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MYSTERY MAN

Brad Parks’s journey from journalism to award-winning mystery writer

ALSO THE PRINCETON PUBLIC LIBRARY MAGAZINE Spring 2011

A second helping of Pi The library’s teen advisers Stories and the early mind

MUSIC OF THE BOOK Quintet of the Americas performs compositon inspired by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

2 TUESDAY, MARCH 1 March 1, 7 p.m. Tech Talk: Social Media Panel Social media enthusiasts will share tips for making the most of social media to communicate and engage. Panelists are Kristin Weinstein, social media and PR blogger; Georgianne Vinicombe, owner of Monday Morning Flowers; Stacey Katz, Exit 8 Real Estate on Facebook; Khurt Williams, information security professional;  A.J. Moore, assistant professor of journalism at Rider University; and Jeff Edelstein, Trentonian columnist. Hilary Morris, owner of HMPR, moderates. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2 March 2, 7:30 p.m. Talk With Your Farmer — Aubrey Yarbrough of Stonehedge Farm and Kelly Harding of Cherry Grove Organic Farm, will take part in this discussion moderated by Judith Robinson, manager of the Princeton Farmers Market. Harding will share how his experience working on a factory pig farm led him to seek another healthier, less stressful way of raising cows, pigs, and goats. Yarbrough will talk about the challenges she has experienced as a young farmer. Community Room

THURSDAY, MARCH 3

March 3, 7 p.m. Witherspoon-Jackson Genealogy Group — The group meets monthly

The Poquelin Players present a premiere reading of “Hallie” on March 27. From left, troupe members Derry Light and Tom Stevenson; playwright Dan Jacobs; actor Dick Swain; playwright Susan Quinn; and actor Dan Siegel.

to share ideas, listen to speakers and get beginners started with researching the history of families who lived in Princeton’s historic Witherspoon-Jackson community.  All interested in the history of this community or in African American genealogy are invited to attend. Technology Center

Spring 2011

STORY TIMES

STORY ROOM, THIRD FLOOR

Program

Ages

Day, Time

Dates

Adult

Lapsits

0 - 15 months

Tue. 11 a.m. Wed. 11 a.m.

Mar. 1 - May 11

Must attend

Mother Goose 15 - 24 months

Wed. 10 a.m. Thur. 10 a.m.

Mar. 2 - May 12

except Apr. 19 & 20

Must attend

except Apr. 20 & 21

Toddler Stories

2 - 3 ½ years

Tue. 10 a.m. Thur. 11 a.m.

Mar. 1 - May 12

Preschool Stories

3 ½ - 6 years

Thur. 2 p.m.

Mar. 3 - May 12 Must remain in library except Apr. 21

SCORE Small Business Counseling — By appointment: Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6 p.m.; Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m. Tower Room

Saturday Stories

2 - 8 years

Sat. 10:30 a.m. Every Saturday Morning

Must attend if child is 5 or under

English Language Conversation Groups — Mondays, 1:30, 3:30 p.m.; Tuesdays 1:30, 4 p.m.; Wednesdays, 11 a.m., 1:30, 5 , 7 p.m.; Thursdays, 1:30, 3:30 , 7 p.m.; Fridays, 10 a.m., 3:30 p.m. Various Venues Call 609.924.9529, ext. 220 for details

Sunday Stories

2 - 8 years

Sun. 3:30 p.m.

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Stories in Spanish

0 months - 5 years

Technology Center Classes and Open Tech Time — Please visit www.princetonlibrary.org for schedule of classes and Open Tech Times. Springboard After School Homework Help — Mondays-Thursdays, 3:30 p.m. on days when Princeton Regional Schools are in session. Third Floor

Stories in Japanese (Preschool)

2 - 3 years

Mon. 2 p.m.

Mar. 7, Apr. 4, May 2

Must attend

Stories in Japanese

4 - 8 years

Thur. 4:30 p.m.

Mar. 3, Apr. 7, May 5

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Stories in French

3 - 6 years

Sat. 11:30 a.m. Mar. 12, Apr. 16

AARP Tax Aide — Mondays, 9 a.m., through April 11 Community Room Call 609.924.9529, ext 220 for details

Stories in Chinese

2 - 8 years

Sat. 11:30 a.m.

Mar. 5, Apr. 2, May 7

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Citizenship Test Preparation Classes — Thursdays, 7 p.m., April 6-May 25. Conference Room Call 609.393.4900, ext. 14 to register

Stories in Russian

2 - 8 years

Sat. 12:30 p.m. Mar. 12; Apr. 9; May 14

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Folktales from Afar

3 - 7 years

Calendar continues on Page 4

WEEKDAYS

WEEKLY

Game On! — Fridays, 4 p.m., board, video games and pingpong for children and teens. Third Floor

except Apr. 19 & 21

Every Sunday

Tue. 4:30 p.m. Mar. 8 - May 24

Sat. 2 p.m.

Mar. 12, 26; Apr. 2, 9, 23, May 7

Must attend

Must attend

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Family Stories for Spring Break Week

Mon. - Sat. April 18 - 22 at 10:30 a.m. All ages.

Books and Authors SPOTLIGHT

Fact to fiction When his newspaper job disappeared, Brad Parks made a sooner-than-anticipated (and highly successful) transition to mysteries By ANNE LEVIN Connections Staff Writer

T

hroughout his years as a sportswriter and investigative reporter for the Washington Post and the Newark Star-Ledger, Brad Parks had a vague plan in mind for the way he would wind down his career. He would segue, gradually, into a new genre: writing crime novels. That shift has taken place, but a few decades sooner than Parks imagined. At 36, he has recently published his second mystery novel, “Eyes of the Innocent.” Parks will talk about the book when he returns to Princeton Public Library for an author appearance on March 11 at 7:30 p.m. He first visited the library two years ago at the publication of his first book, “Faces of the Gone.” “There was probably always a thought in my head that I would write crime fiction,” says the engaging Parks, speaking by phone from his home in Virginia, where he lives with his wife and two small children. “But I always thought it would be in my dotage, after a long and successful career as a newspaper columnist, maybe after 30 years in newspapers.... until, all of a sudden, 30 years in news doesn’t exist anymore. So I was forced by circumstances to follow a dream, basically. I still have strong feelings about newspapers, but also the reality of a family to raise. And let’s face it, if you’re going to have to fall into something new, making up stories for a living is a blast.” Realizing that newspapers were headed for a major downturn, Parks left the Star-Ledger two years ago to focus full-time on crime fiction. He hasn’t abandoned news entirely: a major piece he wrote about Newark’s sorry financial state ran in the New York Post last December.

But he has two more novels completed, waiting for their publication dates. Parks was recently honored with the mystery community’s prestigious Nero Award for “Faces of the Gone,” making him the first author ever to win both the Shamus and Nero awards for the same book. Only a handful of authors have ever won both awards during the span of their careers, including Michael Connelly, Dennis Lehane, Laura Lippman, Walter Mosley and S.J. Rozan. Not bad for a rookie. “Eyes of the Innocent” follows the exploits of investigative reporter Carter Ross, the main character of “Faces of the Gone.” Parks admits the character is somewhat autobiographical. “As long as people are interested in Carter Ross, I’ll use him. I enjoy him. He makes me laugh,” he says. “There are obviously some similarities between him and me, but I don’t envision myself doing what he does. He’s a different person. I have a blast with him. I can’t imagine running out of stories to tell with him. Because when does a newspaper ever run out of stories to tell?” Newspapers have been in Parks blood since he was 14 years old and saw an ad in his hometown Connecticut weekly looking for sportswriters. “I thought that it sounded like a lot of fun, and off I went,” he says. “I never thought I could actually make a career of this until I realized, ‘Hey...people do this for a living?’ I was hook, line and sinker a newspaper guy at a pretty young age. I was incurably ink-stained.” From sports, Parks moved into investigative news. He covered Newark and saw its violence first-hand. “Faces of the Gone” was inspired by the executionstyle murders of four men in the city, whose bodies were found

Brad Parks discusses his new book, ”Eyes of the Innocent” March 11.

in a vacant lot. “Eyes of the Innocent “comes from Parks’ coverage of the foreclosure mess in Newark, which soon spread across the country. The first book springs from actual events, while the second is more of an amalgamation of events he covered. The process is organic, he says: he isn’t sure where each story will go until he is deep into it. “I almost have to revert to a more childlike state, tapping into that childhood imagination that I once had,” Parks says. “Then, I obviously set it within the context of the story. It’s giving myself license to actually create. It’s taken a while to do. The mechanics of writing don’t change at all. That’s something I learned from being a sportswriter and then moving into news. I knew if I could make that transition, then this is just another use of the writing muscle.” Parks’ books are funny and serious at the same time. Everything in his first book was taken directly from his personal experience, “altered slightly to protect the guilty,” he says. The second novel is not based on an actual crime.

