Issuu on Google+

one1one magazine

in music

MS MR

Cat Thomson, DJ K REC & Paige Morgan

|

1

in fashion

Evan ducharme the 21 year old vancouver designer embracing the whispers of simplistic design.

Jen garces and her tricks of the trade: tips for keeping your wardrobe under control.

morfolÓgia nacional in beauty

5 quick fixes for your every day make up messes

top 13 products of 2013 the beauty products at the top of our nice list

3D printed accessories from mexico, with love.

miss america the one 1 one on Miss Nina Davulvri

optical boutique sue randhawa on personal style and finding that right pair of eyewear

theholidayissue december 2013

vol. 1, issue 8

2

3

Masthead Editor-In-Chief | Ghazal Elhaei Associate Editor | Aidan Weinrib Sales Director | Zeenat Hussain Photo Director | Reema Ismail Beauty Director | Kaycee Camaclang Womens Fashion Director | Kenneth Wyse Mens Fashion Director | Marchel Eang Photography Contributors Alex Ross, Megan Bourne, Shayd Johnson, Linsey Hulls Contributors Monica Pankiewicz, Anisa Chaki, Frances Thomas, Saul Alviar, Savannah Rietz, Kelsey Fitzpatrick, Jihan Amer, Aaron wozlowski, Rabab Seblani, Sandy Mac

on the cover ms mr/Max Hershenow & Lizzy Plapinger photographed by shayd johnson edited by marchel eang

4

Vol. 1 , Issue 8 december 201 3 T he holiday Issue

a letter from the editor This past year has flown by in a blink of an eye: it seems like just yesterday a group of ambitious and driven 20-something's decided to get together to create ONE1ONE. We've been so fortunate to have come across such a wide pool of talent across the globe and here at home in Vancouver. There doesn't seem to be a greater time than the holidays to celebrate and give thanks for the incredible opportunities and relationships that we have received over this past year. Every individual in this months issue has not only made an impact within our global community but on each of us personally. From our cover story MSMR's sense of self and passion to that of Nina Davuluri's same self assurance - we were exposed to a new meaning of strength. New comers on the scene Evan Ducharme, Paige Morgan, Cat Thomson, DJ K-Rec juxtapose the same hunger that of our veterans in the game: Sue Randhawa of The Optical Boutique, Jennifer Garces of Your Everyday Stylist and Richard Jones of the Stereophonics. We've also got our travel diary from our trip to Paris to visit our good friends: La Biosthetique. It was c'est chic, magnifique. 

one1one social

This issue will be our last in it's current state as we are pleased to announce that a new and interactive platform will be launching in the new year. Same home - just an updated look. After all, isn't that what a New Year is all about? A chance for a new beginning and a new chapter in our lives.  Until then, we wish you the best that the Holiday season has to offer and a magical New Year's Eve.  #one1oneholiday  See you all in 2014! 

Ghazal Elhaei

contents music 6

cat thomson

14

ms mr

18

dj k-rec

26

one 2 watch: paige morgan

beauty 32

La BiosthÉtique profile

36

makeup: top 13 beauty products of 2013

39

makeup: Quick Makeup Fix-Ups

40

editorial: Calling of the Season

fashion 48

Jen Garces your everyday stylist

54

miss america

58

Sue Randhawa of the Optical Boutique

68

Interview with Local Designer evan ducharme

72

MorfolÓgica Nacional - Seeing in 3D

82

The Ultimate gift guide

90

Editorial: seasons of Love

98

Editorial: The After Hours

one1one magazine

|

5

6

|

one1one magazine

Hat H&M; Sweater Vero Moda; Leggings See You Monday; Necklace Armani; Shoes 8th + Main

cat

one1one magazine

thomson g i r l like u s Text: Ghazal Elhaei Styling & Photography: Marchel B Eang Styling Assistant: Saul Aviar Special Thank-You to The Burrard Hotel

|

7

8

|

one1one magazine

Inspiration comes from everything and everywhere. You want to break the lock off of my journal? Listen to the album.

Hat Hudson's Bay; Sweater 8th + Main; Jeans Just USA

one1one magazine

When someone says that they are a singer-songwriter, I often reflect back on the legends: Carole King, Joni Mitchell, and Carly Simon. Despite a great comparison - it still holds a common stereotype - one that 604 Records artist, Cat Thomson, has broken to new perceptions. Thomson started her musical process having studied for five years at the Louisiana State University; she majored in opera and vocal performance. Her voice surpasses genres in the best way possible - whether listening to records that she has written or renditions of chart toppers on her personal YouTube page - she captivates her listener. Her impressive vocal ability possesses an authoritative note, mixed in with a sophistication that acts as a true reflection of those legends before her. Combine that with a distinct sense of self, an evolving style and an infectious personality and you’ve got a star ready to explode. “I was around 3 or 4 years old and every Saturday morning my mom and I used to dance in the living room to Stevie Wonder’s “I Just Called to Say I Love You.” She recalls her earliest memory of music and reflects on that [moment] when she use to wear her mom’s high heels, turn bath towels into Grammy dress and accept awards in front of any mirror in her home. Her hunger has not only strengthened with time but she still holds the ability to be able to laugh at herself and enjoy the process of finding her place amongst the

|

9

industry. When touching base on her first performance with her own material, Thomson was 9 years old. “There was a big banquet going on at a hotel we were staying at over christmas. We were walking by the hall and I noticed there was a grand piano inside. Before my parents could catch me, I ran into the ballroom and started playing a piece I had written. I remember the room going quiet and then just a massive applause. I’ve been hooked on that feeling ever since.” Performing is the ultimate test and feat for new artists and the ability to withstand anything through an act is key. “I just power through without giving it a second thought. If something is headed for catastrophe, I’ll just calmly make some lame joke to the audience and start again. 99% of the time if you ever hear an artist complaining to someone: ‘O.M.G. Did you hear how badly I screwed up…’ whoever they’re talking to usually says, “I honestly had no idea, I think you’re the only one that noticed”. If you don’t make a big deal out of it, neither will anyone else.” Connecting with her audience stands to be an important value - “I like to play intimate venues.” Thomson is a storyteller and connecting with her audience is not only crucial through her work but allows for her to be a witness to the reactions of listeners. “It’s the absolute best feeling watching how the audience reacts.” One of her favourite places is Kranky’s Cafe in Vancouver; a very small and intimate location continued on pg. 10 ➟

10

|

one1one magazine

that sits about 10-12 people, creating that cozy-at-home-living-room atmosphere that leaves one creating those priceless bonds with their audience. When writing, her process varies, but the root cause always starts on that feeling. “I’ll go sit at the piano and let my fingers do the talking.” The mood of a record is never derivative of her set mood either - an important understanding Thomson has gained - that a lot of her writing comes from a subconscious place. The result is a therapeutic and natural road that starts with a melody and lyrics that would follow suit. Though, sometimes that may not be case. “She’ll Never Be Me,” was a record that came about in an unconventional manner where Thomson notes, “I was showering once and a lyric popped out at me; I jumped out - butt-naked and soaking wet - and ran to my piano.” Similarly, this process of writing on the go has developed within Thomson since a budding age when she would write melodies on scrap pieces of paper and then tape them to her fridge. “They would make absolutely no sense. It would literally just say ‘do daaa de dittle dee doh duuumm.’ Then I would take my masterpieces and record them into the tape player. What I wouldn’t give to be able to find some of those.” [Laughs] Eventually her writing blossomed into an outlet that allowed Thomson to face situations head on without personal confrontation. “I’m a very private person. I’m able to write about people and experiences that I just can’t talk about face to face.” “Sticks & Stones,” the leading single off her debut album, is a story about Thomson growing up from age 10 to current day. In contrast, her song “Down,” was a result of the realization that one of her relationships was sinking. Then comes “This House,” an ode to Thomson’s parents and a story of their lives. “Inspiration comes from everything and everywhere. You want to break the lock off of my journal? Listen to the album.” I confronted her with the accomplishment of writing her perfect song - her answer though continued on pg. 12 ➟

one1one magazine

|

11

Top Vero Moda; Sweater 8th + Main; Shoes Aldo

12

|

one1one magazine

a no - was complimented by the fact that the records written for ‘Puzzle’ fit perfectly together. “They were perfect for the frame of mind I was in and I love listening to all of them still. There would be nothing to keep striving for to better myself if I’d already deemed one of my songs “perfect”. So I guess I will keep striving for the goal of perfection.  I think if a song evokes the type of emotion that you set out to achieve, then you’ve reached perfection. If I can allow an audience to feel and understand the sentiment of a song then I think thats pretty damn near perfection.”

• Exceptional gift selection • Take pictures with Santa all three days • Live Christmas music • Cheese seminars • Gourmet foods • Holiday entertaining ideas • Fresh seasonal florals and greens

Featuring: The Select Artisan Vendor Marketplace

There is an element that surpasses humility with Thomson, it’s almost a fraction of being not only aware of who she is but perceptive of every single person around her that separates her from a pool of talent. “I am incredibly lucky to be able to say I have the most amazing support group around me. All of my best friends have amazing lives and incredibly busy careers as well, so we understand that sometimes you have to pencil each other in for a phone date or Skype chat. I have a core group of 5 best friends and sometimes we’ll go a month or two without talking, but it doesn’t change anything, we pick back up right where we left off. I talk to my parents and my sister almost daily. Believe me, if I ever go a couple days without talking to my mom, I will receive an email with the subject heading ‘I guess you don’t love your old parents anymore...’ Ah, sympathy emails.” Cat Thomson’s single ‘Sticks & Stones’ is now available on iTunes with her debut album ‘Puzzle’ available to audiences in the new year. www.catthomsonmusic.com www.facebook.com/catthomsonmusic www.twitter.com/catthomsonmusic www.instagram.com/catthomsonmusic 

