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Vol. XXXIV, Number 18 N February 1, 2013

Palo Alto’s sister-city program celebrates 50 years — and contemplates its future PAGE 16

Spectrum 12

Transitions 14

Eating Out 23

Movies 25 Puzzles 41

NArts ‘Peter and the Wolf’ in four languages

Page 20

NSports Unique postseason for Paly boys’ hoops

Page 27

NHome Mastering ‘A Year in the Garden’

Page 33

ANTIQUE CARPET SALE

Antique Sultanabad | Central Persia | 7’6” x 14’5” | $35,000 Sale: $16,000

Featuring the World Class Collection of a Famous Collector and Palo Alto Resident

Antique Khorasan Northeast Persia | 10’4” x 13’

Antique Sultanabad Central Persia | 8’3” x 10’9”

Antique Serapi Northwest Persia | 9’8” x 10”8”

Antique Farahan Central Persia | 8’11” x 11’3”

Antique Agra India | 7’10” x 9’8”

$40,000 Sale: $18,500

$24,500 Sale: $13,800

$30,000 Sale: $16,500

$22,500 Sale: $10,800

$17,500 Sale: $9,450

WORLD’S FINEST CARPETS AND TAPESTRIES 532 Ramona Street, Palo Alto, CA 94301 | Phone: 650.326.7900 | Open 7 days a week, 10am–6pm | www.pejmancarpet.com Page 2ÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊ£]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

Traffic, housing top list of citizen concerns .EWSURVEYSHOWSMOST0ALO!LTORESIDENTSAREGENERALLY HAPPYWITH@QUALITYOFLIFEINTHEIRCITY by Gennady Sheyner RAFFICCONGESTIONANDADEARTH OFAFFORDABLEHOUSINGCONTINUE TOFRUSTRATE0ALO!LTORESIDENTS EVEN AS MOST OF THEM CONTINUE TO GIVE THE CITY RAVE REVIEWS WHEN IT COMES TO OVERALL QUALITY OF LIFE A NEWSURVEYSHOWS !CCORDING TO THE .ATIONAL #ITI

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Veronica Weber

49ers fever heats up 2EENA#HANDRA LEFT ANDHERDAUGHTER6INEETA,EVINEENJOYPICKINGOUTER4 SHIRTSANDHATSFORFAMILYMEMBERSATTHEERS4EAM3TOREAT 4OWN#OUNTRY6ILLAGEON7EDNESDAYˆALLINANTICIPATIONOFTHEUPCOMING3UPER"OWL3UNDAY

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‘Positive psychology’ to be offered at Gunn High @,ITERATUREOFCOMEDY MOBILE DEVICEPROGRAMMINGAMONGUPCOMING0ALO!LTOCOURSES 0OSITIVE0SYCHOLOGYvAT'UNN (IGH3CHOOLANDTHEh,ITERA TUREOF#OMEDYvAT0ALO!LTO (IGH3CHOOLAREAMONGNEWCLASS ESSTUDENTSCOULDTAKETHISCOMING SCHOOLYEAR ! PARADE OF TEACHERS PRESENTED THEIRIDEASFORCOURSESBEFOREANEN THUSIASTIC"OARDOF%DUCATION4UES DAYNIGHT *AN h4HERATIONALEFORTHIS,ITERATURE OF #OMEDY CLASS COMES STRAIGHT FROM THE MOUTHS OF TEENS v SAID

by Chris 0ALY %NGLISH TEACHER ,UCY &ILPPU RECOUNTING THE QUESTIONS SHE GETS FROM STUDENTS ˆ h)S THIS ANOTHER TRAGEDY7HODIESINTHEENDvˆ ASTHEYLAUNCHINTOREADINGANOTHER TRAGEDY 0ROPOSINGACOURSEINWHICHSTU DENTS WILL READ 'REEK AND 3HAKE SPEAREANCOMEDY /SCAR7ILDEAND -ARK 4WAIN &ILPPU SAID h4HESE AUTHORS DEMAND AN UNDERSTANDING OF TASTE NUANCE INFERENCE ABSUR DITY SUBTEXTˆTHEVERYHIGHLEVELS

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(ABIBTOLDTHEBOARD h) HAD ONE STUDENT TELL ME SOME LESSONS SHE LEARNED ACTUALLY SAVED HERLIFE!SATEACHERTHERESNOBET TERCOMPENSATIONv 4HEPOSITIVEPSYCHCOURSEWILLFO CUSONRESEARCHASWELLASONhPRAC TICAL TOOLS PEOPLE CAN USE TO LEAD HAPPIER LIVES v SUCH AS REMEMBER INGDAILYWHATYOUAREGRATEFULFOR MEDITATIONACTSOFKINDNESSTOWARD (continued on page 9)

(continued on page 8)

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Upfront

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Support Palo Alto Weekly’s print and online coverage of our community. Join today: SupportLocalJournalism.org/PaloAlto Page 4ÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊ£]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210 PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505) EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Tyler Hanley (223-6519) Arts & Entertainment Editor Rebecca Wallace (223-6517) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant, Internship Coordinator Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Colin Becht, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Editorial Interns Rebecca Duran, Ranjini Raghunath ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Adam Carter (223-6574), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 2236569), Brent Triantos (223-6577), Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales David Cirner (223-6579), Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Rachel Palmer (223-6588) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6546) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Claire McGibeny (223-6546), Cathy Stringari (223-6544) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Bob Lampkin (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo

The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. ©2013 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

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HOUSING DISCRIMINATION

Students can laugh and learn simultaneously.

— Lucy Filppu, Palo Alto High School English teacher, on the new “Literature of Comedy” class to be offered beginning this fall. See story on page 3.

Around Town CITY OF HACKS ... Palo Alto caught attention of technologists the world over last year, when it co-sponsored its first citywide “hackathon” — a combination of hacking session, networking soiree and food-and-music festival. Now it looks as if this event has also caught the attention of the White House, which is hoping to push other cities to follow suit. The White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy has just scheduled a “National Day of Civic Hacking” on June 1 and 2. “A coalition of leading organizations, companies and government agencies have banded together to issue this challenge with the goal of promoting transparency, participation and collaboration among governments, startup, and citizens,” the office announced. The post notes that the nationwide hacking event is being modeled after the Super Happy Block Party, the Palo Alto hackathon that was co-sponsored by Innovation Endeavors, a local venture-capital firm founded by Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt. This time, federal agencies are looking to get in on the fun. Officials from NASA, the U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Labor will be among those offering “specific challenges for hackers to work during the event.” Not surprisingly, Palo Alto is among the roughly 30 cities that are already planning activities for this day. BRIDGING THE GAP ... In Robert Frost’s poem “Mending Wall,” the reader is left skeptical about a neighbor’s assertion that “good fences make good neighbors.” But if there’s one thing that Palo Alto residents have learned in recent years it’s that insufficient parking breeds neighborto-neighbor tension. That’s been the case downtown, where residents in the parking-deprived neighborhoods Professorville and Downtown North have been fighting downtown businesses over parking spots and lobbying the city to make sure new developments offer ample parking spots. And it’s now the case on the border of Palo Alto and East Palo Alto, where residents on one side of the Newell Road bridge are accusing those from the other side of crossing over and taking over their parking spots. The issue was brought to the forefront earlier this month when about a dozen residents from the area around Edgewood Drive and Newell Road in Palo Alto com-

plained about the problem of disappearing spots, speeding cars and increased littering on their blocks. The East Palo Alto drivers reportedly opted to cross the bridge for their parking needs because of new parking restrictions on their side of the bridge. Palo Alto’s planning officials responded swiftly, creating a “no parking anytime” restriction on Newell Road between Edgewood and the bridge and adding red striping at curbs near intersections. Chief Transportation Official Jaime Rodriguez said the city also plans to restripe the yellow center lines on Newell next week. The residents lobbied for more substantive solutions, such as parking permits. “My belief is that the real solution is to require permits for overnight parking on Edgewood as well as further down Newell if necessary,” resident Irving Rappaport told the commission. “And the other part of the solution is to get cooperation from East Palo Alto to deal with its part of the problem instead of pushing their problems onto the Palo Alto side of the bridge.” Ben Ball, who also lives on Edgwood, said he appreciates the efforts of city planners to improve the situation. But the “parking crisis” remains, he said. “We’ve been told it’ll take months and months to come up with a way to solve the problem, not withstanding the support we have of our Edgewood Drive neighbors,” Ball said. IN THE ZONE ... Three years after Palo Alto decided to remove requirements for ground-floor retail at the 600 block of Emerson Street, plans are afoot to bring these requirements back. The Planning and Transportation Commission Wednesday discussed the city’s plan to prevent the ground floors on the vibrant downtown block between Hamilton and Forest avenues from switching to offices, as has already happened at the former Fraiche Yogurt building. The commission didn’t vote, but members expressed enthusiasm for the rezoning effort, which was first proposed by Mayor Greg Scharff, Councilwoman Karen Holman and Councilman Greg Schmid. “It’s hard to have a thriving downtown area if you don’t have life on those ground floors,” Commissioner Alex Panelli said. “It totally makes sense.” The commission will continue this discussion and possibly vote on the zone change on Feb. 13. N

Upfront #)49#/5.#),

Palo Alto council looks to swear in new members earlier 4WOCOUNCILMENWARNOF@LEGALANDPRACTICALPROBLEMSUNDERCURRENTSYSTEM by Gennady Sheyner EEKINGTOSOLVEWHATTHEYCALL hLEGAL AND PRACTICAL PROB LEMS v TWO MEMBERS OF THE 0ALO !LTO #ITY #OUNCIL ARE URGING THEIR COLLEAGUES TO BE MORE EXPE DIENTINSWEARINGINNEWLYELECTED MEMBERS )NACOLLEAGUESMEMORELEASED 7EDNESDAY #OUNCILMEN ,ARRY +LEINAND'REG3CHMIDHAVEPRO POSEDCHANGINGTHESWEAR INDATE FORNEWCOUNCILMEMBERSFROMTHE FIRST -ONDAY IN *ANUARY ˆ AS IS THECURRENTPRACTICEˆTOTHEFIRST BUSINESS DAY 4HE MEMO NOTES THAT WHEN THE MAYOR IS A DEPART ING COUNCIL MEMBER AS 9IAWAY 9EHWASIN HISORHERTERM

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Residents debate Greer Road traffic-calming project 3OMESTILLWANTCLOSEDSTREETS SAYSPEEDBUMPSDONOTREDUCETRAFFICVOLUME by Sue Dremann

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Upfront ,!7%.&/2#%-%.4

County DA: ‘We made a mistake in this case’ SHAPING THE LEADERS OF TOMORROW

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Thursday, February 7th - 9 a.m.

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by Sandy Brundage WHATOPTIONSTHEPROSECUTIONHAD (EIMPLEMENTEDAPOLICYCHANGE ASARESULT&ROMNOWON ALLCASES INVOLVINGLAW ENFORCEMENTOFFICERS AS DEFENDANTS WILL GO TO !SSISTANT $ISTRICT !TTORNEY -ARC "ULLER FOR REVIEW 0UBLICCRITICISMTHATTHEINVESTIGAT INGOFFICERWASCONVENIENTLYABSENT ONLYFORTHE2AMIREZ 6ASQUEZCASES APPEARS UNFOUNDED 7HILE HELPING HIS WIFE THROUGH A LIFE THREATENING ILLNESS THE 3UNNYVALE OFFICER RE CEIVED FOUR S U B P O E N A S DURING *ULY AND !UGUST ANDTES TIFIEDINNONE OFTHOSECAS ES ACCORD INGTOPOLICE DEPARTMENT DATA(EWAS UNAVAILABLE *EFFREY6ASQUEZ FOR TWO CAS ES THEDEFEN DANTPLEADEDGUILTYINTHETHIRD AND THEFOURTHCASEˆTHEPROSECUTIONOF 2AMIREZˆWASDISMISSED 4HEOFFICERRETURNEDTOTHESTAND FOUR MONTHS LATER IN .OVEMBER  )TSSURPRISINGLYDIFFICULTTOLEARN HOWMANYPOLICEOFFICERSIN-ENLO 0ARK AS WELL AS THROUGHOUT 3ANTA #LARAAND3AN-ATEOCOUNTIES HAVE FACED PROSECUTION 4HE DISTRICT AT TORNEYOFFICESDONTTRACKTHATDATA ALTHOUGH 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY AT LEAST INTENDSTOSTART h7E DO NOT HAVE THE TECHNICAL CAPABILITY TO ANSWER THIS QUESTION COMPREHENSIVELY v -EDIA #OORDI NATOR 3EAN 7EBBY SAID h4HE $IS TRICT !TTORNEY HAS DIRECTED STAFF TO STUDYIMPROVINGOURDATASYSTEMSO THATWEWILLBEABLETOIDENTIFYSUCH CASESMOREEASILYINTHEFUTUREv 3AN -ATEO #OUNTY ON THE OTHER HAND ISNOTSOINCLINED h7EDEFINITELYDONOTKEEPSTATISTICS ONTHENUMBEROFOFFICERSPROSECUTED v $ISTRICT !TTORNEY 3TEVE 7AGSTAFFE SAID h7E HAVE PROSECUTED NUMER OUS OFFICERS OVER THE LAST FEW YEARS FORBOTHFELONIESANDMISDEMEANORS RANGINGFROMDRUNKDRIVINGTOTHEFT TOFELONYASSAULT"UTWEDONOTKEEP ALISTOFTHOSEPROSECUTIONSv

!SINOTHERJURISDICTIONS 3AN-A TEO #OUNTY MAINTAINS A CONFIDEN TIAL h"RADY LISTv OF POLICE OFFICERS CHARGEDORCONVICTEDOFANOFFENSE ANDDISCLOSESTHATINFORMATIONTOTHE DEFENSEINCERTAINCASES 4HE"RADYLISTPROVIDESSCANTDATA TO THE PUBLIC 4HE 53 3UPREME #OURT RULING IN THE  "RADY V -ARYLAND CASE STATES THAT PROS ECUTORS MUST DISCLOSE EXCULPATORY EVIDENCE TO THE DEFENSE INCLUDING MISCONDUCTBYAPOLICEOFFICERWHO MIGHTBECALLEDASAWITNESSINACASE IFTHATMISCONDUCTCOULDDISCREDITOR IMPEACHTHEOFFICERSTESTIMONY 7AGSTAFFESAID h4HEREAREUNDER OFFICERSPRESENTLYEMPLOYEDAND WORKINGINTHISCOUNTYONTHE"RADY LISTv (E NOTED THAT DURING HIS  YEARSATTHEDISTRICTATTORNEYSOFFICE h7E HAVE HAD DOZENS OF OFFICERS WHOENGAGEDINCONDUCTWEDEEMED "RADYANDDISCLOSABLEv 6ASQUEZRETURNEDTOHISJOBWITH THE-ENLO0ARK0OLICE$EPARTMENT AFTER AN ARBITRATOR OVERTURNED THE CITYSDECISIONTOFIREHIM 7HEN ASKED HOW MANY CURRENT POLICE OFFICERS HAVE CRIMINAL RE CORDS ANDHOWMANYOFFICERSWERE FIRED DURING THE PAST  YEARS THE CITY REFUSED TO ANSWER SAYING THAT NOSUCHRECORDSEXIST h4HISREQUESTFORSTATISTICSWOULD REQUIRETHE#ITYTOPHYSICALLYREVIEW INDIVIDUAL RECORDSPERSONNEL FILES AND CREATE DOCUMENTS THAT DO NOT EXIST 4HE RECORDS THEMSELVES ARE CONFIDENTIALPERSONNELINFORMATION WHICHWEAREREQUIREDTOMAINTAIN AS SUCH v SAID 'INA $ONNELLY HU MAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR FOR -ENLO 0ARK INANEMAILON*AN ,EGAL COUNSEL FOR THE #ALIFORNIA .EWSPAPER 0UBLISHERS !SSOCIATION #.0! SAIDITSHARDTOBELIEVENO DOCUMENT SUCHASANANNUALREPORT TO CITY MANAGEMENT ON EMPLOYEE DISCIPLINARYACTIONS EXISTS #.0! ATTORNEY *IM %WERT SAID h)FTHEYCLAIMTHATTHEYDONTTRACK THIS THEN THE ISSUE BECOMES WHY NOT4HECITYHASTREMENDOUSEXPO SURETOLIABILITYFORTHEACTSOFTHEIR EMPLOYEESWHOCARRYGUNS ANDTHEY DONTKEEPTRACKvN !LMANAC 3TAFF 7RITER 3ANDY "RUNDAGE CAN BE EMAILED AT SBRUNDAGE ALMANACNEWSCOM

Eric Van Susteren

Toyota SUV crashes into Palo Alto home

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Upfront %$5#!4)/.

