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2 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 3

Where To Find A Dollar dollarbank.com/locations

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DOWNTOWN

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GATEWAY CENTER 412-261-3098

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NATRONA HEIGHTS 724-224-8500

OAKLAND 412-621-3178

NORTH HILLS 412-366-2626

OLIVER 412-261-8400

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BRADDOCK HILLS 412-271-8400

BRENTWOOD 412-881-3777

EAST LIBERTY 412-362-7638

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WASHINGTON 724-228-3305

PENN HILLS 412-244-8589

WEST

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4 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

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PAGE 29 A CLOSER LOOK AT CITY COMMUNITIES

all over the map LAWRENCEVILLE PAGE 42

NORTH SIDE

STRIP DISTRICT+ POLISH HILL

PAGE 44

BLOOMFIELD, FRIENDSHIP +GARFIELD

EAST LIBERTY+ SHADYSIDE PAGE 38

PAGE 30

PAGE 58

DOWNTOWN PAGE 34

OAKLAND PAGE 47

SQUIRREL HILL+ REGENT SQUARE PAGE 55

SOUTH HILLS

SOUTH SIDE PAGE 52

PAGE 50

OK, THE MAP ABOVE is a simplification: We don’t really live in a lollipop world of pleasantly colored abstract shapes — although it can feel that way after playoff wins. But cut us some slack: Pittsburgh has 90 neighborhoods and a street grid in which, as Einstein predicted, even parallel lines eventually meet. (For proof, see the Downtown intersection of Fifth and Sixth Avenues.) Trying to present the city in all its complexity would take dozens more pages, and at least one more spatial dimension, than we have.

The same is true for the rest of this guide. We focused on a handful of neighborhoods, and a pared-down list of experiences, because we didn’t have room for them all. And for every community — every bar and restaurant, every retail and cultural attraction — that we included, we had to leave a bunch of others out. The map above, and the pages that follow, are just to help you get your bearings in a city that’s bigger than it looks. For the rest of the journey, you’ll have to plot your own course.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 7

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There are at least two Pittsburghs. There’s the Pittsburgh of legend, the one people see during Steelers broadcasts, or that they lived in before moving to Phoenix. This is the Pittsburgh that, perhaps ironically, attracts both newcomers and old-timers alike — the one frequently seen through the lens of a camera, or of your own nostalgia. And then there is the Pittsburgh of today, which sometimes seems overwhelmed by the shadow of the past, but is becoming more visible with each passing year. And the thing about the Steel City is … those two cities exist side-by-side. Many of the other sections of this guide include

landmarks of each. But for those who are pressed for time, here’s a quick tour of them both.

The Pittsburgh you’ve come to expect Yes, OK, let’s square away the frieson-sandwiches thing first. Primanti Brothers has locations all over town, but the original is located in the Strip District (46 18th St., 412-263-2142): Legend has it the sandwich was popular with truck-drivers who wanted a meal they could hold in one hand while working. The Strip, of course, has

Saturday, July 12 11AM - 3PM Randyland / PHOTO BY LISA CUNNINGHAM

numerous other attractions — some of which you’ll see on page 58 of this guide. But be sure to stop at La Prima Espresso (205 21st St., 412-281-1922), where you’ll find old Old Worlders speaking Italian, and playing cards at stand-up tables. Not far away is Enrico Biscotti (2022 Penn Ave., 412-281-2602), an old-school bakery immortalized in the 2001 Scott Baio film The Bread, My Sweet. You’ll want pierogies too: Drive just down the Ohio River to Pierogies Plus in nearby McKees Rocks (342 Island Ave., 412-3312224). Round out your caloric intake at the South Side’s Page Dairy Mart (4600 E. Carson St., 412-4310600), a classically unpretentious drive-up spot where Pittsburghers of all kinds gather for soft-serve. Want to sample the geography of the “City of Bridges”? Cross from Downtown to the South Side on Pittsburgh’s most distinctive bridge: the double-lenticular-truss Smithfield Street Bridge. From Station Square, a railroadstation-turned-entertainmentcomplex, you can take an hour-long Just Ducky tour (412-402-3825): You’ll learn some local history and ford a couple rivers in the amphibious tour vehicle. Next to Station Square is the Monongahela Incline, the country’s oldest continuously operating incline. From the upper station, the ambitious will walk the one-mile distance along Grandview Avenue — which connects the city’s most heavily trafficked scenic vistas — to the Duquesne Incline (412-3811665), whose original cars are, yes, the ones you see on TV. For more Pittsburgh hills, try Beechview’s Canton Avenue, which sports a grade of 37 percent and is arguably the world’s steepest street. (Visiting expats can tell their kids that all the streets were this steep back in the ’70s.)

A survey of the region’s history begins with a visit to the Heinz History Center (1212 Smallman St., 412-454-6000), wedged between the Strip and Downtown. The center offers a largely upbeat look at the region’s past, with artifacts like roller-coaster cars and old Heinz ads to reminisce over. But as you may have heard, the steel industry was once a big deal around here: The Frick Art & Historical Center (7227 Reynolds St., 412-371-0600) offers tours of Clayton, the Point Breeze mansion of steel master Henry Clay Frick. Expect a sympathetic portrait of one of the city’s most controversial historic figures … and get a different take at Munhall’s Pump House (880 E. Waterfront Drive), flashpoint of the notorious 1892 Homestead Steel Strike, which Frick’s heavy-handed policies inspired. Across the river from the Pump House you’ll see the Carrie Furnaces: tours of this defunct iron-making facility are provided by Rivers of Steel (623 E. Eighth Ave., 412-464-4020) on Friday and Saturday during warmer months. Rivers of Steel offers other regional tours and exhibits at its headquarters in the historic, if sprawl-isolated, Bost Building. If your interests run toward sports history, seek a visit — by appointment only — to Lawrenceville’s Roberto Clemente Museum (3339 Penn Ave., 412-621-1268). Or make a pilgrimage to Oakland’s Forbes Field shrine: a section of the wall that Bill Mazeroski’s 1960 walk-off World Series homer flew over, just off Schenley Plaza.

The Pittsburgh you didn’t see coming Two of Pittsburgh’s weirdest landmarks are, ironically, decades-

sponsored by pittsburghzoo.org PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 11

old churches: St. Anthony’s Chapel in Troy Hill (1704 Harpster St., 412-231-2994, x7) contains some 5,000 Catholic relics — the bones of saints, including an intact skull. Just upriver, in Millvale, is St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church (24 Maryland Ave., 412-821-3438), home of the Maxo Vanka murals: Painted in a Mexican muralist style for an immigrant congregation, they are a stunning indictment of modern industry and war. Even farther up the Allegheny — is there something in the water? — is yet another offbeat museum: O’Hara Township’s Bayernhof Museum (225 St. Charles Place, 412-782-4231). The former residence of the eccentric Charles B. Brown, the Bayernhof houses self-playing musical instruments, hidden passages and an indoor Bavarian-themed pool. It’s oneof-a-kind, but schedule your tour in advance, and bring comfortable walking shoes. Rounding out the roster of quirky local museums is Garfield’s Center for Postnatural History (4913 Penn Ave., www.postnatural.org). Open Sunday afternoons or by appointment, this facility, created by Carnegie Mellon University professor Richard Pell, is a tiny but provocative look at what innovations in genetic engineering, along with other human intrusions

Bayernhof Museum / PHOTO BY DAVID KELLY

on nature, hath wrought. Lest you think Pittsburghers just watch sports all the time, check out The Wheel Mill, our singular indoor BMX track, made largely from recycled wood and housed in a Larimer warehouse (6815 Hamilton Ave., 412-362-3693). Not far away, along Washington Boulevard, is a former driver’s-license test track that is now an urban velodrome usually open to the public (www.visitpa.com/pa-biking/ washington-boulevard-bike-track). For a lot of folks, “Pittsburgh fashion” means “Steelers jerseys.” No longer: Lawrenceville’s Butler

Street especially has become a mini-fashion district. Check out Jupe Boutique (3703 Butler St., 412-621-2640) for women’s fashions, and nearby Pavement (3629 Butler St., 412-621-6400). A few blocks away is MidAtlantic Mercantile for clothes and décor (4415 Butler St., www.mid-atlanticmercantile.com). But perhaps the best Pittsburgh retail opportunities are the ones in which local crafters and artisans help the new Pittsburgh retain the flavor of the old. Pittsburgh-themed/ Pittsburgh-memed merchandise is on offer at Lawrenceville’s Wildcard

(4209 Butler St., 412-224-2651), at the South Side’s Commonwealth Press (1931 E. Carson St., 412-4314207) and 412 Shop (420 S 27th St., 412-586-7507). If you’re lucky, you can catch an installment of the I Made It Market (imadeitmarket. com), a nomadic craft fair that crops up periodically around town. Want to try your own hand at making something new? In North Point Breeze, the Center for Creative Reuse (214 N. Lexington St., 412-473-0100) offers thrifty crafters, and crafty thrifters, a chance to buy bulk materials of all sorts — yarn, buttons, doll heads, you name it — for their projects. The adjoining Construction Junction (412-243-5025) offers a similar opportunity to home renovators, selling scavenged building materials ranging from old doors to salvaged church pulpits. For a touch of inspiration, visit Randyland (501 Arch St., 412-342-8152) the home of North Sider Randy Gilson. The home’s exterior and adjoining courtyard is a giddy explosion of color, where lawn flamingos vie with hand-painted signs and reconstituted shrines for your attention. It’s one artist’s vision of the city we’re becoming: a place where new splashes of color are transforming a place that remains familiar … no matter how long you’ve been away.

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12 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

The Waterfront

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table hopping

Pittsburgh offers a full course of dining options, across town or just across the street

special occasion CAFÉ AT THE FRICK Indulge in lunch (or afternoon tea) in this garden setting on Henry Clay Frick’s former estate; don’t skip the fresh pastries. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 E2 Fresh takes on Old World recipes, with a focus on unfussy Italian preparations, in a cozy space. 5904 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1200 ELEVEN This multi-level modern venue offers new American cuisines, complemented with an impressive wine selection. 1150 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-201-5656 LEGUME BISTRO A short, lively menu with a focus on seasonal fare, served in a refined but casual space. 214 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-621-2700 MONTEREY BAY FISH GROTTO Fresh seafood available in a variety of preparations, and perhaps Pittsburgh’s best view, overlooking the Point. 1411 Grandview Ave., Mount Washington. 412-481-4414

fun for the whole family CHURCH BREW WORKS This desanctified-church-turnedmicrobrewery offers pub grub, woodfired pizza and full entrees. The altar of beer is a must-see. 3525 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200 MAD MEX Local chain serves an inventive

selection of Cal-Mex fare (with lots of veggie options) in lively atmosphere. Multiple locations, www.madmex.com

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THE PORCH Enjoy a menu of sandwiches, salads and light entrees in a centrally located green space. Patio seating in season. 221 Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-687-6724 SIX PENN Fancied-up comfort food (meatloaf, mac-and-cheese), plus sandwiches and desserts, satisfies all comers. Ideally located for fare before or after Downtown shows. 146 Sixth Ave., Downtown. 412-566-7366

pittsburgh favorites DELUCA’S Large portions of good oldfashioned breakfast fare, served in close but convivial quarters. Expect lines on weekends. 2015 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-2195 LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE The Wholey name is synonymous with Pittsburgh seafood, and this upscale-but-casual restaurant shows why. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509 PAMELA’S This local diner chain is renowned for its thin, crisp-edged pancakes (a favorite of President Obama) and home fries. Multiple locations, www.pamelasdiner.com TESSARO’S A charming corner bar is home to Pittsburgh’s most beloved meal-sized burger — unsullied by fancy trends,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 13

and always satisfying. 4601 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-682-6809

cutting-edge food AVENUE B Offering a small-but-inventive menu of American cuisine, this intimate corner bistro mixes seasonal offerings with daily chalkboard picks. It manages to be stylish without being pretentious. 5501 Centre Ave., 412-683-3663 CURE A short but inventive menu specializing in nose-to-tail fine dining (especially pig), with an emphasis on house-made charcuterie. 5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-252-2595 EDEN Enjoy a full meal prepared from raw foods, with many dishes that go beyond simple salads. Also, fresh squeezed juices. 735 Copeland St., Shadyside. 412-802-7070 MEAT AND POTATOES They start with staples, but the presentation is novel (as are the cocktails). The nose-to-tail ethic here may provide your best excuse to try marrow. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7007 NOTION Fine dining offered via fixed-price, four-course tasting menus, or a chef’s menu. Expect top ingredients, exquisitely prepared. 128 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-361-1188

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ROOT 174 Chef-driven fare that is fresh, local and seasonal, with an adventurous selection of meat products. 1113 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-243-4348 SALT OF THE EARTH Unusual ingredients are combined — often using unique techniques — to create dishes at once familiar and exotic. 5532 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-441-7258

quick grabs COCA CAFÉ A favorite for brunch — a homey storefront setting pairs well with herbed omelets, breakfast quesadillas and waffles. 3811 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-621-3171 D’S SIX PAX & DOGZ Yup, beer and hot dogs, but there’s a lot of beer, and the dog variety is also extensive. 1118 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. 412-241-4666

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NU MODERN JEWISH BISTRO Think traditional Jewish deli fare, updated but still comforting. Try the smoked “Montreal meat.” 1711 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-420-0220

SPAK BROS A sandwich-and-pizza shop that caters to meat-lovers as well as vegetarians and vegans, with options like seitan wings. 5107 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-362-7725 UNION PIG AND CHICKEN Top-quality smoked BBQ, served family-style. Ribs, brisket, fried chicken and Southern sides. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-7675

around the world ALL INDIA With more than 200 items, spanning India’s cuisines, traditionalists and adventurers alike will be happy. 315 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-681-6600 CASA REYNA An extensive menu of Mexican fare — from familiar tacos to regional specialties — makes this below-ground restaurant the perfect getaway. 2031 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-1242 FUKUDA Neo-traditional Japanese fare, exotically prepared, offered tapasstyle in a tiny, but hip storefront. 4770 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-567-5050 KAVSAR A place to explore Uzbekistan cuisine, which reflects the region’s proximity to both Russia and China with rice, meat and noodle dishes. 16 Southern Ave., Mount Washington. 412-488-8708 KAYA The flavors of the Caribbean are fused into snacks and entrees, ranging from spicy bean dip to fish tacos and Cubanos. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565 PARIS 66 BISTRO Your stop for crepes, croques, hearty soups and salads, all in a worthy approximation of a French café. 6018 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-404-8166 POINT BRUGGE CAFE/ PARK BRUGES Sister bistros that offer classic Belgian fare with an occasional twist, from mussels in several preparations, to steak and frites. 401 Hastings St., Point Breeze (412-441-3334), and 5801 Bryant St., Highland Park (412-661-3334) VERDE MEXICAN KITCHEN AND CANTINA The menu offers contemporary spins on traditional Mexican fare; the bar offers hundreds of tequilas. A modern setting with a streetside patio. 5491 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-404-8487

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 15

O EDEN HALL CAMPUS O SUMMER EVENTS SERIES JULY IS K

IDS’ MON

TH!

