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Residents Offer Own Picks for Harbor Commission p. 2

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Final Chapter Closes on Williams’ Books p. 3 This Is Not the Lone Ranger of Yesteryear p.11

The Local Publication You Actually Read

By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

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July 12 - 25, 2013

his past November, California voters approved Proposition 30, raising sales and income taxes, with the express purpose of restoring education funding. The vast majority of new revenues were to be coming from those earning $500,000 or more. The priorities expressed in the vote have broad popular support, both in California and throughout the United States, but this was the only such measure passed anywhere in the country. Leading grassroots organizers who helped make it happen said it’s only the beginning at a panel discussion titled, “The California Comeback: How Progressives Stopped California’s Decline,” on June 22, at Netroots Nation in San Jose. In the corporate media, Prop. 30 is virtually synonymous with Gov. Jerry Brown, but it’s actually a compromise Brown was forced to strike with a coalition of progressive groups who began circulating a petition for a millionaire’s tax in early 2012. The compromise forced Brown to withdraw his own, more modest initiative, and negotiate the much more progressive measure, which voters ended up approving by a nine percent margin. Initially, Brown refused to meet with the millionaires’ tax organizers. 1 California Comeback/ to p. 10

HARBOR AREA Committed to independent journalism in the Greater LA/LB Harbor Area for more than 30 years

Residents Speak Out About Who Should Steer POLA Into Future By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor A key question for the Eric Garcetti administration in the Harbor Area will be the direction of the Port of Los Angeles. On the one hand, the port’s environmental

Community Announcements:

Harbor Area Los Angeles Celebrates Nelson Mandela

Celebrate the life of President Nelson Mandela who is hospitalized in critical condition in South Africa. Mandela’s life, legacy and values, in cooperation of the South African government and the African National Congress, will be celebrated at a series of events: • July 12—First AME Church - 6 p.m. 2270 S Harvard Blvd, Los Angeles • July 13— Leimert Park Village - 2 p.m. 4318 Degnan Blvd., Los Angeles • July 14—First Church of God - 11 a.m. 9550 Crenshaw Blvd., Inglewood • July 14 —Watts Labor Community Action Committee - 4 p.m. 800 E 111th Pl, Los Angeles

Cuba Caravan Cultural Night

Come learn how Cuba and the rest of Latin America are breaking free from over 100 years of control by the United States government and military, yet remaining friends of the American people. The event will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. on July 12 at Random Lengths News, located at 13th and Pacific in San Pedro. Hosted by Pastors for Peace and Witness for Peace. Venue: Random Lengths News Location: 1300 Pacific Ave., San Pedro

July 12 - 25, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Adobe Museum Seeks Tour Docents

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Community members interested in volunteering to share the story of a beautiful historical landmark are invited to attend a docent training session at the Dominguez Rancho Adobe Museum from 10 a.m. to noon July 13. The museum is looking for history enthusiasts and those with a passion for storytelling to help bring the history of Rancho San Pedro and the Dominguez Adobe to life. Public tour docents present the stories of the Rancho, the Dominguez family and the 1910 International Air Meet within the context of the development of Southern California. Docents conduct tours of the Adobe for the public at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. every Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday, as well as the first Thursday and Friday of every month. Details: (310) 603-0088; www.dominguezrancho.org Venue: Rancho Adobe Museum Location: 18127 S. Alameda St., Rancho Dominguez

Sierra Club Open House

Join the Sierra Club at an open house, from 6 to 9 p.m. July 24, in San Pedro. Talk to local leaders who work to preserve and restore the few remaining “wild” places in communities. Details: (310) 832-0013; (310) 378-8723 Location: 3462 Almeria St., San Pedro

City Stage Summer Camp

The City Stage Summer Camp is offering free dance, music and theatre instruction for teenagers ages 12 through 18. The camp runs 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 29 and Aug. 2. Details: (323) 491-4730 Location: 801 E. 4th Pl., Los Angeles

practices have improved significantly since the Riordan years. On the other, there are troubling signs of backsliding, highlighted by the unprecedented array of lawsuits against BNSF’s proposed off-dock rail yard—including a civil rights complaint—and the preemptory abolition of the Port Community Advisory Committee. Since the first order of business is staffing the new administration, Random Lengths asked a number of local residents for their thinking on who they think Mayor-elect Garcetti should appoint to the Harbor Commission. “He needs to appoint someone who has an understanding of global economics and trade— and particularly the fact that in the world we live in there’s an international division of labor,” said labor lawyer Diane Middleton, who went on to point out that shipbuilding has “gone to other countries. We don’t build big ships the way we used to. So talking about the port, and why isn’t there a shipyard here, isn’t going to make sense,” although “On the other hand, there’s certainly a need for ship repair.” In 2007, the United States accounted for only 3 percent of worldwide shipbuilding, compared to 25 percent in South Korea and another 26 percent split between China and Japan. But 10 European countries combine for roughly 30 percent of the total—10 times what the United States produces. So, clearly, it’s not just the international labor

Dr. John Miller waits to testify in Sen. Barbara Boxer’s Senate field hearing at the POLA Board of Harbor Commissioners in 2007. Miller’s name was mentioned as top picks for the Harbor Commissions by local residents. Photo: Tom Politeo.

market, but also government policies that are involved. Middleton does have a point: without a substantial change in U.S. labor policy, it’s highly unrealistic to expect U.S. shipbuilding to return to San Pedro. And yet, changing policies on multiple levels is clearly part of what port leadership in the early 21st century is all about. And this takes us to the heart of the question, since almost everyone agrees on the broadest outlines, such as the need for the green growth—which Middleton went on to discuss—

but the differences arise in fleshing out what that means, specifically, and how to achieve it through multiple levels of action. Middleton cites Commission Vice President David Arian as ideally suited to such challenges, but others might be as well. Several individuals, including former PCAC co-Chairwoman June Smith, mentioned Richard Havenick’s name. “Someone like Dr. John Miller, Janet Gunter or Richard Havenick would be a big help to the community,” Smith said. Havenick was one of the first and most vocal advocates to promote the idea of low-sulfur fuels replacing bunker fuel about a decade ago, when the port declared it impossible. Then Maersk unilaterally committed itself to low-sulfur fuel. Now, there’s an international agreement phasing in, covering coastal shelf waters around the globe. That’s just one example of outside-the-box environmental advocacy from local grassroots activists, which is fast becoming standard policy. Jesse Marquez—another name mentioned repeatedly—has advocated a wide range of cutting-edge technologies, as well as spreading awareness of existing standard practices elsewhere. For example, the commonplace use of electric trains serving European ports. Marquez has already served on national and international bodies advancing environmental justice and environmental technology issues. While organized labor and environmental advocates have often been pitted against one another, the shipbuilding situation highlights the fact that labor desperately needs the sort of

Into the Future/ to p. 4

Ending the Chapter:

Williams’ Book Store Closes By Cory Hooker, Editorial Intern

Recently, a customer told Jerry Gusha, coowner of Williams’ Book Store, that he “doesn’t look that old,” in reference to Williams’ being open for 104 years. Jerry responded with, “Look at the painting in the back room,” a reference to Oscar Wilde’s 1890 classic, The Picture of Dorian Grey. In the story, Dorian does not age, instead a portrait of him does. As with Dorian Grey, the store hasn’t

It’s that kind of a vicious cycle.” Now, the 104-year-old bookstore is closing. “It’s sort of a triple whammy,” said Jerry. “It’s the bookstore business in general, the economy in general and downtown San Pedro. There’s just too many vacant stores. There’s not enough retail business to bring people down here.” Williams’ will stay open until San Pedro’s 125-anniversary celebration, which will take place during the first week of August. After that,

Anne Gusha, long time proprietor of Williams’ Book Store and Los Angeles City Councilman Joe Buscaino honoring her advocacy to restore Plaza Park on April 12, 2012. File photo.

Jerry is unsure. In an age where most people let their fingers do the walking, it seems online retailers like Amazon continue to pose a threat for local storefronts, especially for bookstores since the advent of e-readers. “As a book person, I don’t like them [e-readers],” Jerry said. “I can understand it though. I have one customer with macular degeneration. He uses the Kindle so he can change the size of the print, otherwise he can’t read a book. But most people I talk to prefer to read [a book].” A treasure of a store for most San Pedrans, Williams’ carries books written by local authors or vinyl records of local bands. Things you couldn’t find at any superstore. Jerry thinks that books will end up much like vinyl records, which have made a comeback since online music and CDs. “I don’t think we’ll ever get rid of books,” he said. “There will always be books. But it will go like vinyl records. They are making a comeback, but it’s never going to be like it [was]. It’s going to get worse.” Jerry has now been working full time at Williams’ for 42 years and added that he “doesn’t like changing jobs.” As of now, anything short of winning the lotto, as he says, he may have to.

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changed much over time since its humble beginnings. Rather, time and technology has seemingly caught up to Williams’. Williams’ Book Store in San Pedro is the latest bookstore casualty in the era of the ever present “e-reader” and online shopping, leaving this town with one less landmark. Opened in 1909 by E.T. Williams, a Welsh immigrant, Williams’ Book Store is considered the oldest continuously operating bookstore in Los Angeles. As a child, Anne Gusha made a home and a career out of Williams’. Anne began working at the bookstore part time and eventually became a full time employee after graduating from college. In 1980, she and her son, Jerry, took ownership of the store. For 33 years, Anne and Jerry have had to fight to keep it open with the introduction of mega-stores such as Crown Books, Borders and Barnes & Noble. “When they opened the big Barnes & Noble superstore in Torrance, our sales took a hit,” Jerry said. “It steadily declined with people going online, the Kindle...it just kept on going. You get to the bad point when your sales go down, so you don’t have the money to buy enough new books....So people don’t come in and buy them.

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from p. 2

Into the Future

July 12 - 25, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

outside-the-box thinking that local environmental activists have excelled at. Although struck down by the courts, the Clean Trucks Program’s employee mandate represented an all-too-rare example when labor and environmental activists joined together to redefine the context of the possible. That’s what many community activists

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want to see more of, including on the Harbor Commission. China Shipping plaintiff Janet Gunter— mentioned as a possible commissioner by June Smith and others—does not see herself as a good fit for the job, but does have a long list of suggestions. “The person filling the commission seat (in my view) needs enough backbone to stand up clearly for their determinations with honor, and not relinquish to political pressures,” Gunter said. In addition to Marquez and Havenick, she suggested Dr. John Miller, June Smith, Chuck Hart, Marcie Miller, Connie Rutter and Peter Warren. But the one potential candidate she focused the most attention on was Kathleen Woodfield. “Kathleen is an intelligent, practical and straightforward individual, who thinks in broad terms, with a mind toward the respect of all involved parties,” Gunter said. “She has integrity and honesty ingrained in her system and doesn’t surrender it under any circumstance.... She also has over a decade of experience in community activism with the Port of LA and knows very well the history of the Harbor and its communities.... Having Ms. Woodfield as a Harbor commissioner would energize the port’s professed desire to create a better relationship with the community. If that, indeed, is the intent of the port and city of LA, then the appointment of Ms. Woodfield would be a giant step in establishing that goal.” On the other hand, Pat Nave—a former port attorney, who’s spent most of the last decade as a neighborhood council activist—has more of an eye for what he sees as people who can get things done. He named some possible nominees: “Cindy Miscikowski, one of the best and fairest commissioners ever,” Nave said. “Tim McOsker, great background and good judgment.” Nave explained his first choice. “Cindy is polite, nice, runs a very good meeting, makes sure everyone has their say, has superior judgment and resolves many problems quietly, behind the scenes,” Nave elaborated. Others are significantly less impressed, however. “Cindy is the same old that we’ve had,” said

Peter Warren of Coastal San Pedro Neighborhood Council. “We need a change. “Cindy is the president who presided over the undoing of PCAC, and either planned it or assented to it. That’s not what we need going forward.” Warren also cited as “emblematic” that SCIG was approved under her leadership, a project that “has set a record for the quality and breadth of its opposition,” Warren said. He pointed out that “The AQMD for the first time in its history has sued a municipal agency over an environmental impact report.” They need a real community membership and perhaps three community-based members, who are responsive to the community.... Noel Park [a China Shipping co-plaintiff with Janet Gunter] comes to mind; Kathleen Woodfield has devoted herself and has turned herself into an expert on air pollution and other issues; Dr. John Miller, who is a physician who coined the phrase ‘the diesel death zone,’ which is probably the most appropriate name for what the port has created.” But Doug Epperhart, a former president of Coastal Neighborhood Council, takes a dramatically different view. “Honestly, I don’t know that it matters at all,” Epperhart said. “The reality is commissions like the Harbor Commission, the mayor tells you pretty much how you’re going to vote, and that’s pretty much how you vote. And, that’s just the way it is. I’m not terribly certain it matters an awful lot who serves on the Harbor Commission. “The more I have seen of city government from the inside, the more I realize that you don’t effect change from the inside; you effect it from the outside.... It would be much more effective— and the neighborhood councils have talked about it with the demise of PCAC—to at least have a group that is external to the port that has the ability to really seriously influence what’s done.” Still, there’s value in citing individuals who embody the kind of thinking we’d like to see Garcetti advance. Restaurateur Andrew Silber, who’s worn a variety of civic hats over the past decade-plus, sees dozens of possibilities representing different facets of the community. The top-tier candidates he cited include: Camilla Townsend, Carrie Scoville, Dave Arian, Dick McKenna, Doug Semark, Herb Zimmer, Linda Alexander, Mary Gimenez-Caulder, Paula Moore, Phil Trigas, Sue Castillo and Vernon Hall. But perhaps the most important recommendation is the one you make yourself. Individuals can volunteer to serve in the incoming administration, including seats on the Harbor Commission. Go to http://transition.lacity.org/, click on the link to “Join the Administration” and proceed from there.

