Issuu on Google+

Ten-Year-Old Fights Bullying With Non-profit p. 3 POLA Gives Pennies for Your Thoughts With Community Survey p. 4 Faith Community Hosts Anti-violence Forum p. 6

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Eric Darius’ Mission to Save Music Education p. 11

“…and had he [George Romney] been born of, uh, Mexican parents, I’d have a better shot at winning this.”

New Plan Highlights Proven Path to Broad-based Growth

By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

‘I

September 21 - October 4, 2012

Graphic: Mathew Highland

nstead of the austerity agenda that we have now, focused on debt, this growth agenda is focused, really, on restoring broad-based economic growth and our democracy,” said Yale political scientist Jacob Hacker in a late-August teleconference. Hacker was explaining the rationale behind a new economic approach laid out in “Prosperity Economics: Building an Economy for All,” a report he co-authored with Yale Law School student Nate Loewentheil. Aimed at changing the political debate this election season and beyond, the report has already gained significant support from labor, civil rights and community organizations, including the AFL-CIO, Service Employees International Union, the Center for Community Change, the Economic Policy Institute, the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and the National Council of La Raza. “The current debate is focused on how severely to cut, not whether to cut,” Hacker said. “That’s diametrically at odds with dealing with the two great challenges we face today, which are not the deficit, but rather, the jobs crises, and the long-term stagnation and decline of the middle class.” With the debate framed this way, Hacker warned, “There is a real risk that even if President Barack Obama wins, we could end up with a kinder, gentler version of austerity economics—tax cuts that are slightly less skewed, cuts in public investment, cuts in economic security that are only slightly less draconian than those in the leading budget blueprints on the right.”

Proven Path to Broad-based Growth/ to p. 7

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Rep. Hahn General Election Kick-off

Toberman Softball Tournament Raise Funds to Strike Out Violence

Community Announcements:

Harbor Area Municipal Building Jail Tour

Community members are invited to join the San Pedro Bay Historical Society, starting at 2 p.m. Sept. 21, for a tour of the old jail and courtroom at the Municipal Building in San Pedro. Meet at the San Pedro Bay Historical Society Archives, Room 626. Venue: Municipal Building Location: 638 S. Beacon St.

Marketing and Sales Workshop

On Sept. 15, U.S. Rep. Janice Hahn (D-36), kicked off her general election campaign with Assemblyman Isadore Hall III (D-52), at her campaign headquarters in San Pedro. Hahn is running for her second term in Congress. Photo:Diana Lejins, Contributing Photographer

Toberman Neighborhood Center Communications Director Kristi Day (left) stands with Executive Director and CEO Deb Anthony (center), and proprietor of Plaza Automotive, Mitch Harmatz (right) at softball tournament, Sept. 8, in Block Field in San Pedro. Toberman Neighborhood Center Gang Intervention Unit hosted a softball tournament to raise funds for youth engaged with the nonprofit. Eight teams joined and raised a total of $3,000. Photo: Betty Guevara, Contributing Photographer

Learn effective marketing strategies for your business to reach your customers, from 3 to 5 p.m. Sept. 27, at the MCS Business Source. Venue: MCS Business Source Location: 455 W. 6th St., San Pedro

SP Rotary Community Yard Sale

San Pedro Rotary Club is hosting its second annual Community Yard Sale, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sept. 29, near Think Prime in San Pedro. Venue: Adjacent to Think Prime Location: 29601 S Western Ave., Rancho Palos Verdes

An Evening of Compton/South Bay History

September 21 - October 4, 2012

“I’m running for office for Pete’s sake, we can’t have illegals”

Pat Prescott of 94.7 THE WAVE will interview author Robert Lee Johnson on his new book, Images of America: Compton. Learn about Compton and South Bay history, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Oct. 11, at Cal State Dominguez Hills’ Archives and Special Collections on the fifth floor of the University Library. CSUDH Archives also invites community members to bring in photographs and other memorabilia to enhance the archive of Compton and the South Bay. They are looking for photos: family, church, community groups, celebrations, your favorite local businesses and organizations, that tell the story of Compton and the South Bay. Details: (310) 516 4219 Venue: CSUDH Library Locaation: 1000 E. Victoria St., Carson

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Grant Extension Awarded to McNair Scholars Program at CSUDH

California State University, Dominguez Hills has been awarded the first installment— $288,800—of a 5-year $1.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education to continue the Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program at the university. The federal program began in 1989 to provide financial support and academic guidance to encourage and prepare under-represented, first-generation juniors and seniors for graduate studies. It is named in honor of astronaut Ronald McNair, who died in the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger explosion. Each year, the CSUDH McNair Scholars Program accepts only 26 juniors and seniors. Details: (310) 243-2098.

Sufficient Signatures Certified for Medical Marijuana Referendum

Los Angeles City Clerk June Lagmay announced that the number of verified signatures filed by proponents of a referendum upon the city’s marijuana ordinance has achieved sufficiency. The petition contained 49,021 pre-verified signatures. The City Clerk utilized a random sampling procedure which included the examination of at least 5 percent of the signatures. The statistical sampling showed that the number of valid signatures was 110 percent or more of the number needed to declare the petition sufficient. Charter Section 462 provides that the Council must take one of the following three actions within 20 days of the Clerk’s transmittal of the Certificate of Sufficiency to the City Council: 1. Repeal the ordinance; or 2. Call a special election to be held not earlier than 110 days or later than 140 days after Council action on the petition; or 3. Add the ordinance to the next regular City election to be held more than 110 days from certification of the petition, which in this case would be the City’s March 5, 2013 Primary Nominating Election. The Council is anticipated to take up this matter before Oct. 7.

HARBOR AREA

Committed to independent journalism in the Greater LA/LB Harbor Area for more than 30 years

Kids Resource:

Gerry’s Anti-bullying Message By Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor

“…and had he [George Romney] been born of, uh, Mexican parents, I’d have a better shot at winning this.” September 21 - October 4, 2012

At 10-years-old, Gerry Orz knows Gerry Orz, 10, is the founder, Kids Resource, quite a bit about bean anti-bullying ing bullied. When nonprofit. Photo: Terelle he was 8, he exJerricks. perienced bullying firsthand after moving from Florida to the San Gabriel Valley with his family. Gerry didn’t initially tell anyone about what he was going through. It wasn’t until his parents noticed a change in his behavior and demeanor and questioned him that he opened up. Gerry’s parGerry wants to have this day observed as a ents, Kate Orz and Laura Schneider pressured the National Day of Silence, where supporters would school’s administration to take action. But they remain silent for 12 seconds, starting at 12:12 ultimately transferred Gerry to a new school. p.m., symbolizing the silence victims of bullyGerry’s experience pushed him to conduct ing endure. his own research into bullying, including reading Gerry and his family also would like Kids about the experience of others. Resource to be a source for school clubs where “I was literally heartbroken from all the children can discuss different issues and expestories I read,” Gerry said. “I just wanted to do riences, and be empowered to find solutions to something.” those issues. They also hope that those clubs But through all of his research, he found little could provide counseling in future so that a child that was suitable for teaching his age group how has an opportunity to speak to an adult about to cope with bullying situations. That is why issues at home, for example. The family recogGerry, now a fifth grader, decided to create Kids nizes schools often lack the resources to provide Resource, a resource center that produces anti- such opportunities, which is why they decided to bullying videos targeting grade school students make Kids Resource a nonprofit. and older, as well as other tools that goes beyond They are hoping to get funding and sponlectures and pamphlets to address similar issues. sorship to provide club resources and videos to “There are a lot of anti-bullying materials to- schools. day, but we feel there is not enough good materi“We want to be able to introduce those proals that will realistically explain to younger chil- grams to the schools for free,” Kate said. “So dren what the consequences could be,” said Kate, kids feel safe. They can run their own clubs. Let who is the project manager for Kids Resource. them do something constructive.” “It doesn’t show from every angle…we never The official launch of Kids Resource will be go behind the scenes and look at the bully, why Nov. 17. Also, on Dec. 1, Liu will sponsor a Teen is he doing what he is doing, or she…maybe that Summit, where Gerry will be a part of a bullyperson needs more help than the victim,” Kate ing panel, show his movie Day of Silence and a said. trailer to Born to Bully? as a sequel to Day of The idea of launching the Resource Center Silence. came after Gerry received positive feedback on a The family hopes the Senate resolution and short anti-bullying film he wrote, produced, and that their incorporation as a nonprofit will help starred in, called Day of Silence. cut through barriers with schools and school disDay of Silence is a 20-minute short film that tricts. depicts the reality of what happens when some“It takes one instance to show them ‘this is body gets bullied and how it can get out of hand. what we are capable of doing,’” Kate said. “If Then, it shows children what the positive out- we can get one of the schools on board with us come of speaking out against bullying. or one of the districts on board with us, the rest Gerry’s efforts caught the attention of poli- will follow. It is just a matter of time… In the ticians and in June, California Sen. Carol Liu meantime, we are going to continue working and (D-Glendale), introduced a resolution to declare be patient.” Dec. 12 as California Bullying Prevention Day. Learn more about Gerry Orz, Kids Resource In late August, the state legislature adopted the and Day of Silence at www.gerryorz.com or www. resolution. Some organizations, such as StopBul- kidsresource.org. Like Kids Resource on Facelying.gov, already are using Gerry’s information book at www.facebook.com/DayOfSilencedofs. as a resource on its website.

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Neighborhood Councils Respond to New Community Plan

By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor On Sept. 5, Los Angeles city planners presented the Draft San Pedro Community Plan at a meeting of the Central San Pedro Neighborhood Council Land Use Planning and Public Works Committee. The meeting took place in conjunction with the Northwest and Coastal neighborhood councils. Committee Chairwoman Sue Castillo spoke with Random Lengths about the recommendations her committee made, which were subsequently approved by the neighborhood council

as a whole. Castillo generally sees the plan in a positive light, in need of further tweaking. Representatives of Northwest, however, voiced some more serious concerns, as described below. Turning to the Central Neighborhood Council’s recommendations, the first and broadest one concerned the expansion and further development of the Community Design Overlay (CDO) area. “The (Community Redevelopment Agency) did a lot of work making things that were built much better coordinated,” Castillo said. “Prior to

that, things were built pretty much randomly.” But with the CRA’s demise, she doubts that its design guidelines will endure on their own, despite assurances to the contrary. “I’m worried that that’s just going to go away,” she said. Consequently, “I look now to the CDO to be the guiding document into the future, at least trying to guarantee that anything that does get built in downtown San Pedro will be an enhancement.” The recommendation has three parts—first that the CDO area “should be expanded to include Gaffey Street north to its intersection with the freeways near Summerland Street;” second that “the City Planning Department should hold a community workshop addressing the detailed planning for our CDO;” and third, that “creation of a street tree plan should be added as a pro-

gram” for the CDO area. “We have a lot of great urban appeal in downtown San Pedro, but it’s fragile, and you need to keep that vision” Castillo said. It’s key not only to reflecting what the community wants for itself, but also to making it attractive as a regional destination, so that downtown develops synergistically along with the waterfront. As for the street tree plan, this subject has repeatedly arisen in public planning meetings over the past decade. “The trees on Gaffey are awful. There’s just a row of palm trees,” Castillo said. Which may be just fine for driving by in a Hollywood movie, but have been the source of repeated community complaints throughout the years—they are non-native, and provide little shade, variety or relationship to the built environment—in short, little reason to stop just driving by. The impact might seem secondary to those urgently concerned about empty buildings, “but that’s what we can do now,” Castillo points out— not replace all Gaffey’s trees all at once, but becontinued on following page

Cast Your Two Cents into this Bucket Opinions Sought for Economic Development By Tami Jackson, Contributing Writer

September 21 - October 4, 2012

“I’m running for office for Pete’s sake, we can’t have illegals”

A penny for your thoughts. That’s what the Port of Los Angeles may be paying, according to the Harbor Community Benefit Foundation (HCBF) and Bay Area Council Economic Institute (BACEI) at two recent town hall meetings in Wilmington and San Pedro. The two organizations are working together

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to inspire more residents and business owners to cast their two cents worth into the collective pool of surveys, so the Port’s mitigation funds can ripple out into the most optimal neighborhood communities and programs. Organizers for this land use study hope to scoop 1,100 surveys out of the San Pedro and Wilmington pool before Oct. 31. The surveys are designed to reveal local trends in employment, economic development, culture and residential real estate values. Planners expect the surveys will help quantify all the negative impact that the port has made on the local demographics so they can better prioritize who and what projects should receive mitigation funds first. John Haveman, chief economist at Bay Area Council Economic Institute, has been working on analyzing port impacts for more than 10 years. As a speaker at the town hall meeting, he mentioned how the “cranes tower over everything” and showed a slide of a single home that became surrounded by a stockpile of maritime containers and its view completely blocked after the Port expanded into that neighborhood. According to Haveman, that home was visibly crowded by containers. But other residents of San Pedro and Wilmington are negatively impacted by Port activity in many other significant ways. That’s why each survey, one designed for residents and the other for business owners, asks how neighborhoods and business districts in San Pedro and Wilmington have changed relative to the port’s aesthetics, air quality, ground vibration, Harbor water quality, incidents of crime, invasive lighting, noise, traffic and whatever else surveytakers identify as a looming problem where they live, work, learn and play.

