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Food Trucks and Art Walks: Is the Honeymoon Over? p. 2 Study Show Affordable Housing May Not Be So Affordable p. 6 Nu Generation of Zydeco Artists Taking Over LB Bayou Festival p. 11 Shakespeare By The Sea Celebrates 15 Years In the Half Shell p. 15

By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor The delirium of USS Iowa fever is running hot in the Los Angeles Harbor and will probably continue to do so until its official grand opening over the Fourth of July weekend. But there’s an equally important date fast approaching: The grand opening of Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles­— potentially the largest and most significant showcase for handmade crafts in Southern California.

This isn’t a venue for cheap knockoffs and mass produced trinkets with “Made in (fill in the blank)” stickers slapped on them. We’re talking about handmade, handcrafted objects made in the United States that are utilitarian in nature while embodying the crafter’s inspiration. These kinds of crafted works range from wearable art to furniture, and from soap to desserts made from liquor. In the past, the Art Walk has flirted with the idea of incorporating a craft dimension to the First It’s Not a Swap Meet/to p. 5 The Local Publication You Actually Read June 15 - 28, 2012

Graphic: Mathew Highland

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Is the Food Truck Honeymoon Over?

By Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

June 15 - 28, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

“Gourmet” Food Trucks and communities with budding art walks have increasingly developed a relationship that’s akin to newlyweds. Everything is golden at first and that is so because each bring gifts to the table that complement the other, allowing both to thrive. Food trucks are their own marketing machines, each drawing hundreds of their fans to wherever they may be with a single tweet or a single post on their blog. Art walks provide the perfect festivallike venue that complements and maximizes a food trucks drawing power. Some of Los Angeles County’s artsy-est corners have art walks.

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And, in the past couple of years, they have begun inviting food trucks for their legions of fans to bolster their art walk’s foot traffic. Venice has First Fridays. Downtown Los Angeles has Second Thursdays. Long Beach has its love/hate relationship with food trucks in that they aren’t generally found at First Fridays or Second Saturdays, but can be found weekly at the ZaSo Design District in the summer time. And then, there’s San Pedro, and its First Thursday Art Walk, which has been a success in drawing huge crowds. But like any marriage, there are always things that one partner does that irks the hell out the other. This past year, Downtown Los

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day Symposium

Community members are invited to attend the World Elder Abuse Awareness Day Symposium, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 15, featuring experts in the field of elder abuse, aging issues, law enforcement, mental health and social services at the Alpert Jewish Community Center in Long Beach. RSVP required. Admission is free. Details: myrsvp@hotmail.com Venue: Alpert Jewish Community Center Location: 3801 E. Willow St., Long Beach

FuturePorts’ Annual Conference 2012: Keeping Our Freight Here

Let’s Roll It, an Asian fusion cuisine food truck brings foot-traffic to 6th Street during First Thursday’s Art Walk on June 7. Photo: Terelle Jerricks.

Angeles’ Art Walk was shut down after a car jumped a curb and hit a 2-month-old baby in his stroller, while the arts district was filled with pedestrians enjoying the food trucks, open galleries and bars. Though a food truck was not involved in

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the accident, the regulatory focus was on them. Amidst the fallout was a debate about whether the downtown art walk was more a drunken festival than a venue intended to showcase cutting-edge art. San Pedro’s Art Walk hasn’t yet had to traverse those crossroads but the traffic that the food trucks are drawing and their management is the root of recent skirmishes over the issue in San Pedro. Allyson Vought, Arts, Culture, and Entertainment subcommittee chair on food trucks in San Pedro, has been one of the strongest proponents of trucks. She notes that the trucks have done exactly what they were supposed to do: Draw foot traffic. Vought believes that food trucks have been effectively and logically managed. For the most part, the trucks do not directly compete with any of the brick-and-mortar restaurants. “I think we ran it in a very logical approach into how we facilitate the trucks, where we put them and how we bring them into town,” Vought said. “Now our rule is that we don’t bring in a truck that competes directly with a local stakeholder in the way of food. “We don’t have Greek trucks we don’t have Mexican trucks, fish and chip or anything like that. We really strive to be very selective on who we bring in.” There are no hard numbers that gauge the economic impact of food trucks on art walks. Vought, however, gauges the art walk’s success by how many bags of popcorn she gives out. “We give away hundreds of bags of popcorn and when we first started giving away popcorn we would give away 20 to 30 bags,” she said. The Whale & Ale restaurateur, Andrew Silber, notes that there is no right or wrong answer as to what the right number of food trucks there should be in the district. He just knows that there’s unequal distributions of burden and benefits related to the trucks. “I like the food trucks,” Silber said. “I was an early supporter. I just feel it’s all of our responsibility to protect this event (First Thursday Art Walk). We owe it to the community.” The complaints are that they block the entrances of some business; and because a truck can only operate if there is access to

Food Trucks/to p. 9

Join a discussion of important topics facing Southern California’s Goods Movement Industry on June 19. The topics include everything from policy to financing, technology and the future. The conference is from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Breakfast and registration starts at 7:15 a.m. FuturePorts has extended their member pricing to San Pedro Chamber members. FuturePorts members $99; non-members $120 ($140 after May 18); Gov’t/non-profit $70 ($85 after May 18). Details: www.FuturePorts.org, to download registration form Venue: DoubleTree by Hilton, San PedroPort of Los Angeles, Madeo Ballroom Location: 2800 Via Cabrillo Marina, San Pedro

Summer Activities

Are you and your family looking to get in shape this summer? Join Long Beach Parks, Recreation and Marine for brand new classes in preschool, youth and adult fitness: Fit for a Kid This is a fun fitness and nutrition education class for children. From hula-hoops to hopping sacks, the class incorporates a variety of activities to develop a good attitude towards fitness. Taught by Naima Woodson at Bixby Knolls Park, costs is $50 per child and takes place every Thursday in three sessions. Body Sculpt Resistance training can be intimidating. However, developing lean muscle is crucial to building an efficient metabolism to drop weight and keep it off. All equipment will be provided, and walk-ins are welcome with an additional cost of $10. For adults 18 and older, $85 per person. at Marrillyn McDowell Studio of Dance, 324 Redondo Ave., Long Beach. Details: (562) 570-3111; www.LBParks. org

Tell the City of Long Beach What You Think

The Council of Business Associations has developed and released an online customer service survey to the Long Beach business community as a way to gather feedback that allows small business owners to describe their experiences with the city’s licensing, permitting and inspection processes. COBA has met monthly for three years discussing common issues and concerns pertaining to businesses in Long Beach. The most common issue was the perceived difficulty of going through the “process” to open, expand, or modify a business in Long Beach. The goal of the survey is to provide enough specific feedback, both good and bad, that can be analyzed and presented to city management with solutions to implement and help change any negative perception of Long Beach and create a real “business friendly” environment. Link to the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/cobasurvey Details: (562) 595-0081

Harbor Commission:

Thumbs Down to PCAC on Rancho By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

“History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.”

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History isn’t exactly repeating itself as the Port of Los Angeles legalistically resists the pressure of community activists trying to protect the health and safety of their community—this time against the low-probability/high casualty threat of an explosion at Rancho’s LPG facility on North Gaffey. But there are troubling similarities to the China Shipping controversy of more than a decade ago. Thanks to an historic California appeals court decision, that conflict forever changed the Port’s environmental posture and process, but not its insular, bureaucratic, industry-oriented culture. The question now is how the tensions between the recent changes and the old habits will play out. Superficially, things don’t seem promising, but more may be happening beneath the surface. On June 7, acting on the recommendation of staff, POLA’s board unanimously rejected a motion from the Port Community Advisory Committee which called for the Port to revoke Rancho’s rail permit (covering a short stretch of land south of the facility), to work with the community, Rancho to perform a Risk Management Plan and to establish a working group to assist in examining the risks. The group would include representatives of the Los Angeles Fire Department, United States Geological Service, the Environmental Protection Agency, university research community, local organizations and the PCAC.

—Mark Twain

At one level, it was just another replay of Rancho advancing the argument that it was fully in compliance with all regulations, while community critics highlighted just how inadequate those regulations are a matter of public record dating back to David Prior’s groundbreaking reporting for the Los Angeles Times back in 1977. But there were hints that this deadlock might not continue indefinitely. The legalistic reasoning laid out by Deputy Executive Director Dave Mathewson was applauded by Rancho’s representatives and attacked by community representatives from PCAC, neighborhood councils, homeowner groups and environmental organizations. Commissioners clearly left the door open for future action, particularly in concert with other city agencies and several community activists, including former port lawyer Pat Nave, the PCAC representative from Northwest San Pedro Neighborhood Council, who strongly encouraged them to consider creative, proactive measures beyond the scope of business-as-usual. “Go under section 602(b) of the city charter, ask the city council to put the facility in the harbor district,” said Nave, urging the commissioners to take a leading role in dealing with Rancho. “We’re asking you to partner with us…for new siting of this facility,” said June Smith, former PCAC co-chairwoman, speaking as a priThumbs Down on Rancho/to p. 21

The Local Publication You Actually Read June 15 - 28, 2012

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Fracking? Not Here! By Lyn Jensen, Carson Reporter OXY USA, California’s largest natural gas and oil producer, and a subsidiary of Occidental Petroleum Corp., proposes to renew oil and natural gas production from the historic Dominguez Oil Field in Carson, but the plan is being met with concern. According to a company statement, “After the initial test, which showed that oil and natural gas can be safely recovered in commercial qualities, Oxy applied to the City of Carson and other regulatory agencies for permission to drill additional wells and construct a production facility. Pending completion of the environmental review and permitting, construction would begin in January 2013 and operations would commence in January 2014.” Oxy wants to construct a production facility, in the Dominguez Technology Center, to produce and transport roughly 6,000 barrels of oil and 3 million cubic-feet of natural gas per day. Oil and gas would be transported via two new underground pipelines. The oil produced will likely be

sold and shipped to local refineries. The city must give final approval to the project. A Draft Environmental Impact Report is scheduled for late summer or early fall, after which will come a 45-day public review period. Planning Commission and city council meetings on the subject are expected late this year. Permits to commence production must be secured from the Air Quality Management District, which could delay the project by as much as three years. According to a report by the Los Angeles Economic Development Corporation report, If approved, the Dominguez Advanced Recovery Project could generate $2.6 million in state and local tax revenues by the proposed investment and provide 330 jobs in Los Angeles County. Oxy and the City of Carson organized two community meetings, on May 29 at the Congresswoman Juanita Millender-McDonald Community Center, and on May 30 at California State University Dominguez Hills. Carson: Frack No!/ to p. 18

USS Iowa is Here!

On June 8, hundreds of well-wishers came out to watch the the old battleship make its way up the Main Channel to its new home at Berth 84. Here the crowds line the boardwalk at Ports O’ Call Village. Photo: Terelle Jerricks.

Harbor Interfaith’s New Center Opens

June 15 - 28, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Harbor Interfaith Services executive director/CEO Tahia Hayslet, right, marks the social service organization’s opening of its Famly Resource Center on 9th Street in San Pedro with county, city and state representatives on June 9. Photo: Terelle Jerricks.

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from p. 1

It’s Not a Swap Meet Thursday event, only to watch it devolve into something closer to a swap-meet. In downtown San Pedro, where division is as common as liver spots when it comes to the direction of the arts district, there is uncommon unity in the belief that hordes of imported trinket peddlers do not fit the vision of a destination town. Once fully established, Crafted is expected to serve as an incubator space for up to 500 microbusinesses and drawing up to 500,000 visitors a year. This is project no. 2 for the three-person development team, Wayne Blank, Howard Robinson and Alison Zeno in Santa Monica. Since opening in 1997, Bergamot Station has become a destination point in the art world for both collectors and artists, drawing 600,000 visitors annually.

