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EVENTS: “PHOTOPLAY,” RIVER NORTH DANCE 19 FILM: “THE CALL,” “THE GATEKEEPERS” 28 RESTAURANT REVIEW: BANZAI SUSHI & COCKTAIL BAR 11 URBAN JOURNAL: GUNS AND FEAR

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 28

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

I tell ya, it doesn’t get much more fun than this.” MUSIC REVIEW, PAGE 13

Ginger Beard strikes the South Wedge. MYSTERIES, PAGE 4

Teachers in charge. EDUCATION, PAGE 5

College Town confusion. DEVELOPMENT, PAGE 5

Running through RMSC’s “Race” exhibit. EXHIBIT REVIEW, PAGE 18

ACTIVISM | BY JEREMY MOULE | PAGE 8 | PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

College students in fossil fuel fight Colleges in the Rochester area and across the country have gone to great lengths to build up their sustainability cred. The efforts vary from campus to campus but include reducing food waste and curbing energy consumption. Some schools have pledged to drastically reduce their carbon footprint. Yet many schools, from Ivy League universities to small liberal arts colleges, still have money invested in oil, coal, and natural gas companies. The contradiction

is not lost on students, some of whom are now trying to convince campus administrators to change their investing approach. Student groups at the University of Rochester and SUNY Geneseo are leading campaigns to get their schools to end their investments in fossil fuel companies. They say they want their schools to take a stand against the industry and its role in one of the biggest environmental and social issues of their generation: climate change.

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Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Oil, gas, and our waste-filled lives

Every day at 7:25 a.m. I point my bus north on 590 to take my students to school. I see three or four miles of bumper-to-bumper traffic, often at a standstill. I think about all that wasted fuel, all that carbon heating up the planet, destroying what is trying to keep us alive. I think about all the money wasted on parking, insurance, auto loans, maintenance, and the three empty seats in most cars. Then I think about all the wasted time that could be spent reading, writing, drawing, thinking, meditating, or even working on laptops if these people were on buses or trains. Do we have such an abundance of the precious moments of our lives that we can throw away so many of them stuck in traffic? What kind of living is this? The flashy car ads don’t cover that question. Where is the future in this? Add more lanes, more cars? Right now, corporations are working hard to finish off the atmosphere we breathe and the water we drink with the Keystone XL Pipeline and hydrofracking for oil and gas so that we can continue to piss away our lives behind the wheel. If this seems crazy to you, why don’t you tell someone? JOHN KASTNER, ROCHESTER

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On the problems plaguing the City of Rochester’s red-light cameras: The one issue that no one has talked about is that this idiotic red light camera program gives suburban drivers one more reason to avoid going downtown. The City of Rochester desperately needs suburbanites to spend $ downtown in High Falls and the East End. One or two $50 tickets will make them think twice and could be enough incentive for

them to decide to spend their hard-earned money at Tinseltown or the neighborhood bar instead. Think about that, City Council. CICERO

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com One of the problems with the short yellow lights, as a traffic engineer explained it to me, is the “dilemma zone.” That is the time when you are close enough to the yellow light that you have to decide: 1) Do I have enough time to safely stop without slamming into the windshield? 2) Should I just do the yellow light since I can’t meet #1? Those who say, “Well, they ran the red light” don’t get the “dilemma zone.” If you are driving at or below the speed limit, you should have time to stop safely. If the yellow light is shortened, that time disappears and as a driver you are now stuck with a real problem. MYOBB

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Parents’ role

On our March 13 News Blog on parents’ concern about the Rochester school district’s suspension procedure: The suspension problem in the city would not be as severe as it is if parents began to behave more like parents, and enacted discipline on their kids instead of requiring the schools to do it. There are more than a few students who are remarkably resistant to behavioral modification and make teaching and learning exceptionally difficult for others. If parents started disciplining their kids in elementary school and took measures that caused the kids to behave in manners more conducive to teaching and learning, the suspension rate would not be so high. The suspension rate is as high as it is not because schools aren’t flexible and haven’t tried damn near everything they can think of (they have; I’ve seen a goofy number of different attempts, only a few with even moderate results), but because the students all over the district, for whatever reason, have decided that they have no reason to behave as scholars, or even allow others to behave as scholars. The reasons are numerous and come from all sides of the problem. A few: 1) Students realize that their prospects for getting jobs that

they can support themselves with is minimal at best, and that a high school diploma won’t provide enough help, and that college is an unrealistic goal. 2) Students have been socially promoted far above their ability level, and rather than make the effort to either get themselves up to speed, or find someone to help them get up to speed, have decided to camouflage their ineffectiveness with unruly behavior. 3) Discipline begins too lax at the beginning of the school year, and by the time the school catches up to what needs to happen, those horses are out of the barn and running for the hills. 4) Parents are not effective enough at exerting discipline on their kids. 5) The pull of the streets (short-term reward) is stronger than the desire for an education (long-term reward). 6) Poor diets and too much X-Box mitigate against their ability to sit still for 40 minutes. 7) Students are fed a diet of unhealthy media that impacts behaviors in subtle ways, especially when there is little to counterbalance those behaviors. This is obviously not a comprehensive list, but it gives one a sense of the struggle being waged. If a parent decides to appeal a long-term suspension, some serious questions need to be asked of both side of the appeal. Something has gone tragically wrong, and the kids are the ones suffering. (Doesn’t mean I want to keep unruly kids in my class, though. I’ve got too many “good” kids who need an education.) YUGOBOY

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Irish ways

Ouch! Describing St. Patrick’s Day as “the most sacred of Irish holidays” (music listing for The Tossers’ appearance at Water Street) sounds so cheap. People in Ireland don’t go bonkers there the way Americans do here. When I was growing up (in the US), we ate corned beef and cabbage during the winter months and not necessarily on March 17. Turning former and current Christian holy days into drink fests upsets me deeply. ROSE (O’NEILL) O’KEEFE, ROCHESTER

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly March 20-26, 2013 Vol 42 No 28 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Jason Silverstein Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Our guns and our fear Yet another multiple-victim shooting, this time just a couple of hours east of Rochester, in Herkimer and Mohawk. More deaths. More critical injuries, lockdowns, community trauma. And yet there seems little hope that Congress will enact a sensible gun control law. And New York State’s new law is under attack. I admit that I don’t understand the appeal of guns. I’ve never hunted, and I’ve never lived in a rural area where wildlife could be a threat. But New York’s guncontrol law doesn’t restrict hunters. Neither does the legislation under consideration in Washington. Those laws deal with highcapacity magazines, assault-style weapons, record-keeping, gun registration. The gun culture in the United States is so strong that proposals for reasonable controls get bullied off the stage because people think that they need guns to protect themselves from government. That they might be in a movie theater or a shopping mall when a deranged gunman opens fire. That they’d be able pull out their gun and fire faster than a gun-wielding burglar. The “protection” appeal is so strong that gun enthusiasts are now urging that every teacher in every school be armed. This is a uniquely American cultural issue – fed, unfortunately, by the news and entertainment media, which have glorified violence and created the sense that crime is far more prevalent than it is. People are senselessly afraid, and conservative bloggers and gun extremists have ramped up that fear. And we seem to find a perverse satisfaction in being afraid. South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, says the New York Times’ Gail Collins, worried recently about how, with gun controls, people could protect themselves “in an environment where the law and order has broken down, whether it’s a hurricane, national disaster, earthquake, terrorist attack, cyberattack, where the dam’s broken and chemicals have been released into the air and law enforcement is really not able to respond and people take advantage of that lawless environment.” You wonder how anybody in this country sleeps at night. Studies of whether media violence causes real violence haven’t proved that it does, directly – for most people. But more is involved than that. The US has a gun culture, and, the Times’ film critic A.O. Scott wrote

The news and entertainment media have glorified violence and created the sense that crime is more prevalent than it is.” recently, “it is absurd to pretend that gun culture is unrelated to popular culture, or that make-believe violence has nothing to do with its real-world correlative. Guns have symbolic as well as actual power, and the practical business of hunting, law enforcement, and self-defense has less purchase in our civic life than fantasies of righteous vengeance or brave resistance.” Violence-heavy media can begin to erode the barrier between fantasy and reality. If we are convinced – facts to the contrary, declining violence rates to the contrary – that our community is a dangerous place, we will act differently, individually and corporately. And we will fail to pass sensible laws that can protect us. One ray of hope: Gun ownership has been dropping, according to a recent Times report – particularly among younger adults. It’s been dropping even in the South and western mountain states. Maybe we’ll eventually age out of the gun culture. Unfortunately, a lot of people will be hurt before then.

Ten years in Iraq

We shouldn’t let March 20 go by without reflecting on the tragic path that this country embarked on 10 years ago. The deaths and injuries, the human displacement, the chaos, the financial cost: we unleashed unspeakable trauma and disruption with our invasion of Iraq, and we will continue to pay the price for decades. “Misguided” is nowhere near a strong enough term for our decision to launch that war. And it comes nowhere near the truth. Dick Cheney, the war’s architect, did damage so severe to Iraq – and to this country – that it’s hard to think of actions that deserve a higher place on an Infamy Hall of Fame list.

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CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Buckingham buying Xerox Square

Xerox Corp. reached an agreement to sell Xerox Square to Buckingham Properties for an undisclosed amount. Xerox will continue to lease space for about 1,400 employees in the 30-story tower downtown. The property sits on 2.7 acres of land. Buckingham has 90 days to complete inspections before proceeding with the deal.

RPD’s downtown digs

Rochester City Council was due to consider Tuesday night legislation to lease space at the Sibley building for a new police department substation. The city would enter into a 10-year lease at the building, which would house approximately 40 officers and RPD staff. The new detail is meant to quell concerns about downtown safety, especially in the area around the Sibley building.

Legislative tit for tat

During the Monroe County Legislature’s monthly meeting, Democrats tried to bring to the floor legislation that would

have banned guns — unless they were carried by law enforcement — from county buildings. The Republican majority put a halt to the effort, however. In response, Democrats voted against two bonding resolutions for road projects.

News

Spider cents

Production of the upcoming film “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” will take place entirely in New York State, with some sequences filmed in Rochester. One of the sequences to be filmed locally is reportedly a chase sequence, due to our area’s favorable speed laws. The movie is due to debut in theaters in May 2014.

MYSTERIES | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

The mark of Ginger Beard

“Ginger Beard” sounds like a pirate, or maybe a red-haired chippie doing human-shield work for a closeted so and so. The mark of Ginger Beard — whoever that is — is spreading through the South Wedge like white plastic lawn chairs spreading through suburban summers.

RBTL’s new season

The Rochester Broadway Theatre League announced its 2013 to 2014 season. The shows are: “Ghost the Musical,” “War Horse,” “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical,” “Sister Act,” “Once,” and “The Phantom of the Opera.” In addition to the regular season, the RBTL announced a few special shows: “Rock of Ages,” “American Idiot,” and “Disney’s Beauty and the Beast.”

A couple of examples of Ginger Beard’s work, which has been popping up lately in the South Wedge. PHOTOS BY JEREMY MOULE

GB has been plastering the Wedge with wheat paste posters of varying sizes and imagery, all featuring his or her handle or “tag.” One poster has Abraham Lincoln with a red beard, and another has the name “Ginger Beard” written over a shield. There are more styles out there, too. GB’s handiwork is visible on the walls of Wedge buildings, street posts, under at least one bridge, and reportedly even the resilient South Wedge cheese statue got hit (the cheese survived a brief kidnapping in 2010). Wheat paste is a form of street art and is apparently a fairly new addition to Rochester’s graffiti scene. It’s an adhesive made by mixing flour into boiling water. Chris Jones, co-president of the Business Association of the South

Wedge Area, says graffiti isn’t a big problem in the Wedge, though she says the neighborhood does sometimes see a spike when school is out. A different kind of street art is coming to the Wedge this summer when as many as 15 Wedge walls will be used for the Wall\Therapy initiative. Artists create large murals as a way to inspire and “rehabilitate” the community, according to the Wall\Therapy website. “We’re thrilled about it,” Jones says. “We’re going to give them as many walls as we can.” She says the Wall\Therapy art should serve as a deterrent for other, less-desirable graffiti.

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“The trend has been to get tough with teachers and blame teachers for poor outcomes. But what if teachers were trusted instead of controlled? When teachers are in a position of authority to make decisions, what you get is an emulation of successfully run, high-performing organizations.” [ KIM FARRIS-BERG ]

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Teachers in charge Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas has asked the Rochester Teachers Association to present plans for schools to be run by teachers instead of central office administration and principals. Any proposals for teacher-led schools would be part of the administration’s new contract negotiations, which have just started, RTA President Adam Urbanski told about 200 teachers at a meeting on Monday afternoon. The district could convert one to six schools into teacher-led schools. “We have tried everything else [to improve city schools],” Urbanski said. “I think it would be a sin of omission to not try it.” The teachers listened to a presentation by Kim Farris-Berg, co-author of “Trusting Teachers with School Success: What Happens When Teachers Call the Shots.” Farris-Berg said that there are nearly 70 teacher-led schools throughout the United States in urban, suburban, rural, and charter school settings. Some have unions and some don’t. After a close examination of 11 teacher-led schools, Farris-Berg and her co-author found that autonomy can lead to greater accountability, Farris-Berg said. “The trend has been to get tough with teachers and blame teachers for poor outcomes,” she said. “But what if teachers were trusted instead of controlled? When teachers

are in a position of authority to make decisions, what you get is an emulation of successfully run, high-performing organizations.” Though teacher-led schools vary in their degree of Kim Farris-Berg. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN autonomy, some commonalities include the ability to hire and terminate, set salaries and benefits, establish leadership roles, and set policies for their schools — such as student discipline. Some of the outcomes from teacher-led schools are more individualized student learning, broader use of assessment tools, and greater collaboration between teachers and students, Farris-Berg said. She said that teacher-led schools are not a panacea. But teachers in these schools are pioneers of a movement that contrasts sharply with current education trends, she said. Deborah Meier, senior scholar at New York University and author of “In Schools We Trust,” will work with teachers and schools interested in developing a proposal for teacherled schools in Rochester.

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Designing College Town The City of Rochester’s Zoning Board will hear an application this week to waive certain design standards for Mount Hope College Town, a University of Rochester-initiated project which will be built on 16 acres on the west side of Mount Hope between Elmwood Avenue and Crittenden Boulevard. | The major concerns associated with the application have to do with the project’s planned hotel and the grocery store. As it stands, the hotel would have six out of 10 of its ground-floor windows along Elmwood Avenue blacked out. The grocery would also have blacked-out windows along the street. | A city zoning official explained earlier this week that although those requests are part of the application, the developer knows getting through the Zoning Board would be difficult and is making changes. | In fact, a report signed by Marcia Barry, director of planning and zoning for the city, recommends against granting the variances. | The developer may present changes and-or options at this week’s meeting, the zoning official said. | The meeting is at 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, March 21, in City Council chambers at City Hall, 30 Church Street.

Clarification

In the March 13 edition of Chow Hound we included an item about the impending closure of Park Avenue’s Chester Cab pizza. This information was taken from a press release sent out by the owner of the business, Howard Nielsen. Since the announcement, plans for the restaurant have changed. In Nielsen’s own words: “I was going to close Chester Cab Pizza at the end of this week, but our longtime manager, Dess Ivanov, has made a last-minute purchase offer, which I’m happy to accept. He will have an uphill battle and I wish him all the best of luck. So if the community wants Chester Cab, and he continues to make great-tasting pizza, it should work out for the best.”

"Cost of War" appears online this week at rochestercitynewspaper.com

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CITY 5

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Rebellion in education funding Michael Rebell isn’t a household name, but to many New York educators and parents, particularly those in New York City, he’s a hero. Rebell was co-counsel for the plaintiffs in the landmark Campaign for Fiscal Equity lawsuit against the state. Rebell argued that the state was failing to provide the New York City school district with adequate funding, and therefore was not fulfilling its constitutional obligation to educate the district’s students. The suit ultimately led to the state’s Education Budget and Reform act in 2007. The law was supposed to ensure adequate and equitable funding for all of the state’s school districts. In addition to New York City’s schools, districts like Rochester saw a substantial bump in revenue. But then, faced with a $10 billion gap in the 2010 to 2011 budget, the Legislature introduced a mechanism called the Gap Elimination Adjustment. The GEA allows the Legislature to deduct funds from school districts across the state in order to balance the budget. The result: education aid was severely cut as the problems on Wall Street and the recession reduced the state’s revenue. Some reports put the current education aid shortfall at about $7.7 billion annually. Rebell, a graduate of Yale Law School and adjunct professor at Columbia University, recently discussed the CFE case. In an era of “no new taxes” and a widespread belief that too much money is spent on education, Rebell says educating the state’s poorest children requires more financial support. And he says he’s willing to go to court again, if necessary. An edited version of an interview with Rebell follows. CITY: What is New York State’s definition of an adequate public education?

Rebell: The Court of Appeals defined a sound basic education as a meaningful high school education that provides students with the knowledge to be productive civic participants, and to be prepared to pursue a career in the competitive global economy. That was the essence of what the court upheld in the CFE case. Every child in the state is guaranteed this education, and the resources required to provide it. In high-needs districts like Rochester, should education include intervention and social services?

If you’re talking about after school and summer school programs, experience seems to show you need to have the city, county, and school district working together in a coordinated approach that utilizes available services in the most efficient way. 6 CITY

MARCH 20-26, 2013

Kids from poverty backgrounds do need these kinds of services, and to a large extent they’re covered by the CFE case, though not fully. The issue here is equitable funding for all districts, so how did New York State arrive at the appropriate funding level for education in the past? And how should it be funded in the future?

New York pioneered this idea of a foundation amount, which is a sensible way to go, providing you fairly fund it. A foundation funding system says that you fairly determine what level of funding is needed to provide a sound basic education to all kids, and you guarantee that. In theory, that’s what our system does, but it doesn’t do it in practice for several reasons. Even before they [legislators] froze it and started cutting back, the way the foundation system was set up in New York State didn’t require localities to contribute their share. While [in Rochester] the Maintenance of Effort law requires the city to contribute about $119 million annually to the school district, many communities contribute to their schools at their discretion. The other flaw: the foundation amount was totally artificial. It bore no relation to reality. That was the major thing that the CFE court decision changed. The court was very clear that you couldn’t go with numbers that are determined by political bargaining: historically the “three men in a room.” They would start with New York City, “What percentage are we going to give that?” And they would go to Long Island, “What are going to give that?” Then they would let the computers run a formula for the rest of the districts, and after the local legislators saw what they were getting, they would renegotiate depending on [their] political power. So it was politically run. The court said that’s not what the Constitution requires.

So the court came up with an approach that the Legislature did follow in 2007. But then because of the recession, the four-year phase in of the increased amount that would have given more to highneeds districts like New York City and Rochester did not come to pass. Albany says it has increased education funding, but has the state actually increased it to where we were prior to the recession?

Last year they increased the budget by about 4 percent and it looks like they Attorney and education activist Michael Rebell. PHOTO PROVIDED will increase it again this year by a little more than that. But what they’re actually You’re also critical of the state’s decision doing is increasing it over the inadequate to withhold $260 million from the New base they established a few years ago. So York City school system as a penalty for not we’re about 25 percent below the foundation developing a teacher evaluation plan. funding amount they adopted in 2007 after My argument is just because the grownups the CFE case. can’t get their act together, don’t penalize We’re not where we should be. the kids. If they wanted to pass some law that cut the salary of the mayor, maybe Where is the increased education funding there would be some logic to it. But what supposed to come from? are you penalizing the kids for? Figuring out the best tax policy is what the legislators get paid to do, but I do recognize Is there a new CFE lawsuit coming? that the economy is not what it was in I’m focusing on trying to persuade the 2007. But constitutionally, that’s irrelevant. governor to adopt some of the reforms The courts have repeatedly said that when we’ve been talking about. After the constitutional rights are at stake, it doesn’t legislative session, I will have to access how matter what the state’s fiscal condition is. much progress is being made. My attitude is kids have constitutional You’re not a fan of competitive grant rights and I intend to do whatever I can programs like Race to the Top. What’s to enforce those rights. I’m trying to work wrong with asking districts to reach for with the executive and legislative branches, higher goals and rewarding them with extra and I hope we can make progress. But if funding when they succeed? not, yeah, you always have to consider I look at it from a viewpoint of what kids going back to court. need. What about the kids living in the districts that don’t get the grants? Are they supposed to be left behind? Why should poor kids in New York State or New York City get this extra funding and poor kids in California, where they are desperate for money, not get anything extra?