Probing Questions Make Survey More Valid Although surveys are filled out anonymously, questions therein ask residents to identify where they live, such as what cross-streets are nearby, relative to the sources of port impact. Questions also inquire of the survey-taker’s age, income and education and can be completed in either continued on following page

from previous page

gin planning a long-term process of coherently shaping a diverse mix, that could take decades to fully realize. After that, the recommendations largely shift focus to specific items or stretches of streets, starting with Center Street, classified as a “Secondary Highways” between First and Seventh streets—arguably the shortest “highway” in the world. It’s not simply a silly designation, it “calls for a 90-foot right-of-way with a 70-foot-wide roadbed,” the recommendation notes. This is the direct opposite of what the Central Neighborhood Council has been trying to do, creating a more pedestrian-friendly downtown. Both Center and Mesa should be prioritized for pedestrians, along with the Sixth and Sevenths streets, which they interconnect. Bike prioritization is less developed. It’s clear what doesn’t work—the plan’s current designation of First Street, despite heavy vehicular traffic loads and a narrow right-of-way. The recommendations cite 13th Street is “a practical east-west bicycle route,” but an additional route

closer to the downtown core is needed as well. “I don’t think we’ve had enough input to come up with a good plan,” Castillo said. Zoning on Pacific south of 13th Street and Grand Avenue between Fifth and Ninth streets also drew specific recommendations to encourage and support residential development. Recommendations also called for inclusion of the Ponte Vista development area in the San Pedro plan, as well as “additional references to the California Coastal Trail,” and inclusion of “the 2010 Federal Census statistics for our community demographics.” Northwest President Diana Nave has some more serious concerns, tied to the use of different demographic information in the plan’s draft environmental impact report. These issues will be discussed with city planners in the next meeting, scheduled for Sept. 20. Northwest’s comments will be finalized after that meeting, Nave told Random Lengths. “What I can say at this point is that the (draft environmental impact report) contains a lot of good mitigation measures however we have a

number of questions and concerns, not the least of which is concern over their use of the 2005 Southern California Association of Governments projections rather that the 2010 census data,” Nave said.   “According to the 2005 SCAG estimate there were 82,112 however the  2010 census reported only  76,651.   The capacity of the draft plan is 83,354, a potential growth of 1.2 over the SCAG estimate, but 8.74% over 2010 actual population figures.  Consequently the use of the 2005 estimate results in fewer potential impacts than if the 2010 data were used.” Nave mentioned one more issue related to potentially under-estimating growth impacts. “Another overall area of concern is how the plan would be impacted by (Senate Bill) 1818, which allows for density bonuses of up to 35 percent under certain circumstances,” she said.  “We would like to know the projected impacts on traffic, schools, utilities and public services if   SB 1818 density bonuses were incorporated.”

As proof of the land use survey’s early success, the Harbor Community Benefit Foundation has already secured $350,000 from the Port Community Mitigation Trust fund. On Sept. 20, Councilman Joe Buscaino will congratulate four health care facilities, as they receive shares of that allotment. The four facilities receiving shares of the grant are: Wilmington Health Center, Tzu Chi Community Clinic, Long Beach Alliance For Children With Asthma, and The Children’s Center, also in Long Beach. These grants are intended to provide diagnosis, treatment, medical supplies, education and outreach to help prevent and treat asthma and other cardiopulmonary diseases. The award ceremony will begin at 10 a.m. at the Tzu Chi Community Clinic, 1355 Broad Ave. in Wilmington. from previous page

Spanish or English. According to Haveman, the reason such probing questions are important is because analysts need to guarantee the surveys adequately represent the general demographics of area’s larger population. In addition to allowing individuals to voice their opinions, survey options also include a scale for rating how strongly the respondent feels about a particular topic and that scale ranges from one-to-five, five being most severe irritation of all. According to Haveman, the Harbor Community Benefit Foundation and Bay Area Council Economic Institute want to dip into the community’s bucket of consciousness so badly, “At the end of the survey there is even a section for additional comments and you can always write, ‘Please call me. I’d like to talk to you more.’”

Survey Focus: Port Impacts, All Viewpoints

To take the survey, which requires roughly 10 minutes, one member of each household and/or business, age 18 or older, can simply log-on to: http://www.bayareaeconomy.org/port-survey/. Participants are asked to be as specific as possible when answering survey questions because the more details given in the responses, the more accurate will be the study’s results.

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1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro • 310.519.1442 info@graphictouchdesigns.com

September 21 - October 4, 2012

The survey is about the port, and the impact that it has on the larger community. “We are not interested in (dialoguing about) transient housing and trash in the streets,” Haverman said. To that announcement, a citizen at the meeting argued that truck drivers for the port often throw trash in the street and conduct their oil changes on the side of the road only to discard their oil in a manner that contaminates the area. So, Haverman clarified that the foundation and the institute are interested in all such port-related complaints, but transient housing is obviously not among them. During the meeting, speakers took turns suggest-

ing they also want to dip into the pool of folks who maintain a very positive mindset and have nothing negative to say about the port. Such survey participants will have the option to skip a particularly probing section of the survey that’s designated in the questionnaire. The survey for businesses is intended to be completed by business owners who are either directly or indirectly related to port activity. If a business owner also happens to be a resident of San Pedro or Wilmington, he or she can fill out both business and residential surveys. According to Mary Silverstein, executive director for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, $350,000 in grant monies have already been collected from the port for taking care of Wilmington residents in regards to air quality. Those funds will be formally distributed on Sept. 20 to pre-selected health care facilities and the money will help prevent and address any asthma or cardio-pulmonary problems that citizens might encounter there in Wilmington. “There will be another round of health care grants going before the board soon,” Silverstein said. “The more surveys we get, the more meaningful this land use survey will be.”

“…and had he [George Romney] been born of, uh, Mexican parents, I’d have a better shot at winning this.”

Early Success Story

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Successor Redevelopment Future Projects Uncertain By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter

September 21 - October 4, 2012

“I’m running for office for Pete’s sake, we can’t have illegals”

When the state abolished redevelopment agencies this past February, Carson had several projects underway already funded by the city’s redevelopment agency. Carson Mayor Jim Dear said that those projects that were already approved and funded. “Anything we’ve got a contract on, we’re allowed to control,” he explained. Although current redevelopment projects are proceeding under a successor agency, any new projects face uncertain funding. Planning Officer Sheri Repp-Loadsman expressed concern that “the city as a whole…needs to become much more creative” about future funding sources. Projects funded by the former redevelopment agency include: Completely making over Carson Park—the buildings and landscaping—at a cost of more than $9 million, entirely funded by successor agency bonds, is “one of the last projects” originally funded with redevelopment bonds, according to Repp-Loadsman. The park’s scheduled to be reopened in January 2013. According to city manager David Biggs, improvement of the Wilmington freeway interchange was for a while in doubt. However, construction is now scheduled to begin in November. The project funding and amounts are as follows: Federal funds, $4,712,500, state funds, $11,362,000, and successor (formerly redevelopment) agency funds, $9,428,000. Target date for completion is June 2015. This follows the successful reconfiguration of the I-405 interchange at Avalon Boulevard. Capital improvement along 223 Street, with an approved budget of $3.6 million is another redevelopment project experiencing difficulty. Repp-Loadsman said the schedule is under review pending availability of redevelopment bond funds. She noted that here the city was especially concerned they might have to defuse the redevelopment bonds— return the money to the state. However, she says the city is currently meeting all legal requirements the state has mandated to ensure Carson may continue to use the funds.

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Repp-Loadsman said the Renaissance mixeduse project is progressing despite a recent fire. The fire-damaged part, involving market-rate housing, is privately funded. The fire did not affect the affordable-housing portion. It was built partly with redevelopment agency funds, but was completed before the redevelopment agency was phased out. Another affordable-housing project on the Carson corridor, the Via 425, as been completed and is now accepting tenants for work-live combination offices and residences. One market-rate residential development planned for a former mobile home park along Carson Street was approved before Carson’s redevelopment agency was dissolved but never involved redevelopment agency funds, Repp-Loadsman said. Redevelopment agencies throughout California were dissolved Feb. 1. According to Sen. Ted Lieu’s office, the action saved the state about $1.7 billion. The state legislature passed two bills in June 2011 that laid the groundwork for the end of redevelopment agencies.  One, Assembly Bill 26, ended the agencies and laid out the process by which they were to be dissolved.  The other, AB 27, allowed the agencies to continue if they agreed to pay a large share of their funding to schools.  However, the state Supreme Court struck down the second while letting the first stand. Previously Carson’s City Council doubled as its redevelopment agency. “What we did was we transferred the [redevelopment] assets to two different entities,” explained Dear. “The City has created a Successor Agency to replace the Redevelopment Agency. Although its members are the same individuals, the mayor and the council members, it’s a separate legal entity... The Successor Agency is a disposal company … It is set up to deal with all the remaining contracts, negotiations, and eventually the successor agency will go out of business.”  The City also created a Housing Authority that is, like the Successor Agency, the same body as the City Council albeit a separate legal entity.  Dear and his fellow council members must move

back and forth between three agendas during the course of a meeting.  This past spring Cliff Graves, Carson’s acting city manager at the time, expressed concern that property taxes that had been going to the redevelopment agency would go to the county and “get lost” instead.   Redevelopment agencies in California for

about five decades gave local governments the ability to capture a greater share of property taxes. After an area was declared a redevelopment project area, the share of property taxes that goes to schools and other local agencies was frozen.  All of the growth in property taxes from that point until after the redevelopment area expired went back to the redevelopment agency.

Different Driving: Golf Course to Porsche Center One Carson landmark is undergoing a major makeover. Porsche plans to open a driving skills center on the site of the Dominguez Golf Course, where for more than half a century a giant golfer statue, known as the Mulligan Man, has overlooked the Interstate 405. A draft Remedial Action Plan, to address environmental contamination of site soil, is now available for public review and comment. Sheri Repp-Loadsman, planning officer, the City of Carson, said Porsche has agreed to preserve the Mulligan Man as a locally significant monument and “maybe he’ll be wearing a driving suit” soon.

She also stated about the project, “No city funds are being used. Under a voluntary agreement with (the Department of Toxic Substances Control), Watson Land Company has completed the first phase of the remedial investigation.” Cost estimate for the remediation was not available at press time. Public comments must be postmarked not later than Oct.14, and sent to: Mr. Daniel Zogiab, DTSC Project Manager, Dept. of Toxic Substance Control, 5796 Corporate Ave., Cypress, CA 90630. Emailing public comments to Daniel.zogiab@dtsc.ca.gov is also acceptable. —Lyn Jensen

Faith Takes on Violence By Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor

Faith-based community members are hosting a forum on anti-violence, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 6, at the Pacific Unitarian Church in Rancho Palos Verdes. The forum will discuss the myths, facts and tools to survive domestic violence. “Violence is a gamut throughout our society of teaching, experiencing or witnessing” said organizer Constance Jackson, who has a background in public health. “And yet, we don’t talk about violence as a health problem.” Jackson, a filmmaker and entrepreneur, said that the inspiration for this forum came from a film she made after the mid-90s murder of a 14year-old girl killed by a 13-year-old boy who stabbed her 74 times. The film was called, Blitz Attack: The Andrea Hines Story. Jackson wanted to understand what in the environment triggered this murder. “I wanted to know why, “versus, just saying, ‘Oh, that boy is crazy,’” she said. “Something went wrong and we conjure up in our society

to create these narratives that make us feel safe again.” Jackson said the event is open to perpetrators and victims because violence begets violence, and perpetrators can also be victims. The Bureau of Justice survey, done in 2005 on family violence between 1998 and 2002, found that women were 84 percent of spouse abuse victims and 86 percent of victims of abuse at the hands of a boyfriend or girlfriend.  The bureau’s survey also showed that family violence accounted for 11 percent of all reported and unreported cases. About 3.5 million reported violent crimes committed against family members. While the survey found that 73 percent of family violence victims were female, men also can be victims. The elderly, teens and members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities also are at high-risk for being abused.  Rainbow Services in San Pedro presented inFaith / to p. 22

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Proven Path to Broad-based Growth

opening economic institutions to everyone or allowing social mobility, extractive institutions restrict opportunities to a powerful few and block social mobility. The children of slaves were also slaves. Slaves could not own property, had no opportunity for social mobility.” Thus, it’s no accident that the Southerndominated GOP and its Tea Party wing is once again pushing an exclusionary agenda focused on debt, which doesn’t even attempt to address the short-term employment crisis or the longterm need for growth. In contrast to the historical successes of Europe and North America, the austerity economics that’s been dominating the debate so far has already been tried, and has repeatedly failed—most recently in Great Britain, which is now in the throes of a second recession, and is doing worse now that it was at a comparable period during the Great Depression. A one-page conceptual summary, at the Prosperity For All website puts it like this: Prosperity economics is built on three pillars: growth, security and democracy. These pillars reinforce one another and are intertwined politically and economically. Dynamic, innovation-led growth, grounded in job creation, public investment and broad opportunity. We must take immediate action to jumpstart our sagging economy. In the future, we need to invest in people and productivity that will lead to good jobs and rising wages. Growth alone is not sufficient to sustain our nation. We need long-term growth that is broadly enjoyed, sustainable in light of our resource and energy constraints and driven by investments in our workforce and strong collective bargaining rules that raise our standard of living. Security for workers and their families, the environment and government finances Markets work better when working families feel a basic security for their futures. A dynamic and competitive market requires a strong foundation that is reinforced by programs like Social Security and Medicare

that guarantee a secure retirement and access to health care. Markets also work better when governments have the resources to operate smoothly far into the future. These resources are best raised through a progressive tax structure that supports the middle class; no more tax giveaways for corporations

and super rich. Democratic voice, inclusivity and accountability in Washington and the workplace Money is increasingly corrupting and corroding democracy. When economic winners are allowed to write the economic rules, the rest of America becomes poorer and our political system weaker. For democracy to thrive, strong Unions, and empowered citizens and community organizations are needed to ensure that workers and the broader public have an organized, effective voice in our politics.