Math, music are passions for home-schooled Intel finalist 0ALO!LTOS3AHANA6ASUDEVANATTENDEDPUBLICSCHOOLUNTILSCHEDULESNAFUPREVENTEDIT HE WORLD IS A CLASSROOM FOR  YEAR OLD0ALO!LTORESIDENT 3AHANA6ASUDEVAN /NAGIVENDAYTHEHOME SCHOOLED TEEN ˆ RECENTLY NAMED A FINALIST IN THE  )NTEL 3CIENCE 4ALENT 3EARCHˆMIGHTSTUDY&RENCHAND CHEMISTRY AT HOME ATTEND A MATH CLASSORTWOAT3TANFORD5NIVERSITY THEN HEAD OVER TO 0ALO !LTO (IGH 3CHOOL FOR AFTER SCHOOL MATH TEAM ACTIVITIES 3HEMAYALSOSPENDTIMESINGING ORPLAYINGVIOLINWITHFELLOWDEVO TEESOF)NDIANCLASSICALMUSIC 6ASUDEVANATTENDEDPUBLICSCHOOLS UNTILTHEAGEOF WHENHERUNUSUAL SCHEDULEOFADVANCEDMATHCLASSES BECAME TOO DIFFICULT TO RECONCILE WITHAREGULARHIGHSCHOOLDAY h)NSTEADOFBEINGINONEPLACE FOR MESCHOOLISALOTOFDIFFERENTPLAC ES vSHESAIDINANINTERVIEWWITHTHE 7EEKLY h)MEETALOTOFPEOPLE SO)DONT REALLYFEEL)VEMISSEDOUTONTHESO CIALASPECTOFANYTHINGv 0ALY MATH TEACHER 3UZ !NTINK CALLED6ASUDEVANANhENTHUSIASTICv AND hINNOVATIVEv MEMBER OF THE SCHOOLS !DVANCED 0ROBLEM 3OLV

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Veronica Weber

by Chris Kenrick

3AHANA6ASUDEVAN  ISAMONGFINALISTSOUTOF CONTESTANTS NATIONWIDE INTHE)NTEL3CIENCE4ALENT3EARCHCOMPETITION3AHANA ISHOME SCHOOLED BUTTAKESSOMEMATHCLASSESAT3TANFORD5NIVERSITY ANDPARTICIPATESIN0ALO!LTO(IGH3CHOOLMATHTEAM MEMBERNOTLIKINGITv 6ASUDEVAN ALSO BEGAN LEARNING VOCAL MUSIC AND VIOLIN BEFORE THE AGEOFANDTRAVELSTO)NDIATWICEA YEARTOSTUDYANDPERFORMˆANDTO VISITRELATIVES%ARLYINHERMUSICAL STUDY SHE BEGAN FOCUSING ON #AR NATICMUSIC AGENREFROMSOUTHERN )NDIA h7HEN ) GO TO )NDIA ) FOCUS ON MUSIC v SHE SAID h*UST LIKE MATH )VEBEENINTERESTEDINMUSICSINCE )WASREALLYYOUNGv 6ASUDEVAN SAID SHE EMBARKED ON THE )NTEL CONTEST AFTER MAKING PROGRESSONAPROBLEMGIVENTOHER BY 3TANFORD MATH PROFESSOR 0ERSI $IACONIS

(ER PROJECT h-INIMIZING THE .UMBER OF #ARRIES IN THE 3ET OF #OSET2EPRESENTATIVESOFA.ORMAL 3UBGROUP vWASCHOSENTOBEONEOF FINALISTSINACONTESTTHATINITIALLY DREW ENTRIES .EXT MONTH SHE AND THE OTHER FINALISTS WILL PRESENT THEIR PROJ ECTS TO JUDGES IN 7ASHINGTON $# FOR A CRACK AT THE TOP PRIZE OF  h)M KIND OF NERVOUS AND KIND OF EXCITED v SHE SAID h)T WILL BE REALLY NICE MEETING THE  OTHER FINALISTSvN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BEEMAILEDATCKENRICK PAWEEKLY COM

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Upfront #2)-).!,*534)#%

Driver charged in deaths of Palo Alto family @$ANGEROUSDRIVINGLEDTOFIERYCRASHON"RITISH#OLUMBIAHIGHWAY AUTHORITIESSAY 4HENEWSPAPERSAID"AGRISFLAT BED TRAILER ALLEGEDLY CROSSED THE CENTERLINEOFAHIGHWAYANDJACK KNIFED DIRECTLY IN THE PATH OF THE FAMILYS$ODGECAMPERANDA3U ZUKI 356 IT WAS TOWING PINNING THE VEHICLES AGAINST A HIGHWAY BARRIER AND ENGULFING ALL THREE IN FLAMES h7EDOGOTOALOTOFACCIDENTS BUT IT IS NOT VERY OFTEN THAT WE GO TO AN ACCIDENT WHERE A WHOLE FAMILY IS KILLED v 3TAFF 3ERGEANT -ARKO3HEHOVACOFTHE#OLUMBIA 6ALLEY "RITISH #OLUMBIA 2OYAL #ANADIAN -OUNTED 0OLICE TOLD THE0IONEER

h) THINK THESE ARE APPROPRIATE CHARGESGIVENTHEINVESTIGATIONv 0ROVINCIAL#OURT*UDGE2ON7EBB ISSUED A BENCH WARRANT FOR "AGRI ┬ИWHOMISSEDHISFIRSTSCHEDULED COURTAPPEARANCE┬ИREQUIRINGHEOR HISLAWYERTOAPPEAR&EB $IAS AND (OWARD WERE REMEM BERED BY FRIENDS AND FAMILY AS A CREATIVE BRIGHT AND HOSPITABLE COUPLE WHO LOVED TO EXPLORE THE OUTDOORSANDWEREACTIVEINTHE%L #ARMELO %LEMENTARY 3CHOOL COM MUNITY WHERE6ERONICAWASASTU DENT 3AMANTHA WAS A STUDENT AT *,3-IDDLE3CHOOLN ┬И0ALO!LTO7EEKLYSTAFF

Transportation

THECITYShTRAFFICSIGNALTIMINGvAS hGOODvORhEXCELLENTv 4HEPROBLEMMAYHAVEHELPEDIN FLUENCETHEBEHAVIOROFLOCALCOM MUTERS 4HE PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE COMMUTING ALONE BY A MOTORIZED VEHICLEDROPPEDFROMPERCENTIN  TO  PERCENT IN  WHILE THE PERCENTAGE OF THE PEOPLE WHO HAVEUSEDALOCALBUSINTHEPRIOR MONTHSHASRISENFROMPERCENTIN TOPERCENTIN4HEPER CENTAGEOFCOMMUTERSRELYINGONTHE BICYCLE JUMPED FROM  PERCENT TO PERCENTBETWEENAND .OTSURPRISINGLY ROADCONDITIONS ALSO ATTRACTED SOME CRITICISM AS THEYHADINPRIORYEARS/NLYPER CENT OF THE RESIDENTS RATED THE CITY AShGOODvORhEXCELLENTvONhSTREET REPAIR v THOUGH  PERCENT GAVE 0ALO!LTOTHEHIGHESTTWOGRADESFOR hSTREETCLEANINGv 4HE SURVEY AND THE ACCOMPANY ING3ERVICESAND!CCOMPLISHMENTS 2EPORT WHICH THE /FFICE OF THE #ITY !UDITOR PUBLISHES ANNUALLY HAVECOMEATATIMEOFRELATIVEECO NOMICPROSPERITYIN0ALO!LTO4HE CITYSFISCALPICTUREHASLARGELYSTA BILIZED SINCE THE 'REAT 2ECESSION OFLATETHANKSTOCONCESSIONS FROM CITY WORKERS A REDUCTION OF EMPLOYEES AT #ITY (ALL AND RISING SALES TAXREVENUES)NTHENEWSUR VEY  PERCENT OF THE RESPONDENTS RATED THE CITYS ECONOMIC DEVELOP

How Palo Alto residents rate transportation

MENTSERVICEShEXCELLENTvORhGOOD v COMPAREDTOPERCENTINAND PERCENTIN 2ESIDENTS ARE ALSO FEELING BETTER

THAN IN YEARS PAST ABOUT THEIR PER SONALECONOMICFUTURE THOUGHTHESE NUMBERS HAVE PLENTY OF ROOM FOR IMPROVEMENT )N   PERCENT

SAIDTHEYEXPECTTHENEXTSIXMONTHS WOULDHAVEAhSOMEWHATvORhVERYv POSITIVEIMPACTONTHEIRFAMILY4HIS ISWELLABOVETHEPERCENTWHOFELT POSITIVE ABOUT THEIR ECONOMIC FU TURESINANDTHEPERCENTWHO FELTTHATWAYIN 7HILEPERCENTISHARDLYAREA SONTOCHEER THESURVEYNOTESTHATIN 0ALO!LTOhTHEPERCENTOFRESIDENTS WITHANOPTIMISTICOUTLOOKONTHEIR HOUSEHOLD INCOME WAS MORE THAN COMPARISONJURISDICTIONSv %CONOMIC DEVELOPMENT APPEARS TOHAVEFACTOREDHEAVILYINRESIDENTS FEELINGS ABOUT 0ALO !LTOS OVERALL SERVICEQUALITY4HENEWREPORTIN CLUDESAhKEYDRIVERANALYSIS vWHICH AIMSTOIDENTIFYFACTORSTHATAREMOST RELATEDTORESIDENTSRATINGSOFOVER ALLQUALITYOFLOCALSERVICES)N THESEWEREECONOMICDEVELOPMENT GARBAGECOLLECTION PUBLIC INFORMA TION SERVICES RECREATION PROGRAMS ORCLASSESANDSTREETREPAIR 4HE ANALYSIS SUGGESTS THAT OF THESEFIVEDRIVERS STREETREPAIRMAY DESERVETHEMOSTATTENTIONBECAUSE ITISTHEONLYONETHATISSIMILARTO BENCHMARK COMPARISONS &OR THE OTHERFOURCATEGORIES 0ALO!LTOhWAS ABOVE THE BENCHMARK AND SHOULD CONTINUETOENSUREHIGHQUALITYPER FORMANCE vTHESURVEYSTATESN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM

(EALSOHOPESTOHAVEOTHERBUY BACK PROGRAMS FOR THE THREE CITIES IF THE &EBRUARY EVENT IS SUCCESS FUL4HEPROGRAMTHEYPUTTOGETHER COULD ULTIMATELY BE SHARED WITH ORGANIZATIONS AROUND THE COUNTRY HESAID !LREADY THEIDEAISCATCHINGON ,EE HAS RECEIVED INQUIRIES FROM PLACES AS FAR AWAY AS .EW 9ORK #ONNECTICUTAND4EXAS HESAID h4HELONG TERMVISIONISTOHAVE THE PROGRAMS RUN ON A SYSTEMATIC BASISINCOMMUNITIESALLAROUNDTHE COUNTRY vHESAID #OOK AFORMER53-ARINEWHO ISTRAINEDINSAFEHANDLINGOFFIRE ARMS SAID HE HAS BEEN STRUCK BY HOW MANY PEOPLE DONT HAVE THE TRAININGTOHANDLEFIREARMSSAFELY h)LIKEDTHEIDEA BEYONDTHEOB VIOUS REASONS v SAID #OOK WHO IS

ALSOTHECHAIRMANOFTHE0ALO!LTO 5TILITIES !DVISORY #OMMISSION h4HETHREECOMMUNITIESARESOIN TERRELATED 4HE BUYBACK PROGRAM PROVIDES AN OPPORTUNITY TO WORK COLLABORATIVELYv 4HEGROUPISALSOPROMOTINGGUN SAFETY THROUGH THE CITIES POLICE DEPARTMENTS CITY COUNCILS 0AR ENT4EACHER!SSOCIATIONSAND0ALO !LTO5NIFIED3CHOOL$ISTRICT #OOK SAID (E ALSO PLANS TO WORK WITH THENEWLYFOUNDEDRESIDENTSGROUP 3ILICON6ALLEY#OMMUNITY!GAINST 'UN6IOLENCE h!LLOFTHESEGROUPSWORKINGTO GETHERAREBOUNDTOHAVESOMESUC CESS vHESAID 0ALO !LTO 0OLICE $EPARTMENT SPOKESMAN ,T :ACH 0ERRON SAID HIS DEPARTMENT IS LOOKING FORWARD TOTHEEVENT

h7EREEXCITEDTOWORKCOLLABORA TIVELYWITHOURPARTNERSINTHE%AST 0ALO !LTO AND -ENLO 0ARK POLICE DEPARTMENTSANDALSOWITH0ROTECT /UR#HILDREN )NC v0ERRONSAID 4HEBUYBACKWILLBEHELDAT%AST 0ALO!LTOS#ITY(ALL 5NIVER SITY !VE BUT THE TIME HAS NOT YET BEEN SET #OOK SAID 0EOPLE WILL BEABLETOTURNINTHEGUNSANONY MOUSLY REGARDLESSOFTHEFIREARMS HISTORY 5NLIKE OTHER BUYBACKS THE PRO GRAMWILLGIVECASHINSTEADOFGIFT CARDSINEXCHANGEFORTHEWEAPONS 4OGETMOREPOWERFULWEAPONSOFF THE STREET THE COMPENSATION WILL BE BASED ON THE FIREPOWER AND DANGEROFTHEGUN(YPOTHETICALLY A SMALL CALIBER HANDGUN WITH A SMALL MAGAZINE MIGHT FETCH  FOREXAMPLE WHILEAHIGH POWERED

ASSAULTWEAPONWITHALARGEMAGA ZINEWOULDGARNERMORE┬ИPERHAPS OR #OOKSAID 4HEGROUPHOPESTHEREMOVALOF GUNSFROMTHEPUBLICWILLHELPCURB ACCIDENTAL SHOOTINGS SUICIDES AND HOMICIDES ESPECIALLYINHOMES HE SAID h4HERE ARE SO MANY DIFFERENT STORIES OUT THERE OF MANY PEOPLE WHO HAVE GUNS AND DONT WANT THEMANYMORE SUCHASAGRANDPAR ENTWHODOESNTWANTAGUNAROUND FOR THE GRANDKIDS TO GET INTO v HE SAIDN !DDITIONALINFORMATIONABOUTTHE GUN BUYBACK EVENT WILL BE POSTED ONWWW0ALO!LTO/NLINECOMWHEN ITBECOMESAVAILABLE 3TAFF 7RITER 3UE $REMANN CAN BEEMAILEDATSDREMANN PAWEEK LYCOM

A

(continued from page 3)

ASCORETHATRATES0ALO!LTOhMUCH ABOVEv BENCHMARK CITIES 4HE CITY SCOREDPARTICULARLYWELLWHENRESI DENTS COMPARED ITS SERVICES WITH THOSE OFFERED BY THE FEDERAL GOV ERNMENTWHICHPERCENTRATEDAS hGOODOREXCELLENTv THESTATEGOV ERNMENTPERCENTOFTHERESIDENTS AND3ANTA#LARA#OUNTYPERCENT THOUGHTHISISAMAJORIMPROVEMENT FROMPERCENTIN  4HESURVEYSEXECUTIVESUMMARY NOTES THAT hON AVERAGE RESIDENTS GAVEVERYFAVORABLERATINGSTOMOST OFLOCALGOVERNMENTSERVICES vPAR TICULARLY WHEN COMPARED TO THEIR COUNTERPARTSINOTHERCITIES h/FTHESERVICESFORWHICHCOM PARISONS WERE AVAILABLE  WERE ABOVE THE BENCHMARK COMPARISON ANDEIGHTWERESIMILARTOTHEBENCH MARKCOMPARISON vTHESURVEYSTATES 4RAFFIC CONGESTION HOWEVER RE MAINS A SORE ISSUE FOR 0ALO !LTO RESIDENTS )N THE NEW SURVEY  PERCENTOFTHERESPONDENTSGAVETHE CITYHIGHRATINGSINTHEhEASEOFCAR TRAVELv CATEGORY ┬И AN  PERCENT DROP FROM  AND A  PERCENT DROP FROM  #OMPARED WITH SIMILARJURISDICTIONS THERATINGWAS BELOWAVERAGE )NADDITION ONLYPERCENTRATED

Gun buyback (continued from page 3)

"UT GUN BUYBACKS HAVE PROVEN POPULARWHENTHEREHASBEENENOUGH CASHASANINCENTIVE ANDINTHEAF TERMATHOF.EWTOWNTHEYHAVEBEEN EVENMOREEFFECTIVE ,EESAID!RE CENTPROGRAMIN3AN-ATEONETTED ABOUT  FIREARMS INCLUDING  ASSAULTRIFLESANEARLIERBUYBACKIN -ARINBROUGHTINGUNSWITHIN FOURTOFIVEHOURS HESAID ,EE SAID HE AND #OOK WILL BE MEASURINGTHEEFFICACYOFTHEPRO GRAM 4HREE 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY GRADUATESTUDENTSFROMTHELAWAND ECONOMICSSCHOOLSWILLGATHERDATA ONGUN RELATEDCRIMESOFALLKINDS BEFOREANDAFTERTHEBUYBACKTOSEE IFITMADEANIMPACT ,EESAID

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Courtesy of the Howard family

#ANADIAN TRUCK DRIVER FACES CHARGESINTHEDEATHSOFFOUR MEMBERSOFA0ALO!LTOFAM ILYWHOWEREWASKILLEDININ A FIERY CRASH WHILE VACATIONING IN +OOTENAY .ATIONAL 0ARK IN "RITISH #OLUMBIA A #ANADIAN NEWSPAPER HASREPORTED *ASWINDER 3INGH "AGRI  WAS CHARGED*ANIN)NVERMERE0RO VINCIAL#OURTWITHMULTIPLECOUNTS OFDANGEROUSDRIVINGINTHE*ULY  CRASH THAT KILLED !NA -ARIE $IASAND2OBERT(OWARDANDTHEIR TWO DAUGHTERS 3AMANTHA  AND 6ERONICA  THE #OLUMBIA 6ALLEY 0IONEERREPORTED

4HEDRIVERTHATALLEGEDLYCAUSEDTHEFATALCRASHIN#ANADAINVOLVING THEENTIRE0ALO!LTOFAMILY┬И2OBERT(OWARD LEFT !NA -ARIA$IAS 6ERONICA(OWARDAND3AMANTHA(OWARD┬ИIN*ULYWASCHARGED WITHMULTIPLECOUNTSOFDANGEROUSDRIVING

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

Ease of car travel

51%

62%

66%

65%

60%

65%

60%

61%

52%

Ease of rail travel

71%

64%

62%

63%

52%

55%

60%

69%

64%

Ease of bicycle travel

81%

77%

81%

79%

78%

84%

78%

79%

80%

Ease of walking

82%

83%

85%

82%

86%

88%

87%

86%

85%

TrafямБc ямВow on major streets

36%

40%

47%

46%

38%

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

0ERCENThEXCELLENTvORhGOODv FROMTHE.ATIONAL#ITIZEN3URVEY

How Palo Alto residents get to work 2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Motorized vehicle (car, van, truck, motorcycle, etc.) alone

55%

63%

61%

68%

59%

Motorized vehicle (car, van, truck, motorcycle, etc.) with other passengers

5%

9%

9%

8%

6%

Bicycle

20%

11%

13%

9%

16%

Walk

6%

6%

5%

7%

4%

FROMTHE.ATIONAL#ITIZEN3URVEY

Upfront

News Digest

Course

City racks up costs as street project evolves

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Menlo Park names new police chief 2OBERT*ONSEN A YEARVETERANOFTHE,OS!NGELES#OUNTY3HERIFFS $EPARTMENT HASBEENNAMEDTHENEWPOLICECHIEFOF-ENLO0ARK #ITY -ANAGER!LEX-C)NTYREANNOUNCED7EDNESDAY *AN *ONSENSUCCEEDS,EE6IOLETT WHOHASBEENINTER IMCHIEFSINCEFORMER#HIEF"RYAN2OBERTSLEFTLAST !UGUST*ONSENISEXPECTEDTOSTARTINMID &EBRUARY AFTERAREQUIRED0EACE/FFICER3TANDARDSAND4RAIN INGCOMPLIANTBACKGROUNDCHECKISCONDUCTED &ORTHEPASTTWOYEARS THENEWCHIEFHASBEEN CAPTAIN OF THE ,ANCASTER 3HERIFFS 3TATION IN ,OS !NGELES#OUNTY OVERSEEINGDEPUTIESINTHECITY OFABOUT RESIDENTS0RIORTOTHAT HEHEADED ANhANTI CRIMEEFFORTIN!NTELOPE6ALLEYTHATHELPED REDUCECRIMERATESTOTHEIRLOWESTINOVERADECADE v ACCORDINGTOTHE-ENLO0ARKPRESSRELEASE 2OBERT*ONSEN *ONSENHOLDSABACHELORSDEGREEFROM#ALIFOR NIA3TATE5NIVERSITY ,ONG"EACH ANDAMASTERSDEGREEINORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIPFROM7OODBURY5NIVERSITYIN3OUTHERN#ALIFORNIAN ˆ0ALO!LTO7EEKLYSTAFF

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Upfront

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

Mountain View parking dispute leads to fisticuffs For a complete list of classes and class fees, lectures and health education resources, visit pamf.org/healtheducation.

!MANPUNCHEDAWOMANINTHEFACEAFTERSHESLAPPEDHIMINSIDEA -OUNTAIN6IEWSUPERMARKET-ONDAYAFTERNOON *AN POLICESAID 4HECONFRONTATIONALLEGEDLYSTEMMEDFROMADISPUTEOVERTHEWAYTHE MANPARKEDHISCAR(Posted Jan. 30 at 4:03 p.m.)