Lindsay Zuelich’s Wood on the Brain, a Crafted vendor that crafts wearable and home décor objects from wood. Then there are the food related vendors such as the Cake Bar, which bakes any imaginable pastry with its main ingredient being liquor or Hepp’s Salt Co., which has many variety of cooking salts. Zeno comes from a design background, as does everyone on her team, and has been in the arts industry for more than 30 years. She explained that her team avoided the traditional jury process of selection, noting bias amongst different disciplines of crafts. “Everybody has such a distinct point view of their own and then applying that to their peers,”

began with the desire to promote family literacy and the recognition early on that with a holistic approach, family literacy could be the catalyst that mitigate some of the more destructive forces affecting low-income immigrant families. For Cicketic, that meant carving out a place for where mothers can have a bit of peace and quiet. “The result was something like a quilting bee sort of an environment,” Cicketic explained. This space turned out to be a classroom in Meyler Elementary School in Harbor Gateway, she noticed that most of the women had hidden talents that they took for granted like embroidery, knitting, crocheting and sewing. Before long, immigrant women from around the world were sharing their native knowledge of embroidery, sewing, crocheting while teaching each other English with assistance from Cicketic, who is a retired Los Angeles Unified School District teacher. This is what Zeno encountered when she met Cicketic and was introduced to fINdings: “I came down here and talked to Annette and learned about her passion for family literacy, and helping people finding gainful employment and it resonated with the work that we’re doing,” Zeno explained. “You can see it in the quality of work that they’re doing. It’s an excellent example of

what we keep saying, ‘It’s about high quality, not high end.’ “It doesn’t matter that some pieces sell for $2.50. It’s not about $1,000 sweatshirts. Everybody should have the opportunity to appreciCrafted/ to p. 10

Annette Cicketic, above, founder of fINdings Art Center will have a space in Crafted for hand made items by participants in fINding’s family literacy program. Right, Crafted’s Alison Zeno handed out brochures during First Thursday on June 7. Crafted’s grand opening is June 29. Photos: Terelle Jerricks.

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Zeno explained. “And, what we wanted to do was stress a broad definition of craft… So I couldn’t get a committee of people who represented everything from skateboard art to fiber art. “At the end of the day, what we’re trying to create here is not a juried art affair with prizes, we’re trying to bring together a quality group of visual artists who have an opportunity to make a living making the things they love and they have to have a consumer appeal to do it.” The concept of raising in importance process to the level of substance is a common refrain amongst Zeno and the craft community. One of the first crafting organizations to sign on to Crafted was fINdings Art Center, which sells handcrafted stationery goods, clothing, aprons and handbags made from recycled or reused materials. The makers of these goods are the women who are a part of fINdings’ family literacy program. “We applied for Crafted and of course they fell in love with our concept and they offered us first contract,” Annette Cicketic, founder of fINdings said. “So we are the first contracted in Crafted to have a booth. And they loved the concept of women and the nonprofit, and community involvement.” Cicketic explained that the art center really

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Zeno has been the face of Crafted from the start, pitching the idea to the Port as well as to the community. With gravitas garnered from Bergamot Station’s success, she has been able to inspire a degree of confidence and comfort in the Harbor Area. Random Lengths News caught up with Zeno at fINdings Art Center during First Thursday’s Art Walk this month and picked her brain about the vision of Crafted. She had just fought through the 6 o’clock traffic after an already long day to pass out handbills for the Crafted grand opening, and then touch bases with various community members amidst the throngs of people there for the Art Walk. So far, there are more than 70 crafted business listed as sponsors that will have booths at the super marketplace for crafts. By opening day, Zeno expects to have close to 100 crafted artists locked in and ready go. Though Crafted is a juried exhibition space, there’s enough flexibility to allow for the diversity that is exhibited by its crafted sponsors, like K.C. Sears who describes her boutique, Make Shop Live, as eco-chic meets funky vintage—a community that supports a lifestyle that embraces process over product, by making wearable and furnishing goods from “up-cycled” materials.

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Affordable Housing Out of Reach

Traffic Fatality

Long Beach — A 51-year-old woman died, June 9, as result of a hit-and-run collision at the intersection of Anaheim Street and Linden Avenue. Long Beach Police responded to the incident at about 9:51 p.m., when they found the woman laying on the roadway on Anaheim Street. The Long Beach Fire Department paramedics took the woman, who had serious injuries, to the local hospital, where she was pronounced dead. The preliminary investigation revealed that the suspect vehicle was traveling westbound on Anaheim Street when it struck the victim. At the time, the victim was in the No. 2 lane attempting to cross northbound Anaheim Street on the west side of Linden Avenue. The suspect vehicle stopped near the victim and both driver and passenger were seen getting out of the vehicle momentarily and walking up to the victim before getting back in and driving westbound on Anaheim Street. The suspect vehicle is described as a black, 4-door Honda, unknown model, which likely sustained moderate to major front-end damage, as well as a broken headlight. The driver was described as a male Hispanic in his mid-20s, wearing a white t-shirt. The passenger was described as a female Hispanic with shoulder-length hair. The victim, whose identity is being withheld until next of kin can be notified, was a resident of San Pedro. Any witnesses to the collision or anyone seeing a vehicle matching the suspect vehicle description is strongly encouraged to call (562) 570-7355. Anonymous tips may be submitted at www.tipsoft.com.

UTLA Reaches Tentative Agreement with LAUSD

June 15 - 28, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Los Angeles—United Teachers Los Angeles reached a tentative agreement with the Los Angeles Unified School District, June 8, to help save jobs and programs for the 2012-13 school year. Under the agreement, 4,149 full-time positions would be restored, including elementary arts educators, nurses, Options program instructors, librarians and secondary counselors. All programs threatened would be restored, although the Adult Education, Childhood Education and the School Readiness Language Development programs will be restructured and some positions will be lost. Also, class size will be maintained at current levels with no across-the-board-class-size increases. And, the number of furlough days would be directly tied to Gov. Jerry Brown’s initiative; meaning, employees would take from zero to 10 furlough days in the year that follows, depending on the governor’s education funding initiative on the November ballot. If the governor’s initiative passes, funds would be unlocked to eliminate or reduce furlough days. LAUSD also would have to use any year-end surplus to reduce the number of furloughs. If the initiative fails furloughs will take place. However, if it is found that at the end of the fiscal year funding levels sufficed, the school district must reimburse employees for lost pay. UTLA member votes will be counted and available by June 16.

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California Creates Statewide Underwater Park System

Eureka, Calif.­—On June 6 the Fish and Game Commission voted to adopt a network of Marine Protected Areas for northern California. The vote marks the completion of the country’s first statewide network of underwater parks, protecting coastal waters and sea life. News Briefs/ to p. 18

New Report Shows Persistent Problem Worsening By Paul Rosenberg, Senior Editor

If you’re working a minimum wage job in America, where can you afford to live? Other than your parents’ basement, the answer is simple: nowhere. That’s according to “Out of Reach 2012,” the National Low Income Housing Coalition’s most recent version of its annual report. “In no state can a minimum wage worker afford a two-bedroom unit at Fair Market Rent, working a standard 40-hour work week,” the report states, above a map showing the number of hours of minimum wage work required in each state. The map shows how deep and widespread the problem is. For minimum-wage workers, the most affordable states are Arkansas and West Virginia at 63 hours—though the territory of Puerto Rico is a steal at 54 hours. It takes at least two minimum wage jobs to afford a two-bedroom apartment in 23 states. And in six states—including California—it takes at least three minimum-wage jobs. Beyond that, the report notes, there are “very few places in the United States where even a onebedroom unit…is affordable to someone working full-time at the minimum-wage.” “So what?” You might think. “Minimum wage jobs are just for teenagers.” Not true. The report notes, “According to analysis from the Economic Policy Institute, 78 percent of minimum- wage workers work at least 20 hours per week and 80 percent are at least 20 years old, dispelling the myth that the majority of minimum-wage workers are teenagers working part-time afterschool.” What’s more, there are millions of workers making more than the minimum-wage, but not by much. There are 9.8 million workers categorized as “extremely low income,” who make less than 30% of area median income—a regional income figure adjusted to family size. From 2007 to 2009, another 900,000 workers fell into the “extremely low income” category. But the problem even extends to the category of renters as a whole. “[O]ver half of all renters (53 percent) are cost burdened, paying over 30 percent of their income for housing,” the report notes. This is a far cry from how things used to be. “Only 25 percent of renters faced such a burden in 1960,” it adds. Thus, minimum-wage workers are canaries in the coal mine—the most sensitive indicators of an affordability problem impacting the majority of renters in America, squeezed by low wages on the one hand, and scarce, expensive housing on the other. Which is the real problem? “You really have to say it’s both,” said Megan Bolton, the coalition’s [National Low Income Housing Coalition] senior research analyst, a coauthor of the report. And while both factors have been significant over the years, both have intensified significantly with the housing bubble collapse, the financial crisis, and the ensuing Great Recession. “With the housing crisis, we’ve seen as people have become more wary of home ownership, renting has become more appealing,” Bolton said, focusing first on the demand side. “The demand for rents have gone up, and vacancy rates have gone down.” As a result, “It’s become more and more difficult for those with lower incomes to find affordable rent.” On the other hand, “There’s been massive income loss due to layoffs. You often need to work multiple jobs to afford the rent, as the report says.” According to free market ideology, none of this should be happening. But it is. For one thing, both labor and housing markets deviate from free

market ideology in various ways—not least in the phenomena of “sticky prices” that don’t respond instantaneously to changes in supply and demand. But the two markets are increasingly at odds with one another as globalization intensifies, with worldwide labor markets driving down wages, while worldwide financial markets attract real-estate investments that help drive up highend housing costs and shrink supplies of affordable housing. The problem has been intensified by the Great Recession, but goes back much further, coalition president Sheila Crowley told Random Lengths. “The founding of coalition was in response to a major policy shift,” Crowley explained. Nixon declared a moratorium on building public housing, and “consolidated all the ‘War on Poverty’ programs into block grants.” “In 1970s, there was a small surplus of rental housing the poorest people could afford,” Crowley said. “It was crummy housing, but there was a sufficient supply.” Serious problems emerged under the Reagan Administration, with the beginning of wage stagnation (“Wages at lowest levels have grown down, not up,” Crowley noted), the explosion of homelessness, and “an exodus of government from funding programs.” The 1986 tax code revision was particularly devastating, “They did away with tax breaks that landlords used to get for depreciation” which supported low-income housing, Crowley said. At the same time, gentrification significantly reduced older affordable units, particularly in urban centers. While homeless programs—resulting from the Homeless Assistance Act of 1987—were primarily short-term, the new programs from that time were primarily structured to provide housing for those making around 60 percent of median income— leaving a big gap for extremely low-income renters. “You end up with very little to offer the people who are not homeless but are too poor to afford a tax credit unit,” Crowley explained. Back in 2000, the policy solution was supposed to be the National Housing Trust Fund, which in turn would fund state-level efforts. The federal budget was in surplus, and hopes were high that it would be fully funded, Crowley noted. Now, more than a decade later, the working poor are still waiting. “We can safely say that the housing crisis and Great Recession exacerbated the existing crisis.” Bolton added. “We produced a report in 2004

called ‘Losing Ground in the Best of Times: Low Income Renters in the 1990s. This report compared the housing situations of low income renters in 1990 and 2000 and shows that during that time of strong economic growth there were some declines in the percentages of low income households with unaffordable cost burden, indicating that increased incomes did contribute to a slight improvement in the conditions of low income households. “However, the housing problems that remained became more concentrated among the extremely low income, and furthermore, the shortage of affordable units increased over that same time period.” “Conversely,” Bolton continued, “since the beginning of the Great Recession, we’ve seen a significant increase in the percentage all households with unaffordable and severely unaffordable cost burden and a continuing decline in the supply of affordable housing. “One thing that has held true for the past few decades is the disinvestment in federal programs that create affordable housing affordable to the lowest income households. This indicates that in good economic times and bad, if there aren’t real efforts to build new affordable housing, these longstanding problems will not go away.” Two final slices of data analysis help define the problem more clearly. First is the geographic diversion away from free market expectations. Whatever the full range of reasons, the geographic variation in housing costs is striking. While it takes 3.3 minimum wage jobs to afford a twobedroom apartment in California on average, this figure varies tremendously between counties or even metro areas. It’s 1.9 in Bakersfield, for example, compared to 2.8 in Riverside, 3.5 in Los Angeles or Long Beach, 4.0 in Orange County and 4.6 in San Francisco. Second is the impact of policy on the wage side. Bolton provided Random Lengths with data from the first Out Of Reach report in 1989. Back then, it took more than three full-time jobs at minimum wage to afford a two-bedroom apartment in 18 states plus the District of Columbia. But that was after 8 years under Reagan with no increase to keep up with inflation. Using wage rates from the next increase. In 1991, the number of states requiring more than three full time jobs would have been just five—a jarring indication of how much a higher minimum wage matters. In short, the message is clear: Policy matters. It can shape markets to meet human needs—or to neglect them.