Leading liberal blogger Digby (Heather Parton) also participated in the teleconference. “What we have needed up to now is a broader prosperity vision, that Jacob has just talked about... to offer as a counterpoint,” she said. “If we don’t do that, the debate is going to be limited to this very narrow little difference between the Obama balanced approach and the SimpsonBowles approach and the Romney-Ryan dystopian hellscape.” “The take-away message is that jobs and growth have to be at the center of the fight,” Hacker said, as he concluded his presentation. “That means growth now, through immediate investments in our decaying infrastructure, help to struggling state and local governments that continue to slash their workforces, and substantial mortgage debt relief. But also growth over the long term. So everything we do now should be aimed at investments in people and productivity, from college education to clean energy, guarantees of basic economic security that allows people to innovate and take risks in a rapid-change economy, and rebuilding our money-driven system so it responds to the priorities of the middle class, not just the priorities of corporations and the affluent.” Or, as Digby put it, “We can all prosper together, that’s a different way to look at it.”

Port of Los Angeles Container Volumes Slip 2.3 Percent in August

The Port of Los Angeles released its August 2012 cargo volumes on Sept. 14. Overall volumes decreased 2.3 percent compared to August 2011. Imports decreased 4.1 percent, from 376,189 Twenty-Foot Equivalent (TEU) containers in August 2011 to 360,762 TEUs this August. Exports decreased 10.5 percent, from 184,231 TEUs in August 2011 to 164,819 TEUs in August 2012. Combined, total loaded imports and exports for August decreased 6.2 percent, from 560,421 TEUs this past August to 525,581 TEUs in August 2012. Factoring in empties, which decreased 11.2 percent year over year, overall August 2012 volumes (706,669) decreased 2.3 percent compared to August 2011 (723,170 TEUs). For the first seven months of 2012, overall container volumes have increased 5.1 percent (5,443,248 TEUs) compared to the same period in 2011 (5,178,723 TEUs). Current and past data container counts for the Port of Los Angeles may be found at: http://www.portoflosangeles.org/maritime/ stats.asp In contrast, nationwide imports rose an estimated 4.4 percent in August compared to last year, according to Global Port Tracker put out by the National Retail Federation. Imports for the first half of 2012 were up 3 percent over 2011, while imports for July were up 2.5 percent. News Briefs/ to p. 18

September 21 - October 4, 2012

There is nothing new or radical in this. This is how the multi-generational prosperity of Europe and America were built in the first place, with the first large-scale middle classes in human history. More specifically, Hacker and Lowentheil point to the work of economist Daron Acemoglu and political scientist James Robinson in their book, Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty. As Hacker summarized in an article published by Politico, they found that, “Where government is responsive to the broad citizenry, countries are far better at doing the things that create long-term growth, like investing in education and infrastructure, and ensuring that economic gains translate into a better quality of life for all citizens.” They listed the United States “as one of the most successful of these inclusive democracies,” Hacker wrote. But in a more recent paper, this past November, “Is This Time Different? Capture and Anti-Capture of US Politics” they point to ways “we are losing our edge,” as Hacker put it: “We increasingly display elements found in less successful societies, including runaway inequality, influence-buying, corporate and financial lobbies that tilt government and the market in their favor,” along with “underinvestment in our human capital, infrastructure and basic research and development.” In that paper, Acemoglu and Robinson wrote, “The U.S. case in fact illustrates a more general principle. Countries which have created egalitarian, economically dynamic societies have done so because they have forged inclusive political institutions, which then led to inclusive economic institutions. This is precisely what happened after the 1688 Glorious Revolution in England and what resulted from the French Revolution in large parts of Western Europe. In contradistinction to this, societies with extractive institutions have remained poor and inegalitarian.” “Once created there is a natural tendency for inclusive institutions to persist—a virtuous circle. Unfortunately in the same way…extractive institutions generate their own vicious circle… [T]hough such positive feedbacks existed in the U.S., the system faced continual challenges, most obviously from the Southern states.” Regarding the South, they wrote, “The slave economy in the U.S. South epitomizes the nature of extractive economic institutions. Instead of

Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson, authors of the book, Why Nations Fail, has become critical reading for many on the left looking to stem the tide of austerity measures that have exacerbated the Great Recession around the world. File photos.

LOS ANGELES—On Sept. 14, three defendants pleaded guilty afternoon to federal charges related to the illegal trafficking of rhinoceros horns. The case sprung earlier this year as part of “Operation Crash,” a nationwide U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service crackdown on those involved in the black market trade of endangered rhinoceros horns. Vinh Chung “Jimmy” Kha, 49, and Felix Kha, 26, both of Garden Grove, each pleaded guilty to five felony counts—conspiracy, smuggling, wildlife trafficking in violation of the Lacey Act, money laundering and tax evasion—stemming from their roles in the smuggling conspiracy. The third defendant—Win Lee Corp., a Westminster company owned by Jimmy Kha—pleaded guilty to smuggling and wildlife trafficking in violation of the Lacey Act. In their plea agreements, Jimmy and Felix Kha each admitted purchasing White and Black rhinoceros horns, knowing that the animals were protected by federal law as endangered and threatened species. Both defendants admitted that they purchased the horns in order to export them overseas so they could sold and made into libation cups or traditional medicine. The Khas each acknowledged making payments to Vietnamese customs officials to ensure clearance of horns sent to that country. In addition, Jimmy and Felix Kha each admitted that they failed to pay income taxes owed for 2009 and 2010. According to court documents, the smuggling conspiracy began in January 2010 and continued until February 2012. As part of the scheme, Felix Kha contacted Steffen and others across the United States who were willing to sell White or Black rhinoceros horn. Jimmy Kha met with others who traveled to Long Beach to give them money for previous rhinoceros horn purchases and shipments, and to provide money to fund future purchases and shipments of rhinoceros horns.

“…and had he [George Romney] been born of, uh, Mexican parents, I’d have a better shot at winning this.”

The problem is that a clear alternative exists, based on plenty of empirical evidence, old and new, but that it hasn’t been clearly and forcefully articulated as part of the debate. Hence the need for their report, Hacker explained. “Our goal was really to lay out an alternative that’s both realistic, in the sense of capable of producing ends we want—that is, immediate job growth and broad-based shared prosperity over the long term—and is supported by evidence, by economic research and theory, by the experience of our past and the best examples we find in other countries.” In the report the authors explain: “Prosperity doesn’t just ‘trickle down’ from the top. It depends on the common investments and sources of security we agree on as members of a democracy, on institutions—especially unions—that ensure that gains are broadly shared, and on a healthy democracy that can sustain sound economic policies and prevent today’s economic winners from undermining the openness and dynamism of the economy.”

International Smuggling Ring Plead Guilty Trafficking Endangered Rhinoceros Horns

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Was President John Adams a Closet Socialist? Forbes Magazine article reveals first national health care act passed in 1798 By James Preston Allen, Publisher

September 21 - October 4, 2012

“I’m running for office for Pete’s sake, we can’t have illegals”

These days the “we’re so right that we’ll drive the country off the cliff” crowd have come to call President Barack Obama a “Socialist” for his signature legislation to provide health care to millions of uninsured Americans and to regulate an industry that has basically run amuck. They fought the Obama administration all the way to the Supreme Court where conservative Chief Justice John G. Roberts decided against them in on an 4-5 split on the issue. On what basis was this decision made? Obama is far from a socialist by any stretch of the definition. If he was really a socialist, he would have just nationalized the entire health care system, fired the CEOs at all of the insurance corporations and told the pill manufactures to lower their exorbitant prices or face the same fate as the insurance companies. He didn’t do anything like that. What he did is pretty much in line with what President John Adams did in 1798 with the “Act for The Relief of Sick and Disabled Seamen” (See http://tinyurl. com/sick-disabled-seamen1798). With this piece of legislation, Congress set up a system to guarantee the health of a workforce that was critical to the future of the nation. The article that brought this to my attention was published in none other than the conservative-leaning publication, Forbes Magazine in November 2011. Most of the mainstream press and right-wing pundits ignored the story. What this first act of Congress on health care establishes is the right of the federal government to regulate and tax a specific industry to maintain the health and medical care of its workers. This is a legal precedent that gives justification for everything else that has followed within the past 214 years. It seems a little too late to challenge that precedent or this president. And no one ever called Adams a socialist for signing this bill. Upon reflecting on this historic act of Congress, I started thinking, “What other pieces of the national health care puzzle do we have?” Surely, this wasn’t the only time in the history of our nation that this subject has come up. This is what I’ve found with a simple Google search:

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The National Institutes of Health was formed in 1887 and is an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary agency of the U.S. government responsible for biomedical and health-related research. Its science and engineering counterpart is the National Science Foundation. It comprises 27 separate institutes, centers, and offices. (http://history.nih.gov/exhibits/history/index.html). The Public Health Service was established in 1798 and is directed by the U.S. Surgeon General. The U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps employs more than 6,000 public health professionals for the purpose of delivering public health promotion and disease prevention programs and advancing public health science. Members of this uniformed Commissioned Corps often serve on the front lines in the fight against disease and poor health conditions (www.usphs.gov). Next the Centers for Disease Control, a branch of the Health and Human Services, was founded in 1946, during World War II as the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. It works to protect public health and safety by providing information to enhance health decisions and it promotes health through partnerships with state health departments and other organizations. The CDC focus national attention on developing and applying disease prevention and control, especially infectious diseases and foodborne pathogens and other microbial infections (http://www.cdc.gov/). Well before this country declared its independence there was precedent of government taking care of its veterans going back to 1636, when the Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony passed a law that stated that disabled soldiers would be supported by the colony. The Continental Congress of 1776 encouraged enlistments during the Revolutionary War by providing pensions for soldiers who were disabled. Direct medical and hospital care given to veterans in the early days of the Republic was provided by the individual states and communities. In 1811, the first domiciliary and medical facility for veterans was authorized by the federal government. In the 19th century, the nation’s veterans assistance program was expanded to include benefits and pensions not only for veterans, Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIII : No. 19

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communities of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

www.randomlengthsnews.com

Assoc. Publisher/Production Coordinator Suzanne Matsumiya info@graphictouchdesigns.com Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks editor@randomlengthsnews.com Assistant Editor Zamná Ávila reportersdesk@randomlengthsnews.com Senior Editor Paul Rosenberg

but also their widows and dependents. The federal government created the Department of Veterans Affairs and accompanying VA Hospitals in 1930. It is the federal government’s second largest department, after the U.S. Department of Defense. Then, of course, we come to the 1960s with the creation of Medicare/Medicaid that provides health care for seniors, the poor, and the disabled. This is what really chaps Romney’s hide. This is the group of “free loaders” the Republicans really object to. They are the deficit according to some. They are the ones who want somethingfor-nothin’, the conservatives exclaim!

It would appear to me that for many years, ever since the earliest days of our republic and before, that our government has thought enough of “health care” as part of the general directive of the U.S. Constitution, as in “to provide for the general welfare,” that Congress has acted repeatedly to this end. Should we expect anything less of Congress today? Much of what we’ve inherited is a patchwork of band-aids, and like other parts of our government, it doesn’t work as a comprehensive system. What is missing from Obamacare is not that it goes too far, but that it doesn’t go far enough.

