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Parks&

Fall 2012

The Official Newsletter of the City of Memphis Division of Parks and Neighborhoods

Ne i g h b o r h o o d s Bridging the Gap Between Parks and Neighborhoods

Memphis Music Commission Unplugged Brings Memphis Music to trolley experience

Olympian Cullen Jones visits Bickford

Make a Splash Midsouth wins video contest

Inaugural Track and Field Day Wins big

Fletcher Creek Features: City Wins Operation Feed - Training Camp for Dads - MAS Logo Contest Track & Field Day - World’s Largest Swim Lesson - Memphis wins NUSA Award

Summer Camp THE NUMBERS Number of Sites 25 Number of Campers 1865 Cost per child $162.00 Ages of Campers 5-15 Campers at Davis Community Center enjoy one of many field trips.

SPRITE SPARK PARKS Jesse Turner Park recently

E-mail:

Parksinfo@memphistn.gov

Facebook: Parks and Neighborhoods Memphis Library Memphis Music Commission Friends of Memphis Animal Services Memphis Community Affairs Memphis Museums Memphis Botanic Garden Memphis Zoo Brooks Museum

Web:

@MEMparks_nbhds @ MemphisLibrary @MusicCommission @MemphisMuseums @MemphisBotanic @MemphisZoo @BrooksMuseum www.parks.memphistn.gov www.memphislibrary.org www.memphismusic.org www.memphismuseums.org www.memphisbotanicgarden.com www.memphiszoo.org www.brooksmuseum.org

City of Memphis Parks and Neighborhoods

courts

such

as

Jesse Turner Park are among the

on votes it earned through the

best places teens can go to be

national Sprite Spark Parks Project

physically active, improve their

initiative, which refreshes courts in

health and have fun with friends,”

public parks and recreation centers

said Janet P. Hooks, Director of

throughout the country.

the Division of Parks & Neighbor-

Voting in the Sprite Spark Parks

hoods. “The overwhelming par-

Project, a joint program from Sprite

ticipation in the Sprite Spark Parks

and the National Recreation and

Project proved that the preserva-

Park Association (NRPA), took

tion of vital public spaces like bas-

place between March 28 – May

ketball courts is important to peo-

31

ple everywhere, and that is a great

on

SpriteSparkParks.com.

Thanks to the 27,264 votes it received, Jesse Turner Park which is located at 1250 South Parkway, East has been awarded a grant that will be used to fund a few

Twitter:

“Basketball

received a $10K grant based

updates to the basketball court. “We would like to thank everyone

who

supported

Jes-

se Turner Park in the Sprite Spark John

Parks

Project,”

Norman,

said

Coca-Cola

Refreshments Distribution Center Manager. “The court will soon be a cleaner, safer, more fun place to play and we can’t wait to see our young local basketball players using it to hone their skills.”

thing to see.”

Parks and Neighborhoods Message from the Director’s Bench Welcome to the City of Memphis Parks and Neighborhoods quarterly newsmagazine! It is my hope that you find this information both informative and helpful as you learn about our newly consolidated Division. Parks and Neighborhoods consists of six service centers: Memphis Public Library System, Memphis Music Commission, Memphis and Shelby County Office of Re-entry, Office of Community Affairs, Memphis Animal Services, and Parks which includes golf courses, community centers, museums and parks. It is an exciting time to be a part of government as there are many wonderful things happening around our city. Highlighted in this issue and just to name a few are Olympian Cullen Jones’ visit to Bickford Aquatic Center, Memphis Music Commission’s Trolley Unplugged, Baptist Women’s Hospital’s Health and Wellness Series held at the Memphis Public Library, and our newest addition to the parks roster Fletcher Creek Park. We also have plenty of classes and many opportunities that promote wellness and still al- Director Hooks with her friends Bentley and Ceasar low you to have fun. Our senior centers and community centers offer great activities, and the parks, ball fields, pools, and trails afford you with a diverse set of recreational options. Our goal is to create thriving communities that enhance our neighborhoods through peo ple, services, programs, parks, and facilities, and we strive to give our citizens the best amenities that we can offer. As you flip through these pages, I hope you are filled with the same excitement that I have and become encouraged to get involved. Whether you live here or are just a visitor, we invite you to take advantage of the many services we provide. with Olympian Cullen Jones Also, feel free to e-mail your thoughts, comments, ideas, suggestions, or good news to parksinfo@memphistn.gov. Yours in Service, Division of Parks and Neighborhoods Janet P. Hooks, Director Janet P. Hooks, Director Deputy Directors Dr. LaSonya Hall Joseph Lee Larry Smith Produced by the Office of Public Relations Allison J. Fouche’ Editor-in-Chief Design and Layout Contributors: Justice Bolden Toni Holmon-Turner Nika Jackson Christina McClain Jackie Trenthem Stephanie White

Liberty Bowl gets upgrade Upgrades include: the tenth largest college digital video board, along with a new artificial turf field, new lighting and extensive repainting.