Feb. 2013

March is National Nutrition Month Special Nutrition Month Author Events – Mountain View Center Celebrate by visiting the Mountain View Center every Wednesday evening in March from 7 to 9 p.m., for a discussion, tasting and/or food demonstration led by a local food author. Featured authors are: Laura Stec, Cool Cuisine: Taking the Bite Out of Global Warming – Mar. 6 Stephanie Lucianovic, Suffering Succotash: A Picky Eater’s Quest to Understand Why We Hate the Food We Hate – Mar. 13 Lisa Barnes, The Petit Appetit Cookbook – Mar. 20 Donia Bijan, Maman’s Homesick Pie: A Persian Heart in an American Kitchen – Mar. 27

Mountain View Center %%L#AMINO2EAL -OUNTAIN6IEWs   For more information, visit pamf.org/nutrition-month for more details.

Personalized Cholesterol Management Tuesday, Feb. 12, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Palo Alto Center 795 El Camino Real, Palo Alto

Presented by Catherine Henderson, R.N. PAMF Cardiology 650-853-4879

Have you ever wondered why you have to take a larger dose of cholesterol lowering medication than your friend? Or why changing your diet doesn’t lower your cholesterol level enough? Please join us for a presentation that will focus on the different levels of intervention and treatments to lower blood cholesterol levels, from lifestyle modiďŹ cation to medication management. We will discuss how the available research and data shapes the choices you and your doctor make to keep a healthy cholesterol level.

Editorial: Why the secrecy in Menlo Park? 2ECENTREQUESTSBYTHE!LMANACFORINFORMATIONABOUTPOLICEDEPART MENTMATTERSHAVEPRODUCEDSOMETROUBLINGRESPONSESFROMTHECITYOF -ENLO0ARK(Posted Jan. 30 at 12:05 p.m.)

Palo Alto woman, dog struck by hit-and-run driver ! YEAR OLD0ALO!LTOWOMANANDHERDOGWERESTRUCKBYAHIT AND RUNDRIVERON&RIDAY *AN AND0ALO!LTOPOLICEARESEEKING INFORMATIONABOUTTHEDRIVERSWHEREABOUTS(Posted Jan. 30 at 9:46 a.m.)

Teen attacked while riding bike in Mountain View !TEENAGERRIDINGHISBICYCLEIN-OUNTAIN6IEWON-ONDAYNIGHT *AN WASSERIOUSLYINJUREDWHENANASSAILANTSTRUCKHIMINTHEHEAD POLICESAID(Posted Jan. 30 at 8:15 a.m.)

Former 49er in court over fight at Su Hong To Go !JURYTRIALISSETFOR!PRILIN3AN-ATEO#OUNTY3UPERIOR#OURT FORFORMER3AN&RANCISCOEROFFENSIVETACKLEAND0ALO!LTORESIDENT +WAME(ARRIS(Posted Jan. 29 at 4:53 p.m.)

Bicyclist, cars struck by hit-and-run driver ! YEAR OLD0ALO!LTOWOMANALLEGEDLYSTRUCKABICYCLISTANDTWO CARSONTHE3TANFORDCAMPUS THENFLEDTHESCENE-ONDAYAFTERNOON *AN ACCORDINGTO3TANFORDPOLICE(Posted Jan. 29 at 9:36 a.m.)

AT&T’s sweeping antenna plan wins final OK !CONTENTIOUSPLANBY!44TOMOUNTDOZENSOFANTENNASONUTILITY POLESTHROUGHOUT0ALO!LTOCRUISEDTOTHEFINISHLINE-ONDAYNIGHT *AN  WHEN THE CITY APPROVED THE FINAL TWO PHASES OF THE PROJECT DESPITECOMPLAINTSFROMRESIDENTSWHOLIVENEARTHEPROPOSEDANTENNA SITES(Posted Jan. 28 at 10:45 p.m.)

Minor damages reported in laundromat fire 0ALO!LTOFIREFIGHTERSWERECALLEDTOAFIREATACOIN OPERATEDLAUN DROMAT-ONDAYMORNING *AN ACCORDINGTOAPRESSRELEASE(Posted Jan. 28 at 4 p.m.)

Clutter fuels house fire in Mountain View /NEPERSONSUFFEREDMINORINJURIESINATWO ALARMFIREINNORTHEASTERN -OUNTAIN6IEW-ONDAYMORNING *AN FIREOFFICIALSSAID-OUNTAIN 6IEWAND0ALO!LTOFIREFIGHTERSWEREBUSYREMOVINGSMOLDERINGDEBRIS FROMTHEHOMEATAROUNDAM(Posted Jan. 28 at 1:34 p.m.)

POST acquires 1,000 more acres of open space 4HE0ENINSULA/PEN3PACE4RUSTISRICHERINOPENSPACEBYNEARLY  ACRESAFTERSPENDINGABOUTMILLIONFORTHREETRACTSOFLAND IN3AN-ATEO#OUNTYONTHEWESTERNSIDEOFTHE3ANTA#RUZMOUNTAINS (Posted Jan. 28 at 11:42 a.m.)

Women’s Health Update 2013 Monday, Feb. 25, 7 to 8:30 p.m. San Carlos Library 610 Elm Street, San Carlos

Stanford stalker faces six months in jail Presented by Christina A. Lee, M.D. PAMF Hospitalists

!FORMER3TANFORD5NIVERSITYSTUDENTFACESUPTOSIXMONTHSINJAIL FORHACKINGHEREX BOYFRIENDSCOMPUTER ACCORDINGTOTHE3AN-ATEO #OUNTY$ISTRICT!TTORNEYS/FFICE(Posted Jan. 28 at 9:51 a.m.)

Please contact Rhea Bradley at 650-591-0341, extension 237.

Firefighters use CO2 to douse underground blaze

Dr. Lee will provide an overview of current recommendations and controversies in women’s health. Topics will include preventative care, osteoporosis, menopause and urinary incontinence.

&IREFIGHTERSUSEDA#/CANISTERTOEXTINGUISHANUNDERGROUNDFIRE IN0ALO!LTO-ONDAYMORNING *AN ABATTALIONCHIEFSAID (Posted Jan. 28 at 7:57 a.m.)

Man shot, killed in East Palo Alto Saturday ! YEAR OLDMANWASSHOTMULTIPLETIMES3ATURDAYNIGHT *AN IN%AST0ALO!LTOANDDIEDOFHISWOUNDSONTHESCENE ACCORDINGTO POLICE(Posted Jan. 27 at 8:25 a.m.)

Mother and child injured in Menlo Park shooting !MOTHERANDTODDLERWERESHOTANDINJUREDIN-ENLO0ARK3ATURDAY EVENING *AN INAPOSSIBLEGANG RELATEDDRIVE BYSHOOTING ACCORD INGTOPOLICE(Posted Jan. 26 at 11:59 p.m.) twitter.com/paloaltomedical facebook.com/ paloaltomedicalfoundation

pamfblog.org youtube.com/ paloaltomedical

Scan this code with your smartphone for more health education information. Get the free mobile scanner app at http://gettag.mobi.

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Want to get news briefs emailed to you every weekday? Sign up for Express, our new daily e-edition. Go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com to sign up.

Upfront

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (Jan. 28)

AT&T: The council upheld the decision of the Planning Director to allow AT&T to move forward with the final two phases of its plan to install about 80 antennas on utility poles throughout the city. Yes: Unanimous Retreat: The council approved a proposed agenda for its annual retreat on Feb. 2. The retreat includes a priority-setting session and discussion of the city’s guiding principles and core values. Yes: Unanimous

Board of Education (Jan. 29)

Boundary change: The board approved a boundary change between the attendance areas of Addison and Walter Hays elementary schools, effective beginning in the 2013-14 school year. Yes: Unanimous Bond issuance: The board discussed a proposal for issuance and sale of $70 million in bonds under the $378 million “Strong Schools” bond approved by voters in 2008. A final vote is expected Feb. 12. Action: None

Planning and Transportation Commission (Jan. 30)

California Ave.: The commission discussed the status of the California Avenue streetscape project and a staff proposal to replace the streetlights on California Avenue. Commissioners said they support replacing the lights but did not vote on the project. Action: None Emerson Street: The commission discussed a proposal to institute a retail requirement on the ground floor of buildings in the 600 block of Emerson Street. The commission will continue its discussion on Feb. 13. Action: None

City Council Rail Committee (Jan. 31)

COMMUNIT Y TALK:

Rail: The committee heard a report from its high-speed rail lobbyist in Sacramento and discussed potential changes to the California Environmental Quality Act. Action: None

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to hold a retreat to set its priorities for 2013. The meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 2, in the Palo Alto Art Center (1313 Newell Road). CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to discuss the Service Efforts and Accomplishments report and the results of National Citizens Survey for 2012. The council will also discuss ways to deal with the rising heath care costs for employees and consider a proposal from Larry Klein and Greg Schmid for council reorganization. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 4, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL FINANCE COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to consider a recommendation for a carbon-neutrality plan for the electric supply portfolio. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 5, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to interview candidates for the Public Art Commission, the Parks and Recreation Commission and the Planning and Transportation Commission. The meeting will begin at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 6, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PLANNING AND TRANSP0RTATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss a proposal by Jay Paul for initiation of a planned community (PC) zone to accommodate a four-story office development at 395 Page Mill Road and a three-story public-safety building with an attached seven-level parking structure at 3045 Park Blvd. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 6, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD ... The board plans to hear a request by Jacobs, on behalf of the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University, for a review of new exterior storefronts, signage and awnings for the American Girl store at Stanford Shopping Center, 180 El Camino Real. The board also plans to review 780 Welch Road, a request by WRNS Studio on behalf of Stanford University Lands and Buildings for review of a replacement of a three-story building. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 7, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). CUBBERLEY POLICY ADVISORY COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to hear an update on the work of the Cubberley Community Advisory Committee. The meeting will begin at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 7, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm problem, affecting over 2 million Americans. Without detection and treatment, atrial fibrillation can affect quality of life and cause stroke and heart failure. Expert Stanford physician specialists will discuss the signs and symptoms of atrial fibrillation and the options for evaluation and treatment, which may improve quality of life and decrease complications. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9 9:30AM – 11:00AM Sheraton Palo Alto (Reception Room) 625 El Camino Real r Palo Alto, CA RSVP at: stanfordhospital.org/heartmonth This event is free and open to the public. Please register, seating is limited. MODERATED BY: Paul J. Wang, MD, FACC, FHRS, FAHA Professor of Medicine Director, Stanford Cardiac Arrhythmia Service

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Editorial City proudly leads on ‘carbon neutral’ Major push to go green puts Palo Alto on cusp of major milestone s President Obama promised to take on the threat of climate change in his inaugural speech last week, Palo Alto residents can take comfort that their city has been focused on the effort to reduce greenhouse gases for quite a few years. Showing more determination to reduce the production of carbon pollutants than during his first term, the President promised a vigorous attack on emissions that cause global warming, like those produced by coal-fired power plants. No such effort will be required in Palo Alto, where the city’s utility officials note that this year they expect the entire operation to be “carbon neutral.� Reaching this milestone means that overall, the city’s electric power will have net zero carbon emissions when the purchase of all energy types is balanced out. The definition of carbon neutral was approved by the City Council in November. It says, “A carbon-neutral electric-supply portfolio will demonstrate annual net-zero greenhouse GHG emissions, measured at the Citygate, in accordance with the Climate Registry’s Electric Power Sector protocol for GHG emissions measurement and reporting.� Palo Alto residents benefit from not only living in a community that is leading the way in reducing GHG emissions, but doing so without pushing electricity rates above those charged by PG&E. Although not the best measure of comparison, in November the median residential electric bill was $48.49 for Palo Alto residents and $59.98 for PG&E customers, according to city staff. And when the slightly higher cost of going carbon neutral is included next year, the additional average cost increase will be between $2.60 and $4.20 a year, literally just pennies a month. In addition to purchasing clean electricity and holding down costs, the city has moved on numerous other fronts to act on global warming. Back in 2006, environmentalists formed the area’s first Green Ribbon Task Force that issued a call for the city to take numerous actions to reduce emissions. Among the highlights in its report: promote public transportation; create a much tougher green building code; and reduce emissions from the city’s own vehicles. One goal that may have been considered a nearly insurmountable challenge back then was reaching carbon neutrality in the purchase of electric power, a benchmark that the city will surpass this year. From this modest beginning, the city has moved forward on many fronts, to: s3TRENGTHENTHEGREENBUILDINGCODE s)NSTALLELECTRIC VEHICLECHARGINGSTATIONSINPUBLICGARAGES s2EQUIREDOWNTOWNDEVELOPERSTOOFFER#ALTRAINPASSESTOBUILDing tenants, and; s %XPLORE WAYS TO BRING SMART METER TECHNOLOGY TO ELECTRICITY customers. Another success story for the city’s electric utility is PaloAltoGreen, a program that allows residential and commercial customers to purchase energy exclusively from wind and solar sources for an additional 1.5 cents per kilowatt hour. The percentage of participants by neighborhood is impressive, with Crescent Park leading the way at 35 percent, but closely followed by College Terrace, Community Center, Duveneck/St. Francis and Leland Manor/Garland. Barron Park, Fairmeadow, Palo Verde, Southgate and Greenmeadow had close to 30 percent participation. More than 200 commercial users are also in the program, including HP, Lockheed, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati and the Vi at Palo Alto. Overall, 21.5 percent of the electric utility’s customers took part in the program, enough to win first place in the Dept. of Energy’s national contest for the sixth time. Finally, another bright spot is a modest reduction of GHG emissions from the city’s operations in the last seven years. Direct emissions from natural gas use and the landfill were down 4,400 metric tons between 2005 and the projected amount released in 2012. In other areas, emissions from electricity generation is down 66,000 metric tons during the same period, and down 43,000 metric tons from transportation and solid waste. If a city the size of Palo Alto can bring its emissions down by more than 100,000 metric tons in seven years, other Bay Area and U.S. cities can follow the lead and join in a concerted effort to go green. It will take much more effort by cities, as well as the state and federal government, to make a real impact on the dangerous greenhouse gases that continue to contribute to global warming. But at least we’re proving that it can be done with minimal pain and sacrifice.

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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Keep the status quo Editor, The obvious solution for the Newell bridge is to replace it with one that fixes the flood problem, that maintains two lanes of traffic as today (one in each direction, although perhaps a tiny bit wider, so two cars fit side by side) and that add a small lane on each side for pedestrians and people on bikes, who currently have a dangerous time crossing the bridge. This essentially keeps the status quo while implementing the flood management plan and while adding to the safety of people not in cars. For those concerned about slightly improved automobile lanes, speed humps could be added to the end of the bridge, complementing the stop sign at the other end, in order to calm traffic. People in nearby neighborhoods who don’t like the status quo should have considered buying elsewhere. Andy Robin Walnut Drive Palo Alto

Explore trench option Editor, Cars under tracks at Churchill, Meadow and Charleston? No way! Side streets joining Churchill, Meadow and Charleston within 600 feet of the tracks would be cut off. Numerous private homes would be taken. To maintain connection of cross streets with Alma, cars on Alma would be forced to go through a dipsy-doodle at every intersection. Worst, school kids on foot or bikes would be forced to cross Alma at the bottom of the pit. Imagine a kid on a bike, rolling down the ramp and losing control, shooting out into Alma traffic. Compare the cost of trenching with the cost of underpasses. Two stretches of trench are required: one between Adobe and Matadero creeks for the Charleston and Meadow crossings, and one under Churchill. Each trench has 1,000-foot ramps at each end. For comparison, three underpasses would require a total of 600 feet of street at depth plus 12 ramps 600 feet long from depth to the surface. Cost elements are cubic yards of soil excavated, cubic yards of concrete poured, relocating utilities, taking of private property, and measures to keep the trains rolling during construction. My guess is the cost of trenching would be somewhat more than the underpasses, but not a lot more, so the obvious benefits of tracks-in-trench outweigh the higher cost. A competent engineer could get a good ballpark number in a week or two, so let’s do the math and settle this issue once and for all. “Big Bill� Cutler Park Boulevard Palo Alto

This week on Town Square Town Square is an online discussion forum at www.PaloAltoOnline.com Posted Jan. 30 at 11:52 p.m. by Full Circle, a resident of the College Terrace neighborhood: The California Avenue streetscape project has come a full circle. It started off as a small Capital Improvement Project to replace the streetlights. When it was found that the cost of replacing the streetlights exceeded the budget, the decision was made to use the funds for streetscape improvements like replacing the trees. After the clear cutting fiasco, there was simply an acceptance that replacing the lights was still too expensive. Then, over a period of time, all the new elements of the current proposal were piled on top and council

approved increasing the budget. Neither the residents, the merchants, the property owners, the staff, the PTC nor council considered adding back the street lights that started off the whole process, until very recently. Yes, it’s too bad that no one thought to add back the lights earlier. But, it’s simply not accurate for (Michael) Alcheck to say no one was discussing them. Alcheck’s lamentations show that he has no knowledge of the history of this project. This is what the city gets when council appoints a young real estate attorney who had not attended any Planning Commission meetings prior to his appointment.