“What I’ve found is that I get more comfortable making stuff up,” he says. “I find that the question is no longer ‘Is this real?’, but ‘Is this plausible?’ As long as the answer is yes, I keep going.” Writing books about the same character works for Parks, and entertains his readers. “I think of great book series as being kind of like friends,” he says. “You hope there is a familiarity and a comfort there, but the friend is still telling you something you didn’t know before. It’s that mix of the familiar and the new.” Parks is the stay-at-home dad in his household; his wife works full-time. He has help with childcare, allowing him to work on his books. While he has no complaints about the set-up, he admits to missing things about his former life. “I miss the newspaper. I miss the deadlines,” he says. “That’s how much of a nut I am. To me, that was the ultimate adrenalin high. But this works, too. It’s all about telling a story, and that’s what I’ve always enjoyed doing.” Brad Parks / March 11, 7 p.m. Community Room

3

4 FRIDAY, MARCH 4

March 4, 10 a.m. Film: “Michael Collins” — Liam Neeson and Julia Roberts star in this 1996 film about the Irish revolutionary who fought to free Ireland from the clutches of British rule. Part of the Friday Film Café series. Community Room March 4, 7 p.m. CD Release Event: The Wilson Family Forgery — This ever-shifting troupe of musicians anchored by Thomas Wilson and Sarah StewartKroeker celebrate the release of their latest CD. Community Room

TEENS March 4, 7 p.m.

Open Mic Night — Cross Witherspoon Street to visit the Arts Council of Princeton’s Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, where What’s Up Princeton will host this free event for high school students. Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon St.

MONDAY, MARCH 7 March 7, 8:30 a.m. School Gardens: From Seed Packets to Soup Pots — This free workshop is for teachers, parents, administrators and members of the community interested in learning what to plant, how to incorporate homegrown food into lessons and connecting the garden to the classroom. There will be speakers, breakout sessions, and panels. Among the speakers are David Bosted, policy expert from the New Jersey School Boards Association; Dorothy Mullen, garden artisan-in-residence at Riverside School and others. Registration is required. Community Room Co-sponsored by the Princeton School Gardens Cooperative and the Princeton Public Library, in association with Princeton Environmental Film Festival.

and who killed them? Discussion led by Gayle Stratton. Conference Room

not just for kids but a parent must accompany those under age 7. Activity Room, third floor

TUESDAY, MARCH 8

March 9, 7 p.m. Ask a Lawyer — Lawyers will be at the library for free private consultations on immigration and general legal issues. No appointments are necessary; service is on a first-come, first-served basis. Spanish translators will be available. For more information, call Lucía Acosta at 609.924.9529, ext. 245. Conference and Tower rooms

March 8, 7 p.m. Retirement Talk: Getting Nagging Financial Questions Answered Eleanore Szymanski, a certified financial planner and founder of the Financial Answer Place presents this program in the Engaged Retirement series. Conference Room. March 8, 7 p.m. Film: “Reprise” — In this 2006 film by Joachim Trier, two competitive friends, fueled by literary aspirations and youthful exuberance, endure pangs of love, depression and burgeoning careers. In Norwegian, with English subtitles. Part of the World Cineclub series co-sponsored

What’s Up Princeton is a collaboration of the library, the arts council, Corner House, HiTOPS, and the Princeton Recreation Department to provide programs for teens.

March 9, 7 p.m. Circulo de Lectura: “Cartas a mi vecina de arriba” por Ariel Magnus — Todos lo sabemos, un vecino es siempre un enemigo en potencia. Y si vive arriba y taconea sobre nuestra cabeza la guerra está declarada. Moderado por Lucia Acosta. Princeton Room March 9, 7:30 p.m. Talking Politics Book Group: “Boiling Mad: Inside Tea Party America” by Kate Zernike — Discussion led by Joan Goldstein of Mercer County Community College Quiet Room

SATURDAY, MARCH 5 TEENS March 5, 10 a.m.

Go-Between Club — This club for middle school students meets monthly at the library. Talk about books and other interests, help with library events, plan programs with the librarians, and have a say in library services. New members are always welcome. Conference Room.

TEENS March 5, Noon

GLBTQ Films and Lectures  Watch films with gay, bisexual, lesbian and transgender themes and participate in post-screening discussions led by students at this daylong event. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library, Princeton High School Gay Straight Alliance and HiTOPS.

SUNDAY, MARCH 6 March 6, 3 p.m. Lecture and Book Signing: Dr. Ari Tuckman — In a talk titled “How the ADHD Brain Works: Strategies to Overcome Executive Functioning Weaknesses,” the internationally noted expert in Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder provides practical strategies to more effectively manage your own or someone else’s ADHD. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library, the Latin American Task Force, Lutheran Social Ministries, The Princeton Housing Authority and the Mercer County Bar Association.

Flutist Jayn Rosenfeld appears at Princeton Symphony Soundtracks on March 9.

March 7, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Discussion: “White Sky, Black Ice” by Stan Jones — In the small Alaskan village of Chukchi, what are the odds of two suicides occurring in a matter of a few days? State trooper Nathan Active discovers that his suspicions concerning the deaths are well-founded; the two men were murdered. But what was the motive

by the library and L’ Association Francophone de Princeton. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9 KIDS+ March 9, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club — Anyone with a passion for paper folding is invited to meet for an hour of new and interesting, often seasonal, folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is

SPRING 2011

March 9, 7:30 p.m. Princeton Symphony Soundtracks: Jayn Rosenfeld — “Playing in Circles: The Orchestral Musicians’ Experience” is a lecture by Rosenfeld, the orchestra’s principal flutist. A member of several other musical ensembles who teaches at Princeton University and The Juilliard School, Rosenfeld will discuss the emotional and technical experience of being an orchestral musician. Comparing the orchestral experience to working within “circles of awareness” of increasing proportions (starting with the individual player and extending to the entire concert hall), Rosenfeld will invite the audience to become part of these “circles” through interspersed musical activities; no instrument necessary. Community Room Calendar continues on Page 6

For an up-to-date listing of all Princeton Public Library programs, please visit www.princetonlibrary.org

Music SPOTLIGHT 5

14 minutes of ‘Solitude’

of them had joined the National Orchestra of Colombia in 1976. “We decided to form a woodwind quintet. We were playing the standard repertoire at first, and we had a weekly radio program,” says Oldham. “We had to perform a piece by a Colombian composer, and we found one who wrote a lot of dances for us in a lot of styles. We all came back to the U.S., and in 1979 we re-formed the quintet. What we realized was that we had a repertoire that nobody else had. And we decided that we liked to commission new music. We also played native American instruments. So we started collecting music from Latin America, and that’s how it started.” Members of the quintet, who play flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and horn, are multi-faceted, teaching and playing in orchestras — “everything from pop and jazz to Mozart and in between,” says By ANNE LEVIN Oldham —  as well as in the ensemble. Their unique repertoire Connections Staff Writer allows them to explore a dimension of music that the traditional works for woodwind quintet might not provide. “Everybody does omposer Judah Adashi loves the novel “One Hundred Years of the standards, but they don’t, in general, take advantage of the color Solitude” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Reading it for the second possibilities that a woodwind quintime, the 35-year-old Baltet has,” says Oldham. “It is made up timore native, who teachof instruments that produce sounds es at the prestigious Peabody Instiin different ways, creating the possitute of Music, was inspired to create bilities of a huge array of color, una piece of music based on seven inlike string or brass ensembles where stances that take place in the story. the instruments all come from the “Songs and Dances of Macondo” same family.” will be performed at Princeton PubPerforming in a small ensemble oflic Library on May 15 at 3 p.m. by fers certain artistic advantages. “Evthe Quintet of the Americas, a welleryone has a lot of input into musical known woodwind ensemble that decisions, from the repertoire to how specializes in music of the Western to play a phrase,” says Oldham. “You Hemisphere and works by contempoget so much musical satisfaction. You rary composers. The piece is part of a can help decide the program. Everyprogram devoted to Latin American one has to know everyone else’s parts music and literature, and also inwithout looking at a score, and be able cludes works by composers Barbara to react. It’s sort of like a basketball Harbach, Charles B. Griffin and some game. You have to be able to react.” Colombian dances. Each piece is couAdashi’s  “Songs and Dances of pled with a related work, or several, of Macondo” was not his first piece to poetry or prose. be inspired by literature. “A lot of my Adashi will be on hand to talk about pieces have some literary connechis 14-minute piece at the event. He tion,” he says. “This one is sort of a will lead a master class on compossongbook to accompany the novel, ing for 25 participants on May 11 at you could say. I picked out some 1 p.m. (Register from the library’s onepisodes in the book that have muline events calendar.) sical episodes, some of which are “The quintet found me on the Inobscure. I whittled it down to seven ternet,” Adashi says. “They’re an outinstances that I sort of translated standing group. I was thrilled to work into music.” with them.” Not atonal, Adashi’s music “will Members of the quintet are equally sound contemporary in certain enthusiastic about their work with The Quintet of the Americas performs on May 15. ways, but it begins from traditional Adashi. “I was researching works for sources. There is melody, harmony woodwind quintets and I found this and rhythm,” he says. “I want some of the movements to be memowonderful piece he had written,” says Barbara Oldham, the ensemble’s horn rable, and it hopefully walks that elusive line.” player. “Even though we focus on music of Latin American origin, we also Judah Adashi Master Class / May 11, 1 p.m. / Community Room have recently received an Encore Award from the American Composers Forum which is given to groups doing a new work by a composer from “Gabriel García Márquez: Magic and Reality” / May 11, 7 p.m. another area. It’s been an honor for the piece and for us.” The Quintet of the Americas / May 15, 3 p.m. / Community Room These programs are funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The original members of the Quintet have been colleagues more than 30 Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent years. All U.S. citizens, they began working together in Bogota, where each those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

The Quintet of the Americas showcases a composition based on ‘One Hundred Years of Solitude.’ Composer Judah Adashi discusses his ‘Songs and Dances of Macondo’ at performance and master class.