M e m p h i s Tr o l l e y U n p l u g g e d By Christina McClain

Summer in Memphis is a wonderful time of the year. I personally love the warm weather as well as the various activities the city has

also contributed and is one of the many reasons why Memphis is my city of choice.

to offer. Since I recently relocated back to Memphis, I wanted to

My experience included, Robert and Candace Mache. Their

develop a new relationship with the city I call home. Like many Mem-

performance really got the passengers involved.

phians, I enjoy the local parks, the festivals, cultural events as well

phis Music Commission also had giveaways and trivia for pas-

as the variety of food served in local eateries. But most of all I love

sengers, as they enjoyed a hot day in

listening to some good music!

Next season, I advise getting a daily pass to enjoy Memphis Trolley

In my quest to renew my relationship with Memphis, I heard that the Memphis Music Commission and the Memphis Area Transit

The Mem-

downtown

Memphis.

Unplugged and all of the wonderful hidden gems here in the city. Trolley fares range from $1 single base fare to a $3 daily pass.

Authority (MATA) have partnered together to bring citizens live music while enjoying historic downtown and riverside scenery called:

For

“Memphis Trolley Unplugged”.

sion, you can like them on Facebook and follow on Twitter.

more

information

about

the

Memphis

Music

Commis-

Since Friday, June 22nd , local artists played on the Main Street Trolley Monday - Friday during lunch, Noon - 1.30 p.m., and on the

Riverfront Loop Trolley, Friday - Saturday evenings, 5:00-7:00 p.m. The Main Street Trolley can be accessed between Auction Avenue and G.E. Patterson Avenue, while the Riverfront Loop Trolley offers a 2.5 mile route of outstanding views of the Mississippi River and Main Street. Listening for the trolley was easy, it’s the only one with singing, dancing and of course live music! It’s Memphis Music on the Move with local artists who sing, play instruments and who really know how to entertain an audience. Whether it’s down home blues, heartfelt gospel or that good ole’ southern rock- n- roll, each artist brought excitement, inspiration and joy to each trolley ride. This experience

Robert and Candace Mache have a jam session

World’s Largest Swim Lesson Hickory Hill Community Center summer campers participated in helping set a Guinness Book World Record for the “World’s Largest Swim Lesson”. One hundred and twenty swimmers from Memphis participated and over 23,000 participants from 14 countries on 5 continents simultaneously participated on June 14, 2012. Swimmers at Hickory Hill Community Center

Aquatics Attendance Aquatics Attendance 70,000 64,282

60,000 50,000 41,428 40,000

Summer Season

30,000 20,000

24,995

10,000 0 2008

Summer Season

Aquatics

43,580

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Attendance up 48%

Memphis Public Library

I Scream, You Scream, We all Scream for

ICE CREAM!

a Bag” is the ease of clean up. Once the ice cream is gone, just discard the newspaper and put your ingredients away. For more information about other library events and programs, visit www.memphislibrary.org

I

Scream, You Scream, We All Scream for ICE CREAM (in a Bag)!

With temperatures

soaring into the high nineties and the heat index feeling

as though the temperature is higher, people were looking for ways to stay cool. At the Cherokee Branch Library, customers learned how to make a favorite treat with plastic bags, rock salt, vanilla extract, and some ice cubes.

StoryWalk

Queen Edwards with the Coopera-

The Friends of the Library have

tive Extension Program taught partici-

earmarked $2,000 to bring Storywalk

pants how to make ice cream. So, how

® to Overton Park. StoryWalk® is an

do you make this ice cream? Not sure

exciting initiative that combines a chil-

whether to give away the secret, but it

dren’s story with a popular walking

involves two separate plastic zip lock

route. Promoting literacy and physical

bags, some sugar, some half and half,

fitness, pages from a book are post-

some vanilla extract, some rock salt,

ed at stations along the route as you

and some ice cubes.

walk.