November 22-24 ABBOTSFORD TRADEX

www.westcoastchristmasshow.com

one1one magazine

|

13

14

|

one1one magazine

Text/ Ghazal Elhaei Photos/ Shayd Johnson

ms mr

one1one magazine

We walked into Venue Nightclub while Lizzy Plapinger and Max Hershenow, more commonly known as MS MR, were doing soundcheck. The New-York based duo had just landed in Vancouver only hours prior to our sit-down with them. Despite being a little tired, they seemed eager to be back into city - noting that Vancouver had and continue to be incredibly receptive of their music and body of work. Plapinger and Hershenow grew into MS MR in 2010, where they reconnected following graduation from Vassar College and found their career ascending at full speed. Their debut album, Secondhand Rapture, had been in the making for a few years and the first single off of the record, "Hurricane" had found itself as the soundtrack to Tom Ford's 2012 runway show, featured on Game of Thrones and has landed the duo appearances on shows such as Late Night with Jimmy Fallon and Live with Letterman. The record attributes to how unique the duo are and how immaculate their approach to their art is. Though they never over think things too much. They just go with what feels right and what inspires them. I asked if they had a formula to create the perfect pop record and Plapinger noted, "There's no such thing as a perfect song. The perfection is in the mistakes and the raw moments of a record." Despite their success, it was very hush-hush in it's roots. Most of their friends and family didn't even know that they continued on pg. 16 âž&#x;

|

15

16

|

one1one magazine

were working on the project until it started gaining traction through Tumblr. By keeping the element of who they were out of the equation, they allowed for their music to be the main focus amongst a very personality and image-based driven industry. I asked if their music was going to become more commercial as they succeed further into their careers, and both of them sternly said no at the same time. "I think we're starting to experiment even more with what we've been writing lately, but what defines commercial anymore?" Plapinger notes. "I just go with what feels right, I think Max is the same way." Could they seem themselves ever quitting music? What would their lives outside of music look like? "I think I was always meant to do something within music, I can't really imagine myself doing anything else." Plapinger pauses, turns to Hershenow and asks, "Max, would you ever go back to dance?" Hershenow dove into his love of dance but admitted his path seemed to lay more within music these days. He told us of his time as a dancer and how his path had originally led towards becoming a modern dance choreographer. Whilst at the same time Plapinger had cofounded Neon Gold Records while she was in college, a label that helped launched the likes of Ellie Goulding and Marina and the Diamonds. Their musicality seemed to have been developing long before the two even crossed paths - but it's within the versatility of their past that compliments their current state so well. They've created a new era of pop through Plapinger's haunting, eerie and psychedelic voice with Hershenow's contrasting upbeat and colourful production. The vibrant duo have an ever-evolving look that contrasts bright saturated colours with the dark tones in their sound. I asked about Hershenow's style and he starts breaking down how his apartment in Brooklyn is filled with maybe a little too much clothing. I ask if it's all vintage and he nods, adding that his wardrobe has an eclectic mix of old and new. Plapinger stands on the same line, touching on a local Vancouver boutique that she frequents when in town. "I love USED, I always find some great pieces there - I wish we had time to go this time around." I asked Plapinger about her ever-changing sense of style and she admitted that over time, it's been about dressing

more around how she feels rather than an image she tries to portray. This a stark contrast from the first time I saw the duo, when they came into town as support to Marina and the Diamonds where Plapinger had long blonde-diva-worthy locks and donned a bedazzled number - versus her multicoloured do and fur piece she wore on stage later that night. "I used to hate the colour orange until Lizzy dyed her hair, then it started growing on me and I found myself loving it." Hershenow starts laughing as he starts dissecting Plapinger's colour stories. She adds: "I wonder what colour I should dye my hair next." Their aesthetic is very kitschy, a little dark and maybe creepy to some - but their look and their sound is stylized in a way where it challenges the audience to understand something that may not have made any sense to begin with. While we were walking to the local sex shop to shoot a couple of photos, I asked the duo what the one thing they try to do in every city they tour in is and Hershenow immediately replied by talking about his love of food. "We don't always have time to do the tourist thing but I try to make sure we always go somewhere really good to eat." Plapinger laughs and admitted that if Hershenow didn't YELP obsessively, she would have the worst diet. The two are very attentive towards each other; they took the time to listen to each other. Their relationship off stage only strengthened their connection whilst on stage. They effortlessly took over the stage later in the evening and the simplicity of the show's set-up allowed for their performance to do exactly as the duo have always thrived for: to let the music speak for itself. From their humble and mysterious beginnings to their visually enticing and innate musicality, MS MR have cultivated their forum of expression to be one that is adorned and evocative at the same time. www.msmrsounds.com www.facebook.com/msmrsounds www.twitter.com/msmrsounds

one1one magazine

|

17

18

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

19

dj

k-Rec The music industry is a strange and ever-changing beast that has a tendency to eat up new artists and spit them right back out. Of course there are longstanding icons, but it’s somewhat rare that we get a chance to talk to someone who has been around the block and has as much enthusiasm and dedication to a local movement as Kent Stephany, aka DJ-KREC, does. Coming of age within the 90’s, the Vancouver-based DJ is heavily influenced by hip hop of the era - notwithstanding a brief venture into electronic music in the early 2000’s. From splicing together tapes by hand to remixing them to becoming a mainstay in Vancouver’s underground scene, KREC has witnessed and been a part of massive growth and shifts in music and its community. While there have been highs and not-so-highs in his career, KREC’s love for the music has been steadfast. We talked to him about inspiration and progress, including his love for De La Soul, the vibrancy of the underground Vancouver music scene, vinyl records, how the Internet has changed the game for musicians and the reality of what it takes to be in the modern music industry. ONE1ONE: So you’re a little bit of a jack-of-all-trades in the music industry, but let’s get started by talking about your DJ career, because that’s where we [at One1One] were introduced to you. We first caught you [opening] for De La Soul, and given your background in hip hop that must have been pretty awesome for you! Can you tell me a bit about that? DJK: It was definitely like a once in a lifetime thing. I have a connection with Live Nation - I’ve done a bunch of shows with them - and they were the ones putting on the De La Soul show. So when I found out they were coming, I sent a couple emails and was bugging them. De La Soul is probably if not my favourite all-time musical group, it’s definitely my favourite hip hop group. So it was a huge, huge night for me and it was a great experience. Also, I come from that era. I was in high school in the ‘90’s and I was really into hip hop. From [around] ‘92 to ‘98 was when

20

|

one1one magazine

I really lived and breathed it nonstop. And that was when De La Soul Is Dead was out and [Buhloone] Mindstate, which are probably two of my favourite albums from them. So, yeah, it was crazy. Did you get to meet them and nerd out a little bit? Yeah! [Laughs] See, I was so nerded out that I was so nervous and kind of, like, stared at them from across the room. But they were super nice! They were probably one of the nicest guys of that stature that I’ve met. They were really nice to me and didn’t have any attitude or ego it seemed. They definitely left me feeling [great]. For like a week afterward I basically went through their whole catalogue and listened to it all again. And that was a solo show for you, but you’re also involved with [the Vancouver-based hip hop group] Friends With The Help. You guys have three albums, with your most recent coming out in July [2013]. I was wondering how you originally got together? We got together around the Olympics, so about 2010. Nigel - “Young Nige” from Friends With The Help - was putting on a hip hop show in the Downtown Eastside. It was called The Heavy Set and a mutual friend of ours, Dave another local artist that goes by the name Corvid, who I’ve produced and knew him from doing a show called the Chugalug, which was like a breakdance, freestyle, everyone kind of come and jam out - hooked me up with Nigel. I would DJ The Heavy Set show. Nigel and Josh [AKA “Low Lux”] were in Friends With The Help before me. So it’s a roundabout way of telling the story, but I met them

through The Heavy Set. We started hanging out and becoming friends. I liked what they were doing, I thought it was cool, but they didn’t really have anything recorded yet and lot of their stuff was [done] over other rapper’s instrumentals. So we got together and I had a studio… and just kindof started recording for fun. There was sort of a chemistry and it all worked out really well, so we just kept on recording and continue to. You guys are pretty integrating in the whole East Van music culture and are really supported by the community there. What’s that scene like for you? In the East Van hip hop scene there’s a whole bunch of, um, sub-genres? I don’t even know what to call them. But the scene is all very supportive and it’s all very grassroots. It’s been good. There’s a lot of jams where people get together and freestyle and there’s a lot of breakdancing. Like there’s ‘hipster rap,’ there’s ‘gangster rap,’ but everyone gets together and really supports each other. You’ve been around - you’re not a newcomer. No! [Laughs] So how do you find that the hip hop community has changed or grown over time? What’s it like now versus then? I think now it’s gotten more recognition from other places. Vancouver has grown hugely since I started [DJing and making music] in the early 2000’s. [Even] the size of the city and how it’s grown has kind of been mirrored in the hip hop scene, where there’s tons more people doing it. But I think it’s finally

gotten to a place where it’s really community based now. Before there seemed to be little pockets of just a few people doing it here, and a few people doing it there. I think the Internet has become a big [factor] too, so you can [get your word out]. People know about the party, or people know about things that are happening just through things like Facebook, whereas back in the day there really was nothing like that. If there were parties happening in Vancouver it would be word of mouth, which would be hard if you’re say, living in Surrey. Like I grew up in Langley, so it would be hard to find out what exactly was going on. But now you know that there’s an all ages show happening in Vancouver that you can go to. I work with STL - he’s another guy who’s been doing it for a long time - and we try to do a lot of all-ages shows because now kids are coming from like Surrey and Langley and bussing out here because they know there’s going to be an all-ages show and they know what’s going to be happening. It sound like a really welcoming environment too, where you’re all really encouraging each other and embracing a lot of people instead of it being an exclusive atmosphere. Yea, I mean just like any scene there is some exclusivity happening. But on the whole, I find especially in the hip hop scene, people just really want to rap, you know? They just want to rap in front of somebody, and the most supportive people are the people on the scene. It’s good because it helps everyone grow, it gives everyone a platform to do it. There’s a bunch of guys & girls I work with now called Chapel Sound and they are basically beat makers and

one1one magazine

DJs and they do a lot of different electronic music. They’re another great community-based thing and they’re based around live internet shows like Ustream. Basically, back to your question, years ago I found it wasn’t that easy because it seemed like the cliques were this huge thing to break into. And that might have not been the truth, I just feel that maybe with the amount of people there is now, everyone knows somebody in the scene. I was going to ask you about electronic music because I saw that Much Music video. Yeah, Electric Circus? [Laughs] Yeah! It was such a flashback for me! So, I wanted to ask about your involvement in electronic music now and whether it still plays a big role for you.