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CITY 7

Jennifer Benson, a SUNY Geneseo student, says that divesting from fossil fuels would benefit her school, as well as the environment and people’s health. PHOTO BY JEREMY MOULE

College students in fossil fuel fight

Alykhan Alani, a University of Rochester student, says he wants his school to establish a socially responsible investment committee. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Allison Hoppe, a SUNY Geneseo student, says divestment is a way for her school to act on climate change issues.

ACTIVISM | BY JEREMY MOULE

PHOTO BY JEREMY MOULE

Colleges in the Rochester area and across the country have gone to great lengths to build up their sustainability cred. The efforts vary from campus to campus, but include changes that greatly reduce waste from dining halls and retrofits that slash energy use in campus buildings. And some campuses have signed on to climate change commitments, pledging to reduce their carbon footprints. Yet many schools, from Ivy League universities to small liberal arts colleges, still have money invested in oil, coal, and natural gas companies. The contradiction is not lost on students, some of whom are now trying to convince campus administrators to change their approach to investing. Students at University of Rochester and SUNY Geneseo are among those pushing their schools to stop investing in fossil fuel companies. The students leading the UR and Geneseo campaigns say that by pulling their investments, their schools would be taking a stand against the fossil fuel industry and its role in one of the biggest environmental and social issues of their generation: climate change. “If you are coming out and publicly saying, ‘We value sustainability, we value the environment, we believe that climate change is real [and] we need to do things about it if we don’t want it to become literally a global disaster,’ then it’s time to not just say those things and actually do things about them,” 8 CITY

MARCH 20-26, 2013

says Allison Hoppe, a SUNY Geneseo senior who helped start a divestment campaign at her school. Nationwide, colleges and universities invest a total of approximately $400 billion, says Dan Apfel, executive director of the Responsible Endowments Coalition, which is working with student-led divestment campaigns across the country. Most schools don’t have large fossil fuel holdings and eliminating those investments wouldn’t hurt the performance of their endowments, says Apfel, a UR alumnus. But how schools invest their money can make a statement and influence other investors, he says. Divestment — by government as well as by universities and colleges — is not a new tactic: it played a role in ending apartheid in South Africa. In September 1985, trustees for the statewide SUNY system voted to sell off $11.5 million worth of stock in companies doing business in South Africa, according to an Associated Press report from the time. SUNY was and is the largest university system in the country. The University of Rochester followed in 1987, says a New York Times article. UR also has a policy prohibiting direct investment in companies that support the Sudanese government. “This isn’t something that’s brand new, it’s been done before,” says University of Rochester student Alykhan Alani, who supports fossil fuel divestment. “The

question is, do we have the political will to institute it here and now?” At the University of Rochester, the student-

Jessica Kroenert, a SUNY Gen-

led push for fossil fuel eseo student, supports greater divestment is part investment in renewable enof a larger campaign ergy. PHOTO BY JEREMY MOULE targeting how the school invests its $1.7 billion endowment. For several years, Students for a Democratic Society has pushed for invested in the university to establish a socially the company, responsible investment committee. Alani says. The committee would advise university The university’s trustees on how social issues should Investment Office affect their investment policies. Similar will tell students, faculty, staff, and alumni committees exist at universities including whether the UR has investments in specific Georgetown and Columbia. companies, says university spokesperson Initially, SDS planned to focus on Sara Miller. But the school doesn’t disclose specific companies as opposed to industries, that information to the public, she says. but the national momentum behind “University policy precludes us from fossil fuel divestment provides a critical commenting on investment matters other opportunity, Alani says. than what is found on the endowment Last year, Alani asked university website,” Miller said in an e-mail. officials whether the school had Alani says the environmental degradation investments in several companies, caused by the fossil fuel industry is one including Chevron. He specifically asked reason why colleges and universities should university officials about Chevron, which stop investing in the companies. The bought Texaco a decade ago, because industry also puts money into fighting courts in Ecuador found the company climate change legislation, he says. liable for substantial pollution in the The UR has taken steps to reduce Amazon rain forest. University officials energy consumption in its buildings. And confirmed that the school had money

it purchases local food items, provides incentives for employees to carpool, and purchases renewable energy credits to cover a chunk of its energy consumption. “There are certain things that the university has taken a stand on and that’s commendable,” Alani says. “I would just like to see the university continue to make that kind of progress when it comes to decisions on how it invests the endowment money.” The university has policies governing how its endowment is invested, including a social investment policy. Students, faculty, staff, and alumni can submit requests for action on a specific security and the UR board’s Investment Committee reviews and responds to the requests, Miller says. Under President Christopher Dahl, SUNY Geneseo signed on to the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Change Commitment. Under that commitment, Geneseo has pledged to track and reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. And the college is supposed to incorporate issues around climate change and sustainability into its academic program. The school has also taken steps to reduce food waste, increase recycling, and curb energy consumption. It’s with those efforts in mind that junior Jennifer Benson, sophomore Jessica Kroenert, and senior Allison Hoppe, formed Divest SUNY Geneseo. The school itself doesn’t have any long-term investments, but two affiliated organizations do have mutual fund investments, school administrators say. The funds include a mix of stocks, and commonly include holdings in fossil fuel companies, administrators say. One of the organizations is the Geneseo Foundation, a nonprofit which maintains an approximately $18 million fund used for scholarships, research, and student programs. All of the invested money comes from donations, administrators say. The other is Campus Auxiliary Services, a nonprofit company that oversees services including campus dining, laundry machines, and waste management. Divest SUNY Geneseo wants the foundation and Campus Auxiliary Services to get rid of any investments they have in fossil fuel companies. “No matter when it happens, fossil fuels are nonrenewable and we’re going to run out,” Benson says. “The earlier we can start transitioning and the more support we can have for renewable energy, the better it will be not only for the institution and its investments, but also for the environment and our health.” The Geneseo administration doesn’t have a position on divestment, says a statement from college officials. The foundation and the

“No matter when it happens, fossil fuels are nonrenewable and we’re going to run out” SUNY Geneseo junior Jennifer Benson auxiliary services each have their own board of trustees, which makes decisions about investments. And administrators say they have confidence in the boards. Students at other SUNY schools, including Purchase, Stony Brook, and the College of Environmental Science and Forestry are campaigning for divestment, too. And the Divest SUNY Geneseo leaders see an opportunity for their school to be a leader among state college campuses. “Really, what this country needs and what this state needs is to invest more in renewable sources of energy,” says sophomore Kroenert. Ultimately, the organizers realize that student, alumni, faculty, and staff pressure are the keys to a successful campaign. Divest SUNY Geneseo has collected approximately 100 student signatures supporting their cause. And more than 200 people have signed an Internet petition posted on www.350.org, though Divest SUNY Geneseo didn’t start that petition. Beyond the environmental and social arguments for divesting from the fossil

fuel industry, the students also say there’s a business case. The industry deals in a finite resource. And while its stocks have historically offered investors good returns, that may not be the case in the future as reserves dwindle and resources become harder to extract. And the investment policies of schools may soon become an issue of competitiveness, particularly when it comes to attracting students and faculty. Alani, who also works as a campus tour guide at UR, says that prospective students often ask him about campus sustainability policies and efforts. And students at UR’s peers, including Syracuse University, are also pushing for their schools to divest from fossil fuels. Hoppe, Kroenert, and Benson say Geneseo officials highlight environmental initiatives and commitments when they market the school to potential students. The divestment movement is growing and attracting more public and media attention, which means more potential students are going to have the issue on their minds. “It’s something that’s going to be in the public eye for a while and hopefully that will be something that will encourage schools to take action,” Hoppe says.

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For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Wednesday, March 27. Urrea will read passages from the book. The event will be held at Linehan Chapel in the Golisano Academic Center.

Preservation conference

Rally against abuses below the border

The Landmark Society of Western New York and Rochester Colonial are among several sponsors of the conference, “Outside the Box: Innovative Preservation Practices for the 21st Century,” on Friday, April 19, and Saturday, April 20. For a complete list of events, location, registration, and cost, call 546-7029 Ext. 11 or www.landmarksociety.org/conference.

Talk by author Luis Alberto Urrea

Nazareth College presents an afternoon with Luis Alberto Urrea, author of “Into the Beautiful North,” this year’s choice for “If All of Rochester Read the Same Book” at 3 p.m. on 10 CITY MARCH 20-26, 2013

The Rochester Committee on Latin America will hold a rally in front of the Federal Building, 100 State Street, at 4 p.m. on Monday, March 25. The rally is to protest the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation and its ongoing training of Latin American soldiers who commit human rights abuses throughout Central and South America.

Stopping human trafficking

RIT will host a discussion by Laura Lederer at 2 p.m. on Friday, March 22. Lederer is president of Global Centurion, a non-governmental organization dedicated to fighting slavery and

human trafficking. The event will be held in Liberal Arts Hall.

Voice of the Citizen forum

Mayor Tom Richards will hold four public forums to solicit feedback to close a $28 million gap in next year’s budget. Richards will lay out the city’s fiscal problems and proposed cutbacks. The first forum is at 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 21, at Freddie Thomas campus, 625 Scio Street.

How to run for school board

The Monroe County School Boards Association will hold its annual seminar for prospective school board candidates from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Saturday, March 23. The role and responsibilities of board members and how to run a successful campaign will be discussed. The event is at the Airport Holiday Inn. Cost: $10 for materials.

Dining with Hendricks gin, pureed cucumber, and fresh lemon juice.

Banzai wings (left) and the South Wedge roll (right) at South Avenue's Banzai Sushi & Cocktail Bar. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

On a roll Banzai Sushi & Cocktail Bar 682 SOUTH AVE. 473-0345, BANZAIROCHESTER.COM MONDAY-TUESDAY 11:30 A.M.-MIDNIGHT; WEDNESDAY 11:30 A.M.-2 A.M.; THURSDAY-FRIDAY 11:30 A.M.-2 A.M.; SATURDAY 1 P.M.-2 A.M.; SUNDAY 4 P.M.-MIDNIGHT [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

The South Wedge is quickly becoming my go-to place for just about anything I might need. Craft beer? The Tap & Mallet fills that niche admirably. A reliable place to take your girlfriend and her parents for dinner? Zeppa Bistro’s a great choice. Jamaican for lunch? Peppa Pot. A dive bar to suck down PBRs and shots on the cheap? Lux Lounge. Chocolate to get you out of trouble after spending far too long at Lux? Hedonist is right next door. Until recently, though, the South Wedge was not blessed with one of the essential hipster sacraments: sushi. In October, Nick Grammatico, owner and chef at the successful sushi joint Piranha on Park Avenue, decided that it was long-since time to fill that niche. So he and his brother Matthew opened Banzai Sushi and Cocktail Bar.

Banzai is not Piranha II. More strictly Asianinspired than its big brother across town, Banzai offers only sushi and modern Chinese-ish dim sum along with a full bar. (Piranha offers only wine and beer, and Grammatico decided that he wanted the room to experiment that a full bar would provide him and his crew.) While Piranha was playful and exuberant at 5 months old, Banzai is a remarkably mature restaurant. Grammatico claims that Piranha was his “masters degree” in restaurant management. He applied everything he learned there to his new digs on South Avenue. There are few if any rough edges to the place, the service, or the food. If the hallmark of a mature restaurant is consistency, Banzai is already poised to be very successful. Late on a Thursday night, the long bamboo-

topped bar at Banzai was crowded with an eclectic assortment of 20- and 30-somethings. The younger members of the crowd were drinking what they called Genny-sakes — Genesee pounders with shots of sake on the side — and trading quickly emptying plates of maki rolls between them. Down toward my end of the bar, things were a bit more refined, with folks savoring selections from Banzai’s cocktail list and eyeing each other’s generously portioned

dim sum with envy (the grass always seems greener on the other side of the fence, but in this case both sides were lush and verdant). I was sipping an American Pie, a concoction of whiskey, reduced apple cider, and cinnamon that struck just the right warm, cozy note for a chilly March night, and nibbling at a plate of white, fluffy steamed buns full of shredded duck slathered with a spicy barbecue sauce and finished with a bit of scallion ($6.50). The couple nearby were gushing over a plate full of crab rangoons while drinking a rum-based cocktail arrestingly called The Walking Dead. They were so effusive in their praise of the rangoons that I had to order a plate for myself, and they were right — they were sensational. Grammatico has always liked to play with his food; that’s one of the hallmarks of the menu at Piranha, and the crab rangoons that he put on the menu over at Banzai ($5.50) are an upscale riff on the Chinese restaurant staple. They offer an approximately 50-50 mix of what tasted like high-quality crab meat and probably a ricottacream-cheese blend with scallions encased in empanada-sized pockets of fried wonton skins. The result is elegant, creamy, and eminently satisfying, particularly when accompanied by a drink that seems to distill the essence of summer in a glass: a cucumber lemonade made

Banzai, though, is mostly about sushi. Grammatico and his newly installed executive chef at Banzai, Joachim Quintana, both learned — or at least honed — their sushi skills at California Rollin’ in Village Gate. Quintana was among the first people that Grammatico brought on board when he opened Piranha. Both men are squarely in the tradition of eclectic, even odd-sounding maki, rolling cream cheese, mango, red-curry chicken, and bacon along with tuna, escolar, octopus, salmon, and smoked eel in rice and nori. The results are tasty and remarkably well composed. Sushi at Piranha in the early days tended to be a bit more loosely constructed, the rolls sometimes cut unevenly or falling apart under the weight of Grammatico’s attempts to stuff just one more thing into rolls already burstingly full. Almost five years of making sushi daily has turned Grammatico into a master roll-maker, and he’s clearly taught his skills to everyone who rolls sushi for him. Banzai’s rolls are precisely cut and never mashed as might happen with a knife that’s not razor sharp. Sure, the ends are a bit messy, and the rice is not quite as tightly bound as it might be, but the rolls themselves are tasty and crowd pleasing. Spicy tuna with basil, a Grammatico signature, found its way over from Piranha, as did the Spider and Sea Monster rolls. New creations, though, have also shown up. Spicy shrimp and creamy-cool avocado covered in ever-so-slightly briny salmon make the Acapulco Gold roll ($11) a winner. The charmingly named Delicious Fishes roll ($9) stuffed with bits of ultramild escolar avocado, chili pepper, and diced tomato drizzled with lemon juice and finished with deep-fried onions is vaguely and pleasantly reminiscent of ceviche. But I’m a sucker for bacon, and the Hot Rod roll ($10.50) in which crunchy bits of the stuff are incorporated into the rice on both the inside and outside of the roll along with smoked eel, cream cheese, avocado, and scallion did not disappoint. Smoked eel and bacon are a natural complement to each other, salty and meaty foils for cheese and avocado all pulled together by, oddly, the nori, which is usually a fairly neutral background player. While his other rolls are pretty and tasty, it’s the Hot Rod that shows us that Grammatico still has a taste for whimsy in his food, and that Banzai isn’t likely to remain staid and sober for very long.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

Upcoming [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Macklemore & Ryan Lewis Sunday, April 28. RIT Gordon Field House, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. 8 p.m. $17-$41. rittickets.com

Music

[ HIP-HOP/R’N’B ] Kings of the Mic Tour: LL Cool J w/Ice Cube, Public Enemy, De La Soul Saturday, June 22. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. Details TBD; on sale 3/22. cmacevents.com. [ JAZZ/ROCK ] Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival presents Guitar Circus w/Peter Frampton and Robert Cray Friday, June 28. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, Gibbs Street. Details TBD; on sale 3/22. rochesterjazz.com.

The 1975 SATURDAY, MARCH 23 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $10-$12 | 454-2966, BUGJAR.COM [ POP/ROCK ] Though none of its members can claim to have been born quite near the year that is the band’s namesake, that hasn’t stopped Manchester, England’s The 1975 from releasing three lauded EPs in quick succession since last summer. On the second EP, “Sex,” in particular, the quartet demonstrates the ability to alternate between sticky-sweet ballads and anthemic pop rock with utmost grace. With each new release’s new tweaks and progressions, and with a debut full length on the way, the band continues to excel at attention-grabbing pop music; a trend one can only hope continues. — BY DAVE LABARGE

Eastman Chamber Jazz FRIDAY, MARCH 22 KILBOURN HALL, 26 GIBBS ST. 8 P.M. | FREE | ESM.ROCHESTER.EDU [ JAZZ ] Keyboardist David Paich is a member of the rock group Toto, known for writing and singing ear candy like “Hold the Line,” “Rosanna,” and “Africa.” A top session musician, composer, and producer, he also wrote the soundtrack for the David Lynch movie “Dune.” Drummer Dennis Mackrel is the leader of the Count Basie Orchestra. The concert features the works of Paich’s father, composer/arranger Marty Paich. From the early 1950’s to the mid-1990’s, Paich was a major arranger for greats like Ella Fitzgerald, Stan Kenton, Buddy Rich, Mel Tormé, and many others. — BY RON NETSKY

avant garde to funk bop to big bands blues and beyond

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] The Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Samantha Fish. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Jimmie Highsmith, Jr.. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. 21+. $10.

Chris Cohen MONDAY, MARCH 25 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 7:30 P.M. | $8-$12 | 454-2966, BUGJAR.COM [ INDIE ] Chris Cohen has done plenty of work with other bands, including Haunted Graffiti and Deerhoof, and has the likes of Pitchfork and Captured Tracks tooting his horn. He finally released his first solo work. The music is firmly mid-tempo and ranges from psychedelic to easy-listening 60’s pop, and is geared toward hanging out on your porch swing listening to cicadas at dusk. Cohen is an easy choice if you like Tame Impala. Opening the show will be locals Light Feelings, which ironically enough seems to deal with the topic of heavy feelings. — BY SUZAN PERO

Goodbye Ronnie FRIDAY, MARCH 22 TALA VERA, 155 STATE ST. 6 P.M. | $5-$7 | TALA-VERA.COM [ ROCK ] Occasionally an album emerges from the

pack and flirts with the possibility of being one of the classics. “What Have We Done” is an acoustic folkinspired album from Goodbye Ronnie, a.k.a. Ronnie Lickers, a veteran drummer for local prog-metal group BML. Lickers takes us on his journey of self-reflection with a collection of songs that were born out of a period of sadness, and ultimately contributed toward a process of healing. Thus the name, Goodbye Ronnie, a metaphor for the artist getting away from his old self in order to find himself again. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet.

Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free.

The Fox Sisters played Friday, March 15, at Abilene. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Do the sardine

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Thunder Body Medicine Wednesdays. Skylark

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

loose/tight and had an incredible groove and feel. What an awesome new band. Headliner 5Head, which was mostly to blame for the copious crowd along with the gaggle of fine females lapping up the boogie ringside, exploded with a slick set of ska/ pop that most ska/pop bands only think about in the shower. New tunes and old ones brought on another new dance we’re going to call the Skankin’ Sardine. I tell ya, it doesn’t get much more fun than this. I’m not intentionally following Minds Open Wide (no shame if I was), but the band seems to pop up on bills in a variety of venues all over the map. The band is an interesting study in extreme dynamics and stop/start control. The covers are more tongue-in-cheek than anything else, and during the band’s brief set at The California Brew Haus on Saturday night I arrived at one suggestion. In much the same way that blues clubs around the United States have banned “Mustang Sally” from being covered, rock clubs should get together and enforce an injunction on “War Pigs.” Let the crowd howl, “Oh lord, yes” to something else.

