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A SENSE OF PLACE

JULY 1, 2013 – MAY 1, 2014

PIER 24 PHOTOGRAPHY Pier 24 Photography is a venue in which photographers, educators, collectors, and curators share photography and photographic ideas with the community. Our aim is to provide an environment for the experience and quiet contemplation of photography. In addition to presenting ongoing exhibitions, Pier 24 houses the permanent collection of the Pilara Foundation.

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01 03 Restrooms

Entrance

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01 Richard Learoyd:

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11 John Chiara

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12-14 Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust

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15 Lee Friedlander:

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The Stour from Dead Man's Bridge, near Flatford, Winter

02 JosĂŠ Manuel Fors: Havana Circle

03 John Chiara:

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Embarcadero at Interstate 80

America by Car

04 Scale and Space:

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Edward Burtynsky Jan De Cock Thomas Demand Andreas Gursky Lucia Koch Richard Misrach Cinthya Soto

05 Doug Aitken:

16 Home:

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House (video)

06 Robert Adams

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Robert Adams Uta Barth Moyra Davey Thomas Demand Todd Hido Veronika Kellndorfer Stephen Shore Wolfgang Tillmans Photographer Unknown

17 Erik Kessels:

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24 HRS in Photos

07 Todd Hido

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18 Jeff Wall:

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In front of a nightclub

08 Eric William Carroll:

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19 Rinko Kawauchi Asako Narahashi

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20 Stephen Shore:

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Blue Line of Woods

09 Paul Graham: The Present

10 Thomas Demand: Grotto

Uncommon Places

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Richard Learoyd, The Stour from Dead Man’s Bridge, near Flatford, Winter, 2013 José Manuel Fors, Havana Circle, 2012

A SENSE OF PLACE Today, like never before, pictures are inescapable, blanketing every facet of dayto-day life, from advertisements and billboards to social media sites like Facebook and Instagram. Because our relationship to photography is both personal and universal, this medium more than any other defines how we view and understand the world. For its fifth exhibition, Pier 24 Photography presents A Sense of Place, an exploration of how photographs shape our perceptions of our surroundings. Together, the exhibited works suggest how we see through the lens of our own experience, our impressions shaped by emotional responses based in a felt connection between one’s own life and the pictured subject. Approaching the grand scale historically reserved for landscape paintings, photographs like Andreas Gurksy’s F1 Pit Stop III (Rm 04), Thomas Demand’s Grotto (Rm 10), and Jeff Wall’s In front of a nightclub (Rm 18) immerse the viewer in the pictured environment. Works from Stephen Shore’s Uncommon Places (Rm 20) recall the spirit of anytown USA. In an adjacent gallery, Paul Graham’s The Present (Rm 09) captures continuous moments in the Manhattan landscape from various perspectives, mimicking how the eye shifts focus to pinpoint different details unfolding in one’s surroundings. Subjects similar to those considered by Shore and Graham are recognizable in Lee Friedlander’s America by Car (Rm 15), a series of photographs documenting both the everyday and specific eccentricities in the United States—all of them captured from the confines of his car. Unconventional technical processes and methods of display bring fresh perspectives on the commonplace. Referencing one of the oldest forms of photographic printing, Eric William Carroll’s diazotypes (Rm 08)—a form similar to blueprints—are produced at an unprecedented scale, creating an immersive experience of being in the woods. When photographing familiar Bay Area terrain, John Chiara’s (Rm 11) distinctive camera obscura process transforms images into otherworldly scenes. To create the installation 24 HRS in Photos, Erik Kessels (Rm 17) downloaded and printed every picture uploaded to Flickr during a 24-hour period, allowing the viewer to both visually and physically experience the overwhelming number of photographs shared online. Works drawn from the Sack Photographic Trust (Rms 12-14)—primarily from the nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century—reflect one collector’s sense of place. These three galleries present historical photographs in contemporary installations focusing on traditional themes that are well represented in the collection. Taken as a whole, the pictures assembled in A Sense of Place demonstrate what photography does best, drawing our attention to the everyday—and what we might otherwise bypass—and inspiring us to take another, closer look.