Once the ingredients were com-

The experience is free and open to

bined, they were not placed in a

the public. StoryWalk® was developed

freezer to await the mixture to solidi-

in September 2007 by Anne Ferguson,

fy. No – the eager ice cream eaters

a volunteer with the Vermont Bicycle &

took the mixture on top of ice cubes

Pedestrian and aligns perfectly with

inside of a plastic bag wrapped in

the No Child Left Inside philosophy that

newspaper for about five minutes

stresses the vital importance of recon-

and voila – ice cream was made!

necting children with the natural world.

The beauty of making what Ms. Edwards introduced as “Ice Cream in

City of Memphis Parks and Neighborhoods

Photo credit Vermont Storywalk project

More about

details this

are

underway

exciting

initiative.

Community Affairs

Training Camp for Dads By Nika Jackson On Saturday, June 30th

with every man present sign

families from across the city

ing a fatherhood resolution

gathered at the University of

signifying their united purpose

Memphis wins NUSA Best Neighborhood Program Award

Memphis’ Fogelman Executive

in serving as caregivers to not

Center for Mayor A C Wharton,

only their children, but also chil-

Jr.’s 2nd Annual Training Camp

dren in the greater community.

for Dads.

Hall of Fame award recipients

Memphis Neighborhood leaders and representatives proudly

was dedicated to educating,

included:

display the first place award they won at the 2012 Neigh-

engaging and empowering lo-

Clyde

borhoods USA (NUSA) Conference for Best Neighborhood

cal fathers through interactive

Hart, Frank Holmes, USN Com-

Program.

workshops, training sessions

mander Bradley Meeks, and

and a resource expo.

Reverend Samuel “Billy” Kyles.

The fun-filled day

The

Andrew

Dortch,

Brunson,

Christopher

The group won the award for “Ready Shelby/Neighbor-

day ended with a Hall of Fame

hoods”, which is an innovative approach to prepare Memphis

Dads Awards Luncheon hosted

The event, organized by

neighborhoods for disaster and emergencies.

by WMC-TV Action News 5’s

the Office of Community Af-

Andrew Douglas and Hallelu-

fairs,

jah FM’s Michael Adrian Davis.

through

Over 250 people were

was the

made

possible

generosity

of

Families Matter, Le Bonheur

present at the luncheon to cel-

Children’s

ebrate local fathers and father

Urban

figures, and hear the Mayor’s

United Healthcare.

personal story reflecting on the

childcare was provided by

responsibilities fathers face.

Shelby County Head Start.

Child

Hospital,

The

Institute,

The luncheon was capped off

NATIONAL NIGHT OUT Children enjoying the bounce house during National Night Out at Bickford Community Center.

and

On-site

This 22 acre park, located at the corner of Dexter and Chimneyrock, features a pavilion with picnic area, a walking trail, playground with an open free play area for multi-purpose use, 140 new trees and an observation deck overlooking Fletcher Creek.

Fletcher Creek

Despite the rain, on Saturday July 14, 2012 Mayor A C Wharton, Jr.. Councilman Bill Boyd and Parks and Neighborhoods Director Janet P. Hooks, conducted a ribbon cutting ceremony for Fletcher Creek Park in the Chimneyrock neighborhood.

City of Memphis Parks and Neighborhoods

Fletcher Creek Park History •

Shelby County Government through the Shelby County Conservation Board purchased the 22 acre parcel in 1974 for use as parkland.

Shelby County Conservation Board hired a planning consultant – Dugan Design Group (DDG) in 2001 to develop a Master Plan for park property.

Shelby County Conservation Board approved Master Plan by DDG in fall of 2003.

Shelby County transferred the property to City of Memphis in 2006 following the annexation of the Countrywood area, with stipulation of a minimum $1,000,000 investment in improvements.

City of Memphis allocated $144,000 for architecture and engineering in July 2007 (FY08 ).

Planning staff started its process in September 2007 with neighborhood meeting in Cordova. At this meeting the community requested that the name be changed from Countrywood Park to Fletcher Creek Park.

City of Memphis allocated $1,560,000 for construction in July 2008 (FY09)

Park design out to bid in April of 2011.

Wagner General Contractor awarded the contract.

Park construction started in August of 2011.

Park completed in July of 2012.