Out of the oblivion of Memphis low-fi rockers’ The Oblivions emerged The Reigning Sound, a raw and low-down outfit full of Muscle Shoals muscle and stacks of Stax. The band rocked unpretentiously and unparalleled. Nobody did it better. Nobody, that is, until the advent of Rochester’s The Fox Sisters. This band of brothers is a deep-dish, double-scoop of rock ’n’ roll talent. It’s a savage wail that runs deep from musical histories that, if added up, collectively equal dead. You’ve got members of Dog’s Life, The Quitters, Hinkley, Veluxe, The Thundergods, and that’s before you even get to drummer Rob Filardo’s resume. The band rocked an unbelievably packed house at Abilene Friday night. I think the crowd inadvertently — and out of necessity — invented a new dance called The Sardine. It’s easy; just rub your body all over the bodies of the people shoehorned in around you. It was so crowded I went home with someone else’s wallet. It was so crowded that when the girl next to me sneezed, she covered my mouth. The music was a full shot-fromthe-hip delivery of blue-eyed soul and twisting r ‘n’ b. The band was locked in

Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Arrows Over Athens w/There I Say is Lightning, Scholar, Hideout. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Rexx. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free.

THURSDAY, MARCH 21 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Abilene’s Fifth Anniversary bash ft. Woody Pines.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. Free. Hypnotic Clambake. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $5.

Laura Stevenson w/The Rice Cakes, MD Woods.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7:45 p.m. $10. [ BLUES ]

Ezra & The Storm. Dinosaur

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

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Acanthus EVENTS

Music to play everything — ‘Night Train,’ ‘Flying Home’ — and then you had to play the pretty stuff like ‘Stardust.’” Person has kept it pretty, but he has always done it with commanding style and muscular tone. “The biggest sound in the world — I wanted it,” he says.

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When Person began his career

in the mid-1960’s it was a time of upheaval in the jazz world. Players like John Coltrane were taking the tenor Saxophonist Houston Person performs this week as part of Jazz 90.1’s Meet saxophone on a ride the Artist series. PHOTO BY GENE MARTIN to the stratosphere. “Ornette Coleman and others were farther out than ’Trane,” says Person. “Everybody was doing their own thing. The only thing that I believe in is natural evolution — it’s not contrived. Coltrane paid all of his dues. He went through a natural evolution. He came out of Houston Person the rhythm and blues bands.” THURSDAY, MARCH 21 But while Coltrane, Coleman, and others RADISSON HOTEL, RIVERSIDE, greats like Sonny Rollins and Wayne Shorter 120 E. MAIN ST. were playing abstract solos miles from the tune’s 8 P.M. | $10 ADVANCE (TWO-DRINK MINIactual notes, Person never strayed too far. MUM) 966-2660, JAZZ901.ORG “I’m really just trying to reshape the melody,” says Person. “I believe in the [ PROFILE ] BY RON NETSKY melody. I try to play these great melodies that also have great lyrics. I read those lyrics and Houston Person still remembers the day in get what I think the song means and what the 1950 that changed his life. He was a typical 16-year-old in his hometown of Florence, South composer meant for it to be, and then I want to get right in the middle of all of that and Carolina. He sang in the high-school choir add just a little bit.” and glee club, but he was mostly interested Sometimes even a little bit is too much. On in football and basketball. Then, Christmas his 2011 album, “So Nice,” he recorded Stephen morning, his parents gave him a surprise gift: a Sondheim’s “Anyone Can Whistle.” “I did tenor saxophone. “I don’t know why,” says Person, by phone straight melody,” says Person. “A lot of songs are from his home in Great Neck, Long Island. so beautiful, you don’t have to add anything.” “I’ve often thought about it as I’ve gotten older. He may not be pushing the envelope, I don’t know if it was preordained or what.” but few saxophonists can boast a gorgeous Sixty-three years, hundreds of albums, sound like Person’s, recalling that of Gene and thousands of concerts later, his life and Ammons and Stan Getz. On his latest album, career remain centered around the tenor “Naturally,” Person injects a bit more into sax. When it comes to soul-jazz, Person has classics like “My Foolish Heart” and “That’s been at the top of the genre for six decades. All.” “I improvised solos that were more Through all the different styles coursing bluesy than jazzy,” he says. through those decades — from hard bop, through fusion, to avant-garde — Person has The blues influence is not surprising been steadfast in his dedication. considering that blues was on the radio when “I know that I always wanted to play Person was growing up. Add some classical and pretty,” says Person. “The guys used to call it gospel and you’ve got the roots of his sound. ‘sweet horn.’ When I was in college you had

Playing it straight

“Every home had a piano,” says Person. “My mother played piano and I took lessons.” Person switched to sax lessons after receiving his tenor, but his real jazz education came several years later during his military service. Stationed in West Germany in the mid-1950’s, Person played in a band with some future jazz greats. “That was my learning experience,” says Person. “Eddie Harris was very helpful to me. Cedar Walton — every weekend we played together. And Don Menza was there, too. We had a lot of fun and I learned everything from those guys.” Six decades after his military experience, Walton is the pianist on Person’s latest album. His saxophone prowess developed further at the University of Hartford’s Hartt School in Connecticut. “They didn’t have any jazz there, it was strictly classical,” says Person, who still loves the great composers. “I would lean toward Bach and then the French guys, Debussy and Ravel, and then Franz Liszt — he was an improviser. So was Bach; I don’t know how he came up with those things every Sunday.” Person did not have too many encounters with the more experimental side of jazz, although in 1984 he recorded an album with adventurous pianist Ran Blake. “We went to school at the same time,” Person says. “He was at Bard and he’d come up to Hartford to hang out. He’s far out but he’s far in, too. He kept on top of the roots of jazz, gospel music, and blues. He’s a little like Cecil Taylor, plus he’s a wonderful guy.” Person’s longest musical association was with singer Etta Jones. They performed together for 35 years, until her death in 2001. What was the secret of their longevity? “She felt comfortable,” says Person. “She was a great singer. I always tried to get her to go out on her own, but she was comfortable in that situation. She didn’t want the hassles of leading a group. She had no ego. I played half a set and she played half a set.” Most musical careers have ebbs and flows;

artists who are hot one year sometimes can’t find an audience the next. But Person has never had a lull. “I’ve had a good run,” says Person, who is now in his late 70s. “I formed personal relationships by booking the band myself. I learned early that I could blow my own horn better than anybody else, so I got out there and did it. “Now I’ve got to figure out a way to slow down. I just went on a whirlwind West Coast tour,” Person says. “I can’t do that anymore, but I’m doing it. I play wherever. Whenever they call, I’m there.”

THURSDAY, MARCH 21 Son House Blues Night w/ Gordon Munding, Wales Road. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Bach Birthday Celebration.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts.

1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: Romantic Dvořák. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m. Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$82. [ JAZZ ]

Dave Rivello Ensemble.

Village Rock Cafe, 213 Main St. 586-1640. Every other Thursday, 9 p.m. Free. Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Funk in the Box. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. Jim Nelson. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian

Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Ultraviolet Hippopotamus w/ Aqueous. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 9 p.m. $5-$13. [ POP/ROCK ]

East Coast vs West Coast Punk Rock Tap Takeover. Tap

& Mallet, 381 Gregory St. 4730503. 7 p.m. Free. Envoi, The Results. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

Los Luchadores,Mark Grover, and Miche Fambro. Boulder

Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info.

FRIDAY, MARCH 22 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Adam Clark w/Luke Metzler, Susanna Rose. SPoT Coffee,

200 East Ave. 585-613-4600. 7 p.m. Free. C’est Bon Cajun Dance Band. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $5.

Goodbye Ronnie w/Enduring December, Maria Betts Music, Michele Sestito. Tala

Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

PROGRESSIVE JAZZ | BILL FRISELL

Famed author and pal-o-mine Charles Benoit once described the two schools of writing to me: plotting and plodding. The plotters lay it out ahead of time, the plodders discover as they go. Bill Frisell is a plodder, in this case with a Tele in lieu of a typewriter. I mean, how could he know where he was going with Beautiful Dreamers (his guitar/cello ensemble)? Frisell is prolific, having played guitar on more than 250 recordings. He has worked with masters like Elvin Jones and Ron Carter, and interpreted the music of Elvis Costello and Burt Bacharach. Frisell as a performer is a minimalist, his back frequently to the audience. But if you clear a little head space for the cat, his plodding will take you places you’ve never gone. Bill Frisell plays Sunday, March 24, 7 p.m., at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $35-$55. waterstreetmusic.com.— BY FRANK DE BLASE

Over & Under. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 5 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. True Blue. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 486-4937. 9 p.m. Free. Young Audiences of Rochester’s Area Youth: Cipher Live. Rochester Youth for Christ, 1 Favor St. 2565050. 6:30 p.m. $3-$5. [ BLUES ]

Dan Schmitt. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Perinton Concert Band: Discover America Concert.

Fairport High School, 1 Paddock Way. 234-2585. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Four RPO Cellists. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. 8 p.m. Ingrid Bock, Christopher Haritatos, Lars Kirvan, and Benjamin Krug. $5-$20. Gibbs & Main. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 6 p.m. $50.

Project Ludwig II: The Piano and Cello Sonatas of Beethoven. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 3892700. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro

135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Chamber Jazz. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free. The Evn Bri Duo. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Shades of Blue. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Hedges Restaurant, 1290 Lake Rd. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Westview Project. The Mendon House, 1369 PittsfordMendon Road. 624-7370. 6 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

Madrigalia: Modern Madrigals. First

Congregational Church of Christ, 26 E. Church St. 2230224. 7:30 p.m. $5-$15. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

FRIDAY, MARCH 22

[ POP/ROCK ]

Ikebe Shakedown w/Mosaic Foundation, The Greyhound Bandits. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

The Goods w/Tenth World Orchestra. Lovin’ Cup, 300

Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9.

[ POP/ROCK ]

St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Shouting at Satellites. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 7 p.m. Call for info.

The September Campaign, Sparrows, There I Sat is Lightning, and Anchorage Nebraska. Tala Vera, 155 State

Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

The Chinchillas w/Davey-O. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $5-$7. Downslave w/Mobday. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. $5. Fat City. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. The Greener Grass Band, Experimental Sandwich.

Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. 21+. $4. Into the Now. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Jam Box. The Bistro at Towpath Cafe, 6 North Main St. 585 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free. Jeff Bloom. Boulder Coffee Co - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. John Akers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 9 p.m. Free. Karma. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. MoChester. Jukebox, 5435 W. Ridge Rd. 352-4505. 10 p.m. $5.

Velvet Elvis w/Sleepy Hahas, All Them Witches. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $5-$7.

SATURDAY, MARCH 23 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ache. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 585-262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Acoustic Brew. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 6710816. Call for info. Bluegrass Fest. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 3 p.m. Free. Bogs Visionary Orchestra. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. John Akers. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 4977010. Call for info.

March Music Madness: Dady Brothers, The Crawdiddies, and Windsor Folk Family.

Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. $10-$15.

The Night of the Drum ft. Bush Mango, The Mambo Kings, The Buddhahood. Harro East Ballroom, 155 N. Chestnut St. 7:30 p.m. $20-$30.

Rosie Ledet & The Zydeco Playboys. Harmony House, 58

East Main St. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Spring String Thing. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 3 p.m. Free.

Tullamore Celtic Band w/Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub,

MONDAY, MARCH 25 [ JAZZ ] HONKY TONK | WAYNE HANCOCK

DJ/ELECTRONIC | NINA FLOWERS

Before Hank III nasally announced a return of outlaw country to the outlaws, there was Texas troubadour Wayne Hancock. A songwriter since he was 12, Hancock landed in 1995 with “Thunderstorms and Neon Signs.” He also contributed heavily to the aforementioned Williams’ debut. Hancock is the real deal, a throwback to general stores and sawdust floors with an affinity for the two-step. His touring guitarist, Mark Mencher, is a simply amazing guitarist from the Scotty Moore school of rollicking finger-style. His twangin’ with Hancock’s sangin’ makes this the show of the week. Yee haw!

If you don’t watch “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” then I pity you. It is a brilliant mix of entertainment and inspiration, and the costumes and performances routinely put out by the drag-queen participants are astonishing to behold. Nina Flowers is the universally beloved runner-up of Season 1 of the show, and in addition to being a fierce queen with a brilliant visual style, she is also DJ. This weekend Nina will come to Rochester’s Tilt for three shows over two nights. On Friday, March 22, Nina will be in DJ mode. On Saturday, March 23, see Nina in all her full performance glory as she takes to the stage in two drag sets. If you have any interest in drag or just want to take in a seasoned, artistically bold performer, this is not to be missed. Andale, locas!

Wayne Hancock performs Tuesday, March 26, 8:30 p.m. at Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $15-$20. abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE [ BLUES ] Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free. Rachel Brooke and Band. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$8. Third Degree. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Brighton Symphony Orchestra: Early Spring Concert. Brighton

Recreation, 220 Idlewood Rd. 3 p.m. Call for info.

Day of Brass ft. UR Brass Choir, Prime Time Brass.

University of Rochester Alumni and Advancement Center, 300 East River Rd. 3 p.m. Free.

Finger Lakes Concert Band: Evening of Contemporary Music. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. 7:30 p.m. $5.

Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus: The Boys in the Band.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 8 p.m. $6-$15. RPO: Romantic Dvorák. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m. Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$82. [ COUNTRY ]

Country Done Come to Town Tour. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 5:30 p.m. Free.

16 CITY MARCH 20-26, 2013

[ JAZZ ]

5th Annual CURE Dance Benefit ft. Gap Mangione & The New Big Band. Temple

B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 244-7060. 7 p.m. $25. El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Frank’s Rat Pack. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Glengarry Inn @

Eagle Vale, 4400 Fairport 9 Mile Point Rd. 598-3820. 7 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Bordertown. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. Call for info.

The Everleigh Club w/Dave Sestito. Boulder Coffee Co. –

Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 6970235. 8 p.m. Call for info.

The Filthy McNastys w/ Anonymous Willpower, Extended Family. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 7:30 p.m. $6-$10. Hardroad. The Bistro at Towpath Cafe, 6 North Main St. 585 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free.

Joywave w/1975, Soviet Dolls, The Branch Davidians. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $10-$12.

Tilt is located at 444 Central Ave. Tickets to the Flowers events cost $5-$6 for 21+, $12-$15 for ages 18-20. For more information call 232-8440 or visit Tilt’s page on Facebook. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK The Mighty Dry and High. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. MoChester, Wild Adriatic. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. RockCity. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Sirerns & Sailors w/Affiance, The Weight We Carry, Memento Mori, and Before the Foundation. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 5:30 p.m. $10-$15.

Springer, Rich Paolotto Birthday Bash. Nola’s

Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 9 p.m. Call for info. Stephanie & Co.. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8:30 p.m. $8. Stygian. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. Call for info. The Surge. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 9 p.m. Call for info.

SUNDAY, MARCH 24 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays: Dave North. Temple Bar and Grille,

109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Salseros . Rochester

Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 1 p.m. Free w/museum admission. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman at St. Michael’s: Eastman Student String Quartet. St. Michael’s

Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave. 325-4041. 2:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

The Irondequoit Chorale: On the Road!. Irondequoit United

Church of Christ, 644 Titus Ave. 3 p.m. $8-$10. Madrigalia: Modern Madrigals. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street. 325-4000. 4 p.m. $5-$15.

Women in Music Festival: Faculty Artist Series Carol Rodland, Tatevik Mokatsian.

Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 3 p.m. $10. [ JAZZ ]

Bill Frisell. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 7 p.m. $35-$55. Day Break. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5 p.m. Call for info. The Rhythm Dogs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Women in Music Festival: Opening Concert. Eastman

School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000. noon. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Chris Cohen w/Light Feelings, Paxtor. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $8-$12.

Lovin’ Cup Idol: Red Carpet Finale! The Final Two. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. Call for info.

Peter House and Susanna Rose. Boulder Coffee Co. -

Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Randall Shreve and The Sideshow w/The Lonely Ones.

Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 8 p.m. $7-$10.

TUESDAY, MARCH 26 [ POP/ROCK ] Jay Wilkinson. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Sports w/Ghost Pal, Drippers. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. [ CLASSICAL ]

Women in Music Festival: Dana Suesse: The Girl Gershwin. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. 7 p.m. Free.

Women in Music Festival: Noontime Concert. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. 12:15 p.m. Free.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17

Exhibit

Left: A photo from the “Race” exhibit demonstrates how racial categories have changed throughout American history. Right: A young visitor adds her skin tone to an ever-changing palette assembled from visitors’ contributions. PHOTOS PROVIDED

Beyond black and white: the forest for the trees “Race: Are We So Different?” THROUGH APRIL 28 ROCHESTER MUSEUM AND SCIENCE CENTER, 657 EAST AVE. 271-4320, RMSC.ORG MONDAY-SATURDAY 9 A.M.-5 P.M., SUNDAY 11 A.M.-5 P.M., UNTIL 9 P.M. ON THURSDAYS, MARCH 28 AND APRIL 25 | $11-$13, FREE TO MEMBERS AND KIDS UNDER 3 [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

I have visited the “Race” exhibit at Rochester Museum and Science Center twice so far, and both times caught college classes crowding the different stations, with students and teachers strolling in pairs or small groups and discussing with one another — and with community members — the heavy things that we must discuss. I witnessed people coming together in earnest to hear each other and to help each other understand, having halting, carefully measured, and at times awkward conversations. The show is a good stepping stone for the community, but made effective only by the patience and respect we are willing to offer each other going forward. With its heavy focus on reading and listening, the exhibit skews toward an adult crowd. But with adult guidance it could be beneficial for young children as well. The show offers a wealth of information about variations 18 CITY MARCH 20-26, 2013

in the human race, covering a lot of ground, from how geographic location has affected human variety, to race as a social construct used to control and shape human society throughout history. People from countless different backgrounds and combinations of cultures convey their experiences via video and in quotes. One section holds instruments once used to measure differences and define us into ever-increasing categories. Another station discusses slavery and servitude, exploring the literal and legal ways that racial definitions have shackled humans. Yet another offers the historic horrors of segregation and Apartheid, which endure as open sores in American and other cultures, but which we overlook in current situations around the world. Videos playing in a newspaper stand tackle the hideous twin issues of racism and classism and the increasing divides between citizens as they struggle and throw one another under the bus. Viewing the exhibit will be uniquely complicated for each visitor, as well-meaning openness wars with insidiously ingrained prejudices and all manner of memories. A section about the U.S. Census asks viewers to vote on whether they think the demographic questionnaire’s question on ethnic background should include the multitude of complexities, be more simplified, or omit the question of race altogether. Other interactive parts of the exhibit include an individual opinion-based survey

on which people around the world we deem as “white,” as well as two stands where visitors may look at their own skin under a magnifying camera. At one of these, information is provided about how sunlight and vitamins, not race, determine our skin pigmentation. At the other, a photograph is taken of our flesh, which is added to a digital mosaic of the human prism. The exhibit vaguely explores how we are still manipulated by the idea of race in a section about the first race-specific drug, BiDil, a prescription drug used to treat African Americans with congestive heart failure, which was approved by the FDA in 2005. At this section, quoted doctors debate whether there is any concrete evidence to support race-specific medicine and treatments, and after reading what they had to say, it seems far more likely that pill developers are just trying to sell pills. But that’s about as far as visitors are guided

with regards to how the concept of racial differences manipulates our thoughts and actions today. Missing from the exhibit is an exploration of how ongoing prejudices guide each of us in sneaky ways even today, not only those we deem backwards souls, at whom we can shake our heads. Also not addressed is scripture-based racism, and how perceived rights to specific scraps of land and their resources are bolstered by the concepts of “chosen people” and “manifest destiny.”