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Richard Learoyd, The Stour from Dead Man’s Bridge, near Flatford, Winter, 2013

Richard Learoyd 01

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JosĂŠ Manuel Fors, Havana Circle, 2012

José Manuel Fors 02

“I often place camera lenses in the center of my pieces as if all the photography of that universe was bursting out of the camera.” José Manuel Fors, 2012

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“First we have to see. Or first we have to be taught to see. We have to be taught to see here, because here is everywhere, related to everywhere else, and if we don’t see, hear, taste, smell and feel in this place – not only will we never know anything but the world of sense will be by that much diminished everywhere.” William Carlos Williams

John Chiara 03

John Chiara, Embarcadero at Interstate 80, 2013

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Andreas Gursky, F1 Pit Stop III, 2007

Scale and Space 04

SCALE AND SPACE Unprecedented in scale for photography, the eight works in this gallery demonstrate the ways that technology has altered the medium over the past several decades. While exploring wide-ranging subject matter, these contemporary color photographs share a scale historically reserved for landscape painting. Each work immerses the viewer in an expansive environment, physically placing us within the space of the photograph, sparking considerations of how images affect our perceptions of place.

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Cinthya Soto, Tramo el Saborcito, 2005

Scale and Space 04

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Jan De Cock, Denkmal 9, Henry Van de Velde Universiteitsbibliotheek, Rozier 9, Gent, 2004

Scale and Space 04

Richard Misrach, Desert Fire #43, 1983

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Edward Burtynsky, SOCAR Oil Fields #1a and #1b, Baku, Azerbaijan, 2006

Scale and Space 04

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Andreas Gursky, 99 Cent, 1999

Scale and Space 04

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Thomas Demand, Kabine, 2002

Scale and Space 04

Lucia Koch, Spaghetti (2 windows), 2006

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Scale and Space 04

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Doug Aitken, House, 2010 (video)

Doug Aitken: House 05

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Robert Adams Newly Occupied Tract Houses, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1968

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Denver, Colorado, 1973 31

“The form the photographer records, though discovered in a split second of literal fact, is different because it implies an order beyond itself, a landscape into which all fragments, no matter how imperfect, fit perfectly.” Robert Adams, 2009

Robert Adams Selections from Colorado, 1968–82

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1. Pike’s Peak, Colorado Springs, 1969 2. Longmont, Colorado, 1976 33

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Todd Hido 1. #10845-7, 2012 2. #10101, 2011

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Todd Hido 1. #6426, 2007 2. #7557, 2008

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3. #10320, 2011 4. #3179, 2003 37

“My work in photography all goes back to the basic struggle of wanting to capture and hold on to moments while trying to be present in the experience at the same time.� Eric William Carroll, 2013

Eric William Carroll, Blue Line of Woods, 2010

Eric William Carroll: Blue Line of Woods 08

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Paul Graham, Broadway, 3rd June 2010, 2.10.12 p.m., 2012

Paul Graham: The Present 09

“You don’t need a multiplicity of images. You show what happens, then what happens next. And so you shift your focus. You don’t need to show 10 other moments, you’ve implied that it’s a continuum and what you thought mattered shifts quickly and transforms itself into another thing that matters for that instant.” Paul Graham, 2012

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Paul Graham 1. Uptown (Nurse), 19th October 2009, 2.03.40 p.m., 2012 2. Vesey Street, 25th May 2010, 5.51.05 p.m., 2010

3. 1st Avenue, 11th May 2011, 2.29.57 p.m., 2013 4. 51st Street, 18th June 2010, 1.28.45 p.m., 2010

Paul Graham: The Present 09

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5. 125th Street, 9th March 2010, 2.09.36 p.m., 2012 6. 53rd Street and 6th Avenue, 6th May 2011, 2.41.26 p.m., 2012 43

Thomas Demand, Grotto, 2006

Thomas Demand: Grotto 10

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“When I look very carefully around me, while also being completely aware of my own photographic process, I can catch a glimpse of where to aim the lens. My photographs are made from exposures that take place inside my camera. I think of each photograph as a document of an event, one that happens over a long exposure time. With each photographic event, I gain a deeper understanding of the malleability of this process within its fixed parameters. The photographs record this experience and hopefully transmit a progression of what I am seeing.� John Chiara, 2013