"I actually started out trying to rap, and that was maybe what disenfranchised me too, because I wasn’t very good at rapping. My personalty didn’t fit being a rapper"

Well basically back in ‘99, 2000, 2001, I got a bit disenfranchised with the whole hip hop scene. I don’t know [why], maybe it was my age, but I started listening to a lot of electronic music at that time. A lot of guys like Fatboy Slim and Moby and Aphex Twin and other kindof guys like that were exciting me. DJ Shadow was a huge influence and DJ Krush. I actually started out trying to rap, and that was maybe what disenfranchised me too, because I wasn’t very good at rapping. My personalty didn’t fit being a rapper. So anyway, I started making beats and I ended up getting a bunch of videos on Much Music through Much Music video grants for my electronic music. Through that, I got a record deal with Network Records and I was doing big beats. Kind of like Fatboy Slim, Moby, Chemical Brothers-type music. I really liked [electronic music], and I still like it, but I guess my heart was always in hip hop and I always have been really good at hip hop. Sometimes with the electronic music it could

|

21

have been a little bit forced maybe. But I had a lot of success with it. I got nominated for a Much Music Video Award for best electronic video. That’s rad! In what year? In 2001. But the problem was the award show was supposed to be on the 15th of September, and you know what happened on September 11th. So, it all got cancelled. So I’ll never know if I won and I never got to go, which was a bit sad but, of course, understandable. But anyway, I did that for a while and things didn’t go as planned with the whole Network thing and that’s why I ended up getting back into the hip hop scene. But as far as does electronic still play a big role? Yeah, I mean I like to listen to it, I like to listen to a lot of the new stuff that’s coming out and I’ve always been really big into anything that’s beat-based. There’s a lot of great stuff that’s out right now, and that’s another thing with the Internet. There’s Soundclound and all these places with just so much stuff out there to hear. I can just get lost in it. Luckily I know people who are more on the ball than me. [Laughs] The people you trust show you what’s out there. Actually, as I was researching for this interview I found a lot of the things you were posting [on Instagram] I had never heard of before. I was really down with some of those playbacks and records. And that’s what I’ve gotten into lately, is collecting old 45s and records. A lot of my samples come from that. It’s all really connected. A lot of the electronic music I listen to now is very hip hop based. Do you remember the first track you made? The first track I made? [Laughs] I used to go on my dad’s stereo and I would take snippets from other tapes and put them all together on one tape. So it was kind of like making master mixes of just little chunks of all my favourite songs. I would try to match them together sort of as a collage. Those were the first things I was doing. You hit pause and then find the place on the tape, then record a snippet and try to string together sentences and stuff. That was the very first stuff I did. But the first track was probably really bad. [Laughs] I used to be in a rap group called SKV - which [stood for] Some Kind of Vibe back in high school. Probably one of those tracks, which would have been like grade 9 or 10.

22

|

one1one magazine

I’m always interested in the process of making music and how it differentiates for a lot of people. So if that’s how you started off, how did your process of music making evolve? It’s never really gone away from sampling other music. It always starts with a sample or a kind of idea. Even if I’m not sampling, I have an idea of a track I know or a sound that I want, and then I try to go about getting that. [Maybe] there’s an instrument that I like that I want to be the core. I used to start out with drums. I would program my drums first and then I would try to piece everything around the drums, which I don’t do anymore. I found that when I listened to my older stuff it’s very drum-based. So now I would try to find a sample first or try to find some sort of groove first. I would say 90 percent of the stuff I do is sample-based. A lot of the times now, just because I don’t want it to be sample-based, I will take the sample out. Build everything around the sample, then take it out and then you’ve got a track that has that kind of vibe of what the sample had. What I’ve been doing now is also sampling friends of mine who play bass or guitar or whatever and treat them as though they were a record. I’ll just get them to play for like 20 minutes, then go through what they’ve played and take my favourite parts. Even if it’s just a two-second chunk of what they played. That reminds me of trying to find a sample through records. You’re just listening for that piece where you’re like, “oh, I’ve got to steal that!” So you’ve mentioned that you’ve got some connections with Live Nation and you’ve opened or played with a variety of artists, from UB40 to Waka Flocka Flame. De La Soul was obviously major, but are there any other stand-outs for you? I opened for DJ Krush a couple of years ago, which was another big stand-out because he was a huge inspiration in me wanting to do beat-making and take it seriously. But yeah, De La Soul is probably on the top. I did Method Man. I love Method Man and I love Wu Tang Clan and the energy at this show was just crazy. It was sold out at the Commodore [Ballroom in Vancouver], and that was a crazy one just because I was really nervous. The De La Soul show was different in terms of nerves because I felt like I knew the crowd so well because I felt like I would be playing to me. Whereas with the Method Man show, I was wondering what the crowd would want. That’s kindof in the challenge with some of the people I open for, because I’ve done Waka Flocka Flame and I know the music, but I

wonder about how hard I should go. Those are fun in the sense that I feel kind of nervous and I feel like I’ve got to do some research before and make sure I’ve got the hot tracks. But De La, I just knew. If I was in the crowd - and I would have been if I wasn’t playing - what would I want the opener DJ to play? I would assume that everyone else going to that show would appreciate the same thing. So what did you play for De La Soul versus Waka Flocka? For De La I played things like Tribe Called Quest, a lot of the classic 90’s nostalgia tracks. Whereas for Waka Flocka you just want to play the new hard stuff like Gucci Mane. The stuff that’s on the radio now, like 2 Chainz. I mean you can put some classic, like 2Pac and Notorious BIG, but you don’t want to go too soft. Is that what you really want to be playing? Well you mentioned about me posting those records, and I’ve got a gig tonight at FanClub where I’m spinning vinyls and 45s. It’s all soul and funk, and that’s what I really want to play because I just like hearing that loud. And yeah, the classics are really what I want to play because that’s where my head is at. I like a lot of the new turnt up hip hop, but it’s not particularly what I’m pumping in my car. But I appreciate it, I’ve always liked beats and especially the new stuff I can tune out what they’re saying. And then you’re looking for that sample again. [Both Laugh] Yeah, exactly. And also I want to keep my ear open all the time. I think that’s a problem with a lot of the hip hop heads from my generation is they completely tune out the new stuff and then they become old grumps, right? And I think that’s doing hip hop music a disservice because, like Kendrick Lamar is incredible and I love his stuff, but I know a lot of guys who don’t want to listen to it just because it’s new and because he’s rapping over new-style beats, right? People really hold on to the things that they liked when they were growing up, and then because they are in that mentality you aren’t so willing to accept some of the newer styles. It’s funny too, because it’s like people 35 and up are the first generation of hip hop heads. hip hop didn’t exist really commercially before ‘78, right? They’re the first

one1one magazine

generation, so it’s funny to see them now become what my dad was. My dad hated hip hop. But now it’s old-style hip hop versus new-style hip hop. They don’t want to listen to it. I understand too, because a lot of it you’re kind of like “ugh.” But if it’s good music, it’s good music. I think there’s also an interesting way that commercialization plays a role, too. A lot of that old school hip hop was so much more underground. It started off as grass roots that slowly got bigger, whereas now there’s a totally different attitude and drive for fame. It’s hip hop as pop music. It’s true and that’s the thing. I remember back when I was in grade nine and ten and really into hip hop, the only place you could hear hip hop was on this show the Krispy Biscuit. [Laughs] Great name! Yeah, and it was the greatest show. It was on at midnight on Tuesdays I think. I would have to stay up late, and I could barely stay up because would play basketball in the mornings and had to be there at like seven in the morning. So I could stay up until midnight in order to put my tape on record and then I could fall asleep and listen to the tape the next day on my walkman. But that was the only place I remember hearing it. You would see Rap City on Much Music back in the day. So that was basically it. Now it’s [so different]. The Internet [has contributed] to the commercialization of it.

The anyone-can-get-famous kind of mentality? Yeah. I think the whole thing with Miley Cyrus right now, you know she’s taken a form of hip hop music and kind of made it her thing right? But whatever, it is what it is and just as much as there is that commercialization, there’s still tons of underground stuff happening, which is really good. Totally. That’s kind of like what we were saying before. How there’s so many people out there. Even though there are the ones that everyone hears about who are on the radio, there are definitely the ones that aren’t so well known that are still really rad. Back to one of your earlier questions, Vancouver I think has a very vibrant underground, independent, grassroots hip hop scene, which is very much in the spirit of what was going on before. Do you think that’s something that deserves more recognition, or do you like it to stay at that grassroots level? I think it definitely deserves more recognition. I would love for it to get more recognition. The problem is though, the reason it doesn’t get more recognition is because it’s not particularly sellable. It’s good as a grassroots, it would be great to have more recognition and money behind it to push it, but [that] also keeps it what it is. And I know there’s also a lot of people in the scene who are there because they’re rejecting the commercial side. There’s a lot of Vancouver

|

acts who are pushing to be the famous rapper doing the harder pop-rap, and there’s a lot of guys who are doing it really well. So, there’s that whole scene too. You’re not just a DJ, you’ve also got your hand in audio engineering and producing, so can you tell me a bit about that? I went to school, it’s AI [Art Institute of Vancouver] now, but was CDIS [Centre for Digital Imaging and Sound] when I went and took audio engineering. Actually, my full-time day job is doing audio engineering. I do basically editing TV shows, and I also do descriptive video, which is describing video for the blind. I record and work with that, so if you’re visually impaired or blind you can listen to what’s happening and you would understand what’s happening even if you couldn’t see exactly what’s going on. It would fill in the blanks. Because you are a jack-of-alltrades, is there something you consider yourself to be first and foremost? It’s funny that you ask, because I was struggling with this. Having a bit of an identity crisis for a bit because, being a jack-of-alltrades, I feel like I neglect certain things and am maybe not the best at everything. I would say I’m a producer, beat-maker, artist first and foremost, and then DJ second. I was asking myself the question, “well, what do I consider myself more?” Everyone can be a DJ these days, right? It’s easy to be a DJ and there’s a lot of competition, but you have to put in tons of time, and I used to put in tons of

23

24

|

one1one magazine

time. I find being a jack-of-all-trades I don’t put in as much time anymore. And so I was lamenting that. But yeah, I guess I would say that my heart is in producing and my heart is in being in the studio, but I also really like performing live. So the DJing gets me out there and it’s a way for me to perform. I love doing that, but I don’t know if that’s what my number one is. I think that that’s a very modern issue for a lot of people. Yeah it is, and I see that a lot. So I consider audio-engineering my day job. I’m focused on doing that, I hate to say, for money. Whereas DJing and producing I’m not focused so much on making money from it. If you were to be a DJ hardcore, that means having to do it all day everyday, and that means having to pay the bills with it, which has always been a really scary thought. I tried to do that back in the day when I was doing electric circus and Network stuff. It was hard and I didn’t like it. It was stressful and made me hate [aspects of it]. [Business] really changes the way you work, because that’s your art and you want to do it for pleasure, but when you change the main goal to profit… I do a lot of different music and I do a lot of different things, but I would never consider what I do today selling out. Whereas back then, I definitely did do some selling out and that was because I wanted to pay my bills. But now as far as my artist side, I don’t consider anything that I do selling out because I’m only doing it because I want to. That’s why I try to keep the audio-engineering side as business because I love doing it, but I could take it or leave it as far as my art is concerned. It fulfills me to a certain extent, but never what making a beat artistically will do. www.k-rec.bandcamp.com www.facebook.com/djkrecmusic www.twitter.com/djkrec www.soundcloud.com/djkrec www.instagram.com/djkrec

one1one magazine

|

25

26

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

o n e 2 wa t c h

paig e morgan

Words/ Ghazal Elhaei Styling and Photography/ Marchel B Eang Stylist Assistant/ Saul Aviar Clothing/ 8th + Main