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

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Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on 4OWN 3QUARE A READER FORUM SPONSORED BY THE 7EEKLY ON OUR COMmunity website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editor’s blog or just stay up on what people are TALKINGABOUTAROUNDTOWN

Guest Opinion

Just do it! Biking will make you healthy, wealthy and on time Start the year out right by exploring the city’s numerous opportunities for easy cycling by Yoriko Kishimoto ow are you doing on your N ew Ye a r ’s resolutions? It’s not too late to start a lifelong habit to truly make you healthier, wealthier and wiser. You guessed it — it is walking and biking on a daily basis. Nationally, about 40 percent of all trips are less than two miles, an easy distance for cyclists. The latest census survey showed that the percentage of residents who commute mostly by bike in Palo Alto crossed the 10 percent mark, making our city second in the nation after Davis. Menlo Park (8.8 percent), Mountain View (6.2 percent) and other neighboring communities are close behind. But we can do better — much better. Just think about Amsterdam and Copenhagen where the weather is much less ideal and yet cycling has become part of the everyday culture and lifestyle. In Copenhagen, 36 percent of residents get to work or school by bike and 50 percent use a bike everyday. Here are 10 things you can do to help the environment, avoid congestion, and most of all, improve your health and pocketbook: s 4AKE YOUR BIKE OUT OF THE GARAGE AND get it tuned up. Biking is a lot more fun, easy and safe with a bike that works. Don’t forget a helmet and lights. s 'ET IN SHAPE ) WAS NEVER A 3PANDEX

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cyclist, but I signed up for a century ride (100 miles) around Lake Tahoe for my 50th birthday seven years ago. Once you do a century, you can breeze across town. Yes, it felt great and the coaching and camaraderie helped a lot. s ,EARN THE BEST BIKE ROUTES AROUND TOWN 4HERE ARE QUICK ROUTES FOR EXPERTS and scenic routes for those who want to avoid traffic. (Check out bike routes on 'OOGLEMAPSANDHTTPBIKESILICONVALLEY ORGCONTENT s 7ALK OR BIKE TO SCHOOL OR WORK ˆ AT least once a week. You’ll be surprised how addicting it is. s !S A DRIVER SHARE THE ROAD AND OBEY the rules. s4HESAMEFORCYCLISTS s&ORTHOSEGOINGLONGERDISTANCES CONsider combining biking with Caltrain or EXPRESSBUSES s3UPPORTOURCITYANDREGIONSEFFORTSTO improve our bike infrastructure. You could JOIN THE 3ILICON 6ALLEY "IKE #OALITION OR SUPPORTOUR3AFE2OUTESTO3CHOOL s*USTDOIT s!NDDOITEVERYDAY The younger generation is leading the way with the strong support of the city, school and PTA. The resulting U-turn in our kids biking to school is inspiring and hopefully is the harbinger for the rest of us. &ROMAPRECIPITOUSFALL OFFTOANADIRIN 2002 when only 11 percent of high school students biked to school, the new generation of students begin with safety training in elementary school and continue through

Nationwide, we have seen historic decreases (although small) in vehicle miles traveled per capita over six of the past seven years.

middle school and high school with full support from our schools, PTA and the city with school crossing guards, better bike parking and constant encouragement. 4HISYEAR 0ALYAND'UNNAREATANAMAZing 40 percent bike ridership. Palo Alto has come a long way since FORMERVICEMAYOR%LLEN&LETCHERCHAMPIoned the bike boulevard in Palo Alto. Ellen, who sadly passed away late last year, also worked steadfastly but passionately to get bikes on Caltrain — now about 12 percent of Caltrain riders bring bikes on BOARD TO HELP WITH THE hLAST MILEv 3HE also championed the successful bike vaLETPARKINGATEVENTSSUCHASTHE3TANFORD football games, allowing thousands of fans to bike conveniently and safely to just outside the gates. The trend we see in our communities reflects larger trends in the Bay Area and the nation. Nationwide, we have seen historic decreases (although small) in vehicle

MILES TRAVELED PER CAPITA OVER SIX OF THE PAST SEVEN YEARS 2IDERSHIP FOR #ALTRAIN has been jumping every month for the past TWO YEARS OFTEN EXCEEDING   RIDERS EVERY DAY .EW EXPRESS BUSES EQUIPPED WITH7I &I FROM3AN*OSETO3TANFORD2Esearch Park, are popular, often with every seat filled. Our representatives are committed to making the region even better for CYCLING 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY SUPERVISORS just awarded $10.4 million to significantly upgrade regional bike and pedestrian paths, connecting across borders and barriers from the foothills to the baylands. Ultimately, it will be up to us to wake up to decide to try biking or transit. One cyclist testified recently, “Biking to work really doesn’t add any time to my schedule. My round-trip bike time is about 1.5 hours. That’s about the same time I was spending driving and then working out after work. The workout I get from my commute has opened a door to a whole world of bicycling and new friends. I feel great and I’m about 15-20 pounds lighter.� 7ITH YOUR GOOD WILL AND PARTICIPATION we can double our biking and walking. Our newly updated bike master plan calls for 15 percent bike commute share by 2020, ANENTIRELYFEASIBLEGOAL*USTDOIT N Yoriko Kishimoto is a director of the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District, Ward 2 and former mayor of Palo Alto. This column is written in memory of Ellen Fletcher, our late bicycle pioneer, with special thanks to Kathy Durham and Penny Ellson and all who champion Safe Routes to School.

Streetwise

What do you think about flood control in Palo Alto? Asked at Palo Alto Main Library on Newell Road, California Avenue and Cambridge Avenue. Interviews and photos by Rebecca Duran.

Linda Zadik

Homemaker Saint Francis Drive, Palo Alto “We need to prioritize placing bridges and work on storm-drain systems.�

Dorothy Deringer

Retired Palo Alto Avenue, Palo Alto “It’s obviously getting better. We haven’t had a flood in a while. I don’t know how other people will feel on the other side of 101.�

Kathleen Karry

Retired Cowper Street, Palo Alto “It seems to me that they were going to do something in 1982 and they didn’t.�

Sue Riggs

Retired Tolman Drive, Stanford “It was spectacularly needed. I really worry about people in East Palo Alto on the other side.�

Bruce Gravelle

Contractor Ramona Street, Palo Alto “I don’t think they have fully determined what they are going to do.�

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Leah McDonough April 24, 1924 - January 16, 2013 Dr. Leah McDonough died Jan. 16, 2013, in Redwood City of complications from Alzheimer’s. Born and raised in New York City, she and her husband Joseph McDonough had lived in Palo Alto since 1962. She was preceded in death by her husband of 61 years in 2010. They had known each other since they were 3 years old. Leah attended the College of New Rochelle (CNR), received a Master’s Degree at Fordham University, and earned her Doctorate in Psychology at Michigan State University. CNR awarded Leah a scholarship during the Great Depression, allowing her to pursue a career in psychology. Without CNR’s generous support, Leah would never have achieved her many accomplishments. A clinical psychologist, Leah worked for San Mateo County for more than two decades. For 12 years, she directed the forensic unit of San Mateo County’s Mental Health Division. Her psychology research was published in numerous articles and book chapters. After retiring from the County, she took up writing essays and short stories, publishing locally and nationally. She enjoyed babysitting for her granddaughter Carrie. Leah and Joe traveled extensively, and loved to take Carrie along with them. Leah was a trail-blazer of her generation and an inspiration to her daughter and granddaughter. She was a devoted and wonderful wife, mother, grandmother, and citizen of the world, and will be deeply missed. Leah is survived by her daughter, Susan McDonough (Warren Mar); and her granddaughter, Caroline Mar (Sandy Metivier). Donations in Leah’s honor may be made to the College of New Rochelle (CNR, 29 Castle Place, New Rochelle, NY, 10805, web http://tinyurl.com/CNRDonateLM) or to the American Civil Liberties UnionNor Cal (39 Drumm St., SF, 94111; http://tinyurl.com/ACLUNCgift). PA I D

OBITUARY

Elizabeth Apperson Myers Jan. 8, 1925 – Jan. 10, 2013 Elizabeth (Betty) Apperson Myers, longtime Ladera resident, died at Stanford Hospital unexpectedly on January 10, two days after her 88th birthday. Born in Montgomery County, Virginia, on January 8, 1925, to Kent Apperson and Margaret Rucker Apperson, Mrs. Myers graduated from high school in 1944 and then attended Virginia Polytechnic Institute. She joined the United States Army in 1945 and was honorably discharged in 1946. She moved from Virginia to Seattle, Washington, in 1946 to marry Frederick B. Sutton, an engineer with Boeing. In 1949 she moved with her husband down the coast to California as he took a job at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (now NASA) in Mountain View. They eventually had a son and built a house in Ladera. She was widowed in 1960, and though her extended family lived in Virginia, she decided to stay in California. She married John (Jack) Barber Myers in 1962 and they remained in Ladera. She was a homemaker, community volunteer, worked some outside her home, and continued her education at Cañada Community College. After her husband’s death she moved into The Sequoias, a retirement community in Portola Valley, and had lived happily there for the past 10 years. She was an active member and volunteer at the Ladera Community Church for 50 years, and was an active volunteer at The Sequoias. She is survived by a son, George Sutton of Menlo Park; daughter-in-law Connie and grandson Colin; her sister and brother-in-law, Nita and Harland Little of Blacksburg, Virginia; sister Mary Kent Elliott of Christiansburg, Virginia; sister and brother-in-law, Pam and Don Mason of Cheyenne, Wyoming; and nieces, nephews, cousins and many friends. A memorial service is scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, February 23, at the Ladera Community Church, 3300 Alpine Road in Portola Valley. Donations may be made to the Ladera Community Church Endowment Fund, 3300 Alpine Road, Portola Valley, CA 94028; or to a charity of your choice. PA I D

OBITUARY

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Transitions Pulse Karin Edith Hamilton

Karin Edith Hamilton, a longtime Los Altos resident, wife, mother and omi, died unexpectedly Jan. 9 of cardiac arrest while vacationing in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. She was born Nov. 30, 1940, in Stuttgart, Germany, to Karl and Paula Burger. It was in Germany that she met her husband, William P. Hamilton, who was serving in the U.S. Army. They married at The Ludwigsburg Castle on Sept. 13, 1958. They set up permanent residence in California a few years after marriage. She enjoyed spending time with her family and friends, shopping, taking relaxing hikes and leisurely bike rides, cooking, wine (with an ice cube) and watching Lifetime movies. She was proud to be a great grand-

mother at a young age. Although she and her husband had home bases in Lake Tahoe, Germany and Puerto Vallarta, they continued to travel all over the world. She was preceded in death by her parents, her sister, Eva Skyles Smith, and her brother, Karl Burger. She is survived by her husband of 54 years, William P. Hamilton of Los Altos; son, William G. Hamilton of Los Gatos; daughter, Yvonne K. Messimer (Dale) of Mountain View; granddaughter, Michelle Y. Donati (Paul) of San Jose; grandsons, Christopher W. Crook of Sunnyvale and Justin W. Hamilton of Campbell; great-grandsons, Brady P. Donati and Parker W. Donati of San Jose; aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews and dear friends in Germany and the U.S.

Howard B. Hushbeck October 19, 1923 – January 17, 2013 Howard B. Hushbeck passed away the evening of Thursday, January 17, 2013. Howard, the last of six siblings, was a native of Watsonville, California, where he attended Watsonville High School in the Class of 1941. After graduation he joined the Navy as part of the war effort of World War II. He was the radio operator on the personal aircraft of Admiral Chester Nimitz, and as such visited all of the major locations in the Pacific Theatre. After the war he obtained a degree in electrical engineering from California State Polytechnic University in San Luis Obispo. During college, he developed passion for golf, amateur radio, and tinkering with electronic gadgets, passions which stayed with him for the rest of his life. Howard married his late first wife Ruby in 1957. Howard retired from Lockheed Missiles and Space in 1989 after 32 years as a Senior Research Engineer, working on projects ranging from weapon systems to communication satellites. In 1987 he married Elaine, to whom he was married until his passing. Howard is survived by his wife Elaine, his son Brian, and his stepsons Gerry and Ron. Memorial services will be held at Covenant Presbyterian Church where he was a member for more than 50 years, located at 670 East Meadow Drive in Palo Alto on Saturday, February 9th at 3pm. PA I D O B I T UA RY

Dorothy M. Shoemaker Carter Dorothy M. Carter passed away peacefully January 22, 2013. Her granddaughter was with her until shortly before her death. Born 27 Feb 1916 in Sioux City, IA to Howard A. and Edith (Rogers) Shoemaker, Dorothy came to California to attend USC. She married Thos. J. Carter Jr. in Norwalk, CA on 4 June 1939. Mr. Carter died in 2001. Mrs. Carter is survived by her three children, Thomas E. “Ted” Carter (Teresa Cuseo) of Santa Rosa, CA; Carolyn M. Johnson (Richard H. Greene) of Palo Alto, CA, and Marilyn A. Carter of San Antonio, TX. Mrs. Carter is also survived by six grandchildren and fourteen greatgrandchildren. A family gathering celebrating Dorothy’s life will be held later in the spring. PA I D

O B I T UA RY

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto Jan. 24-30 Violence related Attempted suicide/juvenile . . . . . . . . . . .1 Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Child abuse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Elder abuse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Attempted burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Shoplifting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .6 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Lost/stolen plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .3 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Possession of paraphernalia. . . . . . . . . .1 Sale of drugs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Casualty/fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Juvenile problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .2 Psychiatric subject . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Menlo Park Jan. 24-30 Violence related Shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Attempted burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Checks forgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .5 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Traffic stop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle accident/non-injury . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Alcohol or drug related Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Drunken driving. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Coroner case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Info case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Juvenile problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of concealed firearm . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

Atherton Jan. 24-30 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Vehicle accident/non-injury . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Vehicle/traffic hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Construction complaint . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Hang-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Possession of stolen property . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

miki's

Farm Fresh Market MEAT DEPARTMENT

This is what’s fun — developing this market and seeing it succeed! I am dedicated to quality and taking care of Miki’s customers. So stop by and see me — and tell me what you need. Mike Myers is the store’s Director of Meat Operations and a former employee at Berkeley Bowl. Mike has worked in markets for more than 40 years, starting in a small store in Hayward in 1972, then moving into the wholesale part of the business. Next came Berkeley Bowl. He was hired as the Meat Buyer/Manager for the main store and then opened the West store and served both locations. Mike left Berkeley Bowl in July 2012 to help Miki put a meat program together for Miki’s Farm Fresh Market.

Alma St. El Camino Real

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Try out Palo Alto’s newest full-service market, featuring locally grown organic produce and quality foods at great prices.

m i k i 's

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3445 Alma Street, Palo Alto | MikisFarmFreshMarket.com | Mon-Sat 7am-8pm, Sun 9am-7pm | 650.485.8600 ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊ£]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 15

Cover Story

<SWUVP]`a/P`]OR ObOQ`]aa`]ORPalo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sister-city program celebrates 50 years â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and contemplates its future by Sue Dremann

The little frogs, the little frogs are funny to observe. The little frogs, the little frogs are funny to observe. They have no ears, they have no ears, no tails do they possess They have no ears, they have no ears, no tails do they possess Kou ack ack ack, kou ack ack ack, kou ack ack ack ack kaa. Kou ack ack ack, kou ack ack ack, kou ack ack ack ack kaa.â&#x20AC;?

Bruce Wilner organizes the Neighbors Abroad display for LinkĂśping, Sweden, at Lucie Stern Community Center in Palo Alto in January. On the left is a scale model of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Foreign Friends,â&#x20AC;? which LinkĂśping gave to Palo Alto in 1989. idea was an orphanage to care for children whose parents are imprisoned. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was no foster care, so the kids had to go into the prison with their parents,â&#x20AC;? Mandell said. The project even caused a social movement of sorts within Oaxaca, where upper-class women found they could leave behind their luncheons and teas and volunteer for a nonprofit organization, she said. The transformation just five years later was astounding, according to Mandell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The first time I went there, there was this muddy field,â&#x20AC;? she said. Now 55 children live there. The older girls learn sewing skills by making clothing for the younger ones, she said. Neighbors Abroad also funded the NiĂąo-a-NiĂąo (child-to-child) health program in rural villages, which teaches children to teach

Page 16Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;iLĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

other kids about basic health care. The program has had far-reaching results, Mandell said. Many parents adhere to traditional misconceptions regarding health care, such as the belief in withholding water from children with diarrhea because being drier would stop the discharge. But many children died from dehydration, Mandell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change adultsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; minds, but you can change a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,â&#x20AC;? she said. Kids learned how to mix a rehydration drink of simple ingredients to give to a sick child. The children survived, the parents saw the benefits, and thereafter they incorporated the practice, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Before this program, 36 percent of children died in the first year. After this, it was 1 to 2 percent,â&#x20AC;? Mandell said.

Views of sister cities Albi, France (at top), and LinkĂśping, Sweden.

Cour tesy of the City of LinkĂś ping

Andre Zandona

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The people of Palo are, indeed, worthy of this honor. They resisted even to the death the efforts of the Japanese invaders to subdue them during the late war and were of inestimable assistance as I landed with the forces of liberation to redeem their native soil,â&#x20AC;? MacArthur wrote to City Councilwoman Frances Dias on Jan. 17, 1963. Barbara Evans, Neighbors Abroad president, recalled the climate in which the program began: â&#x20AC;&#x153;We started in an idealistic time. The Cold War was on. We were a Ashley learned the frog song little town, but we were very conwhile on a summer solstice trip cerned with non-aligned powers,â&#x20AC;? to LinkĂśping, Sweden. It was arshe said. ranged through Neighbors Abroad, In the Bay Area, engineers and Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sister-city cultural-exscientists were working for the change program that is turning 50 government on projects, many of this year. which were military in nature, Palo Altans and others will and trying to find a way on a comtake part in a Swedish frog dance munity level to address social and and other merriment on Feb. 9, at cultural issues outside of politics Neighbors Abroadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s golden-anand governments, Evans said. niversary festival. It will be held â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was part of the zeitgeist of from 2 to 5 p.m. at Lucie Stern the time.â&#x20AC;? Community Center on MiddleNeighbors Abroad adopted Oaxfield Road. The event will inaca as its second sister city in 1964. It was closer than the Philippines, making it easier for people to travel there. Like Palo Alto, it is also a university town, Mandell said. Early on it became obvious that there was an unequal relationship, Ashley said. Less wealthy than Palo Alto, Oaxaca had social and educational needs. Palo Altans rallied to provide children with scholarships and build a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s library. They also constructed a planetarium and obBarbara Evans is the president of Neighbors Abroad, an organization that was servatory. Among formed to establish connections with â&#x20AC;&#x153;non-aligned powersâ&#x20AC;? during the Cold War. the most ambitious

Courtesy of the City Council of Albi

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clude exhibits, performances and traditional foods of Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s six sister cities: Palo, the Philippines; Oaxaca, Mexico; Enschede, the Netherlands; LinkĂśping, Sweden; Albi, France, and Tsuchiura, Japan. The free event is open to the public. As Neighbors Abroad celebrates its milestone, the organization is also taking stock of how to maintain its relevance in the 21st century. Palo Alto has expanded from a small college town to an economic center with global reach. Times have changed. So too must Neighbors Abroad, some say. Neighbors Abroad began during the heart of the Cold War as a volunteer program of cultural exchanges and humanitarian projects. It launched on Jan. 18, 1963, as a member of Sister Cities International, which was founded in 1956. President Dwight D. Eisenhower started his Town Affiliation Program to urge U.S. cities to establish ties with other towns throughout the world. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eisenhower said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;People donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t kill people they know,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? said Marion Mandell, Neighbors Abroadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s liaison with sister city Oaxaca. The first group to become a sister city with Palo Alto was a city that shared in part of the name: Palo, the Philippines. The adoption won kudos from Gen. Douglas MacArthur the day before it was formalized.

Andre Zandona

ary Ashleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes twinkled. Tall and athletic, with smooth white hair, she wiggled her hands beside her ears as she sang the SmĂĽ Grodorna, Swedish for â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Little Frogs,â&#x20AC;? a traditional dance and song performed midsummer around a maypole:

Cover Story

Enschede, The Netherlands, became Palo Alto’s third sister city in 1980.

ther than Oaxaca and Palo, the four remaining sister-city relationships have remained culture- rather than service-oriented, Evans said. Adult and student exchanges have included visits by artists, lawyers, musicians, hikers and chefs, said Betty Gerard, a Neighbors Abroad board member. There have been cross-cultural bicycle tours organized by the local Western Wheelers club and joint concerts between the local Aurora Singers and Albi’s Assou-Lezert. The first concert took place at Stanford University’s Memorial Auditorium to a standing-room-only audience, Gerard said. “Albi-based Compagnie Evelyne Remazeilhes has performed here several times, recreating the dances of the Moulin Rouge in Paris as depicted in the paintings of native son Toulouse-Lautrec. Palo Alto musical groups that have performed in Albi include the Palo Alto Chamber Orchestra, the Palo Alto High School Jazz Band and the Paly Madrigal Singers,” she said. But sometimes even seemingly innocuous cultural exchanges can create controversy. Foreign Friends was an 11-foottall, traditional Swedish plank sculpture of a man and woman sitting on a bench with their dog. The sculpture was not universally appreciated by Palo Altans. A gift from Linköping in 1989, the sculpture sat at the corner of Waverley Street and Embarcadero Road. At first, it was a novelty. The sculpture was dressed up for the city’s Black and White Ball and became a destination for photographs, with visitors sitting alongside the sculptures. But Foreign Friends became the target of multiple assaults. Once it was doused with gasoline and set ablaze; at other times it was defaced with spray paint, according to Palo Alto Weekly reports. There are pictures of the Friends each with a black eye. And the sculptures were decapitated twice. In 1993, someone removed the heads on Halloween night and left them in the statues’ laps. By February 1994, just two months after being restored by a local sculptor at a cost of $3,000, youths allegedly unbolted the heads after getting around motion sensors. The wooden noggins were never found, according to the Weekly. New heads of redwood were fashioned but seemed incongruous.

