents. These changes will also allow for sidewalks and pedestrian crossings thereby providing for safe pedestrian circulation within the campus. In addition, the changes will reduce any impact of RGRTA’s operations on the nearby residential community by reducing the need for earlymorning bus starts during cold weather, the need for overnight bus servicing, and the number of buses parked at the eastern and southern perimeters of the campus. In addition, the new perimeter landscaping and higher perimeter wall will create a new buffer between the campus and the surrounding residential neighborhood. Overall, these improvements will make RGRTA’s Main Street Campus operations more efficient, less intrusive, and better able to accommodate future growth in bus operations. LOCATION AND REASONS FOR SELECTION The proposed location for the Project is preferable to an alternative location because it is adjacent to RGRTA’s existing campus and is more compatible with existing RTS operations and route structures. In addition, RGRTA considered alternatives where varying amounts of land would be acquired. During the course of its evaluations, RGRTA determined that it could not meet its operational needs within the footprint of its existing campus because several critical needs would not be able to be met. RGRTA also considered acquiring only 1.4 acres of land, but again the area was not large enough to accommodate all the needed functions, including providing adequate employee parking. ENVIRONMENTAL AND LOCALITY EFFECTS The Project will not have a significant adverse impact on the environment or the community, and any adverse impacts that will occur can be mitigated. The land to be disturbed for purposes of development of the Project is located in an urban area occupied by residential structures and yards, which will be

demolished and removed as part of the Project. The building and construction of the Project will be performed as quickly and efficiently as possible. Construction activity generally will be limited to daylight hours. The contractors undertaking construction activities will implement appropriate measures to avoid or minimize excessive noise, vibration, air quality impacts, and impacts from stormwater run off and erosion. Upon completion of the construction of the Project, there will not be any significant adverse impacts to the Project site or to any areas adjacent thereto, including adjacent and nearby residential areas, associated with mobile source emissions or stationary source emissions. The Project will not significantly change the number or timing of vehicle trips arriving at or departing from the Campus and will not change the numbers of buses entering and exiting the Campus or their schedules. Therefore, no significant changes to existing traffic conditions are anticipated as a result of the Project. Projectgenerated noise levels will be well below the FTA impact threshold levels, indicating that the Project will not result in significant adverse noise impacts at nearby noise-sensitive uses. Further, the small change in vehicle trips will not affect existing noise levels at the Campus entrance. Moreover, the Project includes several improvements that will reduce presently existing noise impacts to the surrounding neighborhood including expansion of indoor bus storage that will reduce noise associated with the early morning cold bus starts; increase in servicing capacity to allow servicing to be completed much earlier in the evening; and installation of a new 10-foot-high pre-cast, decorative concrete wall around the perimeter of the expanded campus that will improve security and create a visual and noise buffer between the campus and the surrounding neighborhood. Given its location, the Project will not result in any impacts to water resources. As with existing conditions, stormwater discharged from the Project site will enter a combined sewer that is treated at the City of Rochester’s sewage treatment plant and, thus, no significant adverse impacts to groundwater are expected. Further, as part of the Project, drainage structures, primarily located along the eastern boundary of the Campus, will be replaced as will the storm sewer piping, catch basins and trench drain. The Project will not have a significant adverse impact

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on historic or archeological resources. The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (“SHPO”) confirmed that there are no State/National Register eligible/listed properties on or within the immediate vicinity of the Project site; thus the Project will not affect any historic properties. The Project will involve subsurface disturbance on the residential properties west of the existing campus that have been identified as potentially archaeologically sensitive. Therefore, Phase IB archaeological testing will be conducted in these areas to test for the presence or absence of archaeological resources. The archaeological testing will be implemented when RGRTA has control of the properties, in advance of construction of the Project on those portions of the site. The Phase IB surveys will be undertaken in compliance with applicable standards and guidelines for archaeological surveys, including those promulgated by the SHPO, New York Archaeological Council, and the U.S. Secretary of the Interior. At any locations where archaeological resources are encountered, additional archaeological study will be undertaken in consultation with the SHPO. This will include determining the National Register eligibility of any resources or sites encountered. If any sites are determined to be eligible for the National Register, then mitigation measures would be implemented for those sites, which could include avoidance or data recovery prior to any project construction at those locations The Project site is not in an area encompassed by agricultural uses, nor is it known to have been devoted to such uses previously. Further, the Project site is not known to be used for recreational purposes, nor is it known to be used as an open space by the community, nor does the Project site contain any views deemed important to the community and, thus, development of the Project will not have any detrimental effect on such views. Moreover, the Project site and associated area is not located in a statutorily defined “critical environmental area” under New York law, nor is the Project site designated or proposed as a “critical habitat” in accordance with federal law. The project will not result in any impacts to threatened or endangered species. There will be minimal impacts to the local infrastructure, including public safety, solid waste and energy. The Project will not create a material conflict with the community’s current land