MUSIC Sat., July 12, 4:00 p.m. Kids: Secret Agent 23 Skidoo* Thur., Aug. 21, 7:30 p.m. Classical/Chamber: Various Artists

MOVIES Thur., July 10, dusk • Kids: Bears Thur., Aug. 7, dusk • Date Night: Chocolat Thur., Sept. 4, dusk American Classic: American Graffiti

THEATER Sat., July 26, 10:00 a.m Madcap Puppet Theater: The Enchanted World Thur., Sept. 18, 7:30 p.m. The Improvised Shakespeare Co.* All events are held outdoors at the Hilda M. Willis Amphitheater on Chatham University’s new Eden Hall Campus in Richland, PA

chatham.edu/summerseries

Bar Marco / PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

raising the bar The sophisticated drinker’s guide to Pittsburgh There was a time when Pittsburgh “bar culture” meant properly pronouncing the order “Imp ’n’ Arn” (that’s a whiskey with an Iron City chaser, kids.) No longer: Pittsburgh’s craft-cocktail/craft-brewing/crafteverything scene has arrived. Don’t believe it? Drink a round on us.

top shelf ACACIA Don’t let the boarded-up windows — a token of speakeasy nostalgia — fool you. You won’t want to miss the handcrafted cocktails in this Carson Street refuge. 2108 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-1800 BAR MARCO This craft-cocktail pioneer is still innovating, with a new rustic wine cellar offering limited-seating wine and food pairings. 2216 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-471-1900 BUTCHER AND THE RYE The backlit floor-to-ceiling wall of liquor behind the bar makes a statement. And everyone, including the folks at the James Beard Foundation, is listening. 212 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-391-2752 BUTTERJOINT Though attached to trendy eatery Legume, Butterjoint stands on its own with a very selective drinks list and small-plate menu. 214 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-621-2700

*Tickets for these events may be purchased at the website. All other events are free and open to the public. 16 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

THE LIVERMORE Classic cocktails accompany a tasty small-plate menu in this tilewalled space: Watch East Liberty gentrify through the plate-glass

windows. 124 S. Highland Ave. 412-361-0600

TENDER Prohibition trappings are fused with the building’s history as a former bank, and original cocktails complement classics and a small-plate menu. 4300 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-402-9522 THE SUMMIT This neighborhood secret appeals to both Mount Washington residents and bar pros winding down with, say, an infused-liquor cocktail. 200 Shiloh St., Mount Washington. 412-918-1647

hip havens BRILLOBOX Great drafts served with a sophisticated menu, and a side of retro-chic design and music upstairs. Brooklyn expats need go no further. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-4900 HARRIS GRILL/SHILOH GRILL Though located across town, these sister facilities both offer terrific outdoor seating, food served with a smirk and … Bacon Night. 5747 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside (412362-5273) / 123 Shiloh St., Mount Washington (412-431-4000) INDEPENDENT BREWING COMPANY The all-local beer list distinguishes this bar, which offers food and Saturday-night “cocktology” sessions. 1704 Shady Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5040 KELLY’S Among the first new-old-school

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bars. Drinks belie the divey trappings, and don’t miss the mac-and-cheese. But come early. 6012 Centre Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-6012

LE MARDI GRAS With its smoke, shadows and stiff drinks, this local landmark had speakeasy vibes before speakeasies were cool. 731 Copeland St., Shadyside. 412-683-0912 REMEDY An artsy multi-floor venue that attracts customers interested in everything from dinner to dance parties upstairs. 5121 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771

serious wines ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER Expertly curated wines alongside craft beer and cocktails, as well as artisanal meats and cheeses. A sociable, if offbeat, vibe predominates. 5326 Butler St. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337 CASBAH A cozy Mediterranean-themed restaurant that was an early adopter of the wine-bar approach. 229 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. 412-661-5656 SONOMA GRILLE A hotel restaurant whose selection, food pairings and staff make it a destination in itself — especially for California wines. 947 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-697-1336 SPOON An expansive wine list joins a locally sourced menu of toptier American cuisine in a spacious lounge setting. A top all-around experience. 134 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-362-6001

made on site ARSENAL CIDER HOUSE Buy and consume growlers of hard cider, mead and other fermented products in this tastefully converted row house. 300 39th St., Lawrenceville. 412-260-6968 BREW GENTLEMEN This new Braddock brewery promises lots of innovation in a brick-and-wood interior. Exhibit A: the chai wheat beer. 512 Braddock Ave., Braddock. 412-871-5075 CHURCH BREW WORKS A brewpub in a former church, good for a night out with friends or for shocking religious in-laws. 3525 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. 412-688-8200 COPPER KETTLE The Kettle is a brew-your-own (with guidance) facility, with 50 recipes to

choose from. It’s attached to Hough’s (412-586-5944), whose 71 taps provide inspiration. 563 Greenfield Ave., Greenfield. 412-906-9400

EAST END BREWING Pittsburgh’s first hipster brewery; the IPA and brown ale are staples. Tastings available at its Larimer brewery and the Pittsburgh Public Market in the Strip District. 147 Julius St., Larimer. 412-537-2337

Q&A

with

GRIST HOUSE BREWING A just-opened Millvale beer garden that shows promise. Especially the brown ale. 10 E. Sherman St., Millvale. www.gristhousebrewing.com HOFBRAUHAUS If you tire of the lederhosen and oom-pa-pa music, take your giant stein outside to survey the riverfront view from this SouthSide Works anchor. 2705 S. Water St., South Side. 412-224-2328 HOP FARM BREWING Yep, they grow their own hops, best sampled in their flagship IPA. That and other beers are available for tasting and taking home from here. 5601 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-408-3248 MAGGIE’S FARM RUM When Pittsburgh is distilling rum, you know the scene is serious. Bottle purchases/cocktail hours at its Strip District location are from Wed.-Sun. 3212A Smallman St., Strip District. 412-709-6480 PENN BREWERY The granddaddy of Pittsburgh microbrewing still offers German beer and ambience best sampled in its cobblestone courtyard. 800 Vinial St., North Side. 412-237-9400 PITTSBURGH WINERY Don’t think “Pittsburgh” and “wine” go together? Try the malbec here. 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-1000 ROCK BOTTOM This chain brewpub, just outside of town, brews up some local connections, like a beer made with locally foraged knotweed. 171 Bridge St., Homestead. 412-462-2739 ROUNDABOUT BREWERY Wednesdays through Sunday, try a pint or take home a growler: “Ginga wheat” is a good summer pick. 4901 Butler St., Lawrenceville. www.roundaboutbeer.com WIGLE WHISKEY Rye and wheat whiskeys, bitters and Dutch-style gin are all made, and can be tasted, here. Tours of the distillery, and a new Spring Garden barrelhouse, are available. 2401 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-224-2827

apply to be a dreamer. While the selection criteria is loosely based on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs the great litmus test is to ask yourself does your dream make others feel warm & fuzzy? After a brief interview and orientation dreamers can be on their way to raising funds for causes they are passionate about! Dreamers can apply year round at our website which is dreamcreamicecream. com. They can also inquire for the application by email at info@dreamcreamicecream.com You held your first “Dream On” or through social media at facefestival in April, where did this book.com/dreamcreamicecream idea come from and do you plan or Twitter @dreamcreampgh. on making it an annual event? The DreamOn Festival was a What is your Vision/Mission collaborative effort between and where do you see Dream Dream Cream Ice Cream and Cream Ice Cream in 5 years? Omicelo. The idea was inspired Our Vision is, “We believe that by a dinner table conversation with milk, sugar, and a process between two entrepreneurs both we can change the world!” and building their brands. Ice Cream over the next 5 years we will be and Music both make people feel guided by Our Mission, “to be a good which is why they go great social enterprise that aids othtogether! We think the event was ers to realize their dreams- one well received by the Pittsburgh cause, one cone, and one comcommunity and definitely plan munity at a time!” We are listento produce similar events in the ing closely to customer feedback future. and suggestions about parlor space, kiosks, and mobile trucks/ How does the selection process carts which will all be considwork for the “Dreamers”? ered carefully. One thing that is Any individual or Organization certain is that we want to focus with a noble goal, volunteer ca- on serving and empowering the pability and fundraising need can community around us!

Where did the idea of Dream Cream Ice Cream come from? Dream Cream Ice Cream is the by-product of a conversation on how to create a sustainable source of revenue to help people fund their dreams, you know the side-projects, causes, or goals that matter most to us that when we have nowhere to turn for help. An opportunity to secure a retail space through the Project PopUp initiative threw the idea into hyperdrive and here we are...

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around the triangle A quick guide to LGBT recreation and resources It’s been a big year for Pennsylvania LGBT rights, topped off by a May court decision striking down the state’s same-sex marriage ban. Check out this list to get LGBTfocused resources, help out the movement or just celebrate.

bars+clubs 941 SALOON The laid-back vibe, darts, pool tables and private booths makes this a solid place to hang. 941 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-281-5222 5801 VIDEO LOUNGE & CAFÉ One of the city’s go-to gay bars, and maybe the best-known among straights, 5801 is usually hopping on weekends, with three bars on three levels and an outdoor patio. 5801 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-661-5600 CATTIVO BAR Nestled in a residential area, this two-floor spot has featured some of the country’s best drag performers, including favorites from RuPaul’s Drag Race. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157 CRUZE BAR Sweat it out on the dance floor, or lounge with friends on the outside deck. 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-471-1400 BLUE MOON ON BUTLER STREET From leather daddies to drag queens, Blue Moon is one of the city’s more diverse LGBT watering holes and features some of the city’s most impressive drag. 5115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-781-1119

support THE GAY AND LESBIAN COMMUNITY CENTER Drop in to hang out, play board games or get help connecting to local resources. The GLCC’s regular fundraiser, OUTragous Bingo, is worth every moment. (Check www.glccpgh.org for the latest schedule.) 210 Grant St., Downtown. 412-422-0114 PERSAD CENTER One of the country’s oldest counseling centers specifically targeting the LGBT community, the organization offers a range of health services and programming. 5150 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-441-9786 PITTSBURGH AIDS TASK FORCE Offering everything from HIV testing to a food pantry and support groups, PATF’s mission is to improve the lives of those living with HIV/AIDS. 5913 Penn Ave., second floor, East Liberty. 412-345-7456 PROJECT SILK Silk offers a variety of resources, including testing and a space to dance and vogue, predominantly for black and Latino men and transgender women ages 13-29. Open from 3-9 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. 810 Penn Ave., eighth floor, Downtown. www.projectsilk.org

events+ programming

IMAGES A buck gets you in the door for some of Downtown’s best happy-hour specials, DJs and karaoke. 965 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-391-9990

PRIDE FEST One of Pittsburgh’s biggest parties, Delta Foundation’s annual June event often includes bar crawls, a street festival and a fabulous march that seems to grow every year. www.deltafoundation.us

SPIN BARTINI & ULTRA LOUNGE An intimate, stylish bar experience mostly popular with men. In nice weather, enjoy the patio. 5744 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-362-7746

REEL Q The annual film festival, running from Oct. 10-18, features a range of documentary, narrative and short films exploring different facets of LGBT life and history. www.plgfs.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 19

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Pittsburgh offers cultural options from venerable Downtown presenters of classic art forms to genre-blurring storefront startups. The marquee spot belongs to the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust (412-456-6666). The nonprofit that remade Downtown’s red-light district into its Cultural District runs art galleries, hosts touring Broadway shows and stages quarterly gallery crawls, the annual Three Rivers Arts Festival and New Year’s Eve community bash First Night. But there’s plenty more going on around town.

museums+galleries THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM This seven-story venue honoring a native son was recently smartly overhauled. A chronology of Warhol’s life and work (including stuff he drew in college) complements temporary shows reflecting his legacy. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. 412-237-8300 CARNEGIE MUSEUMS OF ART AND NATURAL HISTORY Since 1896, these twin venues have offered visitors an array of classic and contemporary art, plus all the dinosaur bones, gemstones and interpretive displays they can handle. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER Works from antiquity through impressionism occupy marbleappointed galleries — a legacy of industrialist Henry Clay Frick, whose nearby preserved home is open for tours. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 MATTRESS FACTORY MUSEUM An internationally known museum

of installation art hosts work by cutting-edge artists from around the world. Permanent pieces include work by James Turrell. 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. 412-231-3169

PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS Occupying a former mansion, Pittsburgh’s largest space dedicated to local artists emphasizes contemporary work. Annual shows honor an artist and emerging artist of the year. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY The city’s top photographyonly gallery boasts documentary, abstract and experimental work by artists from around the world. 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1810 SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT Gallery and shop specializing in innovative takes on clay, wood, fiber and more. 2100 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-7003 SPACE GALLERY This spacious Pittsburgh Cultural Trust gallery spotlights often-funky work by local artists. 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7723 THE TOONSEUM The museum of cartoon art and its well-curated bookshop honors everything from the Sunday funnies to superheros, with geekfriendly special events. 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-232-0199 UNBLURRED This first-Friday-of-the-month crawl tours Penn Avenue’s burgeoning

gallery scene, with venues from the sleek Pittsburgh Glass Center to DIY spots like the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. 4100-5500 Penn Ave., Bloomfield/Garfield. www.pennavenue.org

WOOD STREET GALLERIES This sleek, two-floor Pittsburgh Cultural Trust venue shows off technologically enabled installations by international practitioners, from interactive works to wall-sized experimental videos. 601 Wood St., Downtown. 412-471-5605

performance ARCADE COMEDY THEATER This eclectic startup features standup, skits, improv, musical comedy, magic — you name it. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. www.arcadecomedytheater.com ATTACK THEATRE This long-running, internationally touring contemporary-dance troupe stages lively work and often collaborates with groups like Pittsburgh Opera. 2425 Liberty Ave., Strip District. www.attacktheatre.org CITY THEATRE The South Side institution occupies an old church but highlights new work by name and up-and-coming American playwrights. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. 412-431-2489

* in the wings Keep your eyes open for these worthy groups with limited performance dates Pittsburgh Dance Council (www.trustarts.org) hosts internationally known, cutting-edge troupes; Pittsburgh Opera (www.pittsburghopera.org) stages offerings from La Bohème to contemporary work; Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre (www.pbt.org) has classics, new work and the annual holiday Nutcracker; and Bricolage Productions (www.bricolage productions.org) features new plays, storytelling and immersive theater. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER This eclectic venue in newly resurgent East Liberty — named for native sons Gene Kelly and Billy Strayhorn — spotlights dance, with residencies by cutting-edge choreographers. The newMoves dance festival is a fall highlight. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-3000 NEW HAZLETT THEATER The popular performing-arts venue also programs new work, including its innovative Community Supported

Art subscription series for performance art. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. 412-320-4610

PITTSBURGH ARTS & LECTURES The Monday Night Lectures, at the Carnegie Music Hall, feature such authors as George Saunders and Anne Patchett. Special events include the popular annual Moth StorySlam. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-8866

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PICT CLASSIC Under new leadership, this stage troupe is hewing closer than ever to the time-tested, from Shakespeare to Waiting for Godot. 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 421-561-6000 THE PILLOW PROJECT Pearl Ann Porter’s small but inventive troupe stages hybrids of dance, visual art and multimedia in its funky, lounge-style Space Upstairs. 214 N. Lexington Ave., Point Breeze. www.pillowproject.org PITTSBURGH IMPROV In the Waterfront shopping district just outside town, this national franchise hosts touring standup acts like Pablo Francisco, Dan St. Germain and MoNique. 166 E. Bridge St., West Homestead. 412-462-5233 PITTSBURGH PLAYHOUSE Point Park University’s iconic theater houses three companies: the Playhouse Conservatory, with talent drawn from its top-notch drama school and a knack for musicals; its professional company, The REP, and the Conservatory Dance Company, with performers supplied by a highly ranked dance school. 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. 412-392-8000