The unwanted sculpture bounced from one place to another. By January 2000, its wood rotting, Foreign Friends was unceremoniously carted off to the city landfill, where it was finally put to rest and composted. Foreign Friends “was like something from the Twilight Zone,” said

=

Ralph White, chair of the Neighbors Abroad Linköping Committee, said in a 1997 Weekly article that the sculpture was conceived as traditional Swedish folk art to be climbed and played on. But Palo Altans, who viewed it as high art, objected to the new heads.

Courtesy of the Palo Alto Historical Association

Courtesy of Joan Reid

Courtesy of Marion Mandell

Marion Mandell meets with children at the Neighbors Abroad-built orphanage in Oaxaca, Mexico.

People pose with “Foreign Friends,” a gift from Linköping, Sweden. The sculpture was repeatedly defaced by vandals.

Palo Alto muralist Greg Brown, who traveled to Linköping in 1991 to paint one of his famous, quirky murals on a concert hall as part of a cultural exchange. “(The mural) was a picture of a fellow coming out of a small doorway on the balcony of the second

floor. He was a black-tie character dangling from the balcony holding a violin. The strings were all that was holding him up from the balcony,” he recalled. “I was quite pleased to be ‘inflicted’ on Linköping, to be (continued on next page)

Aging in Place 2013 Saturday, February 9th 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Seniors, families of seniors, baby-boomers! Don’t miss out on our second annual Aging in Place event at the Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Avenue, sponsored by the City of Mountain View’s Senior Advisory Committee and partner, DrukerCenter for Innovation. 40 minute seminars offered on an array of topics. Volunteer eldercare professionals will be on-site to answer your questions. This event is FREE. Registration begins at 8:30am. Cash lunch is provided. 9:00-9:30 Main Hall: Introduction by Elna Tymes, Senior Advisory Committee member What is Aging in Place? The benefits and challenges of staying in your own home.

Conference Schedule:

12:00-12:45 BLOCK TWO (two choices)

9:45-10:30 BLOCK ONE (two choices)

Stroke Prevention (A) Caroline L. Baron, Stroke Awareness Foundation

Clutter: Respectful Intervention (A) Michelle Rogers, Home Instead Senior Care Advances in Technology for Seniors (B) Greg Hartwell, Homecare California 1:00-1:45 BLOCK THREE (two choices) Obamacare and the New Medicare Options (A) Connie Corrales, Sarah Triano, Council on Aging Silicon Valley Eat Healthy, Eat Smart, Innovative Nutrition (B) Vanessa Merlano, SCC Public Health Dept.

Safety, Warmth and Independence at Home (B) Stewart Hyland, Lily Abt, Rebuilding Together Peninsula 2:00-2:45 BLOCK FOUR (two choices) linkAges: Creating a Community Network to Support Aging in Place (A) Dr. Paul Tang, DrukerCenter for Innovation Posture and Fitness for a Pain-free Back (B) Maya White 3:00 Conference Ends

Contact: Nanci Cooper SAC member at nancicooper@gmail.com or 650-965-1127 ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊ£]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 17

Cover Story

Neighbors Abroad (continued from previous page)

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Top: Neighbors Abroad exchange students from Palo Alto visit sister city Tsuchiura, Japan, last summer. Right: From left, Barbara and Joe Evans, copresidents of Neighbors Abroad; Palo Alto Mayor Peter Drekmeier; Tsuchiura Mayor Kiyoshi Nakagawa; and Consul General of Japan Yasumasa Nagamine break open a ceremonial sake barrel in November 2009.

Weekly file photo/Veronica Weber

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tudent exchanges have become a large part of forwarding the Neighbors Abroad agenda, with most of the sister cities participating. The travel goes both ways, with students coming to Palo Alto from abroad, said Keiko Nakajima, a Japanese-language teacher at Jane Lathrop Stanford and Jordan middle schools. Sixteen students are coming from Tsuchiura, Japan, on March 9 and will stay with host families for one week. There will be a welcoming party and picnic at Mitchell Park, two days of shadowing their host students at school, a visit to Palo Alto City Hall and attendance of a City Council meeting with a commemoration of their visit by the mayor. Palo Alto police will take the students on a tour of the department,

Photo courtesy of Emily Hwang

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no place like home.â&#x20AC;?

known as the guy who paid them back for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Foreign Friends.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? The LinkĂśpingersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; view of the value of plank sculptures surprised Brown, he said. He found out that similar works of art had been crafted for 500 years. At a large festival, the sculptures were all over town. But after the festival, nearly all were removed and dumped in a field behind the university to decompose, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A professor drove me out there to see these things dying in the field,â&#x20AC;? Brown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Palo Alto â&#x20AC;&#x201D; put away your guilt.â&#x20AC;?

and they will visit Stanford and sample American college cuisine in the cafeteria, Nakajima said. The Japanese students will also cook family recipes for their host (continued on next page)

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Cover Story (continued from previous page)

1WbgSgSa\SePcaW\Saa^O`b\S`aVW^aO`]c\RbVSe]`ZR Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s international relationships demand cultural literacy, city officials say ranching out from the cultural exchanges promoted by the Neighbors Abroad program, Palo Alto leaders are eyeing new business-oriented relationships with cities around the world. The turning point came in 2007, when the mayors of sister city Enschede, the Netherlands, and Palo Alto agreed to a formal economic alliance in addition to continuing cultural exchanges. Last December, Palo Alto furthered the entrepreneurial direction the city is taking in its international partnerships when it established a business relationship with Yangpu in Shanghai, China. The joint effort will include student exchanges with a business curriculum, busi-

0

ness internships for youth and collaborations between high-tech companies. With increasing overseas investment in Bay Area businesses and real estate, the globalization of Palo Alto is a trend that cannot be ignored, city leaders said. City Councilwoman Nancy Shepherd said the Smart City Partnership with Yangpu, which focuses on technology and green programs, is â&#x20AC;&#x153;very, very different from the type of exchange than Neighbors Abroad.â&#x20AC;? But there is still a deep need for cultural literacy in global business, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You cannot escape that, even with an economic exchange, you

Courtesy of the City of Palo Alto.

Palo Alto Mayor Yiaway Yeh, right, is joined by the Mayor of Yangpu, Shanghai (at table), along with top officials from the Yangpu District and the Bay Area Council as they sign an agreement to explore economic opportunities between Palo Alto and Yangpu. a month,â&#x20AC;? Nakajima said. Exchange students arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t limited to high school kids. Johan Lindell, a computer-science student from LinkĂśping who is an exchange student through Neighbors Abroad, said graduate students at Stanford are so diverse that he also meets many people from around the globe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The biggest thing is definitely the passive broadening of my horizons just from being around people with different backgrounds,â&#x20AC;? he stated in an email. Lindell arrived at Stanford last September and will return to Sweden in June. American culture is not unfamiliar in Sweden because it imports U.S. media, and Swedes in general are interested in most things from the United States, he said. Stanford studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; drive to excel has had an impact on Lindell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think most of my surprises come from meeting Stanford people rather than other Americans. Having a population base of 300 million tends to lead to the ... people of the top schools to be very driven. The whole â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;aura of ambitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; that can be found at Stanford is probably the biggest shift from back home,â&#x20AC;? he said. ike many organizations founded five decades ago, Neighbors Abroad is struggling for ways to attract younger members.

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need to understand the culture,â&#x20AC;? she said. In Shanghai, for example, there is a thousand-year-old cultural rule for gifting among businesses. Cultural etiquette includes giving out business cards to just about everyone. When a Palo Alto delegation that included then-Mayor Yiaway Yeh, City Manager James Keene and Shepherd went to Shanghai in early December, Shepherd discovered there is an entire ritual involved in handing out the cards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They give you the card with both hands, thumbs up, and I had to do it back to them, trying not to spill my cards all over,â&#x20AC;? she recalled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They like to do a lot of toasting. They put a teaspoon of wine in the glass for each person,â&#x20AC;? she said. Whoever had the higher title received more toasts and teaspoons and a higher level of wine that reached toward the rim of the glass. Shepherd said cultural literacy is much deeper than toasting spoonfuls of wine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The concept is huge. It used to be â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I want to sell my razors in India,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; so companies would put up a billboard and put the face of an Asian person over a white person,â&#x20AC;? she said. But now cultural understanding permeates everything, including industrial methodology. Businesses need to look at the culture in its entirety to understand what kinds of technologies are possible and

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting harder and harder,â&#x20AC;? wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t anybody who went to a forAshley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are just so eign country,â&#x20AC;? he said. busy with their families and workTechnology has made exposure to ing full-time jobs. I look at my own cultural ideas and everything else daughter, who was an exchange stu- instantaneous. dent in Enschede.â&#x20AC;? But Councilwoman Nancy ShepEvans and Mandell said the job herd, a strong proponent of building of a sister-city liaison is time con- business relationships with cities suming and requires fundraising and reaching out to people. For now, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t plan to take on any more sister cities. But some cities are knocking on the door. One person wanted Palo Alto to adopt a sister city in India, Evans said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There have to be a lot of people involved if we are going to add another city. We need to reach out to the broader community.â&#x20AC;? Palo Alto City Councilman Larry Klein said perhaps the business model of Neighbors Abroad will need to change to attract more people. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a lot of competition and so many different opportunities for young Student Emily Hwang holds a baseball that people to travel. When students at a Japanese school signed during I was growing up there her two-week stay in Tsuchiura, Japan. Andre Zandona

families, and they will travel to Yosemite, she said. Emily Hwang, a Jane Lathrop Stanford Middle School eighthgrader, said she hosted a Tsuchiura student in March 2012. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She was very shy, but it was fun to get to know her a little bit while she was there. Since we were both a little bit embarrassed to speak in the otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s native language, there were some awkward silences, but we got over that eventually because we taught each other some stuff. I enjoyed showing her around places in Palo Alto and school and doing a bunch of things that I love with her. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m glad I met her before I went to Japan. Otherwise, it would have been even more of a culture shock to me,â&#x20AC;? she stated in an email to the Weekly. Hwangâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 11-day trip to Tsuchiura with a group of students took place last July. She said she wanted to participate after learning of the program from her older brother, who was studying Japanese. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My experience as an exchange student was incredible and lifechanging. Exposure to such a drastically different culture was shocking but equally exciting. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made lasting friendships and seen and done things I will remember forever. I feel like participating in an exchange program gave me insight into Japanese life that I will never have the opportunity to experience again, so I am very grateful for that,â&#x20AC;? she said. The most surprising thing was how nice the people were and how clean the city was, she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d heard some things about how polite the Japanese were, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually pretty ridiculous how helpful they are. Everyone there did so much to make sure we felt welcome and had a positive experience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Japanese teacher had told us various things about Japan throughout the year, and my grandma is familiar with Japan, so I thought I had a faint idea of what it was like there in terms of food and culture. However, I learned that you can never compare what people say about something and the actual thing,â&#x20AC;? she said. Nakajima said the Palo Alto students go to the Atomic Bomb Museum in Hiroshima and visit Kyoto. They attend the school in Tsuchiura, where students routinely take off their shoes and clean the classrooms. The weather, unlike Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, is very hot and muggy. Perhaps the most valuable lesson students learn? Tolerance. Nakajima said if the students donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like aspects of Japanese culture, she tells them: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Too bad.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their culture,â&#x20AC;? she says. Japanese students were about to travel to Palo Alto in 2011 when an earthquake and tsunami hit. The airport was closed, so their trip was canceled, Nakajima said. But that did not stop Palo Alto from springing into action. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neighbors Abroad and host families had to do something. They met that Sunday at Jordan Middle School and established a fundraising effort that collected $14,000. The students sold cookies and wrist bands, and $10,000 was collected in

acceptable there. It could mean the difference between using wind turbines, which are already accepted, instead of trying to import â&#x20AC;&#x153;smart gridâ&#x20AC;? technology, she said. Palo Alto needs to think harder about its relationships around the world and what that will mean for the city over time, Councilman Larry Klein said. Many countries want a sister-city business relationship with Palo Alto â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a copy of â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Silicon Valley plan,â&#x20AC;? as one Chinese delegate once requested, so that the other countries could build tech centers, Klein said. No such plan exists, Shepherd pointed out. Sister City business relationships could have a big impact on quality of life in Palo Alto, Klein said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve become this worldwide economic power, and people want to join up with us. It raises questions about what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really doing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very flattering, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a built-out community. We all like our idea of being the center of innovation. If a company wants to build a new facility of a million square feet, another community might say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;greatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but Palo Alto will say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have it.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Klein said the city must determine what it is trying to accomplish and what it expects to get out of such partnerships. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To help existing companies? To help startups? To help Stanford in some way? What does the citizenry think our role is?â&#x20AC;? he asked. N â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sue Dremann around the world â&#x20AC;&#x201D; most recently the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Smart City Partnership with Yangpu, Shanghai, China (see sidebar) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; said the relevance of cultural exchanges such as Neighbors Abroad has not diminished. Social networking has its place, but people still want to meet face to face, she said. Nakajima said that cultural literacy will always be relevant, and that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t diminish in the global business climate. But more importantly, she said, Neighbors Abroad still affects students on a basic human level. And it harks back to the core reason the organization was founded. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It might change their lives. Half of the students say they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to go home â&#x20AC;&#x201D; they want to go back. They are never going to hate the Japanese. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They can come home and tell their stories, and it might change the world,â&#x20AC;? she said. N Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@ paweekly.com. On the cover: Palo Alto student Emily Hwang, right, and a friend stand beside a memorial obelisk in Japan during a Neighbors Abroad student exchange in July 2012. Photo courtesy of Emily Hwang.

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Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

1SPLPGJFW JO 1BMP"MUP by Rebecca Wallace ou can tell a lot about people from their favorite “Peter and the Wolf” recording. Do they go classic, with Lenny Bernstein narrating on vinyl? Highbrow, with Sir John Gielgud and the Royal Philharmonic? Or just completely random, with David Bowie, Weird Al, a Dixieland band or Japanese jazz quartet? Mr. Prokofiev would surely be surprised by the sheer versatility of interpretation that his 1936 children’s composition has inspired. (As would many of us who grew up with the basic Bernstein or Disney version of the simple tale about a boy at his grandfather’s dacha.) Yes, “Peter and the Wolf” has legs. Long, multicultural ones. This month, Prokofiev’s work comes to Palo Alto in four languages. A quartet of narrators will present four performances of “Peter”: in English, Mandarin, Russian and Hebrew. Ming Luke, a guest conductor at the San Francisco Ballet, will conduct a chamber orchestra. (At press time, tickets to the English program had just sold out.) This will be the first Mandarin-language program held at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center. “We’re embarking on a new journey,” said Ronit WidmannLevy, the center’s director of arts and culture. “We do have some members who speak Mandarin, at the fitness club, but we have not been programming for the Mandarin population.” Widmann-Levy, herself a seasoned opera singer, joined the JCC five months ago and is on a mission to expand the center’s multicultural offerings beyond the Hebrew and Russian programs that currently exist. “Peter,” with its wide appeal, seemed a good fit. Prokofiev’s composition follows a boy (Peter, played by string instruments) who goes out exploring in the forest and meadow, where he meets up with such animals as a duck

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Oshman Family JCC hosts a quadrilingual ‘Peter and the Wolf’

Left: The San Francisco Ballet’s Ming Luke will conduct “Peter and the Wolf” at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center. Top: Composer Sergey Prokofiev. Page 20ÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊ£]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Arts & Entertainment (oboe), a bird (flute) and, of course, a wolf (French horn). Grandfather is played by an authoritative bassoon. Young listeners learn about different types of instruments, as well as what might happen if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a duck and a little too slow. Luke, who makes music education a major focus of his career, calls â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peterâ&#x20AC;? an unusual schooling opportunity as well as a musical classic. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seeing the instruments and how they can directly portray various animals, with the colors of the sounds, is timeless. There are not very many pieces like that, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so ingeniously composed,â&#x20AC;? he said. Interestingly, while the piece was written for children, it can be a challenge for adult musicians to play, Luke added. The flute part is often used as an excerpt to test musicians on how well they play. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very tricky to get really precise.â&#x20AC;? The Palo Alto performances of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peterâ&#x20AC;? are scheduled for Feb. 10, with the following narrators: Susan Pari (English), 12:30-1:30 p.m.; Derek Tam (Mandarin), 2-3 p.m.; Boris Vladimirsky (Russian), 4-5 p.m.; and Ilan Vitenberg (Hebrew), 5-6 p.m. Before and after performances, kids can make animal masks at an arts booth, or take part in an instrument â&#x20AC;&#x153;petting zoo,â&#x20AC;? where they can touch the types of instruments played in the concerts. Luke is a fan of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;zooâ&#x20AC;? idea. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Music should not be simply about sheer exposure,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one thing to see people perform. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another thing to have the opportunity to try it yourself.â&#x20AC;?

Besides serving as assistant conductor of Opera San Jose and associate conductor of the Modesto Symphony, Luke is also associate conductor and director of education programs at the Berkeley Symphony. There he makes great efforts to involve kids in classical music, and not just as spectators. One of his favorite Berkeley programs is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a Performer,â&#x20AC;? a partnership with elementary schools. First, professional musicians go into classrooms to meet the students and talk about why they love music; next, the kids go see the players perform. Lastly, the kids get to perform sideby-side with the musicians, playing simple arrangements. One can imagine the little ones, piping away on a recorder or singing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All musicians need to be involved in every level,â&#x20AC;? Luke said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just being a conductor is almost a disservice,â&#x20AC;? he said. N What: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peter and the Wolfâ&#x20AC;? by Sergey Prokofiev, conducted by Ming Luke and read in four languages Where: Schultz Cultural Hall, Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto When: Sunday, Feb. 10, with performances at 12:30 p.m. (English), 2 p.m. (Mandarin), 4 p.m. (Russian) and 5 p.m. (Hebrew). (Tickets to the English program just sold out.) Cost: Tickets are $18 general and $15 for JCC members, students and children ages 14 and under. Info: Go to paloaltojcc.org or call 650223-8699.

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Announcing the Embarcadero Media

Gap-Year Media Internship Thinking about taking a gap-year before starting college? The Palo Alto Weekly and Palo Alto Online invite graduating high school seniors to apply for a unique one-year paid internship between mid-June, 2013 and July, 2014. Working as an assistant to the publisher, you will learn about all aspects of print and digital publishing and be assigned a wide variety of tasks and projects, ranging from routine administrative support to helping with events and promotions, creating web content, assisting with research on reporting projects and learning about sales & marketing. For more information and an application, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/gapyear

Deadline: March 1, 2013

(We also offer limited unpaid summer internships for high school seniors.)

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Arts & Entertainment

Ms. Bilfield goes to Washington Stanford Live artistic director Jenny Bilfield will head the Washington Performing Arts Society

At Stanford since 2006, Jenny Bilfield has been an active member of the Bing Concert Hall planning team. Yo-Yo Ma.” Bilfield has also been active in arranging commissions and premieres on campus. In fact, she plans to stay at Stanford through March 16 so that she won’t miss the performance of a new, Stanford-commissioned

n e n c o t i C o n p m a C

The Almanac’s, Mountain View Voice’s, Palo Alto Weekly’s popular, annual Camp Connection magazine will be inserted in the newspaper the week of February 18.