The Girl You Wished Lived Next Door

Paige Morgan possesses an infectious personality with a kickass attitude to match. As soon as she walked into the room, the atmosphere was immediately lifted with her upbeat energy. Morgan, a recording artist signed to 604 Records Inc., is a newcomer to the scene but acts a veteran when it comes to her manner and work ethic. She has a cunning ability to not only gain your attention but to earn your time and respect. There's a poise with Morgan that is rare to find when meeting new artists who are just starting out. She has stars in her eyes but has her feet firmly planted on the ground. Understanding that business is business, and sacrifices have to be made in order to get ahead in one's career. We sat down with budding songbird to learn a bit more about where she's from and where she's headed. O1O: When did you know that music was something you wanted to pursue?  Paige Morgan: It started when I first entered into a local idol competition in my home-town and won. I learned that it was something I really enjoyed and wanted to pursue. My career sort of just evolved from there. What was the idol competition like? It was the first time I performed at all and I sang "I'm OK" by Christina Aguilera. She was my idol at the time. That's a tough song to perform for your first time! What was that experience like for you? It was an incredible experience. I had so much adrenaline before I went on, and as soon as I stepped foot on that stage, all my worries continued on pg. 28 âž&#x;

|

27

28

|

one1one magazine

went away. I literally turned into a different person. I connected with the crowd extremely well and it felt amazing. My dad ran onto the stage after I performed and brought me flowers, it was so cute!  How did you learn to build your craft before the idol competition? I taught myself to play and sing lots of songs and perform them in my room before I stepped foot on a real stage. What's been your favourite performance to date? I just recently started getting back on stage since I wrapped up my album. I played at the Backstage Lounge a couple weeks back with a band that I just put together last minute. It went really well and I had so many people out supporting me. I had a little crowd at the front of the stage screaming for an encore and then we all sang my single "Never Change." That must've been so much fun singing your own song with your audience. It was a cool feeling to have people know the words to my songs, and to see them enjoying themselves so much. I wanna do that again and again forever. How do you handle mistakes during a performance then? I just keep going like it never happened. It makes for great stories at the end.

What would you say has been the hardest thing for you so far? The hardest thing through this whole experience of pursuing my career as a musician, is sometimes feeling alone. There will be Friday nights I'll be sitting at home in my room getting a song finished, while the rest of my friends are out partying. I wouldn't trade this life style for anything though. My motto is: "Work hard to play hard."  Sacrifices will always pay off in the end, tell me more about your video for "Never Change." What was that like making your first music video? Oh, it was AMAZING. I had no idea what to expect when I showed up on set. Seeing everyone involved in the production, all of the set up, the props, and the organization put into this; I thought to myself: 'All of this for MY song?!' It was crazy. After the first take, I just knew what to do. I turned into a character and just had fun with it. My manager was like 'Is this your first video shoot or your 6th..?!'  Watching the video you did seem like a complete natural, which is an incredible feat on it's own. Looking to your career down the road, who would you like to collaborate with?  I would love to collaborate with a DJ actually, maybe Alesso or Audien. Cyril Hahn would be dope to work with too and I know he lives in Vancouver right now! 

Better start making some calls then for Hahn, [laughs.] Who represents your version of the ultimate pop star? Hands down, Beyonce and Rihanna. They are true professionals, extreme talents, and major business women.  I couldn't agree with that more. When looking at pop culture today - how do you feel about where it's at and the lack of privacy? I think it would be frustrating at times for sure but it just comes with the job. You just have to remember that it's because your fans think the world of you. What more could you ask for?  Does it freak you out at all? Not at all! It's what I signed up for when I said I wanted to pursue a career as a musician. I knew I would be in the public eye potentially and I don't mind it all. Fair enough. Let's talk about some of your must-haves for when you're on the road. What's a fashion item you always have to have with you? I need a big comfy cardigan and a scarf for sure. I use my scarf as a blanket on the plane. continued on pg. 31 ➟

one1one magazine

|

29

My motto is, 'Work hard to play hard'

30

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

[Laughs] I use my circle scarves as blankets when travelling too. What about beauty items? Bronzer and a good lotion. And what's something you can't go anywhere without? I will never travel without my iPod and a notebook. And what do you like to come home too? My family and friends, a clean house, and a made bed. And of course some wine. You've got an incredible sense of style, let's talk a bit more fashion. Who is your favourite designer? I love Alexander Wang. He has such simple pieces that are to die for. What's a must-have in your wardrobe? Definitely my Misguided coat and my Tom Ford booties; perfect for almost all seasons. I tend to spend all of my money on t-shirts, I have way too may of them. If you have a favourite pair of jeans - you can never have too many t-shirts to pair them with. What's coming up for you? I've got a new single coming out in the new year along with my album which is expected to release in the Spring. It's all so exciting!

www.paigemorganmusic.com  www.facebook.com/OfficialPaigeMorgan www.youtube.com/user/paigemorgannn www.twitter.com/_paigemorgan

|

31

32

|

one1one magazine

bonjour f rom

L a B io sth É tiq ue Text/ Kaycee Camaclang We were recently invited to visit the offices of La Biosthétique International Headquarters located in the heart of Paris, France. Amongst Rue de Tilsitt lay a 150 year old building where creative minds work to bring you the best at La Biosthétique Paris. We had the pleasure of meeting the incredible team and received an in-depth tour of the La Biosthétique Headquarters. We were taken to room after room - one more beautiful than the next. Being there, you would know exactly why creating such beautiful products would come with such ease for the renowned beauty brand. You never fall short of inspiration: with the Arc de Triomphe and Avenue des Champs-Élysées wrapping around the building, minimal yet articulate interior designs blended with a modern sophistication - it was the epitome of class. After a tour of the offices, we were taken to La Biosthétique Academy Paris flagship salon: COIFFURE BEAUTE - just a five minute walk away from the Headquarters. COIFFURE BEAUTE is where all of the international hairdressers for La Biosthétique are trained and educated. Hairdressers from all around the world attend the salon to learn the in’s and outs’ of hair, hair colour, body care, skin and make-up with a team of specialized educators. It was incredible to experience where the company began and to see how the transition to the Canadian market will take place. www.labiosthetique.com www.facebook.com/labiosthetique www.youtube.com/user/labiosthetiqueparis

paris

one1one magazine

|

33

34

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

THE CULTURE OF TOTAL BEAUTY Exclusive, holistic care for beauty in harmony with people and nature. In selected spas and salons.

35

36

|

1 3 2013

one1one magazine

Top of

beauty favs

Text/ Kaycee Camaclang

RIMMEL Kate Moss Lasting Finish Lipsticks www.ca-en.rimmellondon.com

NuMe Tri-fect Curling Wand www.numeproducts.com

Trader Joe’s Organic Virgin Coconut Oil www.traderjoes.com

Dior Crème de Rose Smoothing Plumping Lip Balm www.dior.com

Maybelline The Falsies Volum’ Express Mascara www.maybelline.ca

Covergirl Outlast Stay Fabulous 3-in-1 Foundation www.covergirl.ca

LUSH Cosmetics Tea Tree Water www.lush.ca

Herbal Essences Hello Hydration Shampoo & Conditioner www.ca.herbalessences.com

Bioderma Sensibo H2O www.bioderma.com

NYX Cosmetics Blush in Pinched www.nyxcosmetics.ca

Sleek Makeup Face Contour Kit www.sleekmakeup.com

LABIOSTHETIQUE Molding Spray www.labiosthetique.com

Garnier Fructis Triple Nutrition Moisture Spray www.garnier.ca

ILLUSTRATION + DESIGN

38

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

39

all know how chaotic the Holiday season can common We be - in between work, shopping for gifts, and life - the last thing you have time for is hiccups? everyday putting on your makeup. Being in a rush can cause smudges, and sometimes your Quicker over-application, makeup just doesn't look right.

Fix-Ups! Problem #1 Cakey Foundation Most would think that to fix this would be to start fresh, but the quickest way to remove excess foundation is with a makeup sponge. Dampen the makeup sponge with water and squeeze out the excess water until it is barely even damp. Stipple your skin with the damp sponge in light, downward strokes. Reapply your foundation if you’ve removed too much. Finish with powder.

Text/ Kaycee Camaclang

Here's your quick guide to fix 5 common make-up boo-boos. Problem # 2 Too Much Blush Take a cotton ball or cotton pad and dap the area with too much blush until you’ve take a majority of it off. Take the same brush you used to apply your blush and blend it all out.

Problem #3

Problem #4

Take a spooly or old mascara wand that has been cleaned and wait until the mascara has dried. Work the spooly through your lashes and comb out all of the clumps without losing your curl.

Over-Done Eye-Shadow

Problem #5 Dirty Makeup Brushes If you find yourself with dirty makeup brushes, and little time, spray them with rubbing alcohol (70% or more) to kill the germs. The solution dries under five minutes and you wont have to worry about bacteria in between deep cleaning.

If you’ve been heavy handed with the eye shadow, take a clean blending brush, and blend out the eye shadow until you have your desired look.