Driver Falls into Harbor, Dies Trapped in Truck

SAN PEDRO—Truck driver Mark Passaro died July 1, trapped in his truck when it fell into the Los Angeles Harbor, officials said. Officials said that the 45-year-old Redondo Beach man’s truck plunged into the ocean at about 3 p.m. near the Evergreen Container Terminal. The truck was attached to a chassis when it entered the water without a container. The chassis and cab were found separately, officials said. A Los Angeles firefighter sustained minor injuries in an attempt to rescue Passaro. The cause of the incident still is under investigation, said Port of Los Angeles spokeswoman Rachel Campbell.

Pensioners Picket PMA

LONG BEACH—Union members are displaying their displeasure with the Pacific Maritime Association’s handling of their health care benefits by demonstrating in front of the PMA offices in Long Beach, San Francisco, Seattle and Tacoma, Wash. More than 100 members demonstrated locally in Long Beach (for photos of the protest see p. 6). Members of the ILWU Southern California Pensioners are upset because in January PMA changed its benefits administrator to Zenith American Solutions, which has delayed and even denied payments to members’ health care providers. “Some of our members are being taken into small claims and getting turned over to collection agencies,” said Greg Mitre, vice president of the ILWU Southern California Pensioners group. “To let a claim go past 90 days is putting undue burden on our members.” The situation has not improved, Mitre said. This past month union members picketed two terminals and no action on the Part of PMA or Zenith took place. There is a backlog of 141,000 claims, union members said. Demonstrators, who are not in direct talks with PMA or Zenith, say they want the claims paid immediately. The group is planning to protest through 8 a.m. July 12. “If we get a resolution by then, we’ll walk the pickets out,” Mitre said. “We are going to take whatever necessary steps are needed to take care of our members.”

Mayor Appoints Deputy Mayor, Interim Economic Development Manager

LOS ANGELES—On July 2, Mayor Eric Garcetti announced his choice for deputy mayor of city services. Garcetti chose 50-year-old Doane Liu, most recent chief of staff to Councilman Joe Buscaino. News Briefs/ to p. 6

Long Beach Community Gains Power through Friendship By Zamná Ávila, Assistant Editor

The Catalyst

have a more connected community, [be]cause I think anonymity breeds this type of stuff.” The group opted to take the asset-based community development approach. “The real goal is how do we create volitions for ourselves based upon the skills that we have, which are pretty abundant in our community.” Asset-based community development focuses on what a community has, rather than what it lacks, and utilizing those assets to better a community. The way it would work is by making new connections, making new relationships, forming new groups, training other people or even creating a space where local businesses recruit from within their neighborhood. “It’s not just being blind to the negative things

Friendships/ to . 7

Asset-based Community Development Their options were to either have a wellrespected community leader broker peace agreements among rival community members, which was beyond the group’s reach, or continue with the enforcement approach already in place. “Enforcement is a tool,” Fisher said. “For a long time it’s been the primary tool, if not the only tool…. There is already a space for that, but there hasn’t been that much of a space for self-determined empowerment. There is not as much of a conversation about what we can do for ourselves, as there is about what law enforcement can do for us.” While conditions in the neighborhood are continuously getting better, the challenge is moving forward while retaining its diversity. The fear is that a one-prong approach to fighting violence might lead to homogenizing of the community, where wealthier and more enfranchised community members price out people from the neighborhood, condensing poverty to certain areas of the city. The Friendship Neighborhood believes that creating opportunity for a connected community could ultimately lead to a place that rejects violence. “We don’t believe we will get rid of the violence, but we do strongly believe that we will reduce the violence,” Fisher said. “The only thing I can see that can possibly impact it, is to

Stay current with news, announcements and community events at http://tinyurl.com/rlnnews-announcements

July 12 - 25, 2013

About four years ago, Fisher and several of his peers moved to the neighborhood envisioning an improved sense of community in a diverse area of Long Beach. But recently, gun violence started becoming routine in Willmore City. In March, 23-year-old Nelson Suarez was shot and killed near 8th and Maine streets. At one point, the neighborhood was on lockdown by the police after a shoot-out, six days after the death of Suarez. What surprised Fisher is noticing the reaction from longtime residents. “Everyone was pretty nonchalant about it,” Fisher said. “This is not that odd to people who have lived in this neighborhood longer than I have and that’s not OK.” Property owners, managers and renters came together at a community meeting featuring Councilman Robert Garcia and Long Beach

Police Department representatives. “I left the meeting feeling very unsatisfied with the answers we got,” said Erin Foley, Willmore City resident and local organizer in a released statement. “The only solutions perpetuated seemed to be that of increased surveillance via video cameras and operating as a ‘nosy neighbor’ that reports any and everyone they think ‘doesn’t belong.’ How do I know who doesn’t belong just by looking at them? “I don’t want us all just peering through our window, afraid of everyone.” That’s when Foley, Fisher and other friends committed to doing something about it. “Because we love the neighborhood … we have these beautiful homes remaining in our neighborhood … and we want to continue living in the neighborhood,” Fisher said.

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When the Willmore City neighborhood was rocked with violence, residents didn’t settle for a police-state solution. “A lot of the existing power structure would suggest to you that as a neighbor, your role is really to call the cops on people you think might be doing something that is illegal,” said Ben Fisher, one of the organizing members of the Friendship Neighborhood, a recently formed group whose mission is to foster a safe and vibrant neighborhood. “A lot of the rhetoric that has existed is more about enforcement and that can be problematic, because if that’s the only tool that we have, maybe you’ll create an environment eventually that’s safer but it won’t be as diverse, it won’t be multicultural, it won’t have the flavor and interesting things that have really drawn me to the neighborhood.” The Friendship Neighborhood is using music, activities and shared skills to build community in the historic Willmore City area on the southwest side of Long Beach. The group is hosting a series of neighborhood festivals at Drake Park for neighbors to get to know each other, network and become a stronger, active community. “The outside game that we are working our way towards is an environment where through positive safe spaces and events we are able to create new relationships and grow our network,” said Fisher, 29. “And in that growth, be able to start attracting people with some common interests.” The first Friend Fest took place June 22, with live music, skill-sharing workshops on seed planting, do-it-yourself cleaning products presentations, reuse artwork, games, face painting and an open free market, thanks to a grant that Building Healthy Communities awarded to the group. “We like this kind of stuff,” said 61-year-old Sergio Hernandez, who came out with his wife to enjoy the music. “Sometimes you get informed about things you didn’t know about.” The fact that the event is free is an added asset to the festival. “It promotes positive ideas,” said Long Beach resident Vince Mosby. “Nobody is trying to make money out of anybody. They are just trying to use their resources for the community.”

that are going on, but it’s more about ‘what can we do for ourselves and what kind of skills and assets do we already have in our community to make it better for ourselves?’” Fisher explained. Asset sharing is not a new concept in the neighborhood, Fisher said. A group of mothers, Madres Unidas, in the neighborhood already have used the idea to help each other and their children with simple tasks, such as taking turns taking their children to school. The relative newcomers realized they were yet to be considered part of that neighborhood. They decided to make themselves known as a positive presence. They began with a monthly trash parade (cleanup), complete with music. The second step was to meet people and build relationships. The third step was to discuss their shared resources and assets. The fourth step is taking action. “What is unique is that we are going to have more of a democratic space for people to express what they need to express,” Fisher said. “We are

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ILWU Pensioners Protest Benefit Delays More than 100 members of the ILWU Southern California Pensioners demonstrated their displeasure with the Pacific Maritime Association’s handling of their health care benefits in Long Beach. PMA changed its benefits administrator to Zenith American Solutions, which has delayed and even denied payments to members’ health care providers. Photos: Slobodan Dimitrov.

It Can Happen Here—

Quebec Petroleum Blast Shakes Up Local Residents

July 12 - 25, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor “This is a first,” said Bernard Théberge, 44, a cook who lives on the outskirts of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, Canada. “Smoking saved my life.” The Quebec tourist town was rocked by

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massive oil explosions at 11 a.m. Eastern Time July 6, the Toronto Globe and Mail reported. Théberge had been out with friends at the Musi-Café, a popular hangout that was engulfed

in flames shortly after he stepped outside onto the patio for a smoke. More than 30 buildings were destroyed in the blast and the fires that followed, after 73 driverless train cars rolled into town without warning. It was a freakish way to escape death in a freakish accident, but freakish accidents involving petroleum products are all too common. They regularly arouse local activists who fear that something similar could happen here in San Pedro, specifically at the Rancho LPG facility, where multiple problems abound— not least—safety planning that flew in the face of the actual physical properties of the liquified gases involved: protane and butane. “I would urge Councilman [Joe] Buscaino, Congresswoman Hahn and Senators Boxer and Feinstein, to immediately call for a suspension of activity with the LPG tanks in northern San Pedro and find an alternate location for the millions of gallons butane and propane that these tanks hold,” said June Smith, president of Coastal San Pedro Neighborhood Council. “We have an ‘accident waiting to happen’ and should be smart enough to take actions to prevent a potential tragedy to our town and to the Port of Los Angeles.” “Remember that Rancho LPGs 25 million gallons of butane and 300,000 gallons of propane are surrounded on three sides by more jet propellants (in huge underground storage tanks across the street) at the Naval Fuel Depot (west) and a host of other types of oil and gases (including additional butane) at the abutting Phillips 66 refinery (north),” said homeowner activist Janet Gunter. “Let’s not forget the full array of marine oil terminals within a half-mile (east) or the multitude of chemical and fuel pipelines running directly underneath the Rancho facility.” By law, Rancho’s safety plans take no account of these nearby risks. Nor does Rancho appear to have any insurance covering liability to others in case of a catastrophe—though it has refused to say anything specific.

