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THE PRINCETON PUBLIC LIBRARY MAGAZINE Winter 2011-’12

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connecting with tiffany shlain

FILMMAKER’S APPEARANCE HIGHLIGHTS ENVIRONMENTAL FILM FEST

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Dec. 6-21 Jan. 3-Feb. 29

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Dec. 7-22 Jan. 4-March 1 Dec. 6-22 Jan. 3-March 1 Dec. 8-22 Jan. 5 Jan. 19-Feb. 23 Dec. 3-Feb. 23 Dec. 4-18 Jan. 8-15 Jan. 29-Feb. 26 Dec. 5 Jan. 9, Feb. 6 Dec. 1 Jan. 12, Feb. 2 Dec. 17 Jan. 21, Feb. 25 Dec. 3 Jan. 7, Feb. 4

Stories in Russian

Sat. noon.

Dec. 10 Jan. 14, Feb. 11 Dec. 3, 10 Jan. 14, 21 Feb. 4, 11

Kwami Anthony Appiah leads a post-screening discussion of “Prince Among Slaves” on Monday, Dec. 5 at 6:30 p.m. Please see Page 4.

FAMILY STORIES FOR HOLIDAY WEEK Dec. 26-30, 10:30 a.m. Ages 2-8 years

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1

TOOTH TALES

Jan. 12, 2 p.m.; Jan. 22, 3:30 p.m.; Feb. 4, 10:30 a.m. Ages 2-8 years

PLAYGROUP FOR BABIES

Tuesday, after Lapsits. Babies up to 15 months and caregivers only.

WHAT’S THE BIG IDEA?

Saturdays, 3:30 p.m., Jan. 7, 14, 21 and 28. A new story time for ages 5-10 with a fun focus on science and math. Please register at princetonlibrary.org

WEEKDAYS SCORE Small Business Counseling — By appointment through SCORE: Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6 p.m.; Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m. Tower Room English Language Conversation Groups — Various Venues Call 609.924.9529, ext. 220 for details Technology Center Classes — Please visit princetonlibrary.org or the library for a schedule of classes. Springboard After School Homework Help — Mondays through Thursdays, 3:30 p.m., on days when Princeton Regional Schools are in session. Third Floor

WEEKLY

Reading with Emma — Mondays, 4 p.m. Story Room Game On! — Fridays, 4 p.m., board, video games and pingpong for children and teens. Third Floor

Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m. Author Philip Kennedy-Grant “AIA New Jersey Guidebook: 150 Best Buildings and Places” Kennedy-Grant will discuss the book he edited and co-authored with fellow architects Mark Alan Hewitt and Michael Mills featuring 150 color photographs that capture the beauty of New Jersey’s architectural heritage. From stately Victorian inns to distinctive “Doo Wop” style motels, the book reveals the state’s rich architectural legacy and eclectic mix of periods and styles. Princeton Public Library’s Sands Library Building is among the buildings photographed by Alexander M. Noble for the book. Community Room

Dec. 1, 7 p.m. Witherspoon Jackson Genealogy Group — The group meets monthly to share ideas, listen to speakers and get beginners started with researching the history of families who lived in Princeton’s historic Witherspoon-Jackson community. All interested in the history of this community or in African American genealogy are invited to attend. Technology Center

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2

Dec. 2, 10 a.m. Film: “October Sky” — Adapted from Homer Hickam’s bestselling memoir “Rocket Boys,” this is the story of how the sight of the Soviet satellite Sputnik flying over his West Virginia home inspired 14-year-old Hickam and his friends to build and launch their own rockets. Despite a series of obstacles, including a disapproving father’s expectation Calendar continues on Page 4

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Princeton Envrionmental Film Festival COVER STORY

Declaration of Interdependence Tiffany Shlain’s ‘Connected’ opens the Sixth Annual Princeton Environmental Film Festival By AMY HIESTAND

Connections Staff Writer

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aught up in the legwork of her latest film, Tiffany Shlain felt she was on to something. The topic – how technology is rewiring the human brain and creating global connections that can potentially solve the world’s worst problems – was immense. She needed the perspective of her collaborator on the film and tried to give him a call. Shlain’s collaborator was her father: surgeon and best-selling author Dr. Leonard Shlain, whose writings were shaping the background of the film. But he didn’t answer the phone, and Shlain would soon learn her father had advanced brain cancer. A few days later, Shlain would also learn that, after prolonged infertility treatments and several miscarriages, she and her husband Ken Goldberg were expecting their second child. Against this backdrop of personal upheaval, Shlain continued working on her film. She felt everything was out of her control – except when she was working. But her perspective had changed, and ultimately, so would her film. Shlain initially set out to explore how the world’s new “central nervous system” and the instantaneous availability of information had altered the way we communicate on every level. She was intrigued with the potential of harnessing the power of millions of minds. But now, facing the loss of her much beloved father and enduring the stress of a high-risk pregnancy, Shlain knew that her film about connecting broadly needed to be balanced with what it means to be connected deeply. The result, “Connected: An Autoblogography of Love, Death and Technology,” opens the 2012 Princeton Environmental Film Festival on Thursday, Jan. 26 at 7 p.m. Shlain will lead a post-screening discussion of the film.

Triffany Shlain discusses her film “Connected” at the library on Jan. 26, Opening Night for the 2012 Princeton Environmental Film Festival

Fast-paced, informative, perceptive and moving, “Connected” features archival footage, entertaining graphics and Shlain’s home movies. At first glance, “Connected” may seem an unlikely choice for the sixth annual festival. But to Susan Conlon, the librarian who founded the festival, it’s an exciting selection. “This amazing film is a great fit and ideal opener for our festival,” Conlon said. “Its energy and dynamic style, together with Tiffany’s vision, set the pace for all the films that follow. It sets us on course to examine our lives and the environment from so many angles – and to consider all the levels of how we and our world are inter-connected.” Shlain, founder of the Webby Awards and named “one of the women shaping the 21st century” by Newsweek, debuted “Connected” at the Sundance Film Festival. Since then, she has seen how it resonates with environmentalists and many others.

“What’s exciting about ‘Connected,’ ” she said recently from her home in California, “is how many different groups see it as expressing their issue. Scientists, women, spiritual and technological people have all seen something relevant to their cause in this film. And that’s true for environmentalists, too.” Noting how the environment is “tied to other issues like world finances, human rights and more,” Shlain thinks that understanding those connections is the first step toward gaining a new perspective on how individual choices have an impact on the planet. “If you’re going to be motivated to live differently,” she said, it’s vital to understand how we’re connected to the world at large.” Shlain employs humor throughout “Connected” but doesn’t underplay the severity of the world’s problems. She notes that technology has often had unintended consequences and shines a sobering light on issues such as overpopulation and diminishing resources. When people see her film, Shlain hopes they’ll start thinking and talking about connectedness in their own lives and in the world. A discussion kit, designed to keep the conversation going, includes a DVD of “Connected,” question cards and a companion book. Near the end of “Connected,” Shlain, who gave birth to her second daughter 2½ weeks after her father’s funeral, strikes an optimistic chord. She believes the more technology allows us to see the immediate results of our actions, the more thoughtful and conscious we will be about our behavior. “Imagine if everyone was thinking interdependently,” she says in the film, “The ripple effect would change the world.” “Connected” I Screening and Discussion with Tiffany Shlain I Jan. 26, 7 p.m. To view the trailer of “Connected,” or to learn more about the film and discussion kit, visit www.connectedthefilm.com.

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Princeton Environmental Film Festival events are featured in the calendar as PEFF

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4 Librarian Gayle Stratton leads the discussion. Quiet Room

that he, too, would become a coal miner, Hickam perseveres and sets off on a path toward college and a career as a NASA engineer. 1 hour, 48 minutes. Community Room

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6 NEW SERIES Dec. 6, 10:30 a.m. 

TEENS Dec. 2, 7 p.m.

A Cappella Night The library extends its regular Friday hours for this annual event featuring vocal groups from high schools in Princeton. The event is open only to students attending Princeton high schools, and it will be chaperoned by library and Corner House staff. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Corner House. Funding is provided by the Princeton Alcohol and Drug Alliance, through the Mercer County Office on Addiction Services and the Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3 Dec. 3, 2 p.m. Folk Tales from Afar Princeton University students will read stories and tales that originated in faraway lands. Series continues biweekly through Februrary. Story Room

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4

Dec. 4, 2 p.m. Discover Korea — Learn about Korean culture during this program that includes two brief documentary films: one that illustrates Korea’s early artistic and cultural achievements and one that shows its industrial accomplishments since the Korean War. A Korean wedding ceremony featuring traditional dress will be demonstrated followed by a feast including favorites such as kimchi, bibimbap, jeon and more. Presented by members of the Korean Spirit & Culture Promotion Project, the program is limited to 80 participants, ages 8 and older. Please register at the online events calendar at princetonlibrary.org. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Korean Spirit & Culture Promotion Project.