Clumpy Mascara

40

|

one1one magazine

calli ng

Find your calling with these must have holiday looks perfect for any moment of the season Makeup artist: Kaycee Camaclang Hair Stylist: Savannah Rietz Photography: Reema Ismail Models: Sally Lunn, Alison Nichol, Rachel Sargeant

of

one1one magazine

t he

|

se as on

41

42

|

one1one magazine

COLOUR Skin Makeup Forever High Definition Foundation; Concealer Maybelline Fit Me Concealer; Eyes Urban Decay Vice 2 Pallete (Madness, Rewind, X-Rated, Coax); Blush MAC Cosmetics Blush in Pink Swoon; Lips MAC Cosmetics Lipstick in Brave; Brows Anastasia Brow Wiz Kit

one1one magazine

|

43

44

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

BOMBSHELL (opposite page)  Foundation Cover Girl Outlast Stay Fabulous 3-in-1 Foundation; Concealer Bobbi Brown Creamy Concealer Kit; Eyes Urban Decay Naked Palette (Virgin, Sin, Naked, Half Baked, Dark Horse, Creep); Liner TOPSHOP Makeup Gel Liner in Ink; Blush MAC Cosmetics Blush in Peachykeen; Contour Sleek Makeup Contour Kit in Medium; Lips Revlon Lip Butter in Tarte; Brows TARTE Amazonian Clay Brow Mousse in Medium Brown MODEST (this page) Brows Sonia Kashuk Arch Alert Brow Kit; Contour Sleek Makeup Contour Kit in Light; Eyes Urban Decay Vice 2; Pallete (Habit, Rewind); Lips NYX Cosmetics Lipstick in Mauve; Lashes Benefit They’re Real Mascara

|

45

46

|

one1one magazine

MINIMALIST (opposite page) Skin Bobbi Brown BB Cream; Concealer Maybelline Fit Me Concealer; Brows Anastasia Brow Wiz; Eyes MAC Cosmetics Eyeshadow in Wedge; Blush MAC Cosmetics Blush in Peaches; Lips TOPSHOP Lipstick in Nevada; Lashes Maybelline Volum’Express The Falsies Mascara HOLLYWOOD GLAM (this page) Brows Sonia Kashuk Arch Alert Brow Kit; Contour Sleek Makeup Contour Kit in Light; Concealer Bobbi Brown Creamy Concealer Kit; Lashes Benefit They’re Real Mascara; Liner TOPSHOP Gel Liner in Inked; Eyes MAC Cosmetics Eyeshadow: Wedge, Carbon, Palace Pedigreed; Blush TARTE Amazonian Blay 12 Hour Blush in Dollface; Lips Rimmel Kate Moss Lipstick in #107

one1one magazine

|

47

48

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

49

jen garces your everyday

STYLIST

Text: Ghazal Elhaei Photography: Reema Ismail

For an every-day girl, fashion gets trumped by function and efficiency; where attention to detail may slip for an extra five minutes of sleep. For an every-day girl, fashion gets trumped by function and efficiency; where attention to detail may slip for an extra five minutes of sleep. Let's face it: in our lifetimes, we've made at least one or two questionable wardrobe decisions. It's a challenge to dress like those effortlessly styled stars and personalities that we see on a dayto-day basis. They have a secret weapon: a personal stylist. That's where Jennifer Garces comes in as 'Your Everyday Stylist.'

shape. We went on a shopping trip to a local boutique, Jennyfleur Loves, and went through my personal challenges faced when on a shopping expenditure. Throughout the process she kept the atmosphere light and filled with many laughs. We focused on cuts and shapes that worked for my curvy body - not against. Then I faced the all too common dilemma of not buying more than I should. When I started trying to validate why it shouldn't be bought (more so for my own sake,) she just cut in and said, "You can Garces has been a stylist for over ten years, just say no. There's no need to explain and starting humbly by helping friends and no need to apologize." It was such a simple family with their wardrobe dilemmas. Fast- but powerful effect. She makes shopping forward to current day and she assists easy by being honest but well prepared; clients by maximizing what they already the leg work is done so you don't have to have access to: their own closets. She has worry about it. She creates the ultimate a very a distinctive way of looking at the VIP experience by making it as seamless as minute details in fashion but it's done so possible. in the simplest ways - editing out what doesn't work, and finding pieces that will As an everyday stylist, Garces aims to make fit a client's personal lifestyle and body her clients feel the very best in their skin. continued on pg. 50 âž&#x;

50

|

one1one magazine

She works with clients who have a budget and helps them make the most of what they have. It's about taking what they already know and adding in the finer details. Her services include closet makeovers (there was major closet envy when we snuck a peak inside her wardrobe,) shopping excursions, and personal shopping. It's not just for women either, the men in your life can gain incredible insight to personal style with Garces' help. Simplicity seems to be key for Garces who lives and works from home with her husband and adorable little pup, Hugo. She humanizes style in a way that allows for clients and those around her to fall in love with shopping again. She helps her clients capture moments of creating an awareness to a person's sense of self. There's something to be said about a woman who empowers others and Jennifer Garces is the secret weapon that we've been looking for: ultimately a friend - not a foe - in the fashion world who creates moments of clarity and confidence through personal style.

one1one magazine

|

Jen' s ch eat s he et To ols for Every War drobe:

1

Text: Anisa Chaki Photography: Reema Ismail

HANGERS Your wardrobe deserves to have the proper hangers. Depending on what you’re hanging up this could mean wood, thick plastic or flocked [great if you’re tight on space] for tops and clipped hangers for bottoms. For a button-up shirt you only need to do up the top button. It will allow the shirt to stay on and to stay in the right shape. Heavy sweaters should be folded not hung. Hanging can stretch them out or leave bumps on the shoulders/arms from the ends of the hangers. If you’re short on time in the mornings, get into the routine of doing any ironing or steaming of your clothes before they go into the closet. That way everything you want to pick from is ready.

2

FULL LENGTH MIRROR Having a full-length mirror where you get dressed is necessary. There are affordable options available for you at various department stores. Having one in your closet and/or room will make sure you look put together from head-to-toe and it’ll save you from having to run out of the room to check out every outfit continued on pg. 52 ➟

51

52

|

one1one magazine

3 4 5

FABRIC SHAVER / SWEATER COMB A manual fabric shaver to sweater comb is a better option to that of a battery operated, as they produce gentler results. This will come in handy for wool sweater and cashmere sweaters that get pills to maintain their appearance.

SEAM RIPPER Make sure to take notes of what your garment is made of along with care instructions. A seam ripper will help you take off those irritating and scratchy labels with no muss and no fuss.

GARMENT DEODORANT REMOVER Get rid of pesky deodorant stains with this little pink sponges. They’re reusable (I’ve had mine for years!) If you notice a stain and you’re already out the door often rubbing the fabric together will help lift it out.

one1one magazine

|

53

54

|

one1one magazine

miss america

N ina Dav ulur i Text/ Ghazal Elhaei Photo/ Shayd Johnson

Nina Davuluri is a woman who has gained a lot attention since being crowned Miss America 2014 to all of us at ONE1ONE, she is the epitome of what the Miss America Organization represents.

A woman of poise, intelligence and drive; one not afraid to stand up for what's right and a woman who is going to make a change not only in the United States but around the world. Nina represents an incredible standard of what women of all ages and colour should uphold themselves with and possesses the humility to admit that she is still growing and learning. She's revitalized the platform that woman aspire to reach. Nina made her first stop on her Canadian media tour as Miss America in Vancouver. We got to sit down with her at the UVA Wine & Cocktail Bar in the heart of Downtown Vancouver and touched based on her role as Miss America, her clothing sponsor Joseph Ribkoff, meeting the President, and Star Trek. continued on pg. 56 âž&#x;

one1one magazine

|

55

56

|

one1one magazine

ONE1ONE: Joseph Ribkoff has brought you to Canada to tour a couple of the cities, how has that been for you? Nina Davuluri: It's been really great. Joseph Ribkoff is the wardrobe sponsor for Miss America, and we've been working with him for a few years now I believe. It's been really wonderful. O1O: Have you had a chance to check out the headquarters for Joseph Ribkoff yet? ND: That's actually going to be my next stop. O1O: That's something great to look forward to. What's it like getting clothes sent to you and essentially having to play dress up as a part of your role? ND: Well it's great. It's so convenient because it's shipped to me directly, which is really nice, but so far I'm only one month into my year of service. So, this trip is for them to get to 'Nina' and to get to know my style, and I'm going to be able to work with them to choose my outfits for my year. O1O: That's awesome. How would you define your personal style then? ND: Sexy but classy. O1O: I like that. ND: Yes, it's very Mad Men. O1O: What would you say are some key pieces to have in your wardrobe to fit your style? ND: The little black dress. Also making sure I have professional pieces that can go from day to night, especially with my job: since I'm consistently going from one event to another and I often don't have a lot of time; having those day-to-night pieces are essential. O1O: How do you change up your look up when you're limited to key pieces? ND: Definitely with accessories, switching up my hair and make-up, and my shoes of course. Although, I'll be living out of two suitcases for the whole year, so I've learned to downsize to a pair of nude pumps and black pumps. Even if there's a fun pair of shoes, I think that could add a great element to my look as well.

O1O: You could never go wrong with a good pair of pumps. So, you get to switch up your pieces with Joseph Ribkoff every month then? ND: Yeah, it's definitely not a bad gig. O1O: I'd say. I understand that Joseph Ribkoff also gave you a scholarship to put towards your studies, tell me more about that. ND: Yes. I graduated from the University of Michigan, where I received my undergraduate degree and I'm currently applying to medical school which is one of the reasons why I started competing in the Miss America Organization. And so, I just won $50,000 from winning Miss America, and an additional $10,000 which I received through winning Miss New York - so I have a total of $60,000 that I can put towards forwarding my education. O1O: What do you hope to do with your medical degree? ND: My degree in undergrad was in brain behaviour and cognitive science. So psychiatry is definitely on the radar but I'm not ruling out any options. O1O: You are a Miss America that has accomplished a lot of firsts, which I commend you for, what's a first that you haven't done that you would like to do? ND: That's a great question. I'll have to come back to that one. O1O: That's fair, let's look at everything you have done leading up to this moment as the current Miss America, what has been the one moment that has stood out for you? ND: Meeting the President. O1O: How was that? ND: It was very surreal. I was led into the oval office and remember thinking, "oh my gosh, I'm in the oval office!" I wanted to go and look around but I was also having a conversation with the President and trying to focus. O1O: What did you guys talk about? ND: We touched based on the Miss American organization and what I'm doing in the year ahead, as well as what's

one1one magazine

following up after my year with medical school. He was very genuine, personable and very kind. O1O: That's incredible, did you also get to meet the First Lady, Michelle Obama? ND: No, I didn't. I hope I get too though! O1O: You've got the whole year ahead of you, I'm sure you can make something happen. ND: I hope so too. O1O: Who else would you like to meet this year? ND: I totally have a celebrity crush - well a few - but I would love to meet Captain Kirk (Chris Pine) or Spock from Star Trek. They are so cute. O1O: The new Star Trek or the old one? ND: The new one. I know, I jumped on the bandwagon a little too late. O1O: Spock is definitely a cutie. Let's go back to a first that you haven't done yet. ND: Well, I just remember when I started competing in the Miss America Organization about two years ago - my sister would say: "why do you want to compete? Why is this important to you?" And I remember telling her, 'In the next five years, I truly believe that Miss America is going to be an ethnic girl and that's gonna be.' That was my focus for such a long time to be the first Miss America of Indian decent and it was so important to me. And now that it's happened, I don't even know what another first I would like to do. O1O: It can be a dream, it can be a wish. Something that you personally really want to experience and you haven't had the chance too yet? [At this point, everyone in the room bursts into laughter because Nina is stumped and not sure how to respond. Her tour manager responded with: 'She'll be the first Miss America to introduce her manager to Brad Pitt.' Where do I sign up for that?] ND: You know, medical school is really important to me because I come from a family of physicians, I'm not sure if that's particularly interesting.