RANDOMLetters Tragic Milestone

We got some sad news today that the number of U.S. military members killed in the war in Afghanistan has surpassed 2,000. This tragic milestone is just another reminder that it is long past time to end the war in Afghanistan. My heart aches for the families of those who have given their lives, and for the more than twelve thousand men and women who have suffered terrible wounds in the service of our country. A decade at war is long enough. We must bring the troops home. I will continue to carry this message forward in Congress, and work to end the war now so we can reinvest in our communities, create new jobs, and, most importantly, get our troops home. I am so proud of our servicemen and women and am forever grateful for the bravery and sacrifice they

Columnists/Reporters Lyn Jensen Carson B. Noel Barr Music Dude John Farrell Curtain Call Gretchen Williams Entrée Calendar 14days@randomlengthsnews.com Photographers Terelle Jerricks, Slobodan Dimitrov, Robin Doyno Contributors Tami Jackson, Danny Simon, Andrea Serna Cartoonists Ann Cleaves, Andy Singer, Matt Wuerker

give to our country. We need to give them the same devotion by not just continuing this seemingly endless war. Let’s end the casualties and bring them home. Congresswoman Janice Hahn (CA-36), San Pedro

Billionaires & Ballot Bandit

If you’re not sick and outraged and ready to vomit, then don’t talk to me. When I see a cruel bucket of garbage and winky-winky racism and bullshit and venom like Paul Ryan talk to America like he’s some kind of Boy Scout, I want a gun, or a TV network where I can tell the truth or a giant washing machine to dunk America and rinse off the crud of lies and pure manipulative evil that they’re feeding us. An investigation of Karl Rove, the Koch Gang and their billion-

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aire Buck-Buddies. The guys who bought [Paul] Ryan. It’s the most important bullet I’ve ever fired.   I watch these smug jerks at the Republican Convention and I’m ill...because I know something they won’t tell you on CNN or CBS, let alone Fox.  And here’s the facts, ma’am: In 2008, no fewer than 2,706,275 ballots were cast—and never counted. It didn’t make a difference then, but it will make a difference now. And, in 2008, no fewer than 3,195,539 legal voters were denied the right to vote.   Told to get the hell out of the polling station. Add it up.  That’s at least 5,901,814 legitimate votes and voters tossed out of the count. So God Bless America. By the way, these numbers are from the raw data supplied to me by the U.S. Elections Assistance Commission.  It’s official. It’s in your face.  It’s

Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #08916627). All contents Copyright 2012 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.

RANDOMLetters sick.  It’s unreported.   I cry.  I scream.  I retch.  Then I make jokes—but I give you the inside info on the Koch Brothers (“Target 67C” as federal prosecutors called Charles Koch) that will make your eyes pop.  Fact: The 2012 election’s been stolen.  Already.  Stolen by billionaires who’ve created databases

Community Alerts 710 Corridor Project Draft EIR Released for Public Review

San Pedro Community Plan/DEIR Available For Comments

A Draft of the proposed San Pedro Community Plan is now available for public review, along with a corresponding Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR). The DEIR analyzes environmental impacts, such as air quality, traffic, cultural resources and other areas. The proposed plan and related materials, including a map of the recommendations by sub-area, and the DEIR can be found on the Planning Department website at: https://sites.google. com/site/sanpedrocommunityplan A hard copy of the DEIR is also available for review at the San Pedro Branch Library on Gaffey Street and the Harbor City-Wilmington Branch Library on Western Avenue. Interested stakeholders may provide comments on the new plan and the DEIR by Sept. 24. There will be an open house and public hearing scheduled sometime in the fall. To be included on the notification list for this event and other updates, please email Debbie Lawrence at debbie. lawrence@lacity.org or call here at (213) 978-1163. Comments may also be e-mailed.

SP Democratic Club Meeting

Hear guest speaker Assemblyman Mike Feuer, candidate for L.A. City Attorney and a discussion on Props 30 and 32. All are welcome! Mon., Sept. 24, 7-8:45 p.m. The Whale & Ale 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro

Land of the Outsourced

As always, I continue giving you credit for typically very insightful observations about our town and country. Your comments on your most recent editorial regarding negative publicity on San Pedro should certainly stimulate some serious concerns an attention by so-called community leaders. In the distant past when I was about to embark on the long journey to America and San Pedro, and curious of knowing where the place was, I consulted a foreign atlas and quickly established where the place was, located as it was west of Long Beach, south of Los Angeles and north of San Diego. Since that time I have run into untold numbers of local maps and noticed with much disappointment how rare it is for San Pedro to appear on them. My theory is that ever since the “Beacon Street” redevelopment of forty-five years ago, our local leadership has terribly botched its responsibility to the town, either due to its own disconnection from the community it claims to represent or, worse yet, because of its won incompetence. As a result, we locals find ourselves regaled with waterfront improvements that fail to interface with the rest of the community, reflecting a lack of joint coordination between Harbor and City leadership and certainly contributory to the continuing difficulties by our downtown area in revitalizing itself, notwithstanding numerous and well subsidized efforts for the area. And this brings me to another comment you made about President Obama and his “job creation.” My dear friend, neither Mr. Obama nor his counterpart Republicans know what they are talking about. No one in this country will ever “create a job” until the issue of massive job outsourcing to other countries is addressed, something neither party is willing to do. With nearly a billion dollars projected to be spend during this presidential election cycle, our Congress and presidency are no longer representative of the people but beholden only to multinational-globalist interests and their seditious association, both inside and outside government. Roger D’Altavilla San Pedro

Youth Sailing Club is a Bad Idea

Wilmington has long had no Boy or Girl Scout Program, let alone YMCA, to teach local kids to swim, go on trips to experience boating of any kind. This plan for a sailing club in the marina is of Wilmington is part of the Port of Los Angeles’ operations that have fouled our local waterfront and made the air quality above it very bad. Is it wise to allow kids to learn to sail in such an environment, when other sites might be more appropriate? Both Cabrillo Beach and Port of Los Angeles High School Youth

have sailing clubs. So why not merge the proposed Wilmington Club with these already in existence? If the Wilmington Club must go forward as is, then take an example form the LAPDs Explorer Scout Program that has Harbor Division officers as their mentors. If the Wilmington Club promoters can get, say the Coast Guard and or U.S. Navy to sponsor the training program and keep close tabs on it, then it might convince parents that such a Sailing Club might lead to a job down the road. If the enrollees are required to get a high school diploma, that is, make progress toward same or be dropped form the club program, , say.

Most of us with experience in boating and fishing think such is more appropriate for quiet lakes, not in the ocean, especially a polluted area like our industrial zone Wilmington Waterfront. It is my understanding that the pollution aspect of this plan would not be mitigated so the C.E.Q. A. override provision was used to remove liability, if the program went bad, from being imposed on the decision makers; in this case the LA Port Commission. I would suggest that the Wilmington Club be dropped, unless the Navy or Guard sponsors it. Donald Compton Wilmington

“…and had he [George Romney] been born of, uh, Mexican parents, I’d have a better shot at winning this.”

Los Angeles—The California Department of Transportation has released the Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement for the Interstate 710 Corridor Project and extended the public comment period through Sept. 28. The project was developed in cooperation with various other agencies. The environmental review involves proposals to improve the Interstate 710 in Los Angeles County between Ocean Boulevard and State Route 60. Major elements include widening the I-710 freeway up to ten general purpose lanes; modernizing and reconfiguring the Interstate 405, State Route 91 and a portion of the Interstate 5 interchanges; modernizing and reconfiguring most local arterial interchanges along the I-710. Written comments may be sent to: Ronald Kosinski, Caltrans District 7, Division of Environmental Planning, 100 South Main Street, MS 16A, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Or send an e-mail through the project website at www.dot.ca.gov/dist07/resources/envdocs/docs/710corridor/

called “Themis” (the Kochs own that) and “DataTrust” (Karl Rove’s satanic machine). The election has not been stolen from Barack Obama — it’s been stolen from you.  From We the People who march to the polls believing America is still a democracy, the land of the Brave, home of The Free, and that our votes count. And for my terrible language, I apologize, Greg Palast New York

September 21 - October 4, 2012

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September 21 – October 4, 2012

“I’m not concerned about the very poor.” –Mitt Romney

Eric Darius at the Long Beach Jazz Festival Aug. 10. Photo by Earl E. Gibson III

Smooth Jazz Artist Keeps on Giving by: Melina Paris, Contributing Writer

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“Corporations are people, my friend.” –Mitt Romney “My wife drives a couple of Cadillacs.” –Mitt Romney

atching Eric Darius bouncing on the stage with his saxophone at the Long Beach Jazz Festival this past August, it seemed that everything about him was on acceleration mode. His rendition of old school up tempo R&B cuts kept taking us higher and higher. I suspect his youth had something to do with that. Darius may have began his career as an 11-yearold prodigy, but as he approaches 30, he’s a matured master musician capable of pulling out the most from classic cuts like Al Green’s, “Let’s Stay Together” and Teddy Pendergrass’ “Love TKO,” as well as making audience follow him on a journey through his own discography. On that night, the crowd was taken through “Night on the Town” from his most recent album of the same name. It’s a distinctly smooth jazz number with a very catchy hook. He showed off his skills, playing outside the changes and coming right back into the main harmonies again in quick time. He likes to spread this liveliness of his around as he moves about the stage, clapping to the audience, getting them into the music. It’s as if he doesn’t want a single soul to miss out on the fun. Particularly when he performed the 2008 up tempo, “Goin All Out,” which peaked at No. 1 on Billboard’s Smooth Jazz Songs charts. It’s an expressive tune with a groove that gets into your head. Darius also played cuts from his latest album, On a Mission, including “Kingston’s Flavor.” This cut was a nice long reggae number showcasing that Eric Darius to page 17.

September 21 – October 4, 2012 September 21 – October 4, 2012

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Under the Bridge Express Grill by: Gretchen Williams, Cuisine Writer

“I’m not concerned about the very poor.” –Mitt Romney

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ith the soaring span of the Vincent Any affection for the old Catalina Terminal Thomas Bridge above and bustling vessel traffic is forgotten when you walk onto the new paon the Main Channel alongside, Catalina Bistio at Berth 95. Bombard and crew have done tro and Express Grill a splendid job of at the new Catalina face lifting the old Express terminal at Princess Pavilion, Berth 95 is the most creating a welcomexciting place to eat ing spot for travelers in the Harbor. to the Island while Outdoor tables providing a destinawith umbrellas have tion for casual dina front row seat for all ing. Attractive landthe action. Swift Catscaping and gentle alina Express ferries earth tones soften discharge and load the open courtyard. Catalina Bistro’s South American Steak Frites, available passengers and charge The dramatic view from 4 to 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. back to sea again. Port of the bridge and c o m m e r c e s u rg e s channel is riveting overhead with the roar of trade and the sounds to children and adults. The Catalina Bistro and of the Harbor are accented with tug whistles. accompanying bar have made the terminal a go-to Huge cargo, grain and bulk vessels pass en place for drinks, snacks and breakfast. route to berth, laden with the needs and wants of The counter service is delivered with a smile, the country. The tiny grill is a wonderful surprise and Chef Laurel Lyman has brought the menu of great coffee and good food, right at the beating into the modern age. Yes, coffee and soda and heart of the Harbor. beer and wine, but excellent latte and Thomas

September 21 – October 4, 2012

Continued on page 13.

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Catalina Bistro’s BLT Salad.

The California Caesar wrap is a meal in a whole wheat wrap, akin to a large flour tortilla, enclosing grilled chicken or shrimp with Romaine lettuce, avocado and Parmesan cheese with house made Caesar dressing, with mixed green salad. Catalina Cobb salad is a portrait on a plate, reflecting the verdant variety of vegetables here in California, with grilled chicken and bacon and cheese, served with smooth yogurt lemon herb dressing. Fresh fruit salad is gorgeous and glow-

ing, luscious with the ripe fruit of late summer. Children won’t mind adults lingering over latte with so much to look at and a children’s menu of favorites like grilled ham and cheese sandwiches or hot dogs, most priced at $3.95. Pancakes with bacon, ham or sausage and one egg would make any member of the short set happy in the a.m., for $5.95. The Oyster Bar in Grand Central Terminal in New York became a happening on the half shell with Chef Jerome Brody. Los Angeles Union

Station is a destination for cocktails and cuisine, courtesy of Chef Tara Thomas and her California Waldorf Salad. The Catalina Express Grill could be just the spot for Kobe burgers and Bloody Marys for sea trippers and landlubbers alike. Catalina Bistro and Express Grill is at Catalina Express Terminal Berth 95 in San Pedro. Details: (800) 481-3470

Contiued from page 12.