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John Chiara 1. Crestmont End, (Southwest), 2013 2. Crestmont End, (Southeast), 2013 47

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John Chiara 1. Crestmont End (Upper-East and Lower-East), 2012 2. Funston at Cascade, 2013 3. Inca at Avalon, 2012

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4. Sunnydale at Russia, 2013 5. Felton at Amherst, 2012 49

Walker Evans, South Street, New York City, 1934

Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust Each of the three galleries in this exhibition, organized by Pier 24 Photography, identifies a different thematic thread within the Sack Collection: Horizons, Dwellings, and The City. Although many of the featured pictures are familiar, they have not been assembled in this manner before. This presentation encourages us to examine them— and the Collection more broadly—in very new ways. The photographs in the first room, organized around the theme Horizons, have been selected for the graceful continuous line that delineates the point where the earth ends and the sky begins. A great deal of care has been taken to match up the horizon lines in these works and thereby visually unite the pictured sites, which range from Europe and the Middle East to the United States. The specific location of these pictures is not the first thing we notice; what is most striking is the broad horizon and expanse of sky. After viewing the continuous horizon presented jointly by these pictures, we move close and examine each of them intimately. We look into the lovely picture by Roger Fenton (1819–1869) and see a man fishing on the banks of the Wye River; we see the particular barrenness, the beautiful emptiness, of the desert around the Second Pyramid in Frith’s picture from Egypt; we see the dense forest and the rushing Columbia River in Watkins’s depiction of Rooster Rock. Many of these pictures were the first photographs ever made of their subjects; all of them reflect a desire to inform and excite the viewer by representing what these far-flung places looked like. The pictures in the second gallery form a much sparser display. Most of them represent dwellings in villages or country homes that are graced and protected by trees. In this room there is a sense of the pleasure and gracefulness of country life. There is a long tradition of idealizing such settings in England. Henry White’s (1819–1902) couple at the door of their cottage is paired here with its American version: David W. Butterfield’s (1844–1933) picture of a house and barn in a New England village, the sidewalk lined by a white picket fence. Such visions of harmonious domestic life are echoed in Edward Weston’s (1886–1958) picture of a working farm surrounded by trees and the view of San Francisco’s Telegraph Hill by Johan Hagemeyer (1884–1962). Though it shows a city, Hagemeyer’s beautiful Pictorialist photograph depicts a very harmonious, atmospheric, and graceful landscape, full of trees and gentle breezes. The last room, representing The City, is filled with the energy and aspiration we commonly ascribe to urban life. It is not surprising that most of the pictures in this room were made in the twentieth century. Hung together in an arrangement that emphasizes the dynamism and vitality we appreciate in cities, they show the city as a living entity in itself—we see forests of chimneys, mountains of walls, curtains of windows. All of these elements, and more, are present in this room. In most of the pictures on display there are no people at all, and when people are present they are most often fragmentary (as in Lisette Model’s [1901–1983] picture of a storefront reflection), or they are dwarfed by towers or walls (as in Bill Brandt’s [1904–1983] nighttime photograph). There are also the sublime renderings of the city by the brilliant Eugène Atget (1857–1927), who saw his beloved Paris as the epitome of a long history and culture, and depicted it most often without the people that inhabited it, indicating their presence through other markers, such as the worn stones of streets and buildings. The early morning fog filling Atget’s empty streets is also heavy with meaning, evoking the weight of the city’s rich history as well as the inevitability of change. Walker Evans’s (1903–1975) atmospheric early picture of a dark Manhattan skyline shows both his indebtedness to Atget, his acknowledged predecessor, and his need to see beyond the clarity and order of twentieth-century artistic Modernism into a more complex modern reality. Sandra S. Phillips, 2013