Building On the Public’s Dime

Marriott developer seeks $67.3 million tax subsidy By James Preston Allen, Publisher

Homeowners Bill of Rights—

Going the Way of the 48-State Settlement By Sherry Hernandez, author and member of Occupy San Pedro

“I see in the near future a crisis approaching that unnerves me and causes me to tremble for the safety of my country. Corporations have been enthroned, an era of corruption in high places will follow, and the money-power of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people until the wealth is aggregated in a few hands and the Republic is destroyed.” —President Abraham Lincoln • Community tools to prevent blight after banks foreclosed upon homes. • Tenant protections after foreclosures. • Enhanced law enforcement to defend homeowner rights—paid for by fees imposed on banks. • A special grand jury to investigate financial and foreclosure crime (details: www.oag. ca.gov). Henry Walker, CEO of Farmers and Merchants Bank, stood before the Long Beach City Council and stated that these proposed Homeowners Bill of Rights would continue to damage the banking industry. He even went so far as to praise the existing home foreclosure process and that borrowers already had rights when they signed notes agreeing to repay the home loans. For the state to interfere with those contractual loan obligations, he argued, is wrong and, “in fact I almost think it’s un-American.” (Click link [http://tinyurl.com/LBCouncilVideos2012] Bank Regluations Needed/ to p. 8

“A newspaper is not just for reporting the news as it is, but to make people mad enough to do something about it.” —Mark Twain Vol. XXXIII : No. 12

Published every two weeks for the Harbor Area communities of San Pedro, RPV, Lomita, Harbor City, Wilmington, Carson and Long Beach. Distributed at over 350 locations throughout the seven cities of the Harbor Area.

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Random Lengths News editorial office is located at 1300 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731, (310) 519-1016. Address correspondence regarding news items and news tips only to Random Lengths News, P.O. Box 731, San Pedro, CA 90733-0731, or email to editor @randomlengthsnews.com. Send Letters to the Editor or requests for subscription information to james @ randomlengthsnews.com. To be considered for publication, all Letters to the Editor should be typewritten, must be signed, with address and phone number included (these will not be published, but for verification only) and be kept to about 250 words. To submit advertising copy email adv@randomelengthsnews.com or reads@ randomlengthsnews.com. Extra copies and back issues are available by mail for $3 per copy while supplies last. Subscriptions are available for $35 per year for 27 issues. Random Lengths News presents issues from an alternative perspective. We welcome articles and opinions from all people in the Harbor Area. While we may not agree with the opinions of contributing writers, we respect and support their 1st Amendment right to express those opinions. Random Lengths News is a member of Standard Rates and Data Reporting Services and the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. (ISN #08916627). All contents Copyright 2012 Random Lengths News. All rights reserved.

June 15 - 28, 2012

Columnists/Reporters Lyn Jensen Carson B. Noel Barr Music Dude John Farrell Curtain Call Assoc. Publisher/Production CoGretchen Williams Entrée ordinator Calendar Suzanne Matsumiya 14days@randomlengthsnews.com info@graphictouchdesigns.com Photographers Managing Editor Terelle Jerricks, Slobodan Dimitrov, Terelle Jerricks Diana Lejins editor@randomlengthsnews.com Contributors Assistant Editor Congresswoman Janice Hahn, Zamná Ávila Danny Simon reportersdesk@randomlengthsnews.com Cartoonists Ann Cleaves, Andy Singer, Senior Editor Paul Rosenberg Matt Wuerker Publisher/Executive Editor James Preston Allen james@randomlengthsnews.com

For Los Angeles in particular, a city regularly hit-up to subsidize housing and commercial developments, it is not stretch of the imagination to ask for a return on our dollar. We want an equity position in the real estate deals equal to or greater than that which we invest. “What’s in it for us?” should be the standard answer to anyone who comes asking the way Williams/ Dame & Associates has come. Instead of engaging in these sorts of tax give-backs that has become so common place these days, the city should be forcing its pension fund managers to invest in Los Angeles in ways that guarantee higher rates of return. It’s not like they’re swimming in Wall Street success anyway. Part of the dysfunction of the city’s budget is that when the pension funds don’t make enough on their investments the city has to “back fill” the funds up to 105 percent of their forecast obligations. This can amount to as much as $400 million per year. In other words, the city has a legal obligation to pay on future retirement costs, which is only fair. What the city doesn’t do well is manage these funds for optimum returns and relies on institutions like Northern Trust to manage them. As you will recall, our erstwhile City Attorney Carmen Trutanich, was suing Northern Trust for fiscal malfeasance before he decided to run for the District Attorney’s office. Can we hear from him now on this latest Marriott Hotel deal or shall he just go back to litigating with Northern Trust? In the end, the public is under no obligation to give away tax breaks to private entities without just compensation. But there are a few caveats to this rule. Take for example Los Angeles County’s recent grant of $4.7 million to Harbor Interfaith Shelter to construct its Family Resource Center. When the non-profit sector steps in to fulfill a public service that goes beyond what government can do adequately, the pay back to the people comes in the services rendered, as well as, the jobs that are created. This, however, is not the case with the LA Live Marriott Hotel. Unless, that is, they are promising to house the homeless in luxury accommodations.

The Local Publication You Actually Read

When the U.S. housing market tanked in 2008, former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan admitted “that he had put too much faith in the self-correcting power of free markets and had failed to anticipate the self-destructive power of wanton mortgage lending.” You would hope that by year four of dealing with the fallout from the financial sector’s hubris that some of Greenspan’s newfound humility would have spread throughout the industry. Apparently, it has not. Early this past month, on May 8, the Long Beach City Council heard public comments on whether to endorse Attorney General Kamala Harris call for the state legislature to enact the Homeowners Bill of Rights. Enshrined in this package of bills are guarantees of: • Basic standards of fairness in the mortgage process, including an end to dual-track foreclosures. • Transparency in the mortgage process, including a single point of contact for homeowners.

It seems like every time certain private investors come up short on their grand development ideas––like the current plan to build a 23-story, 392-room Marriott hotel next to LA Live––they want to beg, borrow or steal money from the public purse­—with the best of intentions. The Los Angeles City Council is considering a $67.3 million tax give-away even while prepping the public for further austerity measures that would deeply cut into the city’s budget. This current attempt to pillage the public purse––this time by Portland, Ore. developer William/ Dame & Associates, with its partner American Life Inc., a Seattle real estate management corporation–– is just the latest tax give-back coming to City Hall. How will our new Councilman Joe Buscaino vote? Previously, the City of Los Angeles agreed to provide $249 million in tax relief within 25 years to the Wilshire Grand Hotel, just five blocks north of the Los Angeles Convention Center on Olympic Boulevard. It also is providing AEG a $300 million bond to construct an adjacent football stadium. Now I’m not one to stand in the way of progress, or even to stop these kinds of developments that will create good jobs in a down economy. I believe that government has a significant role in stimulating the economy. But I believe that we, the public, should be getting something more for our investments. Jobs are good. New buildings are great, but how about a share of the profits too? All too often in this great nation of ours––a nation that touts self-reliance and free market enterprise–– the captains of industry come hat-inhand looking for subsidies, bail-outs and special funding for their pet projects. More often than not, our government just gives it to them with few strings attached. How about a return on our investments? Just think of all the technologies that have been invented by U.S. government contracts–GPS mapping, fax machines, cell phones, not to mention pharmaceutical drugs. Just think if the public received just a small royalty from these inventions, our reliance on taxes would diminish in direct proportion to our return on these investments. Not such a foreign idea to a country wedded to stock market investing.

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RANDOMLetters Thoughts About Frankenbanking

June 15 - 28, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Oops…! J.P. Morgan made a bad bet and it’s looking like it will cost $5 billion…(at least). That’s what happens when a bank decides to take all of its investments and offset them in a one-time-put-allyour-money-on-black-roll-thewheel-Vanna-package deal—a task undertaken (badly) by the official fall guy—aka the “London Whale.” Had he succeeded, we the schleppers of the earth wouldn’t have heard squat. Meanwhile, whale man would have received

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a tidy bonus indeed (read: zillions of pounds). I bet he was peeing his pants as he bought up his massive positions, at last able to afford that portable pool for his summer cottage. Oops. He failed. Bad bet, and suddenly J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon is saying “Oh crap!” (with a knowing, insider grin). Not because a $5 billion loss really matters to J. Dimon. Ya win some, ya lose some, right? What’s really bothering them is that normal people (the 99% who don’t have direct access to God), find it repulsive and worse—completely freaky—to lose $5 billion. Call me naïve, but

I tend to think the same. To J.P. Morgan the peons (i.e. you and me) don’t get it. It’s mathematics… It’s logic… Sure, a $5 billion loss sounds impressive, but that’s because we don’t all share the inner wisdom of world class, übersmart bankers!!! We’re stuck in our ridiculous world where $1,500 is the difference between paying our kid’s preschool tuition or not. It reminds me…About ten years ago some very smart men working for Bush decided to create a trading desk for terrorist event futures. Brilliant! Capture the wisdom of markets to establish the probability of More Letters/ to p. 21

from p. 7

Bank Regulations Needed

to see the video of the Long Beach City Council proceeding and skip to the 1:25:00 mark.) In reply to Walker’s outburst: It is established case law that, “The most elementary conceptions of justice and public policy require that the wrongdoer shall bear the risk of the uncertainty which his own wrong has created.” The U.S. Treasury’s Office of Thrift Supervision noted in 2010 that, “The FBI estimates that 80 percent of all mortgage fraud involves collaboration or collusion by industry insiders.” This confirms what one of the country’s top fraud experts, William K. Black, professor of economics and law and senior regulator during the Savings and Loan crisis in 1980s, has said for years. Black said that it was fraud by the big banks—more than anything done by the little guy—that caused the financial crisis. The lenders have proven time and again that they cannot be simply left to their own devices. Do I even need to mention the $2 billion-plus lost by J. P. Morgan with no accountability? Foreclosures and bankruptcies have always been with us, but never in the epidemic proportions that we are finding today. The bankers cannot possibly expect us to believe that millions of families responsible enough to want to own their own home to care for their families were simply being “irresponsible deadbeats.” Walker stated that the homeowners had rights when they signed the note and deed of trust. Can I see a show of hands for those who were allowed to negotiate the terms? Now, can I see a show of hands of those who are homeless now? Often the argument by our officials and bankers has been that the home buyer has legal recourse. We filed a lawsuit in 2007 and we have yet to have our day in court. We are out-financed by the banks who have unlimited resources. Thus far, we have invested more than $300,000 trying to save our home over and above our principle mortgage payments. Let me outline one of the reasons why lenders need regulations: In 2009, Time magazine named Angelo Mozillo one of the “25 people to blame for the financial crisis.” CNN

named Mozilo as one of the “Ten Most Wanted Culprits” of the 2008 financial collapse in the United States. Countrywide has made many settlements within the past five years due to their fraud. Following is a list of settlements that not only acknowledge illegal behavior, but serve as evidence that the home buyers were not the perpetrators of this fraud: 10/6/2008: $8.68 billion dollar settlement with Countrywide for the State of California—relief for home buyers—$0 to $100; 8/3/2010: $600 million dollar settlement with Countrywide Financial with the New York City Pension Funds—relief for home buyers—0; 10/15/2010: $67.5 million settlement with the SEC— relief for homebuyers—0; 2/2/2011: Former Countrywide executives make a $6.5 million settlement with California—relief for homebuyers—0; 6/29/2011: BofA settles with 22 institutional investors for $14 billion—relief for homebuyers—0; 12/21/2011 – Countrywide settles bias suit for $335 million dollars for discrimination—relief for homebuyers—to be determined. Now we have a new settlement on the books. The $25 billion 48-state settlement! You know, the one where those who had been wrongly foreclosed upon were going to get as much as $2,000 each? Well, it seems our governor has budget problems… so the relief to the home buyers looks like it’s going to be (you guessed it) ZERO! With all the settlements and court cases regarding bank fraud still pending, the lenders are still allowed to foreclose and remove families from their homes. This is making countless families homeless and destroying the moral of millions of American citizens. Former California treasurer and Democrat, Phil Angelides was quoted in the May 14 edition of Newsweek saying, “It is perplexing at best, and it’s deeply troubling at worst” in regards to the lack of investigations and prosecutions in this housing debacle. The public needs to stand up before it is too late and have lost our rights completely.