C

6 THURSDAY, MARCH 10

FRIDAY, MARCH 18 KIDS March 18, 9:15, 10:30 ,11:30 a.m.

March 10, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group: “The Housekeeper and the Professor” by Yoko Ogawa — He is a brilliant math professor with a peculiar problem. Since a traumatic head injury, he has lived with only 80 minutes of short-term memory. She is an astute young housekeeper with a 10-yearold son who is hired to care for the professor. Between them, a strange and beautiful relationship blossoms. Discussion led by Kristin Friberg. Conference Room

Home-School Book Discussion Club — Home-schooled children meet to discuss the very best in children’s books. Those ages 7-9 meet at 9:15 a.m.; ages 10-12 at 10:30 a.m. and ages 13-15 at 11:30 a.m. Registration is required. Call Pamela Groves at (609) 924-9529 ext. 244. Conference Room March 18, 10 a.m. Film: “Grand Hotel” — Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford and Wallace Beery star in this 1932 classic about the intertwining lives of the guests at a plush Berlin hotel. Part of the Friday Film Café series. Community Room

March 10, 7:30 p.m. Rain Gardens — A rain garden captures and filters the rainwater before it can runoff to the nearest storm drain, reducing flooding and pollution and providing a wildlife habitat. Curtis Helm, project coordinator, Urban Forestry and Ecosystem Management of Philadelphia’s Department of Parks and Recreation, will talk about basic principles and methods for constructing a rain garden. Community Room

FRIDAY, MARCH 11 through SUNDAY, MARCH 13 Pi Day Events — Please see feature story on Page 7

FRIDAY, MARCH 11 March 11, 7 p.m. Author Brad Parks — Please see feature story on Page 3

SATURDAY, MARCH 12

March 12, 4:30 p.m. Film: “Plunder: The Crisis of Our Time” — This film explores how the financial crisis was built on a foundation of questionable activity. Part of the Global Cinema Cafe series. Community Room

SUNDAY, MARCH 13 KIDS March 13, 4 p.m.

Heads and Tales — Children ages 7-9 are invited to join librarian Pamela Groves to discuss some of the best in children’s books. This month’s selection is “The Real Thief” by William Steig. Registration is required. Call Pamela Groves at (609) 924-9529 ext. 244. Study Room, third floor

KIDS March 13, 5 p.m.

Word for Word — Librarian Pamela Groves leads book discussions for children ages 10-12. This month’s

TEENS+ March 18, 7 p.m.

The McManus Band performs Celtic music on March 15.

book is “Trouble Don’t Last” by Shelley Pearsall. Registration is required. Call Pamela Groves at 609.924.9529 ext. 244. Study Room, third floor

sions; just the truth of experience. Alan Goldsmith leads this discussion group. Quiet Room

MONDAY, MARCH 14

March 15, 7 p.m. Concert: The McManus Band Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with this band specializing in Celtic rock. The group includes a fiddler, guitarist, bass player and drummer. Community Room

March 14, 7 p.m. Performance and Talk: The Practitioners of Musick The ensemble, featuring John Burkhalter on flutes and Donovan Klotzbeacher on harpsichord, presents a program titled “Beyond the Fanlight: Music in Georgian Dublin.” Concert-going in 18th century Dublin was an important part of the social life of the nobility. The city became a stop on the itinerary of internationally renowned musicians traveling between the main European centers of London and Paris, and many accomplished musicians, George Frideric Handel among them, visited the city. Community Room  March 14, 7 p.m. Noodle Talk — Participants select from a container filled with paper strips (“noodles”), each with one or two questions about life experiences. There are no right or wrong answers in these resulting discus-

TUESDAY, MARCH 15

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16 March 16, 6:45 p.m. Talk: From Entrepreneur to Spaceman — Get entrepreneurship advice and ideas from Greg Olsen, a pioneer in the sensors industry and in space travel. In 2007, Olsen was named Princeton University’s first entrepreneur-inresidence, with the university’s Keller Center in collaboration with the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials. Community Room

SPRING 2011

Science Café — Be part of a creative scientific brainstorming iGEM team in this interactive session and experience what it’s like to design genetically engineered machines. Learn about the exciting and controversial new scientific field of synthetic biology and break into small groups to design your project. Synthetic biology involves the design and construction of novel biological systems to create functions not yet found in nature. Biological Engineering departments are sprouting up at major universities across the globe, but the real impetus for discovery lies within the annual International Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) competition at MIT. Teams of students from high schools and universities around the world compete to create and combine standardized biological parts to make systems that can be immediately applied to solve real-world problems. High school students and adults are invited to learn about this new field and to experience the excitement of the iGEM competition. Lindsey Kayman, an environmental health and safety specialist, and Caroline DeHart, a doctoral student in molecular biology at Princeton University will present the program. Community Room Calendar continues on Page 8

Pi Day SPOTLIGHT 7

Pi squared

The second annual Pi Day celebration promises more of everything Pi and pie By ANNE LEVIN Connections Staff Writer

I

t would be an understatement, at best, to say that the second annual Princeton Pi Day celebration is bigger than its predecessor. This year’s version of the commemoration of Pi, the most revered mathematical constant in the universe, is packed with events spread out over four days, several of which take place at Princeton Public Library. The celebration culminates on March 14, the 132nd birthday of famed former Princeton resident Albert Einstein, the man at the center of all the madness. Partnering  this year with Joy Chen of JOY Cards,  Princeton Pi Day co-founder Mimi Omiecinski of Princeton Tour Company has taken her original concept to new heights. Between Pi recitations, “mathlete” events, pie-eating, pie-throwing and piejudging contests, a no-sock sock hop (Einstein hated wearing socks) and an Einstein lookalike contest, there are events for participants of all ages and all levels of scientific scholarly sophistication.  “We’re super thrilled to get as many partners as we have gotten,” says the enthusiastic Omiecinski. “We’ve been brainstorming all year about this thing, which we want to take place every year here in Princeton. We really believe that in 10 years, this will be the Olympics for ‘mathletes’. We’re two people who are going to will this thing to work.” Partners in the four-day event include local hotels, which will deliver wake-up calls by Einstein (played by noted Einstein impersonator Bill Agress); the Arts Council of Princeton, which with the Princeton Theatre Experiment will present the Steve Martin play “Picasso at the Lapin Agile” (Einstein is a character); NJ Transit, which will provide rides on the Dinky train; and Princeton Airport (airplane rides with Einstein). Princeton Public Library is where the fun begins. At 3:14 p.m. on Friday, March 11 (314 are the first three digits of Pi), the movies “IQ” and “A Beautiful Mind” will be screened. The following day, an Interactive Science Fair for all ages, starring scientists from Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, starts at 2 p.m. In the second floor fireplace area at 3 p.m., an Energy Summit with Greg Olsen, the private citizen from Princeton who ventured into space; and Herb Mertz, the co-founder of Psyleron, will be staged. Sunday’s Pi Recitation Contest, which will include contestants as young as 7, will start at 1 p.m. in the Community Room. Then at 2 p.m., the ‘mathlete’ challenge takes over. Middle school math enthusiasts will compete in this event facilitated by John Witherspoon Middle School. The winner gets a savings account from the Bank of Princeton with a starting balance of, what else? $314.159. At 5 p.m., The Einstein Look-Alike Contest begins in the Community Room. Contestants can portray the scientist at any age. Princeton was a late bloomer in the Pi Day celebrations that take place all over the world. Researching last year, Omiecinski found that the town so central to Einstein’s life had never joined the commemorations because Einstein was a private person who shunned the spotlight. But after the enthusiastic response last year from the public, local merchants, and the community at large, she knew this was an event to continue. Events for “geek freaks,” an Einstein pub crawl, parties at the Historical Society of Princeton, special pricing from area merchants, Einstein re-enactor tours (Omiecinski’s mother will return to reprise her role as Einstein’s mother Pauline), and a curator’s tour of Einstein’s home are just some of the activities on the ambitious weekend schedule. The website www.pidayprinceton.com even has a “swag” category with tee shirts, hats, mugs, even baby clothes that sport a Pi theme. “If you’re a geek, you’re the star of the show that weekend,” says Omiecinski. “And if you’re not, you’ll have fun too.” Pi Day events / March 11-13 / Community Room

Pi Day co-founder Mimi Omiecinski with Dr. Martin Weinapple of Princeton Township, one of the contestants in last year’s Einstein Look-Alike Contest at the first Pi Day.