“Corporations are people, my friend.” –Mitt Romney September 21 – October 4, 2012

Kemper bottled soda, domestic and imported beers and Kendall Jackson wines are on offer, at non-tourist prices. Great coffee is $1.50 with a double latte for $3.95. Breakfast breaks beyond brilliant with French toast made with brioche and served crowned with beautiful grilled pineapple. Maple syrup becomes redundant with this gorgeous plate, for $4.95. Grilled veggie and feta cheese omelet is a bounty of smoky grilled eggplant, red peppers, zucchini and summer squash and mushrooms, with flavorful feta and served with crunchy home fried potatoes and choice of toast, for $6.95. Fresh and colorful seasonal fruit adorns the Greek Island Parfait, with thick, creamy Greek yogurt and a sprinkling of granola, for $3. 95. The Catalina Combo with two eggs any style and choice of bacon, ham or sausage, is served with spuds and toast for $6.95. The giant ham steak is worth the price of admission by itself and eggs came perfectly poached. The attention to detail here is so delightful to see in a casual place, and so unusual. The ambiance may be casual, but the kitchen is serious. Soup of the day is homemade, with clam chowder on Fridays. It would be tough to beat the half sandwich and soup or salad for $5.95. Garden tuna sandwich spikes regular tuna salad with lettuce, tomato, sprouts, slivered red onion, cucumber and Swiss cheese on whole wheat – quiet dynamite. Garden Gobbler sandwich adds real depth to oven-roasted turkey with garnish of avocado and hummus, with the crunchy compliment of cucumber, sprouts, lettuce and tomato and slices of mellow Swiss cheese. The Mile High sandwich rivals the towering bridge for height with pastrami or corned beef sliced thin and piled high on rye bread, served with zesty mustard and house made cole slaw. Grilled veggies are a stunning mountain of California’s gold, grilled eggplant, mushrooms, red bell pepper and squash with creamy goat cheese and olive tapenade spread on grilled ciabatta bread. The Express burger is delicious, full speed ahead. A third pound Angus beef is grilled to order, dressed with garlicky red pepper aioli sauce on brioche bun with lettuce, tomato, red onion and pickles, and served with killer french fries. For a step up, the Channel Island Burger uses Kobe beef, blessed with caramelized onions, sautéed mushrooms and bleu cheese on a golden brioche bun, with french fries. The garden burger gets appropriate attention, with a very high quality veggie burger sauced with red pepper aioli and stacked tall with lettuce, tomato, red onion and pickle on a brioche bun and those legendary fries. A recent visitor to the terminal marked his second birthday, happily dipping french fries in ketchup while watching the Ever Pride ease into berth across the Channel. The Kobe dog is a well endowed one-third pound hot dog, nestled into a gourmet bun and served with fries.

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San Pedro’s Original ArtWalk— Fine Dining Event • Live Music Special Performances • Food Trucks! Gallery 345

From Within and Beyond Gloria D Lee and Pat Woolley exhibit mixed media and watercolor paintings, books, small works and more. 6-9 pm 1st Thursday, and by appointment. Please call 310 545 0832 or 310 374 8055 for appointments or email artsail@roadrunner. com; www.gloriadlee.com; woolleybear@verizon.net ; www. teddytraveler.com• 345 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731

The Loft Gallery

Portraits: Works by L.A. Assemblage Group Open Studios: Candice Gawne, Carol Hungerford, Sam Arno, Daniel Porras Murial Olguin, Jan Govaerts, Anne Marie Rawlinson, & Nancy Towne Schultz 401 S. Mesa St. • 310.831.5757 • Open 6–9pm & by appt.

Michael Stearns Studio

September 21 – October 4, 2012

“I’m not concerned about the very poor.” –Mitt Romney

Currently showing “Sky Ladders” Sculptures by Michael Stearns. Current works include paintings, papier mache and mixed media sculptures, reflecting interest in the southwestern landscape, spiritual studies and veteran issues. Open 1st Thursday Art Walk, by appointment, or by chance. 347 W. 7th St. • 562.400.0544 • Michaelstearnsstudio.com

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Richard Lopez Studio

“Cosmic Abstracts and Other Considerations” by Richard Lopez. Topics exploring life’s ever-shifting balance of chaos and order. Art classes by appointment. Watch for our art sale in November. 372 7th St. • 562.370.7883 • Ralopezart.com

Artist Studios & Galleries

Gallery 381 • 381 West 6th St. • 310-809-5082 Dwelling • 387 West 6th St. • 310-547-4222 Neil Nagy • 408 West 6th St. • 310-617-3459 Mike Rivero Studio • 414 West 6th St. • 310-720-3407 Dekor • 445 West 6th • St. 310-831-1800 fINdings Art Center • 470 West 6th St. • 310-489-1362 Arcade Gallery Ovation • 479 West 6th St. • 267-909-0799 Ancient Arts Stained Glass • 333 West 7th St. • 310-832-7613 Studio 339 • 339 West 7th St. • 310-514-1238 Allyson Vought • 356 West 7th St. 424-210-7475 Human Array Gallery • 357 West 7th St. • 408-475-8867 Nancy Crawford • 360 West 7th St. • 310-732-7922 Gallery Ls • 362 West 7th St. • 310-541-4354 Paul Turang • 364 West 7th St. • 310-547-9771 Gallery Neuartig • 366 West 7th St. • 213-973-8223 Jim Harter • 368 West 7th St. • 310-533-8753 Studio MNX • 370 West 7th St. Meredith Harbuck • 372 West 7th St. • 310-528-7184 Yoon Jin Kim • 374 West 7th St. • 310-514-2143 Julia Strickler • 376 West 7th St. • 310-908-3824 Shannon LaBelle • 378 West 7th St. Hiroko • 382 West 7th St. • 310-514-8881 SP Chamber Board Room Gallery • 390 W 7th St. • 310-832-7272 Gallery at the Vault • 407 West 7th St. • 310-548-6585 Shalla Javid Studio • 407 7th St. Unit 119 A • 918-557-2165 Scott Boren Borenstudios • 412 West 7th St. Yong Sin • 414 West 7th St. • 310-221-0283 Medea Gallery • 445 West 7th St. • 310-833-3831 Gallery 478 • 478 West 7th St. • 310-732-2150 Norm Looney • 318 S. Pacific Ave. • 310-548-6293 Warschaw Gallery • 600 S. Pacific Ave • 310-547-3606

Advertise Here for As Low As

$35

per Month!

(310) 519-1442 302 W. 7th Street • 310. 833.1589 –Entertainment Calendar– Fri 9/28 Sat 9/29

First

Thurs 10/4 Fri 10/5 Fri 10/12 Fri 10/19 Sat 10/20 Fri 10/26

Longhorns State of Grace

9pm

TJ Rox 5 Mile Radius Whiskey Flats Harbor Groove Soul Shot Daddyos

7pm

9pm

9pm 9pm 9pm 9pm 9pm

Karaoke Every Tuesday at 8pm with Amorette Jazz Jam every Wednesday 7 - 11pm

– www.godmotherssaloon.com –

Sixth Annual SP ♥ TriArt Festval by: Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

S

Invertigo Dance Theatre (Contemporary), New Beginnings/Steven Nielsen (Contemporary), LaDiego Dance Theater/Daniel Marshall (Contemporary ballet),

San Pedro City Ballet (Ballet), Andalosi Dance Company (Middle Eastern dance)

DW3 at the 7th Street Chophouse Hometown favorite rhythm and blues soul band DW3 headed by Billy Mondragon returns to the Chophouse. Starts at 8:30 p.m. Details: http://7thstreetchophouse.com Venue: 7th Street Chophouse Location: 465 W. 7th St., San Pedro

September 22

LADO B The (Other Side of Brazilian Music) plays Sept. 22 at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

September 23

Susana Elena Spanish Classical & Flamenco Dance (Spanish and flamenco solo), Angela Todaro & Elizabeth Ann Poinsette (Tap), Ballet Folklorico Mixteco, East Los Angeles. Pre-professional youth groups opening on Sunday include: Degas Dance Co. (youth group, pre–professional) Frederick Douglass Academy High School Cheer Squad.

• Happy Hour • Blu Bar at Crowne Plaza • $4 Drinks and half off appetizers. (310) 519-8200, 601 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro The Chowder Barge • Try the 34oz. captain’s mug! (310) 830-7937, 611 N. Henry Ford, Leeward Bay Marina, Wilmington Godmother’s Saloon • Live jazz from Mike Guerrero Trio: 7 p.m. every Wed. (310) 8331589, 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro Iron City Tavern • Happy Hour 1/2-price appetizers & drink specials: 4 to 6 p.m. Mon. to Fri. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro; (310) 547-4766 Ports o’ Call • Happy Hour: Mon. to Fri., 3 to 8 p.m. Taco Tuesdays. Oyster shooter & bloody mary Wednesdays. (310) 833-3553, Berth 76 Ports O’ Call Village, San Pedro San Pedro Brewing Co. • Happy Hour: 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Mon. to Fri. (310) 831-5663, 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Whale & Ale • Happy Hour: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Mon to Fri., 4 to 7 p.m. on Wed. Late Night Happy Hour: 10 p.m. to Midnight, Fri. Only. (310) 832-0363, 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro Happy Hour Listings Are Paid Advertising

Windy Barnes Farrell Spend an afternoon at the Annex and hear, Windy Barnes Farrell, starting at 3 p.m. at the Grand Annex in San Pedro. Farrell slides easily between gospel, rhythm and blues, pop and jazz. Her mesmerizing and sensuous voice is deepened by her heartfelt performance. Farrell has toured with Stevie Wonder, Julio Iglesias and Michael Bolton and performed extensively throughout China and Asia. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door. Details: www.grandvision.org Venue: Grand Annex Location: 434 W. 6th St, San Pedro Harry Scorzo - CD Release! Harry Scorzo is a widely recorded studio musician, award winning jazz violinist, and a sought after composer, arranger and producer. His violin solos can be heard in the recordings of “Bongo Logic” (Rycodisk, Rhythm Safari and Montuno Records) as well as in the motion picture soundtracks to Envy, Rushmore and more. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro Flamenco Salon Join Rina Orellana and her students for a mid year flamenco music and dance show, featuring new soloists and group numbers. Tickets $25 adults, $15 children younger than 13. Details: (800) 403-3447 Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

September 26

Becky Lee and Drunkfoot Becky Lee is known for her warm voice and genuine approach to the one man band genre. She is one of the world’s few female one man bands and plays guitar, kick drum, snare with a foot pedal and floor tom with her strum hand. Show starts at 7 p.m. Details: (562) 434-8292 Venue: Alex’s Bar Location: 2913 E. Anaheim St., Long Beach

September 28

Next N Line Band Next N Line Band is a Rock n Roll Cover Band playing the Best Rock songs from ALL decades. Show starts at 9 p.m. Venue: Busters BeachHouse & Long Board Bar Location: 168 N. Marina Dr., Long Beach Rick Parma and Chitown Soul Saxophonist Rick Parma is going to bring the heat with Chitown soul on this Friday night. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. He’ll return Sept. 29. Details: http://7thstreetchophouse.com Venue: 7th Street Chophouse Location: 465 W. 7th St., San Pedro

September 21 – October 4, 2012

Sunday’s line-up of professional companies includes: Soul Lab Dance Project (Contemporary dance theater), ACFCLA (Artist Community For Change LA)/Anacia Weiskittel (Contemporary), Louise Reichlin & Dancers/ LA Choreographers & Dancers (Modern, contemporary), Lissa Resnick’s No Strings Attached Dance Company (Contemporary ballet), Ruby Karen Project/Orange County Aerial Arts (Acrobatic Latin Fusion and Aerial Arts),

September 21

The Good Fiction Alternative rock band The Good Fiction featuring Ben Hinch (Bass and Vocals), Shannon McMurray (Guitars) and Hale Savard (Drums). Starts at 8 p.m. Venue: DiPiazza’s Location: 5205 E. Pacific Coast Hwy, Long Beach

“Corporations are people, my friend.” –Mitt Romney

T h e f i r st d ay ’s l i n e u p o n Saturday includes: The LA Follies (Kick line, Tap, Variety), Dembrebrah Drum & Dance Ensemble (African music and dance),

Entertainment

Golden State Pops Orchestra Golden State Pops Orchestra celebrates its 10th anniversary with the 2012-13 season opening concert, directed as by conductor and composer Steven Allen Fox. Starts at 8 p.m. Details: www.warnergrand.org Venue: Warner Grand Theatre Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

Louise Reichlin & Dancers, from the new dance. Photo By Paul Antico

ept. 22 will be the first year that the annual TriArt Festival goes on without its founder, Joe Caccavalla Sr., who died this past July. But the torch and his legacy was passed onto the next generation including Louise Reichlin and Los Angeles Choreographers & Dancers, along with Caccavalla’s sons, Mike and Joe Caccavalla. Also stepping is Jan Kain of People’s Yoga, Health & Dance. Now in its sixth year, the family oriented arts event covering dance, music, and visual arts and crafts has been expanded to include 22 dance companies, as well as more music and crafts. The event even has a new name: SP ♥ TriArt Festival. This is a change from simply the TriArt Festival in San Pedro as it had previously been known as. Since Reichlin has joined the TriArt festival, the event has become more oriented towards dance, drawing dance companies throughout the Southland to San Pedro.