Community Alerts

Draft Port Master Plan Amendment No. 27 A public hearing on draft amendment No. 27 will be held at 8:30 a.m. June 21, during the regularly scheduled meeting of the Los Angeles Board of Harbor Commissioners. Written comments may be submitted to the Port of Los Angeles Planning and Economic Development Division 425 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro, CA 90731 or emailed to mcham@portla.org. Deadline for comments is 5 p.m., Thursday, June 21. The Draft Port Master Plan Amendment No.21 is available on the Port of Los Angeles website, www.portoflosangeles.org and available for public inspection at the Port of Los Angeles Planning and Economic Division. Venue: Harbor Administration Building Location: 425 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro NOAA Eelgrass Public Meetings The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will hold its Southern California public meeting on eelgrass preservation at 10 a.m. June 26 in Long Beach. Eelgrass warrants a strong protection strategy because of the important biological, physical, and economic values it provides. NOAA Fisheries Services developed this policy to establish and achieve a goal of protecting this resource and its functions, including spatial coverage and density of eelgrass beds. Details: (562) 980-4006 Venue: City of Long Beach Council Chambers Location: 545 Ocean Blvd., Long Beach

Public Safety Hearing on Rancho LPG

City Councilman Joe Buscaino has scheduled a hearing on the safety of Rancho San Pedro’s LPG facility and other liquid bulk facilities in the harbor on June 27 at Taper Ave. school from 6-9 p.m. More information about the agenda is not yet available, but as the time draws near, more information should be available by calling the Council office at 310-732-4515. Venue: Taper Ave. School Location: 1824 North Taper Ave., San Pedro Community activists who have been organizing to close down the existing facility will hold a ‘Prep’ Rally in advance at Holy Trinity Parish Center on June 21, 7 p.m., to inform the public about the dangers and urge them to attend the hearing. Sponsored by: San Pedro Peninsula Homeowners United, San Pedro & Peninsula Homeowners Coalition, HT Peace & Justice, Citizens for Responsible & Equal Environmental Protections Venue: Holy Trinity Parish Center Location: 209 North Hanford St. San Pedro Details: (310) 251-7075 and www. hazardsbegone.com

from p. 2

Food Trucks

a restroom within 200 feet of the vehicle, some proprietors have to shoulder most of the brunt of non-paying customers utilizing their restroom. Another complaint is that the trucks as they are currently positioned, do little to spread foot traffic throughout the district. Vought notes that there are no laws specifically regulating where trucks can be brought. But food trucks require the cooperation of local businesses for their facilities in order to stay in compliance with the law. The Arts Culture and Entertainment district manages the placement of trucks by sort of an opt-in process where local businesses agree to

operate by the same rules but does nothing to reinforce violations of the opt-in rules. The trucks are situated in clusters next to restroom facilities—three clusters, in fact: Along 7th Street between Mesa and Centre streets; on Mesa between 6th and 7th; and at least this past First Thursday, on 6th Street between Pacific and Mesa. Lack of public restrooms has been an ongoing issue, placing the burden onto a few businesses leading to an unequal distribution of costs and benefits. With the high demand for food trucks and the scarcity of public restrooms, a reasonable degree of cooperation between local businesses has the potential of getting everyone what they want. Recently, ACE board president and executive director of Angels Gate Cultural Center, Debo-

from p. 5

Crafted

ate their own art. You should be able touch art everyday. It should be a piece of your house. You should be able to find out the story of the object you bought. And I can’t think of a better story than this one [of fINdings].” Zeno, reflecting on potential and the future of said of the artisans leasing with Crafted, “Here’s a group that can help each other learn from experience rather than failure. But at the same time everybody takes Mothers, part of fiNDings Art Center Family Literacy Program and a responsibility for their busi- quilting circle, spend two hours conferring on craft projects. Photo: ness.” Terelle Jerricks. In Zeno’s way of looking at things, no one is coming to the table saying, “I love, despite a rough economy. She noted historidon’t know how to do this, can someone do it cally that people turn to crafting in such economic times to supplement their incomes. for me.” “They’re finding that they don’t have to fit To Zeno, Crafted is a forum where artisans come to the table and say, “I don’t know how into someone else’s mold,” Zeno explained. to do this, can somebody give me the benefit of “They can have an entrepreneurial spirit and there’s a venue that’s now available to them that their experience so that I can go sell this.” Zeno, like many of those connected to Craft- is somewhere between their dining room table ed, believes passionately that an one should be and a retail storefront on Main Street. “We hope to grow people up and out of Craftable to make a living from making things they

rah Lewis, moved to commission a cost-benefit analysis in conjunction with Marymount College. The study will gather the thoughts of local merchants, property owners and the general public. As with any good relationship, communication is important. The issue of food truck placement was largely squashed with the spreading out of the trucks. But the conversation as to what the art walk should look like will be an ongoing one that will occasionally filled with tension and backbiting. But in the end, everyone is interested in a beautiful and productive relationship.

Food Trucks add new flavors to the First Thursday Art Walk. Photo: Terelle Jerricks.

ed. The rents are affordable enough to take that leap of faith.” Though it’s a cliché, Crafted was born out of the idea that if you build it, they will come. There’s a lot of things that will come out of this, Zeno explained. With the presence of gourmet food trucks and live music, Crafted will take on a festival atmosphere without turning into a carnival, allowing it to become a sophisticated event destination. Zeno stresses that there are also other busi-

ness opportunities for the folks who plant themselves at Crafted, noting that as they grow, they could grow the wholesale side of their business or form partnerships with people doing likeminded things. “It shouldn’t be viewed through the, ‘I make, I sell.’ lens,” Zeno explained. “It should be, ‘I make, I sell, I expose myself to the world and see what happens.’” And that’s the view many observers with hopeful aspirations for the Waterfront are taking.

The Local Publication You Actually Read June 15 - 28, 2012

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June 15 - 28, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Nu-School of Zydeco at the Bayou Fest by: Terelle Jerricks, Managing Editor

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on’t expect the same headliners as you had in last year’s Bayou Festival. This year’s Bayou festival won’t just feature legends of the old guard such as Barbara Morrison, who is playing this year on the Blues stage, and Dr. John, who also is not performing this year. In fact, this year’s festival features a “Nu” generation of zydeco’s progenitors with Chris Ardoin and NuStep, JPaul jr. & the Zydeco Nubreeds, Lil’ Wayne & Same Ol’ 2 Step, and Geno Delafose and French Rockin boogie. Each of these bands embody the old-school zydeco sound but have infused modern day rhythm and blues, gospel, and hip hop in a genre that already embodies a lot of older musical forms. Each of these artists could be considered the children — musically speaking — of the legendary Roy Carrier, the founder of the zydeco mecca The Offshore Lounge in Louisiana, the place where aspiring zydeco musicians met, learned and jammed with other zydeco musicians during the 1980s. Chris Ardoin & NuStep Zydeco will get you on your feet. They play a lot of familiar rhythm and blues songs that folks in Bayou Fest Continued on page 14. Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community. Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community.

RANDOMNotes

The Wrecking Crew for June Edition by: B.Noel Barr, Music Writer Dude

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film is set to show, at 5 p.m. June 17, at the Grand Annex in San Pedro. In the 1960s there was a period where one group, made up of spectacular musicians, made the greatest run of hit records in music called “The Wrecking Crew.” The name was given to them by percussionist Hal Blaine, because he had heard record company executives complaining that these musicians were wrecking the entire industry. These dozen or so players were the cream, the first–call players who everyone wanted on every session in town. A large portion of the greatest recordings done in Los Angeles during the 1960s were made by The Wrecking Crew. The records they made are considered the classics

Random Notes Continued on page 17.

June 15 – 28, 2012 June 15 – 28, 2012

n that mythical land we all call Hollywood, the glamorous and the infamous all find a place around those who truly are artists. The music business, like film, has built an industry off of iconic figures. This is a melting pot of sorts where the magic is served in large doses with a great deal of suspect and irony. Throughout the past 100 years of recorded music it was the talent that put everyone’s attention on notice that something great was happening. The talent, however, may not be the pretty face on the cover of the dust jacket. A lot of the times, it was the men and women behind the scenes who made art out of what they are doing work. Denny Tedesco, son of legendary session guitarist Tommy Tedesco, has made a documentary, The Wrecking Crew. The

of the period, along with the commercials, television shows and movies for which they produced music. These professional musicians were everywhere. The Wrecking Crew has played with everyone, from those with questionable talent like Nancy Sinatra and her “These Boots are made for Walking” to the very skilled like The Byrds and their cover of Bob Dylan’s “Mr. Tambourine Man,” save for the Roger McGuinn parts. The Wrecking Crew worked on hundreds of singles and albums in their heyday, by groups like The Beach Boys, The Carpenters, the 5th Dimension, John Denver and Nat King Cole. The Wrecking Crew was the “The West Coast Sound” and the sound of a couple of generations. Record producer Phil Spector used them to help create his “Wall of Sound.” This was not the only great group of players that was working at the time, in the 1960s you had the Brooker

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Fish From Sea to Dinner Table F

Sunday–Thursday 10am-11pm

Friday & Saturday 10am–11:30pm

1110 N. Gaffey St., San Pedro

Fast Delivery!

310–732–5800

June 15 – 28, 2012

ACE>> Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

Fax: 310-732-5804

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by: Gretchen Williams, Cuisine Writer

ish and seafood is the last food industry dependant on wild catch. The whims of nature dictate the fortunes of man as in no other food source save agriculture, in spite of the inroads made in aquaculture, fish farming and ranching. Weather and water temperature make fishing a gamble equal to the odds when betting in Vegas, and dangerous enough to rival coal mining. Fishing takes gut instinct, fearlessness, and sheer physical power. The drive to go to sea and challenge the fishery is deep in the blood, a profession passed down through the generations. And for good reason. A fishing boat used to mean a good living for a family and respect in the community.