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Find.... * Summer Activities * Camps * Schools * and more ....in one magazine that’s delivered to your home! Additional complementary copies can be found at local libraries, schools and recreation departments.

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ATTENTION PENINSULA PARENTS

work by Steve Reich. The innovative chamber orchestra Alarm Will Sound will be performing Reich’s Radiohead-inspired “Radio Rewrite.” Bilfield is scheduled to start her new job on April 1, and says her

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ecutive director of Stanford Lively Arts, and then as artistic director of the organization after it was rebranded as Stanford Live last year. She’s been a member of the central planning team for the Bing hall and a particular advocate for arts programs that bring performers and students together at the university. Rather than just whisking in a big name for one performance, Bilfield wanted to have performers arrive earlier and stay longer when they could, imparting artistic knowledge to Stanford’s students. Collaborations in the last few years have included sound sculptor Trimpin teaching students to build their own musical instruments; and Stanford dancers and gymnasts being trained by Brooklyn dancer Elizabeth Streb’s company — and then getting to perform with the group. One of the great joys of this job has been seeing high levels of student participation, Bilfield said. With the Bing hall now open, student concert attendance has been especially robust, she added. “Last night we had 150 students for

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fter playing a starring role in bringing Stanford’s new Bing Concert Hall to life, Jenny Bilfield is heading east: to the iconic Kennedy Center and the modern Music Center at Strathmore. She’s leaving her job as the artistic director of Stanford Live to become president and CEO of the Washington Performing Arts Society. The Washington, D.C., organization, founded 47 years ago, presents dance and classical, jazz, pop, vocal and world music. Performers this season include violinists Hilary Hahn and Anne-Sophie Mutter, jazz singer and bassist Esperanza Spalding, and the dance company Ron K. Brown and Evidence. The Kennedy Center is a big venue for the group, along with Strathmore, the Harman Center for the Arts and others. Bilfield, who used to live in New York City, is looking forward to moving back to a bustling urban area. “It’s exciting, and a different environment,” she said. “There’s a real sense of mission and opportunity.” Bilfield has been at Stanford since 2006, serving first as artistic and ex-

Toni Gauthier

by Rebecca Wallace

OPER

husband, the composer Joel Phillip Friedman, and their daughter, Hallie, are excited for the move. Before moving to California, the family lived in New York, where Bilfield was president of the music publisher Boosey & Hawkes. Reginald Van Lee, who chairs the board of directors at the Washington Performing Arts Society, said Bilfield was the natural pick for her new job. “She was the unanimous choice of the search committee from an impressive list of candidates,” he said in a press release. Bilfield will replace Neale Perl, who will become president emeritus. Stanford Live also had some staffing changes last year, when the organization was rebranded. Wiley Hausam came from New York to become the first managing director of the Bing hall, and then was also named executive director of Stanford Live, with Bilfield staying on as artistic director. When asked whether a replacement would be hired for Bilfield -- or whether Hausam would also assume artistic-director duties -Matthew Tiews, executive director of arts programs at Stanford, said the decision had not yet been made. “We are sad to see Jenny leave Stanford but wish her all the best with this exciting new opportunity. ... Stanford Live is currently evaluating its next steps and based on the outcome of that process will begin a search for an appropriate replacement,” he wrote in an email. N

Eating Out FOOD FEATURE

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#HEFANDFOODBLOGGER*ESS$ANGPREPARESPEANUT SESAMENOODLESIN HER0ENINSULAKITCHEN

ANAVIDEATER vSHESAIDh4HATKIND OF MOTIVATED ME TO LEARN HOW TO COOKLATERONINLIFEv 4HEMOTIVATIONHASNOWLEDTOA CAREER !FTER WORKING FOR YEARS IN THECORPORATEWORLD $ANGDECIDED TOFOCUSONCOOKING ANDDEVOTESHER TIMETOHERBLOG h#OOK3MARTS vAND WEEKLYNEWSLETTER h7EEKLY%ATSv (ER FOCUS GIVING RECIPE SUGGES TIONS FOR  MINUTE MEALS WITH HOPES OF EDUCATING HOME COOKS ANDSAVINGTHEMTIME3HERUNSTHE PROFESSIONAL LOOKING BLOG THROUGH 7ORD0RESS AND TAKES ALL HER OWN PHOTOS OF HER DISHES AS WELL AS SHOOTINGCOOKINGVIDEOS 3OME OF $ANGS INSPIRATION FOR COOKINGEFFICIENTLYCOMESFROMHER TIME AT 3TANFORD 5NIVERSITY WHICH BROUGHT HER TO THE 7EST #OAST IN

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Cucina Venti Recipe

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Cucina Venti

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All coastal regions of Italy serve some version of this dish. In the north it is Burrida alla Genovese, in Tuscany itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cacciucco Livornese and along the AmalďŹ coast itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Zuppe di Pesce. The American dish Cioppino gets its beginning from these dishes. No matter the myriad of names and recipe variations, this dish holds an honored and storied place in Italian cooking.

From our kitchen to yours. Buon appetito! Chef Marco, Ventiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chef

Zuppe di Pesce (Fish soup) sCLOVESGARLIC CHOPPED sPINCHOFREDPEPPERmAKES sCUPOLIVEOIL sLBSQUID CLEANEDAND CUTINTO INCHRINGSAND tentacles (about 1 lb when cleaned) sCUPDRYWHITEWINE sLARGERIPETOMATOES peeled, seeded, and chopped

Preparation:

sTABLESPOONSCHOPPEDFRESH ďŹ&#x201A;at-leaf Italian parsley sTEASPOONSALT sCUPSWATER sLBBLACKMUSSELS SOAKEDINCOOLWATER for 30 minutes and well scrubbed sLBASSORTEDlRM mESHEDlSHlLETSSUCH as whiting, monkďŹ sh, porgy bream, red snapper, and sea bass, cut into chunks sLBLARGESHRIMP DEVEINED sSLICESCRUSTYBREAD TOASTEDANDRUBBED on one side with a garlic clove

In a large saucepan over medium heat, sautĂŠ the garlic and pepper ďŹ&#x201A;akes in the olive oil until the garlic is slightly golden, about 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove the garlic. Add the squid and cook and stir until opaque, about 2 minutes. Add the wine and simmer for 1 minute longer. Add the tomatoes, parsley, and salt and cook until the juices evaporate, about 10 minutes longer.

1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.cucinaventi.com

Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

Add the water and bring to a simmer. Add the clams (discard any that do not close to the touch) and ďŹ sh, cover, and cook until all the clams open and the ďŹ sh is opaque throughout, about 5 minutes. Discard any clams that failed to open. Adjust the seasonings. Place a bread slice in each warmed soup plate. Ladle the soup over the bread and serve. Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;iLĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 23

Eating Out

Veronica Weber

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PENINSULA

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willy’s

Chef Chu’s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

The Old Pro

Ming’s

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

STEAKHOUSE

New Tung Kee Noodle House

Sundance the Steakhouse

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

INDIAN

Janta Indian Restaurant Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

THATHADBEENBOTHERINGHERh)WAS ASKING@7HYARETHERESOMANYRE SOURCES AROUND FOOD YET SO MANY !MERICANS HAVE A REALLY STRESSFUL TIMEINTHEKITCHENANDCANTGETDIN NERONTHETABLE)DIDNTKNOWTHE ANSWERTOTHATQUESTION h4HATS WHEN ) DECIDED ) WAS GOING TO PUT TOGETHER THE SERVICE OF PROVIDING IN HOME COOKING LES SONSSOTHAT)COULDGOINTOPEOPLES HOMESANDHELPTROUBLESHOOTITv ,AST YEAR SHE GAVE IN HOME LES SONSFROM*ANUARYTHROUGH!UGUST WHERESHEGOTAGLIMPSEINTODIFFER ENTRANGESOFCOOKINGSKILLS h)WORKEDWITHAGENTLEMANWHO WASPROBABLYINHISSANDDIDNT KNOW HOW TO TURN A STOVE ON )N A COUPLELESSONS WEGOTHIMSEARING PROTEINSANDROASTINGVEGETABLESAND MAKINGASOUP4HATSREALLYGRATI FYING)TSNICETOKNOWYOUVEBEEN APARTOFTHEIRLIVESv 4HE NEXT PHASE WAS CREATING A NEWSLETTERTHATCOULDBESENTOUTTO PEOPLE WITHOUT HAVING TO GIVE THE IN HOMELESSONSh)THOUGHT(ERES A WAY ) CAN START REACHING PEOPLE ANDTESTSOMEIDEASOFWHATPEOPLE WOULD WANT IN A MEAL PLANNING SERVICE WITHOUT HAVING TO HIRE A DEVELOPER OR REALLY BUILD ANYTHING TECHNICALv $ANGSOWNHOMESITUATIONHELPED HERBECREATIVEWITHPLANNINGMEALS (ER HUSBAND IS A VEGETARIAN WHO PARTICIPATESIN)RONMAN4RIATHLONS ANDSHEHASAHISTORYOFDIABETESIN HERFAMILY h)TSKINDOFLIKEAPUZZLE)TSLIKE @/+ )VEGOTTHESEISSUESANDHES GOT THESE RESTRICTIONS AND WE STILL

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Veronica Weber

(continued from previous page)

0ANKO CRUSTEDFISHTACOSANDCABBAGESLAWCREATEDBY*ESS$ANG

BUY 1 ENTREE AND GET THE 2ND ONE

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

powered by

with coupon (Not valid Friday & Saturday)

,UNCH"UFFET- 3s3UNDAY/NLY "ROWN2ICEs2ESERVATIONS!CCEPTED

369 Lytton Avenue Downtown Palo Alto (650) 462-5903 Fax (650) 462-1433

Family owned and operated for 17 years

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Movies

Bullet to the Head -1/2

MOVIE TIMES

All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies. A Haunted House (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 9:50 p.m. Amour (PG-13) (((( Guild Theatre: 1:15, 4:30 & 7:45 p.m. Argo (R) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 2, 4:45, 7:35 & 10:20 p.m. Broken City (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 11:40 a.m. & 2:20 p.m. Bullet to the Head (R) (1/2 Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 2:10, 4:40, 7:30 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 12:25, 2:55, 5:20, 7:50 & 10:15 p.m. Django Unchained (R) ((( Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 3:50 & 8 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 2:50, 6:25 & 10 p.m. Gangster Squad (R) (1/2 Century 20: 5, 7:45 & 10:30 p.m. Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Noon, 2:30, 5, 8 & 10:30 p.m.; In 3D at 11 a.m.; 1:30, 4, 7 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 12:15, 2:45, 5:05 & 7:25 p.m.; In 3D at 1, 1:45, 3:20, 4:10, 5:45, 6:40, 8:15, 9:05 & 10:35 p.m.

Christopher Walken and Al Pacino are furious that there isn’t a hyphen in “Stand Up Guys.”

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; In 3D at 3:20 & 7:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:05 a.m.; In 3D at 2:35, 6:15 & 9:55 p.m. Hyde Park on Hudson (R) (( Century 16: Sat. & Sun. at 11:40 a.m.; 2:05, 4:30, 7:20 & 9:55 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 1:30, 4:30 & 7:25 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:45 p.m. The Impossible (PG-13) ((( Aquarius Theatre: 1:30, 4:15, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m.; 2:35, 5:15, 7:55 & 10:35 p.m. Josh Groban Live: All That Echoes (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Mon. at 7:30 p.m. Century 20: Mon. at 7:30 p.m. Les Miserables (2012) (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11 a.m.; 2:25, 6:05 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 3, 6:35 & 10:05 p.m. Life of Pi (PG) (((1/2 Century 20: 1:25 p.m.; In 3D at 4:20, 7:15 & 10:20 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 1 p.m.; In 3D at 4 & 7 p.m.; In 3D Fri. & Sat. also at 10 p.m. Lincoln (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 2:40, 6:05 & 9:20 p.m. Century 20: 12:20, 3:35, 7 & 10:15 p.m. Mama (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 2, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: Noon, 2:25, 5:10, 7:50 & 10:25 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: Maria Stuarda (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Palo Alto Square: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Movie 43 (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:10, 2:30, 5, 7:40 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 12:45, 3:10, 5:40, 8:20 & 10:40 p.m. Parker (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:20, 3:30, 7 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 2:10, 4:55, 7:40 & 10:30 p.m. Please Subscribe: A Documentary About YouTubers (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: Tue. at 7:30 p.m. Quartet (PG-13) ((( Aquarius Theatre: 1, 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R) (Not Reviewed) Guild Theatre: Sat. at midnight. Saturday Night Fever (1977) (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed. at 2 & 7 p.m. Century 20: Wed. at 2 & 7 p.m. Silver Linings Playbook (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:10, 3:10, 6:20 & 9:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 2, 4:50, 7:35 & 10:25 p.m. Stand Up Guys (R) (( Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 1:50, 4:20, 7:10 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:55 a.m.; 2:15, 4:40, 7:10 & 9:35 p.m. Warm Bodies (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 12:20, 1:40, 2:50, 4:10, 6:10, 7:10, 9:10 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 12:40, 1:55, 3:05, 4:25, 5:35, 6:55, 8:05, 9:25 & 10:40 p.m. Zero Dark Thirty (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 3:40 & 7:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 2:30, 6:40 & 10:10 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CinéArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260) Stanford: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700) Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies

OPENINGS Stand Up Guys --

(Century 16, Century 20) It’s tempting to give this “Grumpy Old Gangsters” comedy-drama a pass. Noah Haidle’s screenplay seems chronically incapable of making smart choices. But that’s why you hire Second City veteran and Oscar winner Alan Arkin: to spin gold from straw. It’s also why you hire Oscar winners Al Pacino and Christopher Walken, the former an Actors Studio vet and the latter famed for his refusal to respect punctuation. Their spontaneity makes the picture’s first scene an immediate pleasure, though a sinking feeling sets in soon enough. These guys are so good as to almost make the slight script they’re given irrelevant ... almost. Pacino and Walken play BFFs Val and Doc, who reunite when Val walks out of prison after 28 years. Though he owes Val for being a “stand-up guy,” Doc finds himself in the position of having to kill his only friend (at the behest of Mark Margolis’ mobster Claphands). The screenplay does backflips to explain this contrivance and delay the inevitable, to little avail. Over 95 leisurely minutes, “Stand Up Guys” covers a period of about 17 hours between Val’s release and Doc’s deadline. The characters wander the streets by night: stealing a luxury car for a joyride, busting their old wheel man Hirsch (Arkin) out of a nursing home, and getting their drink and prostitutes on. With hope springing eternal, director Fisher Stevens plays these “adventures” for the cheapest of laughs. In addition, the requirements of sticking Pacino, Walken and Arkin into the likes of a sub”Blues Brothers” police chase result in choppy editing. But the director’s long resume as an actor is the film’s secret weapon, for the movie’s best bits are surprisingly tender moments between friends. Those moments, sadly, are outnumbered by crass (OK) but dumb (not OK) episodes designed to allow the old men to bond with

younger women, in the hope their demographic will sit through the movie. These scenes take place at the local bordello (run by Lucy Punch); the local hospital, where one of the nurses (Julianna Margulies) is Hirsch’s daughter; and the local diner, which not-so-mysteriously draws Doc to a kind and pretty young waitress (Addison Timlin). There’s also the naked victim (Vanessa Ferlito) the guys happen upon, who provides a sudden excuse for a righteous mission against bad guys. The awfulness of the narrative is plain to see, and yet acting junkies probably won’t be able to resist the cast. Fertile comic Arkin, graceful hangdog Walken and shambling wild man Pacino can’t do much for the story. But each inevitably brings his own cinematic backstory to the table. No one can say “Stand Up Guys” lacks personality. Rated R for language, sexual content, violence and brief drug use. One hour, 35 minutes.

(Century 16, Century 20) Sylvester Stallone, A r nold Schwarzenegger and (to a lesser extent) Bruce Willis seem eager to prove they can spearhead gratuitous action flicks with the same gusto they mustered in the 1980s and ‘90s. They’re literally sticking to their guns regardless of Father Time’s inconvenient intrusion. And while Stallone’s “The Expendables” (2010) served up some cheeky charm, the shtick has grown old. It’s borderline depressing, like watching a former high school football star with a paunchy gut. Willis has seen several recent actioners go straight to DVD, and Schwarzenegger’s “The Last Stand” fell flat. Now it’s Stallone’s turn. The title itself should deter viewers who favor smart cinema over mindless mayhem. Based on the French graphic novel “Du Plomb Dans La Tete” and set in New Orleans, the story (as it were) revolves around hired killer James Bonomo (Stallone) and his unlikely alliance with Washington, D.C., cop Taylor Kwon (Sung Kang of “Fast Five”). Kwon heads to The Big Easy to investigate the murder of his ex-partner; meanwhile, Bonomo is seeking his own answers following the brazen killing of his hitman cohort. When the two realize the deaths are linked, they grudgingly join forces to track down those responsible. They unearth a conspiracy that involves a real-estate mogul (Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje), a socialite (Christian Slater) and a violent mercenary (Jason Momoa). Even Bonomo’s tattoo-artist daughter (Sarah Shahi) is along for the bumpy ride. Although Stallone lumbers his way through the film and appears

— Peter Canavese

(continued on next page)

5 BEST PICTURE ACADEMY AWARD ® NOMINATIONS INCLUDING

WINNER

GOLDEN GLOBE® AWARD

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

©HFPA

ON OVER 125 TOP TEN LISTS

WINNER

“A MASTERPIECE.”

BEST PICTURE CANNES

-Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

JEAN-LOUIS TRINTIGNANT

AMOUR A Film by MICHAEL HANEKE

EMMANUELLE RIVA

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

NOWPLAYING VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.AMOURTHEMOVIE.COM

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Movies Thursday February 28, 2013 7:00 - 8:30 pm

A free â&#x20AC;&#x153;How Toâ&#x20AC;? workshop for Family Caregivers

at Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center 270 Escuela Avenue Mountain View

Understanding Early Stage Dementia with Grace Lee, LCSW Memory Clinic, Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center and

Stefanie Bonigut, MSW Family Care Specialist Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association

(continued from previous page)

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square Fri and Sat 2/1 - 2/2 Life of Pi 3D - 4:00, 7:00, 10:00 Life of Pi 2D - 1:00 Hyde Park on Hudson - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25, 9:45 Sun thru Tues & Thurs 2/3 - 2/5 & 2/7 Life of Pi 3D - 4:00, 7:00 Life of Pi 2D - 1:00 Hyde Park on the Hudson 1:30, 4:30, 7:25 Wed Only 2/6 Life of Pi 2D - 1:00 Hyde Park on the Hudson - 1:30, 4:30, 7:25

Please RSVP to 650-289-5499 Light refreshments will be served.