Attendees won’t be made into wallflowers at this event. Kain from People’s Yoga, Health, & Dance will lead the charge of getting audiences off the wall and on the dance floor alongside pre-professional youth groups such as Ballet Folklorico Mixteco, East Los Angeles Youth Group, Centennial College Prep (ballroom and hip hop), J-Town Dance Team (hip hop), and Brockus Conservatory (jazz). The event is free, with plenty of free parking. Everything begins with live music at 11 a.m. Sept. 22, with dance performances beginning at 1 p.m. and more music from 4 to 8 p.m. The same schedule continues on Sept. 23, with different music and dance groups. Details: (213) 385-1171; TriArtSP.com Venue: Port O’Call Special Events Stage Location: 1199 Nagoya Way, San Pedro

15

Big Nick’s Pizza Tradition, variety and fast delivery; you get it all at Big Nick’s Pizza. The best selection of Italian specialties include hear ty calzones, an array of pastas and of course, our amazing selection of signature pizzas, each piled high with the freshest toppings. Like wings or greens? We also offer an excellent selection of appetizers, salads, beer and wine. Call for fast delivery. Hours: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 1110 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 732-5800 Boardwalk Grill

September 21 – October 4, 2012

“I’m not concerned about the very poor.” –Mitt Romney

C a s u a l waterfront dining at its finest! Famous fo r s l a b s o f Chicago-style baby back ribs, fish-n-chips, rich clam chowder, cold beer on tap and wine. Full lunch menu also includes salads, sandwiches and burgers. Indoor and outdoor patio dining available. Proudly pouring Starbucks coffee. Open 7 days a week. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 519-7551

16

Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria A San Pedro landmark for over 40 years, famous for exceptional awa rd - w i n n i n g pizza baked in brick ovens. Buono’s also o f fe r s c l a s s i c Italian dishes and sauces based on triedand-true family recipes and hand-selected ingredients that are prepared fresh. You can dine-in or take-out. Delivery and catering are also provided. Additionally, there are two locations in Long Beach. Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. 1432 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 547-0655 www.buonospizza.com The Chowder Barge

L.A. Harbor’s famous floating restaurant, surrounded by boats in Leeward Bay Marina. Dine inside by our fire place, or outside on our deck . This unique spot ser ves great sandwiches, burgers, fish & chips, wings and of course, the BEST clam chowder anywhere! Try our sourdough bread bowl and daily specials. Wine and beer on tap or by the bottle, featuring our 34oz Captains Mug! The new owners have kept the “funkiness” of the old barge, and stepped it up several notches. Watch the games on our big screen TVs, utilize our WiFi and enjoy our XM tunes. THE place for your next party. Hours: Mon, Tues 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Wed, Thurs 11 a.m.–8 p.m. Fri, Sat, Sun 9 a.m.–8 p.m. 611 N. Henry Ford, (at Anaheim) Leeward Bay Marina, Wilmington • (310) 830-7937 www.ChowderBarge.com

Iron City Tavern

Iron City features a newly renovated dining room and wonderfully restored bar in a modern setting. The most comfortable gastropub in San Pedro, Iron City offers casual dining for lunch and dinner with food service at the bar. Catch all sporting events on seven 50” screens in surround sound and listen to your favorite tunes on our internet jukebox. (Iron City is a supporter of the Black & Gold.) Iron City features authentic Philly cheese steaks, various hot sandwiches and burgers, calamari steaks and a variety of Italian pasta dishes. Hours:10:30 a.m.-2a.m. 7 days a week. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. featuring 1/2 priced appetizers and drink specials. Free parking in rear. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro • (310) 547-4766 Mishi’s Strudel Bakery Mishi’s is a fragrant landmark on 7th Street, where it is possible to find Nirvana by following your nose. The enticing aroma of baking strudel is impossible to resist, and the darling café is warm and welcoming like your favorite auntie’s house. Aniko and Mishi have expanded the menu to include homemade goulash soup and a variety of sweet and savory Hungarian strudels, crepes and pastas. The best indulgence is taking a frozen strudel home to bake in your own kitchen and create that heavenly aroma at your house. Mishi’s Strudel Bakery and Café, 309 W.7th St., St., San Pedro • (310) 832-6474 www.mishisstrudel.com NIKO’S PIZZERIA

Downtown San Pedro’s newest restaurant features a full Italian menu, as well as pizza, and a beer and wine bar. We carry a wide selection of beers on tap and by the bottle. Watch spor ting events on plasma TV screens throughout the restaurant. Delivery service to all of San Pedro, Port locations, and hotels. 399 W. 6th St., San Pedro (at the corner of Mesa and 6th sts.) • (310) 241-1400 PORTS O’CALL WATERFRONT DINING Since 1961 we’ve extended a hear ty welcome to visitors from every corner of the globe. Delight in an awe-inspiring view of the dynamic LA Harbor while enjoying exquisite Coastal California Cuisine and Varietals. Relax in the Plank Bar or Outdoor Patio for the best Happy Hour on the Waterfront. With the Award-Winning Sunday Champagne Brunch, receive the first SPIRIT CRUISES Harbor Cruise of the day FREE. Open 7 days, lunch and dinner. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 76, San Pedro • (310) 833-3553 www.Portsocalldining. com

PRONTO’S FRESH MEXICAN GRILL & PRONTO’S BURGERS

(25th and Western) 2420 S. Western Ave. , San Pedro, (310) 832-4471

Los Angeles 110 W. El Segundo Blvd., Los Angeles, (310) 527-7323 Gardena 13890 S. Normadie Ave., Gardena, (310) 327-5615

www.prontosmexgrill.com.

San Pedro Brewing Compnay SPBC has an eclectic menu featuring pastas, steaks, seafood, sandwiches, salads, delicious appetizers, and great BBQ. Handcrafted ales and lagers are made on the premises. A full bar with made-from-scratch margaritas and a martini menu all add fun to the warm and friendly atmosphere. WIFI bar connected for Web surfing and e-mail—bring your laptop. Hours: From 11:30 a.m., daily. 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro • (310) 831-5663 www. sanpedrobrewing.com SPIRIT CRUISES

An instant party! Complete with all you need to relax and enjoy while the majesty of the harbor slips by. Our three yachts and seasoned staff provide for an exquisite excursion every time, and “all-inclusive” pricing makes party planning easy! Dinner Cruise features a 3-course meal, full bar, unlimited cocktails and starlight dancing. Offering the ultimate excursion for any occasion. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 5488080, (562) 495-5884 www. spiritmarine.com

Trusela’s

Southern Italian & California Cuisine • Bob and Josephine Trusela have been awarded the “Most Promising New Restaurant 2010” award and three stars 2011 and 2012, by the Southern California Restaurant Writers Association. Catering available for all ocassions. Hours: Sun. 5 p.m.–Close, Lunch: Tues–Fri 11:30–2:30, Dinner: Tues–Sat 5 p.m.–Closing. 28158 S. Western Ave., San Pedro • (310) 547–0993 www.truselas.com

The Whale & Ale

San Pedro’s British Gastro Pub offers comfor table dining in oak paneled setting, featuring English fish & chips, roast prime rib, sea bass, rack of lamb, beef Wellington, English pies, venison, salmon, swordfish & vegan/vegetarian dishes. Open for lunch & dinner, 7days/wk; great selection of wines; 14 British tap ales, & full bar. Frequent live Music. First Thursday live band & special fixed price menu. Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. 11:30 a.m.midnight Sat. & Sun. 1-10 p.m. Bar open late. 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro • (310) 832-0363 www.whaleandale.com San Pedro’s Best Guide To —Fine Dining—

Brochure Pick Up Your 2012 Copy Today!

Think Café

Think Café is giving downtown San Pedro a taste of sophistication for breakfast and lunchtime, and dinner. Located in the hear t of downtown on 5th Street, Think Café’ has been a magnet for local s and business types alike for over 15 years. The special secret of Think Café? Dining outside on the patio. Lovely for latte’ in the morning or soup and salad at midday, the patio is a wonderful rendezvous in the evening, perfect for enjoying a selection from the wine list. The Café’ also boasts a selection of imported beers. Breakfast at the Café’ runs the gamut from bacon and eggs to eggs Benedict, with a wide variety of dishes to awaken the taste buds. Think Café’s sandwiches are hard to beat. 302 W. 5th St. Suite 105, San Pedro • (310) 519-3662

To Advertise in Random Lengths News’ Restaurant Guide for the Harbor Area, Call (310) 519–1442.

Toulouse Engelhardt: The Segovia of Surf by: B. Noel Barr, The Music Writer Dude

of the area like everywhere were into whatever was current. Surf music was on the wane and the British invasion had begun, the AM top 40 was king. In a world that changing rapidly and tastes in music turned on a dime, Dylan would break out of his folk period and go electric. The folk rock band The Byrds had a huge hit with Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man.” That same year they would play Palos Verdes High School. Toulouse heard the sound of Roger McGuinn’s 12 string Rickenbacker guitar it was magic. It would be 10 years and Toulouse Engelhardt would open for the very last concert of the Byrds. “I not only played the group’s last gig ever, but I opened for every individual member of the Byrds over the last 40 years,” Engelhardt said. A night in mid-60s Hermosa Beach and Wes Montgomery is playing. The underage Engelhardt is standing outside the back of Howard Rumsey’s Lighthouse. Seated on the back doorway to the once pre-eminent jazz club was the jazz guitar giant. Engelhardt said that Montgomery had seen him back behind the club. Engelhardt asked Wes how he made those octaves. “Wes reached around the corner and pulled his guitar out and showed me how he did that. It was my first lesson from someone like that,” Engelhardt said. Other great lessons came from Larry Carlton and of course John Fahey, impressing upon Engelhardt technique and improvisation. What you will experience at Alvas showroom will be nothing short of spectacular. Engelhardt is a musical rebel in field of instrumentalists who play the catchy tunes that are great, but are not daring. Expect an evening of great guitar playing filled with fun and musical adventure. Details: www.alvasshowroom.com

from page 11.

around the country to spread importance of music education and inspire kids to follow their dreams and play musical instruments. I feel there is a big need in the school system nowadays with all the budget cuts and with the economy, arts are suffering the most. There are so many schools out there that don’t have a music program now and these kids are the future. I came from a school system with a music program so I want to do whatever I can to give back and make a difference with this younger generation. So, that’s why I started this campaign; to inspire kids to follow their dreams even if it’s not music. But just to expose them to jazz and about following their passions that’s why I do it.

months to start working on my next project. I’m not 100 percent sure what direction it’s going to go in but with each album I strive to do something different and stretch myself musically and do things I haven’t done before. So I’m really excited to work on this next project because I’m trying to work with different artists and producers just going for a different sound.

MP: I understand you just came out to [live in] Los Angeles in April, what do you want to do out here? ED: I’ve been in Tampa, Florida since I was 3 years old. I was always coming out here for shows and recording and there are so many more opportunities here in LA than there are in Florida. I just feel I need to be here and take advantage of those opportunities and spend more time in LA. I’m definitely at a point in my career [where] I want to expand and diversify. LA gives me that opportunity.

MP: Is there anything you want to let your fans know? ED: I love to connect with my fans they’re truly the reason why I to do what I get to do. And I love to stay in touch with them; they can always reach me on Facebook and Twitter. I love to get their feedback. There’s something about being able to connect with people through music, that’s why I love it. You can express yourself in different ways that you can’t through your voice or other ways, music gives you that outlet. To be able to connect with people on a personal level in that way really amazes me. I just thank the fans for their continuous support and definitely ask that they keep in touch. I have a website which is ericdarius.com, they can find out where I’m performing and see what’s new there. I look forward to seeing everyone and continue to follow my journey and the best is yet to come.

Eric Darius Caribbean Island flavor with a funky guitar and heavy percussion. It was an interesting fusion of smooth jazz and reggae that was perfect for the laid-back Rainbow Lagoon setting and the audience was into the prolonged groove. The main thing I took away from the show was that Darius isn’t just a hardworking entertainer. He’s a hardworking man committed to providing opportunities. That became evident when I pulled him aside for a brief chat after his show. Darius learned to play the saxophone at 10 and began seriously writing music at 12. As a youngster, Darius played in Americas Youngest Jazz Band, a youth band for ages 5 through 12 years old that played straight ahead jazz, dixieland and swing music. The band traveled around the world, including the Montreux Jazz festival in Switzerland when he was just 11 years old, in 1995. It was this experience that led him to launch a national music education tour while promoting On a Mission. During each visit, he would not only perform for the students and share his story with them, but also perform with students from their music department. I was able to connect with him after he had signed CDs for the folks purchasing them at the event. I wanted to ask Darius about a project he initiated with schools around the country to inspire and educate kids about music. Melina Paris: So can you elaborate on the project that you initiated with schools? Eric Darius: Sure, I just started a new campaign that’s called On a Mission, for schools

MP: How did you end up coming to the Jazz Festival this year? ED: I’ve been doing the jazz fest for a while; the first time was about 7 years ago. Al Williams has been strong supporter of my music and my career, he’s always believed in me from day one so he keeps bringing me back. This is the fourth year I’ve been here. MP: What’s coming up next for you? ED: I’m getting into the studio in the next few

MP: I liked the reggae number (Kingston’s Flavor). ED: Oh, thank you I love reggae music. I come from a Caribbean background, my dad’s from Haiti. My mom is from Jamaica. I have strong reggae, Caribbean music roots so I like to incorporate that music whenever I can.