Pi Day at the library FRIDAY, MARCH 11 3:14 p.m. Film screenings: “IQ” and “A Beautiful Mind”

SATURDAY, MARCH 12 2 p.m. Interactive Science Demonstration for kids 3 p.m. Energy Summit with Greg Olsen and Herb Mertz Fireplace Area, second floor

SUNDAY, MARCH 13 1 p.m. Pi Recitation Contest 2 p.m. Mathlete Challenge 5 p.m. Einstein Look-Alike Contest All events are in the Community Room, unless otherwise noted DETAILS ON ALL PI DAY EVENTS: www.pidayprinceton.com

8 SATURDAY, MARCH 19 March 19, 10 a.m. Local and Independent Author Day — Local and independent authors get a chance to read and showcase their work. A workshop for writers is 10 a.m. to noon; followed by an author fair with selected readings from 1-4 p.m. Featured authors are Lauren B. Davis, John Fleming, Chris Illuminati and Kelly Rouba. Author registration information: www.princetonlibrary.org/events Community Room

SUNDAY, MARCH 20 March 20, 1 p.m. Scrapbooking Circle — At these five-hour monthly sessions, participants have space to spread out and scrap, while getting advice from others. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23

Co-sponsored by the Library, Greenwood House and the Alzheimers Association.

March 23, 6:30 p.m. Film: “Praying with Lior” Lior has Down syndrome. Some call him “the little rabbi,” as he is known to pray with abandon. As his Bar Mitzvah approaches, different family members describe him as a best friend, a burden, an inspiration, and an embarrassment. The movie poses questions about disability and who really talks to God. Part of the “What Are You Looking At?” Film Series. Community Room

FRIDAY, MARCH 25 TEENS March 25, 7 p.m.

Card Tricks and Word Games In this special evening program for high school students, Mark Zacharia teaches card tricks. Then, participants can play a variety of board games. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Enable, Inc.

SATURDAY, MARCH 26

March 23, 7:30 p.m. Poetry Reading: US1 Poets Jim Haba and Elizabeth Bodien read for 20 minutes each, followed by an open mic session. Fireplace Area, second floor

 

March 20, 3 p.m. Princeton Writers Block An Afternoon of Comedies.  This group of actors and writers return with their popular program of vintage comic sketches by Nichols & May and Burns & Allen. Also on the program are one-act comedies by contemporary playwright David Ives. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library, US1 Poets Cooperative and Delaware Valley Poets.

THURSDAY, MARCH 24

will feature Patti Kerr, author of “I Love You, Who Are You?: Loving and Caring for a Parent with Alzheimer’s” as well as representatives from The Greater New Jersey Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association and Greenwood House. Fireplace Area, second floor

March 24, 7 p.m. Panel Discussion: Caring for your Loved One with Alzheimer’s This  informative panel presentation

March 26, 2 p.m. Citizenship Workshop — For those applying to become U.S. citizens, all of the necessary resources will be at this three-hour workshop. Trained, bilingual volunteers will be on hand to assist local immigration attorneys who will be donating their time to review citizenship applications. Those who just need information or to have a consultation about the process and requirements to obtain U.S. citizenship are also

Co-sponsored by the library and the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund.

SUNDAY, MARCH 27

March 27, 4 p.m. Staged Reading: “Hallie” — The Poquelin Players (Derry Light, Tom Stevenson, Dan Siegel and Dick Swain) present the premiere reading of this play by Susan Quinn and Dan Jacobs about Hallie Flanagan, director of the Federal Theatre Project of the Works Project Administration. Quinn is the author of the book “Furious Improvisation: How the WPA and a Cast of Thousands Made High Art out of Desperate Times.” The new play brings to life this important period in American theater history. Community Room

KIDS March 27, 4 p.m.

Children and Stories — This session for young readers and nonreaders, ages 5-7, is led by librarian Pamela Groves, who will read a story that will be discussed by participants. No advance reading or registration is required; just come to talk about stories. Conference Room

TUESDAY, MARCH 29

March 29, 7 p.m. Encore Careers: Doing Good While Doing Well — Carol King of Princeton Senior Resource Center leads this session on using your skills, knowledge and experience in an encore career in such growth industries as education, health care, and the environmental field. Conference Room

TUESDAY, MARCH 22 March 22, 8 a.m. Tuesday Networking Breakfast Alex Freund speaks at the monthly meeting of this group for those currently unemployed, under-employed, or seeking to make a job or career change. Community Room

THURSDAY, MARCH 31

Co-sponsored by the library and NJ Unemployed

March 22, 7 p.m. Socrates Café — In the spirit of Socrates’ belief that “the unexamined life is not worth living,” participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group.  Everyone is invited. Conference Room

invited to attend. Registration is necessary by calling the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund at 877.452.5333 Please leave a name and phone number and an LALDEF representative will call back with more information.  All services are free and confidential. Community Room

John McPhee reads March 31 in a program co-sponored by the library and the Story Brook-Millstone Watershed Association SPRING 2011

March 31, 6 p.m. Reading: John McPhee The renowned Princeton author presents a reading in support of the Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association. In reviewing his most-recent collection of essays, “Silk Parachute,” Elizabeth Royte of The New York Times wrote, “In the age of blogging and tweeting, of writers’ near-constant self-promotion, McPhee is an imperative counter weight, a paragon of both sense and civility.” Community Room

9 FRIDAY, APRIL 1

April 1, 10 a.m. Film: “Anna Karenina” — This 1997 version based on Leo Tolstoy’s novel tells of a married woman who embarks on a doomed affair with a military officer, set in late 19th century Russia. Sophie Marceau and Alfred Molina star. Part of the Friday Film Café series. Community Room

SATURDAY, APRIL 2 April 2, 10 a.m. Book Drive — Bring your used books to this daylong event to help support the library and literacy programs. Students from the library’s Teen Advisory Board and the Go-Between Club will join volunteers from area schools and organizations to help collect the donated books. Individual students or groups interested in volunteering or anyone with questions about donating books should contact Teen Services Librarian Susan Conlon: sconlon@princetonlibrary.org Community Room April 2, 4 p.m. Book Launch: Lois Marie Harrod’s “Brief Term” — At this reading, which includes a booksigning and refreshments, Harrod introduces her often humorous book of poems about teaching, teachers, and students. A teacher of creative writing at the College of New Jersey, Harrod’s “Cosmogony” won the 2010 Flyway Hazel Lipa Chapbook contest. Fireplace Area, second floor

SUNDAY, APRIL 3 April 3, 2:30 p.m. Book Launch: US1 Worksheets — Volume 56 of this publication includes works by 98 poets, including members of the US1 Poets Cooperative and other poets from across America and Europe. Refreshments will be served and poets will read from their work in this volume, which is dedicated to the memory of Ralph Copleman, a longtime member and friend. Community Room

MONDAY, APRIL 4

April 4, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Discussion: “The Cold Dish” by Craig Johnson After 24 years as sheriff, Walt, along with Deputy Victoria Moretti and lifelong friend Henry Standing Bear, is embroiled in the most

Gary Snyder, left, and Jim Harrison in a scene from “The Practice of the Wild,” screening April 7 at 7 p.m.

volatile and challenging case of his career. Discussion led by Gayle Stratton. Conference Room

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6 TEENS April 6, 4 p.m.

Money Matters: Real World Lessons in Money Management — Cynthia Lambert leads this interactive workshop for students in grades 8-12 about the basics of spending, budgeting, saving, and managing their financial lives. Quizzes, games and more will be used to help students learn about topics such as setting and meeting short-, medium-, and long-term financial goals,  ATMs, credit cards, 401(k) accounts, car loans, check books, online money management tools and investing. Community Room

TEENS April 6, 6:30 p.m.

My Power Pizza — This is a goal-setting tool for students in grades 8-12 who want to take charge of their lives and make things happen. Holly Landau, Leadership Expert and the CEO and Founder of Landau Leadership, is the presenter. Pizza will be served. Community Room Please register for these programs by visiting the online events calendar at www.princetonlibrary.org

THURSDAY, APRIL 7

April 7, 7 p.m. Witherspoon-Jackson Genealogy Group — The group meets monthly to share ideas, listen to speakers and get beginners started with researching the history of families who lived in Princeton’s historic Witherspoon-Jackson community.  All interested in the history of this community or in African American genealogy are invited to attend. Technology Center April 7, 7 p.m. Film: “The Practice of the Wild” — This documentary is a profile of poet and Pulitzer Prizewinner Gary Snyder, a central figure of the Beat generation. The film follows Snyder and novelist Jim Harrison as the two old friends wander the trails of the central California coast and debate everything from Google to Zen koans. Community Room

SATURDAY, APRIL 9 TEENS April 9, 10 a.m.

Go-Between Club — This club for middle school students meets monthly at the library. Talk about books and other interests, help with library events, plan programs with the librarians, and have a say in library services. New members are always welcome. Conference Room April 9, 10:30 a.m. SCORE: Quickbooks Workshop Oria Gonzales, SCORE counselor and certified Quickbooks trainer presents

this free, hands-on workshop. This event is co-sponsored by the Princeton Area Chapter of SCORE and the Princeton Public Library. Registration is limited, and must be done through SCORE’s website (www.scoreprinceton.org). Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the SCORE of Princeton.