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PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER The city’s largest independent theater company offers deluxe productions of blue-chip titles from Antigone to True West, and newer fare like Clybourne Park. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-316-1600 QUANTUM THEATRE Founded in 1990, Karla Boos’ company remains adventuresome: It stages everything from Shakespeare to world-premiere experimental works in a new venue every time, be it an empty swimming pool or vacant warehouse. www.quantumtheatre.org

film PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS The city’s top exhibitor of arthouse films and classics has three onescreen theaters: the old-school, neighborhood-style Regent Square Theater; Downtown’s Harris Theater; and the Melwood Screening Room. In November, watch for the Three Rivers Film Festival. 412-682-4111

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THE SMILING MOOSE While this South Side venue is a bar and restaurant, the upstairs hosts shows that are usually all-ages. An early-evening pop-punk show might give way to a late-night hip-hop revue. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-4668

Your guide to the Pittsburgh music scene

Today’s Pittsburgh music landscape is bigger — and more varied — than it has been in years. Everything from small DIY shows to big arena concerts can be accommodated, and music appears in plenty of unique spots along the spectrum in between.

big rooms ALTAR BAR This old church — originally converted into a dance club, and now serving as a live venue — has a lineup that’s all over the board, from emo to hip hop. Don’t be surprised to see a line of teenagers stretching down the sidewalk. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-263-2877 MR. SMALL’S THEATRE Another old church(!), Mr. Small’s is in Millvale, just across the river from Lawrenceville. It’s one of the older venues in town, having opened more than a decade ago. Indie rock is common here, as are sell-out crowds. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. 412-821-4447 REX THEATER A former movie theater, the Rex hosts jam bands, electronic producers, DJs and rock bands in equal measure. If you can take Carson Street on a weekend night, there’s bound to be something worthwhile going on here. 1602 E. Carson St,. South Side. 412-381-6811 STAGE AE Built to accommodate various capacities in its different configurations (including an outdoor amphitheater), this relative newcomer on the North Side has become a favorite venue for mid-sized draws, from Mac Miller to Brian Wilson. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. 412-229-5483

bars+clubs 31ST STREET PUB One of the last truly gritty rock clubs in town. It’s mostly punk, metal and bar rock here; some big national names come through. 3101 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-391-8334 ANDYS WINE BAR What seems from the outset like a

22 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

outdoors Local rock band The Cynics at Mr. Small’s Theatre / PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDY JOHANSON

regular hotel bar also happens to be a home for local jazz. The focus is generally on vocalists, but in Pittsburgh, every good vocalist is backed up by a fabulous instrumental combo. 510 Market St., Downtown. 412-773-8884

BRILLOBOX The place for hip local shows, touring indie acts on the rise and interesting DJ nights, from world music to queer dance parties. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-4900

* vinyl destinations Pittsburgh is known around the country for its record stores; a few are definite must-sees for music enthusiasts. Jerry’s Records (2136 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-421-4533) is everyone’s first stop; there always seems to be another room of crates. The Attic Record Store (513 Grant Ave., Millvale. 412-821-8484) is similar in size and scope, and stocks new records too. And for vinyl plus — and by that we mean coffee, clothes and more — try 720 Music, Clothing and Cafe (4405 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592), with possibly the city’s best hip-hop stock, but plenty for all tastes. CATTIVO What looks (except for the sign out front) like another house in central Lawrenceville gives way to a massive basement show space when you head inside. Long known for local music and drag shows, Cattivo recently started hosting national-level acts. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157 CLUB CAFÉ The classic cocktail-lounge setup here lends itself well to

intimate singer-songwriter shows and jazz jams; the Mondaynight AcoustiCafe open-mic is renowned. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-431-4950

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB AND SPEAKEASY People just call this place “James Street,” in part because it retains the cachet it originally earned as a jazz club called James Street Tavern. Luminaries young and old can be found here several nights a week. 422 Foreland St., North Side. 412-904-3335 PITTSBURGH WINERY The winery opened in 2012 and started hosting live music a year later. Now artists with a national profile stop by regularly for a show amongst the casks of zinfandel. 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-1000 THUNDERBIRD CAFÉ A bar with three floors, Thunderbird allows for different levels of engagement — from the fan who has to be right up front to the barfly who wants to watch on closed-circuit TV. Local and touring acts share the stage here. 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177

all ages GARFIELD ARTWORKS Everything from drone to indie rock and ska finds a home in this gallery, more known for its music than for the art on display. A fixture of the Penn Avenue arts corridor, it’s a unique must-visit for music aficionados. 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-361-2262 MR. ROBOTO PROJECT The long-running punk-andmore room is a good place to find bands that might be playing much bigger spaces in a few years — and to find out what the collegeradio crowd is into these days.

ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS Both Hartwood Acres (Middle Road, Hampton Township) and South Park (Corrigan Drive, South Park) host weekly concerts throughout the warmer months. Recent performers have included Bruce Hornsby, Sharon Jones and Langhorne Slim. www.alleghenycounty.us FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION Old-timers still call it Star Lake; this is the out-of-the-city space that’s hosted summer shows for decades. Think Tom Petty, Dave Matthews, Wiz Khalifa and Warped Tour. 665 Route 18, Burgettstown. 724-947-7400

classical+ new music ALIA MUSICA Founded by Federico Garcia, Alia Musica concentrates on performances of local composers, but is establishing itself as a prime presenter of contemporary works by out-of-towners too. www.alia-musica.org CHATHAM BAROQUE A quartet that specializes in music of the Baroque era and plays on period instruments, Chatham has established a reputation well outside of Pittsburgh. But it still plays intimate shows here in its home city. www.chathambaroque.org PITTSBURGH NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE The PNME sets up each year at the South Side’s City Theatre, during the theater’s off-season. Featuring new compositions from local and non-local composers, its summer season always has a few surprises. www.pnme.org PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The biggest game in town when it comes to classical, the PSO does everything from the expected classical repertoire to works by new-music composers and pops shows, with touring artists like Ben Folds. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-391-4900

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home games Your ticket to the city’s top action in sports Pittsburgh is known for a lot of things — bridges, Mr. Rogers, odd driving habits — but it’s probably best known for its sports. The Steel City is home to six Super Bowl wins, five World Series titles, three Stanley Cups and nine NCAA football championships. And those marquee sports are just the beginning.

HIGHMARK SPORTS WORKS Part of the Carnegie Science Center, Sports Works offers 30 interactive exhibits to help visitors learn about the science behind their favorite sports. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. 412-237-3400 PITTSBURGH STEELERS You won’t be able to walk up to the ticket booth on game day to buy a ticket, but enterprising souls can source a couple. And from April 1 through Oct. 31, you can take also tour Heinz Field and its collection of sports memorabilia. 100 Art Rooney Ave., North Side. 412-697-7700 or www.steelers.com PITTSBURGH PIRATES After 20 years of praying for mediocrity, the city’s baseball club is … respectable. Tickets are available in advance for most home games, and tickets can usually be purchased on game day on site. 115 Federal St., North Side. 412-321-2827 or www.pirates.com

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PITTSBURGH PENGUINS After a couple of disappointing postseason appearances, the Pens will be back in 2014 with a new coach and general manager, but the same quest: Bring a Stanley Cup to the Consol Energy Center. 1001 Fifth Ave, Uptown. 412-642-1800 or www.pittsburghpenguins.com PITTSBURGH PASSION This women’s professional football team is co-owned by former Steelers great Franco Harris; the

Passion plays from April to July at George Cupples Stadium. 930 E. Carson St., South Side. www.pittsburghpassion.com

PITTSBURGH RIVERHOUNDS This professional soccer team’s stadium, adjoining the Station Square shopping complex, has one of the best views in the city, and a fun-loving crowd. Highmark Stadium, 510 Station Square Drive, South Side. www.riverhounds.com PITTSBURGH POWER Founded in 2011 by an ownership group that includes former Steelers receiver Lynn Swann, the city’s Arena Football League team plays at the Consol Energy Center between late March and early September. 1001 Fifth Ave, Uptown. www.pittsburghpowerfootball.com STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY Competitive professional roller derby, led by the renowned Steel Hurtin’, is in season from January to August, with regular bouts at the Romp N’ Roll in the northern ’burbs. 1661 E. Sutter Road, Glenshaw. 412-4864117 or www.steelcityrollerderby.org UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH PANTHERS Everyone knows about the Panthers football and basketball teams, but the university offers a wide array of collegiate sports year round. For schedules, tickets and information: www.pittsburghpanthers.com WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA SPORTS MUSEUM An essential stop for any fan of the city’s sports history, the museum is part of the Heinz History Center. You’ll gain a deeper appreciation of Pittsburgh’s impact on the world of sports — and vice versa. 1212 Smallman St, Strip District. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

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Through September 21

Three Rivers Heritage Trail on the South Side / PHOTO BY DAVID KELLY

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Sun-Thurs 11 -10 • Fri-Sat 11 -11PM

412-421-9579 • 412-421-2238 Reservation • Take-Out • Free Delivery • Catering • BYOB Service Available 26 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

BIKE PITTSBURGH The city’s cycling-advocacy group offers maps of bike-safe routes, a calendar of cycling events, and other services — while sponsoring the annual BikeFest festival, taking place this year Aug. 8-24. 412-325-4334 or www.bikepgh.org EMERALD VIEW PARK The newest of the city’s five regional parks combines several smaller parks into a nearly complete circle around the neighborhood of Mount Washington. All told, it includes 257 acres and more than 10 miles of trails. 412-481-3220 or www.mwcdc.org/emerald-view-park FRICK PARK At 644 acres sprawling across the East End, this is the largest of the city’s parks. Attractions include Pennsylvania’s only public lawn-bowling green, a 151-acre nature preserve and Clayton Hill, where 100 species of birds have been documented. www.pittsburghparks.org GOLDEN TRIANGLE BIKE RENTAL This bike shop is located on the periphery of Downtown, just steps from the city’s Eliza Furnace “jail trail”: It offers bike rentals for cyclists looking to hit the streets. 600 First Ave., 412-600-0675 HIGHLAND PARK Visitors to this facility in the neighborhood of, well, Highland Park are welcomed by an entry garden with a fountain and reflecting pool. The park also includes Lake Carnegie, a babbling brook, seasonal pools and an open-water reservoir. www.pittsburghparks.org

KAYAK PITTSBURGH Traverse the city’s three rivers with the help of this kayak-rental outfit: Rentals are available along the Allegheny River right beside PNC Park under the Roberto Clemente Bridge. 412-969-9090 RIVERVIEW PARK This North Side park is known for its dense wooded trails, steep hillsides and winding Wissahickon Creek. It also contains the historic Allegheny Observatory, where occasional tours are available. 1 Riverview Ave., 412-255-2370 SCHENLEY PARK The site of the landmark Flagstaff Hill, this Oakland park contains playgrounds, a pool and ice-skating rink, three meadows of wildflowers and Panther Hollow Valley, where several streams empty into Panther Hollow Lake. 101 Panther Hollow Road, 412-687-1800 THREE RIVERS HERITAGE TRAIL A 24-mile, paved multi-use riverfront trail system that connects Downtown to trails along all three of the city’s rivers. www.friendsoftheriverfront.org VENTURE OUTDOORS This is a one-stop shop for guided outdoor activities. From hiking to boating, this nonprofit organization has options for beginners and novices alike. Summer activities include backpacking, urban hiking and cycling; winter affords opportunities for cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and other sports. As a bonus, some offerings also feature food pairings. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.com

28 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER PITTSBURGH PIT P IIT TTS TSB T SSB BUR URG U R RG GH HC CITY IITY IT TY T YP PA PAPER APER AP PER ER CITY CIT CIT TY GUIDE GU UIIID UID DE 2014 20 2 01 14 4 29 29

PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

“A lot of people

have lived here most of their lives, which is awesome. You can sit on your porch, and it’s real chill, with kids riding their bikes everywhere. Garfield is also a southfacing slope, so it’s always sunny.” Nina Marie Barbuto Garfield resident and “architect-turnededucator-instigator” who runs Assemble

30 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

bloomfield, friendship+garfield BLOOMFIELD, FRIENDSHIP and Garfield are a cluster of East End neighbor-

hoods that were formerly home to (predominantly Italian) immigrant communities. They’re each in various stages of shaking off the workingclass dust of the 20th century: Sushi spots are replacing cobblers, while yoga studios and pop-up art galleries move into vacant storefronts. Between the close-knit rowhouses of Bloomfield and the hillside family homes and urban farms of Garfield are the large detached Victorian homes of Friendship, rich with period details like wide porches and turrets. The area is defined by two main corridors: Liberty Avenue — which runs through the heart of Bloomfield and provides plenty of retail and dining opportunities — and Penn Avenue, the newly dubbed “Arts Corridor,” which traverses all three communities. As befits one of the city’s relatively flat areas, you’ll find many residents on foot or on bike, from crusty punks to architects, from multi-generational families to foreign-born graduate students.

Unblurred / PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

music A selection of small venues lets the discerning music-head get up close to on-the-rise local bands, national touring acts and performers of various experimental and edgy stripes.

GARFIELD ARTWORKS Cutting-edge, fascinating fringe. 4931 Penn Ave., 412-361-2262 HOWLERS From alt-country to ancient rockers, and plenty in between. 4509 Liberty Ave., 412-682-0320 THE ROBOTO PROJECT Mostly punk and hardcore. 5106 Penn Ave., www.therobotoproject.org THE SHOP All-ages, avant-garde indie. 4312 Main St., www.theshoppittsburgh.com

bars+clubs ARMAND’S BAR A perennial argument in Pittsburgh revolves around the “best fish sandwich.” (Hint: size matters.) A frequent contender can be found here, at an otherwise dark and smoky neighborhood bar. 4755 Liberty Ave., 412-681-3967 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN Pittsburgh’s self-described “Polish party” spot. Bar food resembles pierogies, there’s occasional live music, and the outdoor patio overlooks an amusingly complicated intersection. 4412 Liberty Ave., 412-682-8611 BRILLOBOX A rare treat: a hip bar that doesn’t feel too ridiculously hip, especially early in the evening. Decent bar

* don’t miss ...