Today the old boats are symbols of a way of life gone by, an industry moved elsewhere and good jobs lost. The Los Angeles Harbor was the center of West Coast fishing in the past century, with more than 40 species caught and gathered commercially in the era after World War ll. Today, that variety has dwindled by 90 percent, ravished by pollution, over fishing, off–shore industry and fickle consumer tastes. The commercial fishing slip in San Pedro once boasted so many boats it was possible to walk to Terminal Island on the decks of the assembled vessels. These days, open water and a few idle boats grace the berth. Plans for a new industrial ice house and processing sheds have been shelved. Old warehouses on Terminal Island move empty cans for shipment to support a tuna industry now offshore in Samoa. Diners are caught at a culinary crossroads. Omega -3 fatty acids are invaluable, yet mercury

is hazardous and the entire seafood industry is ecologically suspected. What is a hungry Californian to do when presented with a menu fraught with contradictions? Monterey Bay Aquarium has taken pity on the clueless consumer with a color coded buyer’s guide to seafood, using green, yellow, red to indicate go, slow and stop. Locavores can look for the closest domestic product in calamari and sardines, species still pursued commercially here in Los Angeles. The Santa Barbara Fishermen have gathered together to produce and promote local Santa Barbara County products, from spot prawns to spiny lobster to sea bass and sea urchin. Santa Barbara County mussels are being grown on the legs of the oil drilling rigs in the channel, making good use of the clean water flow and active sea life to support a new industry. Santa Monica Seafood has taken this to a new level, identifying its very green choices for fish and seafood as having the least negative impact on the environment as well as providing the most positive amounts of nutrients. A smartphone app will enable a diner to select an entrée choice, and evaluate it instantly for sustainability and nutrient value. Local restaurateurs have taken fish and seafood choices seriously, making their menus friendly to the sea and the diner. Fourth generation restaurateur Chef Dustin Trani is always aware of the fresh fish available, especially the local swordfish he cold smokes for the legendary carpaccio appetizer at J.Trani’s. Catalina swordfish warriors are almost beyond the ordinary designation of fisherman, engaging in combat with the lance men of the sea for beautiful pale and delicious raw fish. Only limited swordfish consumption is recommended for children and pregnant women. The best that local fishermen have to offer used to be thought of as strictly bait, though these Continued on page 13.

Continued from page 12

days California calamari is everyone’s favorite bar snack. Trusela’s Ristorante serves the golden crunchy morsels with homemade marinara sauce, classic and splendid with a glass of Bob Trusela’s best Sicilian wine. Trusela’s special cioppino is rich with fish and seafood, perfect for dipping the wonderful bread rolls made by Bob’s father in law each morning. Word to the wise: Save room for desserts. Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch Program: www.montereybayaquarium.org J.Trani’s Ristorante, 584 W. 9th St., San Pedro, (310) 832-1220. Trusela’s Ristorante, 28158 S.Western Ave. Rancho Palos Verdes, (310) 547-0993

Entrée News Barbara Wood, Partner in Admiral Risty Restaurant Dies

The sunset scene at the ‘Risty just won’t be the same without the “Admiral.” Barbara Wood was involved in all the creative aspects of the landmark Palos Verdes Peninsula namesake restaurant from its inception in 1966, until her death on May 20, at the age of 87. Mrs. Wood is survived by her husband of 67 years, restaurateur Ralph Wood and their children, John, Sara, Chip, and Eric; grandchildren, Lars, Anders, April, Don, Evan, Christine; and great-grandchildren, Ian, Anabella and Mia.

Best Chowder in the LA Harbor! Hours: Mon, Tues 11am - 3pm Wed, Thurs 11am - 8pm Fri, Sat, Sun 9am - 8pm

611 N. Henry Ford, Leeward Bay Marina, Wilmington 310-830-7937 • www.ChowderBarge.com

Blu Bar at Crowne Plaza • $4 Drinks and half off appetizers. (310) 519-8200, 601 S. Palos Verdes St., San Pedro The Chowder Barge • Try the 34oz. captain’s mug! (310) 830-7937, 611 N. Henry Ford, Leeward Bay Marina, Wilmington Godmother’s Saloon • Live jazz from Mike Guerrero Trio: 7 p.m. every Wed. (310) 833-1589, 302 W. 7th St., San Pedro Iron City Tavern • Happy Hour 1/2-price appetizers & drink specials: 4 to 6 p.m. Mon. to Fri. 589 W. 9th St., San Pedro; (310) 547-4766 Ports o’ Call • Happy Hour: Mon. to Fri., 3 to 8 p.m. Taco Tuesdays. Oyster shooter & bloody mary Wednesdays. (310) 833-3553, Berth 76 Ports O’ Call Village, San Pedro San Pedro Brewing Co. • Happy Hour: 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., Mon. to Fri. (310) 8315663, 331 W. 6th St., San Pedro Whale & Ale • Happy Hour: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Mon to Fri., 4 to 7 p.m. on Wed. Late Night Happy Hour: 10 p.m. to Midnight, Fri. Only. (310) 832-0363, 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro Happy Hour Listings Are Paid Advertising

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Breakfast at The Barge Weekends 9am Eggs Benedict

• Happy Hour •

June 15 – 28, 2012

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Entertainment June 15

Next N Line It’s going to be a late night party at SPBC with Next N Line performing. Starting at 10 p.m. The cover is $3. Venue: San Pedro Brewing Location: 361 W. 6th St.,  San Pedro

Continued from page 11

BayouFest

Claire Mann with Aaron Jones Claire Mann with Aaron Jones are scheduled to perform June 15 at Alvas Showroom in San Pedro. All the way from Scotland, this outstanding duo met in the thriving Edinburgh folk music scene back in 1997 and over the years they have developed a unique and exciting musical relationship which enthralls audiences with a mixture of traditional and original Scottish and Irish music and song. Their critically acclaimed album Secret Orders has become a favorite amongst musicians and audiences alike. Cover is $20. Details: (800) 403-3447, www.alvasshowroom.com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro Simon Spalding, James Hendricks Get ready for a treat for those who love Sea Shanties: An evening with Simon Spalding and James Hendricks, from 7 to 10:30 p.m. June 15, at The Whale & Ale in San Pedro. This dynamic duo of sea chanteys and acoustic folk music are multi-instrumental performers with a repertoire that includes sea chanteys, Celtic music, early ragtime or jazz, and 200 years of popular music. Venue: The Whale & Ale Location: 327 W. 7th St., San Pedro

June 16

ACE>> Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

Kofi Baker’s Cream Experience Kofi Baker, Ginger Baker’s son, is back at Alvas Showroom to present “Kofi Baker’s Cream Experience.” Tickets are $20 Details: (800) 403-3447, www.alvasshowroom.com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro On With the Show The Golden State Pops present their next concert, “On With the Show: Musicals From The Silver Screen featuring Susan Egan,” June 16, at the Warner Grand.   Ms. Egan, the original “Belle” in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast on Broadway, and the voice of “Meg” in Disney’s Hercules will join the orchestra to perform music from Funny Girl, Chicago, Cabaret and more.  Venue: Warner Grand Theatre Location: 478 W. 6th St., San Pedro

June 23

George Kahn – Jazz & Blues Revue The Jazz & Blues Revue, with George Kahn (musical director) on piano and featuring the vocals of Courtney Lemmon, Gina Saputo and Dianne Wright, each a fabulous soloist in their own right, who take turns singing together and as individuals. The evening includes a medley of songs by such jazz greats as Peggy Lee, Nina Simone and Lambert, Hendricks and Ross. What does George Kahn think of his new group? “I am thrilled to be working with these three ‘Divalicious’ singers. For a long time I have felt the idea that holds it all together is that the groove comes first, last and always. The melody supports the groove. The solos stay in the groove.” Details: (800) 403-3447, www.alvasshowroom.com Venue: Alvas Showroom Location: 1417 W. 8th St., San Pedro

Community/Family June 15

June 15 – 28, 2012

Bridge the Gap Emerson Parkside Academy parents recently launched the “Bridge the Gap” campaign to save physical education and science. The school hopes to raise $100,000 by June 15, which would allow the school to keep the programs for another year. Weekend Fundraisers include a Wild West Carnival from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and a Zumba-thon from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Tickets are $20 for adults and $15 for children. Two other ways to help: By making business or personal donations to Emerson via the Long Beach Educational Foundation. One hundred percent of the dollars you designate to Emerson go directly to the school. The school has permission to post sponsor signage at the busy, highly traveled Willow-P.V. intersection. Venue: Emerson Parkside Academy Location: 2625 Josie Ave., Long Beach 14 Continued on page 15.

Chris Ardoin will be stepping onto the stage at the Bayou festival with his NuSteppers on June 23.

their 20s, 30s, and certainly 40s would recognize. It really doesn’t matter what culture accordion music is played, whether it’s polka, tejano or Brazilian music. Out of the bunch, JPaul jr is probably the most in touch with what younger generations are wanting. JPaul released a single in 2009 called “I Know You Want to Leave Me,” which is an obvious rip from the first line of the Temptations’ “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg.” The song is essentially about preventing a significant other from leaving, but he makes clear that he is too proud to beg and plead. I couldn’t but wonder if JPaul had infused some of the hypermasculinity of hip hop into his brand of zydeco. Listen to his other tracks, right down the ones he’s released this year, they probably sound more like R&B rather zydeco with barely a hint of accordion and washboard music mixed in. Lil Wayne & Same Ole 2 Step hews closer to traditional music even as they produce original music. His music would fit well in any R&B club, but don’t expect too much slow dancing at Rainbow Lagoon. Zydeco is intended for you to shake a tailfeather through every song. Geno Delafose & the French Rockin Boogie literally has zydeco in his genes, picking up where his father John Delafose left with his country-western offshoot of zydeco with occasional Creole or French lyrics. Of the four, Geno Delafose is probably the oldest of the bunch considering he’s been doing his thing for nearly 20 years. Roy Carrier may not be living, but his influence certainly lives on these young generation of players. In 1980, while still working the rigs, Roy purchased a neighborhood roadhouse in Lawtell and christened it The Offshore Lounge. Throughout the 80s it became the place for aspiring zydeco musicians to meet, learn and jam with other zydeco musicians. It is difficult to find any zydeco musician that came of age in the 80s and 90s that weren’t encouraged and tutored by Roy. From helping Beau Jocque find his boogie to encouraging John Delafose to perform publicly and giving him a bunch of songs in the process to loaning equipment to Zydeco Force to giving Geno Delafose his first paying gig, Roy was at the center of zydeco music development. This year we are back to the more traditional Cajun and zydeco sounds. Returning is Geno Delafose and French Rockin’ Boogie with 13 other (mainly) zydeco bands on the main stage. Barbara Morrison and Guitar Shorty are returning this year, with Sherry Pruitt and seven other groups working the blues stage. Details: www.longbeachbayoufestival. com.

Calendar from page 14.

Bard of Avon’s 15th Season of Free Plays

June 15

Nature and Me Storytime Enjoy an imaginative journey through stories at the George F. Canyon Preserve  and Nature Center from 9:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. June 15. The event is part of a  monthly series of guided hikes, bird walks, and full moon walks through this  unique riparian canyon habitat. Details: (310) 541-7613 Venue: George F. Canyon Preserve and Nature Center Location: 27305 Palos Verdes Dr. East

by: John Farrell, Theater Critic

A

June 16

Native Plant Nursery Join the Palos Verdes Land Conservancy for a fun volunteer outdoor workday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. transplanting  seedlings and weed plant containers. Reservations are required. Details: (310) 541-7613 Juneteenth Be part of the annual Juneteenth celebration, from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. June 16,  at Martin Luther King Jr. Park in Long Beach.  Juneteenth commemorates the ending of slavery in the United States.  The celebration will showcase performances by local choirs, dance troops and other entertainers. There will also be good ole fashion community hamburgers and hot dogs, as well as, the annual domino tournament, softball game, and Zumba dancing. The celebration is a free open-air festival, so bring your  own chairs and blankets for seating. There will be a Health Pavilion, sponsored by St. Mary Medical Center, which includes free various health screenings. Children will enjoy a spectacular children’s area with water games, jumpers, arts and crafts and more. There’s something for everyone at this year’s celebration. Details: (562) 570-6816 Venue: Martin Luther King Jr. Park Location: 1950 Lemon Ave., Long Beach

June 17

Julia (Kristina Teves) and her servant, Lucetta (Dana Pollak) in Shakespeare by the Sea’s 2012 production of Shakespeare’s Two Gentlemen of Verona directed by Margaret Schugt. Photo: Mickey Elliot, Courtesy of Shakespeare by the Sea.

chilly at night, after all) and you have more than 500 participants (although many come back year after year for the summer-long party.) One actor, David Graham, holds the record: This is his 10th year with Shakespeare by the Sea. There are veterans of three, four and five years. Barbara Jean Ulrich, this year’s Juliet, is in her fourth year with the company. Cylan Brown, Romeo, is in his third year. Actors in the company come from 18 different communities around Southern Curtain Call to page 16.