The ever-increasing problem of classism is touched on in various spots throughout the exhibit, but the connection isn’t quite made about the ongoing usefulness of racism by the financial elite to help maintain classism. Racism is a big facilitator of classism; the people hurt by racism are also hurt a great deal by classism as well. We pay no attention to the man behind the curtain, we fight amongst our impoverished selves over scraps. Of particular interest is a wall on which people weigh in about the significance of electing a black president vs. the reality of racism in modern America. Lacking from the exhibit is a clear delineation between personally learned and practiced racism and institutionalized racism, and the reality that while both must be fought, we cannot defeat one by defeating the other. We cannot feel good about eliminating racism from our daily lives if we uphold racist laws (for example, the disparities in the standards of punishments for the possession and sale of certain substances put in motion by the Rockefeller Drug Laws), merely because they are laws. Institutional racism makes us incurious about the discrepancies between neighborhoods within the same city. It makes it easier to swallow the story of extremism in the Middle East and Africa and ignore our own. It reduces the innocent casualties to our aggressive resource-grab from whole lives to an unfeeling number. We can easily find anecdotes from soldiers who have said that once in Afghanistan, it became clear that racism was the tool by which our politicians took us to war. Ongoing racism dulls American citizens’ sharp awareness of our own selfishness, as well as the bigger threats to us in authority at home. I left the second visit to the museum curious if any other animal group on this earth has showed signs of discrimination against members of its own species based on physical trait variations. Then I struggled. This is certainly something that we could set forth to study, but to what end? We could try to determine what survival purpose prejudices might serve, but we already know we don’t want to live like animals, so we can find no excuse in brutal nature. We live in a time with more open access to information than ever before, but we have been lazy with it. We already know that technology’s potential to connect us has failings, that the explosion of information has also created an illusion of understanding and a new breed of narcissism. Our patience for cultivating depth in our relationships and especially beyond the home, into the community, is steadily slipping. Which is not to say that efforts toward these ends are not being made — this very exhibit is a step in the right direction — but individual initiative needs to catch fire and spread.

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Schoenhals Symposium. Through Apr 19. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 1-4 p.m. Reception Mar 22 5-7 p.m. 594-6442. roberts.edu. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. A Photographer’s Path 16. Reception Mar 20 3-6 p.m. 1st Floor Museum: Neil and Jamie Montanus: A Glimpse of the World and Tom Kirn: The Walk Through Photo Album. 3252030. centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Through the Student Lens 2013. Through Apr 14. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Mar 22 5-8:30 p.m. and Apr 5 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. Keshequa High School, 13 Mill St. Livingston Arts Student Art Exhibit. Through April 27. Reception Mar 23 12-4 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “Silver Print” Awards Ceremony, Book Release, and Exhibition Receoption. Studio 678, the Wilson Foundation Academy Photo Club. Exhibition on display through Apr 29. Reception March 22 6:30-8:30 p.m. 271-5920. cityofrochester.gov. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Spirit & Mind. Through May 1. Reception March 22 5-9 p.m. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. Rochester Art Club Spring Show. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Through May 9. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery in Joseph S Skalney Welcome Center. Reception March 27, 6-8 p.m. rochesterartclub.org. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Connections” Arena Art Group. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri & Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Reception Mar 21 5-7 p.m. 475-2866. jleugs@rit.edu. rit. edu/fa/gallery. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “From Thought to Image: Art Quilts of Nancy P. Hicks.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Thu 4:30-7:30 p.m. Reception Mar 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m. nancyphicks.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Sproutkeepers” Justyn Iannucci & Margot Hughes. 1975ish.com. AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. 2449892. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Precious Metals: New Paintings on Gold, Silver, and Copper” by Beverly Rafferty. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. A Celebration of Youth Art Month. Irondequoit, Penfield, Webster High Schools. Closing reception Mar 23 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. “Within the Wallpaper,” new work by Jolene Beckman. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m, Sat 12-6 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com.

DANCE | RIVER NORTH DANCE CHICAGO

If the first teases of spring haven’t gotten you longing for the summer’s heat, the sexy, jazz-based choreography of internationally acclaimed River North Dance Chicago will. On the scene since1989, the company is beloved for its bold, emotive, theatrical dance, and has been the subject of three Emmy-winning documentaries on the company and the individual stories of its dancers. Three members of the company hail from Western New York, including Rochester-born Hayley Meier, who is a former member of Rochester City Ballet. The company has performed throughout the United States and abroad, and in 2012 completed a 28-city tour through Germany, Switzerland, and Russia. The dance group will perform one night only, on Saturday, March 23, at 8 p.m. in the Callahan Theatre at Nazareth College Arts Center (4245 East Ave.). Tickets to the show cost $30-$60. To reserve your seat or for more information, call 389-2170 or visit artscenter.naz.edu. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “What Fury Fiends Find” Adelin Karius: New Paintings and Woodcuts. Through Mar 31. lobbydigital@ gmail.com. lobbydigital.com. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite 225. Hunk of Burnin’ Love. Through Mar 31. Paul Taylor & Clifton Wood. 414-5643. catclay.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “LIFE and TIMES” by Cheryl Amati Martin American Way Collection. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Cumming Nature Center Hurst Gallery, 6475 Gulick Rd. Nature in Art: Selections from the Finger Lakes Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “It’s Black It’s White” New Drawings by Tim Mack. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Camera Obscura” Through Apr 7. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org.; “Silver and Water” Through May 26. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Janice Jakielski “Being Here” Installation. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m. 2754188. blogs.rochester.edu/ hartnett. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “What Shape is White” Featuring David Kerstetter, Monteiro Prestes,

Peggy Corthouts, Edward Loedding. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A. Operation P.H.O.T.O. (People Helping Others Overcome). TueThu & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., MonFri by appt. First Fridays 6-9 p.m. 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com. Livingston Art Center, 4 Murray Hill Drive. Apartment One. A show featuring the photographic art and graphic design created for the 2013 “official” Visitors Guide Livingston County. 243-6785. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Second Annual Art in Tourism exhibit. The work of the artists who helped to create this guide, Bob Oswald, Larry Tetamore, and Cindy Altmire Harris, will be featured in the exhibit. Wed & Fri, 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org/visit. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. 232-9030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Creative Workshop Adult Student Show. Admission free during workshop hours. 276-8959. mag.rochester.edu.; “Becoming Modern:Armory Show Artists at MAG” Through May 12. In Lockhart Gallery. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Thu. Open school break hours Tue Feb 19 and Apr 2, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester. edu.; “It Came From the Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

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FILM | WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH FILM SERIES

It’s the merry month of March, so it’s time for the Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender and Women’s Studies’ annual showcase of girls on film. SBAI and WXXI will host “Women & Power: Women’s History Film Series,” with 10 stories about women across many cultures, to be screened at the Little Theatre (240 East Ave.) from March 22 to March 28. Among this year’s features are “Invisible War” (pictured; screens Friday, March 22, 7 p.m.), about the epidemic of rape within the U.S. military; “Boxing Girls of Kabul” (Saturday, March 23, 1 p.m.), which follows a group of young Afghan women who strive to become world-class boxers; “The Price of Sex” (Tuesday, March 26, 7 p.m.), about Eastern European sex trafficking ad abuse; and “Water Children” (Wednesday, March 27, 7 p.m.), which explores the cycle of life through the eyes of a Japanese-Dutch pianist. Tickets for each film cost $5, and many of the screenings will be followed by a talk-back with a panel discussion. For more information, call 258-0400 or visit thelittle.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Jack Wolsky. Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 292-2021. kfarrell@monroecc.edu. monroecc.edu/go/mercer. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Rochester Area Fiber Artists (RAFA) presents: “Winter’s End” millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Art Therapy.” A display of wooden sculptures by Cheryl and Don Olney. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. “Contrasts & Contours” Hamilton Aguiar.. Introducing regional sculptor Lucien Casartelli’s sophisticated, contemporary, mixed media sculptures. 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Hours: Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Time & Again: Photography by Tom Policano. Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. ntid.rit.edu/dyerarts/.; Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. The Perry Bible Fellowship. Closing reception Fri March 29, 7 p.m. with Nicolas Gurewitch. pbfcomics.com. Our House Gallery of Veterans Outreach Center, 783 South Ave. Faces of Veterans. Tue 5-7 p.m., Fri 1-3 p.m. or by appt. 295-7836.

Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Mis en Scène. Featuring the work of Richard Jenks and Daniel Mosner. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 2715885. oxfordgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Heroes and Villains. recordarchive.com. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Vicki Hartman: New Works on Paper and Ceramic Sculpture. Art & Music Library in Rush Rhees. library.rochester.edu/ artmusic/home.; Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 275-4477. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. “Modern Love A collection of Paintings” by Sam Snyder. 6134600. spotcoffee.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Let Them Eat Cake! Portraits of Pastries.” 732-0036. studio212@shoefactoryarts.com. shoefactoryarts.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. “Toothpick World” by Stan Munro. Tue-Thu noon6 p.m., Fri noon-8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-8731. assisiinstitute.org. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Avenue. “As ready as I’ll ever be,” new work by Andrew Cho. Reception Fri Mar 1 6-9 p.m. 244-1730. geneseearts.org.

Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. “Salvador Dalí: Dante’s Divine Comedy.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Closed from March 16–24 for academic break. 395-2805. brockport. edu/finearts. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Connections” Arena Art Group. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri & Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Reception Mar 21 5-7 p.m. 475-2866. jleugs@ rit.edu. rit.edu/fa/gallery. UR Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition Winners. 275-3361. urmc.edu/libraries/miner/. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. PhotoBook Awards 2012. 442-8676. vsw.org. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. 2013 Annual Wayne County High School Art Exhibit. 315-3314593. waynearts.wordpress.com. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “From Thought to Image: Art Quilts of Nancy P. Hicks.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Thu 4:30-7:30 p.m. Reception Mar 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m. nancyphicks.com.

Art Events [ WED., MARCH 20 ] Especially for Educators “It Came from the Vault” tour. March 20, 4:30-7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $30, register. 267-8971. mag.rochester.edu. [ FRI., MARCH 22 ] Exhibition Tour: It Came from the Vault. March 22, 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. [ SAT., MARCH 23 ] Creative Workshop Open House. March 23, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Free. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Unveilling of Michael Taylor’s “Right Place/Right Time” Installation. March 23, 7 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave 389-2170. naz. edu. [ TUE., MARCH 26 ] Christine Marsh: “Adventures in Creativity and Art Marketing.” March 26, 7:30 p.m. Chapel Oaks, St. Ann’s Community, 1550 Portland Ave Irondequoit Art Club meeting Free. irondequoitartclub.org.

Comedy [ THU., MARCH 21 ] Esther Ku. March 21-23. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us.

Dance Events [ FRI., MARCH 22 ] PUSH Physical Theatre. March 22, 5 p.m. Spurrier Dance Studio, University of Rochester, River Campus $5. 273-5150. rochester.edu/college/dance/ events. [ SAT., MARCH 23 ] 5th Annual CURE Dance Benefit Fundraiser. March 23, 7 p.m.

Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Fundraising dance benefit for CURE Childhood Cancer Assoc. featuring Gap Mangione and The New Big Band. Cash bar. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres. Chinese auction. Raffle for PGA tickets $25 advance, $30 at the door. 585.244.7060. paddance.com. River North Dance Chicago. March 23, 8 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave $45-$60. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. Sock Hop for Mercy Flight Central. March 23, 8 p.m.midnight. Airport Holiday Inn, 911 Brooks Avenue. Live Music will be provided by “The Generations”, a 50s and 60’s rock & roll band. Raffle prizes and silent auction items $10 advance at Wegmans, $12 at door 396-0584. Mercyflightcentral.org. Zydeco Dance Lesson with Esther Brill. March 23, 7:15 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St Rosie Ledet & The Zydeco Playboys play 8-11 p.m Free, $10-$18 for performance. 727-4119. [ SUN., MARCH 24 ] Culture and Commuity Sundays: Salseros. March 24, 1-3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $11$13. 271-4320. rmsc.org.

Festivals [ WED., MARCH 20 ] 28th Annual Martial Arts Festival. March 20, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St Free, register. 428-7442. cityofrochester.gov/edgerton. [ SAT., MARCH 23 ] Annual Day of Brass. March 23, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Advancement and Alumni Center, 200 E. River Rd. All-day festival featuring workshops, lectures, demos, and a concert at 3 p.m Register. 273-5157. rochester.edu. Maple Sugar Weekends. Sundays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Pancake breakfast (includes admission) $7-$10, 9 a.m.-1 p.m Admission $3, $10 per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Maple Weekend at Packard Valley Farms. Sundays 438 Macedon Ctr Rd, Macedon. All-you-can-eat pancake breakfast. Horse-drawn and tractor wagon rides. Tour of the sap house. Petting zoo. Bird’s eye view of the sugar bush. Craft sale. Kid’s activity zone. Maple products and baked goods for sale. Free samples of syrup and other delicious maple products. 9 a.m.-4 p.m mapleweekend.com. Maple Weekends. Sundays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m Wohlschlegel’s Naples Maple Farm, 8064 Coates Rd., Naples. Pancake breakfast 8 a.m.-1 p.m Free admission, $3-$7 breakfast. 775-7770. wohlschlegelsnaplesmaplefarm.com. [ SUN., MARCH 24 ] Persian New Year Celebration. March 24, 1:30-5 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Presentations, art talks, traditional music, tours, tea and sweets for purchase $5 suggested donation. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu.

LECTURE | BREEDING ENDANGERED ANIMALS

For decades preservation endeavors have worked to prolong/ revive myriad endangered species. But for various reasons, there are complications in getting some animals to breed in captivity. Learn more about this cumbersome topic at this week’s Science on the Edge lecture, “The Science and Technology of Breeding Endangered Species when Mother Nature Needs a Helping Hand.” The talk takes place on Wednesday, March 27, 7:30 p.m. at Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave.), and the speaker will be Terri Roth, VP of Conservation and Science/CREW Director at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden (pictured). The talk will explore how changes in the natural environment can disrupt reproductive efficiency, and how cutting-edge technology has helped scientists to learn more about the needs of particular species — and to produce offspring. A local connection: the world’s first artificial insemination attempt with a polar bear occurred at the Seneca Park Zoo in Rochester. Tickets are $15 ($14 for RMSC members) or $8 for students ($7 for members). For more information, call 697-1942 or visit rmsc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Kids Events [ WED., MARCH 20 ] Get Involved with the Finger Lakes Invention Convention. Through March 30. Entry forms due March 30. Event on May 18. Ages 6-14 705-2662. invention@ flicsterny.com. flicsterny.com. [ THU., MARCH 21 ] Make it Fake: Recipes for Teens with Tops Cooking School. March 21, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Ages 12-18 Free, register. 225-8951. greecelibrary.org. [ SAT., MARCH 23 ] Easter Tea Party with Beatrix Potter Author of The Tale of Peter Rabbit. March 23, 3 p.m. Pullman Memorial Universalist Church, 10 East Park St. Veteran children’s theater actor Gretchen Murray Sepik in live interactive performance as Beatrix Potter. Complimentary English Afternoon Tea Reception follows the performance. Under age 12 bring your adult and a favorite bunny toy to the party! Free, donations accepted. 454-9450. louwu2006@gmail.com. Egg Dying. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd. 1 p.m. Bring your own hard-boiled eggs Free. 315-947-6143. snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. facebook.com/ sterlingnaturecenter. Saturday Author Salon featuring Sharon Swart. March 23, 2-4 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Local children’s book author Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Science Saturday. March 23. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave.

Noon-3 p.m. Making Tracks with the Animal Teachers and Anne Meade. Noon-4 p.m. Society of Women Engineers Included in admission: $11$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ SUN., MARCH 24 ] 3rd Annual Easter Egg Hunt. March 24, 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Castle Creek Farms, 3760 Rush Mendon Rd. An Easter egg hunt followed by family fun activities throughout the afternoon. Egg hunt 12-12:30 p.m. Adults are free $8 per child, groups of 2 or more $5 per child for egg hunt. 861-7708. mike@castlecreekfarms.com. castlecreekfarms.com. Family Fun Movie Day: “Wreck-It Ralph.” March 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. [ TUE., MARCH 26 ] Terrific Tots Tuesday. March 26. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Buy one, get one general admission all day. 263-2700. museumofplay.org.

Lectures [ WED., MARCH 20 ] “Clean, Smart and Secure: How the U.S. Department of State is Transforming Energy Systems Abroad” with Patrick Meyer. March 20, 10 a.m.noon. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Golisano Hall auditorium Free. 475-7052. rxhgpt@rit.edu. Neilly Lecture: Author and Playwright Anthony Giardina. continues on page 22 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21

Lectures March 20, 7:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Hawkins-Carlson room 275-4461. Seabreeze Park When You were a Kid with Matthew Caulfield. March 20, 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free, register. 336-6060. Skalny Center Lecture: Krakow’s Metamorphoses. March 20, 7:30 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Sloan Auditorium, Goergen Hall 275-9898. rochester.edu/college/psc/cpces. Telling Tales: External Narratives in Opera. March 20, noon. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. The

Opera Guild of Rochester’s Art Axelrod presents this program on opera’s external narratives; a part of the story that occurs offstage or before the curtain rises. Come and find out why opera becomes good theater!. Free. 428-8145. libraryweb.org. [ THU., MARCH 21 ] Annual Society for Technical Communication Conference. March 21-23. Keynote by Alan Houser: “Seeing the Future, by Looking at the Past.” spectrum.stc-rochester.org. The Business of Art with Scott Grove. March 21, 10-11 a.m. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St Register. 473-4000 x206. dsemple@artsrochester. org. artsrochester.org.

Digital Humanities Distinguished Speaker Series - Matthew Knutzen. March 21, 8 p.m. Max Lowenthal Hall, Room 3215, Lomb Memorial Dr. Matt Knutzen, Geospatial Librarian and Curator, Lionel Pincus and Princess Firyal Map Division, New York Public Library. He oversees this collection of around 500,000 maps and 25,000 books and atlases, both building the collection and ensuring its long term preservation. He provides context and insight to students, donors and scholars alike. Matt helped the library establish a new vision for map libraries on the web, through the large scale digitization of historic map collections, the creation of innovative tools for

public engagement through those maps and by building from them, with the help of the public, new, queriable, mashable databases Free. 4752057. rit.edu. Ferrari Humanities Symposia Lecture: Reformations in Western Thought with James Simpson. March 21. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus rochester.edu/college/ ferrari-symposia. “The Road Less Traveled,” The Joseph A. Trovato Lecture featuring Mary Jeremy Daigler. March 21, 7 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Basil Hall, room 135 Free. sjfc.edu. “Susan B. Anthony and the Sonic World” with Deane Root. March 21, 5 p.m. Rush Rhees

Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Welles-Brown room rochester.edu/college/ humanities. [ FRI., MARCH 22 ] Laura Lederer talk on Human Sex Trafficking. March 22, 2 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Liberal Arts Hall, room A205 Free. 475-1918. mslgsh@rit. edu. rit.edu. [ SAT., MARCH 23 ] 5th Annual Diabetes Symposium: The Diabetes Effect – Unique Considerations for Vascular and Cardiac Care. March 23, 7:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Unity Hospital, 1555 Long Pond Road $15, register. unityhealth.org/symposium.