Memphis Parks & Neighborhoods Athletic Department Exposes Memphis Youth to Soccer By: Justice Bolden, Athletics Specialist The Memphis Parks & Neighborhoods Athletics Department is

doing my job”. Coaches and players seem eager to kick off the 2012

excited about the upcoming 2012 Fall Soccer Season as it looks to

Fall Soccer Season. “They really enjoyed last season and they’re

expand the game of soccer throughout the Memphis area. “Last fall

already itching to play this season” says second year coach, Andre

we registered approximately 500 youth participants for Fall Soccer,

Reed.

and we are looking to build on that. It is important we expose Memphis

The soccer program provides a glimpse into ways the Athletic De-

youth to the health and wellness benefits of soccer”, says Jackie Tren-

partment plans to fight issues plaguing the community such as child-

them, manager of the Athletic Department. The six week program is

hood obesity and a lack of physical activity. The program is an excel-

designed to increase physical fitness, teach the fundamentals of soc-

lent way to keep kids in shape while having fun. While the goal is to

cer, and build self-confidence and discipline within youth participants.

increase physical fitness and fight childhood obesity, ultimately we are

Fall soccer registration is $50.00 and includes: a soccer uniform, cer-

achieving both, and the kids are having fun while doing it.

tificate of participation, practice instruction, skills clinics, regular season games, and an individual postseason trophy.

For questions please call the Memphis Parks & Neighborhoods Athletic Department at (901) 767-4580.

The Athletic Department is also focused on volunteer coach development, as it offers coaches certification and on-field training to all new and returning coaches. As a part of the coaches’ development program, the Athletics Department invites other experienced soccer coaches from around the area to mentor coaches both on and off the field and provide suggestions on how to get the best out of their players. Second year Coach Brooks Stevenson thinks the program is excellent for volunteers looking to learn new ways to motivate players, “The coaching development program was very informative and it gave me tips on things to do during practice, as well as the importance of keeping the kids moving. If the kids are not having fun, then I’m not

ks & Neigh

Quotable: “As a child growing up2012 in Memphis, enjoyed visiting June 16, - March 8,I 2013 our city’s parks with my family and friends. For many people, the most cherished childhood memories are connected with park activities. Parks continue to be one of Memphis’s greatest attractions where families can spend quality time together!” - Janas Jackson

Ready, Set, Go ! Summer Day Camp Track & Field Meet Athletic Department and Summer Camp Collaborative wins big with Memphis youth By Jackie Trenthem, Manager Athletics Just in time for the Olympics, on

energy and efforts of Lonnie Lewis,

June 27th, eighteen of the City’s Com-

the meet would have been in serious

munity Center Day Camps converged

jeopardy of failing. Lonnie served as

at Halle Stadium to participate in the

the starter for all track events and

first ever Day Camp Track and Field

kept everything running smoothly.

Meet.

Kristine Strickland assisted with the

A collaborative effort between the Ath-

track, getting participants ready for

letic Department and the Summer Day

the races. Debra Tate assisted in

Camp Committee, each camp was al-

the softball throw. Linda Bates and

lowed to enter a maximum of 12 par-

Jameka Ward held down the awards

ticipants.

tent and recording of results. Toni

There were a total of 46 events of-

Holmon-Turner and Rick Williams

fered in four age divisions 7-8 boys/

kept the refreshment tables replen-

girls. 9-10 boys/girls, 11-12 boys/girls

ished with energy bars, bananas,

and 13-15 boys/girls.

oranges, as well as monitoring water

All were track

Street Hockey Clinic • • • •

Four clinics were held 11 community centers attended Instructed by the Memphis Ice Hockey Team through University of Memphis Clinics held at Tiger Lane and Bert Ferguson Community Center

intake for the campers.

Lewis Burton

was ready to assist with any request for the campers and volunteers. A sincere thanks to

Eumecca

Long

and Margaret Fluckers

for

preparing

lunch and transporting it to the event. All said and done, events, except for the softball throw

the meet was fun and all camp-

and the standing long jump.

ers seemed to have a good time

were approximately

There

219 camp-

ers registered and each could enter

and

enjoyed

the

Cricket Clinic • •

competitions.

three events. This event was a huge success in part to our volunteers.