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Jenny Chavez, Buscaino’s policy director is his chief of staff. Garcetti only plans to have four deputy mayors, unlike Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa’s 12. As deputy manager Liu will oversee the Department of Water and Power, the Department of Public Social Services, the Department of Recreation and Parks and the Department of Transportation and Public Works. He graduated from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1985. He later worked as the director of community affairs, in 1992, at the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office and entered politics in 1995, as district director for Rep. Jane Harman, after several years in the banking industry. Liu had served as deputy mayor under James K. Hahn, from 2001 to 2005. Garcetti also named his former colleague on the Los Angeles City Council Jan Perry as his interim general manager of the Economic Development Department. In her 12-year tenure in office, she worked toward real estate development and construction in downtown and south Los Angeles. Perry, who unsuccessfully ran against Garcetti and later endorsed him for mayor, will temporarily oversee the new business and development department until a permanent general manager is found. In addition, Garcetti appointed Rich Llewellyn as counsel to the mayor. Llewellyn was chief of staff to Councilman Paul Koretz and special council to former District Attorney Gil Garcetti, Eric Garcetti’s father. Stephen Cheung, an aide to former Mayor Villaraigosa, will serve as director of international trade, taking responsibility for the Harbor and airport. Also staying, at least temporarily, is Eileen Decker, Villaraigosa’s deputy mayor for public safety. Matt Szabo, Villaraigosa’s deputy chief of staff, will stay on in an interim capacity. Heather Repenning, who worked on Garcetti’s political campaign for mayor, was named director of external affairs. He named Kelli Bernard, who used to work as his director of planning for his council office and now works at the DWP, interim chief of economic development. She previously worked as Garcetti’s director of planning in his council office. Garcetti named Borja Leon director of transportation. Martha Preciado is staying in the same role as she held under Villaraigosa, director of scheduling.

TWIC Test Doesn’t Pass

A report released in May by the Government Accounting Office confirmed that the expensive new scanners that are to read Transit Worker Identification Credential cards, TWIC, are “incomplete, inaccurate and unreliable.” The cards were implemented as a safety precaution after 9/11. The cards, which cost workers about $132, were touted as state of the art as they contained a vast amount of information about the card holder. The ILWU pushed legislators to focus on the inspection of containers, citing that requiring TWIC cards was the wrong approach. When giant retailers such as Target got behind the TWIC card method, the ILWU’s response went unnoticed, even though technical experts had warned Congress that the technology promised was premature and unlikely to work as advertised. More than 75 percent of longshoremen whose TWIC card applications were originally rejected, have since appealed. Ninety-nine percent of appeals were won, but the process takes about six months. Six months of receiving no pay. The Coast Guard has since modified original plans to put scanners everywhere. It now proposes to only require them at a limited number of facilities.

Samoans Unite for Flag Day By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter

from p. 5

Friendships

Long Beach!, The Long Beach Time Exchange, The Long Beach Depot for Creative Reuse, East Yard Communities for Environmental Justice, Willmore City Heritage Association, Friends of Drake Park, Housing LB and Building Healthy Communities: Long Beach to spread the word. “My hope is that through this process, we can really develop a community to have enough power to retain what we want to retain in our neighborhood,” Fisher said. Attendee Sandra Pimental agreed. “When something is giving people in the community something they want to continue, instead of people feeling embarrassed, they take pride,” Pimental, 35, said.

All residents and friends of Willmore City are invited to the bimonthly Friendship Neighborhood meetings, which take place on Sundays from 2:30 to 4 p.m. in Drake Park. The Friendship Neighborhood also hosts a neighborhood cleanup the second Saturday of every month starting at Cesar Chavez Park (5th Street and Golden Avenue) at 9 a.m. and ending at Drake Park.

Somoans celebrate the their traditions by observing Flag Day in Carson in 2012. Courtesy of the Samoan Federation of America.

Seniors and Youth Involvement Inc. Chief Vae O Tagloa Nua, founded it as Samoan-American Senior Citizens Involvement Inc. He says he changed the name to avoid confusion with other Samoan groups and to involve youth. Nua says his group is not directly involved with Flag Day, although he plans to attend. At group meetings, conducted in Samoan, members may receive health screenings, or discuss such subjects as applying for citizenship or social services. The organization is primarily privately funded, but a Community Development Block Grant helps meet overhead.

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working to try to get people together in a way which hopefully, some folks who aren’t used to being listened to will realize that when they get together, they need to be listened to. That’s the inside game.” The Friendship Neighborhood isn’t limiting their approach to festivals. In fact, this is just the beginning toward achieving different goals. Through the festivals, organizers hope to expand their network and exchange skills. Not only are they meeting with groups within the community and going door-to-door to invite neighbors to participate in their festivals, they also are canvassing and keeping an inventory list of the assets in the community, so that they can match shared interests sets among residents, such as housing, rides, mechanic skills, gardening, etc. In addition, they partnered with local groups such as Centro CHA, Foodscape Long Beach, Green

dances, in terms of who we are as a people.” Faletogo explains the Samoan Federation was started in 1969, to assist Samoans seeking U.S. citizenship. He says about 100 people per month come through the federation seeking service. The federation helps them learn English as a second language and prepare for the citizenship test. The City of Carson now helps fund the federation’s ESL classes through a Community Development block grant. Pouesi emphasizes no one in need of services is turned away. “We went through the process of asking the City of Carson for help,” he says. “These are economic hard times, but they were gracious enough to allocate $10,000.” Faletogo explains the Samoan Federation is raising $120,000 to put on the Flag Day celebration but that is handled entirely through private donations. His organization works with the Office of Samoan Affairs on such matters as immigration. Pouesi says her office doesn’t work on the Flag Day celebration but manages about eight community programs dealing with issues ranging from nutrition to domestic violence to navigating the welfare system. Pouesi says the Office of Samoan Affairs has been located in Carson since 1989. “It started off with targeting the Samoan community,” she said. “It expanded into the other Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders. Now it’s opened up to the general community.” She adds the office serves several thousand people per year. OSA is funded with both public and private dollars, she explains. The City of Carson has provided a Community Development Block Grant specifically to deal with eligible at-risk families, who have lost their homes and need help navigating the welfare system. The OSA nutrition program is state-funded, while a program in support of healthy marriages and relationships is federally funded. According to the 2010 census, SamoanAmericans make up about 2.6 percent of Carson’s population. The Samoan Federation and OSA are not the only city-funded organizations serving this minority community. Another is Mapuifgalele

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For 28 years, one of Carson’s biggest events has been the Annual Samoan Flag Day Celebration. The event takes place for eight days this year, Aug. 3 to 10, at Victoria Regional Park in Carson. This year’s theme will be “Ole Telo O Lina E Mama Ai Se Auega,” which translates from the Samoan as “Helping Hands Will Ease the Burden.” Attractions include vendors, entertainment and a rugby tournament. As president and executive director of the Carson-based Samoan Federation of America, Chief Loa Pele Faletogo is responsible for presenting the celebration in association with the City of Carson and the Second District, County of Los Angeles Parks and Recreation. In Faletogo’s birthplace, American Samoa, the title “Chief Loa” indicates the highest of chiefs. He’s also chairman of Carson’s planning commission. “I’m very busy,” said Faletogo, a retired military man and teacher. “I travel a lot in order to take care of the problems” on his home island. He says attendance is expected to be about 30,000, including visits from Samoan dignitaries. “This is a Samoan-American thing; Western Samoa and American Samoa living together in America,” he explains about the purpose of the celebration. “It’s not an American Samoan thing. It’s not a Western Samoan thing.” He says the celebration is scheduled for a week in August because that’s when school’s out and school children and families may attend. In American Samoa, Flag Day is April 17, the day the American flag was first raised over the territory. Western Samoa is a separate independent state and has its own independence day on June 1. “The Samoan Federation is more a cultural organization whose primary activity is the Samoan Flag Day celebration,” explained June Pouesi, the executive director of another community organization, Office of Samoan Affairs, which for a time put on the Flag Day celebration. “Before that, it was a group called the Coalition of Samoan Affiliates and before that, I think, a cricket team. “It’s a place to celebrate one’s culture, the food,

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And the Rockets Red Glare Trying to stop people from celebrating the Fourth without fireworks and alcohol is like attempting to sweep the tide back at the beach with a broom James Preston Allen, Publisher

July 12 - 25, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

On my drive down Pacific Avenue to a Fourth of July party overlooking Cabrillo Beach this year, I noticed the flashing temporary road sign placed by the city’s workers that read, “All fireworks and alcohol are illegal.” I chuckled to myself as I headed to the Beach City Market to pick up a bottle of wine before showing up to the ignition of the “official” fireworks display. Trying to stop people from celebrating this national holiday without fireworks and alcohol is like attempting to sweep the tide back at the beach with a broom. On top of this, there is this inherent sense of patriotic right of free expression to blow up some arsenal of gunpowder while inebriated to prove our American-ness. Perhaps this is subconsciously linked to our belief in the Second Amendment? Now, I’m not sure that the majority of folks out here celebrating know whether July 4 is about celebrating the passage of the Bill of Rights, winning the American Revolution, defeating the British in the War of 1812, the signing of the Declaration of Independence or if they even care at this point. However, from my perspective on that night overlooking San Pedro Bay, the night’s festivities looked more like the Battle of New Orleans or the siege of Baltimore Harbor. You see, as night falls on this hallowed night, my neighborhood—like many all over this city for weeks ahead—people fire off bottle rockets and firecrackers in stealth. Dogs bark, car alarms go off and children scream with glee. This annual Independence Day battle lasts until all the ammo runs out and all the beer is drunk. Then everybody goes home to sleep it off. Overlooking the field-of-fire, the skies over nearly every block, from Point Fermin to 22nd Street billowed with gun-smoke and skyrockets. This night is one of the best examples of when more than one-tenth of the population simultaneously chooses to break the law. There’s not much that the authorities can do. There are not enough officers in the Los Angeles Police Department, Port of Los Angeles Police department or fire department to do much more than control the thousands that show up at the beach, direct traffic, give out a few tickets for bad behavior and inspect the pyrotechnics used by experts. Besides, they are more truly worried about some lone

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terrorist sneaking into the crowd and igniting a shrapnel-laced pressure cooker bomb like the Boston Marathon bombing. Was Homeland Security on the scene? Was the NSA listening? My main point is that on this national day of exuberance, things change. Priorities of law enforcement shift and discretionary enforcement of the “no fireworks and no alcohol” laws change to something you might call “enforcement for the common good,” without doing something stupid like shooting somebody’s dog or arresting the councilman’s staff. If, on any other day of the year, the authorities found just one of these stashes of celebratory ammo, the SWAT team would be called, the bomb squad rousted, the HAZMAT team brought into action and the neighborhood evacuated. It makes you wonder what your neighbors are stashing in their garages, doesn’t it? I’m not suggesting that the authorities just give up on nights like this. I’m not suggesting that they hide in their newly built bunkers and wait for the calls either, but that they take a proactive approach. Host a community fireworks show where neighbors could gather and bring their own, for example. This could take place at a distance to the over-crowded beach area where friendly fire department folks could demonstrate safe handling, for both young and old, in a contained area with fire equipment present—if needed—and where the police can put into practice their community-based policing skills. What I’m suggesting is that instead of this being seen as a challenge to enforcement. Let’s use this as an opportunity to connect. This is also an opportunity for one or more of our local nonprofits to promote. I can imagine the Friends of Fort MacArthur cooperating with the San Pedro Chamber, Clean San Pedro and others, and figure out how to have just this kind of community fireworks event without it costing $50,000-plus in pyrotechnics. After all, the fireworks would be donated by the attendees! I’m in no way suggesting that this would cure the national day of patriotic law breaking. I kind of enjoy this expression self-indulgent independence. I just think that, we as a city, should stop pretending that we can contain it by putting up signs to which obviously no one is paying attention. Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIV : No. 14

Assoc. Publisher/Production Coordinator Suzanne Matsumiya info@graphictouchdesigns.com Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks editor@randomlengthsnews.com

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communi- Assistant Editor Zamná Ávila ties of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, zamna@randomlengthsnews.com Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations Senior Editor Paul Rosenberg throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

www.randomlengthsnews.com

Studies in Power:

Educating the Public About the Powers-that-Be By Greggory Moore, Contributing Writer

You get the basics in high school. The federal government is divided into three branches (executive, legislative, judicial). Locally, you’ve got the mayor and the city council, etc. Most of us don’t graduate with enough knowledge so that as adults, we really grasp how even the most well-known governmental power structures really work, let alone more obscure power centers. (What percentage of Americans can actually explain the Electoral College?) The Long Beach Coalition for Good Jobs & A Healthy Community, is aiming to redress this lack of knowledge through a series of Power Analysis Workshops, which the coalition says are intended “to build collective knowledge of the power of local government [,…] of where branches of government get their power, how they impact the community and how residents can ensure local government works for all residents.” “It’s important that all residents are engaged in the political process and understand how the decisions their representatives make impact their daily lives,” says Christine Petit, a member of the coalition’s steering committee. “The first step in this, is demystifying the political process by looking at the different structures, and evaluating what powers our representatives have through their positions, and where that power comes from. When people understand how a system