|

57

O1O: Well no, I think that's interesting because if you come from an ethnic background - I know the pressures of having to follow an academic route - what was it like for your family when you decided to partake in the Miss America Organization? ND: They were always supportive but not necessarily encouraging. I really think that they genuinely believed that this would never happen because I was indian and I struggled choosing my talent. I can't tell you how many people told me, "Nina if you're serious about winning Miss America, change your talent because Bollywood would never win Miss America." It was one of those things, that when it happened, it was done on my terms and in my way - I think my family was shocked but proud of me. O1O: Despite any negative feedback - despite any obstacles that you have faced - you really have carried yourself with such poise and you've broken down social barriers and have really made an impact. I personally commend you on becoming this force in our society today and for doing what you have so far. ND: Thank you. I think that's been the best part of my experience so far. I was speaking with a group of girls and we had a Q&A session, and one of them said: "My parents really want me to do something but how do I tell them that it's not something I want to do?" And it's really hard, because we all struggle with that battle with our families at one point in our lives. To help guide her through it, I told her "It's okay to take the road less travelled. Sometimes that will allow you to be more successful. Taking risks isn't necessarily a bad thing as long as it's something you truly believe in." www.missamerica.org www.facebook.com/MissAmericaOrganization www.instagram.com/missamericaorg www.twitter.com/MissAmerica For more on Joseph Ribkoff: www.josephribkoff.com www.facebook.com/Joseph-Ribkoff/ www.twitter.com/JosephRibkoff‎

58

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

59

sue randhawa

of t h e optical b o u tiq ue

Text/ Anisa Chaki Photography/ Reema Ismail

As I walked up to the door of The Optical Boutique my mind flashed back to the fourth grade... when, after months of sitting up front and squinting at the board I was told that I would need glasses. Seventeen years later, I'm a contacts-only kind of girl as I can't remember the last time I felt remotely confident in a pair of frames. I'm greeted at the door by owner, Sue Randhawa in a shocking aqua blazer and magenta pointy toe block heels. With her impeccable black bob and hot pink lipstick aside, her enormous cat-eye frames were what I noticed first. “I think having your own style or developing your own style is something that every individual should have. It's your personality that's coming through, it's a first impression and you only have a few minutes to make that impression. You only get one chance at it and I take that very seriously.” The Optical Boutique came to be over 35 years ago, in the heart of Kerrisdale. Original owners, Fred and Almaza Kroeschel began with one simple goal in mind: to provide Vancouver with the latest in lens technology along with the best eyeglass frames around. Randhawa joined Fred and Almaza at The Optical Boutique as a licensed optician in 1997 and just 10 years later, became owner. “I wanted to take that [original] philosophy and pair it with my love for fashion. Every frame in our collection is the perfect culmination of style, craftsmanship and function,” she says. Personally, I had always thought of glasses as a burden or a disadvantage, but the expressiveness with which Randhawa speaks about her job, her industry and simply glasses themselves has me quickly reconsidering. continued on pg. 60 ➟

60

|

one1one magazine

“For people who've had to wear glasses [all their lives] we can fit them with frames while taking their prescription into account. We can find them a pair of glasses that looks nice and that is comfortable and that they don't need to be embarrassed about.” As I entered the store and took in the walls and walls of frames, I casually mentioned that I had been in need of a new pair of glasses for a while now, but was having trouble finding something I really liked. “I take the same approach with anybody that walks through the door,” she says. “I connect with that individual. I need to find that connection in some way, shape or form. We [at The Optical Boutique] sit down with our clients to find out what their wants and needs are and our frame recommendations are based on those needs and on our client's individuality. The experience that we offer our clients is so different.” Randhawa isn't shy when it comes to pushing the envelope. “If somebody comes in and says 'I don't want anything too loud,' or 'I don't want to make a statement,' we do want you to make a statement but we also want you to stay within your comfort zone.” Just not too far in, she explains further: “I'm going to say, 'Try this. Try that. The reason this works is because this brings out your eyes or it follows your brow line or it accentuates your cheekbones,' and very soon you'll realize that it can actually be a good thing.”

After a few questions about my style, my likes and dislikes and the general strength of my prescription, Randhawa had picked out three different frames in shapes that I had never considered before within just a couple of minutes. The frames worked; and they looked good. This experience, this idea of breaking boundaries, this idea of pulling people in a direction that they may never have considered before, this is what makes The Optical Boutique so much different from your typical chain eyeglass store. This is what brings people back. Her genuine passion for what she does combined with a passion for the people she gets to see and work with everyday. “I don't understand people who don't have passion,” she says. I think that you should have passion in whatever you're doing in life whether it's being a mother, a wife, a father or a brother. Be passionate about it. Have a hobby. Whether it's photography or gardening. Be passionate. And if you're lucky enough to work a job that you're passionate about, I think that's wonderful, and I am. Find the passion.” Randhawa isn't shy when discussing the ups and downs of the job, “When I find that right pair of glasses for somebody and they're so grateful, so thankful because by putting on that right pair, I have now set the tone. They can completely change their look. Some people don't know their frame style and that's what I help people figure out and that is very, very rewarding.”

When I ask her what her least favourite part of her job is, she has a harder time coming up with an answer, “I love what I do. If I had to pick one thing, it would be when I can't give somebody what they want, and ever so often I have to do that,” she says. “When somebody has a particular look in mind because they've seen it in a magazine or they've seen a celebrity wearing it and they come in asking for it, I sometimes have to very diplomatically say to them, and we say it in the nicest way possible, 'This is not going to work, and here are the reasons why.' But we will always find something that is going to work,” she states, confidently. The extensive frame selection alone is enough to make even a now converted, once anti-glasses girl swoon. “Our collections are all carefully curated and hand selected based on current trends in fashion and design,” Randhawa explains. They do things differently at The Optical Boutique. Randhawa makes a point to avoid the mass produced and stick with frames that are often hand made, uniquely designed and in some cases, exclusive to them. “I travel to shows in Paris, Italy, and New York, to bring in lines that are independently designed and I focus on the finest materials and on true craftsmanship. It's not about the Guccis and the Versaces, it's about the smaller, independent labels, like Thom Browne [for example], where the same attention and detail found in their clothes, is then applied to their frames.” continued on pg. 63 ➟

one1one magazine

|

61

62

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

It's clear that fashion plays a big part in Randhawa's life and career. “I love that I get to bring my two greatest passions together; science and fashion,” she says. “As the owner, I enjoy the freedom that I have to do what I want, which translates into me bringing in collections that are sometimes avant garde. I can push the boundaries when I want to. It's about having the confidence to trust my own instincts because in some cases what I bring in is based on my own personal style.” The conversation moves to her personal inspiration; what inspires her in work and in life in general. “The talent in Vancouver inspires me. So much. I'm an avid supporter of the fashion scene here and the talent that we have is amazing. Designers like Kim Cathers, Nicole Bridger, upcoming designers like Evan Clayton. Young people working hard to achieve their goals and dreams inspires me. It's wonderful to see that.” I'm curious to know just how much trends in other industries, such as fashion, design and the economy can affect trends in eyewear so I ask her what she thinks of trends overall. “I think trends make life a little bit easier for people, because it gives them a quick insight into what is happening,” she says. “Yes, I look at the trends, I wouldn't be able to forecast what's going to sell in my store a year from now otherwise, but it's about taking the trends and incorporating them and making them work for my clientele. Style is more personal and that's what I get behind. Style is one's own. True style isn't affected by trends, it doesn't change season to season.” And currently? “We're seeing trends from the 1920's made popular by the Great Gatsby – the round tortoiseshell frames are a classic. Designers like Anne et Valentin and Lafont are well experienced in those shapes. We're seeing the horn-rimmed frames of the 40's and 50's. Claire Goldsmith has gone into her archives to re-release these original shapes. My favourite, the cat eye shape, continues to be strong and nobody does it better than Theo. And Andy Wolf has put the 1980's back on the map with larger shapes which the 20-something crowd is loving.” Although eyewear trends mimic trends in fashion, they seem to go above and beyond it as well. “Trends in design and in the economy definitely have a bearing on the eyewear world,” Randhawa explains. “With

|

people being more environmentally conscious we're seeing frames made of recycled materials like wood and horn.” Tying into the subject trends, we move on to the idea of people seeing glasses as more of an accessory as opposed to simply a functional object. “I like the fact that more and more people are seeing glasses as an accessory because it is the first thing that people see on your face. It can set the tone, it's an extension of yourself so yes, you can have glasses that fade away but you can also have glasses that accentuate your features and that's what I keep going back to. It's nice to help people develop their own style,” she says. As for what the general public think of glasses as an accessory, Randhawa brings up a fairly recent transition that she's noticed within the sunglass industry, as sunglasses were the first to make the transition from a purely functional item to an important fashion accessory. She moves on to talk about how that concept has slowly trickled into regular eyeglasses with the popularization of the 'hipster' frame. “It took a little time but we've seen it strongly in the last five years or so. It's become what people put on to look cool or to go out. People wear glasses with clear glass or with no lenses at all and that's really cool to see.” As our interview comes to a close I ask Randhawa if she has any final thoughts and she sums it up perfectly: “When people come in to see me it's about the experience from the moment they walk into the store. People might not remember what you said to them, or how you said it, but they are going to remember how you made them feel. And I make them feel special.” I can personally vouch for that. www.theopticalboutique.com www.facebook.com/theopticalboutique www.twitter.com/opticalboutique www.instagram.com/theopticalboutique

63

64

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

65

66

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

67

68

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

69

ke e p i t si mpl e,

st up id

Text/ Frances Thomas Photography/ Alex Ross

Like his clothing designs, Evan Ducharme whispers; he doesn’t shout. The soft-spoken 21-year-old has a quiet confidence, a measured excitement. One gets the sense that Ducharme lives in a world all his own, a distant fantasyland where he can play by his own rules and within his own boundaries. The rest of us can reach this private world through the Evan Ducharme Collection, Ducharme’s brand of evening-wear and separates for the modern woman. Ducharme’s designs tell his story and ideas in a way that only clothes can: the romantic draping and high-impact silhouettes immediately take you to the core of his intent. Ducharme is tall and willowy with an angelic face. He holds no grudges and asks for no sympathy: he is refreshingly – not conceitedly – content. This contentment extends to his small-town origins. He is grateful for the lack of cultural stimulation in St. Ambroise, the lakeside town outside of Winnipeg in which he grew up. “I think if someone grows up in a really culturally rich place they can be influenced more easily by the things that are surrounding them, so I feel like I grew my point of view in a more organic way,” Ducharme says. “Anything that came to my mind, it was all about imagination. It was about the landscape where I grew up.” As a teenager, Ducharme took it upon himself to become educated in the fashion world. Though there were few resources, he made use of those he could find: “It was Vogue, it was Fashion Television, it was Jeanne Beker. That was it. And the Internet: Style.com was my bible.”