Unblurred is a monthly arts-and-performance event held along Penn Avenue on the first Friday of every month. Expect fresh work from up-and-coming artists, with much stuff spanning the art-music-performanceeducation-retail divide. www.pennavenue.org

food — with veggie options — and occasional live music and special events upstairs. 4104 Penn Ave., 412-621-4900

CRAZY MOCHA If you prefer your café latte with local color, head for this coffee shop. The Bloomfield outpost of this local chain offers plenty of characters; outside is liveliest, with people and dogs expressing opinions. 4525 Liberty Ave., 412-681-5225 NICO’S RECOVERY ROOM So named for its proximity to hospitals, the raucous Saturdaynight karaoke may be the only cure you need. 178 Pearl St., 412-681-9562 THE SHARP EDGE EMPORIUM A neighborhood bar turned Belgian-beer-headquarters; plenty of other brews on tap and in bottle. Add thin-crust pizza and you’re set. 302 S. St. Clair St., 412-661-3537

restaurants +markets FUKUDA Inventive and modern Japanese fare, exquisitely prepared. Late-night hours on weekends. 4770 Liberty Ave., 412-377-0916

Dine with us outdoors this summer. Try our new craft cocktails. “Vallozzi’s fresh mozzarella bar deserves to become a classic in its own time” – Pittsburgh City Paper 220 5th Avenue, Pittsburgh vallozzispittsburgh.com For Reservations: 412.394.3400 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 31

Check out the newly renovated

Friendship Park / PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

SALT OF THE EARTH Now under the direction of chef Chad Townsend, this casual, fine-dining restaurant offers seasonal fare; the menu is never the same twice. Expect crazy food combinations, hand-crafted cocktails and a good time. 5532 Penn Ave., 412-441-7258 SPAK BROTHERS A vividly painted hole-in-the-wall that serves take-out (hoagies, pizza, wings) for the food-conscious, with veggie and vegan options alongside traditional preparations. 5107 Penn Ave., 412-362-7725

COME TO DRINK, STAY TO EAT!

32 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER Nationally renowned space for art glass, with classes and exhibitions. 5472 Penn Ave., 412-365-2145

shopping

*

arts+culture

TONICPITTSBURGH.COM

ASSEMBLE A community workshop space for arts and technology, with monthly shows, with a focus on educating youth. 5125 Penn Ave., 412-432-9127

THE BIG IDEA COOPERATIVE TESSARO’S BOOKSTORE AND CAFE A gorgeously preserved old corner Worker-owned, this friendly shop tavern serves Pittsburgh’s has that Noam Chomsky book favorite hamburger — no you’re missing. Also: post-modern used books, zines and frills, just big community info. and juicy. 4812 Liberty Ave., 4601 Liberty 412-687-4323 good to know Ave., 412Good news: Penn Avenue 682-6809 GROCERIA is getting a major rehab, ITALIANA VERDE Just off Liberty and when completed Sometimes Avenue, food will have new trees, bike you just like your Italian amenities, sidewalks and need nana made: so on. Bad news: Road tequila. ravioli, cannoli, construction is More than ready-to-use happening now. 200 varieties of sauces. 237 tequila and Cedarville St., mescal can be 412-681-1227 found at this SOUND CAT contemporary Mexican-ish Your stop for new vinyl and restaurant that also boasts expertly curated selection of rock, a popular outdoor patio. jazz and indie CDs. 4526 Liberty 5491 Penn Ave., 412-404-8487 or Ave., 412-621-3256 www.verdepgh.com VOLUTO This light, airy coffee shop attracts plenty of laptopppers, but outside seating lets customers interact with the non-virtual world, too. Monthly “Pie Fridays.” 5467 Penn Ave., 412-661-3000

971 LIBERTY AVENUE • DOWNTOWN • (412) 456-0460

performance. 5530 Penn Ave., 412-363-4321

THE ALLOY STUDIOS Learn to dance, or check out a

parks+recreation FRIENDSHIP PARK According to the signs, this is a “passive park,” but neighbors have interpreted that to include impromptu swap meets, discand other-object-tossing and even snowball fights. Or, you can just sit quietly. Friendship Avenue, between Gross and Edmond streets

PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL

“What makes our Downtown special is the marriage between the arts and business. You can go, see a show, hear live music and enjoy the visual arts and then go to any number of wonderful restaurants and bars and taste fine food. There’s no place like it.” Eric A. Smith

Hill District resident and managing director of Downtown-based Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co.

34 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

downtown TODAY, PITTSBURGHERS think of Downtown as a business nexus and cultural center. But it was once the city’s first neighborhood — site of its earliest settlements — and a new generation of pioneers are now homesteading in high-priced lofts. In between, Downtown has been remade many times over — sometimes by fire and flood, other times by urban-renewal efforts. More recently, there was a seedier era when “going to the theater” Downtown meant you needed a pocket full of quarters and a can of Lysol. But that’s changed thanks to the establishment of the city’s Cultural District — which houses the area’s landmark performing-arts institutions — and a vibrant dining scene. Gone are the days when the best part of Downtown Pittsburgh was viewing its majestic skyline from some other part of the city: Being Downtown no longer means dwelling in the shadows of skyscrapers.

arts+culture

the combination of flavors and toppings is scary good. 5 Market Square, 412-434-5600

Really, there are too many attractions to list: Downtown’s Cultural District (www.culturaldistrict.org) hosts a number of theaters for music and live performance, and smaller/edgier performance troupes and galleries have grown up alongside them. But among the offerings are:

bars+clubs BUTCHER AND THE RYE We’d tell you about this place’s awesome food, but the bar — which boasts top-flight staff and top-shelf liquor — is clearly the star here. 212 Sixth St., 412-391-2752

ARCADE COMEDY THEATER These upstarts host standup and improv comedy every week, including a monthly event dedicated to fantasy roleplaying games. 811 Liberty Ave., 412-339-0608

LITTLE E’S JAZZ CLUB Pittsburgh’s jazz legacy lives on here, where jazz greats like Sean Jones play on a regular basis. 949 Liberty Ave., 412-392-2217 SHARP EDGE BISTRO 922 PENN It’s hard to top the beer selection, which includes domestic crafts and a wide array of imports, including nearly 20 Belgians on tap. 922 Penn Ave., 412-338-2437

HARRIS THEATER Downtown’s only movie theater screens independent and art films programmed by Pittsburgh Filmmakers. 809 Liberty Ave., 412-471-9702

parks+recreation

PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATRE COMPANY Intimate productions of local playwrights are the highlight of this company founded by award-winning writer and director Mark Clayton Southers. 937 Liberty Ave., www.pghplaywrights.com Point State Park / PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Established in 1896, the city’s symphony is the grande dame of the city’s arts scene. Performances take place at historic Heinz Hall, a handsomely restored movie palace. 600 Penn Ave., 412-392-4900

TOONSEUM A unique museum dedicated to comics and cartoon art, highlighting the best local and national artists in this medium. 945 Liberty Ave., 412232-0199

* while you’re here ... and soups with fresh, locally sourced ingredients. 221 Forbes Ave, 412-642-4414

GRIT & GRACE Small plates allow you to experiment as much as this eclectic restaurant’s decorator fun fact and kitchen, For reasons anthropologists which brings don’t fully understand, the unexpected animal-costume enthusiasts ingredients known as “Furries” converge to dim sum on the David L. Lawrence and other Convention Center each dishes. 535 Liberty Ave., July for Anthrocon 412-281-4748 (www.anthrocon.org),

*

the fandom’s largest annual gathering.

SPACE This free visual-arts gallery is a prime spot to discover young, emerging local artists in a variety of media. 812 Liberty Avenue, 412-325-7723

restaurants +markets BLUEBIRD KITCHEN Open for breakfast and lunch only, the menu at this spot focuses on seasonal salads, sandwiches

To get a sense of the city, take a Just Ducky Tour (412-402DUCK), whose amphibious vehicles tour not only Downtown landmarks but also the city’s famed waterways. Tours begin at Station Square, across the distinctive Smithfield Street Bridge from Downtown proper.

* don’t miss ...

The Three Rivers Arts Festival (www.3riversartsfest.org) is held all over Downtown each June; June also boasts the city’s Pittsburgh Pride event. The Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta is held over the July 4 holiday, at Point State Park.

MEAT AND POTATOES It’s tough to pick just one dish at this upscale take on restaurant staples; the menu features such fare as pork-belly tacos and Waygu flat-iron steak. 649 Penn Ave., 412-325-7007

in this intimate setting are so fresh you’d swear they were pulled out of the water that morning. 308 Forbes Ave., 412-562-1710

THE ORIGINAL OYSTER HOUSE This venerable Downtown landmark still serves classic seafood, from fried fish to clam chowder. 20 Market Square, 412-566-7925

SEVICHE A Latin American-style tapas joint/ bar that blends Peruvian and Asian flavors in inventive dishes. 930 Penn Ave., 412-697-3120.

PENN AVENUE FISH COMPANY The fish entrees and sushi served

WINGHART’S BURGERS The meat is ground fresh daily and

KATZ PLAZA This park in the heart of the Cultural District is funky, cool and includes a bronze fountain and large benches that look like human eyes, designed by artist Louise Bourgeois. Corner of Seventh Street and Penn Avenue POINT STATE PARK The city’s front lawn, where the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers join to form the Ohio, is the one Pittsburgh green space that everyone knows about — even if they don’t live here. The Fort Pitt Museum, operated by the folks at the Heinz History Center, is worth a visit, along with the accompanying Fort Pitt blockhouse — the city’s oldest still-standing structure. 101 Commonwealth Place

shopping AMAZING BOOKS A sprawling collection of used books; the perfect lunchtime getaway for Downtown bibliophiles. 929 Liberty Ave., 412-471-1899 SINFUL SWEETS CHOCOLATE COMPANY This decadent sweet shop offers chocolate in many forms, from truffles and cake pops to chocolate-covered bacon. 901 Penn Ave. 412-235-7865 SPORTS WORLD SPECIALTIES This is the City of Champions: Why not go home with a bit of sports memorabilia? 645 Smithfield St., 412-232-3343

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 35

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ALL AGES “ACTIVE FUN” FAMILY CENTER ULTIMATE 3D PLAY EXPERIENCE SKYMANIA (Ages 10-15) FRIDAY NIGHTS 9PM-10:30PM SKYJAM (AGES 16+) SATURDAY NIGHTS 10PM-11:30PM TODDLER TIME (AGES WALKING T0 5) FRIDAYS 10AM-11AM

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PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

“Shadyside still has that bohemian feel, and it’s still very residential. It has maintained a high standard, and is still sort of affordable. ... It’s a very open neighborhood, which I love. That’s why I’m very comfortable here.” Richard Parsakian owner, Eons

38 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

east liberty + shadyside ALTHOUGH THESE two neighborhoods are separated by little more than a

rail line and adjoining busway, 15 years ago, few would have imagined putting them on the same page — or even the same map. East Liberty’s Penn Circle business district was hollowed out by white flight and illadvised city planning. Meanwhile Shadyside, once a hippie enclave, was a bastion of affluence, with not one but two tony retail areas: chain-friendly Walnut Street and funkier Ellsworth Avenue, a few blocks away. But when it comes to the area’s business districts, at least, the strongest difference between East Liberty and Shadyside these days may be that people in the former worry it’s becoming too much like the latter. And if you’re looking for a leisurely dinner out, a vintage dress or an organic cantaloupe, this section of the East End will provide. Walnut Street’s mix of fancy chains and locally owned businesses makes it a welcome alternative to suburban malls. East Liberty’s Whole Foods and Target similarly sit along-side independent stores, coffee shops and restaurants.

Kelly’s Lounge / PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

bars+clubs 5801 VIDEO LOUNGE Stop by this LGBT spot for the drinks and the scene. Stay for the roomy patio and Katy Perry videos. 5801 Ellsworth Ave., 412-661-5600 HARRIS GRILL This old favorite boasts an aboveaverage pub-grub menu and an impressive cocktail menu. And on a nice evening, the front patio is reason enough to pay a visit. 5747 Ellsworth Ave., 412-362-5273 HARVARD & HIGHLAND Located above barbeque specialist Union Pig and Chicken, this hip-but-cozy cocktail bar offers a chance to indulge in some seriously creative mixology. 220 N. Highland Ave., 412-363-7675 KELLY’S LOUNGE This hip spot is known for its vintage cocktail menu — try the Rusty Nail — but it’s also worth stopping by for a shot-and-a-beer and some of the best mac-andcheese in town. 6012 Centre Ave., 412-363-6012 LE MARDI GRAS This hole-in-the-wall feels like a well-kept secret. Perfect for quiet day-drinking or late-night socializing, it’s the details, like the fresh-squeezed orange juice, that make this place special. 731 Copeland St., 412-683-0912

restaurants +markets BRGR A casual restaurant that revisits America’s contribution to global cuisine with gourmet toppings, along with traditional or spiked milkshakes. 5997 Centre Ave., 412-362-2333 NOODLEHEAD The menu at this laid-back Thai

spot is minimalist, but every item is a winner. 242 S. Highland Ave., www.noodleheadpgh.com

PARIS 66 BISTRO This small, Parisian-café style spot features down-to-earth French fare like crepes, croques and salads. 6018 Centre Ave. 412-404-8166 PRANTL’S Earlier this year, the Huffington Post declared this bakery’s burnt almond torte “the greatest cake America has ever made,” and who are we to disagree? 5525 Walnut St., 412-621-2092

* while you’re here ...

Try to catch Weather Permitting, the family-friendly Sunday outdoor concert series held all summer long at Shadyside Nursery (510 Maryland Ave., weather permittingpgh.com). Food trucks, local beer and activities like giant squirt-gun fights are part of the fun. SOBA/UMI These restaurants share the same building and ownership. Umi offers Japanese cuisine — the sushi menu is particularly impressive — while Soba’s focus is on modern pan-Asian fusion. 5847-9 Ellsworth Ave., 412-362-5656/412-362-6198 STATION STREET This re-opened and re-imagined vintage hot-dog shop offers tradition and adventure: The banh mi dog and Cubano dog are among the more unusual offerings. 6290 Broad St., 412-365-2121 TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE This welcoming, spacious spot offers a wide selection of entrees for meat-eaters and

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 39

HPV is an anti-cancer vaccine for tweens and teens. It’s Safe - Eective - Recommended.

Station Street / PHOTO BY DAVID KELLY

vegetarians alike, as well as a variety of Ethiopian beers and tej (honey wine). 5929 Baum Blvd, 412-665-2770

shopping Talk with your child’s health care provider.

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EONS This vintage shop really has been around for eons — well, decades, anyway. Make sure you have time to browse this treasure trove: You never know what you might find. (Bonus: For more vintage options, head up the street to Hey Betty). 5850 Ellsworth Ave, 412-361-3368. KARDS UNLIMITED In addition to a mind-boggling selection of greeting cards, this charming shop offers an array of novelty gifts, toys, books and much more. 5522 Walnut St., 412-622-0500 MODA Gentlemen, expect to look spiffier after a trip to Moda, which specializes in designer clothing and attentive service. 5401 Walnut St., 412-681-8640

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40 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

SMILEY’S PET PAD Thanks to friendly, personalized service (and the fact that you may be greeted at the door by a store cat), this mom-and-pop pet shop has remained a neighborhood favorite for decades. Offering a range of premium foods, toys and other pet paraphernalia. 215 S. Highland Ave., 412-362-7556 TIME BOMB SHOP This trend-setting clothing store — which has long had ties to the local art and hip-hop scenes — is the place to shop for urban fashion. 200 S. Highland Ave., 412-661-2233

arts+culture GALLERY 4 Operating under the philosophy, “Fine art should be within the reach

of everyone,� this gallery reliably offers hip, thought-provoking exhibitions. 206 S. Highland Ave., 412-363-5050

KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER This former movie house has become a cultural and community hub, hosting events ranging from dance and theater to musical and educational programs, as well as several artist-residency programs. 5941 Penn Ave., 412-363-3000

* don’t miss ... Saturday mornings between 5 a.m. and noon, catch the Farmers’ Market Cooperative of East Liberty: This indoor venue (344 North Sheridan Ave., 412-661-4414) is open year-round and boasts of being one of the city’s few wintertime suppliers of locally grown meat and produce.