Columnists/Reporters Lyn Jensen Carson B. Noel Barr Music Dude John Farrell Curtain Call Lori Lyna Hirsch-Stokoe Food Writer Andrea Serna Arts Writer Malina Paris Culture Writer Calendar 14days@randomlengthsnews.com Photographers Terelle Jerricks, Diana Lejins, Betty Guevara, Jerrick Romero,Slobodan Dimitrov Contributors Danny Simon, Greggory Moore

Cartoonists Ann Cleaves, Andy Singer, Matt Wuerker Advertising Production Mathew Highland, Suzanne Matsumiya Advertising Representatives Mathew Highland reads@randomlengthsnews.com adv@randomlengthsnews.com Editorial Interns Joseph Baroud, Cory Hooker Display advertising (310) 519-1442 Classifieds (310) 519-1016 www.randomlengthsnews.com

works, it becomes more accessible for folks to engage in a meaningful way.” Thus far, the Coalition has presented workshops on the Long Beach Unified School District, the Long Beach City College Board of Trustees, and an overview of various Long Beach boards and commissions. “Local organizations and residents have come to the coalition since we successfully passed Measure N, the hotel-worker living wage, and asked about the process for passing public policy— not just at the ballot box,” says Jeannine Pearce, the Coalition’s lead organizer. “The coalition decided to host these sessions in collaboration with other organizations as a starting point for residents interested in policy, government accountability and the political process.” Subsequent workshops will examine the machinations of the Mayor’s Office and the city council. “Although people likely know who our mayor is and hopefully can name their city council member, a lot of people don’t know what decision-making power and influence our representatives actually have, where they get that power, and how changes can be made to our governance structures,” explains Petit. “Not all cities have the same structure as Long Beach. We’ll examine that structure and in what ways it continued on following page

Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #0891-6627). All contents Copyright 2013 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.

RANDOMLetters The Spanish-American War and San Pedro

One hundred and fifteen years is enough. It was 115 years ago that the United States launched it’s first overseas, some say, imperial war, the Spanish-American War. Besides giving the U.S. military control over the Philippines and several Pacific islands, the war assured U.S. military, political and economic domination over Cuba as well. Within a few years, the U.S. military occupied Cuba’s Guantanamo Bay on the island’s southeastern coast. U.S. taxpayer

Community Alerts

Speak Out on Ponte Vista

A public hearing for the final EIR for the 830-unit Ponte Vista Project is scheduled at 10 a.m. July 24 through Aug. 12. The project is comprised of 1,135 dwelling units, featuring a combination of single-family homes, duplexes, townhomes and flats. Details: (213) 978-1324 Location: 200 N. Spring Street, Room #1020 Los Angeles

405 Improvement Project

Proposed 2013-2021 Update for the Housing Element of the General Plan

Power

is working—and not working— for residents. We’ll also likely look at voter engagement and who is actually electing these folks. In past local elections, we’ve seen very low voter turnout. Five of our 9 citycouncil districts saw less than 15 percent voter turnout by registered voters in the last mayoral election.” Nikole Cababa, a coalition community organizer, said the coalition sees the workshops as inching Long Beach toward fashioning a more responsive local government. “These workshops are one step toward our goal of having a local government that is transparent and accountable to the needs of the community,” she says. “Our vision is to have more residents and leaders that are well-informed about the political process and governance structure of our city. When residents are wellinformed, they can also make well-informed decisions.” The workshop series is part of the Coalition’s yearlong, Long Beach Rising! Civic Engagement Program, which is designed “to promote civic participation, alliance building, voter engagement, and community organizing amongst communities historically marginalized from the political process, including low-income communities.” The program opened in April with the second annual People’s

State of the City address. The workshop series continues throughout the summer, and in the fall will be succeeded by a leadership training program “geared toward strengthening skills in civic engagement and organizing to advance social, economic, political, and environmental justice.” The final stage of the program will commence at the end of 2013 with “a project to engage and mobilize lowpropensity voters, particularly working families.” “On April 8, 2014, less than a year from now, Long Beach will host local elections for its mayor and odd-numbered city-council districts,” Cababa notes. “We need to make sure residents understand the importance of organizing and being civically engaged as a way to address issues they care about and shape the future of their city.” To keep up with the Long Beach Coalition’s Power Analysis Workshops, visit longbeachcoalition.org. Upcoming Power Analysis Workshops include the city council (July 23), the Mayor’s Office (Aug. 7), and potentially the city’s budget process (TBD). Admission to the Power Analysis Workshops is free and includes a light dinner. Spanish and Khmer translations are available upon request, as is child watch. For more information or to RSVP, email GoodJobsLongBeach@ gmail.com or call (562) 3964552.

$10 to see what the “celebration” is all about, and to put my 2 cents in. Coincidentally, we are holding a Cuba Cultural and Information Night Friday July 12 from 7-9 PM at the Random Lengths offices. If you are interested in learning about peace rather than war, you are welcome and encouraged to attend. Rachel Bruhnke Witness for Peace/Southwest Harbor Area Chapter, San Pedro

Reader Response to “Theft of the Court House” (June 28)

of the annexation contract between San Pedro and the City of Los Angeles by the City of Los Angeles? Jason Herring San Pedro Dear Jason Herring, One might presume this to be the case, but the city abdicated its control over the (municipal) courts back when the state consolidated all courts into the superior court system. James Preston Allen Publisher

Isn’t this grounds for breach

Errata

In the June 27 edition of Random Lengths a correction is needed for “City Carson Fires City Manager—In Same Meeting, Council Moves to Remove Former Councilman Harold Williams from Vector Control Board.” The Carson City Council appointed Councilman Harold Williams to the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District Board in Nov. 2007. He took his seat in Jan. 2008. The Carson City Council reappointed Williams to the seat in Sept. 1, 2011, starting his second term in Jan. 2012. On April 4, 2013, a month after Carson’s municipal elections, the Carson City Council sent a letter to the Vector Control District reaffirming Williams as a trustee on the board. At a June 18 Carson City Council meeting, the council began discussing Williams’ removal from the board.

July 12 - 25, 2013

The City of Los Angeles will conduct a public hearing regarding the proposed 20132021 Update at 10 a.m. July 27. A hearing officer who will consider public testimony and received communication up to Aug. 8 will conduct a Public Hearing. A Housing Element is meant to provide policy guidance for local decision-making regarding housing programs and decisions. This proposed project is intended to be an amendment to the previous Housing Element. Details: (213) 978-2666 Venue: Deaton Civic Auditorium Location: 100 W. First St., Los Angeles

from previous page

alive and breathing. And I’ve been to Guantanamo Province, full of 100,000’s of Cubans, working everyday to develop their country, and wishing they had their beautiful, productive bay back. (Alas, we all know what is being “produced” there now, for shame.) This is happening today, and every day, Pedrans. And we celebrate the invasion and occupation this weekend. What is wrong with this picture? How can I not be in solidarity with Cuba? They want Guantanamo Bay returned to them, and they can’t do much about it, lest the Empire Strike Back. So I write this simple letter. And I will pay my

The Local Publication You Actually Read

The public is invited to attend a hearing from 6 to 8 p.m. on July 24, at Hill Classical Middle School in Long Beach. The public will have an opportunity to comment and ask questions about the proposed California Department of Transportation (project to widen the Interstate 405 from Costa Mesa to the Orange County/ Los Angeles County border. The purpose of the project is to ease traffic congestion and improve traffic, interchange operations, and road safety to meet state and federal standards. The project’s endpoint is in the area where the I-605 begins and the 22 freeway transitions into 7th Street. The I-405 Improvement Project is slated to begin in mid-2015 after public review and choice of preferred options. Details: (562) 570-6918 Venue: Hill Classical Middle School Location: 1100 Iroquois Ave., Long Beach

dollars built a military base on Cuba’s waterfront land in order to control the island, and to serve as a military launching pad for the rest of the Southern Hemisphere. Over 100 years later, we are still occupying this land. To me this is a “Pedro issue.” The inability of Cubans to use Guantanamo Bay is the equivalent of the United States not having access to the Los Angeles Harbor Area for economic, recreational and cultural development. This is an issue of justice—Port to Port.

An injury to one is an injury to all... And here’s the kicker: This weekend hundreds of locals will “celebrate” this imperial war at the Old Fort MacArthur Days. Along with celebrating other wars and carnage, performers will trounce around in weekend warrior garb and “re-enact” those ol’ Glory Days of the Rough Riders storming up San Juan Hill in Cuba. The problem for this San Pedran? I’ve seen San Juan Hill, and it’s in a country that is not ours, and we invaded it, and this weekend we are celebrating that invasion as if history weren’t still

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California Comeback from p. 1

July 12 - 25, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

“We kept trying to talk to him, he didn’t want to talk to us,” said Rick Jacobs, head of the Courage Campaign, who moderated the panel. But the California Federation of Teachers put up the funding to circulate petitions for the millionaires’ tax and the response forced Brown’s hand. “Without [California Federation of Teachers] taking that risk and empowering the people here, the governor’s measure would have gone forward as it was, and we probably would have lost,” Jacobs said, “It was the first time in the history of the state a governor pulled a ballot measure he was circulating.” Anthony Thigpenn of California Calls, has a long history of innovative grassroots organizing, going back to LA Jobs With Peace in the 1980s, as well as coalition-building, with the progressive precinct network Coalition ‘88 in the 1988 elections. California Calls is a more diversified statewide version, involving 31 local organizations. “We came together to focus on tax and fiscal budget issues,” Thigpenn said, “We have a long-term strategy of essentially changing the California electorate, so that poor people, people of color, immigrants, young people would come out to vote consistently for progressive taxes.” A 2006 polling report by the California Public Policy Institute, “California’s Exclusive Electorates,” found that the voting-day electorate was disproportionately whiter, older and more conservative than the state’s population as a whole, as Random Lengths reported at the time. If the whole electorate showed up to vote, “California could have bigger government and

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higher taxes: Non-voters prefer higher taxes/ more services to lower taxes/fewer services by a 66-26 percent margin, compared to 49-44 percent among voters.” In effect, the coalition behind Prop. 30 is dedicated to making that larger electorate a permanent reality. “It was a unique blend of many different styles, many different strategies, but all toward the same goal of fixing California.” Thigpenn said of the initiative coalition. “Most important, we were all in this for the long haul. So we didn’t see Prop. 30—or the millionaires’ tax, for that matter—as the be all and end all. We saw it as an important step, to build relationships, to achieve a win, but also to mobilize a sector of our population that hadn’t been mobilized before.” “The environment going into the fall of 2011, with Occupy, was very much part of our calculation.... How could we translate the Occupy movement, the growing frame of 1 percent vs the 99 percent, into something that was real?” The Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment specialized in organizing lowincome communities of color. Random Lengths has covered some of their Los Angeles-area work fighting foreclosures. ACCE Executive Director Christina Livingston, explained that community need was a driving consideration behind ACCE’s decision to get involved in the initiative. “People were starting to experience need in a different way,” she said. “We knew there needed to be some of this long-term strategy.” But the strength of the coalition approach was that organizations were asked to continue doing what they do best—only with a coordinated intent. “Where ACCE has its real strength is where

Gov. Jerry Brown, enacting the familiar bill-signing ritual of executive power, is the perfect protagonist for the corporate media in writing about California’s comeback from the brink of disaster. The real story is neither so neat nor so flattering.

we are sort of scrappy, and like to be in the streets, bringing these issues into the public eye in a way that we can help reframe the debate in the media,” Livingston explained. “We really honed in on what Occupy was doing, and what people were feeling, and blew it up in a way that allowed us to go after the right target, which was not the state capital, and not city council, but in fact was the folks who had the money, the millionaires, the corporations.” As a result, ACCE “helped to build the viability of what was first the millionaires tax, and then Prop. 30.” “Part of what it means to come here and believe in democracy and to believe in the California dream and the American dream, and what have you, is that everyone has an opportunity and everyone has a voice, and everyone has something to contribute,” explained Aparna Shah, executive director of Mobilize the Immigrant Vote, which had previously worked primarily in political education and immigrant language outreach. Underlying a multitude of specific concerns, Shah explained, “We have to really look at the causes of poverty, we have to really look at the causes of disparity in this state and in this country, and the causes as to why our communities don’t have voice, don’t have real institutional power.” As a result, “We decided it was time to take a step into statewide coordinated campaigns, take a step into ballot initiatives,” and in turn, “2012 was the first time that voters of color, new American voters, actually matched turnout of white voters in California,” she reported. Turnout matters most, of course. But turnout builds on registration, and Shah also pointed out that 1994 to 2012 registered voters in California increased by 3.5 million, of which “over 90 percent of that came from Latino and AsianAmerican voters.” “When we look at the change in demographics in this state and in this country, we are such the tip of the iceberg,” Shah said. “There’s such a huge, huge arc, and what we saw in 2012 in this state and in this country is just the very beginning.... It’s just one very easy example of what we can see in a much broader and deeper way going forward to really build power and to really take back the general fund in California, take back the power structure in California and take back the power structure on a national level.” The potential is real, but it’s just that—potential— Thigpenn warned. “Demographics are not destiny,” he said.