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Francis Frith, Pyramids of El-Geezah from Southwest, 1858 Henry Faul, Pike's Peak, Judd Mine, Colorado Territory, 1861 George Barnard, Defences of the Etawah Bridge, ca. 1864–65 John Beasley Greene, Landscape with Palm Trees along the Nile, ca. 1853–54 Joseph Vicomte Vigier, Cauterets. Vue des bains de la Railliere, 1853 Félix Teynard, Nubie-Amadah-Vue générale des ruines, 1853–54 Andrew Joseph Russell, Echo City, looking up Weber River, ca. 1868 Carleton E. Watkins, Sunset Hill, Dalles City, Oregon, 1867 George Barnard, Destruction of Hood’s Ordinance Train and Ruins of Rolling Mill, Atlanta, Georgia, 1864

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Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust 12

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Frank Jay Haynes, Granite Silver Mine, Montana Territory, 1887 Roger Fenton, Lindisfarne Abbey, ca. 1855 John K. Hillers, Hopi Pueblos of Mishongnovi and Shipaulovi, Arizona, ca. 1879 Carleton E. Watkins, The Yosemite Valley from Inspiration Point, 1880s John Beasley Greene, Untitled [Constantine II], 1855 Roger Fenton, On the Wye, ca. 1855 Louis De Clercq, Tour Antonia et environs (Tower of Antonia and Surroundings), 1859 J. F. Ryder, Untitled [Train Tracks], 1862 Roger Fenton, Kakikoi, from Camp of Horse Artillery, 1856 Maxime Du Camp, Nubie, Forteresse d’Ibrym, 1850 Alexander Gardner, View from Fort Laramie, 1868

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1. Henry Faul, Pike's Peak, Judd Mine, Colorado Territory, 1861

Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust 12

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Félix Teynard, Nubie. Environs de Oudai-Halfah. Vue du Désert Pres de la Deuxieme Cataracte, from Egypte et Nubie, 1851 Henry Faul, Pike's Peak, Judd Mine, Colorado Territory, 1861 Carleton E. Watkins, The Domes from Eagle Point Trail, Yosemite Valley, 1880s Humphrey Lloyd Hime, Birch Bark Tents, West Bank of Red River, Middle Settlement, 1858 John K. Hillers, Walpi, One of the 7 Moquis, Arizona, 1881 George Barnard, Rebel Works in Front of Atlanta, Ga. No. 4, ca. 1866 Joseph Vicomte Vigier, Bagneres de Luchon, La Vallee de Biella prise des hauteurs du Portillon, 1853 Timothy O’Sullivan, Water Rhyolites near Logan Springs, Nevada, 1871 Félix Teynard, Louksor. Dattiers et Jardin de l’Expedition du Louksor, ca. 1851 Carleton E. Watkins, Rooster Rock, Columbia River, Oregon, 1867

Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust 12

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Roger Fenton, Richmond Castle and Bridge, 1854 J. F. Ryder, Atlantic and Great Western Railway II, 1862 John Beasley Greene, Untitled [Clifftop Town], 1850s Maxime Du Camp, Vue prise a la premiere Cataracte, Egypt, 1850 Carleton E. Watkins, Spokane Falls, 1882 John Beasley Greene, Sycomore à Korosko, 1853–56 Maxime Du Camp, Ruins of a Christian Settlement at Ramesseum, 1850 Charles Marville, Untitled [Clouds and Paris Skyline], 1857 Carleton E. Watkins, New Tacoma, Washington, Puget Sound, 1882 57

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Albert Renger-Patzsch, Bauernhaus in Wamel, ca. 1947 Alvin Langdon Coburn, Poplar Trees and Cottage, ca. 1900 Edward Weston, Farm House, Salinas Valley, 1934 Johan Hagemeyer, Cypress Trees, Telegraph Hill, San Francisco, 1925 Benjamin Brecknell Turner, Church Oak, Hawkhurst, ca. 1853

Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust 13

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David W. Butterfield, Untitled [New England Houses], ca. 1870 Photographer Unknown, Untitled [Family in Front of a Farm House], 1870 Henry White, Untitled [Country Cottage with Couple], 1856 Photographer Unknown, Family Posed in Front of White House with Clapboard Fence and Trees, 1870s Clarence John Laughlin, The Oak Arch, Woodlawn Plantation, 1945 59