Without the

Three clinics were scheduled 11 community centers were scheduled to attend Instructed by members of the Memphis Cricket Club Clinics were held at cricket field at the Hickory Hill Community Center

400 350 300 250 200 150 100

0

50

Pos. Outcomes (2012)

MAS Adoptions up 25.8%

Pos. Outcomes (2011) Pos. Outcomes (2010)

To date, Memphis Animal Shelter Adoptions for 2012 are up resulting in more positive outcomes for our four- Jan. Feb. March April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. legged citizens. To adopt a pet, call 901-636-1430.

250 (2012) Adoption Adoption (2011) 200 Adoption (2010) Adoption (2009)

Jan. 173 130 133 135

Feb. 192 183 165 151

March 190 169 142 147

April 164 107 109 129

May 193 145 114 122

June 219 149 156 107

July 185 163 121 129

Pos. Outcomes (2009)

k

Dec.

Aug.

Sept.

187 136 120

247 154 124

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

207 91 180 MAS Statistical Overview 156 116 114 131 (Jan 86- July 2012) 125

150 100

Adoption (2012) Adoption (2011)

50 0

Adoption (2010) Adoption (2009)

Jan.

Feb.

March

April

May

June

July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

Building Futures Parks and Neighborhoods has a great partnership with Building Futures, Inc., a non-profit organization, to serve nutritious snacks and meals approved through the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). This partnership will allow us to serve over 1,200 youth participants daily throughout the city of Memphis ages 18 and under at our 24 community centers. The major benefits of this program is not just to feed hungry kids, but it allows our staff to engage children in structured activities and programs after school.

Memphis and Shelby County Office of Re-entry

Help Memphis Animal Services select its new Logo

Recently, three agencies, the

a second opportunity at gainful em-

Shelby County Division of Correc-

ployment and become productive

tions, the City of Memphis Second

citizens . The idea for the joint office

In an effort to project an image more consistent with the

Chance Program and the Tennes-

originated with the Operation: Safe

organization’s mission, goals and values, Memphis Ani-

see Board of Probation and Parole,

Community initiative. The pilot pro-

mal Services is asking you to help in the selection of its

combined resources to assist incar-

gram will provide services for 200

new logo.

cerated felons get life-skills train-

inmates, all within six months to one

ing, find employment and improve

year of release from six West Ten-

their lives after release from prison.

nessee prisons. Selection for par-

On May 30, 2012, the Memphis &

ticipation in the program is based on

Shelby County Office of Re-entry

a rigid criterion.

opened its doors, located at 600 Adams. This Office will provide seamless services for individuals seeking

Visit the City of Memphis website to vote for your favorite. The winner may adopt any animal that is available at MAS within 30 days after the announcement of the win-

For more information, please call 222-4556.

ner, a month’s supply of pet food and a $50.00 PETCO gift card, sponsored by Friends of Memphis Animal Services.

City of Memphis Parks and Neighborhoods

Spotlight:

Senior Center Floyd Brown, Director Vanessa Ford, Asst. Director

Orange Mound Community Complex

Community Center Kristine Strickland, Director

Whether it’s a school supply drive or a line dancing class, Orange Mound Community Service Center knows how to meet the needs of the community it serves and provides programming that is often filled to capacity.

Members of the University of Memphis football, soccer, volleyball, basketball and tennis teams interacted and played games with campers. The event was the "kickoff" to their partnership with local communities.

........And Swimming

The Karate team participated in the Southern Martial Art Tournament in Greenwood, Mississippi and won 11 first place, 4 second place, and 2 third place awards. The Instructor won grand prize for black belts, in the 18 and older division and won 2 second place and 2 first place awards.

Olympian Comes to Town

C

ullen

Jones

--- In Memphis,

four-

time Olympic medalist Cul-

len Jones led a youth rally with approximately

100

children

from KIPP Memphis Collegiate Elementary School at the Bickford Aquatic Center. He shared his personal story about nearly drowning when he was five and discussed the impact the sport had on his life, including his recent Olympic experience. The Memphis tour stop also included a semi-private swim lesson for several local kids at the Fogleman Downtown YMCA. Memphis won the visit from Olympian Jones after creating a video in the USA Swimming Foundation’s Make a Splash for Water Safety contest. The video received hundreds of thousands of votes to secure Jones’ visit and the $5,000 grant for Splash Mid-South. “Every child in America needs to learn how to swim. It is a critical skill that can determine the difference between life and death in a matter of seconds,” said Jones, the first African-American male to hold a world record in swimming. “Drowning is an epidemic, but it’s an epidemic with a cure. That is why I am so proud to be working with Phillips 66 and the USA Swimming Foundation to educate parents, children and caregivers about the learn-to-swim resources available in their communities. By raising awareness and providing the opportunity for more kids to learn to swim, we are saving lives.”