use plans or goals. The Project will continue the present transportation use of the existing Campus site. The twenty-one (21) residential properties that are part of the Project site will be acquired and converted from residential use to transportation use. The enlarged campus will continue the same transportation use that presently exists adjacent to an existing residential neighborhood. Although, the Campus site is being enlarged, the larger campus is proposed to accommodate the existing level of use; no increase in the transportation activities is proposed. As a result, the transportation uses on the enlarged campus will be similarly compatible with the surrounding residential neighborhood. In fact, the improvements proposed as part of the Project, ranging from installation of a new wall, to moving bus servicing indoors, as well as the adequate provision of employee parking on campus, will serve to improve the quality of life in the surrounding neighborhood. The Project will not result in significant adverse impacts to visual and aesthetic conditions. The Project would not result in any significant adverse socioeconomic impacts, including such impacts that would disproportionately effect low-income and minority populations. DETERMINATION The foregoing represents the RGRTA’s Determination and Findings under Section 204(B) of the Eminent Domain Procedures Law. The parcels identified above are needed to construct and operate the Project RGRTA is satisfied that, as required under Section 204(B) of the Eminent Domain Procedures Law : (1) the public use, benefit, or purpose of the project has been established in the record; (2) the approximate location of the proposed public project has been established and an explanation of the reasons for the selection of that location has been provided; and (3) the general effect of the proposed project on the environment and the residents of the localities in which the project will be located has been comprehensively examined. Accordingly, RGRTA finds that the necessary justification exists to proceed to condemn the parcels identified above. Copies of the determination and findings will be forwarded upon written request without cost. [ NOTICE ] Community Forensic Interventions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/4/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of

LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at P.O. Box 391, Penfield, NY 14526. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-9970 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Christopher M. Vanhall, a/k/a Christopher Vanhall; Karon Lewis; NY Financial Services, LLC; Arrow Financial Services, LLC; Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 17, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on October 30, 2013 at 11:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 94 Clearview Avenue, Hilton, NY 14468; Tax Account No. 009.673-8.1 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9345 of Deeds, page 287. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $54,256.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: September 2013 Vincent E. Merante, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] Juvatek Technology Group, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 16, 2013 with an effective date of formation of August 16, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 7825 PittsfordPalmyra Road, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served.

A copy of any process shall be mailed to 7825 Pittsford-Palmyra Road, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] KHG Insurance Agency, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 23, 2013 with an effective date of formation of August 23, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 68 Muriel Drive, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 68 Muriel Drive, Rochester, New York 14612. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1) Name: Blueprint Educational Consulting Services, LLC. 2) Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on November 5, 2012. 3) County: Monroe. 4) The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5) the Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which the process shall be mailed: 62 Notre Dame Drive. Rochester, NY 14623. 6) Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LNQ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 04/30/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at 85 Friel Road, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] MELMAR LAND HOLDINGS, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Mark Freemesser, 1405 Long Pond Rd., Rochester, NY 14626. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] MORFF, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 12, 2013 with an effective date of formation of August 12, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 251 Mystic Lane, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 251 Mystic Lane, Rochester, New York 14623. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Smoochy Brands, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 8/15/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of All Season Services LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 8/22/13. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 127 N Ridgelawn Drive, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of City View Equestrian, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 4310 Union St, North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Dichotomy Rochester, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 06/04/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom processes against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to 371 Park Ave Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of NORTHGATE CAR WASH LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 07/09/2013.County:

Monroe.SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 50 Dobson Rd. Rochester NY 14616,Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, Serial Number pending, for beer, liquor, and wine has been applied for by the undersigned* to sell beer, liquor, and wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 270 Miracle Mile Dr., T/O Henrietta, Rochester, NY 14623 in Monroe County for on premises consumption. *Papaya Properties LLC DBA Papaya Asian Kitchen & Bar [ NOTICE ] Notice of Conversion of Lehigh Station Associates, a partnership, to Lehigh Station Associates, LLC. Certificate filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: Lecesse Development Corp., 75 Thruway Park Dr., West Henrietta, NY 14586, Attn: Salvador Lecesse. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of SEVEN EXPRESS LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 08/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 132 Country Manor Way, Apt 19, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KJN Health & Fitness LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) Nov. 21, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 60 Almay Road, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Pushyourdata LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) August 13, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 863 Rolins Run Webster, NY 14580 . Purpose: any lawful activities.

Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCHESTER ED CONSULTING LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 06/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 68 Georgian Court Road, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activities.

of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Notice of formation of #2B2 LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State (SSNY) 9/6/2007. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: PO Box 10314, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of Course Gems, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o the LLC, Damon Morey LLP, Attn: William F. Savino, Esq., 200 Delaware Ave., Ste. 1200, Buffalo, NY 14202. Purpose: any lawful activity.

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Notice of formation of 111 WEST AVENUE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/14/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 863 Trimmer Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act.

Notice of Formation of CSB Solutions LLC Articles of Organization filed Secretary of State (SSNY) 7/15/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY Designated as agent of LLC upon who process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 35 Wenham Lane Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities.

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Notice of Formation of 1176 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1142 Mt. Hope Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of DOXY.ME LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

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[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 6F6 LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State (SSNY) 5/28/2010. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: PO Box 10314, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of C3C LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State (SSNY) 9/4/2007. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: PO Box 10314, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of COLEMAN ASSOCIATES INTERNATIONAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Dutton and Company Real Estate Services, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 Capron St, 5C, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of E5E LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State (SSNY) 10/2/2009. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: PO Box 10314, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EAST MOUNTAIN SUNRISE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 25 Farm Field Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Family First Holdings, LLC. Arts.of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. United States Corporation Agents, Inc. designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. United States Corporation Agents, Inc. shall mail process to the principal business address of the LLC: 18 Timber Ln, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of G7G LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State (SSNY) 4/27/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: PO Box 10314, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Grovetown Associates LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State (SSNY) 08/30/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 121 University Avenue, Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HARVEST MOON PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 359 San Gabriel Dr., Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Integrity Turnkey Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent

of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MANZLER COTTAGE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 14 Eden Field Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Mars Distilling LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 225 Barrington St., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MT. HOPE OPS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 21 Vineyard Hill, Fairpoint, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of NORTH AMERICAN REALTY TRUST LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Don Trooien at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Odyssey Product Development Consulting, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 10 Brookshire Lane, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PITTSFORD OPS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on

9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 21 Vineyard Hill, Fairpoint, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Purple Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/15/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 165 Turk Hill Park, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RIT Innovation Hot Spot, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 154 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ROC CITY ROYALS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/19/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 16778, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SHINY ASSETS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sibley II Affliate Leveraged Lender LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sibley Redevelopment Phase I LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sibley Redevelopment Phase II NMTC LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tailwind Innovation, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, Damon Morey LLP, Attn: Richard F. Gioia, Esq., 200 Delaware Ave., Ste. 1200, Buffalo, NY 14202. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tap Semiotic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 186 Raeburn Avenue, Rochester, NY 14619. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Adam Rains at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Lost Borough Brewing LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 Capri Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of YP & YL ROCHESTER 2, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on

09/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation: Invenio Recruiting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/19/2013. Office Location: Monroe County SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 263 Village Lane, Rochester, NY 14610 Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qual. of Aspect Management LLC, with a fictitious name of Aspect Management Marketing Services, LLC, Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/10/13. Office loc.: Monroe County. LLC org. in SC 7/16/03. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to PO Box 23727, Columbia, SC 29224. SC off. addr.: Graham Miller, 405 Oak Brook Dr., Columbia, SC 29223. Art. of Org. on file: SSSC, 1205 Pendleton St., Columbia, SC 29201. Purp.: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ACC OP (Park Point) LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/9/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of CLAIRVUE/COTOPS HAMLIN NY LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/9/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 505 Main St., Hackensack, NJ 07601. DE address of LLC: c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., 874 Walker Road, Ste. C, Dover, DE 19904. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy.