David W. Butterfield, Untitled [New England Houses], ca. 1870

Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust 13

Henry White, Untitled [Country Cottage with Couple, 1856

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Minor White, Vicinity of Dansville, New York, 1955 Humphrey Lloyd Hime, Mr. Hingster’s [Inkster] House and Farm Buildings, 1858 Edward Weston, Connecticut Barn, 1941 Willard Van Dyke, California Farm, ca. 1932 Wright Morris, Farm Buildings along Road, South Carolina, 1939

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Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust 13

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Wright Morris, Untitled [Scythe by Shed], ca. 1947 Paul Strand, Façade, Gripp, Hautes Pyrenées, 1951 Paul Strand, Barn, Gaspé, 1936 Imogen Cunningham, Yreka, 1929

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Consuelo Kanaga, Downtown New York, 1924 Willard E. Worden, San Francisco Skyline at Night, ca. 1905 Imre Kinszki, In Moonlight, 1930s Berenice Abbott, Lamport Export Company, 507-511 Broadway, Manhattan, 1935 Charles Marville, Rue des Bourdonnais, ca. 1860 Gabriel Moulin, San Francisco, 1935 Joe Schwartz, Lot Baseball, New York City, 1930s Brassaï, Le Pont des Arts, Paris, ca. 1933–34 Karl Struss, Cables—Singer Building, Late Afternoon. Brooklyn Bridge, 1912

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Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust 14

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Alfred Stieglitz, From My Window at the Shelton, West, 1931–32 Weegee (Arthur Fellig), Flagpole Painter, 1940s El Lissitzky, Untitled [Montage of Runner and City Street], ca. 1930 Robert Frank, London, 1949 Walker Evans, South Street, New York City, 1934 Brassaï, La Bastoche, ca. 1932 Bill Brandt, Rainswept Roofs, London, 1933 André Kertész, Rue Vavin, Paris, 1925 Eugène Atget, Rue des Chantres, 1923 65

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Samuel Gottscho, Elevated Railroad Curve at Coenties Slip, ca. 1933 Leon Levinstein, Windows, East Harlem, 1953 Charles Marville, Rue de la Montagne-Sainte-Genevieve, 1865–69 William Dassonville, The Russ Building, San Francisco, ca. 1925 Henri Cartier-Bresson, Tours de Notre Dame, ca. 1940 Willy Kessels, Untitled; Building Collage, 1930s Walker Evans, We Are Building a New and Greater Bloomingdale’s, ca. 1930 Berenice Abbott, From West Street Corner, Manhattan, early 1950s André Kertész, New York Abstraction, 1936 Ilse Bing, Queensborough Bridge Exit, 1936

Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust 14

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Ilse Bing, Greta Garbo Poster, Paris, 1932 André Kertész, New York, 1947 Edward Steichen, Untitled (Rockefeller Center Montage), 1932 Brassaï, Hotel de Dieu, vue de Nôtre Dame, 1933 Man Ray, Paris Rooftops, St. Sulpice, ca. 1925 Eugène Atget, Fruits, 12bis Rue Mouffetard, ca. 1910 Lisette Model, Fifth Avenue, 1950s Helen Levitt, New York [Pancho Stinks], ca. 1939 Bill Brandt, Policeman in Dockland Alley, Bermondsey, 1934 Eugène Atget, Coin Rue Valette (Corner of rue Valette), 1925

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Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust 14

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3. Lewis Wickes Hine, Empire State Building Construction, 1931

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Berenice Abbott, Murray Hill Hotel from Park Avenue and 40th Street, 1935 Martin Munkácsi, Aerial View of Pest, 1926 Karl Struss, Metropolitan Life Insurance Tower, 1909 Rebecca Lepkoff, On 42nd Street, New York City, 1948 László Moholy-Nagy, Helsinki, 1930 Andreas Feininger, New York, South Street, Corner of Roosevelt Street and Brooklyn Bridge, 1940 Brassaï, Boulevard Montparnasse, 1933 John Szarkowski, The Wainwright Building, St. Louis, 1954 William E. Dassonville, San Francisco Ferry, 1920s