September 22

Festival Gay Latino Check out the Festival Gay Latino in Long Beach, from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sept. 22, at Marina Green Park. Cumbia diva Vilma Diaz and La Sonora will headline the festival. This event will benefit California Families in Focus, an organization that serves the needs of families and children in the Long Beach area. California Families in Focus is known for their many charitable events such as the annual Spirit of Christmas Brunch, which serves over 700 children and families during the holiday season. They are committed to serving the community with leadership development, gang prevention, youth advocacy, youth mentoring, health/nutrition programs, conferences and workshops. The event will include live performances, specialty foods, teen and children areas and health screenings. Details: www.lbfestivallatino.com Venue: Marina Green Park Location: 386 E. Shoreline Dr., Long Beach

September 28

Swing Peedro at People’s Palace With LA’s Hottest Swing Band, “The Swing of Things,” featuring Barry Anthony and Silvia Rodriguez. It all starts at 7 p.m. Free lesson for all levels. Cost is $20. Details: (310) 547-2348 Venue: People’s Yoga Health & Dance Location: 365 W. 6th St., San Pedro

Theater/Film September 21

Bach at Leipzig - Little Fish Theatre It’s 1722 and seven rival musicians are blackmailing, bribing and double-crossing one another to win the most coveted position in Leipzig, Germany: Organmaster of St. Thomas’s Cathedral. Runs from Sept. 21 to Oct 27. Talk Back with the director and actors, Oct. 14 following the 7 p.m. performance. Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., Oct. 7 at 7 p.m., and Oct. 14 at 2 and 7 p.m. General admission is $25, seniors and students $23. Details: (310) 512-6030; www.littlefishtheatre.org Venue: Little Fish Theatre Location: 777 Centre St. (at 8th St.), San Pedro

Art

Nate Jones’ Industrial/Abstract

TransVagrant and Warschaw Gallery will be exhibiting Industrial / Abstract, recent works of Nate Jones. The artist’s reception will be on Saturday, Sept. 29, from 4 to 7 p.m. Selfdescribed “tire man” Nate Jones found his work environment and its ubiquitous rubber shavings ripe for reassignment. The impulse of Arte Povera (or “impoverished art”) is referenced here for its rejection of the scientific rationalism and technological design prevalent in Modernist art of the 50s and 60s, as well as its embrace of unconventional and commonplace materials often presented in absurd, jarring and comical works of assemblage and sculpture. Nate Jones successfully assimilates these strategies in an exhibition of quirky works that mine the potential of the discarded, the remnant or byproduct. Tire shavings are colorized (or not), manipulated and assembled, often with expressionist zeal, to mime conventional painting and sculpture with equal shares of irreverence, intelligence and wit. Venue: TransVagrant and Warschaw Gallery Location: 600 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

September 21 – October 4, 2012

different musical voice. I had not heard this name in many years, on the other end of the phone was Toulouse Engelhardt. A lifelong steel string, finger picker was returning to where his life in music had started all those years ago. “I’m returning to the South Bay to play for my friends and extended musical family,” Engelhardt. “I had not been here since I played Brixton in Redondo Beach, a couple of years ago with David Lindley.” Lindley who has become a sort of mentor to Engelhardt said, “I don’t understand why you are not playing Carnegie Hall.” Engelhardt replied, “I don’t have a good national booking agent.” However throughout the years, Engelhardt has been playing to delighted audiences around the world. I asked about how he got started playing. “Both my parents are very musical, my mother was an opera singer,” he said. “My dad played a tenor guitar; it is like a giant ukulele. My dad played a lot of Django Reinhardt stuff. “He supported himself through college at Berkeley in the 1930’s playing in a jazz quintet. Therefore, it was always around me. I was in a musical environment it was very encouraging for me. I never had any lessons except for the really famous ones.” Engelhardt grew up on the Palos Verdes Peninsula in a time when the working class aerospace workers just wanted to move to the country and not be far from work. The children

Community/Family

“Corporations are people, my friend.” –Mitt Romney

The sound of a 12- string guitar ripples like a mountain stream or thunders like the ocean against the cliffs of Point Fermin. Toulouse Engelhardt is a master artisan who can create such dynamics across a fret board. His fingers flying in octave busting harmonics in a kind of gleeful reverie that leaves one wondering how any person could play guitar like Toulouse Engelhardt. The moniker, “Segovia of Surf” applies here with honest dignity to this amazing guitarist. Engelhardt uses a rolling fingerstyle that is more closely associated with the great classical master Segovia, rather than a style of most acoustic folk players. His use of harmonics, octaves, in play with original and non-original material makes him one the most innovative players out there. Engelhardt is out supporting his latest CD Toulouslogy and is playing Alvas Showroom on Sept. 28. Any true guitar enthusiast or music lover of any stripe should not miss this event. There was a group of guitarists known throughout the world as the Tacoma 7. The Tacoma reference is a record label run by master guitarist John Fahey. I heard Fahey play at the old Ash Grove in Los Angeles. I considered him as the greatest guitarist I had ever heard. The man considered himself in guitar style an American primitive. Fahey would become a mentor to the young Engelhardt. Engelhardt would become a label mate with Fahey, the legendary Leo Kottke and 4 other epic guitarists; these men served a

Calendar from page 15.

17

The Vote/Why Vote?

from p. 7

By Danny Simon, Contributing Writer

Los Angeles Doctor Convicted of Defrauding Medicare

Trailblazing Black Leaders Speak

September 21 - October 4, 2012

“I’m running for office for Pete’s sake, we can’t have illegals”

On Sept. 8, the California African American Museum presented the second of its three part series of panel discussions entitled, “The Vote/Why Vote? Black Politics—Past, Present, & Future.” Moderator USC Vice President Emerita Carolyn Webb Macias led a panel that featured former Los Angeles City Council members Robert C. Farrell and Nathaniel R. Holden, and former U.S. Ambassador to Micronesia and former Congresswoman Diane Watson. The panel described by Macias as “living history and living legends” addressed a wide range of issues including leadership, political gamesmanship, and the re-election campaign of President Barack Obama. “Politics is all about power,” says Holden of a leader’s ability to affect change just by picking up the phone and knowing who to call on the behalf of a constituent. Political access up and down the ladder of power is the key. Holden referred to a phone call between President Jimmy Carter and himself that was the result of Holden’s marshalling of political muscle. Holden argues that political leadership has to cultivate a line of succession so that progress is created intergenerationally. He proudly listed off his political heirs which includes his son, Chris Holden who is running for the 41st seat in the State Assembly. Political power is captured through diligent coalition building, Holden as-

18

serts, and then passed on to the next generation. “When you are a representative, you have the power to speak for the voiceless,” says Watson. Trained as an educator, she recalls her reluctance to run for her first political position, a seat on the Los Angeles Board of Education. She was convinced to enter the political arena by a relentless group of community voices who trusted her to fight on Former Los Angeles City Councilmembers Robert C. Farrell and Nathaniel Holden, their behalf. Watson gracious- and former Congresswoman Diane Watson were part of a Sept. 8 forum presented the California African American Museum. The panel was the second of a threely thanked political leadership by part series of panel discussions entitled, “The Vote/Why Vote? Black Politics like Holden and Mervyn Dy- Past, Present, & Future.” Photo: Danny Simon. mally for “passing the baton” swing states where Republican leadership is attempting to and “paving the way.” As the first African American woman to serve disenfranchise aspects of the black vote with legal pracin the State Senate, Watson recalls suffering end- tices that harken back to the era of Jim Crow. The panel addressed the “Bradley Factor,” wherein less racial abuse. She found that writing down that abuse on yellow legal pads allowed her to white voters tell pollsters that they will vote for a black transcend. Advising would-be politicians, Watson candidate and then proceed to vote for a white candidate. says, “you have to put your head in the air and It’s widely believed that former L.A. Mayor Tom Bradley lost both his gubernatorial runs because his organization know who you are and go out and get the vote.” Inevitably, the discussion moved from per- misunderstood the depth of his base’s support. Holden is sonal biography and legacy maintenance to the concerned that the President might find himself in similar re-election campaign of President Barack Obama. waters and broadly asserted that Bradley’s defeat and quite Holden called for tenacious ground action in key possibly the President’s would be the result of organizational over-confidence or incompetence. Farrell was responsible for getting out the black and brown vote to support Bradley in 1982. In responding to Holden’s broad attack, Farrell deftly explained that conflicting political agendas within the Democratic Party—the issue of gun control in 1982—can weaken a campaign’s strength and blur it’s message. “My desire to participate is to be in the acquisition and sharing of power,” says Farrell who’s long career includes the roles of freedom rider, journalist and long-standing member of the Los Angeles City Council. Farrell describes himself as a political tactician who eschews ideology in favor of winning the horse races by bringing out the vote. But winning the vote is not enough, asserts Farrell. Whether addressing basic concerns like road paving or urgently demanding police reform, Farrell believes that, at heart, a good leader must understand the needs of his or her constituency. All three panelists rose to power by cultivating the support of black constituencies amid a period of profound change in the racial nature of Los Angeles politics. Identity politics is a constant issue for black politicians whose loyalty seems too often suspect. During Q & A, the panel addressed questions about the president and identity politics reflecting the questions of those in attendance, the larger black community, perhaps including those on the radio. Vocal critics within the black community have criticized the President for not specifically addressing the concerns of aspects of his black base; for example, the President’s continuation of the War on Drugs. “We don’t need a black agenda,” says Watson of politically divisive run along racial lines. She argues that the President’s agenda is all encompassing, even if she continues to be personally invested in the upliftment of aspects of the black community that continues to suffer. Farrell voices understandable skepticism of partisanship. He asserted that local politics is unique with unique concerns that are sometimes lost in the larger contests. In light of the fierce obstructionist partisanship the President faces in both the House and the Senate, the panel asserts that American’s understand the President’s role in history. While no longer defined by intoxicating hope, the President follows his pursuit of the possible following in the footsteps of the political leadership that preceded him, the panel in collective spirit.

LOS ANGELES—A doctor already serving a lengthy prison sentence in a narcotics case has been convicted of health care fraud for submitting approximately $1 million in fraudulent bills to Medicare in just 7 months. After less than a day of deliberations, a federal jury on Monday afternoon convicted Dr. Owusu Ananeh Firempong of five counts of health care fraud. Firempong, 61, who resided in the Crenshaw district of Los Angeles and had been practicing in Los Angeles for more than three decades, submitted fraudulent bills for nerve conduction tests and sleep studies that were never performed. As a result of the fraudulent bills, Medicare paid him nearly $700,000. During a four-day trial in U.S. District Court, prosecutors presented evidence that Firempong obtained information about Medicare beneficiaries who were not his patients and then used that information to bill Medicare. The evidence presented at trial showed that Firempong repeatedly lied to Medicare about services he claimed to have provided at clinic locations from which he had been evicted. The jury also heard expert testimony from a neurologist about Firempong’s patient files, which contained so many internal inconsistencies and improbably identical results that they appeared to have been a “copy-and-paste job.” As a result of the guilty verdicts, Firempong faces up to 50 years in federal prison. Firempong is scheduled to be sentenced on Dec. 10.

Occupy Wall Street’s One Year Anniversary

New York—A New York University professor, a group of veterans and an artist featured in The Nation magazine in September were among more than 100 people arrested Sept. 17 as Occupy Wall Street marked its first anniversary with various demonstrations in New York City. “Just grabbed off sidewalk, along with everyone else,” artist Molly Crabapple said on Twitter shortly after being picked up by police. She continued tweeting from the back of a police van—“Everyone in this police van is wicked smart and funny except for the driver,” she said at one point—before other activists said her phone was shut off. Crabapple had recently contributed illustrations as part of the magazine’s Sept. 24 coverage of the movement’s first anniversary and possible future. Gideon Oliver, president of the New York chapter of the National Lawyers Guild said more than 70 arrests had been reported by 10 a.m. EST. Elsewhere, Jacobin magazine founding editor Bhaskar Sunkara reported that New York University Social and Cultural Analysis professor Andrew Ross, was arrested as part of a demonstration in the lobby of the JP Morgan Chase building on Park Avenue. “Cops are never friendly, but these cops aren’t cops,” Sunkara said. “They’re militarized beyond comprehension.”