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Brochure Pick Up Your 2012 Copy Today!

Float Serve Volleyball Come play in the original Father’s Day 2’s tournament at 10 a.m. June 17. The  tournament gets bigger every year, so early registration is recommended. The grass 2’s volleyball has divisions for father/daughter less than 15, father/ daughter 15 and older, father/son less than 15, father/son 15 and older, mentor/girl or boy less than 15, and mentor/girl or boy 15 and older. Mentors must be same age or older as boy or girl’s father. There will be free pizza at noon and free bottled water all day. First time players receive a 2012 FSV t-shirt. Cost for 2’s is $42 per team. Details: (562) 394 -7125; Venue: Marina Vista Park Location: 5355 E. Eliot St., Long Beach

June 23

Victorian Attire and Etiquette The community is invited to the third in a series of Historical Lectures at the  Banning Museum in Wilmington. The lecture will begin at 10 a.m. June 23 in the  historic carriage barn.  Segment one features models wearing Victorian era day fashions from  1865-1889. You will enjoy seeing the attire that would have been worn for  shopping, visiting, church, riding and working around a ranch; and evening fashions worn for dinner parties and balls. In segment two, witness proper etiquette between a man and a woman with a question and answer session afterwards. Segment three’s models will be wearing Victorian era fashions depicting the years 1890-1912. Experience a day in the gay 90s and the opening years of the 20th century. Then come back with us to the Titanic on the first few days of her maiden voyage. Witness the fun of first class when there were no thoughts of disaster. Admission to the event is free for Friends of Banning Museum members and children under 12. Non-members are $5. No RSVP is required. Details: (310) 548-2005 Venue: Banning Museum Location: 401 E. “M” St., Wilmington

Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community.

nyway you count, it is an impressive record. Shakespeare by the Sea, the San Pedrobased production company that provides free (let’s say that again: free) Shakespeare to audiences around Southern California is celebrating their 15th year of giving the public an evening’s entertainment with the Bard. So how do you count it? Well, there are individual performances, more than 490 in all, from their very first year (that was 1998: we’ll save you the calculation), with 41 more performances this year. This season started in Point Fermin Park in San Pedro June 7 with Two Gentlemen of Verona and will continue June 14, 15 and 16 with performances of Romeo and Juliet at 8 p.m. Two Gentlemen and Romeo and Juliet will then run in repertory for two more weeks, Thursday-Saturday, and then the company will hit the road for shows in Beverly Hills and beyond. They’ll return to San Pedro Aug. 10 for a final performance of Romeo and Juliet and on Aug. 11 for Two Gentlemen of Verona. Then the company: actors, stagehands, concessionaires and the lot, will probably collapse in a Shakespearean heap. Another way to count is by plays performed, 30 in all, including everything from such great works as Hamlet, Macbeth and Richard the Third to such obscure plays as, well, Two Gentlemen. Or, how about actors performing? More than 300, by one estimate, everyone from young children and teenagers to old men and women. This year there are 21, if you count Victor the dog who plays Crab in Two Gentlemen, and you’d better, or he will kiss you to death. Yes, cuteness can kill. Or, you could, if you have a lot of time on your hands and nothing better to do, tote up the miles driven by various cast members for shows as far apart as Bonita Canyon Sports Park in Santa Ana and Oak Canyon Community Park in Oak Canyon. Fifty-one-hundred miles a day. Even with car pooling that’s quite a distance, perhaps nearly half a million miles in all. Finally,count the actors and stage hands, the folks selling programs and sweatshirts and blankets (even in Southern California it gets

June 24

June 28

Penguin-Pedia Did you know that there are 17 species of penguins living on the planet today?  And believe it Calendar to page 16.

June 15 – 28, 2012

Wilmington Bike Ride Bring your family and friends along for a slow ride through Wilmington. Interested parties will meet at Banning High School at 11:30 a.m. June 24. Location: 1527 Lakme Ave., Wilmington

15

Calendar from page 15. or not, a number of them live in warm climates. David Salomon,  photographer and author of the book Penguin-Pedia, introduces the 17 species of penguins that the majority of people may have never known existed. Be  transported into the surprising world of penguins as you see his images, hear  stories about his encounters, and learn what you can do to help by attending this guest lecture beginning at 7 p.m., sponsored by Gazette Newspapers. Tickets  are $5 for the public, free for Aquarium members, teachers, and students with valid ID and advanced reservations. Details: (562) 590-3100 Venue: Aquarium of the Pacific Location: 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach

Launce (Connor Dugard) discusses the difficulties of his life with his dog, Victor (Crab the dog) in Shakespeare by the Sea’s 2012 production of Shakespeare’s Two Gentlemen of Verona directed by Margaret Schugt. Photo: Mickey Elliot, Courtesy of Shakespeare by the Sea.

Theater/Film June 17

The Wrecking Crew Meet the Wrecking Crew, at 5 p.m. June 17 at the Grand Annex in San Pedro. In the 1960s artists like the Beach Boys, The Byrds, The Mamas & the Papas and more were topping the charts, but the studio musicians, known as the Wrecking Crew, who actually recorded these hits were virtually unknown. Now, with Denny Tedesco’s powerful documentary, the phenomenal session musicians of the 1960s rock-n-roll era and the “West Coast Sound” are finally given center stage. Tickets start at $20. Details: (310) 833-4813 Venue: Grand Annex Location: 434 W. 6th St., San Pedro

June 15 – 28, 2012

ACE>> Arts • Cuisine • Entertainment

June 22

Forbidden Zone Sing happy 30th birthday to one of the greatest cult classics ever – 1982′s insane  Forbidden Zone, starting at 11:45 p.m. June 22 at the Art Theatre in Long Beach. Forbidden Zone is the inspired brainchild of Richard Elfman, founding member of the legendary Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo, who along with writer Matthew Bright (who would later helm the 1996 cult classic Freeway) mixed in everything from Max Fleisher to Cab Calloway to Josephine Baker to unleash a musical unlike any the world had ever seen. Mix in a typically masterful score by Elfman brother Danny (who makes a fan-favorite appearance…), a dancing frog in a tuxedo, a gorilla, an ex-queen, and a sex-crazed kingdom ruled by the weirdest royal family in celluloid history, and you have the movie that Film Threat called “The Citizen Kane of Underground Movies.” Tickets are on sale at the Art Theatre box office. Venue: Art Theatre Long Beach Location: 2025 E. 4th St., Long Beach

June 29

Monty Python’s Spamalot Davis Gaines (LA’s Phantom of the Opera) will star in the upcoming Music Theatre West’s production of Monty Python’s Spamalot.  Monty Python’s Spamalot will preview on June 29 and run for 14 performances through July 15, at the Carpenter Performing Arts Center. It will be performed with the original Broadway sets and costumes and, as with all Musical Theatre  West productions, is created from the ground up at its rehearsal studios in Long  Beach using a blend of both professional actors from Broadway, Hollywood and national tours, and the best in local talent. Monty Python’s Spamalot spoofs the legendary tale of King Arthur’s quest to find the Holy Grail. However, diverting a bit from the true story, this hilarious musical features such oddities as a line of beautiful dancing girls, flatulent Frenchmen and killer rabbits. Throughout the show King Arthur, traveling with his servant Patsy, recruits several knights to accompany him on his quest, including Sir Bedevere, Sir Robin, Sir Lancelot and Sir Galahad. Besides the rabbits and farting Frenchmen, they meet such iconic Monty Python characters as the Lady of the Lake, Prince Herbert, Tim the Enchanter, Not Dead Fred, the Black Knight and the Knights Who Say Ni. Tickets start at $20. There is a $3 service charge per ticket. Details: (562) 856-1999 ext. 4; Venue: Carpenter Performing Arts Center Location: 6200 E. Atherton St., Long Beach

Art June 23

T-Shirt as Medium Edith Abeyta hosts T-Shirt as Medium, a free day of long mini-conference, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 16 Continued on page 17.

from page 15.

Curtain Call California, including Rancho Palos Verdes, Santa Monica and Inglewood. Acting in 41 plays, for more than 10 weeks, plus rehearsal time, is a big commitment for everyone. But the actors do more than just put on a funny hat, tights and a doublet. They also assemble the set, designed for them, every night, pulling the parts out of the rental truck that holds everything from Corinthian columns to light standards. And when the evening is over, when the applause is no more than an echo, they take the whole thing apart again and put it back into the truck again, ready for the next show. They do this every night, including rehearsals. They say it is a labor of love. The emphasis is on labor. All this comes from one place. One imagination conceived the whole project (though we doubt that she ever thought it would be so big and successful. That source is Lisa Coffi, the founding director

of Shakespeare by the Sea, a woman whose wonderful demeanor must hide a few worries. After all, Shakespeare by the Sea costs more than $277,000 to produce this year, and many places, including Torrance and a few other communities, have cutback the funding they provide for this exciting yearly festival. She isn’t daunted by that. After 14 years she is sure the funding will be found and she is more excited by the audiences that the finances. “By touring to so many locations, we get to take Shakespeare directly into neighborhoods and perform for many people who would otherwise be unable to attend were it a ticketed event” she said in a recent statement. “For the actors, they have the unique opportunity to perform for hundreds of people each night, adding up to more than 21,000 by the end of the summer. It’s a singular rush to have so many people hanging on their every word – when the audience is so captivated you could hear the proverbial pin drop – but since we’re in a park on grass, it’s more like hearing a dog bark a few blocks away.

Film Review: Prometheus

In space, no one can hear you scream, or scratch your head by: Danny Simon, Visit http://wp.me/p2outs-91 for more film reviews

I

t’s always hard to understand why any director would choose to tarnish the memory of the project that made their career. Lucas. Spielberg. And now, Ridley Scott. These guys have vaults like Scrooge McDuck, so what makes them so careless with their legacy? Director Ridley Scott’s Aliens (1979), basically feminism in space, was brutally suspenseful and cutting edge. H.R. Giger’s artistic vision was a mix of sterile utility and Tonka truck bravado. Sigourney Weaver’s performance was a breathtaking marriage of beauty and brawn. A few decades later with two sequels under his belt, Scott returns to that original vision and mars it for a pile of prequel loot. Asshole.

Or maybe I’m the asshole. Having had my curiosity piqued by trailers a few months ago, I entered the theatre with raised expectations that were met for the first half hour or so. The ship is cool. The casting dynamic. But slowly, I felt myself getting annoyed. Scott is a solid storyteller, I thought to myself. Maybe I just drank too much last night. But the film proceeded to get worse. And when the final scene came, I wanted to punch myself in the head. I’m writing this while nursing a hangover, which has been made all the worse by the film’s massive inconsistencies, awkward pacing, and ginormous black holes--one of which has sucked me in and now I wanna crank call Ridley Scott, but I don’t have his number,

“I’m excited to be celebrating our 15th Anniversary – it’s hard to believe I’ve been presenting this festival for so many years. As always, I look forward to seeing old friends and making new ones as the summer season progresses. (Shakespeare by the Sea) has many loyal audience members who look forward to gathering family and friends for a summer evening picnic and theater under the stars. For many, these productions were their first introduction to live theater, and they return year after year. We are proud to have earned a place in the lives of so many Southern Californians.” Shakespeare by the Sea will perform for four weeks and then take their show on the road to Rancho Palos Verdes, Beverly Hills, Lakewood, Rossmoor, Newport Beach, South Pasadena and more than a dozen other venues (see it all on their website, www.shakespeasrebythesea.org.) They’ll return to San Pedro’s Point Fermin Park for their final performances Aug. 10 with Romeo and Juliet and Aug. 11 with Two Gentlemen of Verona, both at 8 p.m. and my caller ID would ruin the gag anyway. No big spoilers here. Thematically, the story focuses on creation, existence, and paternity. Set in 2093, the crew of the Prometheus venture across space to find the extra terrestrials who appear on cave paintings made 35,000 years ago. But there are other agendas, other identities and stories, though none of them are ever developed enough to make anyone care when the inevitable hammer of the gods comes crashing down. When the obligatory ending finally arrived and we see our beautiful alien born, I yawned and considered a nap. Fish tacos? Ray Bradbury passed earlier this week and an NPR reporter credited the author with bringing respectability to the genre of science fiction. The loquacious writer’s stories were filled with anxiety of a future just beyond the horizon. This is the juice of science fiction. When it’s done well, sci-fi forces the reader or viewer to confront hard truths and to attempt to answer difficult questions. When it’s done poorly, like Prometheus, sci-fi offers little but a reminder that our future is likely a predictable extension of our present condition. Clearly, I need a drink.