“Just because the population in California and the country is changing, doesn’t automatically mean that we’re going to win. So turning out young people and immigrant voters and people of color and low income voters takes work,” he stressed. “It’s not just about demographics, its about a strategic approach to take advantage of those demographics.” This dovetails with something else Shah said, about the positive motivation: “It wasn’t just about what we’re fighting, what we don’t want, it’s about the California we do want, and the everyday lives of our communities that deserve to thrive and have a voice.” The key to making it all work was the California Federation of Teachers’ decision to fund a signature drive for the millionaires’ tax, as part of an overall funding commitment—but not, Jacobs noted, with the expectation of dictating to others, as unions commonly do when they foot the bill. Why was that? He asked CFT President Josh Pechthalt. “Moving this ambitious kind of progressive agenda around tax reform in a state where we’ve had 30 years of retreat on taxation, meant that this couldn’t either be a CFT-lead initiative—we don’t have that capacity, and we don’t believe it could be just a labor issue. It had to be broader,” Pechthalt responded. The cuts to education have been massive, he pointed out—six or seven years worth, totalling over $20 billion. “We’ve seen thousand and thousands of educators lose their jobs. We’ve seen kids warehoused, over-crowded classrooms, we’ve seen programs slashed... For us it became a question of survival.” And so they began thinking outside the box, considering the idea of a millionaires’ tax. “It was pretty clear based on our polling that we did in March of 2011, but also working with our partners…and then, underscored by movement on the streets with occupy that we were moving down the right path, and that we shouldn’t be dissuaded by the fact that the bigger institutional unions or frankly the Democratic Party leadership were not on board,” he said. Summing up, in terms of lessons learned, he said, “You have to be willing—you have to do it smartly and strategically—but you have to be willing to go outside your political comfort zone. It’s a lesson I think our politicians have not learned.” By way of explanation, he added, “We won a two-thirds majority in California [in the legislature] and the first words coming out of our leaders in California was ‘oh, let’s California/ to p. 19

By Cole Smithey, Guest Writer

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment ACE • Art, Cuisine, & Entertainment

erhaps more important than what Gore Verbinski’s gleefully postmodern Western isn’t, is what it is. Written by two screenwriters from the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise, along with Justin Haythe (Revolutionary Road,) this deconstructionist movie plays freely with several layers of historic, social and political subtexts surrounding the U.S. government’s decimation of Native Americans — a tall politico-cultural order for a Hollywood summer “tent pole” product. Audiences expecting a standard-issue bloated Hollywood comic-book action movie, favoring style over substance, will be sorely disappointed. Which isn’t to say, The Lone Ranger doesn’t offer its share of rapid-fire chase sequences or gritty brutality; it does, and these sequences matter in direct relation to the form and substance of the narrative. Still, nuanced degrees of allegory make this movie sing like an endangered golden-cheeked warbler for an audience tuned in to its upper reaches of narrative harmonic pitch. Bent notes of side-glanced historic political examination invite the audience to contemplate an anti-imperialistic dialectic, delivered with tongue-in-cheek humor and a cool regard for supernatural aspects of Native American culture. Though necessarily rooted in the ‘30s era radio program and the ‘50s era television series, this Lone Ranger is far removed from its original template. One look at Johnny Depp’s “I Am Lone Ranger Continued on page 17.

July 12 – 25, 2013 July 12 –25, 2013

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Talking Brews with Bobby Trusela & Friends By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

Independent And Free.

T

rusela Ristorante is known for more than its great Italian cuisine and large selection of fine wines, but they are also known for occasionally having in stock very select beers. However, you’d only know it if you ask Bobby Trusela what’s new in the world of craft brewery. Last time I asked him that question, I got a dissertation on Trapist beer and the history of craft beer going back to medieval times, plus a couple of beer samples to boot. This time I asked, Italian craft brews were on his mind. Collesi, Moretti and Peroni are the three brewers that are most commonly known in Italy. The Collesi is Bobby’s most available favorite of beers. “It’s an exciting thing to see locally brewed Italian beer being paired with Italian food,” he said.

They brew a variety of styled beers ranging from Belgian style to stouts. The Collesi brewery has a brew called the Imper Ale Triplo Malto, which is fashioned after a Belgian pale ale. It’s known for its fruitiness, creaminess and high alcohol content in the neighborhood of 9 percent, rather than normal 4.5 percent alcohol content. They use a classic bottle fermentation, where they add the yeast and other ingredients and then cork them like a wine. Those beers are delivered sealed with foil and cork. Bobby noted the crossover of winemaking techniques into artisan beer making. “It’s very drinkable,” Bobby said. “Across the crowd, even for those who are not enthusiastically willing to try new beers, the Triplo Malto is a drinkable beer.” Bobby expressed a degree of satisfaction, that

the American craft brew market is beginning to inspire European innovation where now the craft brew market is beginning to reflect the practice of infusing old-world practices with modern day practices as well as the allowance of winery practices to inform craft brews from barreling to corking. Names brew enthusiasts should keep their eye on include, La Gunitas and the Cappuccino Stout (comparable to liqueur or some other sweet but high alcohol content liquor). Bobby noted that 20- to 30- something year-old generation beer enthusiasts have been gravitating away from the India pale ale and dabbling more with Imperial Stouts. “It’s to the point that people are looking for something else,” Bobby said of the India pale ale. “Belgian beer is not far from that point too. Not all dark beers are heavy.” Bobby cited Guinness as an example. As Bobby talked about beer, restaurant regulars stopped by the table and participated in the conversation. One friend and patron, Alex, had recently traveled to Boston and sampled the offerings there. In Boston, they’re drinking Guinness, New Castle and a lot of other English-styled beers. Alex name dropped brewery names such as Magic Hat Brewery and Allagash Brewery in noting the emergence of a distinct north-eastern Unites States craft beer sensibility. “Allagash is probably the most popular American brewery to produce Belgian-styled beer,” Alex said. The HotRod Red is another beer that came up in conversation. “It’s a hoppy beer and it’s not an IPA. It’s fantastic.” Alex noted it was hard to find. Favorite chocolate stout is the Abyss from Deschutes Brewery. The beer comes in 22-ounce bottles and is very hard to come by. It feels more like a beer house than a bar. The going trend are beer enthusiasts forming cliques online, to go on outings to try new beers or crafting their own home brews together. Frequently what happens, is the people form new friendships over beer. Bobby recalled having Black Ops Beer at a high-end French restaurant recently. “White gloves, white table cloth and everything,” Bobby recalled. “I think the bottle Continued on next page.

• Happy Hour • Blu Bar at Crowne Plaza • Happy Hour, $4 Drinks and half off appetizers. (310) 5198200, 601 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro

July 12 – 25, 2013

Iron City Tavern • Happy Hour, 1/2-price appetizers & drink specials: 4 to 6 p.m. Mon. to Fri. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro; (310) 547-4766

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Ports o’ Call • Mon. to Fri., 3 to 8 p.m. Taco Tuesdays. Oyster shooter & bloody mary Wednesdays. Jazz it Up Wednesdays at 7 p.m. (310) 833-3553, Berth 76 Ports O’ Call Village, San Pedro San Pedro Brewing Co. • Happy Hour, 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Mon. to Fri. (310) 831-5663, 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Whale & Ale • Happy Hour, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Mon to Fri., 4 to 7 p.m. on Wed. Late Night Happy Hour: 10 p.m. to Midnight, Fri. Only. (310) 832-0363, 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro Happy Hour Listings Are Paid Advertising

Entrée News

Happy Diner Celebrates Two-Year Anniversary Gives New Menu items and Coupons to Thank Happy Diners The Summer of 2013 has been a season of changes for Happy Diner. Happy Diner proprietor Roman Carrillo has left his second job to focus his full attention on the restaurant and the prime rib has been added to the menu. Carrillo is a crowd pleaser and works to give diners what they want and how they want it. So to celebrate the restaurant’s two-year anniversary, they added the 8-ounce prime rib dinner recently. From now on, the prime rib dinner will be offered on First Thursdays and

weekends for $11.95 from 3 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. On Sundays, the Happy Diner closes at 4 p.m. If that weren’t enough, they’re offering 15 percent off coupons for their lemon herb salmon dinner and their prime rib dinner. The coupons are good from July 25 to July 31 and available only in Random Lengths. Open Monday through Saturdays from 6 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. and on Sundays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Venue: Happy Diner Location: 617 S. Centre St., San Pedro

from previous page.

Trusela’s

of beer (about the size of a wine bottle) was $70. I usually get it for about $20 [wholesale]. That’s not too bad, but that’s what they were charging considering it’s a seasonal beer.” To Bobby, a French cuisine restaurant that would pair a beer with ragouts and other items on their menu, shows how far craft brews have come in the world of high cuisine. In any case, talking beer with beer enthusiasts on Trusela’s patio in the cool breeze of a July evening satiates like a cold Triplo Malto. Recap of beers enthusiasts should checkout: • Abyss • Black Ops beer • HotRod Red • La Gunitas • Cappuccino Stout

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment July 12 – 25, 2013

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Entertainment July 13

The Matthew Dahlgren Group The Matthew Dahlgren Group is performing at Alvas Showroom at 8 p.m. July 13. The group is a mix of Blue and rhythm and blues. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro The State of Grace The State of Grace is performing at The Godmothers Saloon at 9 p.m. July 13. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmothers Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

July 14

2013 Head Choppers Ball Harvelles will host the 2013 Head Choppers Ball at 6:30 p.m. July 14. Watch the competition heat up in one on one guitar battles. We got an American Monster Blues and Burlesque show to keep the action moving all night. The cover charge for the event is $10. Details: (562) 239-3700; www.longbeach.harvelles. com Venue: Harevelles Long Beach Location: 201 E. Broadway St., Long Beach

July 16

Long Beach Municipal Band Concert The Long Beach Municipal Band Concert takes place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. July 16. Celebrate the 104th anniversary of the Long Beach Municipal Band and the Sounds of the Summer. Details: (562) 570-3232; lbparks@longbeach.gov Venue: Bluff Park Location: Ocean Blvd. and Redondo Ave., Long Beach

July 17

Sean Lane Sean Lane is performing at The Godmothers Saloon at 8 p.m. July 17. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmothers Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

Independent And Free.