April 9, 2 p.m. Raw Foods Workshop Dorothy Mullen, founder of the Suppers Program (pictured above), and Lana Jay Spencer, co-founder of Living Suppers, will screen the film “Simply Raw: Reversing Diabetes in 30 Days.” They will then talk about the raw food diet and provide recipes for incorporating more living foods and adopting a totally raw diet. Samples will be provided. Community Room Calendar continues on Page 10

10 SUNDAY, APRIL 10

April 10, 1 p.m. Scrapbooking Circle — At these five-hour monthly sessions, participants have space to spread out and scrap, while getting advice from others. Quiet Room

MONDAY, APRIL 11

April 11, 7 p.m. Noodle Talk — Participants select from a container filled with paper strips (“noodles”), each with one or two questions about life experiences. Alan Goldsmith leads this discussion group. Quiet Room April 11, 7 p.m. Film: “Play Again” — Children play more behind screens than outside. What are they missing? And what impact will this have on our children, our society, and eventually, our planet? This moving and humorous documentary by filmmakers Tonje Hessen Schei and Meg Merri follows six teenagers who, like the “average American child,” spend five to 15 hours a day behind screens. “Play Again” unplugs these teens and takes them on their first wilderness adventure – no electricity, no cell phone coverage, no virtual reality. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Balance.

April 11, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library — Poets read for 20 minutes each, followed by an open mic session. Presented by the library, US1 Poets Cooperative and Delaware Valley Poets. Fireplace Area, second floor

TUESDAY, APRIL 12

April 12, 7 p.m. Retirement Talk: Caring for the Caregiver and Managing Caregiver Responsibilities — Barbara Stender, a caregiver specialist with Greater Trenton Behavioral Health Care,speaks as part of the Engaged Retirement series. Conference Room

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13 KIDS+April 13, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club — Anyone with a passion for paper folding is invited to meet for an hour of new and interesting, often seasonal, folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids, but a parent must accompany those under age 7. Conference Room

April 13, 7 p.m. Film: “Library of the Early Mind” Please see feature story on Page 13. Community Room. April 13, 7 p.m.  Circulo de Lectura: “El arte de la resurrección” por Hernán Rivera Letelie —El desierto chileno y las oficinas salitreras castigadas por el sol son los hostiles parajes donde el iluminado, más conocido como el Cristo del Elqui, causará revuelo

ishly illustrated volume is believed to be the first authoritative dinosaur book in the style of a field guide. A world-renowned dinosaur illustrator and researcher, Paul provides comprehensive visual and textual coverage of the great Mesozoic animals that gave rise to the living dinosaurs, the birds. Incorporating the new discoveries and research that are radically transforming what we know about dinosaurs, this book is distinguished both by its scientific

past and he often looks to the classical world for inspiration in dealing with themes of loss, loneliness and modern atrocities. Best known for his award-winning poetry, Kirchwey is also a book reviewer, teacher, literary curator and advocate for writers and writing. He directed the Unterberg Poetry Center of the 92nd Street Y and is currently a professor at Bryn Mawr College. Part of the Thinking Allowed series co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press. Community Room

SATURDAY, APRIL 16

Wondergy presents Science of Sound on April 18, the first in a series of special events for kids and teens for Spring Break Week.

entre los lugareños con sus prédicas santas. Moderado por Luciá Acosta. Princeton Room April 13, 7:30 p.m. Talking Politics Book Group: “It Still Takes a Candidate: Why Women Don’t Run forOffice” by Jennifer Lawless and Richard L. Fox — Discussion led by Joan Goldstein of Mercer County Community College. Quiet Room

THURSDAY, APRIL 14

April 14, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group: “To the End of the Land” by David Grossman This epic yet intimate story of an Israeli family haunted by the shadow of war centers on a love triangle between Ora, Avram, and Ilan. It ends when Avram returns to war, and Ora settles down with Ilan to raise two sons. But when her youngest is called to duty, Ora flees for Galilee, dragging with her Avram, who, deeply scared by his experience as a POW during the Yom Kippur War, has refused contact with her for years. Discussion led by Kristin Friberg. Conference Room April 14, 7:30 p.m. Author Gregory S. Paul — The writer discusses “The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs” in this family-friendly appearance. This lav-

accuracy and the quality and quantity of its illustrations. Part of the Thinking Allowed series co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press. Community Room

FRIDAY, APRIL 15 KIDS April 15, 9:15, 10:30, 11:30 a.m.

Home-School Book Discussion Club — Home-schooled children meet to discuss the very best in children’s books. Those ages 7-9 meet at 9:15 a.m.; ages 10-12 at 10:30 a.m. and ages 13-15 at 11:30 a.m. Registration is required. Call 609.924.9529, ext. 240. Conference Room April 15, 10 a.m. Film: “Roman Holiday” — Audrey Hepburn won an Oscar in 1953 for her portrayal of a princess who travels incognito to Rome to experience a “normal” life. Gregory Peck costars as the reporter who discovers her ruse and falls in love with her before his exclusive story goes to press. William Wyler directs. Part of the Friday Film Café series. Community Room April 15, 5 p.m. Poetry Reading: Karl Kirchwey The internationally acclaimed poet will read at a special program marking National Poetry Month. Kirchway’s work is strongly influenced by the Greek and Roman

SPRING 2011

April 16, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Small Business Fair — This annual gathering of experts in financing, web design, marketing, franchising, and more has become a tradition for those looking to start a new enterprise or keep an existing one healthy. Representatives from the Small Business Development Center, Small Business Administration, banking, and other organizations will be on hand to offer advice. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Chapter of SCORE

MONDAY, APRIL 18 KIDS April 18, 2 p.m.

Wondergy: Science of Sound The same dynamic team that brought Skate Science to the Princeton last year will return with this special program that will help us experience sound as we’ve never seen, felt, or heard it before. Turn your voice into a giant laser show. Play with unique instruments, including a Laser Harp and a PVC Xylophone, and get tickled with sound with a huggable speaker. Ages 5-12. Community Room Calendar continues on Page 12

Teens SPOTLIGHT 11

Getting teens on board By ANNE LEVIN Connections Staff Writer

W

Three little words changed the Teen Advisory Board: peer leadership opportunity

hen Susan Conlon took over the leadership of the Princeton Public Library’s Teen Advisory Board nearly a decade ago, it was a drop-in group modeled after learned that those organizations in TAB and some she had met at similar clubs in libraries across structured their programs to ena community service day event the country. The group met gage teens through an application at Princeton High School. She monthly to share interests and process, she got an idea. promoted the new opportunity have a say in library programs “Three words jumped out at through the library’s Facebook and services. The youngest were me: peer leadership opportunity,” page, and to teens who regularly in sixth grade; the oldest were Conlon says. “Teenagers have so used the library. The applications high school seniors. Conlon, many commitments, and they included letters to the parents of PPL’s teen services librarian, was have to make priorities for getting prospective TAB members, detheir liaison. involved in outside-of-school actailing the specific demands that Through the years, the TAB tivities. But they also need comwould be made on members’ time. also provided teens several opmunity service opportunities that “A few of the parents told me portunities to make their voices matter and engage them. I started they really supported the idea,” heard. Two positions were cretalking with Sasha Chhabra, who Conlon says. “That was gratifyated for teen representatives on was our newly appointed repreing, because by changing things the library’s Board of Trustees. sentative to the library’s Board like this we were taking a risk. Members participated in the anof Trustees and a TAB member, What if the continuing members nual Princeton Environmental to get his input on changing TAB didn’t want to move forward with Film Festival, the GLBTQ film from a drop-in to program to the changes, or if we couldn’t inand lecture series, and the Piasomething more structured, with terest newcomers?” no-a-thon. They raised funds to a commitment to attendance.” Conlon need not have worried. contribute to relief efforts from Sasha agreed with Conlon’s Applications soon began coming the 2004 tsunami and Hurricane idea. “Without a lot of time bein. “Their responses on the appliKatrina. fore the start of the new season cation were awesome,” she says. A few years ago, Conlon noof TAB starting in September, I “I had asked them, in the appliticed a significant gap between drew up an application last sumcation, why they wanted to join the younger and older particimer and did some outreach and TAB, how they thought they’d pants. “It became apparent to me publicity to interest new membenefit, what they’d bring to the that the kids were feeling an age bers,” Conlon says. group, and what the value of the divide,” she says. “So we agreed Conlon provided applications library was to them.” to split the group from one large to teenagers who had been sumAmong the statements on apgroup into two. The middle mer volunteers at the library, any plications that Conlon found school kids became the Go Bewho had already been involved particularly gratifying: tween Club, now thriving too, and the high-schoolaged students stayed with Teen Advisory Board. The curious thing that happened is that the Go Between Club took off, but the TAB got smaller.” Concerned that the older group continue and thrive, Conlon realized some retooling was in order. She consulted with colleagues at Princeton’s Corner House and HiTops, both of which sponsor student boards for teens. When Conlon Susan Conlon, left, with members of Teen Advisory Board at their September orientation session.