[ SUN., MARCH 24 ] Vive Mexico! Travelogue. March 24, 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Tom DeClaire, a popular travelogue presenter, visits Mexico, a beautiful and historic country Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ MON., MARCH 25 ] Introduction to Beekeeping- An overview to the management of the venerated honeybee. March 25, 7-9 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Free, donations accepted. RochesterBeekeepers@gmail. com. RochesterBeekeepers.com. Power Your Potential Women’s Leadership Conference. March

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25, 11:30 a.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Louise M. Slaughter Hall. Speaker: Jennifer L. Pozner $10-$40, register. 475-2199. rit.edu/ womensconference. [ TUE., MARCH 26 ] Rochester Singletons “Armchair Travelogue Event.” March 26, 7 p.m. Pittsford Communtiy Library, 24 State St 248-6275. [ WED., MARCH 27 ] Science on the Edge: “The Science and Technology of Breeding Endangered Species when Mother Nature Needs a Helping Hand.” March 27, 7:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. With Terri Roth $8-$15. 271-1880. rmsc.org.

Literary Events [ WED., MARCH 20 ] Book Discussion: American War. March 20, 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. “Kearney’s March” by Winston Groom bn.com. Book Discussion: “Into the Beautiful North” by Alberto Urrea. Through March 20. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Tue 1:30-3 p.m., Wed 7-8:30 p.m 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Pure Kona Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Free. 585-319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East

Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 3195999. acanthuscafe.com. Spring Book Sale. March 20-26. Gates Town Hall, 1605 Buffalo Rd. Wed 3-6:30 p.m. members only (join at the door for $5), Thu-Fri noon-7 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-3 p.m. half price day, Mon-Tue 9 a.m.-7 p.m. fill a bag for $2 247-6446. [ THU., MARCH 21 ] Book Discussion: “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” March 21, 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. Reading by poet Gray Jacobik. March 21, 7:30 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Book signing to follow reading.

Wilson Formal Lounge Free. 385-8412. [ SUN., MARCH 24 ] Book Launch: “Irish America Reawakening: The Eoin McKiernan Story” by Deirdre McKiernan Hetzler. March 24. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Wilson Formal lounge (Haffey Hall). The Dady Brothers will provide music sjfc.edu. Books and Bagels. March 24, 10 a.m. Temple Emanu-El, 2956 St. Paul Blvd. Free, RSVP. 3885212. schwartxljs@gmail.com. emanuelrochester.org. [ TUE., MARCH 26 ] Books Sandwiched In: “The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail -- But

Some Don’t” by Nate Silver. March 26, 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Bring a lunch. Reviewer: David Birkin. Free. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Literature on the Lake event: The Healing Muse. March 26, 7 p.m. The Aurora Inn, 391 Main St. The evening will feature a group of writers and editors of SUNY Upstate Medical University’s Center for Bioethics and Humanities’ literary journal, The Healing Muse Free. 315-364-8866. eambrose@ innsofaurora.com.

Titles over Tea: “Into the Beautiful North” by Luis Alberto Urrea. March 26, 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020. bn.com. Wayne Writers Guild. March 26, 7:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. [ WED., MARCH 27 ] An Afternoon with Luis Alberto Urrea. March 27, 3-4:30 p.m. Nazareth College Golisano Academic Center, 4245 East Ave. Reading from “Into the Beautiful North,” Q&A, book signing. Free. 389-2614. wab. org. continues on page 24

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23

Literary Events Author Visit: Leif HerrGesell “Indians, Rogues & Giants.” March 27, 6:30-8 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. Author Visit: Luis Alberto Urrea. March 27, 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Luis Alberto Urrea, a Mexican American author of Into the Beautiful North, will discuss his novel, part of the community-wide event “If All Of Rochester Read the Same Book.” Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. Read with Seymour: “The Sense of an Ending” by Julian Barnes. March 27, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave. Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org.

THEATER | “BOB”

We all know the rags-to-riches story of the American Dream, in which a disadvantaged individual rises to one of various tops by virtue of his own will and initiative. “Bob,” the comedic production currently presented at Geva Theatre Center’s NextStage (75 Woodbury Blvd.), follows just such a journey in its title character, who was born on Valentine’s Day in the bathroom of a White Castle restaurant.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., MARCH 20 ] African American Museum on Wheels. Ongoing. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Fireside Lounge in RIT’s student union. Opens Mar 19 11 a.m sxpnsc@rit.edu. “Race: Are We So Different?” Through April 28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Apr 28. faceraceroc.org. Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. “To My Valentine.” Through March 31. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Mar 31. Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m Included in admission: $11$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ WED., MARCH 20 ] Spring Equinox Walk. March 20, 7 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd Free. 315-947-6143. snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. facebook.com/ sterlingnaturecenter March 20, 7 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd Free. 315-947-6143. snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. facebook.com/ sterlingnaturecenter. [ SAT., MARCH 23 ] GVHC Hike. March 23, 9 a.m. YMCA Bay View, 1209 Bay Rd Strenuous/hilly 5 mile hike, Abe Lincoln Park Free. 465-0990. gvhchikes.org. Rochester Birding Trip: Lake Shore Marshes East Wildlife Management Area. March 23, 7:30 a.m. Meet in Webster Plaza at junction of Rte 404 and Hard Rd. Extra spotting scopes and FRS radios are helpful 8727334. rochesterbirding.com. Yin Yoga & Journaling Workshop. March 23, 11 a.m. Beyond Center for Yoga, 67 Main St. An hour of Yin Yoga and reflective journaling. Bring a journal or notebook and a pen or pencil $15, register by 3.20. 4660239. beyondyoga@gmail.com. [ SUN., MARCH 24 ] GVHC Hike. March 24, 10 a.m. Post office lot, Main St. Scottsville. Moderate 6 mile hike, Greenway trail Free. 8892724. gvhchikes.org. Rochester Birding Trip: Durand Eastman Park and Lakeshore. March 24, 7:30 a.m. Meet in parking lot on west side of bay

Regardless of such humble beginnings, our ordinary hero is determined to achieve the greatness that he knows is his destiny. The story seeks to remind us that we’re all connected, but aren’t always aware of the “profound and beautiful effect we have on others,” says director Sean Daniels in a provided statement. Bob will be played by Rochester Native Dan Triandiflou, who is now based in Atlanta. The show debuted on March 7 but continues through March 24, with remaining performances on WednesdayFriday, March 20-22, at 7 p.m., Saturday, March 23, at 3 & 8 p.m., and Sunday, March 24, at 3 p.m. Tickets start at $30. For more information call 232-4382, or visit gevatheatre.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY bridge. Dress warmly and bring a spotting scope if you have one 730-2553. rochesterbirding.com.

Special Events [ WED., MARCH 20 ] Annual Bobcat Challenge Keg Race. March 20, 7 p.m. Lovin’ Cup at 300 Park Point Drive, Henrietta, and Tap & Mallet at 381 Gregory St. The Keg Race will start at 8 p.m. sharp; come early to buy drink tickets before the race starts at $3 each. Limit two tickets at a time. Tickets that are not used because the keg is emptied will be honored at the bar for a pint. During this exciting competition, DJ Tanner and DJ Bonafide will be spinning some hits 292-9940. lovincup.com. “Faith on Campus: The Abrahamic Initiative at Work.” March 20, 11 a.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave 52nd Annual Interfaith Event Free, RSVP. 2447060. wrj@tbk.org. tbk.org. Love as a Revolutionary Force. ongoing, 7 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Green Party of Monroe County gpomc.org. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 3 p.m Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Free. highlandwintermarket.com. Info Meeting: China Trip with Rochester Business Alliance. March 20, 5:30 p.m. Rochester Business Alliance, 150 State St 244-1800. rballiance.com. Screening: “Not My Life.” March 20, 6:15 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Followed by Q&A with Laure Lederer, J.D., former senior

24 CITY MARCH 20-26, 2013

adviser on trafficking in persons for U.S. Department of State $4$5. 478-6134. fclny.org. [ THU., MARCH 21 ] Intentionators of Rochester Meet-Up. March 21. The Purple Door Soul Source, 3259 Winton Road S $50 six month program, register. 427-8110. purpledoorsoulsource.com. March Madness Boutique Crawl. March 21, 5-10 p.m. Hosted at 1 N. Main St., Pittsford $20 includes transportation. trubynicole.com/#!boutiquecrawl. Reshaping Rochester: Cities Revinvented Luncheon. March 21, 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Inn on Broadway, 26 Broadway $50, register. rrcdc.org. Rochester Women’s Network Casino Event. March 21, 5:30 p.m. Harro East Ballroom, 155 N. Chestnut St. $60-$70. 2714182. rwn.org. Superintendent Presents Proposed 2013-14 RCSD Budget. March 21, 5:30 p.m. Central Office Building, Central Office Building, 131 West Broad St rcsdk12.org. Toastmasters in General: RGH Open House. March 21, 5:30 p.m. Rochester General Hospital, Twig Auditorium, 1425 Portland Ave Open House for all RGH Staff. Toastmasters in General, the RGH resident Toastmaster International club, invites all to an evening of entertainment, and networking. Learn how you can improve your communication and leadership skills in a supportive and fun environment! Light refreshment provided Free. 922-1484. 1491. toastmastersclubs.org.

[ FRI., MARCH 22 ] Big Screen Adventure: Coral Reef Adventure. Sundays. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Fri 4 p.m., sat 2:30 & 4:30 p.m., Sun 1, 2, & 4 p.m., also Mon Oct 8 2:30 & 4:30 p.m $3-$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Encouraging Student Athletes to Develop Their Minds, Bodies, and Souls. March 22, 5-8 p.m. Vibe Lounge, 302 North Goodman St. Learn about the Kaminna Allen Foundation’s mission and vision 500-7970. kaminnaallenfoundation.org. Film & Dialogue: Black Theater: The Making of a Movement. March 22, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Free, register. thebaobab. org. Ice Wine Gala. March 22, 6-10 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. Join us for an evening of dancing with music by Nik Lite, appetizers, dinner stations, open bar, ice wine tasting, dessert and fun with a wine pull and silent auction. This event will benefit the Western NY Region Easter Seals programs such as the Kessler Center in Irondequoit and our diagnostic treatment center in Henrietta $100/individual, $175/couple. 957-9247. casalarga.com. Nina Flowers. March 22-23, 10 p.m.-3 a.m. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. Fri $5 21+, $12 age 18-20. Sat $6 21+, $15 ages 18-20 232-8440. facebook.com/tiltnightclub. Open Mic Night. fourth Friday of every month A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St 9357173. mjtstages.com. Perfect Pairings. March 22, 7 p.m. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St. Enjoy pairings of beer, wine, and Finger Lakes cheeses at the Schweinfurth Art Center. Music by Joe Whiting. Silent Auction. Art Making with Betsy Menson Sio, Joe Librandi-Cowan, and Robert Loring. Preview of 2013 Made in NY exhibit. Cyanotypes by Victoria Miller in Gallery Julius $30-$35 advance, $35-$40 at door. 315-255-1553. mtraudt@ schweinfurthartcenter.org. myartcenter.org. Presentation by FLCC viticulture students. March 22, 4-7 p.m. Cornell Agriculture and Food Technology Park, 500 Technology Farm Dr., Geneva Free. thetechnologyfarm.com. Women & Power: Women’s History Month Film Series. March 22-28. For details, dates, and times, visit thelittle.org. $5 each film. 258-0400. Young Audiences of Rochester’s Area Youth Present “Cypher Live!” March 22, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Rochester Youth for Christ, 1 Favor Street. A powerful showcase of spoken word, music, dance and visual art by talented Rochester youth $5, $3 for students with ID, free to ages 10 and under 530-2060 x209. lbr@yarochester.info. [ SAT., MARCH 23 ] “An Evening of History” with dinner and musical guest Rebecca Washington. March 23, 6 p.m. Energy on East, 320 East Ave. Speakers: Pastor Robin Higgins and Kathy Connor share the history of Plymouth Spiritualist Church and George Eastman. Musical guest: Rebecca Washington. Advanced

tickets required through Plymouth Spiritualist Church $25 per person. 732-6221. energyoneast@gmail.com. plymouthspiritualistchurch.org. 90s Laser Show. 9:30 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Ages 5+ $6-$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Cellar Tasting with the Winemaker. March 23, 12, 2 & 4 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. Sample new wines with Casa Larga winemaker Matt Cassavaugh. Each tasting will be paired with a local cheese made in the Finger Lakes $20-$25, RSVP required. 223-4210. casalarga.com. An Evening of ECK: The Call of Soul. March 23, 6 p.m. Eckankar Center of Rochester, 3300 Monroe Ave., Suite 313. This free evening event of uplifting stories and songs to inspire you on your spiritual journey. Guest Speaker and Performer Rodney Jones Free. 288-4721. info@eckankar-ny. org. eckankar-ny.org/rochester/ special.htm. The Home & Garden Show. March 23 and March 23-24, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St $7-$8, children 12 and under free 272-8222. rick@ rochesterhomebuilders.com. thehomeandgardenshow.com. Maple Sugaring Festival. Sundays, 10 a.m Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. Self-guided walks through the sugar bush, 19th-century sugaring demos, modern syrup-making demos and sample maple treats. Display of maple sugaring artifacts, crafts, demonstrations and activities at the nature center and in the historic village. Enjoy a pancake breakfast ($) at the Meeting Center from 9 a.m.1 p.m. each day $6.50-$8.50; free to members & kids age 3 and under. 538-6822. gcv.org. Peacework Organic Community Supported Agriculture Group Meeting. March 23, 2-3:30 p.m. Quaker Meetinghouse, 84 Scio St peaceworkcsa.org. Petwoo’s Pet Friendly Single’s Mixer. March 23, 6 p.m. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. The evening will include icebreakers, music, complimentary h’orderves, cash bar, FREE door-prizes, pet goody-bag, and much more. If your dog cannot make it, bring a photo. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Rescued Treasures Pet Adoptions $20 advanced sale $30 @ door. 414-2969. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. Rochester Singletons Movie & Dessert. March 23. Call for information 381-9184. Star Show: Curiosity on Mars. 1 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Also Mon Oct 8, 1 p.m $3-$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Welcome to Spring Exposition. March 23-24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, Fairport Nine Mile Rd., Penfield Free. grossmans.com. [ SUN., MARCH 24 ] “B.Y.O.T” (Bring Your Own Train). 11 a.m.-4 p.m New York

Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd Bring your HOgauge train and operate it on the museum’s huge layout $2-$3. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. Celebration of Nowruz, the Persian New Year. March 24, 1-5 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “Ode to Wine: A Program of Poetry, Art and Culture.” Lectures, demos, tour, more $5 suggested donation. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Painting with a Purpose: Nuts for Mutts Rescue Fundraiser. March 24, 2 p.m. Painting with a Twist, 1276 Fairport Rd., Fairport $35, register. 267-7002. paintingwithatwist.com. Pancake Breakfast. March 24, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave All you can eat with sausage and real maple syrup made on site $5-$7.50. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer.htm. Taiko Note by Taikonnection. March 24, 2 p.m. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St Japanese Taiko Drumming concert $10$12, under age 12 free. 315781-5483. thesmith.org. [ MON., MARCH 25 ] 2013 Community Performance series. Fourth Monday of every month, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 Come and enjoy singing dancing and musical theater. January 28: Grease $5. 398-0220. cobblestonesrtscenter.com. Barbetorium: Men’s Night. March 25, 6-8 p.m. Fusion Salon, 333 Park Ave. Topics covered: hair & skin care, shaving techniques for better home maintenance Free. 271-8120. [ TUE., MARCH 26 ] Community Screening and Discussion of the Documentary Film Childhood in Translation. March 26, 7:15 p.m. Raymond F. LeChase Hall, University of Rochester, 500 Joseph Wilson Boulevard Part of a film series exploring immigrant and refugee experiences. Followed by a discussion of the documentary guided by a panel of experts and practitioners who work with immigrant and refugee populations Free. 276-5405. help@warner.rochester.edu. warner.rochester.edu. East Side Winter Market. 3-6 p.m 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 348-9022. mbartolotta001@ rochester.rr.com. Omakase Tasting. March 26, 5:15 & 8:15 p.m. Next Door Bar & Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. $119.00 per person (dinner) and $49 per person (beverage pairing). 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Radical Mychology Meet-up. March 26, 7 p.m. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St. Free. facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Rochester DOMA Candlelight Vigil. March 26, 4:30-7 p.m. Rochester Federal Office Building, 100 State St. Join the nationwide “Light the Way to Justice” vigil to mark the historic significance of the start of the Edie Windsor and Proposition 8 oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court. At issue is the right of gay and lesbian people to marry the person they love and share the legal benefits, responsibilities and dignity that legal marriage accords. Speakers will address the

CLASSIC BELGIAN CUISINE

human rights advancements reflected by “Seneca Falls, Selma & Stonewall” All are welcome Free. 755-9398. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. Lots of giveaways, including hats, t-shirts, drinks, tacos - come alone or come with a team! $1.50 Beef Tacos, $2.50 Chicken Tacos, $2.50 Drafts except Guinness, $3 Bacardi Flavors 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail. com. templebarandgrille.com. [ WED., MARCH 27 ] Free Community Meal. March 27, 5-6:30 p.m. Covenant United Methodist Church, Culver Rd Reservations are not required. Everyone is welcome!. 654-8115. unyumc.org/churches/detail/917. Rochester Improvement Society Happy Hour. March 27, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave With the Monroe County Young Democrats. 232-9030. rocimprovement.org. Rochester International Film Festival. March 27. Wednesday, March 27, 6:30 p.m., Chili Public Library, 3333 Chili Ave. 889-2200; Saturday, April 6, 11 a.m., Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave., 784-5300; Tuesday, April 16, 7 p.m., Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford, 2486275; Thursday, April 18, 7 p.m., Winton Branch Library, 611 Winton Road, 428-8204 Free. rochesterfilmfest.org/bestof-the-fest/. Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. March 27, 6:30 p.m. Banzai Sushi and Cocktail Bar, 682 South Ave. Tasting 7-9 p.m $30-$35, register. rochesterwinos.com. Samurai Techniques for Social Media. March 27, 11:30 a.m. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. Robin Thompson, Client Relations for BIA, also known as the “Samurai Networker” on her blog $30, $25 DR members 271-1111. digitalrochester.com. Wood Library Cafe. March 27, 10 a.m.-noon. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free. 3941381. woodlibrary.org.