July 19

Soul Shot Soul Shot is performing at The Godmothers Saloon at 9 p.m. July 19. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmothers Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro Andy Fiasco Andy Fiasco is performing at Harvelles at 9:30 p.m. July 19. Andy was the “New Artist to Watch” at the Sundance Film Festival, Orion Music Festival, European Independent Film Festival and Hatch Fest. The admission ranges between $10 and $25, with a two-drink minimum purchase required. Details: (562) 239-3700; www.longbeach.harvelles. com Venue: Harvelles Long Beach Location: 201 E. Broadway St., Long Beach

July 20

July 12 – 25, 2013

An Evening with Sandi Thom Alvas Showroom is hosting An Evening with Sandi Thom at 8 p.m. July 20. Returning from a worldwide tour, Sandi plays songs from her four studio albums. The cover charge for the event is $20. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

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562 Soul Club Harvelles hosts the 562 Soul Club at 9:30 p.m. July 20. No cover charge is necessary, but a twodrink minimum purchase is required. Details: (562) 239-3700; www.longbeach.harvelles. com Venue: Harvelles Long Beach Location: 201 E. Broadway St., Long Beach

July 21

Brian Asher’s Cello 100th B Day Alvas Showroom will host the Brian Asher’s Cello Calendar continued on page 15.

Big Nick’s Pizza

Tradition, variety and fast delivery; you get it all at Big Nick’s Pizza. The best selection of Italian specialties include hear ty calzones, an array of pastas and of course, our amazing selection of signature pizzas, each piled high with the freshest toppings. Like wings or greens? We also offer an excellent selection of appetizers, salads, beer and wine. Call for fast delivery. Hours: 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Sun.-Thurs., 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 1110 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 732-5800 Boardwalk Grill

C a s u a l waterfront dining at its finest! Famous fo r s l a b s o f Chicago-style baby back ribs, fish-n-chips, rich clam chowder, cold beer on tap and wine. Full lunch menu also includes salads, sandwiches and burgers. Indoor and outdoor patio dining available. Proudly pouring Starbucks coffee. Open 7 days a week. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 519-7551 Buono’s Authentic Pizzeria A San Pedro landmark for over 40 years, famous for exceptional awa rd - w i n n i n g pizza baked in brick ovens. Buono’s also offers classic Italian dishes and sauces based on tried-and-true family recipes and hand-selected ingredients that are prepared fresh. You can dine-in or take-out. Delivery and catering are also provided. Additionally, there are two locations in Long Beach. Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. 1432 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro • (310) 547-0655 www.buonospizza.com Iron City Tavern

Iron City features a newly renovated dining room and wonderfully restored bar in a modern setting. The most comfortable gastropub in San Pedro, Iron City offers casual dining for lunch and dinner with food service at the bar. Catch all sporting events on seven 50” screens in surround sound and listen to your favorite tunes on our internet jukebox. (Iron City is a supporter of the Black & Gold.) Iron City features authentic Philly cheese steaks, various hot sandwiches and burgers, calamari steaks and a variety of Italian pasta dishes. Hours:10:30 a.m.-2a.m. 7 days a week. Happy hour from 4-6 p.m. featuring 1/2 priced appetizers and drink specials. Free parking in rear. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro • (310) 547-4766

Lighthouse Cafe

The favorite local cafe for the point Fermin area of San Pedro great breakfasts, lunches and even dinner. Serving traditional offering for breakfast along with specialty omelets, espresso and cappuccino. Lunches include a delicious selection of soups, salads, burgers and sandwiches with hearty portions as well as Chef’s Creations. Dinners feature Top Sirloin Steak or Prime Rib as well as a kids menu. Beer and wine are served. Free Wifi and is pet friendly on the patio. Open 7 days a week 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. close to Cabrillo Beach and the Korean Bell, Point Fermin area- 508 West 39th St., San Pedro. 310- 548- 3354 Mishi’s Strudel Bakery Mishi’s is a fragrant landmark on 7th Street, where it is possible to find Nirvana by following your nose. The enticing aroma of baking strudel is impossible to resist, and the café is warm and welcoming like your favorite auntie’s house. Aniko and Mishi have expanded the menu to include homemade goulash, soups and a variety of sweet and savory Hungarian strudels, crépes and pastas. Take a frozen strudel home to bake in your own kitchen and create that heavenly aroma at your house. Mishi’s Strudel Bakery and Café, 309 W.7th St., St., San Pedro • (310) 832-6474 www.mishisstrudel.com PORTS O’CALL WATERFRONT DINING S i n c e 1 9 61 we’ve extended a hearty welcome to visitors from every corner of the globe. Delight in an aweinspiring view of the dynamic LA Harbor while enjoying exquisite Coastal California Cuisine and Varietals. Relax in the Plank Bar or Outdoor Patio for the best Happy Hour on the Waterfront. With the Award-Winning Sunday Champagne Brunch, receive the first SPIRIT CRUISES Harbor Cruise of the day FREE. Open 7 days, lunch and dinner. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor Berth 76, San Pedro • (310) 833-3553 www. Portsocalldining.com

SPIRIT CRUISES An instant party! Complete with all you need to relax and enjoy while the majesty of the harbor slips by. Our three yachts and seasoned staff provide for an exquisite excursion every time, and “all-inclusive” pricing makes party planning easy! Dinner Cruise features a 3-course meal, full bar, unlimited cocktails and starlight dancing. Offering the ultimate excursion for any occasion. Free Parking. 1199 Nagoya Way, LA Harbor - Berth 77, San Pedro • (310) 548-8080, (562) 495-5884 • www.spiritmarine.com Trusela’s

Southern Italian & California Cuisine • Bob and Josephine Trusela have been awarded the “Most Promising New Restaurant 2010” award and three stars 2011 and 2012, by the Southern California Restaurant Writers Association. Catering available for all ocassions. Hours: Sun. 5 p.m.–Close, Lunch: Tues–Fri 11:30–2:30, Dinner: Tues–Sat 5 p.m.–Closing. 28158 S. Western Ave., San Pedro • (310) 547–0993 www.truselas.com

The Whale & Ale

San Pedro’s British Gastro Pub offers comfortable dining in oak paneled setting, featuring English fish & chips, roast prime rib, sea bass, rack of lamb, beef Wellington, meat pies, salmon, swordfish & vegetarian dishes. Open for lunch & dinner, 7days/wk; great selection of wines; 14 British tap ales, & full bar. Frequent live music. First Thursday live band & special fixed price menu. Hours: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. 11:30 a.m.-midnight Sat. & Sun. 1-10 p.m. Bar open late. 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro • (310) 8320363 • www.whaleandale.com Keep An Eye Out for San Pedro’s Best Guide To —Fine Dining—

Brochure

San Pedro Brewing Company A microbrewery and American grill, SPBC features hand-crafted award-winning ales and lagers served with creative pastas, bbq, sandwiches, salads and burgers. A full bar with made-from-scratch margaritas and a martini menu all add fun to the warm and friendly atmosphere. WIFI bar connected for Web surfing and e-mail—bring your laptop. Live music on Saturdays. Hours: From 11:30 a.m., daily. 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro • (310) 831-5663 • www. sanpedrobrewing.com

To Advertise in Random Lengths News’ Restaurant Guide for the Harbor Area, Call (310) 519–1442.

KKJZ disc jockey, Gary Wagner. File Photo

Wagner Delivers Nothin’ But The

By Andrea Serna, Arts and Culture Columnist

Instead of two days of blues, listeners were relegated to only Sunday, with The Wagman. Management believed the mission of the station is jazz, rather than blues. During his 2012 summer pledge drive, Wagner successfully led an on the air revolt to bring back the Saturday show. In a show of support, fans overwhelmingly stepped up to demonstrate their commitment to the blues, with the one thing corporate management listens to: Dollars. Rabid fans of the Wagman donated $93,998 and the Saturday show was reinstated. When asked about the response to the pledge drive, station manager Stephanie Levine offered the following statement “Our goal is to provide a balance of both jazz and blues programming for as long as we are fortunate to operate KJazz. We will do our best to strike a balance when responding to the feedback we receive, with the understanding that we can never make everyone happy all of the time.” I was fortunate to spend a day with Wagner, while he was playing a tribute to recently deceased legend Bobby Blue Bland. Wagner kept up his fastpaced spinning of two-minute songs, all while fans touched in with Facebook messages and phone calls. The visual was fascinating. Wagner says he is hopeful for the genre of blues music. “There are a lot of young people getting into

Lance and the Longhorns Lance and the Longhorns is performing at Godmothers Saloon at 5:30 p.m. July 21. Details: (310) 833-1589; www.godmotherssaloon. com Venue: Godmothers Saloon Location: 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro

Community/Family July 11

Game Day The San Pedro Library is hosting Game Day at 3:30 p.m. July 11. Challenge your family members or friends to a board game. Advance sign-up is required. Details: (310) 548-7779 Venue: San Pedro Library Location: 931 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro

July 15

CMA Kids News Summer Camp The Cabrillo Marine Aquarium is hosting its Kids News Summer Camp from 2 to 4 p.m. July 15 through July 18. Join Press Friends middle and high school mentors and CMA junior and senior docents for a free, fun summer camp. If you wish to sign-up, please attend the entire camp for the duration. July 15 is News Day. July 16 is Profiles Day. July 17 is Marine Life Day. July 18 is Robotics Day. Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro

July 17

Preschool Story time The San Pedro Library is hosting Preschool Story time at 10:30 a.m. July 17. Join us as we sing songs, read stories and make a take home craft. For children ages 0 through 5. A caregiver or parent must be present. Details: (310) 548-7779 Venue: San Pedro Library Location: 931 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro Stroll and Savor The community of Belmont Shores is hosting the Stroll and Savor from 5:30 to 9 p.m. July 17 and July 18. Belmont Shore’s most popular event is a summer long taste of Belmont Shores, with over 40 restaurants offering the best of their menus. Enjoy the festival atmosphere as you stroll along with your family, friends and even pets. It cost $10 for a book of 12 tickets. Tickets are sold at various locations on 2nd street in Belmont Shores. Details: (562) 434-3066; www.belmontshore.org Venue: Belmont Shores Location: Long Beach Carolyn’s Crew: Crochet and Knitting Club The Carolyn’s Crew Crochet and Knitting Club will be at the San Pedro Library at 3 p.m. July 17. This is a knitting club for kids, adults and seniors. If you wish to learn to crochet, we encourage you to bring a size “I” hook. If you wish to learn to knit, we encourage you to bring needles size 8. This club is also gathering again at 3:30 p.m. Details: (310) 548-7779 Venue: San Pedro Library Location: 931 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro Calendar continued on page 16.

July 12 – 25, 2013

ary Wagner is a self-proclaimed dinosaur in an era when society worships the newest vogue through the Internet. The disc jockey has committed his life to playing blues music, at a time when young African Americans have abandoned blues for rap. The question is often asked, what is the blues? “blues is a healer,” said musician John Lee Hooker. “Blues is an emotion,” says Wagner “it can be a sad emotion or a happy emotion.” Wagner, known by his moniker, The Wagman, uses the blues to send out the vibes over the radio every weekend on public radio station KKJZ, which resides on campus at Cal State Long Beach. His show, “Nothin’ But the Blues,” streams – thanks to the Internet – all over the world. Each weekend, for nine hours, he sits completely alone working at a frenetic pace, often picking songs on the fly, as fans—and artists—call in requests to play music that cannot be heard on any other FM station in Los Angeles. Wagner is proud of the fact he is one of the few DJ’s around who picks his own playlist. This is rare at any radio station today, where playlists are pre-programmed nationally for the highest level of familiarity to listeners and the least amount of variance from the predictable. This past year, the station’s management Global Jazz, cut a full day from the blues program.