 

Talk: “Appetizers and Desserts for the Holiday Season” Frank and Anna D’Angelo, of D’Angelo Italian Market, show how to prepare simple but tasty appetizers and delicious desserts for any holiday gathering. Participants will get a chance to ask questions and sample the final product. Please register using the online events calendar at princetonlibrary.org. Part of the Flavors of Princeton series. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7

The McCarter Live at the Library series returns Dec. 13 with a panel discussion of the upcoming production of “Gatz.” See Page 6.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 5 Dec. 5, 10:30 a.m. Book Discussion: “Prince Among Slaves” — Terry Alford will lead this discussion of his book “Prince Among Slaves: The True Story of an African Prince Sold into Slavery in the American South,” a biography first published in 1986 and recently made into a documentary film. This discussion, limited to 16 participants, precedes a 6:30 p.m. screening and discussion of the film. Please register at the online events calendar at princetonlibrary.org. Conference Room Dec. 5, 6:30 p.m. Film and Community Dialogue: “Prince Among Slaves” — This compelling documentary tells the story of Abdul Rahman, an African prince who was sold into slavery in the American South in 1788. The Best Documentary winner at the 2007 Black Film Festival is based on the biography written by Terry

Alford and explores the global nature of slavery and the role and identity of Muslims in early America. Alford will be present for the screening and will introduce keynote speaker, Kwame Anthony Appiah of Princeton University who will give commentary and lead a question and answer session. Refreshments will be served. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library, Unity Productions and Not In Our Town Princeton. Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Group: “Fer-de-Lance” by Rex Stout Meet Nero Wolfe, an obese, arrogant, eccentric, hard-boiled private detective and his assistant, Archie Goodwin, in this classic mystery originally published in 1934.

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Dec. 7, 7 p.m. Getting College Right Elizabeth Hamblet, a learning disabilities specialist, speaks to students, parents and teachers about how students with disabilities can make a successful transition from high school to college. Hamblet has experience in a variety of educational settings and advises professionals and families about the changes they will find in disability services and accommodations moving from high school to college. Conference Room

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8 Dec. 8, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group: “So Much for That” by Lionel Shriver Shep Knacker’s plan to use the million dollars from the sale of his handyman business to retire to a tropical island receives a blow when his wife is diagnosed with a rare cancer. This deeply resonant novel looks at America’s health care system and poses the disturbing moral question: How much is one life worth? Conference Room Dec. 8, 11 a.m. Holiday Farmers’ Market Local farmers and crafters will present special edible and decorative delights in time for the winter holidays during this five-hour event. Community Room Dec. 8, 7 p.m. Film: “The Way We Get By” Three of a group of senior citizens who have greeted more than Calendar continues on Page 6

20th Century American Literature SPOTLIGHT 5

American Lit 101 Separate programs spotlight Fitzgerald, Salinger, Kesey and their great works By AMY HIESTAND

Connections Staff Writer

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asterpieces of 20th century American literature feature prominently this winter at the library, where separate programs in December, January and February offer a closer look at some great works and the authors behind them, F. Scott Fitzgerald, J.D. Salinger and Ken Kesey. “We hope that this series inspires readers to discover, and for some to rediscover, these books that stand out as pivotal works in American literature of the last century,” said librarian and programming team member Susan Conlon. “These events provide new ways to experience the works as well as the emerging and changing culture of American life.”

‘Gatz’ the Great The first program in the series takes place Dec. 13 at 7 p.m. and is a panel discussion in advance of McCarter Theatre’s production of the groundbreaking “Gatz,” a word-for-word dramatization of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 classic “The Great Gatsby.” Set in the shabby office of a non-descript business, “Gatz” opens as its main character Nick waits for his outdated computer to be repaired. Finding a copy of “The Great Gatsby,” among the office clutter, he picks it up and begins to read out loud. As the play progresses, Nick and his coworkers become the characters in the book. Including six hours of performance, two short breaks and a 75-minute dinner intermission, the production is a nearly eight-hour event. “Gatz” will be performed at McCarter by the original cast from New York’s acclaimed Elevator Repair Service. Director John Collins, one of the founders of the experimental theater company, will take part in the discussion at the library along with actor Scott Shepherd who plays Nick. McCarter’s Erica Nagel will moderate the discussion. Shepherd will do a live reading and Collins will discuss the genesis of the piece The New York Times called “one of the most exciting and improbable accomplishments in theater in recent years.” The discussion is co-sponsored by the library and McCarter Theatre Center and made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Panel Discussion: “Gatz” I Dec. 13, 7 p.m.

Salinger’s ‘Life’ On Jan. 10, author Kenneth Slawenski shifts the focus to another key American literary figure when he speaks at the launch of the paperback edition of “J.D. Salinger: A Life” at the library. The biography of the famously reclusive Salinger was originally published in the United States in 2010, a year after his death at age 91. Slawenski’s appreciation of Salinger was sparked, predictably, when he read the author’s most famous work, 1952’s “The Catcher in the Rye,” as a teenager. “I didn’t pick it up again until I was in my mid-40s,” he said recently from his home in Fair Lawn. “But when I read it again, I found a whole different book.”

That rediscovery led Slawenski to want to read everything ever written by Salinger. “I started tracking down his unpublished works,” he said, finding some at Princeton University’s Firestone Library. “And from there it became an obsession.” Slawenski sites the ambiguity of Salinger’s writing as one of the reasons he continues to be drawn in by the author’s works. “He had the confidence to be ambiguous and allow meaning to be interpreted by the reader,” Slawenski said. “For instance, during the climax of ‘The Catcher in the Rye,’ when he’s describing how Holden begins to cry while watching his sister ride the carousel. He doesn’t really explain it, or revisit it, but we just feel the moment. It affects us – and it’s extraordinary.” In addition to his biography of Salinger, Slawenski is also the founder of the popular web site, deadcaulfields.com, an online resource about Salinger and his works. “I’ve been told he knew about it and that he enjoyed it,” Slawenski said about the site, which took him six years to put together. “I like to think that’s true.” While some Salinger fans would likely be content to listen to Slawenski speak, he doesn’t plan to spend a great deal of his appearance lecturing to his audience. “I try to talk as briefly as possible,” Slawenski said. “So mostly it will be a Q-and-A approach. On (the topic of Salinger), people have their own experiences. They want to talk. And I want to hear their insights.” Author Kenneth Slawenski I Jan. 10, 7 p.m.

Tripping with Kesey On Feb. 23 at 7 p.m., Academy Award-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney will be present at the library for a screening of “Magic Trip,” a documentary shaped from footage shot by Ken Kesey, author of 1962’s “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Intending to make the documentary himself, Kesey shot the footage in 1964 during his famed crosscountry road trip in a psychedelically painted school bus, Furthur. Kesey was accompanied during the trip by a group of likeminded literary non-conformists dubbed The Merry Pranksters. Among them was Beat Generation icon Neal Cassady, the inspiration behind Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road.” As the driver of the bus during the “Magic Trip,” Cassady is featured prominently in the film. Gibney and director Alison Ellwood were given access by Kesey’s family to more than 100 hours of virtually unseen footage in order to make “Magic Trip,” a film that captures the embryonic stage of the hippie movement that followed. Screening and Filmmaker Discussion: “Magic Trip” I Feb. 23, 7 p.m.

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The Princeton High School Jazz Ensemble, featuring members of the school’s award-winning Studio Band, will kick off the Crescendo Series on Dec. 18. See Page 8.

900,000 American troops returning from service in Iraq and Afghanistan over the past five years are profiled in this film. Through service, the greeters at a small airport in Maine overcome personal battles and transform their lives. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and POV/ American Documentary.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9 KIDS Dec. 9, 4 p.m.