Sports [ FRI., MARCH 22 ] Atlantic Hockey Championships. March 22-23. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square For each adult ticket sold, $5 will go to the Webster Fire Dept. Fri 4 p.m., Sat 7:05 p.m $18 adults, $14 kids. 800-745-3000. atlantichockeyonline.com. [ SAT., MARCH 23 ] Roc City Roller Derby Season Opener: Shave & a Track Cut. March 23, 5 p.m. RIT Gordon Field House, One Lomb Memorial Drive Rochester’s only women’s roller derby league opens their season with a full-contact doubleheader at RIT’s Gordon Field House. Watch the B-Sides take on New Hampshire’s Queen City Cherry Bombs and the Roc Stars duke it out against downstate’s Hellions of Troy. Live music and head shaving to benefit St. Baldrick’s Tickets start at $10. (585) 475 - 4121. rocderby.com. [ WED., MARCH 27 ] Rochester Americans v Syracuse Crunch. March 27, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

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THEATER | “PHOTOPLAY”

Lively creativity can arise from minimal material, and at times, artists will place deliberate restrictions and constraints on a project in order to see what emerges. Producer John Borek’s latest conceptual art piece, “PhotoPlay,” will consist of 20 90-second plays to be performed inside a photo booth, and will take place at 7 p.m. on Sunday, March 24, at MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.). As explained in the press release, “‘PhotoPlay’ aspires to present the world’s shortest plays on the world’s smallest stage.” Interested parties have the chance to participate by submitting a play that is suitable for all audiences, requires minimal set-up and props, and makes creative use of the photo-booth environment to the director at spencer@ spencerchristaino.com. Playwrights are encouraged to direct and cast their own works. The first 30 plays submitted will be performed. The event is free to attend, but a donation to MuCCC is requested. For more information, contact the director or visit muccc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Theater The Accidental Hero. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $25. 3254370. downstairscabaret.com. August: Osage County. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through Mar 24. Thu 7 p.m., Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $18-$26. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org. “Bob.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Wed Mar 20-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m Tickets start at $30. 2324382. gevatheatre.org. “The Book Club Play.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. Broadway by the Lake. Inn on the Lake, 770 South Main St. An evening of Broadway music presented by the Finger Lakes Camarata plus guest soloist. Tickets available at the Finger Lakes Gallery & Frame $25. 234-6032. ocarts.org. “City Lights.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Through Apr 14. Previews Wed Mar 20-Thu 7 p.m., opening Fri 8 p.m., shows Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Wed Mar 27 7 p.m $20-$39. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com “Hairspray.” Geneva High School. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $5-$7. 315-945-1528. “Is Life Worth Living?” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave RCP/ Irish Community Players. Fri-Sat Mar 22-23 8 p.m.; Thu-Sat Mar 28-30 8 p.m $9-$19. 244-0960. info@ muccc.org. muccc.org. “Murder Me, Murder Me Not.” Golden Ponds, 500 Long Pond Rd. Sun Mar 24 12:30 p.m

$27 includes dinner. 225-2419. goldenpondspartyhouse.com. Not About Eve. RAPA, 727 E. Main St. Sat 7 p.m. $35. 2342119. rapaonline.us. PhotoPlay. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Sun 7 p.m. 90 second plays performed inside a photo booth. A John Borek conceptual art piece Free, donation to MuCCC requested. muccc.org. Plays in Progress Series: “Tinker to Evers to Chance.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Mon 7 p.m. Free, register. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “The Private Ear.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Thu 12:15-1 p.m. Lunch Hour Play Reading Series $8 play only, $15 includes lunch box, register. 2324382. gevatheatre.org. Rochester Fringe Play Reading: “Shakespeare’s Will” by Vern Thiessen. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Sat 2:30 p.m. Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. “Smith.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Transcendental Theatre Troupe. Donations for the Wounded Warrior Project will be accepted at the door. Fri March 22 9 p.m., Sat-Sun 6 p.m.; also FriSat March 29-30 8:30 p.m. In the Masters Family Community Theater (room A13), located in the lower level of the Nazareth College Arts Center Free. 3892170. nazSMITHtickets@gmail. com naz.edu/theatre-arts. Too Many Questions. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Sat 7:30 p.m. A play commemorating civil rights activist Virginia Foster Durr $7$15. 271-9070 105. showclix. com/event/TooManyQuestions. continues on page 26

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I stand by all previous statements I’ve made about trading our freezing, depressing, and drunken New Year holiday for the traditional Persian New Year celebration of Nowruz, which is celebrated in the springtime. What could be more logical or lovely than pausing to revel in the new life stirring and budding all around you, the return of the songbirds, the longer-lasting daylight? You can take part in Nowruz on Sunday, March 24 (slightly after the vernal equinox on March 20), 1-5 p.m., at the Memorial Art Gallery (500 University Ave.). This year’s theme is “Ode to Wine: A Program of Poetry, Art, and Culture,” and the afternoon will include a presentation of the origin of Nowruz by RIT professors Shahin Monshipour and Robert Dunbar, a lecture and poetry recitation with Dr. Fatemeh Keshavarz (pictured), Persian dance performances, live music, Sofreh Haft Seen displays (the traditional table setting of Nowruz which may include green sprouts, goldfish, eggs, hyacinth, and garlic, among other items), and guided tours of the gallery. There is a suggested donation of $5. For more information, call 276-8900 or visit mag.rochester.edu. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Theater

Workshops

Workshop Reading of “’Tis Pity She’s a Whore.” 169 Atlantic Avenue, across from MuCCC. Thu 8 p.m. ShakeCo: The Shakespeare Company Pay what you will.

[ WED., MARCH 20 ] Borosilicate Glass Weekday Sampler. March 20, 1-4 p.m. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way $75, register. 3497110. rocafc.com. DSLRs with Peter Blackwood. March 20, 6-9 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. $15, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. Family Development Class: “Nothing Works.” March 20, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children 5 to 12 years old Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org. Paul and Deborah Rees Psychic-Medium Workshops. Through March 20. The Purple Door Soul Source, 3259 Winton Road S Various times and fees. Visit web for info 427-8110. purpledoorsoulsource.com. Vision Board Workshop. March 20, 7-9 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $30, register. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery. com.

Theater Audition [ WED., MARCH 20 ] “The Price” by Arthur Miller. Through March 20, 7 p.m. WCBS Players. May production. Warsaw Grange Hall, 177 S. Main Street, Warsaw. Four roles to be filled: 2 adult males age 35-60, 1 adult male age 60-75, 1 adult female age 3-60 535-0512. Sing with the RPO. Through March 26. Apply by 3/26. No audition necessary tinyurl.com/ bbolnwd. Technical Director, Musical Director, Musicians Wanted. Through April 24. Working Class Theatre Company is looking for a Technical Director, a Musical Director, and Musicians for their upcoming Summer 2013 production of The Fantasticks 643-0836. workingclasstheatre.net. [ SUN., MARCH 24 ] “The Fantasticks.” March 24-25, 6-10 p.m. Webster Village Hall, 28 West Main St. Working Class Theatre Company is looking for 1-2 females (age 17-25) and 6-7 males (age 17-65) for various roles 469-4176. workingclasstheatre.net. 26 CITY MARCH 20-26, 2013

[ THU., MARCH 21 ] Community Labyrinth Walk with free energy work, chair massage, and music. March 21, 7-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Free energy work, chair massage or Oneness Blessing, and music. Experience the transformational power of the labyrinth combined with other deeply restorative energies.

Fifteen minute orientation from 7:00-7:15 p.m. Handicapped Accessible Free, donations accepted. 392-3601. kwhipple@rochester.rr.com. rochesterunitarian.org. Dance Lessons. March 21, 7-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Esther Brill will teach Louisiana dance hall, honky tonk and swing. We’ll show off what we learned with a dance party during the last class. Register. 359-7092. Public Art and its Effects on Communities. March 21, 7-9 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $16. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Rochester Art Club: Steven Assael presentation. March 21, 7-9 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Assael is in Rochester to present a workshop for the Rochester Art Club. The Club invites the public to a free presentation by Assael demonstrating his portrait painting method in oil Free. 276-8900. rochesterartclub.org. Shaman Drumming. March 21, 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Shooting on a Shoestring Workshop. March 21, 6-7:30 p.m. RCTV Studios, 21 Gorham St $3, $10 nonmembers, register. rctv15.org. [ FRI., MARCH 22 ] 10th Annual Cindy L Dertinger Breast Cancer Seminar: Tools for the Journey. March 22. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Free, register by 3.20. 473-8177. bccr.org. DIY Designing Spaces. March 22, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ SAT., MARCH 23 ] American Recorder Society Germs of Germany Workshop. March 23, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Rd Beginning with Flemish composers, we will continue chronologically through history $25 half day, $45 full day, register. 244-2468. tmangialno@ yahoo.com. fbcrochester.net. Crazy Couponing. March 23, 1-4 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $30. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Reiki Level 1 Certification Training. 1-5 p.m The Purple Door Soul Source, 3259 Winton Road S $150, register. 427-8110. purpledoorsoulsource.com. Truffle Class 101. March 23, 3:30 p.m. The Cocoa Bean Shoppe, 20 S Main St. $35, register. 2031618. cocoabeanshoppe.com. Zen Self-Defense Class for Women and Children. March 23, 12-2 p.m. Carlson MetroCenter YMCA, 444 E Main St. Free. rochesterymca.org. [ SUN., MARCH 24 ] Things to Know Before You Go: Italy. March 24, 2-4 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ MON., MARCH 25 ] Basic Resume Workshop with Anne Walker of Rochester

[ TUE., MARCH 26 ] African World History Class. 7:309 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. The African World History class provides an ongoing experience of the contributions and achievements Africans and African-Americans have made throughout history. The class uses the historical experiences of African peoples to highlight the cultural values we share. Stay tuned and check the Baobab website for further details $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo. com. thebaobab.org. Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. 6-7 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St 698-7784. Computer Tutoring. 4 p.m Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Boulevard Adult Computer Tutoring and Instruction: Every Tuesday from 4-5pm the Adult Services Librarian will be available for one-on-one computer help. Bring any project are working on, and we will do our best to assist you. Remember to bring a disk or USB drive to save your files Free. 428-8214. Family Development Class: “Twenty Minutes to Effective Parenting Communication Skills.” March 26, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children ages 1 to 6 Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Holistic Living. March 26, 7-9 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. Madness 101: The Trauma Drama: PTSD. March 26, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. Smugtown Mushrooms Winter Classes. March 26. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St. Medicinal Mushrooms: Jan 20, Feb 10, Mar 3; Mushrooms 101: Feb 2, Mar 2; Radical Mychology: Feb 26, Mar 26 smugtownmushrooms.com. [ WED., MARCH 27 ] Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” March 27, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children of all ages Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Soft Glass Weekday Sampler. March 27, 1-4 p.m. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way $75, register. 349-7110. RocAFC. com.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

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Works. March 25, 6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Register. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Easter Brunch with Chef Bridgette Pendelton. March 25, 6-8:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $69, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com. Healthy Cooking with Superfoods. March 25, noon. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. $20, register. 340-8655. penfieldrec.org. Intro to Reiki. March 25, 7-9 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com.

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Learn. Dance. Have Fun. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27

Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Tension and technology [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little

“The Call” (R), DIRECTED BY BRAD ANDERSON NOW PLAYING

Her appearance in “The Call” suggests that Halle Berry, who’s been very busy lately, occupies a position in Hollywood as a kind of female counterpart to those male stars who specialize in action movies. Aside from playing Catwoman, she also serves as one of the charter members of the X-Men in that blockbuster franchise. Most recently, she appeared in multiple roles in the many-layered, fascinating, flawed “Cloud Atlas,” both as hero and victim of her particular stories.

240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-2624386, amctheatres.com Film Previews on page 30

SEE

ALL

That hero/victim duality victim nicely defines the traditional role of leading female actors in American cinema. Beginning with the wonderful Fay Wray in “The Most Dangerous Game” and “King Kong,” the scream queen ultimately manages to defeat the menace that threatens her throughout the initial scenes and sequences of any given movie. That pattern distinguishes the work of such women as Adrienne Barbeau, Linda Hamilton, and Sigourney Weaver; it describes Berry’s roles in “Gothika” and now, “The Call.” In “The Call” Berry plays Jordan Turner, a 911 dispatcher for the Los Angeles police department who encounters, first electronically, then physically, that favorite contemporary villain, a serial killer. The movie opens with Turner responding to a call from a panic-stricken teenager who hears a prowler outside her home. Turner alerts the police and guides the young woman to a hiding place, but the intruder finds her and mocks Turner on the victim’s cell phone. The action restarts six months later, as a guilt-stricken Turner, still suffering anxiety attacks from

Halle Berry in “The Call.” PHOTO COURTESY SONY PICTURES

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her experience, finds it all happening again. A frightened teenager, Casey Weldon (Abigail Breslin), abducted from a shopping mall, calls 911 from the trunk of the kidnapper’s car. Employing her considerable skills and a deep sense of empathy, Jordan Turner tries to calm her and talk her through her ordeal. The movie proceeds swiftly along the parallel tracks of Jordan Turner’s desperate efforts to guide Casey through the horrible situation and Casey’s desperate efforts to escape her captor. Both of them come up with some ingenious ploys, but the kidnapper, growing increasingly vicious, foils them again and again. All of that action plays out within the context of Jordan’s attempts to locate the kidnapper’s car on the Los Angeles freeways, and to identify the man himself. Like so many American movies, “The Call” creates much of its appeal from its concentration on sheer process. It shows in fascinating detail the procedures by which the 911 dispatchers and the police track down a single car among the millions on the Los Angeles streets, then identify its driver, and engage in pursuit. Refreshingly, although the automobile occupies a central place in the plot, the director, Brad Anderson, refrains from the usual high-speed chase, punctuated by collisions and explosions. Perhaps because of his lengthy experience in television, Anderson maintains an admirable efficiency throughout the movie, extracting considerable tension from the materials without

More than 50 shades of gray [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“The Gatekeepers” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY DROR MOREH OPENS FRIDAY

“Planet of Snail” DIRECTED BY YI SEUNG-JIN SCREENS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27, AT THE DRYDEN

ever diminishing its sense of authenticity. The rich context of contemporary high-tech police methods never interferes with the film’s fine sense of pacing. He also employs a purely visual means of providing a sad and even sympathetic back story for the criminal’s motivation and methods; the kidnapper, Michael Foster (Michael Eklund), owes more than a little of his personality and actions to the immortal Norman Bates. Looking a little less glamorous than usual, the beautiful Halle Berry performs adequately in a role that fits neatly with the characters she’s played recently, with a combination of emotionalism and cool control, and in this case intimating the awareness that Jordan Turner herself teeters on the brink of hysteria and despair. Abigail Breslin, who must project suffering and frenzy practically throughout the entire film, looks exactly like the insecure adolescent she portrays, but also convincingly demonstrates that her horrible experience enables her to find a kind of maturity. Although playing a psychotic killer seems somewhat less than rewarding, Michael Eklund may actually deserve the most praise for his performance. His determined intensity, which approaches closer and closer to utter insanity as his situation grows more desperate, expresses itself in some absolutely convincing facial expressions and body language. The possible drawback to his success may also derive from Anthony Perkins’s Norman Bates — a career sometimes blighted by typecasting as a madman.

In the Oscar-nominated documentary “The Gatekeepers,” a gripping recounting of the history of the long-standing IsraeliPalestinian conflict, Israeli filmmaker Dror Moreh has achieved a remarkable feat. Not only in creating a powerful, passionate, and clear-eyed examination of an exceedingly complex subject, but in miraculously convincing all six surviving former heads of Shin Bet, Israel’s secret internal security agency, to be interviewed on camera, for the first time ever. The men are each given the opportunity to talk about particulars of their job, going into detail about specific operations and events. They discuss their successes as well as their failures, including the 1984 Kav 300 bus hijacking, in which Shin Bet officers brutally executed two of the perpetrators immediately after their capture, as well as the assassination of

A still from “The Gatekeepers.”

Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin in 1995. Given their histories, it’s often shocking how, given the gift of hindsight, each man has evolved beyond the black-and-white ideology that their job required, and learned to see the situation as it truly is: an endless landscape painted in nothing but shades of gray. “When you retire, you become a bit of a leftist,” as one explains it. Over the years, most seem to have grown increasingly critical of Israel’s tactics, and several even express their full support in granting Palestinian statehood. Occasionally Moreh’s interviews take on the tone of an interrogation, prodding and applying pressure to his subjects when they threaten to clam up. But for the most part all six men seem perfectly willing to talk, and they all come across as thoughtful and complicated individuals. Listening to them speak about the morality of participating in government-sanctioned violence in the name of achieving peace, one can’t help but wonder if these interviews were something of a relief, giving them the chance to open up about the things they’ve done and seen, after years and even decades of silence. It’s still more than a little chilling to hear them talk about using targeted assassinations, weighing the consequences of taking out a supposed threat against the collateral damage of possible innocent lives lost. At one point or another, all express longing for the clarity of a “clean” operation that doesn’t require such choices, and regret for how rarely those easy decisions present themselves. Clearly, the costs of those choices weigh on them all. Considering that those choices continue to be made, on both sides of the conflict, it’s not at all surprising that all the men remain pessimistic about prospects for peace in the future. “The future is very dark,” one admits late in the film.

Moreh has crafted a stylish and compelling film, and he’s fond of utilizing impressive 3D location modeling throughout the film as a means to provide his audience visuals for certain events that lack archival footage. These flourishes are sometimes an unnecessary distraction during the interviews, especially when the words in and of themselves are so riveting. “Planet of Snail” is the final presentation in the Dryden Theatre’s “Cinema Guild” series, which has screened a wide-ranging selection of recent movies from the foreign and independent film distributor, and it’s as sweet and life-affirming a film as you could ever wish to see. The South Korean documentary, from director Yi Seung-jin, offers a glimpse into the lives of husband and wife Young-chan and Soon-ho. He’s deaf and blind, while she has a spinal deformity that has limited her growth so that she’s not even half the height of her husband, yet together they form the most extraordinary couple. Completely observational, Seung-jin immerses his audience, providing no exposition so that we must glean any personal background information from conversations we overhear as the pair goes about their daily lives. They seem to act as a solitary unit when they’re together (which is always), as Soon-ho communicates with Young-chan by tapping words out onto his fingers. In what’s possibly the most beautiful scene in a film that’s loaded with them, we watch as the couple must act as a team to complete the deceivingly simple task of changing a light bulb which she can’t reach and he can’t see. A lovely and gentle film that never condescends to its subjects, it’s impossible not to feel moved by the love, patience, and devotion these two individuals have for one another.

PHOTO COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSICS PHOTO COURTESY PHOTOFEST

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

Friday, Mar. 22, 8 p.m. Widely considered to be the pinnacle of the genre, Sergio Leone’s epic not only defines the spaghetti Western but also solidified Clint Eastwood as the iconic anti-hero. It follows three treasure-seeking, rival gunslingers against the chaotic backdrop of the American Civil War. (Il buono, il brutto, il cattivo, Sergio Leone, Italy/Spain/West Germany 1966, 179 min.)

WILD WORLD OF LOONEY TUNES Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week.

Saturday, Mar. 23, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Mar. 24, 2 p.m. Join us for a wacky evening with the greatest “wabbit” alive, Bugs Bunny, and the whole Looney Tunes gang! These 12 short cartoons follow Bugs on his madcap misadventures with the likes of Daffy Duck, Yosemite Sam, Wile E. Coyote, and Elmer Fudd. (Friz Freleng, Chuck Jones, Robert McKimson, US 1949-1958, 87 min.)

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—Stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29

NEW!