Ducharme produced multiple fashion shows at his high school of just 40 people. “I knew I wasn’t going to be there forever. I thought, ‘While I’m here, I might as well build up a portfolio.’” He gathered materials from everywhere and anywhere, harnessing the support of the staff and students at his school. “All the guys would set up the catwalk and they would put up the lights and the chairs and the girls would do hair and makeup.” There is no trace of John Waters-type teenage angst in Ducharme’s recollections: he is not pulling that card because he doesn’t need to. “I could have come against a lot more guff than I did in high school.” He made a conscious decision not to be dragged down by his quiet hometown because he knew it was just a jumping-off point. “I never really thought of myself as living [in St. Ambroise] for the rest of my life so I kind of always had it in the back of my mind that I wanted to move to the city and establish myself there.” Now living in East Vancouver, Ducharme has settled into an emerging designer’s expectedly chaotic lifestyle. After graduating from the Visual College of Art and Design in June 2012, he won Fashion’s Night Out Vancouver Fashion Design Competition that August. He has since shown at Vancouver Eco Fashion week and keeps busy on the day-to-day with custom work and made-to-measure pieces for local clients. continued on pg. 70 ➟

70

|

one1one magazine

Though Ducharme hopes to expand the Evan Ducharme Collection into a lifestyle brand – one with shoes, bags, et al – he is firm about maintaining an intimacy and dialogue with his clientele. “I would really like to open an atelier. I feel like the craft of making clothes is more what my brand stands for.” The Evan Ducharme Collection is still in a state of metamorphosis. “I feel like I can sense my customer is emerging in this city; I don’t know if she’s actually here yet,” Ducharme observes. While the Evan Ducharme Collection woman is not yet fully formed, her style is: “I really like to design clothes with what I call maximal minimalism. It’s high-impact visually, but very simple in the lines, very simple in the silhouette.”

“I don’t think [uncomfortable fabrics] work for the way my customer is living her life.” Ducharme designs to actualize his innermost fantasies, evidenced by the palpable sense of story in his clothes. This story is so strong that the designer himself often becomes lost in it: “I can just be walking around downtown and then be like, ‘I had something to do but now I’m just walking around aimlessly thinking about a dress and how I’m going to cut it.’” The designer is currently in the throes of preparing his Spring/Summer 2013 collection to be shown at Eco Fashion Week. This time around he is participating in a challenge Eco Fashion Week is hosting with Value Village, in which participants go to Value Village and choose 68 pounds of clothing and textiles to make into a 25 to 30-look collection. For his Spring/Summer collection, Ducharme will be premiering menswear with a unisex perspective. “I want to do something that is not the usual, boring menswear,” Ducharme says. “I want it to be more interesting and more in conjunction with my female customer where she likes to wear things with a fantasy element.”

His design process, while not a model of WorkSafeBC practices, has a romantic idiosyncrasy: “I can sit there and listen to a song on repeat and chain smoke and just sketch all day drinking a bottle of wine and that’s all that I do. Sitting there and incubating in my mind really helps me get out an idea.” His current musical obsessions are Bastille and Patsy Cline. Though he is not outwardly bold, there is a subtle sense of rebellion evident in Ducharme’s design approach. He eschews the irresponsible disposability of fashion, incorporating repurposed, locally sourced materials into his collections. He is also a selfdeclared feminist and uses his clothes to empower, not suppress, his female clients: “My friends and I always talk about the zipper at the back of the dress and how a woman needs to have someone zip it up for her, so I put the zipper on the side.” His uses of malleable, movable fabrics like double-knit jersey and wool help accentuate the female figure instead of confine it. “I love chiffon because of its movement and the ease of wearing it, how soft it is on your skin, how light it is.” He adds, “I don’t think [uncomfortable fabrics] work for the way my customer is living her life.” It is this attention to what women want that characterizes Ducharme’s fashion ethos; he is not out to force fabrics, cuts, or trends onto clients. He follows the Evan Ducharme Collection wherever it organically goes, letting women and their bodies take centre stage. His design approach is unapologetically straightforward: make clothes that make women feel good. “Something that is made simply needs to be made perfectly. I think minimalism is one of the highest forms of fashion.” Ducharme is showing us the quiet value of something infinitely complicated: simple design. www.evanducharmecollection.tumblr.com/‎ www.twitter.com/evaneducharme‎ www.facebook.com/evanducharmecollection

one1one magazine

|

71

72

|

one1one magazine

r aĂšl

morfolÓ g ica

one1one magazine

gon zÁles

of

nacional Photography, Styling & Interview/ Marchel Eang Interview Editing/ Aidan Weinrib Co-Styling/ Saul Alviar Hair & Make Up/ Kelsey Fitzpatrick Models/ Lukaas Dase & Jennifer Bellefleur

Based in Mexico, Raul and his three person team make up Morfologica Nacional, one of the handful of new brands taking advantage of this growing technological endeavour. 1. What's your position and are you part of a team? If you're part of a team who do you work with and what are everyone's responsibilities? I am currently the general director of the brand, and needless to say I do most of what happens at Morfologica. Our team is composed of 4 product designers, 3 of which are currently in college completing their professional internships with Morfologica, and myself, with a background in product design. Usually I'm the one to come up with a new line or product and then propose it to the team. After taking into consideration everyone's opinions, the project development is assigned to any of the 3 interns, who would then develop the product in 3D starting with the pertinent 3D printing tests. Product photography, graphics, and packaging are all designed by me; we are a small company! 2. Where/how did your company begin and what got you started with 3D printing?

Lukaas wears: Turtleneck by Topman; Shirt & Cardigan by Selected Homme Jen wears: Vintage Dress; Coat by Wilfred Neckwear by Morfológica Nacional

I started 3D printing on dinosaur-age 3D printers, the size of a commercial fridge, while I was still at college. I was enthralled with the technology, and wanted to take it out of the prototype-only conception; but the technology at the time was only available to large-scale industries, and extremely unattainable for a simple designer like myself. Besides that, those machines were really slow and even dangerous—using them required 24-hour surveillance just in case something exploded. Nowadays, the technology's become more accessible and the materials are more widespread, which is perfect to start doing cool stuff with that space-aged technology. It wasn't until late 2012 that I gave up my other job and focused on the business. continued on pg. 76 ➟

|

73

74

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

Lukaas wears: Shirt by H&M; Quilted Sweater by Selected Homme; Jeans by Topman; Sunglasses by Urban Outfitters (Opposite) Jen wears: Dress by Wow-Chic; Studded Jacket by Only Neckwear by Morfol贸gica Nacional

|

75

76

|

one1one magazine

3. What is the translation of "Morfológica Nacional" and why did you choose the name? Morfológica Nacional would translate as "National Morphology", or "Geometry". The name reflects a quest for finding the experimental shape that could represent my country: Mexico. That´s why it's "national": From México to the world, without mariachis, tequila, cacti, etc. It's packed with symbolism from our country without being folkloric, while still appreciating the country that gave us our origins. I wanted Mexico´s design to stand tall. The successive collections on our product line will grow more and more towards a Mexican Neo-Modernism. I would love to find a special shape or form to symbolize our country, one that´s clean from stereotypes, a trendy one that serves as referral.  4. Why did you choose 3D printing for accessories instead of more traditional means of production? How does 3D printing effect the design process? 3D Printing allowed us to do many things with minimal investment. Traditionally, the industry tells you to spend thousands on stock for your store. You don´t know if you will be selling or not, but you "have" to spend a huge quantity just to start. Producing and maintaining stocks in our stores is a demanding and expensive responsibility. However, 3D Printing allowed us to produce per order. What that means is that, as the orders come in, we produced to demand; creating objects that have already been sold. Also, the global eco-friendly trend is a strong one and if you wanted to keep up with it in a traditional manner, you would have to spend thousands upon thousands on green materials, only to have your products take up space sitting in inventory; with 3D printing, we have a material that is stiff, strong, biodegradable, and made to order so there are no products being disposed of when there's no demand. The best part about 3D printing is that it can get us to do crazy things FASTER! And we love that! It´s a technology that can keep up with the speed of fashion. 5. Speaking of process, what's your typical process from start to finish when designing a product? Images strike me in my daily life, like while taking a walk or even a shower. The idea then goes to paper, followed by sketches to better understand the piece that I actually had on my mind. I love sketching because it´s a really fashionable way of putting things out of your mind. Then comes the challenging part: translating those sketches to life as a digital 3D shape. The great thing about the technology is that, without too much extra labour, it allows us to trial our product before it reaches its final form. The process is then repeated in order to create the most energy and material efficient pieces while keeping aesthetics a priority. continued on pg. 81 ➟

one1one magazine

|

77

Lukaas wears: Hat by ASOS; Shirt by Topman; Sweater by Lira; Jen wears: Turtleneck Sweater by H&M; Leather Overalls by Cotton Candy Necklace and Ring by Morfol贸gica Nacional