“I would like to be a member of TAB because I love the library and would like to support it in every way possible. I’ve grown up with it and it is like a second home.”  “I would love to be a member of TAB because I believe it will be a bridge between adults and adolescents in the library environment.” “I want to help make the library experience better for the next set of kids who come to use it; I think it would be really rewarding to know I helped change something to make it better for other kids.” The Teen Advisory Board, at one point down to four, now includes 18 very active participants. Several  are students at Princeton High School, but members also come from both West WindsorPlainsboro high schools, Lawrence High School, Princeton Day School and The Pennington School. The group began meeting last September.  “We started with our first meeting on a Saturday afternoon in September,” says Conlon. “We had a ‘retreat’ at the library, a longer session, to start to get to know each other and track past library activities for teens. We also talked about the future.” After drafting a mission statement, participants started getting involved in a range of library activities. Members are required to keep track of their own volunteer hours.  Last fall, the TAB helped out with the Friends of the Library Book Sale, Science Café, Haunted House, the Halloween program for middle school students, the Geography Bee, and A Cappella Night. For Princeton High School sophomore and TAB member Becca Breslaw, the group has helped fuel her interest in philosophy, history, and reading. “TAB is a group of high Continues on Page 12

12 TEENS April 18, 3 p.m.

Board Game Mania — High school and middle school students are invited to join pick-up board games, including Monopoly, Scrabble and Catan. Part of the Spring Breakthrough series. Third floor April 18, 7:30 p.m. Talk: “Special Education Law: What Parents Should Know” Stanley J. Vitello, professor and coordinator of special education programs at Rutgers’ Graduate School of Education, is the speaker. Community Room

TUESDAY, APRIL 19

April 19, 8:30 a.m. Tuesday Networking Breakfast Katie DeVito’s talk, “The Importance of Networking,” will include an interactive speed networking session. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and NJ Unemployed

TEENS April 19, 3 p.m.

Recycled Book Art — High school and middle school students are invited to turn discarded books into art, and to repurpose them as journals and photo albums (bring your own photos). Part of the Spring Breakthrough series. Third floor

April 19, 7 p.m. Retirement Talk: Job Search Strategies for Older Workers Carol King leads this new, 90-minute program addressing such issues as the changing structure of the job market, ageism in the job market, using the Internet for job searches and networking, and avoiding job search scams. Conference Room April 19, 7:30 p.m. Discussion: Lewis Maltby The president and founder of the National Workrights Institute, a human rights organization committed to workplace issues, will discuss his new book, “Can They Do That?: Retaking Our Fundamental Rights in the Workplace.” Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and NJ Unemployed.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20 KIDS April 20, 2 p.m.

The Strange World of Reptiles Snakes-n-Scales and Turtle Tales will bring live lizards, turtles and snakes to the Community Room, including a

boa constrictor or an amazing Burmese Python, and a rescued baby American Alligator. Learn about the specialties of each and what they eat. We’ll joke about things they do, and find out if these creatures actually make good pets. Ages 5-12. Community Room

TEENS April 20, 3 p.m.

Word Wars — High school and middle school students are invited to test their skills in Bananagrams, Scrabble, and Balderdash for this word games tournament. Part of the Spring Breakthrough series. Third floor

KIDS April 20, 4:30 p.m.

Kids Talent Show — Aspiring entertainers in elementary school are invited to perform at our talent show. Sing, dance, juggle, do magic tricks, or tell jokes and share your special talents in front of a friendly audience. Community Room April 20, 7 p.m. Author Talk: New Novelist Night Meet three new voices receiving rave reviews. Sarah Pekkanen and Kelly Simmons will offer comments on their second novels, while Ru Freeman talks about her first. All three authors will read from their work and explore the challenges of breaking into the literary scene. Part

of the Caroline Llewellyn Writers Talking series. Community Room

THURSDAY, APRIL 21 TEENS April 21, 3 p.m.

Pingpong Meet-Up — High school and middle school students are invited to join open table pick-up games. Part of the Spring Breakthrough series. Third floor April 21, 6:30 p.m. Film: “Autism, the Musical” This uplifting documentary follows five autistic children over the course of six months as they prepare for and perform in a musical production. Director Tricia Regan captures the struggles and triumphs of their family lives, and observes how the show gives them a comfort zone in which they can explore their creative sides. Part of the “What Are You Looking At?” Enable Film Series. Community Room

FRIDAY, APRIL 22 KIDS April 22, 2 p.m.

Up, Up and Away — Take part in some eye-popping demonstrations and experiments. There will be plenty of opportunity for hands-on audiCalendar continues on Page 14

Teen Advisory Board Continued from Page 11

school students that share a common love of the library and the Princeton atmosphere,” she wrote on her midterm exam about community service. “…My hope is that through this service, I will be able to branch out and be able to volunteer at other groups as well, when I’m old enough.” As a framework for their goals, the group has a theme for each year. This year’s theme is innovation. Gab Carbone, co-owner of The Bent Spoon ice cream shop on Palmer Square, was a recent guest speaker, discussing how the shop was created from an original idea. The current TAB will help select the theme for next year’s group. TAB members have provided more than 300 volunteer hours since September. Upcoming spring programs will include an open mic night, Friday night games, the GLBT film and lecture series, and more. Applications for the 2011-12 TAB will be available May 1. “I think it’s been a great learning experience,” says Conlon. “For the TAB members and for me, the challenge has been to make changes to improve what we do and how we do it. I think we will continue to change and evolve. I am very happy that this group has been so willing and open to something new, to make this leap together.” TEEN ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL: Miranda Alperstein, Alexandra  Braverman, Becca Breslaw, Sasha Chhabra, Kathryn DiPippo, Atleigh Forden,Jeffrey Gleason, Kruthi Isola, Rachel Klebanov, Aleksandra Taranov, Mirielle Vasselli PRINCETON DAY SCHOOL: Jonas Kaufman LAWRENCE HIGH SCHOOL: Molly Klimak PENNINGTON SCHOOL: Geena Molinaro WEST WINDSOR-PLAINSBORO HIGH SCHOOL NORTH : Vishan Nigam WEST WINDSOR-PLAINSBORO HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH: Ayanna Gill, Jaskeerat Sethi

JULY 20 & 21, 2011

SUBMIT YOUR WORK

High school and college students and other young filmmakers up to age 24 are invited to submit original short films of 20 minutes or less for the eighth annual festival. Submission Deadline: June 21

ATTEND THE FESTIVAL

Watch the selected films, meet young filmmakers and hear them discuss their work during the two nights of the festival in the Princeton Public Library Community Room. Festival Dates: July 20 & 21, 7 p.m.

SPRING 2011

DETAILS AND ENTRY FORMS ARE AVAILABLE AT WWW.PRINCETONLIBRARY.ORG/TEENS Princeton Public Library | Sands Library Building | 65 Witherspoon St. 609.924.9529 | www.princetonlibrary.org

Children SPOTLIGHT 13

Stories and early learning In ‘Library of the Early Mind,’ two filmmakers explore how children’s literature sparks creativity and imagination By ANNE LEVIN Connections Staff Writer

I

n the documentary “Library of the Early Mind,” it is revealed that most people do 90 percent of their reading for pleasure before age 8. While that statistic may be surprising, it makes perfect sense to Edward Delaney and Steven Withrow, who spent more than a year interviewing 45 authors, illustrators, librarians, critics, booksellers, educators, and others involved in children’s literature for the recently released film. Finished last October, “Library of the Early Mind” will be shown at Princeton Public Library April 13 at 7 p.m. Withrow will be on hand to Filmmaker Steven Withrow will lead a post-screening discussion of “Library of the discuss the film at the screening, which is co-sponsored by the Cotsen Early Mind” on April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Children’s Library at Princeton University. “Very young readers are so receptive to the input of books and stoThe colleagues decided to do a film – “a labor of love,” Withrow says. ries, from every angle,” Withrow says. “Stories have a way of coalescing “We did have some grant support form the Rhode Island Council of their experiences of how life works, of what’s right and what’s wrong. the Humanities, but mostly it was self-funded. We stuck to people They’re almost like a portable metaphor. A child can take things in, within driving distance for that reason, except for a trip to San Franbut they’re not always easy to digest. Stories help with that. They form cisco to interview Daniel Handler (Lemony Snicket).” a kind of framework.” While Delaney would approach the film as a kind of outsider to chilAmong the authors interviewed in the film are Natalie Babbitt (“Tuck dren’s literature, Withrow had in fact immersed himself in the subject Everlasting”) Mary Jane Begin (illustrator of the 2002 edition of “The since graduating from college. He has written several books about chilWind in the Willows”), and Chris Van dren’s literature and has also illustrated Allsburg (“The Polar Express” and “Juchildren’s picture books and comics. manji”). The writers and illustrators ‘Very young readers are so receptive After a year of filming and production, share their personal experiences, and to the input of books and stories, from “Library of the Early Mind” debuted talk about what made them pursue last fall at Harvard University’s Gradutheir respective careers. The filmmak- every angle. Stories have a way of ate School of Education.  ers’ original premise was that seem- coalescing their experiences of how life “It was incredible,” says Withrow. ingly simple stories for children are ac“We had a standing-room-only crowd tually full of unexpected complexities. works, of what’s right and what’s wrong.’ of about 400 people. Since then, we’ve But as they interviewed their subjects, – Steven Withrow shown the film at the New York Public they decided to broaden their original Library, Rhode Island School of Deidea and let the film speak for itself. sign, and schools in New England, Michigan, Nashville. We’re now “We allowed the interviews to guide the film’s direction,” says Withstarting to pick up screenings all over, and Princeton is part of that.” row, who lives in Rhode Island with his wife and 5-year-old daughter. Withrow learns a lot from reading with his young daughter, whose “But there were definitely stories behind the stories, and that’s what we favorite books are interactive. “She likes to find hidden objects and wanted to explore.” puzzle things out,” he says. “She also likes books that have a rhyme and It was an article about children’s literature in The New Yorker magarhythm, like ‘Where the Wild Things Are.’ As for me, I loved ‘Charzine by Adam Gopnik that first got Withrow and Delaney talking lotte’s Web’ as a kid and ‘The Incredible Journey.’ ” about making a documentary. As a student at Roger Williams UniverWithrow doesn’t worry much about emerging technology and its sity some years before, Withrow had studied with Delaney, a professor pull on young readers, away from books. “I guess I am concerned, and of creative writing, journalism and communications. After Withrow there has definitely been a shift,” he says. “But because books require graduated, they kept in touch. Delaney is also a novelist and short stoyou to tune out the electronic chatter and all of the demands that are ry author, and most recently, a filmmaker. He directed his first documade on attention, I feel kids might be looking for that. If we, as adults, mentary, “The Times Were Never So Bad: The Life of Andre Dubus,” can put them in contact with all of this wonderful literature, then we in 2007. can get them interested again.” “Ted knew that he could make good films inexpensively,” recalls Film and Discussion: “Library of the Early Mind” / April 13, 7:30 p.m. Withrow. “We started talking over coffee one day about our mutual Community Room interests. We had both read this article about the wider political and Co-sponsored by the library and Cotsen Children’s Library at Princeton University. cultural dimensions of books for children, and we were fascinated.”