Mid-South Food Bank Operation Feed Only winning the award once in the 21 year history of the competition, City of Memphis employees brought Mayor Wharton the “Mayor’s Plate”, for only the second time since 2002. A friendly competition between City and County governments, the Food Bank awards this trophy to the entity that raises the greatest number of points. Congratulations and thanks to all of the employees who helped us “Feed the Need” in Memphis.

Mayor Wharton graciously receives the Mayor’s Plate from Food Bank President & CEO Estella Mayhue-Greer.

City of Memphis Parks and Neighborhoods

Happenings Memphis Animal Services 2350 Appling City Cove YAPPY HOUR Every Thursday

Memphis Thanksgiving Dinner for the Hungry and Homeless Thanksgiving, November 22nd Memphis Cook Convention Center

Pink Palace Family of Museums 3050 Central

Memphis Public Library Central Library 3030 Poplar

Pink Palace Crafts Fair October 12, 13, 14 Audubon Park

BANNED BOOKS WEEK Sept. 30th - October 6, 2012 Hooks Central Library BOOKSTOCK October 6th Hooks Central Library The COLLEGE GAMES November 16th Memphis area college fair Hooks Central Library WRITEMEMPHIS Poetry Slam Workshops November and December

Memphis Botanic Garden 750 Cherry Rd. A Bats Campfire Party October 12th 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Halloween Hike October 27th 2012 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Dream Team presents Design Your Own Backyard October 27th 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Snowy Nights in My Big Backyard Fridays & Saturdays, November 23rd –December 15th, Daily, December 17-29 (excluding Christmas Eve & Day.) Breakfast with Santa December 1, 2012

Lichterman Nature Center Branching OUT and Scarecrows Exhibit Thru - November 16, 2012 Community Centers Central Defense Security Job Fairs noon - 3:00 p.m. October 2nd Raleigh October 5th Bert Ferguson Frayser Fall Festival 10:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m. October 6, 2012 Ed Rice Community Center Lester Job Fair October 12, 2012 10:00am - 2:00pm Lester Community Center Basketball Clinic October 20, 2012 10-00am - 2-00pm Ed Rice Community Center Halloween October 31st Contact your local community center for details.

The Mallory-Neely House Reopens November 9th SHARPE PLANETARIUM Autumn Night and Bad Astronomy Thru November 16th CTI IMAX Tornado Alley thru November 16th To the Arctic June 16, 2012 – March 8, 2013 EXHIBITS Women of Strength, Women of Color thru October 14th Elvis at 21: Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer thru October 14th Memphis Celebrates King Cotton Thru October 21st ZOO BOO October 19, 20, 26, 27 and 28

04 CITY PARKS FORUM BRIEFING PAPERS

How cities use parks to...

Create Safer Neighborhoods Executive Summary

Key Point #1

For those concerned that green spaces may foster crime and illegal activity, evidence now exists that the opposite may be true. When adjacent to residential areas, green spaces have been shown to create neighborhoods with fewer violent and property crimes and where neighbors tend to support and protect one another. These are the findings of scientists at the Human-Environment Research Laboratory of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign who studied green space alongside public housing in Chicago. Other researchers who are conducting similar studies across the country are finding similar results.

Time spent in nature immediately adjacent to home helps people to relieve mental fatigue, reducing aggression.

The factors that explain these findings emphasize the importance of greenery in community and personal wellness.Time spent in natural surroundings relieves mental fatigue, which in turn relieves inattentiveness, irritability, and impulsivity, recognized by psychologists as precursors to violence. Green spaces also support frequent, casual contact among neighbors.This leads to the formation of neighborhood social ties, the building blocks of strong, secure neighborhoods where people tend to support, care about, and protect one another.

The City Parks Forum is a program of the American Planning Association funded by the Wallace Foundation and the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation

Key Point #2 Green residential spaces are gathering places where neighbors form social ties that produce stronger, safer neighborhoods.

Key Point #3 Barren spaces are more frightening to people and are more crime prone than parks landscaped with greenery and open vistas.

Key Point #4 In order to make the best use of greenery and open space, it must be positively incorporated into a community's design.

American Planning Association Making Great Communities Happen


Parks and Neighborhoods