78

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

(Opposite) Lukaas wears: Jacket by Hugo Boss; Shirt by Dolce & Gabbana; Jen wears: Vintage Top; Skirt by Vero Moda; Leather Overalls by Cotton Candy Bowtie and Ring by Morfol贸gica Nacional

|

79

80

Lukaas wears: Jacket and Pants by Topman; Shirt by H&M; Belt by Hugo Boss Bowtie by Morfol贸gica Nacional

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

6. 3D printing is becoming more accessible but I feel like there's not much information to the public about what actually happens. How does 3D printing actually work? Well, that´s a good question and as you said, many people just don't get it. But it´s quite simple: the machine translates your 3D shape into movements that are transferred to something called the build plate. Imagine you cut an apple in many tiny slices, if you stack one slice after the other, you would get your apple again, right? Well the machine deposits hot plastic as slices, and the stacked slices form the product. 7. How do you think 3D printing will affect fashion in the future?  In the future I imagine 3D modelling will be as popular as speaking a second language, and will become a standard in design schools. I believe this practice will become a really common one, with more and more complex figures being produced. The challenge therefore will be to remain relevant in a world full of people with the knowledge. Fashion changes rapidly, and 3D printing can do just that. 8. I know you're based out of Mexico, is there a market for 3D printed accessories there or were you going into this expecting it to pick up internationally? We are currently based in Monterrey, Mexico. The truth is that people are still trying to understand what the difference is between bringing something over from China versus 3D printing "locally", and the positives that the latter comes with. Upper class people in Mexico recognize the technology faster than middle class markets, but we're catching up to them. We have an especially strong demand in big cities, like Mexico City. 9. Where do you see this company going? Are there plans to expand in the future? We're still in an experimental phase, and we hope this next year will be our big year— many surprises are coming! We are going to expand our business to have more and more equipment, and aim to reach more markets. We are trying to get our products into certain stores and we hope to make it there, too. Keep watching us! 10. If you had any advice to give to any aspiring designers out there, what would it be? Do the work. No matter what. No matter your culture, no matter your background, be proud of yourself! Be open to critique! Talented people get things done. www.facebook.com/morfologicanacional www.mona.mx

|

81

82

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

the

ultimate

|

giftguide In which I pick a bunch of things I think are pretty cool to give you ideas for all those people you don't want to buy gifts for this holiday season. By Anisa Chaki How much do you hate buying gifts for people? I hate it. Almost as much as I hate getting gifts from those people who think they know you well enough to buy you gifts you'll actually appreciate. Like that one year when your weird, frail, pallid second cousin got you a Make Your Own Goat Cheese Kit. Seriously Jeremy, we only see each other on major holidays, so how about no. Anyways. One1One's ULTIMATE GIFTGUIDE is here to help. Or at least encourage you to not be that person who thinks they know their family and friends well enough to buy them gifts they'll actually appreciate...

83

84

|

one1one magazine

COAT: ZARA hooded wool wrap coat www.zara.com | SHIRT: Joe Fresh printed silk shirt www.joefresh.com | BAG: Baggu gold leather bag www.baggu.com BOOK: The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis by Lydia Davis www.chapters.indigo. ca KETTLE: Le Creuset classic whistling tea kettle www.williams-sonoma.com CUP AND SAUCER: Richard Brendon 'Warp and Reason' tea cup and saucer www.richardbrendon.com | SOAP: Jr Watkins lemon hand soap www.jrwatkins.com | SOCK: Richer Poorer 'Farrow' combed cotton sock www.richer-poorer.com | SCISSORS: West Elm iron and brass 'Heirloom' scissors www.westelm.com | MANI PEDI: www.bellagarnetsalon.com | SKIN TREATMENT: www.bareessentialsskinbar.com

mom

one1one magazine

|

85

HAT: London Alexander wool camper 5 panel www.londonalexander.ca COAT: Woolrich down Arctic Parka www.woolrich.com | BAG: C么te&Ciel 'Seine' bowler bag www.americas.coteetciel.com | CLOCK: Verbarius Electronic Clock www.amazon.com | POUCH: Thomas Paul denim tool pouch www.westelm.com SOCKS: J. Crew men's cotton camp socks www.jcrew.com | BARBER KIT: Wahl at home barber kit www.wahl-store.com | SHOE GREASE: Huberd's shoe grease www.westelm.com | KNIFE: Best Made Co. 'The Barlow' pocket knife www.bestmadeco.com

dad

86

|

one1one magazine

dau ghter PANTS: Isabel Marant for H&M sequin trousers www.hm.com | TEE: Bypoststreet's "The Editor" t-shirt featuring original art by Kat Thorsen www.bypoststreet.com | PILLOW: AREAWARE Pug Pillow www.holtrenfrew.com JOURNAL: Chronicle 'Hey Girl' Journal www.chapters.indigo.ca | COAT: Zara coat with knitted lapel www.zara.com PHONE CASE: Pantone iPhone case 325 pure turquoise www.chapters.indigo.ca | CANVAS BAG: Pamela Barsky canvas bag: www.etsy.com/shop/pamelabarskyshop | MAKEUP STORAGE: poshBOX clear acrylic make-up storage box www.poshbox.ca | CURLING WAND: NuMe LUSTRUM curling wand with 5 different size barrel attachments www. numeproducts.com | BOOK: This is How You Lose Her by Junot Díaz www.chapters.indigo.ca | SUNGLASSES: Face à Face Paris 'Poppy' sunglasses www.theopticalboutique.com

one1one magazine

|

b oyf riend PANTS: Muttonhead black unisex baseball pant www.muttonheadcollective.com | BOTTLE OPENER: Fort Standard 'Crest' gold bottle opener www.fortstandard.com | GUITAR PICKS: Surfpick lignum vitae guitar picks www.surfpick.com | BOOK: Pharrell: Places and Space I've Been by Pharrell Williams www.chapters.indigo.ca SHOES: Converse Pro Field leather Chuck Taylor hi-top boot www.converse.com | SHIRT: Publish 'Phillipe' khaki heavy weight shirt www.shop.publishbrand.com | WALLET: Herschel black pebbled leather oxford pouch www.store.hypebeast.com | WATCH: Love Ugly chestnut leather strap watch www.boardoftradeco.com BEANIE: Brixton 'Heist' beanie www.brixton.com | KIEHL'S: Keihl's men's travel-ready starter kit www.kiehls.ca

87

88

|

one1one magazine

PEACOAT: Isabel Marant for H&M navy peacoat www.hm.com | SOCKS: Happy Socks zebra print socks www.hssweden.ca | SHOES: Converse Chuck Taylor Hollis Sneaker www.converse.com | ROMPER: Jammies Prêt-à-Porter Sugar and Cream romper in a jar www.ammiesnyc.com | BOOKS: Welcome to Your Awesome Robot: A book on how to build your own robot Illustrated by Viviane Schwarz www.chapters.indigo.ca - My First Dictionary: Corrupting Young Minds one Word at a Time by Ross Horslet www.amazon.ca | PIG: AREAWARE 'Reality Bank' piggy bank www.areaware.com | PILLOW: Donna Wilson wool dog pillow www.donnawilson.com | PLANE: Artful Flyer elastic band powered model plane www.poketo.com | TEDDYBEAR: FLATOUTbear www.chapter.indigo.ca WOOD BLOCKS: AREAWARE 'Croc Pile' beechwood blocks www.areaware.com

kid

one1one magazine

secret san ta

|

89

SALT & PEPPER: Ladies & Gentlemen stonewear salt & pepper paws www.americandesignclubshop.com COFFEE PRESS: Bodum 'Chambord' 34oz gold coffee press www.bodum.com | MUG: Outlandish Creations 'Nice Tits' mug www.ahalife.com | SHOT GLASSES: himalayan salt tequila shot glasses www.surlatable.com | DOORMAT: Reed Wilson 'Holla' Doormat www.boardoftradeco.com | NOTEBOOK: Michael Roger 'Spirit Animal' Decomposition notebook chapters.www.indigo.ca | LEASH: Found My Animal black ombre dog leash www.anthropologie.com CANDLE: Malin+Goetz 'Cannabis' votive www.shopmasc.com BOTTLE OPENER: wall mount bottle opener www.etsy.com

90

|

one1one magazine

season of

love Photographer: Linsey Hulls Models: Rene-Pacis Ndamutsa & Jihan Amer of Wilhelimina Vancouver Stylist: Jihan Amer MUA: Aaron Wozlowski

one1one magazine

|

91

Jumpsuit Malene Birger Shoes Nine West Bracelet Zara

92

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

93

This Page Dress Topshop Shoes Guess Ring Bebe Opposite Page Suit, Shirt, Tie Stockhomme Revolution

94

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

95

Dress Bridal Boutique Bracelet Zara Shoes Guess Suit, Shirt, Tie Stockhomme Revolution Shoes Aldo

96

|

one1one magazine

This Page Earrings Aldo Dress Bridal Boutique Bracelets Sia Suit, Shirt Stockhomme Revolution Opposite Page Shirt, Tie, Pants Stockhomme Revolution Sweater Joe Fresh Shoes Aldo Earrings Aldo Dress French Connection Shoes Betsey Johnson

one1one magazine

|

97

98

|

one1one magazine

after hours

the

Models/ Dakota Felow & Summer Hemsworth of Family Management, and Vanessa Ashanti-Osas Stylist/ Kenneth Wyse Stylist Assistant/ Rabab Seblani Make-Up/ Sandy Mac Hair/ Kaycee Camaclang Photographer/ Megan Bourne

one1one magazine

|

99

100

|

one1one magazine

Dakota (left) wears Black Gown by Evan Clayton; Sweater by Topshop ( Altered by Stylist ); Toque - Stylists own; Necklace on Toque by H&M Vanessa (left) wears Dress by Averynthe by Mark Abenir; T Shirt by Topshop; Shoes by Bebe

one1one magazine

|

101

102

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

Summer (right) wears Cap by H&M; Bodysuit by Averynthe by Mark Abenir; Socks by Topshop; Shoes by Vans

|

103

104

|

one1one magazine

Summer (left) wears Sweater by Forever 21; Skirt by Averynthe by Mark Abenir; Shoes - Stylists Own; Anklet by Aldo Dakota (right) wears Toque by Aldo; Earrings and Necklace - Vintage; Dress by Nicole Bridger; Vest by H&M; Shoes by Bebe

one1one magazine

|

105

106

|

one1one magazine

one1one magazine

|

107

Vanessa (right) wears Shirt/Skirt by Forever 21; Sweater by Brandy Melville; Shoes Models Own; Choker by Chanel

thank you for reading

fol low u s for more!


ISSUE 8 - THE HOLIDAY ISSUE