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

, Stephen Holden

Free professional care for your loved one is available so you can attend the workshopâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;just call us 48 hours in advance to make arrangements.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A BAD -BOY â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;BUCKET LIST.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

STAND UPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; GOT THE GOODS. CLEVER, ENTERTAINING â&#x20AC;? AND FUN. â&#x20AC;&#x153; PACINO, WALKEN AND ARKIN

half-asleep half the time, the man still has charisma and is occasionally sharp despite dull material. Kang struggles, his weak character made more so by an amateur performance. And while the oddcouple dynamic has its moments, they are few and far between. Shahi and Momoa are solid, but their characters are one-dimensional. Director Walter Hill hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t helmed a feature since 2002â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Undisputed,â&#x20AC;? and it shows. Novice filmmaking techniques such as use of voiceover, flashbacks and erratic transitions become

distracting and seem beneath the standards of a director with a decent resume (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Warriorsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;48 Hrs.,â&#x20AC;? among others). The cheesy hard-rock soundtrack screams â&#x20AC;&#x153;bad â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s action movie,â&#x20AC;? and perhaps that was the goal all along. But bad â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s action movies belong in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2013, and the movie-going public deserves better than a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bullet to the Head.â&#x20AC;? Rated R for violence, bloody images, language, nudity and drug use. 1 hour, 31 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tyler Hanley

â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

, Betsy Sharkey

Quality Daytime Care for Older Adults

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Craig Watson, Director of the California Arts Council.

STANDUPGUYS THEY DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T MAKE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;EM LIKE THEY USED TO.

of bringing art to children

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Palo Alto Bicycles would like to invite you to join us for an evening event of wine, hor dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; oeuvres and Trek Travel. Whether it is white water rafting in Costa Rica, amazing sunset wine tasting in Tuscany or climbing the legendary mountain passes of the Alps,Trek Travel has your vacation of a lifetime. Please join us for a relaxing evening with fellow cyclists and vacation enthusiasts! RafďŹ&#x201A;e prizes throughout the evening, Grand Prize:Trek Travel Luxury Long Wine Country Weekend for 2 in 2013. No purchase necessary. WHEN Thursday February 28th 2013 | 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm WHERE Palo Alto Bicycles, 171 University Avenue, Palo Alto RSVP Space is limited please respond to trektravel@paloaltobicycles.com

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Sports Shorts

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Stanford back in the game

ALL-STATE . . . Stanford-bound Austin Hooper of De La Salle was named to the first-team defense on the Cal-Hi Sports All-State team released Tuesday. The 6-foot-5, 245pound senior, who can play both in the defensive line or tight end, had 17 Division I offers — including Oregon and Cal — before committing to The Farm two weeks ago. His speed on defense coming from the outside for a player his size is what made him so effective. The third-team offense included two Stanford recruits, wide receiver Francis Owusu (6-3, 190) of Oaks Christian and offensive lineman Thomas Oser (6-5, 285) of HarvardWestlake. On the Small Schools allstate team, Sacred Heart Prep senior defensive back Daniel Thaure (5-10, 185) was named to the first team while teammate Mike Covell, a 6-0, 185-pound linebacker, was named to the second team on defense. On the all-state teams for underclassmen, Palo Alto quarterback Keller Chryst was named to the second team for juniors while Menlo School quarterback Jack Heneghan received the same honor on the third team.

Friday Women’s basketball: Stanford at Oregon, 6 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks; KZSU (90.1 FM) Prep basketball: Sequoia at MenloAtherton (girls 6:15 p.m., boys 7:45 p.m.); KCEA (89.1 FM)

Sunday Men’s basketball: Oregon St. at Stanford, noon; Pac-12 Networks; KNBR (1050 AM) Women’s basketball: Stanford at Oregon St., 2 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks; KZSU (90.1 FM)

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

Junior forward Dwight Powell (33) scored 12 points and grabbed 13 rebounds as Stanford dominated visiting Oregon on Wednesday, 76-52, while handing the Ducks their first Pac-12 Conference loss.

(continued on next page)

Palo Alto boys face unique postseason in hoops after streaking to 18-1 mark by Keith Peters familiar matchup in the Central Coast Section boys’ basketball playoffs has been Palo Alto against Mitty. In the past 10 seasons, the schools have met five times in Division II action with the Monarchs holding a 3-2 edge in the series. The Vikings’ two victories came in the section finals, in 2005 and ‘06, the latter with Jeremy Lin in Paly’s state championship season. In recent years, however, Mitty has ended Palo Alto’s season — each time in the semifinals (2011, ‘10 and ‘07). Those losses prevented the Vikings from reaching the Northern California playoffs. That will not happen this season, even if the teams meet again. Thanks to its enrollment of 1,907 students, Palo Alto for the first time has been elevated from the CCS Division II playoffs to Division I — thus escaping the Division II Monarchs. Thanks to the new CIF and CCS Open Divisions, however, Paly and Mitty could meet once again. However, all the teams selected for the CCS Open Division will automatically qualify

A

for NorCals — either in the Open Division or their former section division. Thus, Palo Alto has two chances to reach the NorCal playoffs this season for the first time since Lin-led 2006, and one of the opportunities is guaranteed. To reach the CCS Open Division, all Palo Alto has to do is win the SCVAL De Anza Division. That accomplished, the Vikings are a lock for NorCals. “I like that you are rewarded for winning league and going to NorCals,” said Paly coach Adam Sax. “I really like that (the) Open Division is a tournament and not one and done!” Thanks to Tuesday’s 59-43 victory at secondplace Saratoga on Tuesday night, Palo Alto will take an 8-0 league record, 18-1 overall mark and 16-game win streak into Friday’s home game against Homestead at 7:45 p.m. The 18-1 mark equals the third best (with 2006) in Paly history after 19 games. Only the 1993 team that finished 31-0 and the 1929 squad (19-0) were better. (continued on page 30)

Grant Shorin/THE VIKING

ON THE AIR

by Rick Eymer hen the Stanford men’s basketball team takes the court against visiting Oregon State on Sunday, the Cardinal players will bring a new swagger with them. That’s what happens when you knock the tough kid of the block off his perch. The Cardinal played its most complete game of the season in a contest it sorely needed to grab new life for the remainder of the Pac-12 Conference. Following its best road win of the season, Stanford beat No. 10 Oregon, 76-52, Wednesday night at home. The Ducks (7-1, 18-3) remain the kingpins of the Pac-12, but they’re a little bit dizzy after getting shaken. “It definitely ranks up there as one of the better moments for our program,” Stanford coach Johnny Dawkins said. “That’s the type of team we thought we might have at the beginning of the season. And we’re still developing into becoming the team we want to become.” Stanford (4-4 in the Pac-12, 13-8 overall) asserted itself in every facet of the game, leaving nothing to second guess themselves. The Cardinal recorded its first victory over a top 10 team in almost five years thanks in large part to the efforts of Dwight Powell and Josh Huestis, who dominated the paint against one of the conference’s top rebounding teams. “They helped us with their board

W

Bob Drebin/stanfordphoto.com

“LINSANITY” . . . One day after seeing himself on the big screen during the final viewing of the documentary “Linsanity” at the Sundance Film Festival, Palo Alto High grad Jeremy Lin was back on the NBA floor helping his Houston Rockets win. Lin, who was in Park City, Utah, on Sunday to watch the film along with 600 movie fans, didn’t have far to travel on Monday as the Rockets visited the Utah Jazz. With Lin scoring 12 points on 5-for-5 shooting with seven assists, three steals and two rebounds, the Rockets continued to bounce back from an earlier slump with a 125-80 victory on Monday night. A day earlier, Lin attended the film documenting his meteoric rise in the NBA last season. The movie received great reviews, in addition to a standing ovation before Lin joined his producer and director on stage for a Q&A following the screening. A Los Angeles Times report called “Linsanity: the Movie” easily “one of the most crowd-pleasing documentaries to play the festival this year.” As Josh L. Dickey of Variety noted, the film is a “buzzer-beater away from closing a distribution deal.” Movie reviewer Robert Levin wrote: “The Jeremy Lin story is remarkable and faith-restoring.”

Cardinal gains momentum by handing Oregon its first Pac-12 loss

Paly senior Aubrey Dawkins (33) has scored 38 points in his past two games.

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Sports

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NOTICE OF A SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING of the Palo Alto Planning & Transportation Commission Please be advised the Planning and Transportation Commission (P&TC) shall conduct a Special public meeting at 6:00 PM, Wednesday, February 6, 2013 in the Council Chambers, Ground Floor, Civic Center, Palo Alto, California. Any interested persons may appear and be heard on these items. Staff reports for agendized items are available via the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main website at www.cityofpaloalto.org and also at the Planning Division Front Desk, 5th Floor, City Hall, after 2:00 PM on the Friday preceding the meeting date. Copies will be made available at the Development Center should City Hall be closed on the 9/80 Friday. NEW BUSINESS. Public Hearing 1.

395 Page Mill Road: Request by Jay Paul Company for Initiation of a Planned Community (PC) Rezoning to Accommodate: 1) Four (4) Story OfďŹ ce Development at 395 Page Mill Road and 2) Three (3) Story Public Safety Building with Attached Seven (7) Level Parking Structure at 3045 Park Blvd.

Questions. For any questions regarding the above items, please contact the Planning Department at (650) 329-2441. The ďŹ les relating to these items are available for inspection weekdays between the hours of 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. This public meeting is televised live on Government Access Channel 26. ADA. The City of Palo Alto does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities. To request accommodations to access City facilities, services or programs, to participate at public meetings, or to learn more about the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), please contact the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ADA Coordinator at 650.329.2550 (voice) or by e-mailing ada@cityofpaloalto.org. ***

Curtis Williams, Director of Planning and Community Environment Page 28Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;iLĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;ÂŁ]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Bob Drebin/stanfordphoto.com

Now taking applications for the 2013- 2014 school year!!

play,â&#x20AC;? Dawkins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They blocked shots and were a bundle of activity inside.â&#x20AC;? Huestis scored 14 points, on 6-of-9 shooting, and had 13 rebounds. Powell added 12 points and 13 rebounds. Both received on-air praise from ESPNU broadcaster Bill Walton, who knows a thing or two about rebounding and playing with desire. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Really, we just wanted to be as intense and aggressive as possible,â&#x20AC;? Powell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to help each other out and be be prepared for the type of screens they set. It just came down to the mindset of digging in and doing what it takes.â&#x20AC;? Chasson Randle scored a gamehigh 17 points and Aaron Bright had 12 as Stanford built a 25-point lead early in the second half. The Cardinal shot 52 percent to Oregonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 35 and made twice as many 3-pointers (eight) in fewer attempts. The last time Stanford beat a ranked opponent was just over two years, when it edged Washington, 58-56, in Maples Pavilion. The Cardinal last beat a top 10 team nearly five years ago to the day (Feb. 2, 2008) when it upset Washington State, 67-65, in overtime. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget the formula for success,â&#x20AC;? Dawkins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about continuing to improve.â&#x20AC;? Even though there was a large discrepancy between the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ranking and records, Oregon was a three-point underdog entering the contest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Someone told me that but I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think twice about it,â&#x20AC;? Dawkins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not for us to decide. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re more interested in playing the game

Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chasson Randle (right) tallied a game-high 17 points to help spark a 76-52 upending of visiting Oregon on Wednesday. well.â&#x20AC;? Stanford beat host Utah, 87-57, on Sunday for its most lopsided conference win in nine years and then came back with its largest margin at home in a conference game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope we can look at this game and see the things we did well,â&#x20AC;? Randle said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even the things we can improve on. This can be motivation to play the same way every time out.â&#x20AC;? Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s noon game with the Beavers (1-6, 11-9) on Sunday in another Pac-12 game with consequences. The Cardinal finds itself in a little better shape going into the weekend. A tie for sixth place, with Colorado no less, sounds a lot better

than 10th place. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we continue to grow as a team we can be very competitive,â&#x20AC;? Dawkins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re seeing the ball go in and when you defend, it gives you a little more life offensively.â&#x20AC;? Oregon Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season has been similar to Stanford. The Beavers expected to be better than they were a year ago and have yet to play up to their potential. Like Stanford, the Beavers have the talent to beat good teams. The Cardinal can ill afford a letdown. Oregon took an early 6-2 lead but that was before Randle, Powell, Bright and John Gage each hit a 3-pointer during an 18-2 run that sparked the crowd and the team. N

Stanford womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball looks to remain perfect on the road by Rick Eymer he nationally No. 6-ranked Stanford womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team is on the road this weekend, first at Oregon on Friday and then Oregon State on Sunday. This marks six road games in the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final 10 to close the regular season. While playing away from home can be scary, not so for Stanford. The Cardinal is 11-0 away from Maples Pavilion this season and still owns a share of first place in the Pac-12 Conference. Stanford remained atop the standings as Chiney Ogwumike had 20 points and 12 rebounds in a 69-56 win over visiting No. 20 Colorado, 69-56, on Sunday. Toni Kokenis added 15 points and a game-high five assists as the Cardinal (7-1, 18-2) won its fourth straight. Joslyn Tinkle scored 16 points and Amber Orrange added 10. UCLA and Washington both won Sunday and remain a game behind co-leaders Stanford and California. The Cardinal, which held its 38th consecutive opponent to under 70 points, led by as many as 19 in the

T

second half. The Buffaloes, off to their best start in nine years, closed to within 53-46 with 8:01 remaining to play, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s as close as they would come. Stanford went on a 9-2 run afterward and never trailed by less than 10 the rest of the way. Ogwumike recorded her fourth consecutive double-double and has 15 on the season. She also has reached double figures in scoring in all 20 games, including 20 or more in 15 of them. Kokenis, still bothered by a brace around her right thumb, shot 6 of 11 for the game, including 3 of 4 from long range, and went 9 for 15 on the weekend. That may be an indication sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adapting to her brace. Tinkle also reached double figures for a fourth consecutive time and for the seventh time in her past 10 games. She and Ogwumike each blocked three shots. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gymnastics Stanford finally will get a chance to strut its stuff in front of the home crowd this weekend and what better way than to host one of the top teams in the nation?

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll fit inside Burnham Pavilion, which remains one of the more cozy venues in all of college sports? No need to fret. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also No. 11 Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s debut on Pac-12 Networks and a nationwide audience. The Cardinal (7-1) recorded a team high and several individual season bests in its 196.450-195.775 victory over host California last Saturday but likely will need another season to compete with No. 4 UCLA, which visits Stanford on Saturday at 4 p.m. Stanford has yet to lose a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gymnastics meet to California in the current millenium, winning 28 straight. Stanford is 37-1 against the Bears since 1996. Senior captain Ashley Morgan had a tremendous week, winning the all-around at Georgia on Monday and at California on Saturday. She was named Pac-12 Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gymnast of the Week. The All-American claimed three individual titles against Cal, finishing first on vault, floor exercise and the all-around. Morgan tied her ca(continued on next page)

Sports

Stanford roundup (continued from previous page)

reer-best on vault (9.925), recorded a season-best on floor (9.925) and tied her season-best on uneven bars (9.850). In addition to Morgan, other Stanford gymnasts to watch include: Junior All-American Amanda Spinner, who delivered a career-high performance on balance beam at Georgia, scoring 9.925 to lead Stanford on the only event it outscored the Gym Dogs. She scored a 9.825 for a third-place finish at Cal. Samantha Shapiro earned her first individual title of the year at Cal, with a career-best 9.950 performance on uneven bars; the highest of any Cardinal this season. The sophomore All-American has improved her score on the event in each consecutive meet this season. Shona Morgan, a junior from Melbourne, Australia, continues to be one of Stanford’s most consistent performers. She contributed scores on all three of her events at Cal. Morgan scored a season-best 9.850 on uneven bars and finished third on floor exercise with a 9.875. She also delivered a solid routine on balance beam, good for a 9.800. Football With the Indianapolis Colts luring Stanford offensive coordinator Pep Hamilton away to the NFL, Cardinal head coach David Shaw has been forced to re-arrange his

coaching staff. Shaw on Tuesday announced several staff changes to lead the Cardinal offense into the 2013 season following a Rose Bowl championship season in 2012. Mike Bloomgren has been elevated to Andrew Luck Director of Offense/Offensive Coordinator (Hamilton’s previous position), while continuing to coach the offensive line. Bloomgren has been Stanford’s run-game coordinator the past two years. Also transitioning in his third season, former running backs coach Mike Sanford has taken over Stanford’s quarterbacks and wide receivers, while continuing his duties as recruiting coordinator. Replacing Sanford as running backs coach is former Cardinal quarterback Tavita Pritchard, who for the last two years served as a defensive assistant and worked closely with Associate Head Coach/Defensive Coordinator Derek Mason. Women’s water polo Top-ranked Stanford hosts the Stanford Invitational this Saturday and Sunday at Avery Aquatic Center. The Cardinal (5-0) has won its home tournament the past three seasons, capping last year’s title with a 9-5 win over UCLA. Along with the Cardinal, this year’s field features seven additional teams ranked in the latest national poll: No. 3 UCLA, No. 4 California, No. 9 San Jose State, No. 12 Hawai’i, No. 13 UC Davis, No. 14

Indiana and No. 16 Hartwick. The Olympic Club, based in San Francisco, also will send a squad that will take on Stanford and UC Davis Saturday. The Cardinal will open the tournament against The Olympic Club in exhibition action at 8:30 a.m. Saturday in Belardi Pool. Stanford will return to action at 4 p.m. Saturday, facing San Jose State in Avery Pool. Stanford opened the 2013 campaign this past Friday with an 11-2 win over No. 10 Michigan at Avery Aquatic Center, then followed up with wins over No. 18 Cal Baptist, No. 6 UC Irvine, Cal Baptist and No. 8 Loyola Marymount. Senior two-meter and 2012 Olympic gold medalist Melissa Seidemann led the Cardinal with 14 goals over the weekend, posting four hat tricks. Stanford’s rookies flexed their scoring muscle as well, as Anna Yelizarova, Gurpreet Sohi and Olympian Maggie Steffens combined to score 28 goals over the five game, paced by Yelizarova’s dozen. All three Cardinal goalies — senior Kate Baldoni, sophomore Emily Dorst and freshman Gabby Stone — saw action, anchoring a defensive effort that allowed just 18 goals. Men’s water polo Stanford had four players earn All-America honors from the Association of Collegiate Water Polo Coaches (ACWPC), the organization announced Tuesday. Sophomore utility Alex Bowen was

named to the ACWPC All-America first team for the second straight year while freshman driver Bret Bonanni was named to the second team. Redshirt junior Forrest Watkins and freshman BJ Churnside were both named honorable mention. Men’s volleyball Third-ranked Stanford is undefeated at home, but winless on the road. The Cardinal will need to change that to remain in contention in the hotly contested Mountain Pacific Sports Federation, especially with six of its next eight matches on the road. Stanford (3-2 in the MPSF, 6-2 overall) begins that stretch with a

pair of matches at Hawaii (2-4, 3-6) this weekend. Stanford rebounded from a pair of losses by recording two impressive home victories, beating No. 4 UCLA, 27-25, 19-25, 25-14, 25-12, on Tuesday, and No. 10 UC Santa Barbara, 25-19, 25-17, 25-22, on Friday. Wrestling Stanford (1-2 in the Pac-12, 5-12 overall) goes on the road this week hoping to keep the momentum from Sunday’s 27-9 victory over Cal Poly. The Cardinal travels to Utah Valley on Friday and then to 17thranked Boise State on Sunday. N