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

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[ OPENING ] ADMISSION (PG-13): Tina Fey and Paul Rudd star in this romantic dramedy, which means that even if the movie’s terrible, it will still be worth watching because hey, Tina Fey and Paul Rudd. Also starring Lily Tomlin, Wallace Shawn, and Michael Sheen. Canandaigua, Eastview, Culver Ridge, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE BOXING GIRLS OF KABUL (NR): Documentary follows a group of Afghan women as they train to become boxers and represent their country at the Olympics, despite the risk of persecution. Little (Sat, Mar 23, 1 p.m.) THE CROODS (PG): A prehistoric family sets off on an epic journey to find a new home after their cave is destroyed in this animated family adventure film from Chris Sanders (“How to Train your Dragon”). Featuring the voice talents of Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Catherine Keener, and Cloris Leachman. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster FAT CITY (1972): Two boxers, one aging and past-his-peak, and the other young and down-onhis-luck, train to get back in the ring in John Huston’s underrated pugilist drama. Starring Stacy Keach and Jeff Bridges. Dryden (Tue, Mar 26, 8 p.m.) THE GATEKEEPERS (PG-13): See review on page 29. Little, Pittsford THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY (1966): Clint Eastwood is The Man With No Name in Sergio Leone’s justly celebrated spaghetti western masterpiece. Dryden (Fri, Mar 22, 8 p.m.) HIGH AND LOW (1963): A shoe company executive is the victim of an extortion plot when his chauffeur’s son is kidnapped and held for ransom, in Akira Kurosawa adaptation the “87th Precinct” novel, “King’s Ransom. Starring Kurosawa’s frequent leading man, Toshirô Mifune. Dryden (Thu, Mar 21, 8 p.m.) INAPPROPRIATE COMEDY (R): A new anthology comedy movie attempts to out-stupid “Movie 43” and, judging by previews, it’s got a fair shot. Starring Adrien Brody, Lindsay Lohan, Michelle Rodriguez, and Rob Schneider. Henrietta INTERSEXION (NR): This New Zealand documentary examines the stories and life experiences of people from around the world, including one Rochester resident, who were born intersex. Cinema THE INVISIBLE WAR (NR): This Oscar-nominated documentary investigates the sad and horrifying epidemic of rape of female soldiers in the U.S. military. Little (Fri Mar 22, 7 p.m.) THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960): John Sturges classic western remake of Kurosawa’s “Seven Samurai” about a group of gunslingers hired to protect a town from bandits. Starring

Yul Brynner, Eli Wallach, Steve McQueen, and James Coburn. Little (Thu, Mar 21, 7 p.m.) MINDLESS BEHAVIOR (G): This concert film/ documentary follows teen r&b/hip-hop boy band “Mindless Behavior” as they travel across the country on their first headlining tour. Webster MISS REPRESENTATION (NR): Through a collection of interview with notable women, this documentary examines the portrayal of women in the media and what it means to be a powerful woman in modern society. Featuring Jane Fonda, Gloria Steinem, Margaret Cho, Dianne Feinstein, Katie Couric, and Rosario Dawson. Little (Sat, Mar 23, 7p.m.) MURPH: THE PROTECTOR (PG): Documentary about Navy SEAL Lt. Michael P. Murphy, who in 2005 gave his life to protect his men and was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. Henrietta NEIGHBORING SOUNDS (2012): The arrival of a private security firm to protect the citizens of a city block in Brazil after an outbreak of petty crime unleashes the neighbors’ long-simmering fears and resentments. Dryden (Wed, Mar 20, 8 p.m.) OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R): Terrorists overtake the a White House in this action thriller starring Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, Morgan Freeman, Angela Bassett, Ashley Judd, and Melissa Leo. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster OMA & BELLA (NR): This documentary focuses on the long-standing friendship between two elderly Jewish women and Holocaust survivors. The women cook dishes from their childhoods as a means to hold on to and remember their past. Little (Sun, Mar 24, 1 p.m.) PINK SARIS (2010): Sampat Pal Devi is an outspoken women’s rights advocate in a land where the subjugation of women still thrives. She and her Gulbai Gang do everything in their power to combat violence against women. Little (Sun. Mar 24, 7 p.m.) THE PRICE OF SEX (NR): Young Eastern European women who’ve been a part of, and survived, the sex trafficking trade are the focus of this documentary. Little (Tue, Mar 26, 7 p.m.) SALAAM DUNK (NR): Following the women on the basketball team at the American University of Iraq, as the women discover what it means to be students, athletes, and friends. Little (Sat, Mar 23, 11 a.m.) SPRING BREAKERS (R): Four college coeds turn to criminal activity to fund their spring break debauchery, but soon find themselves in over their heads in this satire from director Harmony Korine. Starring Vanessa Hudgens, Selena Gomez, and James Franco. Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown STOKER (R): Chan-wook Park, the director of “Oldboy” makes the jump to American cinema with this gothic mystery-thriller about one very unusual family.

Starring Nicole Kidman, Mia Wasikowska, Matthew Goode, and Jacki Weaver. Little, Pittsford WILD WORLD OF LOONEY TUNES (NR): The Dryden Theatre presents a vintage collection of 12 classic “Looney Tunes” cartoons. Dryden (Sat, Mar 23, 8 p.m. & Sun, Mar 24, 2 p.m.) WONDER WOMEN: THE UNTOLD STORIES OF AMERICAN SUPER HEROINES (NR): This documentary explores the concept of powerful and heroic women in pop culture; in comic books and mythology, from Princess Diana of Themyscira to Buffy. Little (Mon, Mar 25, 7 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] AMOUR (PG-13): An elderly man suddenly finds himself acting as caretaker to his ailing wife after she suffers a massive stroke in this multi-Oscar-nominated tearjerker from Austrian director Michael Haneke. Cinema THE CALL (R): See review on page 28. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster EMPEROR (PG-13): In this historical drama, Tommy Lee Jones plays General Douglas MacArthur during his postWorld War II investigation into the activities of emperor of Japan. Pittsford LES MISÉRABLES (PG-13): The hugely popular, long-running stage musical based on the Victor Hugo novel comes to the big screen courtesy of “King’s Speech” director Tom Hooper. With Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Anne Hathaway. Cinema LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Little, Pittsford LORE (NR): A young girl must lead her siblings across war torn Germany after their Nazi parents are arrested by Allied Forces in this war thriller from acclaimed director Cate Shortland. Little OZ THE GREAT & POWERFUL (PG): Director Sam Raimi presents the previously untold story of the origins of the Wizard of Oz. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams, and Rachel Weisz. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster QUARTET (PG-13): Dustin Hoffman directs this comedy with a cast stacked with veteran British actors (Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly) about a home for retired opera singers thrown into upheaval after the arrival of a diva. Pittsford SNITCH (PG-13): Dwayne Johnson infiltrates a drug ring as an undercover informant in order to clear the name of his wrongly convicted son. Also starring Susan Sarandon and Barry Pepper. Culver Ridge, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown

Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Rent NORTH WINTON AREA Upper two bedroom, washer, dryer, off-street parking. Deck, fenced yard, no pets. $750+ 585-5860999

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Real Estate Auctions AUCTION CHEMUNG COUNTY REAL PROPERTY

TAX FORECLOSURES- 150+ Properties March 27 @11AM. Holiday Inn, Elmira, NY. 800243-0061 HAR, Inc. & AAR, Inc. Free brochure: www. NYSAUCTIONS.com

Land for Sale REPOS, SHORT SALES BANKRUPT FARMS!  SPRING LIQUIDATION!  MARCH 23rd!  5 acres -$12,900. 10 acres - $19,900.  30 acres -$39,900.  Southern upstate NY!  Terms available! Call or click. (888) 905-8847.  newyorklandandlakes.com

Vacation Property

Retirement Property SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA Affordable custom factory constructed homes $45,900+, Friendly community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean.  772-581-0080, www. beach-cove.com. Limited seasonal rentals

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Accounting & Tax Services I AM LOOKING FOR NEW CLIENTS. After more than 25 years I still enjoy doing taxes and helping my clients pay the minimum possible. Unlike H&R and other tax services I work year round and I answer my own phone. Call me LEW JONES, JONES TAX SERVICE 585-3815820 x27 1250 PITTSFORDVICTOR PITTSFORD RD. Pittsford, NY 14534

Adoption ADOPT - Happily married couple wishes to adopt! We promise unconditional love, learning, laughter, wonderful neighborhood, extended family. Expenses paid. (Se habla español.) www.DonaldAndEsther. com.  1-800-965-5617 ADOPT - Our adopted son dreams of being a big brother! Loving family seeking baby; promises lifetime of happiness, security. Expenses paid. Angie/ Mike: www.angieandmikeadopt. com or call: 855-524-2542

ADOPT: Abundance of love awaits your precious newborn. Happily married couple promises to love and protect your baby. Expenses paid. Donna & Paul 1-877-ADOPT-41 www.DonnaandPauladopt.info PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293.

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@ rochester-citynews.com

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99

DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FILTERED CIGARS Better Than Cigarettes. Only $12.99+ per carton. Large cigars. Pipe tobacco. $5 off your first order. (800) 613-2447 Coupon code: “ALT” www.cigartiger.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE Lady’s Used Haband Pants Collection, $49 cash. 12 pairs: 8 rainbow colors size 16A stretch polyester, 2 dungarees, 2 size 18A corduroy. Phone (585) 413-0827. GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $15.00 585-880-2903 KENTUCKY DERBY T-shirt 1998 XL, New, $12. 585-8802903 PAINT never opened. 2 Gallon Behr Premium Moonlit Yellow $15 each 585-225-5526 RIVAL-SEAL-A-MEAL used food processor for $35 cash. Vacuum bags meals in freezer/ cooking bags. Stretch your budget! Attractive white

appliance, with built-in compressor. Ph: 585-413-0827 TV RCA 35” with remote control. Excellent condition $25 585-225-5526 WALKER FOR HANDICAPPED use. Next to New condition. Red. $50 585-383-0405

Jam Section BLUES/ROCK BAND Needs bass player. Experienced musicians, we have all the pieces but you! Call Mike 424-4122 or 7381151. CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241

continues on page 32

Jim Speedy Sales Associate ReMax Plus 585.746.9875

Park Ave 23 Somerton St Only $10 per sq. ft.!

Modern Commercial building for lease 3000+ sq ft 8 car parking, May divide

BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $25 585-880-2903

OCEAN CITY MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

Lost?

Find your way home with SEE OUR

Real Estate Section ON PAGE 33

To Advertise Call Christine at 585.244.3329 x 23 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31

Home and Garden Professionals Which Color Roof?

Let us pick your roof color for you Getting a new roof this year? • We’ll send you a PICTURE of YOUR house showing the best color choice • Having trouble picking out the best color? • Overwhelmed by all the color choices? • Worried about making a 25 year decision? • Increase curb appeal and resale value – instant payback • The smartest money you’ll spend all summer

WWW.WHICHCOLORROOF.COM • (888) 490-6442

& MASONRY

> page 31 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul.

SPRING IS HERE!!!!! • Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Founda�on Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Pain�ng • Chimneys Rebuilt

I SAY New Wave peaked in 1977-81. Who wants to play Blondie, The Cars, The Ramones, Squeeze, Elvis Costello, U2 and much more? I play bass. Craig. mooskamovers@aol.com

Fully Insured

585-734-8444

Does Your Roof Leak? • General Contracting • Roofs • Siding • Windows/Doors • Kitchens • Baths • Handicap Renovations • Repairs Big or Small • Metal Roofing • Electrical • Masonry

MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337

2 Glass Block Windows Free*

*32”x14” solid glass block windows with any

full roofing or siding job. Coupon must be present at time of signing. *special excludes all previous work Certified Roofing in Owens Corning, GAF and IKO Roofing

Home Repair Specialist! Trusted quality service since 1994!

FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES

703-7738

Build Your New Garage or Addition

Fast, with Custom Built Panelized Structures! • Attached/Detached Garages

Let us tear down and rebuild your new garage! Packages available for any size garage!

Innovative Panelized Systems

www.ipsgarages.com • Henrietta, NY • (585) 624-7780

Where Art and Fine Gardening Meet Garden Maintenance • Pruning • Design Robert L. Wilcox • 474-6584 gardens9@rochester.rr.com

R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585328-4121

Tear-offs • Flat Roofs • Re-Roofs • Ventilation & Repairs Commercial & Residential 10 year labor warranty on all workmanship

We Will Beat any Legitimate Written Estimate

Do it right the first time

Call: 458-ROOF

TRUSTED & RECOMMENDED FOR 25+ YEARS

• Garages, Patios, Decks & Pools • Handyman services for small jobs • Masonry and Concrete • Emergency repairs and storm damage - WE WORK WITH YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (1955) Conn Trumpet (Coprion Bell) serial#517429 $800; (1960) Conn Trumpet (Director) $200; (1960) Wurlitzer Electric Piano model #200 serial #72828L $1500. All good condition 585-458-9722

Once Over (7663)

Affordable Home Improvements

Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including: • Remodeling and Additions • Kitchens and Baths • Finished Basements • All types of flooring including radiant heat • Windows and Siding

MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784

-since 1983-

All Phases of Home Improvements • Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding

THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male

ATTENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. pianolessonsrochester.com

Lost and Found LOST COMPOSITION BOOK REWARD FREE RENT TO RITE PERSON REWARD ANYWAY ron. east8888@gmail.com LOST CAT! Orange, Fluffy Female, 8 lbs., 10 years old. Please Call 585-747-5074 or 585-748-7146 PLEASE! We Miss Her

Notices NEW YORK NEEDS TO KNOW about NOEP! MCLAC’s Nutrition Outreach & Education Program assists individuals, couples and families in Monroe County to apply for SNAP (food stamps). Monroe County residents should call MCLAC at (585) 295-5624 or (585) 295-5626 to find out more. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS, and NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

The Deutsche Schule Rochester invites you to its

414-3692

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job!

Music Services

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

Fully insured

Call

32 CITY MARCH 20-26, 2013

ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089

voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

OPEN HOUSE DAY on Saturday, March 23, from 12:00 to 12:30 p.m. We are a Saturday morning school, teaching German to students of all ages and language skill levels. The Deutsche Schule Rochester admits students of any race, color, and national or ethnic origin. Here is an opportunity to talk to teachers and students. We offer ten different classes and certainly have the right one for you and your child. The school is housed in the Lutheran Church on

111 North Chestnut Street.

You can find more information at our website:

deutscheschulerochester.org

See you on MARCH 23 at noon!

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Miscellaneous

www.woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

BUY REAL VIAGRA, Cialis, Levitra, Staxyn, Propecia & more... FDA- Approved, U.S.A. Pharmacies. Next day delivery avaiable. Order online or by phone at viamedic.com, 800467-0295

SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock

FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585-314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN.

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Check out CITY Newspaper’s

MIND BODY SPIRIT

[ See page 25 of this week’s issue ] THINK, MOVE, BREATHE, STRETCH, STENGHTHEN, RELAX

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

27 W Boulevard Pkwy, Charlotte:

WONDERFUL HOME WITH ALL THE BEAUTY & CHARM! GREAT BIG BEDROOMS! GREAT KITCHEN WITH APPLIANCES INCLUDED, GREAT CUL-DE-SAC LOCATION! MANY MAJOR UPGRADES. $99,900.

RochesterSells.com

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724 RochesterSells.com

Search. Buy. Sell.

Here to work for you! Nino Vitale Real Estate Agent

Proudly serving the Rochester area.

Lovely on Linden 66 Linden Street The house at 66 Linden Street is a sweet example of the Queen Anne style. The dominant front-facing gable features a handsome bay window on the first floor, scalloped shingle work alternating with the wood clapboards on the second story, and, at the top, a decorative half-round attic window and a sunburst gable ornament. A flagstone walk leads to the front porch. The wood paneled and glazed front door is flanked by leaded and stained glass side lights. Inside is a small hallway, the starting point for the circular floor plan. A pair of French doors with divided lights leads into the spacious living area, which is open from the front of the house to the back. A cozy front sitting area is well lit by the south-facing bay window, which also features a pleasant bench seat. A slightly larger living space follows and leads through a wide, framed opening into the dining room. Here a set of French glass doors gives a pleasing sense of openness and leads to a small deck and the backyard. The convenient kitchen is evident with the large, open pass-through off the dining room. A small pantry area leads to the cheerful and efficient kitchen space, which features beaded board wood paneling on the ceiling and portions of the wall. Other attractive features include wood cabinets, wooden trim around the counters, a decorative tile backsplash above the built-in stove, and a second open storage area at the top of the staircase leading to the basement.

The circular floor plan ends at the handsome front hall staircase featuring painted balusters and a dark stained wood railing and newel post. The second floor offers three comfortable bedrooms connected by a long hall and a full bath, which has been recently updated and contains a skylight. Throughout the house are oak floors and molded door and window trim, serving as constant reminders of the past. A paved driveway leads to a one-car garage; a wooden fence on the driveway is part of the backyard perimeter fence which keeps pets and/or small children out of the streets. The backyard also features a lovely large spruce tree and a raised bed for growing vegetables or flowers. The house is located in the lively South Wedge neighborhood, a location that provides all the advantages of urban living. Neighborhood amenities include easy access to downtown, Highland Park, historic Mt. Hope Cemetery, a farmer’s market, as well as popular shops, restaurants and services on nearby South Avenue. This well-maintained property has 1430 square feet and is offered at $139,900. Contact Carol Remley (585-2481020) or Carl Hofstetter (585-248-1038) at Nothnagle Realtors for more information. by Ann Parks Ann is a Landmark Society volunteer.

CALL: 585-381-0540

email: ninovitale33@gmail.com web: vincent-associates.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

Rochester Worships 2013 EASTER AWAKENING: RISE UP! AND CLAIM YOUR DIVINE SELF Good Friday: "Crossing Out the Past" March 29, 7:00 p.m. Easter Sunday Music, Meditation & Message March 31, 11:00 a.m. Children’s Program, 11:00 a.m.

Christ Church Unity Unity

Church of the Daily Word

We welcome you!

55 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607 www.unityrochester.org • 585-473-0910

Parsells Avenue Community Church

A spirit of joy, a place of welcome.

An American Baptist Church

Maunday Thursday service, Thursday, March 28 at 7:00 p.m. Good Friday service, Friday, March 29 at 7:00 p.m. Easter service, Sunday, March 31 at 10:30 a.m.

Rev. Dr. Deborah Roof I N T E R I M P A ST O R

EASTER MORNING SERVICES:

8:00 Communion Sunrise service with Rev. Ray Bagnuolo Ontario Beach Park Bandstand 11:00 Easter Service with the Rev. Dr. Deborah Roof

Serving the Culver/Beechwood Neighborhood for over 110 years! 345 Parsells Avenue, Rochester (Off Culver Road)

Visit our website for photos and audio: www.parsellschurch.org

Come as you are... Be who you are! 121 N. Fitzhugh St. Rochester, NY 585.325.4000

downtownpresbyterian.org

“We open doors to share community in Christ”

MAUNDY THURSDAY

6:30pm • Agape Supper and Holy Eucharist

GOOD FRIDAY

12:00noon • Stations of the Cross at Our Lady of Lourdes 3:00pm • Solemn Liturgy of Good Friday 7:00pm • Tenebrae

EASTER EVE

10:00am • Holy Saturday Liturgy of the Word 8:00pm • The Great Vigil of Easter

EASTER DAY

Brass Quintet prelude before both services 9:00am • Festal Eucharist 11:00am • Festal Eucharist

(Child care for infants and toddlers at both services)

2000 Highland Ave. (corner of Winton Road) • ROCHESTER-BRIGHTON Wheelchair accessible • Hearing loop • 585.442.3544

stthomasrochester.org 34 CITY MARCH 20-26, 2013

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

Rochester Worships 2013 JOIN US DURING HOLY WEEK (March 24-31) Palm Sunday at 9:30am Holy Communion, Procession of Palms Maundy Thursday at 12:15pm & 7:30pm Service of Holy Communion Good Friday at 7:30pm - Tenebrae (Service of Darkness) Saturday at 8pm - Great Vigil of Easter Easter Sunday at 9:30am - Festival of Holy Communion

Please Join Us For Holy Week And Easter Sunday Liturgies

THE LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE INCARNATE WORD A Reconciling in Christ ELCA Congregation 597 East Avenue (at Goodman St.) 244-6065 Handicapped Accessible

www.incarnatewordelca.org

HOLY WEEK with your Presbyterian neighbors Brighton Presbyterian Church 1775 East Ave, Rochester 14610 585.473.5876 www.brightonpresby.org Palm Sunday: 9:30 am Good Friday: 7:00 pm Easter Sunday: 9:30 am

Calvary St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Parish

68 Ashland St, Rochester 14620 585.325.4950 calvarystandrews.org Palm Sunday: 10:00 am Maundy Thursday: 6:00 pm Potluck Supper and Worship Service Easter Sunday Worship: 10:00 am

Dewey Presbyterian Church

(Located inside the Wesley United Methodist Church) 2009 Dewey Ave, Rochester 14615 585.254.1140 www.dapconline.org Palm Sunday: 10:30 am with Wesley United Methodist Church Maundy Thursday: 7:45 pm Service/Communion and Tenebrae in the Chapel Good Friday Service: 12:15 pm in the Chapel Easter: 9:30 am Breakfast, 11:00 am Worship

Downtown Presbyterian Church

121 N Fitzhugh St, Rochester 14614 585.325.4000 www.downtownpresbyterian.org Palm Sunday: 11:00 am Sanctuary Maundy Thursday: 6:00 pm light potluck; 7:00 pm Service/Communion in Celebration Center Good Friday: 6:00 pm Sanctuary Easter: 8:00 am Ontario Beach Park (Bandstand area), 11:00 Sanctuary