MORGAN GLASS GALLERY From sculpture to jewelry to mixed media, the focus here is glass. Its annual Teapots! Invitational, in particular, is not to be missed. 5833 Ellsworth Ave., 412-441-5200 SHADYSIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH This historic church is home to the Music in a Great Space concert series, which features touring musicians and traditional seasonal concerts. 5121 Westminster Place, 412-682-4300 STEEL CITY IMPROV THEATER Whether you’re itching to get onstage yourself, or would rather leave comedy to the professionals, there’s always something happening at SCIT. 5950 Ellsworth Ave., 412-404-2695

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PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

“I think that’s what makes our neighborhood so great: that diverse mix of old and new. They’re welcoming and inclusive and allow me to take part, even though I wasn’t born and raised here.” Dora Walmsley

eight-year resident and co-owner of 52nd Street Market with

Deirdre Kane

lifelong Lawrenceville resident (www.52ndstreetmarket.com)

42 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

lawrenceville NAMED AFTER THE naval hero whose dying words were “Don’t give

up the ship!” Lawrenceville has a lot of history. Established by the father of folk composer Stephen Foster, this onetime industrial center was the birthplace of corporations including Westinghouse and Alcoa. It was also site of a massive explosion at a Civil War armory in which 79 people died. But in many ways, Lawrenceville is emblematic of the “new Pittsburgh”: On Butler Street, hip new boutiques, bars and restaurants sit alongside old-school favorites like a shoe store that’s served four generations. Rents and property values have jumped in recent years, while citizens’ groups try to maintain a neighborhood vibe even as the area becomes a nightlife destination. Along the banks of the Allegheny River, old mills and warehouses now turn out products as diverse as robots and log homes.

bars+clubs

music

ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER Yes, it’s wine, but it’s not too stuffy — you can enjoy your vino here without worrying about impressing anyone with your knowledge of its nose, unless you want to. 5324 Butler St., 412-252-2337

720 MUSIC, CLOTHING AND CAFÉ After stops in a few other neighborhoods, 720 has found a home in Lawrenceville, catering to music-lovers, vintage fashionistas and coffee-drinkers alike, and hosting live music. 4405 Butler St., 412-904-4592

HAMBONE’S The essential, no-frills Lawrenceville bar: a decent menu, cheap drinks, and entertainment most nights. 4207 Butler St., 412-681-4318

THUNDERBIRD CAFÉ Lawrenceville’s main music spot, Thunderbird has live bands most nights, from local jazz jams to big national names. 4023 Butler St., 412-682-0177

NEW AMSTERDAM One of the earliest “hip” spots on the block, New Am caters to a diverse crowd with everything from DJ nights to sports on the big screen. 4421 Butler St., 412-904-2915

BELVEDERE’S Pool tables! Roller-skating nights! Kombucha on draft! Hipsters and townies mingling together! Mass hysteria! 4016 Butler St., 412-687-2555

NIED’S HOTEL A decades-old neighborhood institution, with a famous fish sandwich and an outdoor “amphitheater” for music — mostly country and rock — in summer. 5438 Butler St., 412-781-9853

arts+culture BE GALLERIES Art exhibits that often, though not always, focus on local interests, plus a collection of Japanese prints. 3583 Butler St., 412-687-2606 GALLERY ON 43RD STREET Nestled between houses, this gallery mainly shows work by local artists, in a relaxed but professional atmosphere. 187 43rd St., 412-683-6488

ROUND CORNER CANTINA Round Corner’s distinctions include its patio space, satisfying small plates, big-name touring DJs and its sheer popularity. 3720 Butler St., 412-904-2279 TENDER BAR + KITCHEN You can get a few craft beers or ciders on tap, but cocktails are king at Tender, an old bank turned speakeasy-style bar. 4300 Butler St., 412-402-9522

restaurants +markets 52ND STREET MARKET This new market is up the hill from the main Butler Street drag, but supplies Lawrenceville with food staples, plus a small café area with sandwiches and soft pretzels. 601 52nd St., 412-408-3798 BUTCHER ON BUTLER The recently opened Butcher on Butler has everything from flavored bacon to pig’s ears for the dog, plus daily lunch specials. 5245 Butler St., 412-781-2157 CHURCH BREW WORKS This microbrewery — which occupies a desanctified Catholic sanctuary — opened in 1996. There are always plenty of brews to choose from, plus good eats. 3525 Penn Ave., 412-688-8200

720 Records / PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

FRANKTUARY Fancy hot dogs and fancier cocktails are the draw here; trivia night, crossword competitions and more dot the calendar. 3810 Butler St., 412-586-7224 LA GOURMANDINE This French bakery has been a sweet (and savory) local staple since 2010; get your fix of the cookie

* while you’re here ... Stroll through Allegheny Cemetery (entrance at 4700 block of Butler) or take your pooch to the Bernard Dog Run (riverfront trail near 40 th Street Bridge)

Pick up a growler at Roundabout Brewery (4901 Butler St.), Hop Farm Brewing Co. (5601 Butler St.) or Arsenal Cider House (300 39 th St.) Relax out front at Espresso a Mano (3623 Butler St.), the neighborhood’s most notable coffeeshop.

of the moment, the macaron. 4605 Butler St., 412-682-2210

PICCOLO FORNO The elder statesman of Lawrenceville’s upscale-Italian scene. (Also recommended: the newer Matteo’s, just a block-anda-half down the street.) 3801 Butler St., 412622-0111

shopping BACKSTAGE GUITARS This five-year-old music store specializes in guitars but has equipment for all manner of neighborhood musicians, plus lessons and gear rental. 4123 Butler St., 412-235-7765

* don’t miss ...

HOUSE OF THE DEAD You knew there was one somewhere in Pittsburgh: a store devoted to zombie stuff. It even has a deli counter that serves brains! Just kidding. 4110 Butler St., 412-687-0510

Art All Night, the free event that lives up to its name, takes place in a warehouse space in Lawrenceville each April. Anyone can exhibit and sell, making it a populist classic.

PUSADEE’S GARDEN Lawrenceville’s only Thai restaurant also happens to be one of Lawrenceville’s nicest outdoordining spots. 5321 Butler St., 412-781-8724 TAMARI Latin-Asian fusion that helped put Lawrenceville on the culinary map in Pittsburgh when it opened five years ago. 3519 Butler St., 412-325-3435

JULES The newest of several Butler Street boutiques specializing in duds for stylish women. 4502 Butler St., 412-687-2000 WILDCARD Gifts, cards and local-interest stuff cover the shelves and walls of this destination for crafty types. 4209 Butler St., 412-224-2651

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 43

PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL

“There’s restaurants in the neighborhood, and then there’s the museums. And of course there’s a lot of artists of all sorts on the North Side. … It’s just like a cosmopolitan area in a small unit.” Thaddeus Mosley sculptor and longtime resident

44 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

north side THE NORTH SIDE was once its own municipality: Allegheny City, home

to such luminaries as Stephen Foster, Mary Cassatt and a young Andrew Carnegie. Its neighborhoods ranged from swanky Millionaires’ Row to tough immigrant streets. To the abiding consternation of some, Pittsburgh annexed Allegheny City in 1907. But even bigger changes arrived starting in the 1960s, with “urban-renewal” projects like the ill-fated Allegheny Center Mall, and the 1980s highway construction that leveled huge swaths of this sprawling collection of neighborhoods. Today, many visitors define the North Side by the so-called North Shore: the vast, parking-lot-strewn stretch of riverfront turf boasting sports stadiums (PNC Park, home to Major League Baseball’s Pirates, and Heinz Field, where the Steelers play), the Rivers Casino and more. But beyond that, much of the community’s old diversity and texture remains — in places like the Mexican War Streets, with their densely built, handsomely remodeled 19th-century houses — with a growing array of contemporary touches.

NON HOME GAME SATURDAYS

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ALL DAY! Pittsburgh Children’s Museum / PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL

bars+clubs BEER MARKET No-frills joint near PNC Park lets you bring in food to complement the hundreds of craft beers and imports in bottles and on tap. 110 Federal St., 412-322-2337 MONTEREY PUB Irish-themed neighborhood hang has a clubby, mahoganybooth vibe, and a tasty menu. 1227 Monterey St., 412-322-6535 THE PARK HOUSE This tavern, one of Pittsburgh’s oldest, is a favorite for its beer selection and free popcorn and peanuts; it’s frequented by both stadium-goers and theater folk, and has live bluegrass on Wednesdays and local bands on the weekends. 403 E. Ohio St., 412-224-2273, www.parkhousepgh.com PENN BREWERY This microbrewery inhabits a landmark 19th-century brewery; its German-style specialties, like the flagship Penn Pilsner, go great with the menu’s wurst and schnitzel. 800 Vinial St., 412-237-9400

restaurants BENJAMIN’S WESTERN AVENUE BURGER BAR Custom-blended specialty burgers (like rosemary-balsamic goat cheese and green apple) plus craft cocktails. 900 Western Ave., 412-224-2163. BISTRO TO GO Cozy spot known for its soul food and Sunday breakfast buffet. 415 E. Ohio St., 412-231-0265, www.bistroandcompany.com CARMI’S Southern soul-food emporium offers comfort dishes like

smothered pork chops and chicken-and-waffles. 917 Western Ave., 412-231-0100

EL BURRO Take-out-focused joint serves big, savory burritos (and Mexican Coke). 1108 Federal St., 412-904-1108 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY Strong menu and drink options complement the lineup of local jazz luminaries playing several nights a week. 422 Foreland St., 412-904-3335

* while you’re here ... Visit Bicycle Heaven (R.J. Casey Industrial Park, 412-7344034), a cavernous museum with a mind-boggling array of cycles and cycling paraphernalia from the 1800s on.

LEGENDS Established restaurant offering traditional continental Italian. 500 E. North Ave., 412-321-8000, www.legendsatthenorthshore.com MAX’S ALLEGHENY TAVERN German cuisine like sauerbraten and potato pancakes is the specialty. 237 Suismon St., 412-231-1899 NICKY’S THAI KITCHEN Brings a spicy taste of Southeast Asia, along with garden-patio seating in nice weather. 854 Western Ave., 412-321-8424 PRIORY FINE PASTRIES This offshoot of the nearby landmark church-turned-hotel serves doughnuts, éclairs and more, baked daily. 528 E. Ohio St., 412-321-7270

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 45

PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

“It’s the only neighborhood that we can think of where you can literally walk or bus to anything you want to do.” Andrea Boykowycz community activist, stained-glass restorer, mother

oakland WHEN CIVIC LEADERS boast about the “new” Pittsburgh, they’re usually

talking about Oakland’s “eds and meds” — the research universities and hospitals that replaced steel mills as the city’s job creators. Named for the stands of oak that once dotted a local farm, Oakland began emerging as a civic center in the late 1800s, thanks to the creation of Schenley Park, and steel titan Andrew Carnegie’s decision to build a museum/concert hall/ library complex there. Today, it’s home to the University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University and Carlow University: The streets are often packed with students, and are lined with restaurants and shops. Many of those businesses are chains, especially along the main arteries of Forbes and Fifth avenues. But there’s plenty to give Oakland a more authentic vibe: including the tallest university building in the Western Hemisphere, and a smattering of interesting bars and restaurants. On Friday and Saturday nights, prepare to re-live the boozier moments of your college days. (You can buy shots by the pitcher now!)

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 47

Everybody loves a little Summer Honey…

Grand Prix / PHOTO COURTESY OF BILL STOLER

Summer Honey Ale is now on tap at Rock Bottom. This light, refreshing ale brewed with Pennsylvania wildflower honey is the perfect companion to our smoky new seasonal menu. Stop in for a pint or grab a growler today!

171 E. BRIDGE ST. • AT THE WATERFRONT

arts+culture CARNEGIE MUSEUMS OF ART AND NATURAL HISTORY For the price of one admission you can check out both museums, each with impressive collections. The dinosaur exhibit is extensive, as is the collection of contemporary art. 4400 Forbes Ave., 412-622-3131 CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH Pittsburgh’s flagship public library, the newly renovated (but still historic) branch sits next to the Music Hall and adjacent to Schenley Plaza. 4400 Forbes Ave., 412-622-3114

* don’t miss ...

Catch the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix, a weekend of vintageautomobile races in Schenley Park held each July (July 19-20 in 2014).

greenhouse built in 1893, Phipps Conservatory is home to all sorts of exotic plant life and is worth a stop even if you only have an hour or two to kill. One Schenley Park, 412-622-6914

bars+clubs AVA CAFÉ + LOUNGE This merger of two favorite Pittsburgh spots (Shadow Lounge and Quiet Storm) is still a work-inprogress. (It’s also a music venue.) But don’t let that dissuade you from some reasonably priced vegetarian and vegan-friendly fare — even if it’s a bit of a hike from central Oakland. 304 N. Craig St., 412-904-3400 GENE’S PLACE Gene’s is a smoky hole-in-thewall worth visiting — both for the ridiculously cheap drafts and for owner Gene Nay, an Oakland institution in himself. Also: one of the best trivia nights in town. 3616 Louisa St., 412-682-9213

Cathedral of Learning / PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

CATHEDRAL OF LEARNING NATIONALITY ROOMS Located on the first and third floors of the Cathedral of Learning (can’t miss it), these rooms were designed to represent the region’s ethnic diversity. The rooms are often open to visitors; guided tours are also offered. 4200 Fifth Ave., 412-624-6000 PHIPPS CONSERVATORY AND BOTANICAL GARDENS A steel-and-glass Victorian

48 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

HEMINGWAY’S CAFÉ In the daytime, you’re just as likely to find a professor kicking back with a beer and cardiac sticks as you are a frat bro. But at night, the shot pitchers are in full force. 3911 Forbes Ave., 412-621-4100 PETER’S PUB This is arguably the closest you’ll get to being in a frat house without venturing south of Forbes, right down to the Viking horns they pass out when you turn 21. Peter’s has a decent food menu — and a dance floor upstairs. 116 Oakland Ave., 412-681-7465

Outdoor dining on Forbes Avenue / PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO

restaurants +markets CONFLICT KITCHEN It might just look like a glorified cart, but Conflict Kitchen serves up interesting food with a social-justice bent: The menu is drawn from the cuisine of countries with whom the United States is currently in conflict. 221 Schenley Drive, 412-802-8417 EAT UNIQUE If you need to feed a group that includes vegetarian/vegans and carnivores alike, this fresh sandwich spot will satisfy everyone. 305 S. Craig St., 412-683-9993 FARMERS AT PHIPPS Swing by the conservatory’s front lawn for local/organic/naturally grown produce Wednesdays from 2:30-6:30 p.m. June-October. One Schenley Park. MAD MEX It’s noisy at peak hours. But the funky interior, Cal-Mex-inspired menu, and ample beer list make this popular with college kids and everyone else: The success of this location has been repeated in Shadyside and elsewhere. 370 Atwood St., 412-681-5656 THE PORCH AT SCHENLEY Solid American fare and not outrageously pricey — sit outside for optimal people-watching in Schenley Plaza. 221 Schenley Drive, 412-687-6724 RED OAK CAFÉ Though it’s in the heart of Oakland, don’t let Red Oak or its décor deceive you: This isn’t a greasy diner. Stop by for a salad or sandwich, especially if you’re in a rush. And yes, the rotating “Blue Plate Special” is always worth it. 3610 Forbes Ave., 412-621-2221

THE SPICE ISLAND TEA HOUSE Pad Thai is a favorite, but venture away from the familiar options and you won’t be disappointed. 253 Atwood St., 412-687-8821 TAMARIND FLAVOR OF INDIA A little off the beaten path and easy to miss (it’s in a building that looks like a house), Tamarind is slightly more sophisticated than the all-you-can-eat joints in central Oakland. Don’t skip the garlic naan. 257 N. Craig St., 412-605-0500

* while you’re here ... Check out Caliban Book Shop (410 S. Craig St., 412-681-9111), one of the city’s best used-book stores. (And don’t miss the wellcurated music selection.) Go to Dave and Andy’s (207 Atwood St., 412-681-9906) for homemade ice cream.