Calendar continued from page 14. 100th B Day at 4 p.m. July 21. Brian Asher will be performing a concert celebrating the 100th birthday of his cello built in France. Brian will be presenting a program of three different genres of music using his cello as the common denominator. The cover charge for the event is $20. Details: (800) 403-3447; www.alvasshowroom. com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

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lBluesl

it,” he said. “There are teenage bands playing the blues.” He cites young talents, such as California– based Ray Goren and Quinn Sullivan, who plays with Chicago blues legend, Buddy Guy. “It is cyclical,” he said. “In the 70s, people were interested in disco. Then in the 80s, Stevie Ray Vaughn comes along and there is a whole wave of blues appreciation. Then it fades for a while…I think it is about to come back and I’m excited about it.” Although he is known for classic blues, he tells us most of what he plays is contemporary and artists send him new music to review on a regular basis. He calls the newest interpretation of the music, “post-rock blues.” Wagner became involved with radio at 15, when his mother drove him to a local radio station to sit with the disk jockey. As a teenager, he landed a job at Los Angeles station KNAC. Uncle Sam had other plans. When he left for the Army, legendary Los Angeles DJ Jim Ladd, got his shift – Ladd’s first job in radio – and Wagner ended up in Vietnam. In 1992 Wagner was brought to KLON, now KKJZ. The station had organized the annual Long Beach Blues Festival in 1980 as a fundraiser and it took place each year on the athletic field at Cal State Long Beach. The festival was an iconic event with a national reputation, showcasing legendary blues musicians for 29 years. All the greats played in Long Beach - literally. It’s hard to name a blues musician alive in the 80s and 90s, who did not stop by CSULB. Tens of thousands of blues fans attended each year. The loss of the festival remains deeply mourned. Since the demise of the beloved festival, fans see Wagner as the keeper of the flame. Wagner has met and worked with many of the blues greats. “In 1979, when I was working at WJKL, at Elgin, Ill., I got a chance to interview Muddy Waters,” he recalled. “It gives me chills when I even say the words.” He cites that event as a life changer. The musicians still keep in touch with Wagner. While he was working on a Saturday, Roy Gaines called to say hello and Wagner played one of his songs for listeners. Facebook also keeps the popular radio personality in touch with his fans. Four-thousand fans follow his philosophical musings and humorous postings. Occasionally, Wagner reflects about the impermanence of life. Following a major injury, he is slowly recovering, but feeling his mortality. He is just as philosophical about his broadcast style. “The space in between the songs is where I live,” he said. “The thing that makes it magic is not knowing what’s going to happen next. That means I have to do it, I have to figure out what to do next. That’s the magic of being live.” “Nothin’ But the Blues” will host its next pledge drive the weekend of July 13 and July 21 on KKJZ 88.1. Tune in to hear Gary Wagner carry the flame and keep the blues alive.

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Calendar from page 15.

July 18

Fracas Brothers Vaudeville Show The Fracas Brothers Vaudeville show comes to the San Pedro Library at 3:30 p.m. July 18. This program addresses the all important issue of conflict resolution. Free tickets are required for the event and are handed out one hour prior to the show to the first 100 children ages 0 through 5. Details: (310) 548-7779 Venue: San Pedro Library Location: 931 S. Gaffey St., San Pedro

July 19

Galloping Snails and Other Fishy Tales The Cabrillo Marine Aquarium is hosting Galloping Snails and Other Fishy Tales from 9 a.m., to 12 p.m. July 19. Watch snails gallop and other fascinating seashore animal behavior through shoreline exploration and laboratory activities. Registration includes a Science at the Seashore T-Shirt. Admission is $75 for members and $85 for non-members. Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro KNX 1070 in San Pedro KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO’s award-winning series, “KNX On Your Corner”, will take a look at San Pedro and the Palos Verdes Peninsula on July 19 from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m. KNX will focus on the key issues and events happening in the community. Civic leaders and other guests will be featured during the broadcast that will provide insight to local history and happenings. Along with the broadcast, the public is invited to an open house and live broadcast at the International Bird Rescue where refreshments will be provided throughout the day. Details: www.cbsLA.com/onyourcorner Venue: International Bird Rescue Location: 3601 S. Gaffey Street. Mary Star of the Sea Parish Fiesta Mary Star of the Sea Parish is hosting its 66th annual fiesta, July 19 through July 21. The fiesta will operate July 19, from 5 p.m. to 12 a.m., July 20, from 12 p.m., to 12 a.m. and July 21, from 12, to 10 p.m. Free parking and free admission for all three days. Details: (310) 833-3541; www.marystar.org/fiesta Venue: Mary Star of the Sea Parish Location: 870 W. 8th St., San Pedro

Independent And Free.

July 21

Salt Marsh Open House The Cabrillo Marine Aquarium hosts the Salt Marsh Open House from 2 to 4 p.m. July 21. Join CMA educators to learn about the Salinas de San Pedro wetlands habitat at Cabrillo Beach by using binoculars and microscopes to observe live animals. There isn’t a cover charge. Details: (310) 548-7562; www. cabrillomarineaquarium.org Venue: Cabrillo Marine Aquarium Location: 3720 Stephen M. White Dr., San Pedro

July 23

Long Beach Sea Festival Movie on the Beach The Long Beach Sea Festival is showing Harry Potter on the beach from 8 to 10 p.m. July 23. Free movie and parking. Snacks, dinner and popcorn are available by purchase. Details: (562) 477-6820; www.beachclub2001@ charter.net Venue: Granada Beach Location: 5101 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

Theater/Film

July 12 – 25, 2013

July 11

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Steel Magnolias The Little Fish Theatre presents Steel Magnolias at 8 p.m. July 11. Admission is $23 to the event. Details: (310) 512-6030; www.littlefishtheatre.org Venue: Little Fish Theatre Location: 777 S. Centre St., San Pedro

July 12

Girls Night Out The Warner Grand Theatre is showing Under the Tuscan Sun, for Girls Night Out at 8 p.m. July 12. Details: (310) 548-2493; www.grandvision.org Venue: Warner Grand Theatre Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro Calendar continues on page 17.

Making Music and Friends in Willmore City Melina Paris, Music Writer

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lasshouse Construction Company and Romero Y Perez, which I previously reviewed in this paper, played at the first Friend Fest in Long Beach’s Drake Park. Glasshouse Construction Company kicked things off with John VanBlaircom on guitar and banjo and Guillermo Gómez Luna on guitar, banjo and glockenspiel, otherwise known as a xylophone. They loosely described themselves as acoustic folk Americana. They’re uncertain of the classification, but say it fits in terms of how people relate to their music. Their Myspace page reads: “They are at their best playing intimate songs to intimate audiences.” They continue: “Our music is haunting and melancholic, it comes from that place.” At the same time, they chuckled at the irony of that type of music being played at such a festival. Even so, people seemed to enjoy their beautiful harmonies and low-key vibe. Their first number, with VanBlaircom on guitar and Gómez Luna on banjo, was easy and soothing, almost like a lullaby. On “Bread Crumb Trail,” VanBlaircom performed a bit of spoken word, serving a dose of truth. The song told the story of lovers being real with one another and letting go of the past. What captures the attention, is that his words are powerful, but the delivery is soft spoken. “Exit Strategy,” has more of a rock sound to it, while providing soft guitar and great harmonies. “It Happens to Everything,” is a melodic number with a Spanish-style guitar. Luna’s silky tenor vocals come through tenderly. Check out their wry cartoon video of their single, Love Like Fire, on YouTube. If the vibe of Glasshouse Construction Company was relaxed and smooth, then the vibe of Spanish-fusion band Romero Y Perez, was energetic and infectious. Though, awesome when I featured them, they were on a totally different level on this day. The band is comprised of Johnny Romero, lead guitar, Victor Perez, rhythm guitar and

Cameron Smith, on the cajón (an Afro-Peruvian percussion instrument). Opening with “The Road,” I immediately noticed something very different. An elevated sound. Perez’s guitar rhythms were amplified on a microphone. The first few times I heard them, Perez’s guitar was not on a mic. Now, I witnessed in amazement, an entirely new intense sound. Actually, hearing the rhythm guitar augmented, Perez’s artful strumming is given new life. As always, he plays so fast his wrist appears to be spinning. He twists his wrists forward and back, while strumming and making percussive beats on his guitar. Next was a rock-infused number, in which Smith, on cajón, displayed his finesse with a brief solo. He mentioned after their set that he enjoys playing songs that change up from the 4x4 beat and adds something different. The three laughed a little about how they cue each other while playing. Romero’s biggest sign is when he momentarily stops playing and looks toward Smith. “Oh, now it’s my solo?” Smith quips out loud. “It gives me a break sometimes when my hands really need it, ” Romero responds. However it’s done, it works. These three have developed a fine art in playing together fluidly on standard numbers and improvisations. The next song, “Pirata,” (Pirate) moved its rhythms from fast to slow and back again. Perez’s strings truly sound just like chords being played on a piano as he builds the pace. Romero holds down a rocking lead throughout. This is one of those numbers Smith enjoys, with an alternate percussive beat. On “Sessa,” Romero looks to be enjoying this number. With vigorous strumming and playful stops and starts, he lays down hard rocking riffs with a spicy flavor. Smith adds a marching beat on cajón and Perez adds his own hand percussion between powerful rhythms. The next and last number was an improvisation. I found out when we spoke later that they agreed to call it, “Goblin King,” and it definitely caught

A Contemporary Promenade by: Andrea Serna, Arts and Culture Columnist

In the midst of the exclusive Promenade on the Peninsula, a new gallery is making a major impression. This July, Zask Gallery owners plan to open a mammoth exhibition in the form of a group show titled South Bay Contemporary. The ambitious show presents 90 artists from the Harbor Area, area including Long Beach, San Pedro and the Beach Cities. The exhibition is timed to celebrate the summer season and was created through an open call to artists. The gallery owners refer to it as “an exhibition of art by contemporary artists without boundary or theme.” Retired educators Peggy and Ben Zask, have created an impressive space focusing on original works by contemporary artists with strong local reputations. With advice from such

artists as Nick Agid and Michael Davis, the Zasks are beginning to build a stable of names familiar to art buffs. Peggy and Ben are both artists. Peggy comes from a more traditional practice of representational painting, while Ben tends toward assemblage. When they met, Ben was a framer and Peggy brought work to him for framing. This fitting beginning to their relationship has led to a shared goal of creating a relevant and active resource for arts education. One thing that distinguishes this gallery, is the intriguing blend of an informative view, including sculpture, conceptual art, abstraction and new media. Their mission is to bring to the South Bay, contemporary art education through exhibition of local artists of note, as

the attention of this crowd. Romero opens with a grooving lead as Perez incorporates flamenco, nimbly moving up and down guitar scales. The three of them moved straight into a unified rhythm to the point where Romero lifted his guitar, playing behind his head, without missing a beat. Showmanship, versatility, and don’t forget, high energy, encapsulates Romero Y Perez. When we chatted after their set, they touched a little on their growth as a group. The first thing they mention is that they will not do any more shows for free. When I spoke to them this past October, they explained one of the ways they gain exposure is by playing for free at community events around Long Beach. They love this town and have a lot of pride in it. This was their way of giving back to their hometown. They have done this for more than a year. “Now it is time to open new doors,” Romero said. Although, they did do the Friend Fest for free as members of the Long Beach Time Exchange. The Time Exchange is an organization, whose members exchange services for time dollars, rather than money. As they look for paying venues, part of their negotiations with club owners is that they will bring people in to see their show. It’s a win-win situation. The club makes money and so does the band. They are also buying new equipment and Smith is getting a new, custom made cajón. Toward the end of this school year, they were on a performing hiatus. All three attend Cal State Long Beach. “School was knocking us down,” they said in unison. They are very happy to be back playing gigs and writing new material. In fact, they will have an extended play album out most likely at the end of summer. Their song, “Sessa” will be on it for sure, along with other favorites. Check out Romero Y Perez on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Romero.Y.Perez Details on the Friend Fest Facebook: ( 5 6 2 ) 2 7 0 - 5 4 6 3 ; w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / TheFriendshipNeighborhood

well as national and international artists. They strive to show cutting edge contemporary and activist artists. They are also very interested in exploring art bridging areas such as engineering, architecture and new media. The couple was fortunate to find the space during the economic downturn, which enabled them to place their gallery in a modern, beautifully lit space, with steady foot traffic. The rare, juried group show has given them a chance to bring in new artists and introduce their venture to a broad audience. The opening reception for South Bay Contemporary, is 6 to 9 p.m. July 13. With more than 90 artists, there is a good chance that one or more of your favorite artists is in this show. Details: (310) 429-0973; www.pszaskgallery. com Venue: Zask Gallery Location: 550 Deep Valley Dr., #151, Rolling Hills Estates

Continued from page 11.