Game On! — Young people are welcome to wind down on Friday afternoons by playing video games, pingpong or board games. This event occurs weekly throughout the school year. Third Floor

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11 Dec. 11, 3 p.m. Staged Readings: “Celebrate Your Relationships” Princeton Writers’ Block performs short comedies by Shel Silverstein, Christopher Durang, David Ives and Lily Tomlin. Community Room

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12 Dec. 12, 6:30 p.m. Python Users Group — This monthly meeting is for anyone interested in the Python computer programming language. All age levels and skills levels welcome. Community Room To register, please vist www.meetup.com/pug-ip

Dec. 12, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library — Featured poets Jill Stein and Madeline Tiger read for 20 minutes each followed by an open mic session. Stein has received three N.J. State Arts Council grants. Tiger’s latest collection of verse is “From the Viewing Stand.” Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library, US 1 Poets and Delaware Valley Poets.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13

Dec. 13, 7 p.m. Panel Discussion: “Gatz” Actor Scott Shepherd and director John Collins of the Elevator Repair Service offer an insider’s look at the upcoming McCarter Theatre production, an acclaimed eight-hour enactment of “The Great Gatsby.” This classic is delivered word for word, brought to life by the staff of a mysterious small business in a shabby office. As part of the McCarter Live at the Library series, Shepherd will do a live reading and Collins will discuss the genesis of the piece in a discussion moderated by McCarter’s Erica Nagel. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and McCarter Theatre Center. Made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14 KIDS+ Dec. 14, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club — Anyone interested in the traditional Japanese art of paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new, often-seasonal folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited, too. In fact, an adult must accompany anyone under age 7. Activity Room Dec. 14, 7 p.m. Ask a Lawyer — Lawyers will be at the library for free private consultations on immigration and general legal issues. No appointment necessary; first-come, first-served. Spanish translators will be available. Call Lucía Acosta at 609.924.9529, ext. 245 for more information. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library, the Latin American Task Force, Lutheran Social Ministries, The Princeton Housing Authority and the Mercer County Bar Association.

Dec. 14, 7 p.m. Author Michael Dirda “On Conan Doyle” The Pulitzer Prize-winning author, a passionate lifelong fan of the Sherlock Holmes adventures,

WINTER 2011-‘12

discusses his book about Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle. Dirda is also a member of The Baker Street Irregulars, the most famous and romantic of all Sherlockian groups, and includes an insider’s account of the group in his book. The book also introduces readers to some of Conan Doyle’s lesser-known works. Part of the Thinking Allowed series. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15 Dec. 15, 7 p.m. Film: “Sherlock Holmes” Shown on the eve of the release of its sequel, this film features Robert Downey Jr. as legendary sleuth Sherlock Holmes and Jude Law as his assistant Dr. John Watson. After finally catching serial killer and occult “sorcerer” Lord Blackwood, Holmes and Watson can close yet Calendar continues on Page 8

January Special Events SPOTLIGHT 7

Get in tune during January Resolve to attend these events designed to enhance your New Year By AMY HIESTAND

Connections Staff Writer

It’s not that we don’t have good intentions. Most of us even start out with a great deal of determination. But every year, the enthusiasm we have for our New Year’s resolutions melts away long before the ice and snow. Will 2012 be any different? With a little help from the library, it just might. “From ideas about getting organized and making better use of family time, to finally getting your will prepared, the library has many programs during January to help us all get off on the right foot,” Janie Hermann, public programming librarian, said. “In addition to these programs, look for a variety of self-help ideas in the books displayed on the library’s first floor.” Here’s what we have on tap for what library staff are calling Get it Together Month: Thursday, Jan. 5, 7:30 p.m. “Making the Most of Family Meal Time” — For many parents, the family dinners that anchored their childhoods —providing family bonding, teaching moments and fond memories — are nearly impossible to recreate for their own children. Hoping to help families experience the benefits of sharing family meals more often, Janet Giles of Baby Bear’s Porridge offers ways to create menu plans based on your family’s food preferences, cooking skill and activity level. Community Room Sunday, Jan. 8, 2 p.m. “Suddenly Frugal: How to Live Happier & Healthier for Less” — Leah Ingram, author of “Suddenly Frugal: How to Live Happier & Healthier for Less,” believes many Americans will resolve to try to get out of the red this year. And they need help figuring out how to live more on less. To that end, Ingram will present five frugal New Year’s resolutions that anyone can try and that can add up to big savings overall. Community Room Tuesday, Jan. 10, 7 p.m. Will and Estate Planning — William Isele, an attorney with the law firm of Archer & Greiner, PC, will talk about the need for a will and other planning documents, and some of the aspects of estate planning that you might not have considered. Conference Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement & Encore Careers Program.

Tuesday, Jan. 17, 7 p.m. Stress Relief — Reikki master Karen Davison, a nurse at the University Medical Center at Princeton, will talk about stress and its effect on health. Stress relief tips also will be offered. Fireplace Area, second floor. Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton HealthCare System. Sunday, Jan. 22, 3 p.m. “Tooth Tales”— Frannie Flossasaurus and Mojo Monkey will be visiting the library along with staff from the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services Children’s Oral Health Program. Come listen to great books about taking care of your teeth and visiting the dentist. The session will also feature an interactive demonstration on proper brushing technique. Participating children will receive a certificate, tooth brush and activity packet. Grown-ups must attend. Story Room Monday, Jan. 23, 7 p.m. “The Meaning of Life” — Professional organizer Suzanne Neilson of The Organized Life, who has been working with people in the greater Princeton area for many years, will present a talk she calls “The Meaning of Life.” Designed to help listeners gain control of their lives by gaining control of their possessions, the talk features ways to improve the quality of life by cutting through the clutter that robs us of time and clouds our minds. Community Room Monday, Jan. 30, 7 p.m. “How to Tutor Your Own Child” — Marina Koestler Ruben, author of “How to Tutor Your Own Child” and the in-house writing tutor at Sidwell Friends School, in Washington, D.C., will advise parents on how to make the most of the academic one-on-one time they share with their children. In addition to covering the components of the formal, sit-down homework session, Ruben will explain how to employ the communication tricks of professional tutors, incorporate learning into daily interactions and maximize the educational potential of your home. Community Room

Celebrating a life of books, music and generous advocacy

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hroughout his long and illustrious life, there have been two constants for William Scheide: books and music. While his six decades of philanthropy and civil rights advocacy have put him in a national spotlight, here in Princeton, Mr. Scheide is as well known for his lifelong interest in rare books and his musical scholarship. These twin passions come together at “Booked For The Evening: Celebrating a Life of Words and Music,” a 98th birthday concert to benefit Princeton Public Library. Mark Laycock will conduct the Vienna Chamber Orchestra in a program of Mozart, Brahms, Beethoven and a special birthday arrangement of Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture on January 27 at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall on the Princeton University campus. Mr. Scheide grew up in a household passionate about music, culture, rare books and the well-being of humanity. His father played piano and his mother was a singer; their only child began piano lessons at age 6 and grew up to become an internationLibrary Executive Director Leslie Burger, center, ally recognized authority with Judith and William Scheide. on the music of J.S. Bach. The family’s interest in rare books would culminate with the founding of the Scheide Library, which includes books and manuscripts collected by three generations of Scheides. Now housed at Princeton University’s Firestone Library, the Scheide Library holds copies of the first four Bibles ever printed; materials on the invention and history of printing; and musical manuscripts by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert and Wagner, among many other items. Mr. Scheide’s interest in libraries reaches well beyond his own: he and his wife, Judith McCartin Scheide, are longtime, generous benefactors of the Princeton Public Library. “Bill and Judy’s support of our library has been essential both to the construction of our building and the sustainability of our collection and programming,” Princeton Public Library Executive Director Leslie Burger said. “We’re honored by their thoughtful gesture in donating proceeds from the concert celebrating Bill’s 98th birthday to the library and we look forward to a wonderful event.” Booked for the Evening: Celebrating the 98th Birthday of William H. Scheide Friday, Jan. 27, 8 p.m. I Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall, Princeton University campus I General admission tickets, $35 I Call University Ticketing at 609.258.9220 I For sponsorship and premium seating details, contact Development Director Lindsey Forden at 609.924.9529, ext. 251.

8 another successful case. But when Blackwood mysteriously returns from the grave and resumes his killing spree, Holmes must take up the hunt once again. 2 hours, 8 minutes. Community Room Dec. 15, 7 p.m. The Knit Nook — Join old friends and make new ones at these monthly knit-bythe-fireplace sessions. Bring your own supplies and share your stories and tips in a friendly gathering place for knitters. Please note: the Knit Nook is not a knitting class, but knitters with all levels of experience are welcome. Adults only. Fireplace Area, first floor

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16

Dec. 16, 10 a.m. Film: “Milk” — Sean Penn stars in the heartbreaking true story of New Yorker Harvey Milk, who moved to San Francisco and became the city’s first openly gay public official. The following year both he and the city’s mayor were shot and killed by the former city supervisor. 2 hours, 8 minutes. Community Room

KIDS+ Dec. 16, 4 p.m.

Let’s Dance — Librarians spin tunes from the ‘60s through today at this family dance party. Community Room

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17 TEENS Dec. 17, 11 a.m. Go-Between Club — This club for middle school students meets monthly at the library. Talk about books and other interests, help with library events, plan programs with the librarians and have a say in library services. New members are always welcome. Conference Room

KIDS+ Dec. 17, 2 p.m.