WAFFALLONIA Feel free to pile on ice cream, bananas or chocolate. The real magic here, though, is in the dough. 4212 Forbes Ave., 412-685-4081

parks+recreation SCHENLEY PARK In this 456-acre park you’ll find a swimming pool, public golf course, playground and other amenities. But the focal point is Flagstaff Hill, site of film screenings, political rallies … and a steady population of Frisbee-tossers.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 49

PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

“We came here before I ever heard of the Latino population here, because the area was affordable and quiet. But I have seen the Latinos really have an impact. The whole mix of cultures makes things better.” Antonio Fraga

Mexico City native and chef and co-owner of Beechview’s Casa Rasta restaurant

50 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

south hills THE CITY’S South Hills neighborhoods are easy to overlook, in part because the hilltops separating them from the rest of Pittsburgh are hard to see over. These working-class communities took shape after the completion of trolley lines and the 1927 construction of the “Liberty Tubes” tunnel. (Light rail still serves the area, making Beechview especially accessible.) Once home to small-scale industries like familyowned coal mines and grist mills, they now have the feel of bedroom communities, despite business districts along Broadway Avenue (in Beechview), Brookline Boulevard (in Brookline) and Brownsville Road (Carrick). Nearby Dormont — a suburb that gets honorary inclusion here — sometimes feels more urban than the city neighborhoods next door. But the area has become a destination for Spanish-speaking immigrants, whose tiendas have joined a handful of trendy eateries and hidden gems. With eateries leading the way, Pittsburgh’s South Hills may be poised to reach new heights.

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BAMA’S SOUTHERN KITCHEN This new addition to Brookline puts the “South” in “South Hills,” with BBQ and soul-food fare. 600 Brookline Blvd., 412-668-3459 CASA RASTA The signature dishes at this Beechview BYOB Mexican/ Caribbean restaurant are the fiery wings, but the menu contains other regional surprises, too. 2056 Broadway Ave., 412-344-4700

FAMILY RESTAURANT Ignore the generic name: This Middle Eastern eatery brings some unexpected flavor to Carrick. Familiar offerings like gyros and baba ganoush are made with fresh ingredients and a smile. (Also worth trying: Sam’s Sun Sandwiches, a Middle Eastern deli right next door.) 2614 Brownsville Road, 412-881-8550 FIORI’S PIZZA This is Beechview’s entry in the “best no-frills Pittsburgh pizzeria” sweepstakes. 103 Capital Ave., 412-343-7788 FREDO’S DELI This cheery Dormont café marries an Eastern European market with a sandwich shop; get the Sicilian. 1451 Potomac Ave., 412-344-1060

PITALAND With Las Palmas down the street, this Greek café/market gives Brookline a bit of decidedly un-pretentious cosmopolitanism. Try the falafel sandwich. 620 Brookline Blvd., 412-531-5040

Because I have a membership cap of only 200. NOT 201. Right now we are at 193. As soon as we reach 200 the doors will close. So Call Now or go to my

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ucts for He od al r P

ets

DOR-STOP This family-owned Dormont establishment is one of the great Pittsburgh breakfast places. Get there early on weekend mornings if you don’t want to wait outside. 1430 Potomac Ave., 412-561-9320

LAS PALMAS Few sights show the South Hills’ reinvention like this Brookline outdoor taco stand. The attached Mexican market is justly renowned for its butcher shop. 700 Brookline Blvd., 412-344-1131

T 2 Free Try Lessons L

the Dragon (Flexibility). Out of Shape? Don’t fret! Our beginner classes, run by professional black belt coaches, make learning these simple techniques fun and it’s never boring. You’ll be amazed in just a few short weeks… Guaranteed!

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CRESTED DUCK CHARCUTERIE This purveyor of artisanal meats raised Beechview’s cred among foodies: A Thursday-throughSaturday-night tapas menu and monthly “bacon club” subscription keeps bringing them back. 1603 Broadway Ave., 412-892-9983

Brookline and Beechview boast coffee shops that are community touchstones. Brookline’s Cannon Coffee (802 Brookline Blvd., 412563-0202) offers poetry and open-mic nights; Beechview’s Brew on Broadway (1557 Broadway Ave., 412-437-8676) has frequent community programming.

hy

restaurants +markets

* while you’re here ...

Heal t

Cannon Coffee / PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

I challenge you to call me today at (888) 434-0104 or come visit me at the playground we call ‘We Love Kung Fu.’ You will love this place it is just like a playground . We just play hard! We Call this getting ‘Kung Fu Fit.’ Kung Fu Fit is based on the Kung Fu techniques created by the Masters of the Shaolin Temple… 2000 years ago. They created an unbelievable Health program based on 5 Animals: Tiger (Strength), Leopard (Speed), Snake (Endurance), Crane (Balance) and

shopping GEEKADROME Your Brookline stop for tabletop role-playing games, comics and whatever else the kids are into these days. 534 Brookline Blvd., 412-344-2494 RICKERT & BEAGLE BOOKS Located on Dormont’s southern border, this offbeat bookstore features used and new titles with concentrations in sci-fi, fantasy and horror. 3233 W. Liberty Ave., 412-344-7444

arts+culture HOLLYWOOD THEATER This community theater offers clever, and often surprising, programming, including classic films, local productions and indie fare. 1449 Potomac Ave., 412-563-0368

Specializing in premium, natural and byproduct-free pet foods, treats and supplements. Featuring fun and unique eco-friendly and U.S.-made toys, beds, accessories and supplies!

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www.petagogypgh.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 51

PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

“Like Pittsburgh loves Pittsburgh, the South Side loves South Side. Almost any business owner here either has lived here or lives here now, and they’re goodwill ambassadors. It’s a tight-knit community.” Dan Rugh

former long-time South Side resident and co-owner, with wife Shannon, of Commonwealth Press

52 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

south side SOUTH SIDE’S stature as the city’s open-air party zone has been a blessing and a curse. Bars helped rescue the neighborhood from postindustrial decline. But on party nights, much of the area is only slightly quieter than it was in the industrial heyday, when South Side’s flat riverbottomland housed steel mills and glassworks. (The area’s original name, Birmingham, nodded to the similarly industrialized British city.) College kids mix with lifers, somewhat uneasily, on residential backstreets, while the once-sprawling J&L steel mill, which occupied the neighborhood’s eastern edge, is now a mixed-use development, SouthSide Works. (It’s heavy on chain stores but makes good use of river views and bike trails.) Still, even if you swear to quit the neighborhood completely, there’s always something bringing you back: one-of-a-kind retail and cultural attractions, as well as a number of bars and restaurants where good taste prevails.

NA KA MA

Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar

Over the Bar Bicycle Café / PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

bars+clubs A full inventory of Carson Street dudebro bars would consume the entire guide … and some of them might be out of business by time this rolls off the presses anyway. If dancing is your scene, though, we can recommend Diesel (1601 E. Carson St., 412-4318800), which has stayed in the game by delivering quick drinks and an ample dance floor, and Tiki Lounge (2003 E. Carson St., 412-381-8454), where dancing is accompanied by a South Pacific Island theme and a knowing smirk. Lava Lounge (2204 E. Carson St., 412-431-5282) offers themed dance nights — Friday night’s alt-’80s is especially popular — in a setting that looks like the interior of a volcano. Other bars include …

ACACIA No well drinks here: Acacia offers Prohibition-era cocktails in a setting to match, made by a skilled staff. 2108 E. Carson St., 412-488-1800 DEE’S CAFÉ Darts, pool, ping-pong, cheap beer … this proudly downscale landmark attracts all kinds of drinkers, except the pretentious. 1314 E. Carson St., 412-431-1314 FATHEADS Massive beer list, massive sandwiches. But no matter how much they expand it, you may face a wait. 1805 E. Carson St., 412-431-7433

JACK’S Pittsburgh’s premier dive-barthat-really-isn’t. It, too, is packed on weekends, but in quieter hours still feels like a neighborhood joint. 1117 E. Carson St., 412-431-3644 OVER THE BAR BICYCLE CAFÉ A gathering place for the two-wheeled set, with a laid-back vibe and menu chock-full of healthy choices. 2518 E. Carson St., 412-381-3698

restaurants +markets BEEHIVE In the dictionary entries for “funky” and “eclectic,” you’ll find pictures of this colorful coffeehouse, with desserts and vegetarian-friendly lunch menu. 1327 E. Carson St., 412-488-4483 BIG DOG COFFEE An off-Carson oasis with Intelligentsia coffee (highly recommended) and a great patio. Try the oatmeal. 2717 Sarah St., 412-586-7306 CAFÉ DU JOUR The ever-changing menu here is good, if pricey, and this BYOB joint’s back-porch outdoor seating is one of the city’s best-kept secrets. 1107 E. Carson St., 412-488-9695 DOUBLE WIDE GRILL A gas-station-turned-restaurant

Simply the Best... Japanese Steakhouse and Sushi Bar for 11 consecutive years

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eatatnakama.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 53

It’s Summer @ Soergel’s! Family festivals, farm-fresh produce, applewood-smoked BBQ & everday play all summer long!

July Corn Roast Kick-off Sunday, July 13 Corn Roasts continue every Sunday through August

August Peach Festival Saturday, Aug. 9 & Sunday, Aug. 10

Farm-to-Fork Dinner Saturday, August 16 Tickets Available beginning July 1

PLUS... Everyday play in Tiny Town! Rated one of the Top 10 outdoor play areas in Pittsburgh!

FREE Story Time Every Monday Story time and craft begin at 10:30 AM!

Amish-made Donuts First Saturday of each month!

with a shitkicker theme serving vegan fare? Yep. And the seitan wings deserve their place beside the real thing. Also: outdoor seating, extensive beer list. 2330 E. Carson St., 412-390-1111

LA PALAPA A modestly sized newcomer that argues there’s hope for Mexican food in Pittsburgh after all. 1925 E. Carson St., 412-586-7015 PIPER’S PUB British Isles cuisine in a bar that self-consciously echoes a classic English pub, including soccer (or football, whichever) on TV. Weekend brunches, ample beer and scotch lists, even some vegan choices. 1828 E. Carson St., 412-381-2797

music CLUB CAFÉ Perhaps the city’s most intimate music venue, with acoustics to match. The Monday-night AcoustiCafe may be the city’s top-tier open-mic event. 56 S. 12th St., 412-431-4950 REX THEATER Larger shows, in a variety of genres, hit this former neighborhood movie theater. 1602 E. Carson St., 412-381-6811

* while you’re here ... Check out the Riverfront Trail, which stretches into the Monongahela Valley. (A trip across the Hot Metal Bridge connects with a trail on the opposite side of the river.) The trail passes through Riverfront Park, a popular put-in spot for boaters. Don’t miss “The Workers,” a 25-ton sculpture made by locally based Industrial Artists Co-op, who fashioned it with scrap metal salvaged from shuttered steel mills. It’s one of the few traces you can find of what the South Side used to be.

2573 Brandt School Road - Wexford - 724-935-1743 54 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

second-floor philosophy section. 1111 E. Carson St., 412-481-7555

COMMONWEALTH PRESS This is the place for witty ’Burgh-themed merchandise, like the T-shirt asserting “Pittsburgh: 99 problems, but a bridge ain’t one.” A must-stop. 1932 E. Carson St., 412-431-4207 ONE UP SKATE SHOP A touchstone for the skater set. 1409 E. Carson St., 412-432-7007 PITTSBURGH GUITARS There’s a reason it’s been around 35-plus years: friendly staff, full range of repair services, new/used instruments on offer. 1305 E. Carson St., 412-431-0700 SLACKER This “anti-fashion” shop, with zines and posters rounding out punk clothing and jewelry, recalls what Carson Street was like before the bros discovered it. 1304 E. Carson St., 412-381-3911 THICK BIKES An absolutely cavernous off-Carson bike shop, with full repair service and deals on used bikes in the basement. 1408 Bingham St., 412-390-3590

arts+culture SMILING MOOSE The upstairs space is popular with rock bands (and hosts frequent all-ages shows). Downstairs, the bar offers a menu heavy on salads and sandwiches. 1306 E. Carson St., 412-431-4668

shopping

Soergels.com

La Palapa / PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

CITY BOOKS Old-school used bookstore, with cat in the window, a slight smell of must and a spiral staircase to

CITY THEATRE This professional company occupies a critical niche: Just small enough to take chances, just big enough to do it right. 1300 Bingham St., 412-431-2489 SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY Local and national photographers exhibit in this store-sized gallery, which isn’t afraid of cutting-edge themes. 1015 E. Carson St., 412-431-1810

PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL

“Walking my dog has made me appreciate the streets, the architecture, and how nature intertwines with the city. In the woods of Frick Park, you’d have no idea that you were still in the city.” Jolene Miklas

writer, Regent Square

squirrel hill + regent square JUST UP THE HILL from Oakland’s universities and hospitals, Squirrel Hill is popular with the professorial class and students alike, as well as young families; it has also long been the home of Pittsburgh’s Jewish community. Housing ranges from stately turn-of-the-last-century mansions to student apartments. But such distinctions are lost in the neighborhood’s lively retail district along Forbes and Murray avenues, where visitors can find everything from bike gear and Uggs to Kosher groceries, bluegrass records and even a ukulele. One is never more than a few steps from a cup of coffee, and the hungry can indulge in a United Nations-worth of inexpensive ethnic cuisine. Regent Square is Squirrel Hill’s less busy sibling, with solid housing stock on quiet tree-lined streets, and a small retail district along Braddock Avenue. Bridging the two neighborhoods is Frick Park, a 644-acre expanse of woods, grassy meadows, wetlands and playgrounds, welcoming walkers, bikers and dogs.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 55

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Everyday Noodles / PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

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61B/61C CAFÉ Named for bus routes serving Regent Square and Squirrel Hill, respectively, these are community coffee joints in the most timetested tradition. The elder location, in Squirrel Hill, also boasts an outdoor patio. 1108 S. Braddock Ave. (412-871-3013); 1839 Murray Ave. (412-521-6161)

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LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM 56 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

The most loaded food question in town might be the eternal debate over Squirrel Hill pizza joints: Aiello’s or Mineo’s? But a cultural crossroads like this means plenty of other tough calls too. President Obama’s favorite pancakes at Pamela’s Diner (1711 Murray Ave.; 412-422-9457) or modern Jewish cuisine at Nu (same address; 412-422-0220)? Ramen at Everyday Noodles (5875 Forbes Ave.; 412-421-6668) or nearby Ramen Bar (5860 Forbes, Ave.; 412-521-5138)?