Paul Aghilipour –Manager

arrow accountant named William Blake, escorted by a graceful American Indian named “Nobody” in order to assist with Blake’s voyage to the spirit world — i.e., death. In The Lone Ranger, Depp has transmogrified into a “spirit-walker” sage who guides a white man on a transcendent journey toward an outlaw existence. “Nature is [indeed] out of balance.” It is Tonto’s revenge-driven mission to put some weight back on his people’s side of the scales. That he does so with more wit, humanity, physical grace, and presence of mind than anyone else in the story, is to be expected. With its imminent failure at the box office The Lone Ranger might be the movie that redefines the Hollywood business model. “A man can’t choose his brother. His brother chooses him.”

Calendar continued from page 16.

July 14

Stories of Peter Pan The Long Beach Shakespeare Theatre presents Stories of Peter Pan at 2 p.m. July 14. Enjoy thrilling stories of fantasy and adventure, read live and in costume. Designed for children and enjoyed by all ages. Admission is $10. Details: (562) 997-1494; www.lbshakespeare.org Venue: Long Beach Shakespeare Company Location: 4250 Atlantic Ave., Long Beach

July 19

FAME: The Musical The Warner Grand Theatre presents FAME: The Musical at 8 p.m. July 19. Set during the last years of New York City’s celebrated High School for Performing Arts, FAME: The Musical is bittersweet but ultimately an inspiring story of a diverse group of students as they commit to four years of artistic and academic work. Admission ranges between $15 and $25. FAME is also showing July 20, at 2 and 8 p.m. and July 21 at 3 p.m. Details: (310) 548-2493; www.grandvision.org Venue: Warner Grand Theatre Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

Art July 13

LA Shine, New Works by Mark Metzner Street influenced paintings with fine art sensibilities. Wood panel, canvas and vinyl figures. Venue: Gallery Azul Location: 520 W. 8th St. San Pedro South Bay Contemporary An ambitious show presenting 90 artists from the South Bay area including Long Beach, San Pedro and the Beach Cities. The exhibition is timed to celebrate summer season and was created through an open call to artists. An exhibition of art by contemporary artists without boundary or theme. Details: www.pszaskgallery.com Venue: Zask Gallery Location: 550 Deep Valley Drive, #151, Rolling Hills Estates

Continuing:

National Watercolor Society: 2013 All-Member Exhibition Ninety international artists exhibit in this annual display presented by the San Pedro based National Watercolor Society. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursdays through Sundays, Additional Hours First Thursday, from 5 to 8 p.m. Aug. 1. Highly recommended. Details: nationalwatercolorsociety.wildapricot.org Venue: NWS Gallery Location: 915 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro

3rd & Vermont – Michael Cannon 3rd & Vermont will be on exhibit, through Aug. 29, at Gallery 478. A long-time resident of the polyglot neighborhood surrounding the intersection of 3rd and Vermont Streets in Los Angeles, Cannon shoots the street as reflective of a varied and diverse racial and ethnic cultural dynamic. His street photographs are “unmanipulated” scenes, often quietly intimate; impartial mirror images of society caught in transition—a glimpse into the future that is now. Details: (310) 732-2150 Venue: Gallery 478 Location: 478 W. 7th St., San Pedro Labyrinth of Lines Blair’s painting is recognized for achieving a delicate balance between gesture and structure, intuition and preconception. Philippa Blair’s work has been widely exhibited in Australia, New Zealand, New York and Los Angeles. She currently lives and works in the port community of San Pedro. The exhibit runs through Aug. 10. Details: 310.600.4873 Venue: Warschaw Gallery Locations: 600 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro Long Beach Summer 1 A group exhibition of small works. Details: www.stonerosegallery.com Venue: Stone Rose Gallery Location: 342 E. 4th St., Long Beach

ACE: Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

Crow” painting-inspired face tells you everything you need to know about Tonto’s depth of backstory. This is one heavy cat. Flashes of surrealistic visions hang like suspended grace note trails of freshly performed peyote rituals, permeating the hot noon air of Utah’s iconic Monument Valley, where Westerns of the ‘30s, ‘40s and ‘50s were filmed — e.g., John Ford’s The Searchers (1956). The effect is as haunting as the most forceful cinematic political satires – reference Billy Wilder’s Ace in the Hole or Paul Verhoeven’s Starship Troopers as examples. Although it’s called The Lone Ranger, Johnny Depp’s Native American Tonto is the story’s clear protagonist. Like the Green Hornet television show, where Bruce Lee’s Kato was the ultimate non-white champion, Tonto leads the story, his story. We catch up with the elderly Tonto in 1933 during the Depression. The deeply wrinkled Native American, “works” in a San Francisco circus sideshow, where he stands mannequin-still in an Old West diorama — ironically entitled “The Noble Savage.” The label speaks volumes. Tonto has been turned into a literal “wooden Indian” by a society created by the greedy robber

barons that stole his people’s land, after using every trick in the book — and of course mass murder. The aged roughrider has been patiently waiting for just the right young boy to come along to indoctrinate into his personal story as a freedom fighter against a colonialist system that killed off more Native Americans than Jews systematically killed by Hitler. A quaint narrative-framing device transports us back to Colby, Texas circa 1869. Manifest destiny has a brand: “Unification of the country will come by iron rail,” a smarmy local politician named Latham Cole, (Tom Wilkinson) tells a crowd of onlookers. Laying down miles of railroad tracks to transport freshly mined silver is all that anyone in a position of power around these parts cares about — well nearly everyone. Arnie Hammer’s Ivy League lawyer John Reid, is an adult Boy Scout looking to follow in his sheriff brother Dan’s footsteps. The milquetoast John Reid, exhibits none of the rough-hewn traits of your standard Western hero. He isn’t stoic like a John Wayne or a Clint Eastwood. In fact, he has a tendency to whine. He isn’t particularly brave, and his lack of loyalty to the Indian that saves his life is less than impressive — to say the least. He doesn’t like guns because he’s a pacifist. Nonetheless, his ethics aren’t as responsible as he pretends. It doesn’t take Reid long to forget he owes his life to Tonto. He attempts to abandon Tonto — buried up to his head — before realizing that he still requires Tonto’s assistance. The scene is important because it shows how the “well-meaning” white man is still merely an exploiter of a more honest culture. Villain-of-the-day Butch Cavendish, (William Fichtner) rides in a boxcar shackled to Tonto on their way to an execution, masquerading as a trial. Butch has plenty of outlaw underlings looking to rescue their cruel, hare-lipped leader. Between Butch and Latham Cole, Tonto and the Lone Ranger have plenty of reason to get up in the morning. In Jim Jarmusch’s great 1995 post-modern Western Dead Man, Johnny Depp plays a straight-

Frank Ravalli –Proprietor

July 12 – 25, 2013

Blue Grotto Salad • Caesar Salad • Endives Salad • Wild Mushroom Risotto Caprese Heirloom • Chop Chop Salad • Pate and Charcuterie Cheese Platter • Mediterranean Steak Salad • Fresh Spinach Shrimp Salad Calamari Salad • Grilled Chicken Salad • Salad & Soup Farmer’s Market Omelet • Chicken Caesar Wrap • Sandwich du Jour Beef Koobideh • Chicken Koobideh • Filet Mignon Pita Gheimeh Stew • Ghormeh Sabzi Stew • Angel Hair Scampi Linguini and Clams • Rigatoni • Spaghetti Bolognaise Chicken Curry • Chicken Marsala • Pesto Primavera Spaghetti Provençale • Beef Koobideh • Chicken Koobideh Blue Grotto Burger (Must See It To Believe It) • Grilled Salmon Flame Grilled Breast of Chicken • Fish & Chips • Steak Frites

17

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SERVICES

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013092642 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: San Pedro Vapes, 447 W. 6th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Mailing Address: 22806 Sierra Dr., Carson, CA 90746. Registered owner(s): Anthony Camu, 1331 ½ Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802. Daniel Sandoval, 22806 Sierra Dr., Carson, CA 90746. This business is conducted by a general partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Anthony Camu, Partner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 6, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 06/13/13,

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013107913 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  gabbag.com, 8406 W 3rd Street, Los Angeles, CA 90048. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Jack Kupelian, 4722 W. 163 Street, Lawndale CA 90260. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Jack Kupelian, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 24, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 06/13/13,

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1 5 1 7 S . G a f f e y S t . • San Pedro, CA 90731

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS from previous page Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013116702 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: AK Accounting, 3320 S. Denison Ave., San Pedro, CA, 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Bilko Inc, 3320 S. Denison Ave., San Pedro, CA, 90731. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in 10/27/08. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ V. Anne Kohl, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 6, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common

law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 06/27/13, 07/11/13, 07/25/13, 08/08/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013111398 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Built Strong Construction, 1249 W. 14th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Brian Armstrong, 1249 W. 14th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Brian Armstrong, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 30, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of

itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 06/27/13,

07/11/13, 07/25/13, 08/08/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013116707 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Land’s End Properties, 2515 S. Wstern Ave., Suite 15. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) R. Clinton Miller, 1373 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ R. Clinton Miller, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 6, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New

Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 06/27/13,

07/11/13, 07/25/13, 08/08/13

Order to Show Cause For Change of Name Case No. NS028161 Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. Petition of Christian Martinez-Lopez for Change of Name. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Christian Martinez-Lopez filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Christian Martinez-Lopez to Eliseo Tomas Almaviva-Mata The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that inclu9des the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: 8/30/2013, Time: 8:30 AM,

Dept: G Room: 51. The address of the court is 415 West Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90802 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Los Angeles Daily Journal Date: Apr. 16, 2013 /s/ illegible. Judge of the Superior Court 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3/13 Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013135287 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Original Concrete Stone, 363 W. 12th St., San Pedo Ca 90731. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Kasey Alexander Diaz, 791 W. 6th Strert, Apt #2, San Pedro, Ca 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Kasey Alexander Diaz. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 28, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/11/13,

07/25/13, 08/08/13,08/22/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013123855 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: Point Fermin Marine, 2275 W. 25th Street #58, San Pedro, CA, 90732. County of

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013134123 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Fantasy Spa Mobile Pet Grooming, 2671 S. Cabrillo Avenue, San Pedro, CA 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Adrian Garcia, 2671 S. Cabrillo Avenue, San Pedro, CA 90732. Erica Garcia, 2671 S. Cabrillo Avenue, San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by a married couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Adrian Garcia. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 27, 2013. NoticeIn accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the

from p. 10

California

07/25/13, 08/08/13,08/22/13

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013135288 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Affordable PC Repair, 961 W. 21st Street, San Pedro, CA 90732. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) James Frances Sandor, 961 W. 21st Street, San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ James Frances Sandor. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 28, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/11/13,

07/25/13, 08/08/13,08/22/13

go cautiously’—which, we’ve all been busting our butts for years to get that two thirds, and that wasn’t the first sentence we wanted to hear coming out of their mouths.” In sharp contrast to those politicians, activists on the panel took a decidedly different view. “I would certainly have preferred the millionaires’ tax,” Livingston said, “But Prop. 30 as a win, made it even easier for us to say, ‘it was not enough and we have to keep fighting.’ And, so it really built into what we’ve been saying over and over, that this is really about the long-term strategy... not cutting services is not the same as restoring this state to where it once was—and going even beyond that to what’s the California that Californians deserve, and have paid for and really need.” To do that, said Pechthalt, “We’ve got to build a movement” that’s independent of politicians. “We’ve got to look to what’s going on in Brazil with a president who comes out of the Worker’s Party—Dilma Rousseff—and there are hundreds of thousands of people in the streets going ‘what you’re doing is not enough and we need more’—and that’s the lesson that we need to learn.” 19 July 12 - 25, 2013

07/25/13, 08/08/13,08/22/13

07/25/13, 08/08/13,08/22/13

date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/11/13,

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2013123135 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:  Rain Gutter Service, 1310 W. D St. #1, Wilmington, CA, 90744. County of Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Francisco Lopez, 1310 W. D St. #1, Wilmington, CA, 90744. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Francisco Lopez. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 13, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/11/13,

Los Angeles. Registered owner(s) Daniel Mead Fees Jr., 2275 W. 25th Street #58, San Pedro, CA, 90732. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above in N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.). S/ Daniel Mead Fees Jr.,. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 14, 2013. Notice- In accordance with Subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Business Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411 et. Seq., Business and Professions Code). Amended (New Filing): 07/11/13,

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July 12 - 25, 2013

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area


Rln 07 11 13 edition