Russian Winter Carnival Music, dancing, crafts and more help showcase Russian culture, language and winter entertainment. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Community Room

Author Sam Wang, an associate professor of neuroscience at Princeton University, speaks Jan. 18 as part of the Inside a Child’s Mind series. See Page 10.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18 NEW SERIES Dec. 18, 3 p.m.

Concert: Princeton High School Studio Band Jazz Ensemble — This ensemble, featuring some of the top players in the nationally renowned and award-winning Princeton High School Studio Band, will kick off a new series titled Crescendo: Musicians on the Rise, which will showcase New Jersey musicians under 25. The Studio Band recently returned from Hawaii, where it was the only high school ensemble to perform at ceremonies marking the 70th anniversary of the invasion of Pearl Harbor. Community Room

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20 Dec. 20, 8:30 a.m. Talk: “How to Do the Impossible” — Ed Tseng, an internationally recognized expert on the psychology of peak performance, speaks at the Tuesday Networking Breakfast, a monthly gathering of those unemployed, under-employed

or seeking a career change. Tseng is an award-winning coach, best-selling author, keynote speaker and director of mental conditioning at the Monroe Sports Center. Breakfast supplied by Dispensa Café. Community Room

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22 NEW Dec. 22, 7 p.m.

Story Time for Big Kids: Picture Books with Adult Appeal Bring a snack and sit back and enjoy a variety of picture books written for big kids and little. Story Room

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24 The library will close at 1 p.m.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 25 The library will be closed.

HOLIDAY WEEK ACTIVITIES MONDAY, DECEMBER 26 KIDS Dec. 26, 11 a.m.

Snowflake Cutting After Family Stories, gather in the Youth Services Department to cut paper snowflakes. Third Floor

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KIDS+ Dec. 26, 3 p.m.

“In George Washington’s Shadow” — Between Christmas of 1776 and January 3, 1777, George Washington and his troops were not on winter break. Instead, in a brave and desperate attempt to turn the tide of the war, they crossed the Delaware River on Christmas night. In this fun presentation led by local writers Helene van Rossum and Sara Wegman, kids will use historical maps, images, shadow puppets and their own shadows to create Washington’s “Ten Crucial Days” that changed America’s history. Kids will go home with instructions and cutouts to make their own shadow puppets of

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George and Martha Washington. Grownups and siblings are invited to watch. Bring a camera to take a picture of your 18th century silhouette after the show. Participants 8 and older must register from the online events calendar at princetonlibrary.org Community Room

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27

KIDS+ Dec. 27, 2 p.m.

Family Concert: Presley and Melody — This interactive concert of upbeat children’s music features dancing and singing for children and parents. Community Room Dec. 27, 7 p.m. Socrates Café Participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Everyone is invited. Conference Room

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28 KIDS Dec. 28, 3 p.m.

Winter Fun Puppet Show Friendly puppets sing and tell a fun story about a romp in a winter wonderland. Community Room

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29 KIDS Dec. 29, 3 p.m.

Drop-in Snowman Craft Children 3 years and older and their caregivers are invited to make snowman crafts. Activity Room

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30 KIDS+ Dec. 30, 3 p.m.

Almost New Year’s Eve Dance Party — Dance to your favorite music and get ready to ring in the New Year. For children ages 3 and older and caregivers. Community Room

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31 The library will close at 1 p.m.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 1 The library will be closed.

MONDAY, JANUARY 2

Jan. 2, 7:30 p.m. Continuing Conversations on Race Members of Not In Our Town, the Princeton-based interracial and interfaith social action group, facilitate these discussions of race-related issues of relevance to our community and nation. Princeton Room Jan. 2, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Group: “The Eagle Catcher” by Margaret Coel The unlikely duo of Father John O’Malley, banished from Boston and sent to the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, and Vicky Holden, an Arapaho lawyer, track down the killer of a tribal chairman. Librarian Gayle Stratton leads the discussion. Quiet Room

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 4 Jan. 4, 7 p.m. Author Jon Edwards “Sacking the Citadel: The History, Theory and Practice of the Classic Bishop Sacrifice” Four hundred years ago, an Italian chess master discovered an extraordinary bishop sacrifice that often leads to checkmate or a significant material advantage. This book chronicles the history of that idea, what many have come to call the Classic Bishop Sacrifice, from its discovery and formative years through its more complex uses in modern chess. Community Room

THURSDAY, JANUARY 5 Jan. 5, 7:30 p.m. Bringing Families Together through Dinner — Janet Giles of Baby Bear’s Porridge will present ideas for easy meal prep, menus, planning, and dinner time solutions to help you find your way back to the family table. Community Room See Feature Story, Page 7

SATURDAY, JANUARY 7 KIDS Jan. 7, 11 a.m.

Heads and Tales Club This club is for children in grades 2 and 3 who are reading on their own and would like to discuss what they’re reading. Study Room, third floor

KIDS Jan. 7, 2 p.m.

Word For Word Club Children in grades 4 and 5 are invited to discuss what they’re reading. Study Room, third floor

SUNDAY, JANUARY 8 Jan. 8, 2 p.m. Author Leah Ingram “Suddenly Frugal: How to Live Happier & Healthier for Less” In keeping with her objective of helping Americans figure out how to live more on less, the author discusses five frugal New Year’s resolutions that anyone can try and that can add up to big savings overall. Community Room

TUESDAY, JANUARY 10 Jan. 10, 7 p.m. Author Kenneth Slawenski “J.D. Salinger: A Life” The author of the Salinger biography will speak and sign copies of his book at the official launch of the paperback edition. Community Room See Feature Story on Page 5

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11 KIDS+ Jan. 11, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club — Anyone interested in the traditional Japanese art of paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new, often seasonal folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited, too. Adults must accompany anyone under age 7. Activity Room

See Feature Story, Page 7

MONDAY, JANUARY 9

Jan. 9, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library Featured poets Gina Larkin and John Larkin will read for 20 minutes each followed by an open mic session. Gina Larkin has been the editor of the Edison Literary Review since its inaugural issue. Her book, “When the Gods Play Hide and Seek,” was published this year. John Larkin is a retired electronic engineer whose poems have been published in the Paterson Literary Review, the Edison Literary Review and more. In addition to the Larkins, this session will showcase a selection of poems from the recently published 10th anniversary issue of the Edison Literary Review, read by contributors. Fireplace Area, second floor

Co-sponsored by the library, the US 1 Poets Cooperative and the Delaware Valley Poets.

Jan. 11, 7 p.m. Film: “Call + Response” From child brothels in Cambodia to the slave brick kilns of rural India, this documentary reveals that in 2009, slave traders made more money than Google, Nike and Starbucks combined. Cornel West, Madeleine Albright and other political and cultural figures offer accounts of the 21st-century slave trade. 1 hour, 26 minutes. Community Room Jan. 11, 7 p.m. Círculo de Lectura — El ruido de las cosas al caer, por Juan Gabriel Vásquez. La exótica fuga y posterior caza de un hipopótamo, último vestigio del imposible zoológico con el que Pablo Escobar exhibía su poder, es la chispa que arranca los mecanismos de la memoria de Antonio Yammara, protagonista y narrador de El ruido de las cosas al caer. Princeton Room Calendar continues on Page 10

10 THURSDAY, JANUARY 12

Jan 12, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group: “The Paris Wife” by Paula McLain Experience Paris of the Lost Generation and meet fascinating characters such as Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, and Gerald and Sara Murphy through the eyes of Ernest Hemingway’s first wife, Hadley. Conference Room Jan. 12, 7 p.m. Book Launch: “Logical Miracles” This book, edited by Dorothy Mullen, is a collection of stories by people in the Suppers programs who found their personal solutions by experimenting with whole food. Suppers groups help people with a range of foodrelated challenges including depression, anxiety, learning issues, obesity, diabetes and problems with alcohol. Community Room

SATURDAY, JANUARY 14 Jan. 14, 10:30 a.m. Quickbooks — This free, hands-on workshop conducted by Oria Gonzales, a certified Quickbooks trainer, provides basic training in the use of QuickBooks. Registration required at scoreprinceton.org. Technology Center Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Area Chapter of SCORE.