Selections from the Collection of Paul Sack & the Sack Photographic Trust 14

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Ilse Bing, New York, the Elevated and Me, 1936 Lewis Wickes Hine, Empire State Building Construction, 1931 Paul Strand, Under the El, New York, 1915 Ralph Steiner, Bank of New York, 1926 Alexander Rodchenko, Courtyard, 1927 Eugène Atget, Rue Dusoubs-Les Halles [Umbrella Store], 1914 Alexander Rodchenko, Pushkin Square, ca. 1928–30 Harry Callahan, Building Facade, ca. 1948 Walker Evans, New York, from the Brooklyn Bridge, Looking South, 1928–30 71

Lee Friedlander, Selections from the series America by Car, 1992–2009

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Lee Friedlander 1. Montana, 2008 2. Pinedale, Wyoming, 2000 3. New York City, 2002 4. Savannah, Georgia, 2008

Lee Friedlander: America by Car 15

“Friedlander’s road pictures, taken over the past decade, are about three things central to his life: the American people, the landscape, and photography. He uses his rental car as a deceptively simple framing device, borrowing the built-in borders of its rear-view and side-view mirrors, windshield, and side windows. The result is a collection of brilliant observations about American people and places, their idiosyncrasies, eccentricities, and obsessions, and his love of all.” Elisabeth Biondi, 2010

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Home 16

HOME While the memories and experiences that shape our understanding of home are highly personal, we share a collective appreciation of this place and the objects that occupy it. The nine photographers in this gallery present different interpretations of home, offering varied perspectives on what defines a domestic setting. Together, these photographs offer vignettes of a home that is not our own, but nevertheless elicit a universal familiarity.

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Photographer Unknown, Untitled, ca. 1950

Home 16

Uta Barth, Untitled (aot 7), 2000

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1. Stephen Shore, Selections from the series American Surfaces, 1972 2. Robert Adams, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1968 3. Thomas Demand, K端che (Kitchen), 2004

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Todd Hido, #3878, 2005 Moyra Davey, Shure, 2003 Moyra Davey, Nyro, 2003 Wolfgang Tillmans, summer still life, 1995

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Stephen Shore 1. New York City, 1972 2. London, 1972 3. New York City, 1972 4. New York City, 1972

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Farmington, 1972 Dayton, 1972 Armarillo, 1972 Granite, 1972

9. Alanreed, 1972 10. Amarillo, 1972

Home 16

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11. Robert Adams, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 1968

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Veronika Kellndorfer, Lovell Beach House, 2008

Home 16

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Erik Kessels, 24 HRS in Photos, 2013

Erik Kessels:  24 HRS in Photos 17

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Erik Kessels, 24 HRS in Photos, 2013

Erik Kessels:  24 HRS in Photos 17

“Everyone concedes that photography is now a medium of exchange as much as a mode of documentation. Able to be instantly disseminated around the globe, a digital snapshot initially functions as a message in the present (‘Hey, I’m here right now, looking at this’) rather than only as a record of some past moment. This kind of photograph is meant primarily as a means of communication, and the images being sent are almost as ephemeral as speech, so rarely are they printed and made physical.” Geoffrey Batchen, 2013

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Jeff Wall, In front of a nightclub, 2006

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“The force of the flames burning up the vast grassland was far stronger than I had imagined. Witnessing the landscape completely burnt to pitch black, I was seized by the illusion that I myself had burned up. It was a refreshing sensation, as if the self I had been, up until that time, was no longer. I had been reborn anew.� Rinko Kawauchi, 2013

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2 Rinko Kawauchi 1. Untitled, from the series of Ametsuchi, 2012 2. Untitled, from the series of Ametsuchi, 2013 93

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Asako Narahashi 1. Kawaguchiko #6, 2003 2. Kawaguchiko #4, 2003 3. Kawaguchiko #2, 2003

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4. Mekari, 2004 95

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1 Stephen Shore 1. Second Street East and South Main Street, Kallspell, Montana, August 22, 1974 2. Marland Street, Hobbs, New Mexico, February 19, 1975 3. West Fifteenth Street and Vine Street, Cincinnati, Ohio, May 15, 1974 4. Victoria Avenue and Alberta Street, Regina, Saskatchewan, August 17, 1974