June 23, at the Manhattan Beach Creative Arts Center. Details: (310) 802-5440; www.citymb.info Venue: Manhattan Beach Creative Arts Center Location: 1560 Manhattan Beach Blvd., Manhattan Beach

June 29

Photography Exhibition Experience Anthony Castro most recent photographic project, from 5 to 7 p.m. The series of male portraits focuses on local men in Long Beach, challenging the idea that the photographer has to leave home to create. He photographs in others what he understands about himself. Details: (310) 541-2479; www.pvartcenter.org  Venue: Palos Verdes Art Center’s Promenade on the Peninsula Location: 550 Deep Valley Dr., Suite 261, Rolling Hills Estates    

June 30

Documentary film, The Wrecking Crew, will be featured, June 17, at the Grand Annex .

Continued from page 11.

Random Notes

T. and MG’s out of Memphis at Stax Records. You had the Swappers out of Muscle Shoals, Ala., who Jerry Wexler Ahmet Ertegun and the great producer engineer Tom Dowd laid down the first releases of Aretha Franklin on the Atlantic label there. In Detroit, Motown had the Funk Brothers, who made everything that Berry Gordy produced.

The Wrecking Crew originally, known as the “The First Call Gang” or “The Clique,” back in the late 50s, was made up professionals like Earl Palmer, Mel Pollen, Bill Aken, Barney Kessel and Al Casey. Later it became a more extended version of the Who’s Who of future recording stars like Glenn Campbell, Tommy Tedesco, Carol Kaye, Hal Blaine and Jim Gordon, Dr. John and Leon Russell, Jim Horn - Rolling Stones,

Friday, June 22, 2012

(Every Fourth Friday of the Month)

Dance Class 7 p.m. • Band Starts at 8 p.m.

Come join Barry Anthony, Sylvia Rodriguez and LA’s hottest swing band, “The Swing Of Things” for SWING PEEDRO, an evening of wonderful music, friends and dancing to your favorite Classic Big Band Swing songs. You’ll hear the songbooks of Glenn Miller, Count Basie, Harry James, Frank Sinatra, Doris Day, Nat King Cole and many more while dancing and socializing with friends at the People’s Palace in the heart of San Pedro! New to dancing? Take the free one hour dance lesson with our pro instructor at 7, learn some steps and at 8, the music and the dance begin! Don’t have a partner? Come along and dance with our instructors, guests and suave Peedro staff dancers. Free light refreshments! Advance tickets available for $17, online at www.experiencesp.com and www.peoplesyogahealthdance.com and Swingpeedro.com Tickets at door $20. Call (310) 547-2348 for info and tickets. Get your tickets early!

Shop Local. Dine Local. Support Your Community.

365 W. Sixth Street, San Pedro, Calif • 310-547-2348

Derek and The Dominoes. This is a very deep list of names so many that you know and may have heard of it are impossible to list. This is a must see film for music buff’s or those who want to wax poetic over a long gone era. Here is a chance to celebrate some the greatest music of a generation all wrapped up in a little film that will leave you smiling from ear to ear. Details: www.grandvision.org

A Night of Women Artful Thinking presents A Night of Women, a breast cancer benefit, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Lush Lounge. The night starts off with a champagne art reception, outdoors under the beautiful sky, featuring artist Roberta Nieto, a self-taught, abstract painter from New Mexico. At 7 p.m., put on your dancing shoes as the talented DJ Zenway. And finally, live music that will rock you by musician extraordinaire Jill Warren, currently on the national tour of Cats the Musical. You don’t want to miss this! Details: www.artfulthinking.org Venue: Lush Lounge Location: 49 Pine Ave., Long Beach

June 15 – 28, 2012

17

from p. 4

Carson: Frack No! “[This is not] related to EIR, just a meet-andgreet,” said city planning officer, Sheri ReppLoadsman, at the May 29 meeting. “Oil drilling is a tradition in the LA basin, and with the new prices for oil, Oxy came to us and said, ‘What do you think?’ We need to make sure there will be a full public pro-

cess and what types of mitigation seem safe.” Originally Oxy stated they did not plan to use fracking—using water and chemicals to fracture rock and force oil or natural gas to the surface—in the initial stages of their project but requested that the city approve the process for

possible future use. After being confronted by dozens of angry residents on May 29, however, the company reconsidered. Repp-Loadsman explained to this reporter how the site’s geology was not conducive to fracking, so once the level of public concern was made clear at the May 29 meeting, Oxy redacted the possibility from their permit application and are no longer asking for an evaluation as part of the environmental impact report. Rita Boggs, a chemist and former council candidate, attended both meetings and told Random Lengths, “At the second meeting, Oxy said they decided not to pursue fracking. They would continue with drilling but not fracking.” She cited an Environmental Protection Agency document that suggests the possibility of fracking and the contamination of drinking water from fracking may disproportionately affect communities of lower socio-economic status.

“The contract by the city and Oxy should provide some way of monitoring this,” she added. Saied Naaseh, an economic development associate planner with the city, said Oxy wants to drill 200 wells on 6.5 acres, 130 for oil or natural gas and the rest for water needed for injection, —not the same as fracking. The wells would drill down in different directions to tap into reservoirs not directly under the site. At the first meeting some participants, including Jesse Marquez, strongly challenged how Oxy was allowed to drill test wells in 2011 without applying for a new EIR first. Repp-Loadsman responded via e-mail that the city’s municipal code allows oil and gas production within the Dominguez Technology Center, “The original EIR for Dominguez Tech Center covered all the permitted uses, which included oil well operations. The request for the test wells was an automatically permitted use.”

When you need help, think local. Support the Independents from p. 6

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The protected areas were created through the Marine Life Protection Act of 1999. In the past 8 years, conservationists, business owners, scientists, tribes, fishermen, ocean users and government officials have met to collaboratively design the network. Underwater parks in Southern California include, Naples Reef, off of Santa Barbara’s Gaviota Coast, where white sea bass patrol for squid and anchovy, joined by pelicans and harbor seals; Palos Verdes, where its beaches, kelp forests, surfgrass beds, reefs and canyon support marine plants and animals; and La Jolla, which boast one of Southern California’s most vibrant kelp forests and rocky reefs which provide food and shelter for hundreds of species. Details: (310) 548-2995. Gov. Brown Proposes More Health and Welfare Cuts Gov. Jerry Brown called for additional spending cuts to health and welfare programs June 10, as well as a 5 percent furlough for state workers, to help erase a budget deficit that has grown to $15.7 billion. The Democratic governor relies on a patchwork of solutions to bridge the gap in a $91.4 billion general fund spending plan, including deeper cuts, his November tax initiative and taking money from a multi-state mortgage abuse settlement with banks. With the deadline for getting the budget to the governor’s desk, June 15, Democratic legislators are scrambling to make a deal with Gov. Brown to mitigate some of the cuts he proposed back in January. Assembly Democrats blocked the governor’s proposal to overhaul the state’s welfare-to-work program, CalWORKs, in committee earlier this year. Brown wanted to reduce full aid to parents from four years to two if they do not find work. Brown initially proposed cutting off child care vouchers to low-income parents who did not find a job after two years. After legislative Democrats rejected that plan, the governor instead asked them to cut payments to child care providers, limiting low-income families to the cheapest day care centers available.

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BUSINESS FILINGS Fictitious Business Name ‘Statement File No. 2012076043 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Ofeliaí’s Bookkeeping Service, 1350 W. 9th Street, #4, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Ofelia Familathe , 1350 W. 9th Street., #4, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above April 18, 2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Ofelia Familathe, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 25, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence

address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012060859 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) YKM Services, 305 W. Santa Cruz St., #6 San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Raul Madrigal, 305 W. Santa Cruz St., #6 San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above April 18, 2012. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Raul Madrigal e, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on April 9, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/03/12, 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012088229 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Century Motorcycles,1640 S. Pacific Ave., San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Gwendolyn Rutherford, 630 W. 24th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. Timothy Hickerson, 525 W. 22nd Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by a

June 15 - 28, 2012

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19

from p. 19 general partnership. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Timothy Hickerson, Partner/ Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 9, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12

June 15 - 28, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012089406 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Das Boot, 2317 S. Gaffey, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Eric Swanson, 2317 S. Gaffey, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the

20

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FILINGS fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Eric Swanson, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 9, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012082131 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) RDS Consulting, 1180 W. 7th Street Apt #1, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Rodel Filio , 1180 W. 7th Street Apt #1, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced

to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which

he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Rodel Filio, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 9, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/17/12, 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012082130 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Wingstop, 1685 Pacific Coast Hwy, Harbor City, CA 90710. County of L.A. Articles of Incorporation #: 3351374. Registered owner(s): B&S Ventures, Inc.,1199 Rancho Rd., Arcadia, CA 91006. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) B&S Ventures, Inc, S. Barjar Pithawalla, President

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 3, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12, 07/12/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012100260 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) Mr. Big’s Gourmet Hot Dogs, 655 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Articles of Incorporation #: 3456745 Registered owner(s): Big’s Gourmet, Inc., 1536 W. 25th Street #275, San Pedro, CA 90732. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) Big’s Gourmet, Inc., Edward Nunez, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 23, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name

statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/31/12, 06/14/12,

06/28/12, 07/12/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012091567 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) A-Delta International, (2) LA Express Appraisals, 15915 Ventura blvd., #303, Encino, CA 91436. County of L.A. Articles of Incorporation #: C0797611. Registered owner(s): Kraakevik Corporation, 15915 Ventura blvd., #303, Encino, CA 91436. This business is conducted by a corporation. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above 5/22/2007. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) Kraakevik Corporation, Patti Kraakevik, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 15, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12, 07/12/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012092847 The following person(s) is (are)

doing business as: (1) Amerigold Group, (2) Amerigold Realty, (3) Amerigold Appraisal, (4) Amerigold Appraisals, (5) Amerigold Appraisers, (6) Amerigold Exchange, (7) Amerigold Films, (8) Amerigold, (9) Amerigold Financial, (10) Amerigold Investments, (11) Amerigold Mortgage, (12) Amerigold Productions (13) AmerigoldProperty Management (14) Amerigold Realestate, (15) Amerigold Realestate Services (16) Amerigold Realty Advisors, (17) Amerigold Estates, (18) Amerigold Securities, 7420 Alida Place, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): John R. Aube, 7420 Alida Place, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275. This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above 2007. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) John R. Aube, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on May 15, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 05/31/12, 06/14/12, 06/28/12, 07/12/12

Abandonment Fictitious Name Current File No. 20101227912 Dated Filed: 9/01/2010 The following person(s) is (are)

doing business as: (1) Studio 343, 343 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Sheila Eunice Harrity, Inc., 343 W. 7th Street, San Pedro, CA 90731. This business is conducted by an individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) S. Sheila Eunice Harrity/owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 5, 2012. Original filing: 06/14/12, 06/28/12, 07/12/12, 07/26/12