“Buck” will be screened and discussed Feb. 3 at the Princeton Envrionmental Film Festival. Look for the PEFF tag for other festival events.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 15 Jan. 15, 3 p.m. The Dryden Ensemble Performing on period instruments, the Dryden Ensemble presents a concert featuring works by J.S. Bach. The program will also include a short introduction to Baroque instruments and performance practices. This concert is a prelude to the ensemble’s Bach Cantata Fest on Sunday, Jan. 22 at the Miller Chapel on the Princeton Theological Seminary campus. Community Room

MONDAY, JANUARY 16 The library will be closed for Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 17 Jan. 14, 3 p.m. Talk: “Mozart Masterpieces” Mozart scholar Catherine Sprague presents a 90-minute multimedia lecture featuring some of the composer’s most important works. Community Room

W I N T E R FA R M E R S AND CRAFTERS MARKETS

Jan. 12, Feb. 9, March 8, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Details: www.princetonlibrary.org

Jan. 17, 8:30 a.m. Talk: “Speaking That Connects” Communication consultant and executive speech and presentation coach Eileen N. Sinett of Eileen N. Sinett Communications shares tools and techniques from her book “Speaking That Connects.” Dispensa Café will supply the refreshments at this Tuesday Networking Breakfast, a monthly meeting of those unemployed, under-employed or seeking a career change. Community Room

Jan. 17, 6:45 p.m. Talk: “Marketing for Service Businesses” — This seminar, led by Avdi Hamit, provides an overview of how to sell and market services as opposed to products. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Area SCORE.

Jan. 17, 7 p.m. Stress Relief and Health Karen Davison, a Reiki master and nurse at the University Medical Center at Princeton, provides stress relief tips. Reiki is a Japanese technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also promotes healing. Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton HealthCare System.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 18 Jan. 18, 7 p.m. Author Sam Wang “Welcome to Your Child’s Brain: How the Mind Grows from Conception to College” An associate professor of neuroscience at Princeton University and a parent, Wang is co-author (with Sandra Aamodt) of this acclaimed book, which challenges popular myths and misinformation about brain development and how children think. Wang will discuss the book’s surprising revelations and offer practical

WINTER 2011-‘12

advice backed by real, reliable science about issues such as sleep problems, ADHD, language learning, gender differences and autism. Part of the Inside a Child’s Mind series. Community Room

THURSDAY, JANUARY 19 Jan. 19, 7 p.m. Film and Discussion: “The Big Uneasy” — Created by Harry Shearer, this award-winning film explores the true cause of the flooding that occurred in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Shearer’s investigation led him to the conclusion that taxpayers in more than 100 American cities are being affected by the shortsighted and environmentally damaging Army Corps of Engineers projects. Following the film, Judith Robinson of Princeton Farmers’ Market and Tracy Carluccio, deputy director of the Delaware Riverkeeper, will lead a discussion of the Corps’ proposal to dredge the Delaware River. 1 hour, 35 minutes. Community Room Calendar continues on Page 11

CALENDAR 11 Jan. 19, 7 p.m. The Knit Nook — Join old friends and make new ones at these monthly knit-by-the-fireplace sessions. Bring your own supplies and share your stories and tips. The Knit Nook is not a knitting class, but adult knitters of all experience levels are welcome. Fireplace Area, first floor

FRIDAY, JANUARY 20

Jan. 20, 10 a.m. Film: “Julie and Julia” — On the verge of turning 30, an underemployed woman (Amy Adams) begins a blog that chronicles her quest to prepare all 524 recipes in Julia Child’s “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” The film also follows the life of Julia Child (Meryl Streep) and shows how both women discover that - with the right combination of passion, courage and butter - anything is possible. Part of the Friday Film Café series. 2 hours, 2 minutes Community Room.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 21 Jan. 21, 11 a.m. Go-Between Club — This club for middle school students meets monthly at the library. Talk about books and other interests, help with library events, plan programs with the librarians and have a say in library services. New members are always welcome. Conference Room

KIDS+ Jan. 21, 11 a.m.

Family Concert: The Phoenix Woodwind Quintet This ensemble brings Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf” to life as their instruments play the voices of Peter and his animal friends. Join the cast on “stage” as an actor illustrates the music with masks and mime. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Cotsen Children’s Library.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 22 Jan. 22, 3 p.m. The Snitzer Quartet Named for its benefactor, Gail W. Snitzer, this ensemble is one of the advanced study groups of the Settlement Music School in suburban Philadelphia. Selected by audition, the group includes Chasen Goldfinger, Beatrice Hsieh, Zachary Mowitz and Amy Semes. The program will feature Maurice Ravel’s String Quartet in F major and include a chance to chat with the musicians. Part of the Crescendo: Musicians on the Rise series featuring musicians under 25. Community Room Jan. 22, 4 p.m. ESL Class — Adult speakers of all world languages who are new to English are welcome to join classes designed to increase fluency. Classes continue Sundays through April 1. Conference Room Co-sponsored by the library and St. Paul’s Catholic Church.

MONDAY, JANUARY 23

Jan. 23, 7 p.m. Talk: “Organize and Simplify” — Suzanne Neilson of “The Organized Life” will be speaking about organizing your possessions, papers, time, computer and just about everything else. Take back control of your life. You’ll lessen your stress and enjoy a calmer, unhurried, more self-directed lifestyle. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25

Jan. 25, 4:30 p.m. Talk: “The Onegin Project” Princeton University professor of music and Russian music expert Simon Morrison and Princeton University professor of Slavic languages and literature Caryl Emerson discuss their successful efforts to track down and resurrect the 1936 dramatization of Pushkin’s masterpiece “Eugene Onegin,” a work that was censored and barred from performance by Soviet officials as part of Stalin’s campaign of repression. The work will be given its world premiere on

Feb. 9 at Richardson Auditorium, with the PSO performing Prokofiev’s score, in a joint production with the university’s music, drama and dance departments. The lecture is also a prelude to the PSO’s Feb. 5 Classical Series concert “Simply Russian,” featuring works by Tchaikovsky (performed by cellist Joshua Roman) and Shostakovich, as well as Prokofiev’s suite of incidental music from “Eugene Onegin.” Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Symphony Orchestra Calendar continues on Page 12

TUESDAY, JANUARY 24

Jan. 24, 4:30 p.m. Talk: “Waste NOT In Schools” A panel of educators explores options for waste disposal and recycling in schools. Learn about area challenges and successes, waste-reduction programs, new technologies and resources. Professional development credit is available for educators. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and OASIS (Organizing Action on Sustainability in Schools).

Jan. 24, 6:30 p.m. TEDx Salon — Edward Tenner, a historian of technology and culture who has been a TED speaker and visiting scholar at Rutgers and Princeton University, talks about the importance of learning handwriting and why it’s important that children not be overexposed to technology at an early age. Community Room

Teens take over the Tech Center for these two-hour sessions of creative collaboration on the library’s new iMacs and MacBook Pros Create films in iMovie Compose music in Garage Band Chronicle your life with iPhoto Complete your homeworkassignments

TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS 4-6 P.M. BEGI NNI NG I N J ANUARY IN THE SECOND FLOOR TECHNOLOGY CENTER

T E E N S O N LY

12 Jan. 25, 7 p.m. Sustainable Princeton Leadership Awards — Individuals and organizations are recognized for enhancing the community’s sustainability in areas such as green building, healthy eating, buying local, changing consumer habits and more. Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library and Sustainable Princeton.

KIDS+ Jan. 25, 7 p.m.

Story Time for Big Kids: Picture Books with Adult Appeal Bring a snack and sit back and enjoy a variety of picture books written for ages 8 and older. Story Room

THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 PEFF Jan. 26, 7 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “Connected” Equal parts documentary and memoir, this Princeton Environmental Film Festival opener takes viewers on a roller coaster ride toward discovering what it means to be connected in the 21st century. Director Tiffany Shlain, whom Newsweek named one of the “Women Shaping the 21st Century,” will answer questions after the screening. 1 hour, 25 minutes. Community Room

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27 PEFF Jan. 27, 4 p.m.

Film: “Hummingbirds: Magic in the Air” — This PBS Nature documentary showcases the stunning abilities of hummingbirds using cameras that capture 500 images per second. 50 minutes. Community Room

PEFF Jan 27, 7 p.m.