of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of COLE TAYLOR MORTGAGE, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/20/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of DE, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of EPM Equipment, LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/20/11. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc. (CSI), 1218 Central Ave., Ste. 100, Albany, NY 12205. DE address of LLC: c/o CSI, 1675 South State St., Ste. B, Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Woods Cove III, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/1/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] SHJJ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 8/26/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 3484 Monroe Av, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] STRAIGHT EDGE FAMILY WOODWORKING LIMITED

cont. on page 38

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37

Legal Ads > page 37 LIABILITY COMPANY, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 6/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1229 Crown Point Dr., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT – COUNTY OF MONROE HSBC BANK, USA, N.A., Plaintiff against MARY A. SCHEEL, RICHARD M. SCHEEL, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on April 8, 2013. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City of Rochester, N.Y. on the 11th day of October, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. Said premises known as 14 Piping Rock Run, Perinton, N.Y. 14450. Tax account number: SBL # : 167.031-43. Approximate amount of lien $ 284,479.62 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold

subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index No. 1781909. Paul A. Guerrieri, Esq., Referee. McCabe, Weisberg, & Conway Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 145 Huguenot Street Suite 210 New Rochelle, New York 10801 (914) 636-8900 [ NOTICE ] TWIN HORN LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 8/6/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to The LLC, 10 Muirfield Ct., Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the Company is any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] XLNQ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 04/30/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at 85 Friel Road, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity

[ NOTICE ] ZBJQ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 6/13/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at PO BOX 676 Henrietta NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] ZJ HEALTHY FOOT CARE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 9/16/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 1694 PENFIELD RD PENFIELD NY 14625 . Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Learning Stone, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 7/29/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 9 Tuxford Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

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[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of formation of EvenOdd, LLC (LLC) by way of conversion from a partnership f/k/a EvenOdd Creative. Cert. of Conversion filed with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/13/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 32 Delaware St., Rochester, NY 14607. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Victor Asset Acquisition, LLC filed Application for Authority with the New York Department of State on August 29, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 230 Crosskeys Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the LLC is Blue Sky Media Solutions LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on September 9, 2013. The LLC’s office is located in Monroe County, New York State. Process may be serviced on the NY Secretary of State. A copy of the process served shall be mailed to 919 S. Winton Rd, Suite 314, Rochester NY 14618. The LLC is manager-managed. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, against HERIBERTO HERNANDEZ, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 1/2/2013 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the front steps of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City of Rochester, State of New York on 10/15/2013 at 10:00AM, premises known as 1090 Atlantic Avenue, Rochester, NY 14609 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the City of Rochester, formerly Town of Brighton, County of Monroe and State of New York, SBL NO. 107.81-2-38. Approximate amount of judgment $60,855.27 plus interest and costs. Premises will be

38 CITY OCTOBER 2-8, 2013

sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 8321/12. Thomas P. Rheinstein, Esq., Referee Gross, Polowy & Orlans, Attorney for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 540, Getzville, NY 14068 Dated: August 12, 2013 1054597 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-15155 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Jean C. McDermott, Defendant. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 9, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the lobby of the Monroe County Clerk’s Office located at 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on October 7, 2013 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 64 Arbordale Avenue, Rochester, NY 14610, Tax Account No. 122.421-42, described in Deed recorded in Liber 7310 of Deeds, page 239; lot size 40 x 140.53. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $33,571.85 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: September 2013 Lisa Siragusa, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, against JOHN A. ONDERDONK A/K/A JOHN ONDERDONK, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 7/25/2013 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Steps Of The Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City Of Rochester, NY on 10/21/2013 at 10:00AM, premises known