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE The “escape” here might be the outdoor deck in this offbeat, friendly Regent Square coffeehouse. 401 Biddle Ave., 412-999-9009 AIELLO’S The truth is, it’s really good, but don’t tell that to fans of Mineo’s. 2112 Murray Ave., 412-521-9973 COMMONPLACE COFFEE The vibe here is relaxed, but they take their coffee seriously — seriously enough that Commonplace roasts its own beans (off-site). 5827 Forbes Ave., 412-422-0404 D’S SIX PAX & DOGZ Mix-and-match six-packs are on offer at this Regent Square landmark, and a similarly diverse array of hot-dog and other casual-dining options. 1118 S. Braddock Ave., 412-241-4666

DOBRA TEA One of two teahouses cattycorner from each other — the other is TÉ CAFÉ, at 2000 Murray Ave. (412-422-8888) — Dobra offers scores of tea blends and a vegan-friendly snacks menu, all in a colorful tearoom setting. 1937 Murray Ave., 412-449-9833. GABY Y JULES This patisserie, whose owner came to Squirrel Hill via East Liberty’s Paris 66, is known for its macaroons. 5837 Forbes Ave., 412-682-1966 GLUUTENY Squirrel Hill provides baked goods for those gluten-sensitive souls who usually miss out. 1923 Murray Ave., 412-521-4890. MINEO’S The truth is, it’s really good. But don’t tell that to fans of Aiello’s. 2128 Murray Ave., 412-521-9864

* while you’re here ...

Don’t miss Homewood Cemetery (1599 S. Dallas Ave., Squirrel Hill), or the final resting place of some of Pittsburgh’s famed industrialists, many of whom now slumber in spectacularly ornate monuments. The large park-like cemetery is the perfect place for a stroll, contemplating plinths, Greek columns and secret Masonic symbols. ROOT 174 Regent Square’s bid for contention in cutting-edge New American cuisine, with well-chosen cocktails and wine. 1113 S. Braddock Ave., 412-243-4348 SQUARE CAFÉ This colorful, modish breakfast and lunch joint is a Regent Square community touchstone. 1137 S. Braddock Ave., 412-244-8002

ff aat meerr ooff mm Suum Start the S

Pittsburgh’s BEST Jerry’s Used Records / PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL

SUMI CAKERY Korean-style bakery, where the fare goes easier on butter and sugar than locals may have come to expect. 2119 Murray Ave., 412-422-2253 VANILLA PASTRY STUDIO No visit to Regent Square would be complete without a Vanilla cupcake or two — and fans will insist one of them be the red velvet. 1130 S. Braddock Ave., 412-361-2306

bars INDEPENDENT BREWING COMPANY This relative newcomer to Squirrel Hill takes “buying local” seriously — all the beer on tap is regional. 704 Shady Ave., 412-422-5040 SILKY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL This Squirrel Hill crossroads is the rare sports bar in which non-fans won’t feel out of place. 1731 Murray Ave., 412-421-9222 SQUIRREL HILL CAFÉ Known as “the Cage,” this dark but friendly bar has plenty of characters and character (wooden booths, decent jukebox, even board games). 5802 Forbes Ave., 412-521-3327

arts+culture AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM Housed at the Jewish Community Center, this display space features art focusing on Israel and the Jewish experience. 5738 Forbes Ave., 412-521-8011, x105 CONCEPT ART GALLERY This polished Regent Square space, one of Pittsburgh’s few commercial galleries, mixes exhibits of local

artists with national names. 1031 S. Braddock Ave., 412-242-9200

MANOR THEATER This renovated space offers sophisticated film fare, and — yes — a bar to enhance your cinematic appreciation. 1729 Murray Ave., 412-422-7729 REGENT SQUARE THEATER This single-screen neighborhood theater, long operated by Pittsburgh Filmmakers, brings arthouse fare to the East End. 1035 S. Braddock Ave., 412-682-4111

Indoor/Outdoor Patio!

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shopping ACOUSTIC MUSIC WORKS This Squirrel Hill shop is your go-to source for banjos, guitars, mandolins and ukuleles. 2142 Murray Ave., 412-422-0710 AMAZING BOOKS Incredibly, given its high concentration of advanced degrees, Squirrel Hill lacked a bookstore for years until this used bookseller, a sister shop to a Downtown location, opened as this guide was going to press. 2030 Murray Ave., www.amazingbookspgh.com JERRY’S USED RECORDS This nationally celebrated repository of reasonably priced vinyl draws collectors from down the street and across the globe. 2136 Murray Ave., 412-421-4533 TEN THOUSAND VILLAGES Commerce with a conscience: This gift shop offers fashions, accessories, and home décor from around the world — bought and sold under fair-trade principles. 5824 Forbes Ave., 412-421-2160

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 57

PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

“The Strip District is everyone’s neighborhood. On the weekends, it has all the street vendors, and in the evening, it really comes alive with the nightlife. Everything’s in walking distance. Everything you want, you can get.” John Bettis

executive manager, Savoy Restaurant

58 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

strip district + polish hill NEXT DOOR TO DOWNTOWN, the Strip District was long home to steel mills and factories, warehouses and the working class. (During the Depression, it even housed a “Hooverville” of unemployed residents living in shanties.) Some of those old warehouses are being converted to loft housing, or are incubating high-tech businesses. But especially on Saturday mornings, the Strip is best known as the city’s giant openair market, with produce and retail vendors lining Penn Avenue and Smallman Street, drawing new and old Pittsburghers alike. Next door to, and up the hill from the Strip, is Polish Hill — “Polskie Gory,” as its original residents called it in the late 1800s. Dominated by the Immaculate Heart of Mary church, it’s no longer an ethnic enclave. But today it offers a mix of lifers, working-class folks, urban pioneers and more than a few rock enthusiasts.

Copacetic Comics Company / PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

restaurants +markets

the meat is locally sourced and humanely raised. 2301 Smallman St., 412-586-7177

BAR MARCO Despite the name, this place is known as much for its food as its creative cocktails. Stop in for No Menu Mondays, when it brings in a guest chef to cook dinner. 2216 Penn Ave., 412-471-1900

MON AIMEE CHOCOLAT This shop is a chocolate-lover’s dream. In addition to the assorted candies, visitors can enjoy a hot chocolate or cool gelato, depending on the season. 2101 Penn Ave., 412-395-0022

DELUCA’S This breakfast joint in the heart of the Strip’s bustle may be the Pittsburghiest place in the city: Stop here on a Saturday, or before a Steeler game. But be prepared to wait: The line stretches down the sidewalk. 2015 Penn Ave., 412-566-2195

PENNSYLVANIA MACARONI CO. If you could visit just one location to taste the flavor of the Strip, this might be it: Penn Mac specializes in fresh pasta and Italian imports. Visits to the cheese counter are practically a ritual. 2010-12 Penn Ave., 412-227-1983

GAUCHO PARRILLA The Strip’s ever-changing nature is reflected in this relative newcomer, an Argentine-barbecue joint. Wood-grilled meat and seafood, flavored with chimichurri and other sauces, draw customers to the tiny space. 1607 Penn Ave., 412-709-6622 KAYA Specializing in Caribbean cuisine, this restaurant serves Jamaican jerk wings, fish tacos and more. The menu also includes a tofu entree or two. 2000 Smallman St., 412-261-6565 KLAVON’S 28TH STREET ICE CREAM PARLOR This perfectly preserved corner drugstore/soda foundation is a bit off the beaten path, but worth the trip. 2801 Penn Ave., 412-434-0451 MARTY’S MARKET Another of the Strip’s great markets, this location also features a café and butcher shop. The produce is free of GMOs and

* while you’re here ... Don’t miss Saturday mornings in the Strip, when vendors line the sidewalks selling everything from produce to hometown sports-team memorabilia. Penn Avenue, between 16th and 24th streets

PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET This Strip District indoor market features more than 40 vendors offering handmade crafts, baked goods and more. Wed. thru Fri., Sun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 2401 Penn Ave., 412-281-4505 ROBERT WHOLEY AND CO. FISH MARKET This place is a Pittsburgh institution, with some of the freshest seafood in the city. If food-shopping makes you hungry, try a fish sandwich or the hand-rolled sushi. 1711 Penn Ave., 412-391-3737

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 59

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Cavacini Garden Center Vast selection of gardening supplies, decorations, and plants, ensure that you’ll find the perfect plant or accent for your yard or garden.

Summer Is In Full Bloom! All Annual Flowers PETUNIAS • BEGONIAS • GERANIUMS You Must See Our Variety of Trees & Shrubs, Hanging Baskets, Perennials & Vegetable Plants. OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE

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Bayardstown Social Club / PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL

ROLAND’S SEAFOOD GRILL Famous for its lobster rolls, Roland’s offers seafood at affordable prices. Visit in the summer for a great dining experience on the second-story deck. 1904 Penn Ave., 412-261-3401 SAVOY This restaurant features contemporary American cuisine with a Southern slant. Try the fried chicken and waffles, shrimp and grits, or veal meatloaf. 2623 Penn Ave., 412-281-0660

For urbanites looking for a little green space beyond their postage-stamp lawns, the Bayardstown Social Club, a members-only venue, is the perfect spot for a summer cookout. Taking its name from one of the Strip’s early monikers, it’s BYOB and bring-your-own meat; memberships are $20 for the season. Open Thursday through Saturday evenings, May through October. 3008 Penn Ave., bayardstown.com

bars+clubs ALTAR BAR Converted from an old church, this live-music venue is a destination for local and touring musicians, with shows nearly every night of the week. 1620 Penn Ave., 412-206-9719 CAVO With an event calendar that includes drag shows, burlesque and acrobatics, this venue offers a unique nightclub experience. There’s also a lounge area with a more relaxed feel. 1916 Smallman St., 412-918-1068 GOOSKI’S With cheap beer and a well-curated jukebox, this beloved Polish Hill venue is one of the best dive bars in the city, and hosts some of the best rock shows in town. Patrons come for the smoker-friendly atmosphere and the pierogies. 3117 Bereton St., 412-691-1658 STATIC This nightclub caters to the city’s growing electronic-dance music crowd. Visit Fridays and Saturdays to see top DJs from around the globe. 1650 Smallman St., 412-720-1396

60 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

* don’t miss ...

shopping COPACETIC COMICS COMPANY For comics enthusiasts, it’s a touchstone; for those outside Polish Hill, it’s a hidden gem: Copacetic offers vintage and new comics, as well as used books. The store also features work from local artists. 3138 Dobson St. (third floor), 412-251-5451 WIGLE WHISKEY American whiskey was born in Pittsburgh, and the owners of this family-owned distillery are carrying on the tradition. Visitors can also tour the facility to see how the spirits are made. 2401 Smallman St., 412-224-2827

arts+culture HEINZ HISTORY CENTER Named for the late Sen. John Heinz, this museum gives visitors an upbeat, popular-history glimpse into the region’s past; an adjoining sports museum celebrates the central role of athletics in local life. 1212 Smallman St., 412-454-6000

ned ly Ow l a c Lo and d ate Oper

Bella

FRUTTETO Restaurant 2602 Brandt School Road Wexford, PA 15090 Located right off the Wexford Exit on I-79 Call 724-940-7777 to make your reserva on

Celebra ng 6 years of serving the best Italian food Pi sburgh has to offer. Open seven days a week, Lunch and Dinner Dine in, Carry Out and Catering all available. Full Service Bar with large selec on. Happy Hour Monday through Friday from 5 PM un l 7 PM For full menu, including our Gluten Free, visit us on the web at

www.bellafru eto.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 61

Get Out of

Special Advertising Section

Town

You don’t need to buy a plane ticket to escape from the city. Gather your family or friends together and visit any of these drivable destinations. Flip the pages to find your next vacation spot with this advertiser-sponsored section. Get out of town and experience something new! Allegheny National Forest Region — Kinzua Bridge State Park 800-473-9370 www.visitANF.com Travel into the Pennsylvania Wilds in McKean County, to enjoy camping, kayaking, and hiking in the wildly beautiful Allegheny National Forest. “Walk the Tracks Across the Sky,” 624 feet into the Kinzua Gorge on the amazing Kinzua Sky Walk. Scenic drives take you off the beaten path to enjoy the beauty of Mother Nature. Visit the world famous Zippo/Case Museum, taste and tour Flickerwood Wine Cellars and CJ Spirits-a new craft distillery

located along scenic Route 6. From rustic cabins to deluxe lodges, cooking hot dogs on the campfire to romantic four-star dinners, the Allegheny National Forest Region is your perfect nearby getaway location. Phone 800-473-9370 for FREE Guide & Map or click on visitANF. com.

Ashtabula County 800-3-DROP-IN www.VisitAshtabulaCounty.com Visit Ashtabula County. Welcome to Ashtabula County … Where Our Lake Awaits! With thirty miles of Lake Erie shoreline, eighteen picturesque covered bridges in-

cluding America’s longest (spanning 613 feet) and shortest (a mere 18 feet) and the largest grape-growing region in the State of Ohio, we have a lot to offer on your next vacation. Experience street festivals in our historic downtowns, take a stroll in our Metroparks or cast your line for a record steelhead trout in one of our two Wild and Scenic Rivers. Perched atop the remnants of glacial beaches, and covered with vines planted over generations, the Lake Erie and Grand River Valley growing regions are second to none. Ashtabula County is home to a microclimate which grows 65 percent of all grapes in Ohio! Rolling hills lined with Viniferas and

NEVER TRENDY. NEVER MEANT TO BE. And for that you’re welcome.

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French/American Hybrids give this unique growing region the feel of Napa Valley. Enjoy a glass of wine at our lakefront wineries: The Old Firehouse Winery with live entertainment seven days a week and The Lakehouse Inn Winery while watching a spectacular Lake Erie sunset. The Lakehouse Inn also boasts a state of the art spa and restaurant featuring a locavore menu. Mark your calendars for the Lake Erie Wine Festival June 21-22 in Geneva-on-the-Lake. Take a stroll through Ohio’s first Summer Resort, Geneva-on-theLake. Where the nostalgia of an old-fashioned resort meets the fun of a lakefront getaway. With relax-

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Get Out of Town Get out of town and experience something new! ing and cooling Lake Erie breezes, beautiful sunsets and a laid-back atmosphere, the resort town offers something for everyone. Enjoy one of our three public parks or the 18hole public golf course, marina and the infamous mile-long entertainment strip. Take a spin on a gocart, ride the NEW blaster bumper boats, climb The Wall, or ride the merry-go-round at the premier family entertainment center, Adventure Zone. Be sure to make a stop in the lakeshore community of Conneaut. With the largest beach in Ashtabula County, a lighthouse, birding platform, Township Park, marina with public boat launch, and World-class trout, perch and walleye fishing, there’s plenty for all to enjoy. Conneaut is also home to four wineries and several covered bridges. Attend the July 4th Festival, Dock Fest July 26, D-Day Reenactment Aug. 23rd

and the Rib Fest Sept. 5-7. Visit the Maritime & Surface Transportation Museum located in the historic Ashtabula Harbor. This unique museum is inside the former light keepers home and overlooks the working port where you can see freighters being loaded & unloaded & watch the Bascule Liftbridge raise up for boats to pass underneath. It also boasts the World’s only working scale model of a Hulett Ore Unloading Machine & the original Ashtabula Lighthouse’s Fourth (4th) Order Fresnel lens built in 1898. Kick back and enjoy a week-long vacation in one of our lakeshore cottages, State Park lakeshore Lodge, finely appointed B&Bs or at one of our seventeen campgrounds. Family gatherings along Lake Erie’s southern shoreline are a pastime enjoyed by many. With cool lake breezes, and plenty to do for all

ages, Ashtabula County is a great place to connect with family and friends. Make sure you pack your cameras for your trip to Ashtabula County … Where Our Lake Awaits! VisitAshtabulaCounty.com.