Film “Queen of the Sun: What are the Bees Telling Us?” — An alarming inquiry into the insights behind scientist Rudolf Steiner’s 1923 prediction that honeybees would collapse within 80 to 100 years. Producer/director Taggart Siegel examines the dire global bee crisis through the eyes of beekeepers, scientists, farmers and philosophers. 1 hour, 22 minutes. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Waldorf School of Princeton.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 28 PEFF Jan. 28, 11 a.m. Talk and Demonstration: “Amazing Animals” — New Jersey Audubon will share the many traits and characteristics of the animal

“If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front” will be screened and discussed Feb. 10 at 7 p.m. as part of the Princeton Environmental Film Festival. See Page 14.

kingdom from insects to mammals. Live animals native to our state will add to the learning experience. Community Room

PEFF Jan. 28, 12:30 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “Shellshocked: Saving Oysters to Save Ourselves” — This film follows efforts to prevent the extinction of wild oyster reefs which are vital to keeping the oceans healthy. A post-screening discussion will feature director/producer/editor Emily Driscoll. 39 minutes. Community Room

PEFF Jan. 28, 2 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “Rescuing the Raritan” This one-hour documentary tells the compelling story of a river that has been profoundly contaminated over 200 years and of the extraordinary efforts to clean it up. It reveals how government agencies, powerful corporations, environmentalists, developers, scientists and lawyers have all clashed in their attempts to deal with the aftermath of extensive pollution and environmental neglect. A post-screening discussion will feature writer/director/editor Eric Schultz. Community Room

PEFF Jan. 28, 4 p.m.

Panel Discussion: Independent Filmmakers Environmental filmmakers Steve Chernoski, Emily Driscoll, Jared Flesher, Tish Streeten, Christian Schuller and Robert Szuter discuss

the nuts and bolts of documentary filmmaking, including advice for beginners. The session will culminate with a sneak preview of “Sourlands,” Flesher’s new film about human and ecological sustainability in central New Jersey. Community Room   PEFF Jan. 28, 7 p.m. Film: “Revenge of the Electric Car” Director Chris Paine takes his film crew behind the closed doors of Nissan, GM, and the Silicon Valley start-up Tesla Motors to chronicle the story of the global resurgence of electric cars. 1 hour, 30 minutes. Community Room

SUNDAY, JANUARY 29 PEFF Jan. 29, 1 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “Food Stamped” — This informative and humorous documentary, directed by Shira an Yoav Potash, follows a couple as they attempt to eat a healthy, well-balanced diet on a food stamp budget. Along the way, they consult with members of Congress, food justice organizations, nutrition experts and people living on food stamps. Liz Cohen of Yes We Can! Food Drives will lead a post-screening discussion featuring Mark Smith, food services director of the Crisis Ministry of Princeton and Trenton, and Julia Hicks de Peyster. 1 hour, 5 minutes. Community Room Donations of fresh produce will be gratefully accepted at the screening.

WINTER 2011-‘12

PEFF Jan. 29, 4 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “Overdrive: Istanbul in the New Millennium” This documentary tells the story of Istanbul’s struggle to come to terms with accelerated population growth and car-centric policies that have dominated its development in the last five decades – issues that are challenging megacities around the world. A post-screening discussion will feature director Aslihan Unaldi. 1 hour, 20 minutes. Community Room

MONDAY, JANUARY 30 Jan. 30, 7 p.m. Talk: “How to Tutor Your Own Child” — Marina Koestler Ruben, the author of “How to Tutor Your Own Child” and the in-house writing tutor at Sidwell Friends School in Washington D.C., will advise parents on how to make the most of the academic one-on-one time they share with their children. This program is for parents, grandparents, caregivers, and educators of students in any grade. Community Room Calendar continues on Page 13

CALENDAR 13 TUESDAY, JANUARY 31

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5 PEFF Feb. 5, 1 p.m.

Jan. 31, 7 p.m. Opera New Jersey Preview Richard Russell, artistic and general director of Opera New Jersey, will discuss his company’s upcoming performances of Puccini’s “Tosca.” Parts of the documentary “Tosca’s Kiss,” filmed at Casa Verdi, a retirement home for singers and musicians from the Italian opera, will be shown. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Opera NJ.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1 Feb. 1, 8:30 a.m. Career Coaching Series This is the first in a series of five, two-hour coaching sessions held on consecutive Wednesdays. Alex Freund of Landing Expert Career Coaching will conduct the series that includes modules on objectives and career plan, resume, networking, communications and compensation negotiation. Each module includes an hour of interview preparation via mock interviewing. This series is limited to 35 participants; a $25 fee covers all five sessions. Sign up by visiting the online events calendar at princetonlibrary.org or call 609.924.9529, ext. 220. Series continues Feb. 8, 15, 22 and 29. Community Room

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2 PEFF Feb. 2, 4 p.m. Film Screening Details to be announced. Please see princetonlibrary.org for details. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 2, 7 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “SoLa, Louisiana Water Stories” Director Jon Bowermaster’s one-hour documentary takes a poignant look back at a way of life that may be gone forever since the massive 2008 oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico – what he calls “the worst manmade ecologic disaster ever.” Bowermaster will lead a post-screening discussion. 1 hour, 2 minutes. Community Room

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 3 PEFF Feb. 3, 1 p.m.

Independent Documentaries Details at princetonlibrary.org/peff. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 3, 4 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “Call of Life” This film looks at the growing threat posed by the rapid and massive

Jon Bowermaster Director of “SoLa”

loss of biodiversity on the planet. Featuring leading scientists, social scientists, environmentalists and others, it explores the scope, causes and predicted global impact of a mass extinction occurring on a scale not seen since the disappearance of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Executive Producer David Donnenfield will lead a post-screening discussion. 1 hour, 20 minutes. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 3, 7 p.m.

Film and Discusssion: “Buck” This film follows cowboy and real-life “horse-whisperer” Buck Brannaman, who travels the country nine months each year to help horses with people problems. The film chronicles Brannaman’s life, from his abusive childhood to his phenomenally successful approach to horses. Hunterdon County horseman Peter Boglioli will lead a post-screening discussion. 1 hour, 28 minutes. Community Room

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4 PEFF KIDS+ Feb. 4, 10 a.m.

Film: “African Cats” — An epic true story set against the backdrop of one of the wildest places on Earth. This children’s film captures the real-life love, humor and determination of the majestic kings of the Savanna. The story features Mara, an endearing lion cub who strives to grow up with her mother’s strength, spirit and wisdom; Sita, a fearless cheetah and single mother of five mischievous newborns; and Fang, a proud leader of the pride who must defend his family from a oncebanished lion. 1 hour, 29 minutes. Community Room

Judith Manassen Ramon Producer of “Dolphin Boy”

KIDS Feb. 4, 11 a.m.

Heads and Tales Club — This club is for children in grades 2 and 3 who would like to discuss what they’re reading. Study Room, third floor

PEFF KIDS+ Feb. 4, 1 p.m.

Talk: “Energy Zone: Get All Charged Up About Energy” — Explore how we power our world, and help turn energy into all sorts of fun forms with Wondergy, a Philadelphia-based science entertainment group. Turn your motion into electricity, capture light, and save some energy. Community Room

KIDS Feb. 4, 2 p.m.

Word For Word Club Children in grades 4 and 5 are invited to discuss what they’re reading. Study Room, third floor

PEFF Feb. 4, 4 p.m.

Film: “The Clean Bin Project” The serious topics of modern consumption habits and waste reduction are presented in an uplifting and humorous way through the story of a couple’s competition to see who can produce the least amount of garbage in an entire year. 1 hour, 17 minutes. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 4, 7 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “Journey of the Universe” — From the Big Bang to the epic impact humans have on the planet today, this film is designed to inspire a new and closer relationship with Earth during a period of growing environmental and social crisis. Executive Producers Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim will lead a post-screening discussion. 1 hour. Community Room

Film and Discussion: “Dolphin Boy” Morad, a teenager from an Arab village in the north of Israel, withdraws after experiencing a violent attack. As a last resort before hospitalization, his father takes him to be treated with dolphins in Eilat. Morad starts speaking again after months of silence, but he erases his past and refuses to go home. This documentary, filmed over four years, is about the devastating havoc that violence can wreak upon the human soul, and about the healing powers of nature and of love. Executive Producer Judith Manassen Ramon will lead a post-screening discussion. 1 hour, 12 minutes. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 5, 4 p.m.

Film: “Mother: Caring for 7 Billion” — Since the 1960s, the world population has nearly doubled, adding more than 3 billion people. At the same time, talking about population has become politically incorrect because of the sensitivity of the issues surrounding the topic: religion, economics, family planning and gender inequality. The film illustrates both the over consumption and the inequity side of the population issue by following Beth, a mother, a child-rights activist and the last sibling of a large American family of 12, as she discovers the thorny complexities of the population dilemma and highlights a different path to solve it. 1 hour, 15 minutes. Community Room

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6 Feb. 6, 9 a.m. AARP Tax-Aide Program Seniors and people of low and moderate incomes can get free electronic tax preparations for federal and New Jersey state returns by appointment Monday mornings through April 9. This assistance is for individual returns only – no complex returns. Bring a copy of last year’s return, along with official documentation for all current-year income. For deductions such as medical expenses and charitable donations, bring a list (with a total Calendar continues on Page 14

14 amount) of all the expenses for which you can provide receipts and other back-up, if ever asked by the IRS. In many cases, a local pharmacy can provide a print-out of all medications and their cost. Appointments are scheduled for 9, 10 and 11 a.m. and noon. To schedule, call 609.924.9529, ext. 220.