as 3038 Union Street, Town of Ogden, Rochester, NY 14624 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Ogden, County of Monroe and State of New York, SBL NO. 131.02-224. Approximate amount of judgment $160,771.71 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 201213962. James Bell, Esq., Referee Gross, Polowy & Orlans, Attorney for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 540, Getzville, NY 14068 Dated: August 14, 2013 1055455 [ SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] Index No. 2013864 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT MONROE COUNTY AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. LAMONT ANTHONY BARTON, JR.; SHEILA GRIFFIN; LINDA BARTON, if living, or if she be dead, her husband, heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successors-in interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said LINDA BARTON, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective husbands, or widowers of hers, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to plaintiff; CATHERINE GRIFFIN;MARY GRIFFIN; JAMES O. BARTON, JR.; THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; DAIMLERCHRYSLER SERVICES NORTH AMERICA LLC D/B/A DAIMLERCHRYSLER SERVICES NORTH AMERICA D/B/A CHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES; JACOBSTEIN FOOD SERVICE, LLC; EMPIRE PORTFOLIOS, INC.; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC D/B/A IN NEW YORK AS MIDLAND FUNDING OF DELAWARE LLC; COUNTY OF MONROE and “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in the above-entitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by

personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: August 28, 2013 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Richard Dollinger, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated September 4, 2013, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose tax liens covering the premises known as 229 Elmdorf Avenue, City of Rochester, New York and identified as Tax Account Number: 120.812-54 (“Tax Parcel”). The relief sought is the sale of the subject property at public auction in satisfaction of the tax liens. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $5,884.65, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorneys’ fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Tax Parcel. Anthony J. Iacchetta Phillips Lytle LLP Office and Post Office Address 1400 First Federal Plaza Rochester, New York 14614 Tel. No. (585) 238-2000 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] Index No. 13496/2012 SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff, -against- Christina Vega, if living and if any be dead, any and all persons who are spouses, widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienor, heirs, devisees, distributees, or successors in interest of such of the above as may be dead, and their spouses, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors in interest, all of whom and whose names and places of residences are unknown to Plaintiff, Tony Nguyen, Bank of America, NA, HSBC Bank Nevada, NA ASI Direct Merchant Credit Car, Capital One Bank, Palisades Collection, LLC AAO HSBC, Midland Funding LLC, New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, United States of AmericaInternal Revenue Service, Defendants. Plaintiff

designates Monroe County as the place of trial. Venue is based upon the County which the Mortgage premises is situated. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your Answer or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a Notice of Appearance on the attorneys for the plaintiff within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within thirty (30) days after service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure $42,166.00 and interest, recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County of MONROE on May 26,2005, in Book 19687, Page 155, covering premises known as 1503 Jay Street, Rochester, NY 14611. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this Summons and Complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the Mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the Summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your Mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT.Dated: Williamsville, New York July 16, 2013By: Stephen J. Wallace, Esq. Frenkel, Lambert, Weiss, Weisman & Gordon, LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, New York 11706 (631) 969-3100 Our File No.:01-057030FOO FILED: MONROE COUNTY CLERK 2013 SEPT 11

Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD “With its neatly cut lawns and luscious tropical vegetation,” wrote a BBC News reporter in July, Miracle Village, Fla., is an “idyllic rural community” of 200 residents -- about half of whom are registered sex offenders, attracted to the settlement near Lake Okeechobee because laws and ordinances elsewhere in Florida harshly restrict where they can live (e.g., not within a half-mile of a school or park). Incumbent residents might have been apprehensive in 2009 when a pastor started the local rehabilitation ministry (one even called it a “nightmare on Elm Street”), but since then, no one could recall a single impropriety involving an offender, and lately, 10 to 20 more applications arrive each week (screened to keep out diagnosed pedophiles and those with a history of drugs or violence).