Lakeside Presbyterian Church 75 Stutson St, Rochester 14612 585.663.0644 www.lakesidepresny.org Palm Sunday: 10:00 am Maundy Thursday: 7:00 pm Easter Sunday: 10:00 am

Laurelton Presbyterian Church

335 Helendale Rd, Rochester 14609 585.482.9200 www.laureltonchurch.org Palm Sunday: 10:00 am Sanctuary Maundy Thursday: 6:00 pm Potluck dinner; 7:00 Service/Communion Good Friday: 12:00 Noon Service Easter: 6:30 am Sunrise Service: Durand Eastman Park Beach, 10:00 am Sanctuary

New Life Presbyterian Church

243 Rosedale St, Rochester 14620 585.473.1240 www.newlifepresbyterianchurch.org Palm Sunday Worship: 10:00 am Maundy Thursday Service: 7:00 pm Good Friday: Sanctuary open from 12:00 – 3:00 pm for time of reflection Easter: 7:45 am Outdoor Easter Sunrise service, 8:30 am Easter Breakfast (all are welcome), 10:00 am Easter Worship Celebration

South Presbyterian Church

4 E Henrietta Rd, Rochester 14620 585.271.5078 www.southpc.org Palm Sunday: 10:00 am Procession of the Palms Maundy Thursday: 6:30 pm Simple meal and Labyrinth Walk Good Friday: 6:30 pm Healing Service Easter: 10:00 am Celebration of the Resurrection

Good Friday: 12:15 pm Service in the Chapel Easter: 9:00 am and 11:00 am in the Sanctuary

Blessed Sacrament Church Sunday, 10:00 AM & 12:15 PM St Mary’s Church Saturday, 4:00 PM • Sunday, 10:30 AM St Boniface Church Saturday, 5:00 PM • Sunday, 9:00 AM

HOLY THURSDAY

Mass of the Lord’s Supper: 7:00 PM • St Mary’s Church Night Prayer: 10:45 PM • St Mary’s Church

GOOD FRIDAY

Trinity Emmanuel Presbyterian Church

9 Shelter Street, Rochester 14611 585.235.5967

www.trinityemmanuelpresbyterianchurch.com

Palm Sunday: 11:00 Sanctuary; Distribution of the Palms Maundy Thursday: 7:00 pm Joint Service with Genesee Baptist Church-149 Brooks Ave. Good Friday: 12:00 Noon Sanctuary; Fish Fry available after service ($10 dinner/$15 Combo Dinner (fish/scallops) Easter Sunday: 11:00 Sanctuary

Third Presbyterian Church

4 Meigs Street, Rochester 14607 585.271.6513 www.thirdpresbyterian.org Palm Sunday: 8:30 am in the Chapel; 10:45 am in the Sanctuary Maundy Thursday: 7:30 pm- Tenebrae and Communion Service

PALM SUNDAY WEEKEND LITURGIES

St Mary’s Church Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion: 12:10 PM St Boniface Church Liturgy of the Lord’s Passion: 3:00 PM Stations of the Cross: 7:00 PM

HOLY SATURDAY:

Easter Vigil: 8:00 PM • Blessed Sacrament Church (Reception following)

EASTER SUNDAY:

Mass: 8:00 AM, 10:00 AM and 12:15 PM Blessed Sacrament Church Mass: 9:00 AM and 11:00 AM • St Boniface Church Mass: 8:30 AM and 10:30 AM • St Mary’s Church

Blessed Sacrament is located at 534 Oxford St. (at Monroe) Our Mission Statement: As we “Draw the Circle Wide” we affirm our call by Jesus Christ to share the Gospel and be instruments of compassion, social justice and systemic change

271-7240 • www.blessedsacramentrochester.org

St Boniface is located at 330 Gregory St. (near South Ave) 473-4271 • www.stbonifacerochester.org

St Mary’s is located at 15 St Mary’s Place (near GEVA) 232-7140 • www.stmarysrochester.org

SEEKING CHURCHES IN GREATER ROCHESTER... IS YOUR CHURCH HOSTING A

SPECIAL EVENT OR SERVICE? PLACE YOUR H O L I DAY WOR SH I P A D S N OW ! 244.3329 x23

FREE EVERY WEDNESDAY

CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

700 LOCATIONS

CALL

OR EMAIL

AT MORE THAN

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA

approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.howtoworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN)

OFFICE MANAGER

Rochester, NY, small manufacturing company has immediate need for full or part time office manager. Duties include, but are not limited to: Accounts Payable and Receivable (basic knowledge of accounting principles critical-proficiency in Quick Books a must); prepare shipping documents, invoices, packing slips, etc. Part-time person will have same health benefits as full-time. Pay rate commensurate with abilities. Send resume to glide623@aol.com

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

leave on Monday return on Thursday • Group health plan after 90 days • Pre-employment Screening Required • Equal Opportunity Employer • No Experience Needed Call Mike Snead @ 585-427-2300

LIVE LIKE A POPSTAR Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091 (AAN CAN)

Career Opportunities

PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingstation.com (AAN CAN) RGIS PROVIEDS RGIS provides: • Regular part-time work (30 hours) • Starting pay 9.00 + incentive pay • Promotion opportunities • Paid Training • Paid Travel & Per Diem • Transportation provided • Overnights (3 consecutive nights) Required •Generally

your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www.senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare. org.

Volunteers

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 3402016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000.

LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information

ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 287-6377 or email jpowers@ lifespan-roch.org.

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org

BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s Senior Connection matches volunteers 55+ with older adults who could benefit from a weekly phone call or visit by a friend. Call Katie 287-6352 for info.

MCC DENTAL STUDENT Seeking patients who would like complimentary cleaning. This is FREE of exchange for your time! Contact Tina S. 585-902-8009 or email tinahygiene@gmail.com

DISCOVER “Success and Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1 (800) 470-7545. (AAN CAN)

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate

ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS! To advertise in our

EMPLOYMENT SECTION call Christine at

244-3329 ext. 23 today!

36 CITY MARCH 20-26, 2013

CITY

volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat. org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities RIVERSIDE HOTEL AND BOWLING CENTER For SaleLocated in the Olympic Region of the Adirondacks, 8- Lane Brunswick center, cosmic bowling and sound system, Qubica auto scoring & AMF SPC synthetic lanes installed 6 years ago, established leagues with 37 year annual tournament, turn key operation with many improvements - $300,000– www.riversidebowlinglanes.com – (800) 982-3747 START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800481-9472 www.CenturaOnline. com VETERANS CAREER TRAININGUse post 9/11 GI benefits to become professional tractor trailer driver. National Tractor Trailer School, Liverpool/ Buffalo NY branch www.ntts. edu  800-243-9300  Consumer Information: www.ntts.edu/ programs/disclosures

Legal Ads [ HAN’S BEAUTY SUPPLY, LLC ] A Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company Han’s Beauty Supply, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York on January 10, 2013. As specified in the Certificate of Change filed with the Secretary of State on February 1, 2013, its office is located at 1671 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, New York 14620, Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process will be mailed to 1671 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, New York 14620. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of organization of DUTCHMAN PROPERTIES, LLC filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on October 1, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 140010031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted under the Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of organization of VAN LATHAM, LLC filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on September 7, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 14001-0031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted under the Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of Organization of ZUCCHINI PEOPLE GAMES, LLC, filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on February 19, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 14001-0031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted by law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ACCOUNTABLE HEALTH PARTNERS, LLC ] Notice of Organization: Accountable Health

Partners, LLC was filed with SSNY on January 31, 2013. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: Attn: Robert McCann, M.D., FACP, c/o Highland Hospital, 1000 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE SALON STYLETTO LLC ] Notice of Organization: Salon Styletto, LLC was filed with SSNY on February 1, 2013. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 43 Timberwood Drive, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] ARCONTRACTORS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 74 Root Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] AT&T Mobility, LLC is proposing to install new wireless telecommunications antennas on an existing building located at 144 Exchange Blvd., Rochester, Monroe County, NY. The new facility will consist of the installation of nine antennas on the roof at centerline heights of +/-79 ft, +/-89.6 ft, and +/-90.5 ft above ground level. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 61126751-AMG c/o EBI Consulting, 21 B Street, Burlington, MA 01803, or via telephone at (585) 815-3290. [ NOTICE ] Davidandjill.net LLC Arts. of Org filed NYSS 1/22/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SS is designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SS shall mail a copy of process to 20 Buckingham St., #5, Rochester, NY 14607 which is also the principal business location. General purpose. [ NOTICE ] EQUITABLE ASSET MANAGEMENT (BLOCK 1-2013), LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State

(SSNY) 2/14/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] HONALEE CHILDREN’S BOUTIQUE, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 2/7/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 56 North Main St., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JC JONES PROPERTIES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/25/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O Corporate Creations Network Inc. 15 N Mill ST Nyack, NY 10960. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Corporate Creations Network Inc. 15 N Mill ST Nyack, NY 10960. [ NOTICE ] MARY CORCORAN PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/27/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Corporation Service Company is its registered agent located at 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207 upon whom process against the LLC may be served. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Welcome Home Cinema LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 1/30/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Dunleavy Irish Dance, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/12/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 101

Lincoln Pkwy, Suite D, East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Hare House Enterprises LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 2/21/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 301 Willowbrooke Dr, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Obsidian Group, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 11/14/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 15 Alger Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Roc Alternative, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 89 S Union St, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 20 Hinsdale St., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 109 STRONG STREET, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/24/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 30, Penfield NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of A Healthy Bite, LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y State (SSNY) on 1/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 110 Culver Pkwy, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ]

Not. Of Form. Of Scrapbook Creations Retreats, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 01/23/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, P.O. Box 1171, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of ABBOTT TRENTO ONLINE MEDIA LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 46 Rahway Lane, Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. of South Ave Wine & Liquor, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 313 Pearson Lane, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of American Homestead Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of, Tricia Marsh Holistic Health Coach, LLC was filed with SSNY on 3/1/2013, county, Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 166 Monteroy Rd Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ICSH PROPERTIES, LLC.. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/25/13. Office location:

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BURKWIT LAW FIRM, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: Charles F. Burkwit, 16 E. Main St., Ste. 450, Rochester, NY 14614. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Law.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CandyBearLand, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 3340 Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DAVID PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of F. Zhang, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/5/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Greystone Vending LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal office of LLC: 1133 Webster Rd. Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC at the principal office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Jeremiahs Penfield LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/14/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JUNIOR IV ENTERPRISES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1881 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14610.

SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Operation of restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KAYJOR PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: BLACKCOMB PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on December 12, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 10 Cambric Circle, Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: BITACHON PROPERTIES AT ROCHESTER, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/08/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1911 Avenue L, Brooklyn, New York 11230. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Mason-Bauman Agency LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of OPEN BOOKINGS LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 78

Rossmore St. Rochester, NY 14606 Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROYCO SO NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. As amended by Cert. of Amendment filed with SSNY on 02/04/13, the name of LLC is: ROYCO NY, LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Spectrum Creative Arts, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 1/23/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 46 Durand Drive, Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Stream D, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State (SSNY) on 01/18/13. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 31 Bracknell Circle, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Strong Will Development, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 280 Marne St., Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE GENESEE EWE-ERY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/08/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 64 Beckerman Pl., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Joanne Albano-Vaugh at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Upstate Fish, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent

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Legal Ads > page 37 of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ADVISORS CAPITAL PLANNING LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 03/19/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to NJ addr. of the LLC: 777 Terrace Ave., Ste. 608, Hasbrouck Heights, NJ 07604. Arts. of Org. filed with NJ Dept. of Treasury, P.O. Box 628, Trenton, NJ 08646-0628. As amended by Cert. of Correction filed with SSNY on 02/13/13, office location is Monroe County. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ATIS Elevator Inspections, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MO on 11/21/12. NY Sec. of

State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MO and principal business address: 8531 Page Ave., Ste. 140, St. Louis, MO 63114. Cert. of Org. filed with MO Sec. of State, 600 W. Main St., Jefferson City, MO 65101. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Force-520 Metro LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/20/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Michael B. Kaplan, 9350 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 302, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, also the principal address. Address to be maintained in DE: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 615 South DuPont Hwy, Dover, DE 19901. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Qualification of Forward Development, LLC. App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. LLC formed in North Carolina (NC) on 12/29/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the NC address of LLC: 128 S. Tryon St., Ste. 900, Charlotte, NC 28202. Arts. of Org. filed NC Secy. of State, 2 S. Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Qualification of PIPELINE EQUIPMENT RESOURCES COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 07/02/12. Princ. office of LLC: 3900 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. NJ addr. of LLC: 9 Mars Ct., Unit C-4A, Boonton, NJ 07005. Arts. of Org. filed with State Treasurer, Dept. of Treasury, Div. of Revenue and Enterprise Services, P.O. Box 628, Trenton, NJ 08646-0628. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of M&N Group Holdings, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 6/30/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Adult Services If you are gay Bi, curious, or versatile kind-of-guy, age 18-50, and HIV-negative, you may qualify to take part in an important medical research study at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Participants will be paid an average of $1,000. For more information, visit rochestervictoryalliance.org or call 585.756.2329 to schedule an appointment.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of qualification of RIVERSIDE INVESTING, LLC. Authority filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/05/13. Office in MONROE County. Formed in UT on 11/07/12. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 157 Moul Road Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: Real Estate [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Rosswood Villa Apartments, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in California (CA) on 1/22/1999. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Registered Agent Solutions, Inc., 99 Washington Ave., Ste. 1008, Albany, NY 12260. Address to be maintained in CA: 9350 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 302, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, also the principal office. Arts of Org. filed with the CA Secretary of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Six Month Smiles, LLC. Fictitious name: Six Month Smiles, LLC (Delaware). Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 1/8/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Principal office: 35 Main St., Scottsville, NY 14546. Address to be maintained in DE: 2711

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Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Sweden SPE LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/19/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Paracorp Incorporated, 2804 Gateway Oaks Dr., Ste. 200, Sacramento, CA 92533. Address to be maintained in DE: 2140 S. Dupont Hwy, Camden, DE 19934. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] PATRIOT LAWN AND LANDSCAPE LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 38 Summertime Trl., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] PAULA J. MARTIN CPA, PLLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/8/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1344 University Ave., Ste. 235, Rochester , NY 14607. Purpose: To Practice the profession of Public Accountancy. [ NOTICE ] TROUTSNOBS GUIDE SERVICE AND OUTFITTERS, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 3/4/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 57 Meadow Cove Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] WEBSTER PARTNERS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Stephen Webster, 1595 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: BRU-BAG, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/13/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O BRU-BAG, LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Daniele SPC, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Modern Sales, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 4 Niagara Street, Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Advanced Custodial Equipment and Supply, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on March 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 465 Blossom Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 465 Blossom Road, Rochester, New York 14610. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Earlando Thomas, Physician, PLLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on February 19, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 206 Mill Stream Run, Webster, New York 14580. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent

upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 206 Mill Stream Run, Webster, New York 14580 The purpose of the PLLC is to practice the profession of medicine. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PRIVATE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is TGS KITCHENS, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed 2-22-2013 with the New York State Secretary of State, (SSNY) who is designated as Agent for Service of Process against the LLC. The SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 4391 Lake Avenue, Rochester, N.Y. 14612. Purpose - any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-192 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Christine J. Butkowsky; Jean Butkowsky; Andrew Butkowsky Defendants. February 15, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 27, 2013 at 9:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 662 Moul Road, Hilton, NY 14468; Tax Account No. 015.02-3-48.4, described in Deed recorded in Liber 8970 of Deeds, page 301; 1.79 acres. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $137,460.41 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2013 Adrian J. Burke, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-5976 SUPREME COURT

STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs, Katherine I. Maggi, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 15, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 27, 2013 at 1:00 p.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 7 Rodenbeck Place, Rochester, NY 14620, Tax Account No. 121.742-37.001, described in Deed recorded in Liber 8372 of Deeds, page 424; lot size 70 x 80.62. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $85,352.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2013 Gilbert Perez, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-5977 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs Gerard R. Pinkerton; Nancy A. Pinkerton Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated March 1, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on April 10, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Sweden, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 4450 Sweden Walker Road, Brockport, NY; Tax Account No. 085.011-2 described in Deed

Legal Ads recorded in Liber 7369 of Deeds, page 180. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $136,484.37 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: March 2013 Laurie A. Giordano, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-6268 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs Gary J. Lisman; Jackie Ward; Claire Howe; Katie Burke Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on April 9, 2013 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 51-53 Morningside Park, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.532-7 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6116 of Deeds, page 182. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $139,403.05 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 26, 2013 Joanne L. Best, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767

[ SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION ] Index No. 2012-5294 Filing Date: May 14, 2012 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE RBS Citizens, N.A. f/k/a Citizens Bank, N.A. Plaintiff vs. Robert Werner Citizens Bank, N.A. Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. and “John Doe”, said name being fictitious and intended to include any and all parties having an interest in the mortgaged premises and not otherwise identified above, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. Dated: February 21, 2013 /s/ David P. Martin David P. Martin, Esq.HARRIS BEACH PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 423-7100 TO THE DEFENDANT, Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp.: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of Honorable Justice Richard A. Dollinger, J.S.C. (Acting), dated February 5, 2013, and filed with the Complaint in the office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York. The nature of this action is to foreclose a mortgage bearing date June 25, 2007, executed by Robert Werner to Citizens Bank, N.A., to secure the sum of NINETYTHREE THOUSAND DOLLARS AND NO CENTS ($93,000.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 21328, at Page 0001, in the County of Monroe, on July 23, 2007. The premises hereinbefore referred to are described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Clarkson, County of Monroe and State of New York, and being a part of Lot 4, Section 2, Township 4 of the triangular

tract (so-called) bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point on the northerly boundary of Ridge Road, also known as Route 104 and being 99 feet wide, at a distance of 100 feet westerly, measured along the said boundary, from its intersection with the division line between Lot 10 on the East and Lot 4 on the west, said division line being also the easterly line of a parcel of land described in a deed to Carl H. and Bessie A. Nellis recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 2142 of Deeds, page 537; running thence northerly parallel to the division line between said Lot 10 on the east and said Lot 4 on the west a distance of 200 feet to a point; running thence westerly parallel to the northerly boundary of the Ridge Road, a distance of 100 feet to a point; running thence southerly parallel to the first described boundary a distance of 200 feet to the northerly boundary of Ridge Road; running thence easterly along the northerly boundary of Ridge Road a distance of 100 feet to the point or place of beginning; containing 0.46 acres be the same more or less. Subject to all covenants, conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements and rights of way of record. Dated: February 21, 2013 /s/ David P. Martin David P. Martin, Esq. HARRIS BEACH PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 423-7100 TO THE DEFENDANT, Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp.: That it appears from the public records that Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., holds a lien which is adverse to Plaintiff’s interest and which remains open of public record as follows: a mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989; That upon information and belief, the lien of the Fleet Mortgage has been paid in full, and is therefore, subordinate to the mortgage being foreclosed herein, and should be discharged of record. That the lien of the Fleet Mortgage should be declared invalid and

extinguished pursuant to Real Property Actions and Proceedings Law Article 15. That Plaintiff requests that the Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale state the following: ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that the lien which appears to be prior and adverse to the mortgage being foreclosed herein, namely the lien of Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., is hereby declared invalid and extinguished pursuant to RPAPL Article 15; and it is further ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., and all persons or entities claiming by, through or under them, be and are hereby forever barred and foreclosed of and from all right, claim, lien, interest or equity of redemption in and to said Mortgage Premises; and it is further ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that the record be reformed to reflect that the lien of Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., is invalid and extinguished, and upon granting and entering of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale, a certified copy of same be presented to the Monroe County Clerk so the clerk may mark the mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989, discharged of record. In the case of default, judgment shall be taken against you and ordering the mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989, invalid and extinguished and discharged of record.

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