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CA 90731. Registered Owners(s): Joanne Marie Califano, 314 S. John Way, San Pedro, CA 90732. Business was conducted by an individual. I declare that all information in this statement is rue and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.)S/ Joanne M. Califano, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles County on July 17, 2012. Original filing: 07/26/12,

08/09/12, 08/23/12, 09/06/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 201213388 The following person is doing business as: Trinkets n Treasures, 1909 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: MaryAnn Califano, 1134 W. 21st, San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) MaryAnn Califano, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 3, 2012. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement gener-

continued on following page

September 21 - October 4, 2012

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS from p. 19 ally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 08/09/12, 08/23/12,

09/06/12, 09/20/12

September 21 - October 4, 2012

“I’m running for office for Pete’s sake, we can’t have illegals”

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012138545 The following person is doing business as: International Motors, International Motors U.C.S. 1600 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Antonio Marchione, 4609 W. Carson St., Torrance, CA 90503. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: 1996. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Antonio Machione, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 10, 2012. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration.The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 08/09/12,

20

08/23/12, 09/06/12, 09/20/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012153082 The following person is doing business as: Peninsula Mortuary Transport, 1840 Gaffey St. #226, San Pedro, CA

90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Joseph Voss, 1840 Gaffey #381 St. San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Joseph Voss, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 10, 2012. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 08/09/12, 08/23/12,

09/06/12, 09/20/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012153081 The following person is doing business as: Elite BodyShock Performance, Champion Bodyshock Performance, 2424 S. Carolina St., San Pedro, CA 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Mario Shaw, 2424 S. Carolina St., San Pedro, CA 90731,. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Mario Shaw, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on July 31, 2012. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the

use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 08/09/12, 08/23/12, 09/06/12, 09/20/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012157138 The following person is doing business as: Galope Property Services, 905 W. 25th Street, San Pedro, CA, 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Anthony Galope, 905 W. 25th Street, San Pedro, CA, 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: NA. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Anthony Galope, Partner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on August 6, 2012. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920. were to expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 08/23/12,09/06/12,0 9/20/12,10/4/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012173918 The following person is doing business as: Elite Dance Studio, 805. Deep Valley Dr., RHE, CA 90274, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Dyan Lopez-Flamengo, 24602 Ravenna Ave., Carson, CA 90745. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: NA. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Dyan Lopez-Flamengo, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on August 29, 2012. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the

date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920 were to expire 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing:09/06/12,09/20/12,10 /4/12, 10/18/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012176107 The following person is doing business as: Alka Pi Water RPV, 29505 S. Western Ave. Ste#104, Rancho Palos Verdes,CA 90275, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Kenneth Roy Brewer, 924 S. Wycliff Ave., San Pedro, CA 90732. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above: NA. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Kenneth Roy Brewer, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on August 31, 2012. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920 were to expire 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing:09/06/12,09/20/12,10 /4/12, 10/18/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012168860 The following person is doing business as: Kids Resource, 4401 Palos Drive East, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: LSKO, 4401 Palos Drive East, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275. This Business is conducted by a corporation. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious

business name or names listed above: NA. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Laura Schneider, Secretary/Treasurer. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on August 21, 2012. Notice-In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920 were to expire 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing:09/06/12,09/20/12,10

name or names listed above: January 1, 2000. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Angelo Bacoulis, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on September 13, 2012. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920 were to expire 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 09/20/12,10/4/12,

/4/12, 10/18/12

10/18/12, 11/01/2012

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012183675 The following person is doing business as: Tommys Famous Burgers of San Pedro, 1141 S. Gaffey Street, San Pedro, CA, 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Angelo Bacoulis, 17842 Arvida Dr., Grenada Hills, CA 91344. This Business is conducted by a husband and wife. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious business

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012177138 The following person is doing business as: B & D Treasures, 719 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA, 90731, Los Angeles County. Registered owners: Brandi Rayann Barnard, 772 10th Street, Apt. #4, San Pedro, CA 90731. This Business is conducted by an individual. The date registrant started to transact business under the fictitious

business name or names listed above: NA. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information which he or she knows to be false is guilty of a crime.) Brandi Rayann Barnard, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on September 4, 2012. Notice--In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920. A fictitious name statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the county clerk, except as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920 were to expire 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 1411 ET SEQ., Business and Professions code). Original filing: 09/20/12,10/4/12,

10/18/12, 11/01/2012

LEGAL FILINGS RECIRCULATED DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT for the SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA INTERNATIONAL GATEWAY PROJECT

‘H

By Danny Simon, Contributing Writer

istory is a continuing narrative,” says local historian, Robert Lee Johnson, “It’s a continuing story and if you pay attention to it, you can see where you fit into that continuing story.” In Images of America: Compton, Johnson relates the city’s history and how it transformed from a land of dreams to a city of nightmares, both real and perceived. It took a year for Johnson to produce the slim picture-driven narrative. But he has spent a lifetime contemplating how the city’s history and his own personal narrative fit into the larger story of America. Inspired by tracks laid by A. Philip Randolph, Johnson’s maternal grandfather experienced life outside the South, while working on the railroad. He migrated to Los Angeles before the start of World War II, as part of the Great Migration of blacks who left the South behind in search of a better life. “My family fled Jim Crow in the South and met James Crow Esquire in Los Angeles,” says Johnson, employing a black migrant euphemism that described a racism that was more sophisticated but not necessarily less limiting than its Southern relative. Though Johnson’s family and many black migrants found opportunity in Los Angeles, they also found legal and extralegal barriers to upward mobility, including restrictive housing covenants, discriminatory lending practices, prejudicial employment practices, and a racist police force. After restrictive housing covenants were deemed unenforceable in 1948, black families like Johnson’s were able to purchase homes in cities like Compton where they had previously been barred from residing.

Photo: Danny Simon

Drawn to Compton by the same allure of safety and stability that had inspired the city’s original inhabitants, Johnson’s middle class family found a good life in the multi-racial bedroom community, albeit an idyllic suburbia marred by racial hostility. For his book cover, Johnson chose a photograph, “circa 1962,” which depicts a busy downtown and a thriving economic base. If that picture

Johnson/ to p. 22

“…and had he [George Romney] been born of, uh, Mexican parents, I’d have a better shot at winning this.”

Notice is hereby given that under the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the City of Los Angeles Harbor Department has prepared a Recirculated Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Southern California International Gateway (SCIG) Project. The Project includes construction and operation of a railyard located between the Pacific Coast Highway to the south, the Dominquez Channel to the west, SR-47 to the east and Sepulveda Boulevard to the north. Copies of the Recirculated Draft EIR are available for review at: Los Angeles Public Library, San Pedro Branch, 921 South Gaffey St., San Pedro, California; Los Angeles Public Library, Wilmington Branch, 1300 North Avalon Blvd, Wilmington, California; Carson Library, 23317 Avalon Blvd. Carson California; Long Beach Main Library, 101 Pacific Ave. Long Beach, California; Bret Harte Neighborhood Library, 1595 Willow St., Long Beach, California; and Los Angeles Harbor Department, Environmental Management Division, 222 W. 6th Street, Suite 1080, San Pedro, California. The public notice and the document are available at the Port of Los Angeles web site: http://www.portoflosangeles.org under the Environment/CEQA EIR Projects tab. A public hearing on the Recirculated Draft EIR will be held on October 18, 2012 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm at Banning’s Landing Community Center, 100 E. Water Street, Wilmington, California. Written comments on the Recirculated Draft EIR will be received until November 9, 2012 and should be sent to: Christopher Cannon, Director of Environmental Management, Port of Los Angeles, 425 South Palos Verdes Street, San Pedro CA 90731 or via e-mail to ceqacomments@portla.org. Comments sent via email should include the project title in the e-mail’s subject line and a valid mailing address within the email. For additional information, please contact Lisa Ochsner at the Port of Los Angeles at (310) 732-3675. CD-15

Historian Robert Lee Johnson

had been taken in the late 1970s, Johnson asserts, it would show an empty ghost town. The dominos fell hard and fast for Compton in the intervening years and Johnson was an eyewitness. During the first decade of the new millennium before the current economic crisis, Compton was making a comeback. With white flight and the steady shrinking of Los Angeles’s manufacturing sector, Compton suffered. But because Compton’s demographics changed from white to black, Compton’s troubles were racially type-caste. “When the city elects a black mayor, in the media’s eyes, it’s now a black city with all of the ensuing stereotypes,” says Johnson. “The first one being incompetence.” The city’s leadership changed from white to black in 1969 with the election of Mayor Douglas Dollarhide, the first black mayor in California state history. When Compton became known as a black city, Johnson asserts, it looked less attractive to prospective business owners and private investors. The effects of the economic decline changed the nature of what it meant to be a kid in Compton. Libraries shortened their hours and many civic organizations cut their after school programs. A naturally curious child, Johnson’s passion for history and culture was enriched when his junior high school class made field trips to the Dominguez Adobe and to the Ford and GM auto factories.

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from p. 21

Johnson

As a high school student during Compton’s slow descent, Johnson was largely immune to the effects of program cuts, but he recalls wondering what would happen to younger students who weren’t given the opportunity to see firsthand, the connection between history and industry. A few years later, Mayor Lionel Cade streamlined the budget in response to the economic decline. But while this was fiscally responsible, it left the city’s civic life vulnerable. “Compton already had the fat knocked out of it so Proposition 13 [took] the meat.” Coming of age at the end of the ‘60s, Johnson sensed that he was a breathing contradiction to the American mythology of fairness and equal-

ity. Race consciousness defined the culture of the times and it led Johnson to more questions than answers. Johnson was resistant to polarized explanations that relied only on race. Uncertain as how to understand his place in history, he cast about for information. His quest for knowledge was catalyzed when he was directly confronted by racial violence. “On Dec. 2, 1972, a good friend of mine’s younger sister, who was 14-years-old, was shot in the head by a sheriff’s deputy in front of her house, while her mother was being brutalized by a second deputy,” Johnson relates, “That was just a couple of doors down.” The death of Marquita Faust still haunts Johnson. As the deputy that killed Faust was black and the deputy that beat her mother was white, Johnson recalled how a strict racial analysis was both

unhelpful and unsatisfying to his younger self. “I had to figure out how to define that phenomena,” says Johnson. A year before the murder, Johnson participated in the Black Panther Party breakfast program in Watts. After the murder, Johnson participated in a local anti-police brutality group and increased his activity with the Black Panthers. He became an official party member in 1976. “The only people who were making to me what became a correct analysis, which was not a skin color analysis, was the Black Panther Party.” The party was the target of covert action by the government via programs like the FBI’s COINTELPRO, and overt attacks by a complicit media that distorted the views and actions of the Black Panther Party. Johnson describes that in reality, the socialist organization worked to aid and empower poor inner city communities. Johnson argues that despite the media-generated image, the Black Panther Party stressed to its members the importance of anti-dogmatic pragmatism

and deep intellectual exploration: knowledge is power. In the decades since leaving the Party, Johnson has written and lectured on the history of Los Angeles and the Black Panther Party. Guided by an internal intellectual skepticism, Johnson continues to believe in the Panther’s underlying philosophy. “If we’re all in a boat and we find that it’s sinking,” says Johnson in summation, “instead of fighting amongst ourselves, the thing we need to figure out is how to keep the boat afloat.” On Oct. 11, the Cal State University Dominguez Hills Archives & Special Collections will host a book signing event where Pat Prescott (94.7-FM The Wave) will interview Robert Lee Johnson. The CSUDH Archives invites members of the public to bring photographs (scanners will be available) and other memorabilia to enhance the archive of Compton and the South Bay. (See Community Announcements, page 2.)

from p. 7

September 21 - October 4, 2012

“I’m running for office for Pete’s sake, we can’t have illegals”

Faith

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formation on the availability of shelter beds for domestic violence victims, which it said was woefully inadequate. The 2011 Greater Los Angeles Homeless County Report stated that with only 600 domestic violence shelter beds across Los Angeles County, and an estimated 4,610 homeless domestic victims, six out of seven domestic violence victims have no safe place to go. Jackson said violence is something that is stigmatized and usually perceived by the broader society as a lower-class problem.  But in fact, violence has no economic barriers. That is why it was important to make the forum faith-based, she said. “I realized that we are not as a society going to address violence unless we go to a place where most people give respect and homage to, because our society is based on that respect and that is the church,” Jackson said. “That faith-based involvement needed to be there in order for us to seriously began talking about violence on the many

levels that we all face.” The forum begins at 10 a.m. that will involve speakers from Peace Over Violence, the San Pedro Rainbow Services, The Center in Long Beach, a Redondo Beach registered dietitian, an employment sexual harassment legal advocate, and a member of the American Public Health Association’s Committee on Women’s Rights. Local therapists and community organization representatives will also be present. The event also will include art presentations, spoken word, entertainment, and a small group discussion on overcoming emotional and physical pain.  Jackson’s goal is simple. “Touching one person or more to understand that they can seek help and/or get out of a situation that is uncomfortable for them, so that they can live a healthier life,” Jackson said. Details: (310) 366-4996 Venue: Pacific Unitarian Church Location: 5621 Montemalaga Drive, Rancho Palos Verdes

“…and had he [George Romney] been born of, uh, Mexican parents, I’d have a better shot at winning this.”

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September 21 - October 4, 2012

“I’m running for office for Pete’s sake, we can’t have illegals”


RLn 09-20-12 Edition