Fictitious Business Name Statement File No. 2012108934 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: (1) What’s Sup, Nutritional Supplements by Design, 1840 S. Gaffey Street., #324, San Pedro, CA 90731. County of L.A. Registered owner(s): Janet L. Trevino, 1840 S. Gaffey Street., #324, San Pedro, CA 90731 . This business is conducted by an individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above N/A. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. (A registrant who declares as true information, which he or she knows to be false, is guilty of a crime.) Janet L. Trevino, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Los Angeles on June 5, 2012. Notice-In accordance with subdivision (a) of Section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in Subdivision (b) of Section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A New Fictitious Business Name statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business name in violation of the right of another under Federal, State, or common law (See Section 14411et seq., Business and Professions Code). Original filing: 06/14/12, 06/28/12, 07/12/12, 07/26/12

RANDOMLetters

from p. 8

terrorist attacks! Fucking genius! And mega fail!! You don’t wager money on terrorist strikes. Period. But I can see the same smirk on the face of that smartfella who thought it up telling himself (after his program was cancelled) that the world is just too stupid to understand. Well, I wager that the world is too stupid to understand. But you can’t escape its wisdom. A bank that is betting the farm to offset its total amalgamated risk portfolio is smart, surely. But it just goes to show that smart can be pretty stupid indeed. William Below Paris, France

The Failure of “Change” Rhetoric

Gray Panthers Surprised

Cherry Avenue. The parklets are part of larger redesign scheme championed by entrepreneurs like Kerstin Kansteiner, owner of Berlin and Portfolio Coffeehouse, who want redevelopment in Long Beach to follow an incremental process of revitalization and restoration that adds both charm and functionality to the city. Bohn speaks passionately about urban architecture and its potential to raise the quality of life for city dwellers. He believes thoughtful redevelopment of urban centers like downtown Long Beach should include the revitalization of

from p. 3

Thumbs Down on Rancho vate citizen…We don’t want to lose commerce, we don’t want to lose jobs. We want new siting, and how can the commission take leadership in that role. That’s what we’re asking... However you deal with the PCAC motion today, I would like to see leadership beyond that…We’re in the sandpits in the coliseum. You have 10 hands and 10 thumbs. “Are they going to be up? Are they going to be down? Please partner with us. Help us.” While other speakers directly attacked Rancho’s facade of absolute safety and regulatory compliance, some went out of their way to make a different argument. “I don’t think that an accident at this facility, to a worst-case scenario, or even a modest accident, is likely to happen,” said Tom Politeo, of the Sierra Club. “Fukishima was not likely to happen. But it did.” Politeo referenced a long string of disaster sites—Three Mile Island, the British Petroleum oil platform, Fukushima, the accident that happened here at San Onofre recently, or, closer to home, the terminal where the Sansinena exploded, the GATX site, which had a very big explosion in 1972, or back in the late ‘40s the location of the SS Marclay in Wilmington, where another crude oil tanker exploded. “If you toured these sites the day before distaster struck them, you would see operations that to you, to me, to anybody in this room looked safe,” Politeo said. “And, may have even had all their paperwork in order. (And yet,) every one of these accidents happened.” Dr. John Miller, head of PCAC’s EIR review subcommittee, cited the example of commercial airplanes. They are all regularly inspected, meeting the highest safety standards, and yet airplane accidents still happen anyway. There is simply no way to eliminate all risk, the argument goes, which is why large enough risks, though they be rare, should be relocated in order to limit the number of possible casualties. A decade ago, in the China Shipping case, the port was the lead actor, trying to build a terminal without doing a project-specific environmental impact report. This time, it was simply being asked to hold a tenant accountable. But both times, legalistic reasoning seemed to be preventing a more fundamental process. The China Shipping appeals court decision put it like this: The EIR is intended to furnish both the road map and the environmental price tag for a project, so that the decision maker and the public both know, before the journey begins, just where the journey will lead, and how much they—and the environment—will have to give up in order

to take that journey…Here, the port and the city have reduced (California Environmental Quality Act) to a process whose result will be largely to generate paper, to produce an EIR that describes a journey whose destination is already predetermined and contractually committed to before the public has any chance to see either the road map or the full price tag,” Here once again, the public voice and the real potential costs are both being marginalized in the process. Some voices may seem extreme but sometimes that’s what it takes to break through the bureaucratic inertia. Another repetition from the China Shipping conflict involved a stand-off between Janet Gunter, one of the original China Shipping plaintiffs and longtime ILWU leader

Urban Dwelling/ to p. 22

Dave Arian, now vice president of the Harbor Commission. “You’ve been in opposition to the Port for years,” Arian told Gunter. “You represent something that’s not in the interests of this Port, it never has been.” And yet, the very change of course that the China Shipping lawsuit forced onto POLA is now the source of its signature identity as America’s premier green port, in part because the ILWU itself joined the effort to press for clean air, recognizing that its members were on the very front lines of exposure to toxins, carcinogens and other pollutants. If cooperation could replace enmity in the past, can it do so again? The question is: Where will it come from? And what form will it take? Perhaps those questions will begin to be answered when Councilman Buscaino holds his public safety hearing at 6 p.m. on June 27. Read the Community Alert on page 8.

June 15 - 28, 2012

Re: Iowa Fever (expanded online version) http://wp.me/p2ovOp-d8 It is hard for me to believe the Gray Panthers would be a sponsor of this project [refurbishing the USS Iowa]. We are a strongly anti-war organization. There is no Gray Panthers network in San Pedro and the national organization has not authorized the use of our name in support of this project. It is possible a member of the Gray Panthers has decided to volunteer as a welder, but my guess would be you are using our name to refer more generally to an older person. We are always happy to have the Gray Panthers name in the media, but would like to be sure that your readers know that we are an intergenerational social justice activist group fighting for universal health, environmental justice, economic security and peace. Sally Brown Gray Panthers National Leadership Team and Board member

By Danny Simon, Contributing Writer “There’s no sense of place in suburbia,” says urban architect Michael Bohn beneath the shade of an umbrella on Berlin Coffee House’s nearly completed parklet, an outside seating area that juts into the street taking up 1.5 parking spots. “Long Beach has an authentic history and architecture that we shouldn’t destroy.” “I think 26 [parklets] have been built [in San Francisco] and another 40 are on the boards,” says Bohn, a partner at Studio One Eleven, the locally-based design firm that created the first Southern California parklet in front of Lola’s Mexican Cuisine located near 4th Street and

The Local Publication You Actually Read

Attorney General Eric Holder: formerly of Covington & Burling law firm, in 2008 Holder himself represented big banks such as UBS and MBNA Bank. Holder was Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign co-chairman and raised $50,000 for the president’s campaign. Associate Attorney General Thomas Perrelli: a managing partner at Jenner and Block law firm, whose clients include Merrill Lynch, Perrelli stepped down from his number-three position at DOJ in March. A former member of Obama’s National Campaign Finance Committee, Perrelli bundled$ 500,000 in campaign contributions. Deputy Associate Attorney General Karol Mason: Karol Mason of Alston & Bird previously chaired the firm’s public finance group. She also bundled $500,000 for Obama. Holder awarded her a “Distinguished Service Award” for her work at the Department of Justice. Now, after almost three years at the Department of Justice, she has returned to Alston & Bird to work on their real estate finance and capital markets group. Associate Attorney General Tony West: West was a partner at Morrison and Foerster law firm, whose clients include MF Global, Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley, and Bank of America. West was also co-chairman of Obama’s campaign and, according to the San Francisco Chronicle, “was instrumental in helping the candidate raise an estimated $65 million in California.” Formerly the head of the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division, West is now number three at the DOJ and bundled$ 500,000 for the president’s campaign. Despite Holder and Obama’s “get tough” rhetoric against Wall Street, to date, there has not been a single criminal charge filed by the federal government against any top executive of the elite financial institutions. Don Gaudard Professor of Law Emeritus Washington, D.C.

Michael Bohn, Urbanist

historic structures such as the Kress and Walker buildings, sidewalk tree planting, and the expansion of bike lanes. A steady stream of out-of-town projects recently forced him to rejoin the freeway gridlock. He misses commuting to work by bike. Not everyone can do this, Bohn admits, but the city needs to attract a “creative class,” which he describes as individuals who crave short commutes and want to live in a rich and diverse cityscape. If you build it, they will come, and if they do, Long Beach just might give birth to the next Google. “We need to be farming for the next harvest,” says Bohn, who argues that attracting this creative class is imperative for Long Beach’s long term financial security as it loses aspects of its iconic corporate base like Boeing. Architects like Bohn aren’t grown in a lab. They

21

from p. 21

Urban Dwelling

June 15 - 28, 2012

Serving the Seven Cities of the Harbor Area

are raised in homes that nurture their innate nature. The only child of German immigrants, Bohn was

22

born in Maywood, near Huntington Park. His family relocated to Bixby Knolls when he was a year old. His home was filled with sturdy mid-century Danish furniture, much of which is still intact because it was designed and built to last. Often monopolizing his parent’s den, Bohn spent long hours building large models made from Legos and Lincoln Logs, first following the directions to a tee, and then building structures drawn from his imagination. He fondly recalls incorporating the two dimensional Lego trees into his designs as a child. He wonders if that somehow spurred his love of landscape architecture. The Long Beach of Bohn’s youth was “Iowa

by the sea.” Peopled by white mid-westerners, Bohn describes an idyllic neighborhood in the post-World War II paradigm. Everyone knew everybody, stay-at-home mothers kept track of each other’s children and the neighborhood was safe. But like many neighborhoods across the nation, it also had a grotesque nature. In 1953, the U.S. Supreme Court deemed restrictive housing covenants unenforceable in their ruling on Barrows v. Jackson 346 U.S. 249, but that didn’t stop some of Bohn’s bigoted neighbors a few decades later from harassing a mixed race couple who dared to buy a home in Bohn’s white middle-class neighborhood a few

decades later. The couple fled. The experience clearly left a bad taste in Bohn’s mouth. Class has become more defining than race in modern Long Beach, Bohn argues, with neighborhoods being occupied by people with similar education and income levels. This makes sense to a point, but if left unchecked, separation along class lines can lead to alienation. “If we separate along class lines,” says Bohn, “we loose a sense of a greater community.” Long Beach has matured into a better and fairer place, Bohn believes, and he wants that to continue far into the future. By the time he graduated St. Anthony High School, Bohn found Long Beach boring and provincial and he couldn’t leave for college fast enough. He studied architecture while attending Cal Poly State University, San Luis Obispo, and at the Ecole d’Art Americain in Fountainebleau, France. After graduating, he lived in Berlin with his elderly aunt, who lived to be 93. Bohn attributes her vitality in part to the healthier lifestyle enjoyed by Berliners, many of whom walk and take public transportation. After a few months in Berlin, Bohn travelled to India to work as part of a diverse survey group trying to preserve and study ancient structures located in the pilgrimage town of Hampi, not far from the city of Bangalore. Although he was only paid $5 a day, Bohn recalls with a smile, it was more than enough to live like a king. Like the Danish furniture in his parents home, parts of the aged structures in Hampi had survived because they were wisely conceived and constructed to last. Many years later, now a husband and father of two, Bohn is a partner (along with Winston Chang) at a locally-based design firm, Studio One Eleven, which was founded by Alan Pullman. The firm subscribes to the principals of the architectural movement of New Urbanism, which advocates for the creation of walkable cities with localized employment led by a sustainable ecological and economic strategy. The effects are subtle but visible, a tree here, a parklet there, and are part of an incremental strategy to make the city more livable for its inhabitants. The ideas of New Urbanism fly in the face of what has sadly become conventional wisdom. Post-World War II affluence bathed the country in a surplus of money, energy and building materials. This has led to a trend of mass construction that didn’t take the needs of humans and communities into consideration. Whether one is a conventionalist or a new urbanist, adherents to either philosophy must adhere to the concerns of the marketplace. But whereas many cookie cutter magnets from out of town seize at short-term windfalls, Bohn is one voice in a chorus of community members seek long-term investments that will intrinsically add value to the city in the long term. This battle of ideals will continue to be waged far into the future.

The Local Publication You Actually Read

June 15 - 28, 2012

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June 15 - 28, 2012

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RLn 06-14-12 Edition