14 ence participation with demonstrations on the three states of matter, air pressure (using the Madgeburg Sphere), a Hot Air Balloon, the Mad Science Hovercraft, a giant size vortex generator, and, as a grand finale: The Big Sneeze demonstration. Ages 5-12. Community Room

counterparts, but then began to embrace nationalism, drawing inspiration from folk music and intertwining compositions with facets of Russia’s rich history and culture. The lecture is a prelude to the PSO’s May 15 Classical Series concert “Russian Night,” at Richardson Auditorium. Community Room

MONDAY, APRIL 25

April 25, 7 p.m. Author Talk: Paul De Angelis (“Dear Mrs. Kennedy”) — After President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, letters flooded in to his widow and children from ordinary citizens and celebrities alike. These sympathy notes were filed in a warehouse for decades until the opening of the Kennedy Library. This poignant time capsule is the subject of De Angelis’s book. Community Room

TUESDAY, APRIL 26

April 26, 6:45 p.m. SCORE Seminar: Angel Investing, Venture Capital and Private Equity — This program will explain the differences between angel investing, venture capital, and private equity, and how to secure these types of funding. Presenter David J. Plucinsky is a private investor and business consultant with 35 years in corporate finance, investment banking, and small business consulting. He has raised in excess of $50 million for public and private companies. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the SCORE of Princeton

April 26, 7 p.m. Socrates Café — In the spirit of Socrates’ belief that “the unexamined life is not worth living,” participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group.  Everyone is invited. Conference Room

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27

April 27, 7 p.m. Art Talk: Joanna Tully and Lucy Graves-McVicker  Tully, a photographer, talks about her Coney Island series, while GravesMcVicker discusses her paintings. Community Room          

THURSDAY, APRIL 28

April 28, 7 p.m. Staged Reading: “Tattoo Girl” This work kicks off the Page to Stage series of plays that are based upon books or stories. The series

THURSDAY, MAY 5

“Ancient History,” watercolor, acrylic, charcoal, rice paper on mylar, by Lucy Graves McVicker, who speaks April 27.

will be directed by Brandon Monokian. Community Room

SATURDAY, APRIL 30 April 30, 1 p.m. Performance: Classic Dance of India — Nilanjana Banerjee, a performer, teacher, and lifelong devotee of the traditional Indian dance form Odissi, will talk about its history and demonstrate its unique style. Odissi, a 2,000-year-old dance form that is closely linked to yoga, brings to life the sculptures of ancient India. Community Room

SUNDAY, MAY 1

May 1, 3 p.m. Concert: Don Sheasley — The Princeton baritone turns from his standard Verdi repertoire to present “Airs Poetic & Parodic,” a concert of art songs set by such composers as Ralph Vaughan Williams, Dennis Hyams, and Gerald Finzi to poetry by Hardy, Rossetti, and Shakespeare, among others. The program will also include parody lyrics by Martin Rome of Princeton, set to familiar musical songs. Pianist Dick Swain accompanies. Community Room May 1, 2 p.m. Class : Beginner Songwriting/Lyric Writing for Adults — Learn from experienced songwriter Kim Yarson how to better craft your lyrics, and discover what makes a hit song. Yarson will give writing exercises and evaluate lyrics that are labeled with song parts. Register at www.princetonlibrary.org/ events Conference Room

MONDAY, MAY 2

May 2, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Discussion: “Belshazzar’s Daughter” by Barbara Nadel — When a brutal murder shocks Istanbul’s rundown Jewish quarter, the Turkish police force unleashes their best weapon: the chain-smoking, brandy-swilling Inspector Cetin Ikmen. Discussion led by Gayle Stratton. Conference Room

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4 TEENS May 4, 4 p.m.

Orientation Session: Volunteer Opportunities for Teens — Students who will be completing grades 6-12 are eligible to volunteer at the library during the summer to assist in activities related to the Summer Reading Clubs as well as other volunteer responsibilities. Please attend one of four 45-minute orientation sessions. (Other sessions are May 7, 3 p.m.; May 18, 4 p.m.; and May 23, 7 p.m.) Community Room May 4, 7:30 p.m. Princeton Symphony Soundtracks: “What Makes Russian Music Russian (If Anything)?” — Simon Morrison, professor of music history at Princeton University and a leading authority on Russian music, explores the way Russian composers, after the mid1800s, sought to emulate the musical style of their Germanic

May 5, 6:45 p.m. SCORE Seminar: How to Use Your Foreign Degree in the U.S. For those who earned a university degree in another country, this seminar provides skills and strategies on how to use that degree and experience to continue a career in the U.S. Presenter Paula Restrepo is a SCORE volunteer and a loan officer at the Regional Business Assistance Corporation (RBAC). Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the SCORE of Princeton Community Room

May 5, 7 p.m. Witherspoon-Jackson Genealogy Group — The group meets monthly to share ideas, listen to speakers and get beginners started with researching the history of families who lived in Princeton’s historic Witherspoon-Jackson community. Technology Center May 5, 7 p.m. Gente y Cuentos — In discussing Latin American short stories in Spanish, participants recount their personal experiences and how they relate to the characters in the story. (Also May 12, 19, 26) Conference Room

FRIDAY, MAY 6

May 6, 10 a.m. Film: “Gorillas in the Mist” Sigourney Weaver and Bryan Brown star in this feature based on anthropologist Dian Fossey’s autobiography of her life among the mountain gorillas of Rwanda. Part of the Friday Film Café Series. Community Room

KIDS May 6, 7 p.m.

Library Spelling Bee — Our second annual “library bee” will consist of rounds in which teams of fourth- through eighth- graders spell their way to a final spell-off. There will be a prize for every participant and audience members of all ages will have a chance to challenge our winners at the end of the bee. Please register by calling 609.924.9529, ext. 240. Community Room

15 SATURDAY, MAY 7 TEENS May 7, 7 p.m.

Princeton Student Film & Video Festival Rewind —This teens-only event features favorites from the last festival of short, student-produced films as well as highlights from previous years. Refreshments will be served. Community Room

SUNDAY, MAY 8

May 8, 3 p.m. Songwriters in the Round Songwriter Kim Yarson returns to the library with the duo Barbara Harley and Al Lind for this special showcase. The musicians perform their music, Nashville-style, in an “in-the-round” gathering, letting the audience in on where the sounds come from as well. Community Room

MONDAY, MAY 9

May 9, 7 p.m. Noodle Talk — Participants select from a container filled with paper strips (“noodles”), each with questions about life experiences. Alan Goldsmith leads this discussion group. Quiet Room

and Barranquilla, has rare archival footage of the author and the people of whom he writes in the book “One Hundred Years of Solitude.” Michael Woods of Princeton University will lead the post-screening discussion. Community Room May 11, 7 p.m.  Circulo de Lectura: “Las cartas que no llegaron” por Mauricio Rosencof — Desde los campos de concentración nazis a las celdas de tortura de la dictadura uruguaya, retazos estremecedores de la historia de una familia, en testimonios de un niño, un joven, un hombre. Moderado por Lucia Acosta. Princeton Room May 11, 7:30 p.m. Talking Politics Book Group “Falling Behind: How Rising Inequality Harms the Middle Class” by Robert H. Frank Discussion led by Joan Goldstein of Mercer County Community College Quiet Room

comment and elaborate on the composer’s use of poetry and music in his 1910 choral and orchestral masterpiece. The focus will be on Williams’ inspiration, Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass,” and will examine the historical context and reception of the work. Community Room

SATURDAY, MAY 14 TEENS May 14, 10 a.m.

Go-Between Club— This club for middle school students meets monthly at the library. Talk about books and other interests, help with library events, plan programs with the librarians, and have a say in library services. New members are always welcome. Conference Room.