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Stephen Shore: Uncommon Places 20

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“To see something spectacular and recognize it as a photographic possibility is not making a very big leap. But to see something ordinary, something you’d see every day, and recognize it as a photographic possibility—that is what I am interested in.” Stephen Shore, 2007

5. Church Street and Second Street, Easton, Pennsylvania, June 20, 1974 6. Fifth Street and Broadway, Eureka, California, September 2, 1974 7. Cleburne Road, Fort Worth, Texas, June 11, 1976 97

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5 Stephen Shore 1. Presidio, Texas, February 21, 1975 2. U.S. 2, Ironwood, Michigan, July 9, 1973 3. U.S. 1, Arundel, Maine, July 17, 1974 4. U.S. 22, Union, New Jersey, April 24, 1974

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Stephen Shore: Uncommon Places 20

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5. Broad Street, Regina, Saskatchewan, August 17, 1974 6. Mount Blue Shopping Center, Farmington, Maine, July 30, 1974 7. Holden Street, North Adams, Massachusetts, July 13, 1974

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Pier 24 Photography would like to acknowledge the following individuals and lenders for their assistance in making this exhibition possible. 303 Gallery Jeroen Bijl Eric William Carroll John Chiara Doris Fisher Randi and Bob Fisher Jeffrey Fraenkel Fraenkel Gallery Lee Friedlander Paul Graham Howard Greenberg Gallery Christopher Grimes Gallery Murray Guy Gallery Haines Gallery Cindy Herron Todd Hido Rinko Kawauchi Erik Kessels Lucia Koch Richard Learoyd Richard Misrach Asako Narahashi Abner Nolan Pace/MacGill Gallery Gina and Stuart Peterson Sandra S. Phillips Regen Projects Rose Gallery Andrea Rosen Gallery Paul Sack Sack Photographic Trust for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Stephen Shore Wolfgang Tillmans

Photography Credits Richard Learoyd: © Richard Learoyd, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Andreas Gursky: © Andreas Gursky / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, Courtesy Sprüth Magers, Berlin London / Richard Misrach: © Richard Misrach, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Thomas Demand: © Thomas Demand, Courtesy VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / Lucia Koch: © Lucia Koch, Courtesy the artist and Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica / Doug Aitken: © Doug Aitken, Courtesy 303 Gallery, New York / Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zürich / Victoria Miro Gallery, London / Regen Projects, Los Angeles / Robert Adams: © Robert Adams, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Todd Hido: © Todd Hido, Courtesy Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco / Eric William Carroll: © Eric William Carroll, Courtesy the artist / Paul Graham: © Paul Graham, Courtesy Pace Gallery, New York / Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York / Thomas Demand: © Thomas Demand, Courtesy VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / John Chiara: © John Chiara, Courtesy the artist / Lee Friedlander: © Lee Friedlander, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Uta Barth: © Uta Barth, Courtesy Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Stephen Shore: © Stephen Shore, Courtesy the artist / 303 Gallery, New York / Robert Adams: © Robert Adams, Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Jeff Wall: © Jeff Wall, Courtesy the artist / Rinko Kawauchi: © Rinko Kawauchi, Courtesy Rose Gallery, Santa Monica / Asako Narahashi: © Asako Narahashi, Courtesy Rose Gallery, Santa Monica / Stephen Shore: © Stephen Shore, Courtesy the artist / 303 Gallery, New York

Editor: Seth Curcio Editorial Associate: Allie Haeusslein Copy Editor: Amanda Glesmann Design: Nate Phelps Installation Photography: Charles Villyard Print Management: Sprinkle Media This publication would not have been possible without the generous contributions of the Pier 24 Photography volunteer and internship team.

ISBN: 978-0-9839917-3-1 Printed in the United States ©2013 Pier 24 Photography All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the prior written permission of the publisher / copyright holders. Pier 24 The Embarcadero San Francisco, CA 94105 p. 415.512.7424 f. 415.512.7456 e. info@pier24.org

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A Sense of Place Exhibition Guide