Palo Alto Unified School District Notice is hereby Given that proposals will be received from Pre- Qualified General Contractors by the Palo Alto Unified School District for bid package: Contract No. DES-13 Duveneck Elementary School - Modernization and New Construction DESCRIPTION OF THE WORK: Construction of (1) two story building, (2) single story buildings and modernization of existing buildings: Work includes but is not limited to demolition, abatement, excavation, site work, concrete, structural steel, framing, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, finishes etc. Bid documents contain the full description of the work. There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit at 02:30 p.m. on February 12, 2013 at the Duveneck Elementary School, 705 Alester Ave, Palo Alto California, 94303 Bid Submission: Proposals must be received at the District Facilities Office Building D, by 10:00 a.m. on February 27, 2013. PREVAILING WAGE LAWS: The successful Bidder must comply with all prevailing wage laws applicable to the Project, and related requirements contained in the Contract Documents. Palo Alto Unified School District will maintain a Labor Compliance Program (LCP) for the duration of this project. In bidding this project, the contractor warrants he/she is aware and will follow the Public Works Chapter of the California Labor Code comprised of labor code sections 1720 - 1861. A copy of the Districts LCP is available for review at 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D, Palo Alto, CA 94306. 1. A pre-job conference shall be conducted with the contractor or subcontractors to discuss federal and state labor law requirements applicable to the contract. 2. Project contractors and subcontracts shall maintain and furnish to the District, at a designated time, a certified copy of each payroll with a statement of compliance signed under penalty of perjury. 3. The District shall review and, if appropriate, audit payroll records to verify compliance with the Public Works Chapter of the Labor Code. 4. The District shall withhold contract payments if payroll records are delinquent or inadequate. 5. The District shall withhold contract payments as described in the LCP, including applicable penalties when the District and Labor Commissioner establish that underpayment of other violations has occurred. Bidders may examine Bidding Documents at Facilities Office, Building “D”. Bidders may purchase copies of Plans and Specifications at ARC Reprographics located at 1100 Industrial Rd. Unit 13, San Carlos, CA 94070. Phone: (650) 517-1895 All questions can be addressed to: Palo Alto Unified School District 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D Palo Alto, CA 94306-1099 Attn: Devyani Agate Phone: (650) 329-3927 Fax: (650) 327-3588

ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊiLÀÕ>ÀÞÊ£]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 29

Sports City of Palo Alto NOTICE OF PREPARATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Report (DSEIR) will be prepared by the City of Palo Alto Department of Planning and Community Environment for the project listed below. The agency and public comment period for this notice will extend from February 1 to March 4, 2013. A copy of the Notice of Preparation is available to be reviewed at the Development Center which is located at 285 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA and at 250 Hamilton Avenue, 5th floor, Palo Alto, CA 94301. If you have comments or questions regarding the preparation of the EIR, please contact Elena Lee of the Planning and Community Environment Department at 650-617-3196 or via email at Elena.Lee@cityofpaloalto.org. 2080 Channing Avenue [08PLN-00157/10PLN-00198]: The Final Environmental Impact Report for the Edgewood Plaza project (State Clearinghouse #2011022030) certified by the Palo Alto City Council in April 2012 (hereinafter referenced as the Edgewood Plaza Final EIR) evaluated the potential environmental impacts resulting from renovation of the Edgewood Plaza site and redevelopment with a mix of retail and residential uses. The Edgewood Plaza project was approved by the City Council and renovations began in September 2012. The approved project included renovation of the three existing commercial buildings, and construction of 10 single-family residences and an approximately 9,000-square foot park. The grocery store and Building 2 were to remain in their original locations. Building 1 was proposed to be relocated west of its current location to allow for a reconfiguration of the parking lot. Buildings 1 and 2 were identified as historic structures under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) in the Edgewood Plaza Final EIR. Building 1 was to be disassembled and all significant elements with distinctive design qualities were to be retained. The building was to be reconstructed in its new location and the visible historic building elements from the existing building were to be rehabilitated and installed at the new location. The relocation and reconstruction of historic Building 1 as proposed was determined to be a less than significant impact by the City Council based upon recommendations of the City’s Historic Resources Board (HRB). Implementation of the approved project began in September 2012 at which time Building 1 was demolished. None of the historic building elements were retained after demolition. As a result, the relocation and reconstruction of Building 1 cannot be implemented pursuant to the mitigation measures in the approved project. The proposed project is a modification of the approved redevelopment of the Edgewood Plaza Shopping Center. Under the revised project, Building 1 would be reconstructed with all new materials. The location and design of the building would be consistent with the previously approved project. All other aspects of the approved project, including the renovation of Building 2 and the grocery building, the new parking layout and landscape design, and development of 10 single-family houses, remain the same as the approved project evaluated in the 2012 Final EIR. Potential Environmental Effects of the Project: It is anticipated that the proposed project modifications may have an environmental effect on Cultural Resources and this will be the focus of the analysis in the Draft Supplemental EIR. CURTIS WILLIAMS, Director of Planning and Community Environment In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, listening assistive devices are available in the Council Chambers and Council Conference Room. Sign language interpreters will be provided upon request with 72 hours advance notice.

Prep basketball (continued from page 27)

Equally important, however, the Vikings have a two-game lead over the Falcons (6-2) with four to play. Based on the MaxPreps computer rankings, Palo Alto appears a shoein to play in the CCS Open Division with Mitty, Serra, Bellarmine, Sacred Heart Cathedral, El Camino, Piedmont Hills and Half Moon Bay. “It is going to be tough to play WCAL teams in the first round of the Open,” said Sax. But, unlike in previous years, a loss before the finals will not eliminate Palo Alto. If the Vikings lose before the finals, they will advance to the NorCal Division I playoffs. A CIF selection committee will select eight boys’ teams and eight girls for the NorCal Open Division playoffs. Among the criteria to be selected includes: having won two straight section titles or qualified for NorCals three of the past four years; made the NorCal finals the previous season; or been ranked in the top 10 of Cal Hi Sports, MaxPreps or CalPreps.com rankings the past two seasons. Palo Alto fits none of those and thus will play on in Division I for NorCals. That, of course, means no Mitty standing in the way. Instead, it could be Piedmont Hills, Deer Valley or De La Salle providing a roadblock to the state finals.

“I like the system,” said Sax. “It seems to have more parity.” For the girls, it’s likely Eastside Prep and Pinewood could be included in the CCS Open Division. But, both teams are expected to return to Division V for their run at NorCal honors. Palo Alto, meanwhile, continued one of the best seasons in school history as junior Keller Chryst came up with season highs of 19 points and 15 rebounds. Senior Aubrey Dawkins added 19 points for the Vikings. Eilon Tzur added nine points for the Vikings. He and Chryst combined for 15 points in the third period to end any Saratoga comeback hopes. Chryst won’t have the opportunity to add to his effort as he’ll miss Friday’s home game against Homestead at 7:45 p.m. Instead, he’ll be in New Orleans attending the Super Bowl in New Orleans. His father, Geep, is the quarterbacks coach of the San Francisco 49ers. In the West Bay Athletic League, Ricky Galliani poured in 22 points as Sacred Heart Prep remained tied for first place with a 65-42 victory over host King’s Academy on Tuesday. Corbin Koch added 20 points for the Gators (8-1, 12-7), who will host co-leader Menlo School on Friday (7:30 p.m.) to determine sole possession of first place. Menlo (7-1, 11-7) was in attendance after its game with Priory was postponed to next week. In the SCVAL El Camino Divi-

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ********************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp (TENTATIVE) AGENDA – COUNCIL ANNUAL RETREAT PALO ALTO ART CENTER FEBRUARY 2, 2013 - 8:30 AM 1. 2. 3.

Council Priorities for 2013 Guiding Principles and Core Values Meeting Management

(TENTATIVE) AGENDA – SPECIAL MEETING – COUNCIL CHAMBERS FEBRUARY 4, 2013 - 6:00 PM STUDY SESSION 1. Study Session: SEA Report and Citizen Survey CONSENT CALENDAR 2. Adoption of an Ordinance to Close FY 2012 Budget and Authorize Reappropriations into FY 2013 Budget; Close Completed Capital Improvement Projects and Transfer Remaining Balances to Reserves; Approve the City's FY 2012 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) 3. Finance Committee Recommendation to Accept Macias Gini & O’Connell’s (LLP) Financial Statements and Management Letter ACTION ITEMS 4. Response to Colleagues Memo: Health Care 5. Adoption of a Resolution Setting Council Vacation for 2013 6. Colleagues Memo Regarding Annual Council Reorganization Meeting (TENTATIVE) AGENDA – SPECIAL MEETING – COUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM FEBRUARY 6, 2013 - 5:00 PM 1. 2. 3.

Interviews of Candidates for the Public Art Commission for One Term Ending on April 30, 2015. Interviews of Candidates for the Parks and Recreation Commission for Two Terms Ending on December 31, 2015. Interviews of Candidates for the Planning and Transportation Commission for One Term Ending on July 31, 2014. STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS

The Finance Committee will meet on Tuesday, February 5, 2013 at 7:00 PM to discuss the UAC recommendation to approve the proposed plan to achieve a carbon neutral electric supply. The Cubberley Policy Advisory Committee will meet on Thursday, February 7, 2013 at 10:00 AM to discuss:1) Update on CCAC Work to Date, and 2) Initial Presentation of CCAC Findings

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sion, Gunn battled visiting Los Altos before finally dropping a 51-49 decision. The Titans (1-7, 4-14) held a 29-26 halftime lead before the Eagles pulled ahead in the third period. Chris Russell tallied 16 points for Gunn while teammate Max Girod added a season-high 15. Girls Eastside Prep and Pinewood remain tied for first place in the WBAL Foothill Division after each team posted victories this week. Pinewood won its second game in as many days on Wednesday with a 50-42 win over visiting Menlo School. The Panthers (6-1, 16-4) overcame an outstanding individual effort by Menlo’s Drew Edelman (16 points, 19 rebounds) and their own horrendous shooting (16 of 60 for 27 percent) to win their third straight. Marissa Hing led Pinewood with 16 points while Gabi Bade added 10 points and freshman Chloe Eackles contributed nine points and eight rebounds. Maddy Price finished with 12 points and 11 rebounds for Menlo (4-3, 14-7). On Tuesday, Pinewood began a busy four-game week with a 61-43 win over host Mercy-San Francisco. Hing had 16 points while Eackles had 11 points nine rebounds, five steals and five assists. Eastside Prep, meanwhile, overcame a three-point first-quarter deficit and rolled to a 48-28 victory over visiting Sacred Heart Prep. Hashima Carothers tallied 16 points and Alexus Simon added 12 to rally the Panthers (6-1, 15-5), who held the Gators (3-4, 15-6) to single-digit scoring each quarter. Elsewhere this week: In the SCVAL De Anza Division, Gunn remained a game back of first place following a 43-39 victory over visiting Milpitas on Wednesday. The Titans (5-2, 12-5) were led by junior guard Zoe Zwerling’s 23 points while sophomore Meghan Mahoney added 13. In Saratoga, Palo Alto dropped back in the race after falling to the host Falcons, 53-46. The Vikings (4-3, 8-10) suffered their second straight loss. Paly and Saratoga were tied at at 32 heading into the final quarter before the Falcons erupted for 21 points. Coco Lovely paced Paly with 14 points, draining a trio of three-pointers.. In the PAL South Division, host Menlo-Atherton fell two games off the pace following a 53-49 loss to Burlingame (7-1). The Bears (6-2, 10-10) clung to a 30-29 halftime lead before being outscored 10-5 in the crucial third period. Emma Heath tossed in 18 points and Sarah Howell added 10 for M-A. A day earlier, Menlo-Atherton overcame a three-point first-quarter deficit and pulled away for a 43-36 victory over visiting San Mateo. The Bears got 10 points each from Heath and Naomi Baer. Before facing Pinewood, Menlo overcame a hot-shooting Castilleja team for a 62-52 victory on Tuesday. The visiting Gators made a schoolrecord six 3-pointers in the first half and grabbed a 30-25 lead. Menlo’s strength and size inside prevailed in the second half with Edelman finishing with 17 points and nine rebounds while Olivia Pellarin added 13 points. N

Sports

Menlo school girls are closing in on a second WBAL soccer title

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

by Keith Peters

“This ‘honeymoon’ season is Amos-Grosser added solo tallies. f’s not a matter of ‘if’ for the turning out to be sweeter than the Leah Hess assisted on Olsen’s goal. Menlo School girls’ soccer ‘wedding’ season of last year!” said Pinewood remains tied for the diteam. Rather, it’s simply when. Menlo coach Donoson FitzGerald. vision lead with Mercy-Burlingame. The West Bay Athletic League title “But, we still have lots of work to Those teams meet next Tuesday will go to the Knights for a second do and this group of amazing girls at Skyline College with the winstraight year. will get it done!” ner playing the Foothill Division’s Menlo opened up an eight-point Menlo ran its unbeaten streak to third-place team in a playoff for the lead over second-place Sacred Heart 10 by holding off Crystal Springs. league’s final Central Coast Section Prep following a 1-0 victory over The lone goal was scored in the 34th berth. visiting Crystal Springs on Tues- minute of the first half by senior In the PAL Bay Division, visitday. Priya Medberry on an nicely ex- ing Menlo-Atherton got goals from The division-leading Knights ecuted eight-yard volley. The play Brittany Scheuch and Marilena improved to 7-0 in league (9-2-4 began with a cross from sophomore McCarty during a 2-2 deadlock overall) while Sacred Heart Prep Amber Mallett that was directed on with Burlingame. Elizabeth Cruz and Priory each had to to Medberry by and Julia Stoner added assettle for ties. Menlo took junior Kate Dusists for the Bears (4-3-1, 21 points into Thursday’s manian. 6-5-3), who tallied both match at Notre Dame-San While Menlo goals in the second half to Jose while second-place outshot Crysovercome a 1-0 deficit. SHP is well back with 13. tal, 15-0, and Menlo-Atherton reMenlo, which won its controlled the mains in fourth place with 17th straight division ball much of 13 points, still trailing match against Crystal the match scorWoodside (7-0-1), CarSprings, can clinch its ing goals was a lmont (6-1-1) and Burlsecond straight division struggle. Menlo ingame (5-2-1). title by winning its next Amanda McFarland was led by se- Taylor Ruegg Palo Alto tuned up for two matches, giving the nior defender its run at a SCVAL El Knights 27 points. With four match- Hannah Rubin, senior Rachel Pin- Camino Division title with a 1-0 es left, the best SHP can finish is sker, junior Amanda McFarland, nonleague win over host Gunn on with 25 points while the best Priory and sophomore Lizzie Lacy. Wednesday night. or King’s Academy can finish is In Palo Alto, Castilleja played the Paly junior Megan Tall ended the with 23 points. role of spoiler by deadlocking Sa- scoreless battle with about 20 minDepending on what happened cred Heart Prep, 2-2. SHP slipped utes gone in the second half, taking against Notre Dame-SJ, Menlo like- further in the WBAL race at 3-1-4 a pass from Sunny Lyu before shakly can clinch on Tuesday at home by (7-2-5 overall). Taylor Ruegg and ing a Gunn defender and the Titans’ beating King’s Academy. Brianna Carcione scored goals five goalie to score. Priory, meanwhile, visited Sacred minutes apart in the first half for Palo Alto improved to 9-4-2 while Heart Prep on Thursday in a must- SHP with Brigid White and Riley Gunn dropped to 2-9-3. win match for both teams. Only the Shanahan providing assists. Gunn had an opportunity to take top two finishers earn automatic In Portola Valley, host Priory the lead when Ming Ming Liu made berths into the Central Coast Sec- (2-2-4, 3-4-6) also fell further be- a steal and passed it into the box, tion playoffs. The third-place finish- hind in the WBAL race following where Camille Shrager’s shot was er will have to face a playoff game a 2-2 deadlock with visiting King’s saved by Paly keeper Catherine against the Skyline Division winner Academy. Angell-Atchison. Paly’s Katherine for the league’s third section berth. In the WBAL Skyline Division, Maniscalco later ran down a Gunn That’s what Menlo faced three host Pinewood posted a 6-0 victory player to break up a one on one. straight seasons prior to last year, over visiting Harker on Tuesday to The Vikings will put their 7-0-1 when the Knights finally broke improve to 7-0-1 in league (8-3-2 division mark on the line Friday at through with their first league overall). Olivia Biggs had a hat trick Fremont. Paly might be able to lock crown since 1991. By doing that, for the Panthers with assists from up the El Camino Division crown on Menlo shed its bridesmaid role and Gretchen Olsen and Amrita Mecker. Wednesday at home against Wilcox finally became a bride. Olsen, Nicole Colonna and Gabby (3:30 p.m.).

I

Al Chang

Palo Alto junior Megan Tall (right) manuevers around Gunn’s goalie to score the only goal during the Vikings’ nonleague triumph on Wednesday night. Paly continues to lead the SCVAL El Camino Division.

Sienna Stritter

Jack Heneghan

Menlo School

Menlo School

The junior soccer forward scored the game-winning goals in a 3-1 win over Sacred Heart Prep and a 1-0 win over Priory to keep the Knights undefeated and atop the WBAL Foothill Division standings.

The junior produced 62 points, 12 rebounds and 14 steals as the Knights won three basketball games -- one against co-leader Harker -- and remained tied for first with rival SHP in the West Bay Athletic League.

Honorable mention Hashima Carothers* Eastside Prep basketball

Erin Chang Palo Alto soccer

Destiny Graham Eastside Prep basketball

Amanda McFarland Menlo soccer

Alexus Simon Eastside Prep basketball

Schuyler Tinley-Volk Menlo soccer

Ian Bennett Sacred Heart Prep basketball

Aubrey Dawkins* Palo Alto basketball

Ricky Galliani Sacred Heart Prep basketball

Aldis Petriceks* Palo Alto basketball

Bobby Roth Menlo basketball

Ryan Young Menlo basketball * previous winner

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

Boys’ soccer Sacred Heart Prep opened up a five-point lead over second-place Menlo School following a 7-0 romp over visiting Pinewood in a West Bay Athletic League match on Wednesday. Brendan Spillane tallied two goals and two assists, all in the first half, as the first-place Gators (8-0-1, 11-2-2) grabbed a comfortable 6-0 lead. Robert Hellman added one goal and two assists. In San Jose, Menlo fell back in the race following a 0-0 deadlock with host Harker. The second-place Knights are now 6-1-2 in league for 20 points (9-3-3 overall). Only the top two teams in the WBAL automatically qualify for the CCS playoffs. In nonleague action, Palo Alto kept its postseason hopes alive with a 2-0 victory over visiting Gunn. The Vikings (10-4-2)got a firsthalf goal from senior Kirby Gee, off a deflection of a Gunn player, and sophomore Preston Kuppe tallied an unassisted goal in the second half to hand the Titans (5-9-2) the loss. Gunn keeper Mack Radin made several nice stops in the first half to prevent possible goals by Chris Meredith and Gen Murphy. Paly hit

the post and crossbar before Gee’s shot hit a Gunn player and caromed into the cage. Paly had another deflection off the post that didn’t go in during second-half action. Kuppe took a pass from Fernando Rodriguez and dribbled past two defenders before knocking a shot off Radin for the insurance goal. Paly keeper Tony Maharaj had two nice saves, including a spectacular diving save off a header by Gunn’s Guy Kaznik. Gee and fellow senior captain Alex Chin had arguably their best defensive games of the season as Gunn had just a few shots on frame. Wrestling Gunn junior Cadence Lee will go after a third straight title at the girls’ CCS championships this weekend at Oak Grove High in San Jose. Lee will be seeded No. 1 in her division for the two-day event, which begins Friday. Gunn’s Jessica Sun was fifth last year and could be seeded again. Teammate Grace Robinson, meanwhile, has the next best shot (after Lee) to place high. Palo Alto will be represented by Alexa Austin. N

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Palo Alto Weekly 02.01.2013 - Section 1