Feb. 6, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Group: “The Messenger of Athens” by Anna Zouroudi — On the Greek island of Thiminos, the body of a woman is discovered at the bottom of a cliff. Is it an accident, suicide or murder? Librarian Gayle Stratton leads the discussion. Quiet Room, first floor

Feb. 6, 7 p.m. Continuing Conversations on Race Members of Not In Our Town, the Princeton-based interracial and interfaith social action group, facilitate these discussions of race-related issues of relevance to our community and nation. Princeton Room

Feb 7, 10:30 a.m. Talk: “Spice up Your Valentine’s Day” — Jon Hauge of the newly opened Savory Spice Shop on Spring Street will talk about how to use spices and herbs to create the perfect Valentine’s Day menu for the one you love. A menu and recipes will be handed out along with item samples. Registration requested. Part of the Flavors of Princeton series. Community Room

Feb. 6, 7 p.m. Talk: “Jeff Nunokawa on Charles Dickens” Popular Princeton University English professor and Dickens expert Jeff Nunokawa, commemorates the bicentennial of the birth of the Victorian-era writer whose works transcends his time, language and culture. Community Room Feb. 6, 7 p.m. Job Search Strategies for Older Workers — Carol King of the Princeton Senior Resource Center discusses strategies for competing in the new work place, updating your skills, networking, dealing with ageism, job searching on the internet and avoiding job scams. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7

Feb. 7, 7 p.m. Book Discussion: “David Copperfield” — Celebrate the bicentennial of Dickens’s birth with a discussion of “The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery (Which He Never Meant to Publish on Any Account).” “David Copperfield” is Dickens’s eighth novel and his most autobiographical. Fireplace Area, second floor

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU When you lose power after a big storm, want a good read, need to learn how to download free books or music to your portable device, are looking for free events that are enriching and fun or your kids need help with their homework, you turn to the Community’s Living Room.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 8 KIDS+ Feb. 8, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club — Anyone interested in the traditional Japanese art of paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new, often seasonal folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited, too. In fact, an adult must accompany anyone under age 7. Activity Room Feb. 8, 7 p.m. Film: “David Copperfield” — David O. Selznick and George Cukor assembled an all-star cast for the 1935 film version of the Dickens novel, including W.C. Fields, Lionel Barrymore, Basil Rathbone and Maureen O’Sullivan. The film was nominated for a Best Picture Oscar. 2 hours, 10 minutes. Community Room Feb 8, 7 p.m. Círculo de Lectura: “Las grietas de Jara,” por Claudia Piñeiro ¿Qué precio hay que pagar para dar una vuelta de timón y decidirse a vivir los propios sueños? En esta novela la escritora argentina cuestiona las dificultades de vivir en un mundo donde las reglas las imponen los más fuertes. Princeton Room

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9 Feb. 9, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group: “The Marriage Plot” by Jeffrey Eugenides It’s the early 1980s, the country is in a deep recession and life after college is harder than ever. Madeleine Hanna, dutiful English major, is writing her senior thesis on Jane Austen and George Eliot, purveyors of the marriage plot that lies at the heart of the greatest English novels. But real life, in the form of two very different guys, intervenes. Conference Room Feb. 9, 11 a.m. Winter Farmers’ Market Locally made products such as artisanal cheeses and honey from farmers and the works of many craftspeople are available for purchase during this six-hour event. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 9, 7 p.m.

Help us be here when you need us for all this and more. Support the Annual Appeal for Princeton Public Library.

Author Donovan Hohn “Moby-Duck” Investigating the mysterious loss of thousands of bath toys at sea, the author is pulled in to the secretive world of shipping conglomerates, the daring work of Arctic research-

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ers, the lunatic risks of maverick sailors and the shadowy world of Chinese toy factories. “Moby-Duck” is a journey into the heart of the sea and an adventure through science, myth, the global economy, and some of the worst weather imaginable. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing by the author. Community Room

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10 PEFF Feb. 10, 8:30 a.m.

Great Ideas Breakfast — Sustainable Princeton hosts this event featuring “lightning talks” by the organization’s volunteers and a preview of a new Green Map project for Princeton. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 10, 10:30 a.m.

Film: “Urban Roots” — This film follows the urban farming phenomenon in Detroit and speaks to a nation grappling with collapsed industrial towns and the need to forge a sustainable and prosperous future. 1 hour, 34 minutes. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 10, 1 p.m.

Independent Documentaries Details at princetonlibrary.org/peff. Community Room

PEFF KIDS+ Feb. 10, 4 p.m.

Habitat Adventures — Snakes ‘n’ Scales presents animals from two of the most amazing habitats on Earth: the Southeast Asian Rain Forest and the South African Veldt. The online game “Habitat Adventures” will be included on festival webpage to promote this program. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 10, 7 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front” — By focusing on the transformation and radicalization of one of its members, this film traces the rise and fall of a large cell of the Earth Liberation Front, an organization the FBI characterized as “America’s No. 1 terrorism threat.” Co-director Sam Cullman will lead a post-screening discussion. 1 hour, 25 minutes. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and American Documentary/POV.

Calendar continues on Page 15

CALENDAR 15 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11 Feb. 11, 10:30 a.m. QuickBooks — This free, hands-on workshop conducted by Oria Gonzales, a certified Quickbooks trainer, provides basic training in the use of QuickBooks. Please register at scoreprinceton.org. Technology Center Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Area Chapter of SCORE.

PEFF TEENS+ Feb. 11, 11 a.m.

Next Generation Environmental Fair – Teens and adults are invited to come together with local students and discuss ongoing sustainability initiatives at area middle and high schools. Come discover what today’s youth are doing to help preserve our planet. Light refreshments will be served. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Day School.

PEFF Feb. 11, 4 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “Truck Farm” — Using green-roof technology and heirloom seeds, filmmaker Ian Cheney plants a vegetable garden on the only land he has: his Granddad’s old pick-up truck. Once the mobile garden begins to sprout, viewers are trucked across New York to see the city’s funkiest urban farms, and to find out if America’s largest city can learn to feed itself. Cheney will lead a post-screening discussion. 48 minutes. Community Room.

PEFF Feb. 11, 7 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “The City Dark” — When filmmaker Ian Cheney moves to New York City and discovers skies almost completely devoid of stars, he wonders what we lose when we lose the night. The film spans a journey to America’s brightest and darkest corners. Astronomers, cancer researchers, ecologists and philosophers provide glimpses of what is lost in the glare of city lights. Blending a humorous, searching tone with poetic footage of the night sky, what unravels is an introduction to the science of the dark and an exploration of the human relationship to the stars. Cheney will lead a post-screening discussion. 1 hour, 24 minutes. Community Room

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12 PEFF Feb. 12, 11 a.m.

Film: “Cave of Forgotten Dreams” — Directed by Werner Herzog, the film follows an exclusive expedition into the nearly inaccessible Chauvet Cave in France, home to some of the most ancient visual art known to have been created by man. The film provides a unique glimpse of pristine artwork dating back more than 30,000 years, nearly two times older than any previous discovery. 1 hour, 30 minutes. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 12, 1 p.m.

Panel Discussion: “Green Burial is a Natural” — This discussion will focus on ecological “green” burials and natural, economic and meaningful funerals. Featured will be author Mark Harris and Laurie Powsner of the Funeral Consumer Alliance, Princeton. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Funeral Consumer Alliance, Princeton.

PEFF Feb. 12, 3 p.m.

Short films and talk by Stan Waterman and Carrie Manfrino Waterman, a legendary underwater photographer, filmmaker and diver, and Manfrino, director of research and conservation for the Central Caribbean Marine Institute, will discuss their work. Community Room

PEFF Feb. 12, 4:30 p.m.