SUNDAY, MAY 15 May 15, 3 p.m. The Quintet of the Americas Please see feature story on Page 5.

May 9, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library — Poets read for 20 minutes each, followed by an open mic session. Presented by the library, US1 Poets Cooperative and Delaware Valley Poets. Fireplace Area, second floor

TUESDAY, MAY 10

May 10, 7 p.m. Retirement Tallk: Senior Travel Celia Lidz will talk about traveling with physical disabilities, finding the right trips for you and managing the expected and unexpected. Part of the Engaged Retirement series. Conference Room

WEDNESDAY, MAY 11 KIDS+ May 11, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club — Anyone with a passion for paper folding is invited to meet for an hour of new and interesting folding. Beginners are welcome. A parent must accompany those under age 7. Activity Room May 11, 7 p.m. Film and scholar-led discussion: “Gabriel García Márquez: Magic and Reality” —This film, shot on the Colombian coast in Macondo, the Banana Zone, Cienaga

JUST ADDED

Princeton Pro Musica presents a symposium on “A Sea Symphony” May 12.

THURSDAY, MAY 12

May 12, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group: “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett — During the nascent civil rights movement in Jackson, Miss., where black women were trusted to raise white children but not to polish the household silver, a young woman anxious to become a writer becomes a budding social activist as she collects stories of the black women on whom the country club set rely. Discussion led by Kristin Friberg. Conference Room May 12, 7 p.m. Symposium: “Ralph Vaughan Williams’s ‘A Sea Symphony’: The American Voice of Walt Whitman in Song” — In this symposium presented by Princeton Pro Musica, scholars will

TUESDAY, MAY 17 May 17, 8:30 a.m. Tuesday Networking Breakfast Joe Himelfarb’s talk is titled “Selling You Inc.”This group is for those who are unemployed, under-employed or seeking to make a career or job change. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and NJ Unemployed.

May 17, 6:30 p.m. Film: “Emmanuel’s Gift” — This tells the moving story of a disabled man in Ghana whose goal is to change the terrible fate of the more than two million disabled people in that country. Part of “What Are You Looking At?” Enable Film Series. Community Room May 17, 7 p.m. Talk: Introduction to Your Lifestyle in Retirement — In this single session, Carol King helps you

explore options for dealing with a change, managing your time, identifying your passions and making a difference through volunteering. Conference Room

THURSDAY, MAY 19

May 19, 11 a.m. Princeton Farmers‘ Market Celebrate spring with the return of the market to Hinds Plaza. Local organic produce, poultry, eggs, cheese, breads, baked goods, flowers and more are available, with more and more as the season progresses. The market will be open Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hinds Plaza

FRIDAY, MAY 20 KIDS May 20, 9:15, 10:30, 11:30 a.m.

Home-School Book Discussion Club — Home-schooled children meet to discuss the very best in children’s books. Those ages 7-9 meet at 9:15 a.m.; ages 10-12 at 10:30 a.m. and ages 13-15 at 11:30 a.m. Registration is required. Call Pamela Groves at (609) 924-9529 ext. 244. Conference Room May 20, 10 a.m. Film: ”Bride and Prejudice” This 2004 film is a Bollywood version of Jane Austen’s classic romance, “Pride and Prejudice.” The Indian village of Diaspora replaces Austin’s England and Mrs. Bennett is now Mrs. Bakshi, searching for suitable husbands for her daughters. Part of the Friday Film Café Series. Community Room

TEENS May 20, 7 p.m.

Trivia Night — Show what you know in this fun night of trivia contests. Teams of middle School students can complete in the first hour, and high school teams in the second hour. Register at the door. Some “trivial” prizes will be awarded and refreshments will be served. Community Room

SUNDAY, MAY 22 May 22, 1 p.m. Scrapbooking Circle — At these five-hour monthly sessions, participants have space to spread out and scrap, while getting advice from others. Community Room Calendar continues on Page 16

Tuesday, May 10, 7 p.m. Film: “In July” Part of the World Cineclub Series co-sponsored by L’Association Francophone de Princeton. Community Room

Non Profit Org. U.S. Postage PA I D Princeton, NJ Permit No. 4

Executive Director: Leslie Burger Assistant Director: Peter Bromberg Public Information Director: Tim Quinn Programming Coordinator: Janie Hermann Youth Services Manager: Jan Johnson Princeton Public Library Sands Library Building 65 Witherspoon St. Princeton, NJ 08542 609.924.9529 princetonlibrary.org

Program Committee: Lucía Acosta, Leslie Burger, Susan Conlon, Kristin Friberg, Pamela Groves, Romina Gutierrez, Janie Hermann, Jan Johnson, Terri Nelson, Tim Quinn, Allison Santos, Barbara Silberstein Staff Writer: Anne Levin Illustrations: Lauren Acevedo

Frıends of the

Princeton Public Library

Editing and design: Tim Quinn

16 SPOTLIGHT Friends of the Library

Continued from Page 15

TUESDAY, MAY 24

FROM THE PRESIDENT / Ellen Pitts

May 24, 7 p.m. Socrates Café — In the spirit of Socrates’ belief that “the unexamined life is not worth living,” participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Everyone is invited. Conference Room

Spring Cleaning

G

azing out the window at yet another snowstorm —this one an “ice storm,” actually — I am trying to imagine what Princeton will look like when this issue of Connections arrives at your doorstep. Perhaps the grass will once again be visible and the trees will be starting to bud. This is the spring issue, yet with snow piled high and ice covering every available surface, spring seems at this moment so very far away. Being snowed-in can have its downside. It can also, however, create some wonderful opportunities. My teenage son is blissfully sleeping in, my husband is practicing his scenic photography, and I’ve decided to get a jump on my spring cleaning. Snow day “spring” cleaning appears to be a popular pastime in Princeton. Just ask the volunteers who run the Friends’ book sale. Each snowstorm is immediately followed by an incredible boost in book donations from people who used their homebound hours to clear off some shelves or empty some closets. It’s a win-win situation for everyone. Those donating the books get the satisfaction of creating some clutter-free space while doing a good deed. They can also get a tax deduction for their efforts. Those who frequent the Friends book sale find wonderful treasures at bargain basement prices, and the Friends earn money so the library can buy more books for their collection. This year the Friends of the Princeton Public Library is celebrating its 50th anniversary. This is a huge milestone for an organization of volunteers who have dedicated themselves to ensuring that the library continues to be a dynamic source of enrichment for the community. We hope you will continue to support the Friends by donating to our annual appeal, participating in our Book Store and annual book sale, and attending our annual benefit. Together, we can make certain that this wonderful library remains open and free to all. Thank you for all your support, and have a happy spring.

Calendar

A FRATERNITY’S PLEDGE — The brothers of the Sigma Chapter of Sigma Chi at Princeton University have adopted the Friends of the Princeton Public Library for community service. The fraternity members, seen here with library Executive Director Leslie Burger, helped do some heavy lifting at the Centennial Gala and the Annual Book Sale. We look forward to our continued partnership.

Friends do the right thing

O

ne of the benefits of becoming a Friend of the Princeton Public Library is the opportunity to attend “Girls’ Night Out,” popular events that bring library supporters together in private homes for talks by well-known personalities on a wide range of topics. These stimulating conversations are always accompanied by delicious food and refreshments. On Jan. 12, member Sherri Garber welcomed 40 people to her Princeton Township home for a talk by Randy Cohen, the author and New York Times columnist best known as The Ethicist. After mingling with guests during cocktails and the delicious dinner Garber had prepared, Cohen responded to guests’ ethical dilemmas with his trademark wit. He signed copies of his book at the end of the evening. The Friends recently enjoyed a lively evening with designer and television personality Jonathan Adler, co-hosted by Vivian Allen and Emily Firmenich. Earlier in the season, Princeton University professor Robert Socolow delivered an inspiring talk at the home of Ginny Mason and Robert Willig. Among the upcoming events will be an evening at Eno Terra restaurant with chef Christopher Albrecht, hosted by the Terra Momo Restaurant Group. New members are always welcome. Please consider joining the Friends and taking part in these enjoyable, educational events while raising funds for the library. Interested? Call the Friends office at 609.924.9529, ext. 280.

THURSDAY, MAY 26 May 26, 11 a.m. Princeton Farmers Market Celebrate spring with the return of the market to Hinds Plaza. Local organic produce, poultry, eggs, cheese, breads, baked goods, flowers and more are available, with more and more as the season progresses. The market is open Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hinds Plaza

TEENS May 26, 4 p.m.

Battle of the Bands — This concert by local student musicians on the plaza is presented by What’s Up Princeton, a collaboration of Princeton youthserving organizations including Arts Council of Princeton, Corner House, HiTOPS, Princeton Public Library, and the Princeton Recreation Department. Students interested in performing should contact Susan Conlon: sconlon@princetonlibrary.org. Hinds Plaza

FRIDAY, MAY 27

May 27, 10 a.m. Film: “Captain Corelli’s Mandolin” — Nicolas Cage, Penelope Cruz, John Hurt and Christian Bale are featured in this story of an Italian captain stationed in the Greek islands during World War II. He falls in love with a woman and woos her with his mandolin. Part of the Friday Film Café Series. Community Room


Connections Spring 2011