Can’t Possibly Be True

— Dana Carter’s debut as principal of Calimesa Elementary School in California’s San Bernardino County was quite inauspicious, as parents quickly objected to his August policy of requiring kids to drop to one knee when addressing him. One parent said her daughter was forced to kneel while awaiting his attention and then to rise only when he lifted his arms. Carter said he would discontinue the policy and insisted he had instituted it for “safety” and not because he imagined himself as royalty. — Many consumers already distrust food imports from China, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture nonetheless announced recently (and “quietly,” according to NPR) that it

would exempt four Chinese companies altogether from USDA inspections of their processed chicken exports. The changes are part of the department’s money-saving streamlining that also cuts back domestic regulation -- proposals that have already drawn criticism from the Government Accountability Office because they would replace many on-site USDA inspectors with employees of the food-processing plants themselves. — It was a tough sell for performance artists Doug Melnyk and Ian Mozdzen to defend their controversial show at the Winnipeg Fringe Festival in July. (Wrote one reviewer: “What I saw (on the stage) were not one, not two, but three mayonnaise enemas. (I) do not need to see any more mayonnaise enemas for the rest of my lifetime.”) Explained Melnyk, to a Canadian Broadcasting Corp. reporter in July, if all you’re trying to do is “figure out what people want and you make it for them, that’s not art. ... (Y)ou’re just a shoemaker.”

Undignified Deaths

(1) A 40-year-old woman was killed in a near-head-on collision in August in Spring Lake, Fla., while joy-riding on a back road at night on her dirt bike. She was accidentally hit by her husband, who was also joy-riding, in his all-terrain vehicle, and who also died. (2) A 50-year-old man in Berne, N.Y., was killed in August when, driving an all-terrain vehicle, he virtually decapitated himself on nearly invisible wire strung across a road as one of a series of booby traps he had installed to protect his marijuana plants.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 32 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Go out and have fun. Getting too attached to anyone will lead to jealousy, uncertainty and an inability to get things done. You are better off seeing what’s out there and enjoying the company of those interested in sharing common interests. Fickleness will lead to an unsavory situation. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A passionate encounter is in the stars, but before you decide to become too intimate, you are best to play the waiting game and find out what intention the person you are attracted to has, if any. Too much too fast can lead to an empty offer.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You are likely to run into trouble if you fall for someone you meet through work. Protect your reputation and your emotional well-being. The impression you are given isn’t likely to be accurate. A secret affair will develop if you are too trusting. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll have no problem attracting attention. Love is on the rise, and getting up close and personal with someone special is likely if you get out and socialize. Don’t discount someone who comes from a different background. Someone unique will make you happy.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Keep your mind on what’s important and your emotions under control. Someone will read more into your flirting than what you are offering, leading to an awkward and difficult situation. Don’t lead on anyone or make a promise that you don’t plan to keep. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Call the shots and make plans. The more control you exhibit, the more likely you are to attract someone eager to be your sidekick. Share personal information and your intentions, and you will mesmerize someone who has been searching for someone just like you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your indecisiveness will work against you when it comes to personal relationships. If you cannot make up your mind or make a commitment, you are likely to send a message that tells anyone interested in you that you are not in the market for a long-term relationship. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Open up about your likes and dislikes, and share your interests and concerns. You won’t please everyone you meet, but someone who is as experimental and willing to travel down a unique and passionate path will take you up on your offer and add to your suggestions.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Be careful what you wish for when it comes to passionate encounters. You may think you are a wild and aggressive lover, but you are likely to meet someone who is willing to give you a run for your money. Protect your body, mind and soul. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Focus on the partner who offers a deep, passionate, mysterious persona, and you will have met your match. Don’t waste time or you may give someone else the opportunity to make a move, missing out on the chance to find everlasting love. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Double-check motives when

it comes to love. What you want will be a far cry from what you get if you lower your standards. It’s better to be alone a little bit longer than to settle for someone who cannot hold your interest or make you happy. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Look for unusual pastimes and destinations, and you will find love. What you have to offer will intrigue someone who is looking for a lifestyle change. Make an emotional decision that will lead to a solid commitment and an interesting new beginning. Live, love and laugh.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39

Society for Chamber Music in Rochester celebrates its 2013-14 Season under the new artistic leadership of Juliana Athayde and Erik Behr Their inaugural season promises to thrill and inspire audiences with renowned chamber musicians from across the national landscape such as: Jon Kimura Parker, Nicholas Goluses & William Preucil and a special tribute concert of Baroque music on October 13 remembering SCMR’s founding director Richard Luby DON’T MISS THIS AMAZING SEASON! visit www.chambermusicrochester.org or call (585) 377-6770 Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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October 2-8, 2013 - City Newspaper