Film and Discussion: “The Whale” — This film tells the true story of a young, wild killer whale, an Orca nicknamed Luna, who became lost on the coast of British Columbia and turned up alone in a narrow stretch of sea between mountains, a place called Nootka Sound. Directors Suzanne Chisholm and Michael Parfit will participate in a post-screening discussion via webcam. 1 hour, 25 minutes. Community Room

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13

Feb. 13, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library Featured poets BJ Ward and Wanda S. Praisner read for 20 minutes each followed by an open mic session. Ward’s most recent book, “Gravedigger’s Birthday” was a finalist for the Paterson Poetry Prize. His poems have been widely published and have been featured on National Public Radio. Praisner’s books include “A Fine and Bitter Snow,” “On the Bittersweet Avenues of Pomona”

and the forthcoming “Where the Dead Are.” An award-winning poet, her work has appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. Fireplace Area, second floor

Co-sponsored by the library, the US 1 Poets Cooperative and the Delaware Valley Poets.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14 Feb. 14, 7 p.m. Downsize Your Possessions with Ease — Overwhelmed by all you own? Don’t know where to begin? Professional organizer Ellen Tozzi will help you through the sometimes-emotional process of streamlining. She will share strategies on deciding what to keep and provide resources for the items to be released. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Senior Resource Center Next Step Engaged Retirement Programs.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15 Feb. 15, 7 p.m. “Language Acquisition and the Bilingual Child” Christiane Fellbaum of Princeton University reviews recent findings comparing the linguistic and cognitive development of monolingual and bilingual children and examining the nature of the “bilingual advantage” from a range of different perspectives. Part of the Inside a Child’s Mind speaker series. Community Room

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16

Feb. 16, 7 p.m. “Talk With Your Farmers” Four interns on local farms share their experiences of work and learning. Judith Robinson, manager of Princeton Farmers’ Market, leads the discussion. Community Room Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m. The Knit Nook — Join old friends and make new ones at these monthly knitting sessions. Bring your own supplies and share your stories and tips in a friendly gathering place for knitters. Knitters with all levels of experience are welcome. Adults only. Quiet Room

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17 Feb. 17, 10 a.m. Film: “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly” — At 43, Elle France magazine editor Jean-Dominique Bauby suffered a stroke that paralyzed his entire body except his

left eye. He used a blinking code to write his memoir and eloquently described his life from the psychological torment of being trapped inside his body to his imagined stories from lands he’d only visited in his mind. In French and English with English subtitles. 1 hour, 54 minutes Community Room KIDS+ Feb. 17, 4 p.m. Let’s Dance — Library staff will play tunes from the ‘60s through today at this family dance party. Community Room

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18 TEENS Feb. 18, 11 a.m. Go-Between Club — This club for middle school students meets monthly at the library. Talk about books and other interests, help with library events, plan programs with the librarians and have a say in library services. New members are always welcome. Conference Room

KIDS+ Feb. 18, 3 p.m.

Family Concert: Mr. Ray A favorite among the library’s youngest set, Mr. Ray makes music for the kid in all of us during this interactive concert of lively dance music. Community Room

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19 Feb. 19, 3 p.m. Concert: Spinner’s End This progressive rock band consists of Ali Andresini (vocals, ukulele) and Ryan Yannalfo (keys, programming). They are currently writing their first album and recently composed original music for the library’s Page to Stage production of “Eurydice” by Sarah Ruhl. Part of the Crescendo: Musicians on the Rise series featuring New Jersey musicians under 25. Community Room

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 20 Feb. 20, 7 p.m. Author Daniel Rodgers “The Age of Fracture” The author, a professor of history at Princeton University and historian of American ideas and culture, talks about his latest book, a wide-ranging history of social argument and ideas in America during the last quarter of the 20th century. Community Room Calendar continues on Page 16

Non Profit Org. U.S. Postage PA I D Princeton, NJ Permit No. 4

Executive Director: Leslie Burger Assistant Director: Peter Bromberg Communications Director: Tim Quinn Public Programming Librarian: Janie Hermann Princeton Public Library Sands Library Building 65 Witherspoon St. Princeton, NJ 08542 609.924.9529 princetonlibrary.org

Frıends of the

Princeton Public Library

Youth Services Team Leader: Susan Conlon Adult Services Team Leader: Erica Bess Program Committee: Lucía Acosta, Erica Bess, Leslie Burger, Susan Conlon, Kim Dorman, Kristin Friberg, Pamela Groves, Shelly Hawk, Janie Hermann, Amy Hiestand, Tim Quinn, Allison Santos Staff Writer: Amy Hiestand Editing and design: Tim Quinn

16 CALENDAR TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21

Feb. 21, 8:30 a.m. Speed Networking — This is your chance to practice your “elevator pitch” and fine-tune how you present yourself and your skills in a short timeframe. Participants will move around the room and meet a minimum of 8-10 people during this session. HR managers and local business people will be among those “speed networking” and giving feedback to those in transition at this Tuesday Networking Breakfast, a monthly meeting of those unemployed, under-employed or seeking a career change. Community Room. Breakfast supplied by Dispensa Café.

Feb. 21, 6:45 p.m. How the New Tax Laws Benefit Small Business Owners An IRS representative will speak about major changes in tax law and regulation affecting small business, changes in IRS outreach methods and the impact of those changes on New Jersey businesses. Register online at scoreprinceton.org. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and SCORE of Princeton.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22 KIDS Feb. 22, 7 p.m.

Mindstorm Robotics Princeton Engineering Education for Kids (PEEK) will show children how to assemble and create a Lego Mindstorm robotic device. There will be two separate sessions, one for children ages 6 and 7 and another for children ages 8 and older. Each age-specific session is limited to 20 children. Please register using the online calendar at princetonlibrary.org. Community Room

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23 Feb. 23, 7 p.m. Film and Discussion: “Magic Trip” — This documentary features restored footage from more than 100 hours of film shot during author Ken Kesey’s fabled 1964 road trip across America with a renegade group of counterculture truth-seekers in the legendary Magic Bus. Along with Kesey, who wrote “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” the Merry Pranksters on the LSD-fueled road trip to the New York World’s Fair included Neal Cassady, the American icon immortalized in Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road,” and the painter and driver of the psychedelic Magic Bus. Given access to the raw footage and audiotape by the Kesey family, filmmakers Alex Gibney, who will appear at a postscreening discussion, and Alison Ellwood completed the film Kesey intended to make and captured an extraordinary piece of American history. Community Room

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24 Feb. 24, 10 a.m. Film: “The Queen” — An intimate, revealing and sometimes humorous behind-the-scenes look at the interaction between Queen Elizabeth II (Helen Mirren) and Prime Minister Tony Blair (Michael Sheen) following the death of Princess Diana. 1 hour, 37 minutes. Community Room Feb. 24, 4 p.m. Get to Know Bach — Lisa Terry, who plays viola da gamba for the Dryden Ensemble, and guest harpsichordist Joanne Kong give a

demonstration of the three sonatas for harpsichord and viola da gamba by Johann Sebastian Bach. Discussion follows. Community Room

TEENS Feb. 24, 7 p.m.

Middle School Event Details of this special afterhours program for middle school students only can be found on princeotnlibrary.org. Community Room

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Feb. 26, 3 p.m. Discusssion and Performance: “The Mary Joyce Project” — Saxophonist Claire Daly discusses the life of her cousin Mary Joyce, whose many adventures included being the first non-native Alaskan to dogsled the 1,000 mile run between Juneau and Fairbanks (in 1936), the first ham radio operator in the Alaskan Territories, and the only woman to run supplies for the Allies by dogsled in World War II. Daly and pianist Steve Hudson will perform a program of original compositions in tribute to Joyce. Community Room

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27 Feb. 27, 7 p.m. Art Talk — Painter Phyllis E. Wright and photographer Peter Cook, whose works are on display in the library’s second floor Reference Gallery, speak about their art and answer questions. Community Room Feb. 27, 7 p.m. Voluntourism — Carol King, director of Next Step: Engaged Retirement & Encore Careers of the Princeton Senior Resource Center, talks about volunteering overseas, a different

way of seeing the world and meeting people while helping out and giving back. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement & Encore Careers Program

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28 Feb. 28, 7 p.m. Author Melissa Lane “Eco-Republic” The author talks about her book, which draws on ancient Greek thought — and Plato’s “Republic” in particular — to put forward a new vision of citizenship that can make an ecologically sustainable society a reality. The book also reveals why we must rethink our political imagination if we are to meet the challenges of climate change and other urgent environmental concerns. Part of the Thinking Allowed series. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 29 KIDS Feb. 29, 7 p.m. Mindstorm Robotics Princeton Engineering Education for Kids (PEEK) will show children how to assemble and create a Lego Mindstorm robotic device. There will be two separate sessions, one for children ages 6 and 7 and another for children ages 8 and older. Each age-specific session is limited to 20 children. Please register using the online calendar at princetonlibrary.org. Community Room

KIDS+ Feb. 29, 7 p.m.

Story Time for Big Kids: Picture Books with Adult Appeal Bring a snack and sit back and enjoy a variety of picture books written for kids ages 8 and older. Story Room


Connections Winter 2011 - 2012