Beaver County Tourism 800-342-8192 www.VisitBeaverCounty.com Looking for your next weekend getaway? Visit Beaver County, located just northwest of Pittsburgh. Bring a friend or the whole family for a weekend trip. There are so many things to do in Beaver County that guests of all ages will love! History buffs will enjoy several historical museums, some of which include the Beaver County Model Railroad, South Side Village and Little Beaver Historical Society, which consists of four museums within walking distance. Golfers can tee-off at premier golf courses,

E SAV

like the Club at Shadow Lakes and Black Hawk Golf Course. Outdoor enthusiasts can explore one of three beautiful county parks, along with Raccoon Creek State Park. Throughout the year, Beaver County is home to many cultural and ethnic festivals, along with car cruises and concerts. After a fun-filled day of exploring Beaver County, relax and unwind at one of Beaver County’s comfortable hotels or charming bed and breakfasts, or pitch a tent and enjoy a roaring campfire at Crawford’s Camping Park or Harts Content Campground! Discover all that Beaver County has to offer, and plan your trip today at VisitBeaverCounty.com!

Positively Cleveland 800-321-1001 www.thisiscleveland.com Cleveland has never followed any-

ATE D E

TH

ieving” l e b s i g n i h c u o “T Lippencott Alpacas 2014

OPEN HOUSE Sept. 27th - 28th 1 pm - 5 pm

FIBER ARTISTS • SEMINARS • FARM STORE • HAY RIDES 265 Meadowbrook Road, Waynesburg, PA 15370 Exit 19 off I-79, South on Rt. 221 toward Lippencott Lippencottalpacas.com • lenagaling@windstream.net • 724-852-4084

LIPPENCOTT ALPACAS IS A WORKING FARM, STORE OPEN BY APPOINTMENT OR BY CHANCE. 64 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

Special A d v e rti s i n g S e c ti o n

one else’s rules; we made our own. That’s because the city where rock was born knows a thing or two about passion, freedom and doing things your way. Sure, there’s been pressure. But under the right conditions, pressure can create diamonds. From the Rock Hall to our arts and culture, food scene, and sports, has it all. We don’t need to tell everybody about our amazing restaurants. Our food does the talking for us. We’ve even spent the past 40 years nursing Great Lakes’ Burning River into one of the hottest microbeers in the country. Which just proves that we were perfecting craft beer way before it was cool. We don’t try to be anything but uniquely Cleveland. “Getting away from the usual” is the whole reason people come here. Itineraries aren’t really our style, so go ahead and throw out that schedule, take a hike

and forge your own path. We’ve got plenty of lakefront and nature trails for you to run wild and get lost. We’re never shy on entertainment either. A Christmas Story House is here and open to fra-geelay visitors. Leg lamps and bunny suits are just the tip of the eclectic iceberg. Every neighborhood, every bar, every restaurant has a new vibe. When Cleveland Orchestra musicians perform at the Happy Dog, what kind of hot dogs are served? Gourmet, of course. So, if you like a bit of grit mixed with sophistication in a place where you can wash down a warm, melty sandwich with a cool pinot grigio, dance to world music on the front lawn of a renowned art museum or do yoga in front of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum – and all in a city where we don’t take ourselves too seriously – then come to Cleveland. We’d love to have you

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Just Call 1-888-558-5580 or visit StreetsboroVCB.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 65

Get Out of Town

Special Advertising Section

Get out of town and experience something new! join us. We’ve never been flashy, trendy or perfect. And for that, you’re welcome.

Fallingwater 724-329-8501 www.fallingwater.org Fallingwater, one of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most widely acclaimed works, was designed in 1935 for the family of Pittsburgh department store owner Edgar J. Kaufmann. Dramatically sited over a waterfall in Pennsylvania’s Laurel Highlands, the house was named one of “12 landmarks that will change the way you see the world” by Travel + Leisure. Open daily for tours except Wednesday from mid-March through the end of November. Also open Saturday and Sunday in December and the week between Christmas and New Year’s. House,

landscape, specialty and grounds tours available. Advance ticket purchase is essential contact Visitor Services 724-329-8501 or visit www.Fallingwater.org.

Greene County Tourism 724-627-8687 www.GoGreeneCounty.org From rolling farmland in the summer to snow-covered hills in the winter, from breathtaking vistas in the spring to stunning foliage in the fall, Greene County has it all. Predominantly rural but overwhelmingly charming, a trip to Greene County is a return to simpler times. Generations call this land home and are proud of its rich agricultural and coal mining history. Outdoor recreation is also a key part of Greene County’s appeal, offering dozens of activities and facilities to keep the young – and the young at heart – at play.

Located in the southwestern corner of Pennsylvania, Greene County is approximately one hour south of Pittsburgh, with Interstate 79 running through the central portion of the county. The county is bordered to the south by West Virginia, and the Monongahela River borders Greene County to the east, creating a collection of river towns and communities. In addition to numerous historical sites, integral elements of Greene County’s heritage include its seven covered bridges (Carmichaels, Cox Farm, King, Scott, Shriver, White, and Woods), most of which are more than 100 years old. The Carmichaels and White bridges are two of the 10 sites across Greene and Washington counties that participate in the annual Covered Bridge Festival, held every September. Greene County is also home to a dozen Mail Pouch barns (an ear-

ly-1900’s advertising campaign for Mail Pouch Tobacco) and 10 general stores, offering one-stop shopping for residents in the county’s outlying areas. Celebrating Greene County’s farming industry is the main focus behind agricultural tourism, or agritourism, a unique promotion of the county’s most natural resources. Among the county’s keynote annual events are the Greene County and Jacktown fairs, taking place each summer. Coal has been king in Greene County for decades, and the Bituminous Coal Show held every August is one way the area marks this valued piece of its identity. As the Cornerstone of the Keystone State, Greene County truly has so much to offer. Whether it’s agritourism or shopping, recreation or learning, Go Greene and explore the many attractions that make this

Make a splash in

Greene County. Discover these upcoming events:

19 South Washington Street, Waynesburg, PA 15370 724-627-8687 • www.GoGreeneCounty.org Pictured: Alpha Aquatic Center, Waynesburg, PA-Open Memorial Day-Labor Day 2014 66 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

J ly 15-19 Jacktown July a ktown Fair FFair, i Wind in Ri Ridge July 29 Rain Day, Downtown Waynesburg Aug. 3-9 Greene County Fair, Waynesburg Aug. 3 & Sept. 13 Flashlight Drags, Waynesburg Aug. 16-23 Coal Show, Carmichaels Aug. 30 Art Blast on the Mon, Greensboro Sept. 13 50’s Fest, Downtown Waynesburg

/GoGreeneCounty

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014 67

Get Out of Town Get out of town and experience something new! county a rewarding, relaxing experi- Mountain Rail Adventures ence. For more information on at- 866-882-6507 tractions and events, visit www.Go- www.Mtn-Rail.com GreeneCounty.org. Make it a Blues Weekend in West Virginia! Lippencott Alpacas Farm Just a few hours south of Pitts724-852-4084 burgh, the mountain town of Elkins www.Lippencottalpacas.com plays host to the Riverside Blues Lippencott Alpacas Farm, an hour south of Pittsburgh off I 79, makes a Train & Festival. Friday, July 18, the Riverside perfect daytrip to visit our 4th genBlues Train, operated by the Durbin eration family farm and see our 25 gentle alpacas. We present educa- & Greenbrier Valley Railroad, detional group tours year around for parts Elkins Depot at 11 am. A live $3.00 per person and FREE quick on-board music performance by visits for families. Come prepared to Shirley King, daughter of B. B. King, receive nose kisses! highlights this wilderness rail adOur biggest annual event is our venture. Open House. Experience the alpaca For reservations and lodging lifestyle with your family. Enjoy the info: Mtn-Rail.com or call: 866Fiber Arts skills. Buy a raffle ticket 882-6507 for our knitters’ throw. Try on alpaca Saturday, July 19 enjoy the Rivsweaters at our Fashion show. Bring erside Blues Fest. Festival location: kids to the hay-play area. Check out our ad and “See You Down at the 20 River Street, Elkins. http://riversidebluesfestwv.com Tickets may Farm”.

“...change the way you see the world.” — Travel+Leisure Magazine

FA L L I N G WAT E R . O R G 68 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER CITY GUIDE 2014

be purchased at the gate. Durbin & Greenbrier Valley Railroad 315 Railroad Ave. • Elkins, WV 26241. GPS: 38°55 17 N 79°51 3 W

Palace of Gold 304-843-1600 www.palaceofgold.com Overlooking the Appalachian hills and valleys, Palace of Gold is reminiscent of an Indian kingdom. Award winning rose gardens and over one hundred water fountains adorn these royal pleasure gardens. Inside, see sunlight colors through thirty-one stained glass windows reflected in crystal chandeliers and mirrored ceilings. Walk upon intricate marble floors and inlaid walls. Fiftytwo varieties of marble and onyx imported from Europe, Asia and Africa. In the Grand Hall hangs a giant French chandelier over 150 years old. Murals depicting ancient Indian clas-

sics are painted on the ceiling in the tradition of Renaissance masters. Walls and pillars are accented with semi-precious stones and pure gold. Under the thirty-ton main dome is a 4200 piece crystal ceiling. Four royal peacock windows display more than 1,500 pieces of hand-crafted stained glass. Peacock and lotus motifs pervade the Palace, etched into numerous windows and carved into doors. Peacocks are traditionally associated with Royalty and Lord Krishna, who wears a peacock feather in His hair. The Palace of Gold is home to one of the 100 top award-winning rose gardens in the U.S.A. The rose garden is a vivid bouquet of color set amidst the green hills, where you can see over 150 varieties of roses. The Garden of Time to the east of the Palace is resplendent with color from spring to late fall with Gerani-

Special A d v e rti s i n g S e c ti o n

Discover West Virginia’s

New River Gorge ums, marigolds, zinnias, blue salvias and dahlias. Walkways divide the flowers into islands that surround the central fountain like the segments of a sundial. One visitor wrote, �The rose garden is one of the most beautiful I have ever seen and the vistas are breathtaking. This garden alone made the trip worthwhile.� The Palace Rose Garden has three different blooms, starting in early June to mid-July, followed by a second bloom late July to early August, and the third bloom is late September. Another highlight located behind the Palace is the breath-taking Lotus Pond. The beauty of the lotus flower is sung in ancient poetry and has a fragrance unlike any flower on earth. It is said that lotuses create an atmosphere of transcendence. Our lotus pond is often visited by

the white swans who reside at our temple lake. Enjoy a walk around the Lotus pond in full bloom (JuneAugust) nestled on a hilltop with gorgeous vistas of three different states. Explore the idyllic atmosphere of the grounds and gardens during your visit. Down by the main temple is a small lake surrounded by trails ideal for picnics. This lake is home to our swans and is the site of our annual swan-boat festival. This area is also home to a special breed of ducks and roving peacocks letting out their unique call. April - June: weekends only - 10 am - 6 pm • July - August: open Noon to 5 on weekdays, 10 – 6 on weekends • September - October: open weekends only 10 am – 6 pm • Extended hours during bus and group tours and festivals.

Nature. History. Culture. Adventure. Reconnect with family and friends. Experience all the fun and excitement that awaits you in wild, wonderful West Virginia. The adventure begins here.

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Get Out of Town

Special Advertising Section

Get out of town and experience something new! River Expeditions

Visit Streetsboro, OH

800-463-9873 304-574-2827 www.raftinginfo.com

888-558-5580

Experience adventure, nature, culture and history in West Virginia’s New River Gorge. Let River Expeditions, the area’s best outfitter, be your host for rafting on the New & Gauley Rivers – choose from their scenic family float trip or classic whitewater adventure. They are also home to West Virginia’s newest zipline adventure – The Ridges. River Expeditions operate trips daily from April – October with all-inclusive packages featuring adventures, meals and lodging at affordable rates so you can bring your entire family, friends or group. Special discounts and events are available throughout the season. Kids raft for half price each day on the family-friendly Upper New River Canyon trip.

www.StreetsboroVCB.com Welcome to Streetsboro — Northeast Ohio’s Best Vacation Value! Streetsboro offers something for everyone year round! Streetsboro is located directly off the Ohio Turnpike (I-80), exit 187, and is within minutes of Akron, Canton, Cleveland and Youngstown. Streetsboro is the ideal location for a relaxing vacation, sentimental reunion, memorable get-away or productive business trip. We provide exceptional and budget-friendly accommodations at our 9 hotels and 2 campgrounds, and delicious dining options at over 40 restaurants. We also feature numerous annual events and over 60 nearby attractions, including many of the area’s best attractions! Start your planning now, call 888558-5580 or visit www.Streetsboro-

Little Beaver Museum

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Western Pennsylvania Conservancy / Fallingwater 724-329-8501 waterandlife.org fallingwater.org

Some buildings are meant to be lived in, while others are built to be businesses, schools, palaces, and more! We can learn a lot when we look closely at buildings, especially about the people who built or lived in them, how they were built, and what they were used for. Buildings come in all shapes, sizes, and materials. Some buildings are so beautiful or interesting, they become famous! Fallingwater is the name of a very special house that is built over a waterfall. Frank Lloyd Wright, America’s most famous architect, designed the house for his clients, the Kaufmann family. Fallingwater was built between 1936 and 1939. It instantly became famous, and today it is a National Historic Landmark.

The Todd House B&B

Bridgewater River Regatta

Golf Courses & Country Clubs

VCB.com for your FREE Vacation Value Packet!

Beaver Falls Car Cruise

Zanesville Muskingum County 800-743-2303 www.VisitZanesville.com Zanesville-Muskingum County has fun for the whole family! Take a safari tour at the Wilds and or a Lorena Sternwheeler cruise. Experience the Artist Colony of Zanesville and First Friday Art Walk. Tour the John and Annie Glenn Historic Site, National Road-Zane Grey Museum, Putnam Underground Railroad Education Center, Stone Academy, Zanesville Museum of Art and more. Visit Weasel Boy Brewing Co. and local wineries. Explore state parks, beautiful gardens, Village of Dresden, antique shops and pottery factories and outlets. Enjoy golfing, biking, hunting, fishing and boating. Located off I-70, 55 miles east of Columbus. Request a Visitors Guide - 800-743-2303, www.visitzanesville.com.

Darlington Polo Night

Hookstown Fair

Bradys Run Park

visitbeavercounty.com

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2014 City Guide