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6 Behind the enviro-busts 8 Who killed the music? 10 Feds messin’ with our redwoods 38 Plaza pretties 24 Huckleberry hicks 39 Men, love, porn

Tim Thornton of Mad River Woodworks

Murphy’s salutes our neighbor “My first attempt at working with wood as a kid was building a slot car track”, says Tim. Since then, woodworking had been an off and on craft depending on whether Tim was working in his dad’s Pasadena bakery or an electronics parts house or starting his own yard maintenance business. Finally the world turned in his direction and Humboldt County was in his path. Tim and his wife, Kathy, were tempted to choose Oregon as a new place to live but they finally opted for Humboldt County. Their Indianola area home has been wonderful for the Thornton family. When their daughters were youngsters they rode their bicycles along the forest paths near the house. The only consistent exception to this bliss remains

the rose devouring deer that regularly decapitate their garden flowers. For the past 27 years Tim has been turning newel posts and stair banisters and developing sturdy corbels and gable brackets in his custom millwork shop, Mad River Woodworks. He creates and reproduces ornamental and supportive elements that can transform a house into a warm welcoming home. Tim also duplicates existing decorative molding. If he does not already have the matching pattern among his extensive assortment of knife blades he can develop a corresponding set to replicate the original desired shape and make any full size pieces for his clients. “I love Murphy’s Market. That’s my

favorite place!” says Tim. “I ask for something new and they just get it for me, it’s wonderful! Bonnie is a character and the guys in the meat department, well, they just customize anything for you. Murphy’s has a really good cross section of foods and the organics are great to have in the store, too.” Tim takes his granddaughter to Murphy’s because she loves the mini grocery carts that are just perfect for her little hands to hold while she pushes meaningfully around the market. So when you see a little determined girl accompanied by a tall blue-eyed granddad coming down a Murphy’s aisle near you…. stand clear, she is on a mission! By Colleen Hole, Advertising, North Coast Journal

Sunny Brae • Glendale • Trinidad • Cutten • Westwood

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

table of 4 Mailbox 4 Poem child’s play

6

The Week in Weed Green-eyed Cops

7 Best of Humboldt 2013 Ballot 8 News the day the music died

10 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover dead and disconnected

17 Home & Garden Service Directory

20 Art Beat an extraordinary “oddist”

21 Arts Alive! saturday, oct. 5, 6-9 p.m.

24 Table Talk hounding for huckleberries

Gray Matters Special Insert

30 Music & More! 34 The Hum you’d better sit down

35 Calendar 39 Filmland man up

40 In Review a book

41 Workshops 46 Field Notes the air on mars

46 Sudoku 46 Crossword 47 Marketplace 49 Body, Mind & Spirit 50 Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013

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Oct. 3, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 40

Comment of the Week

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez contributing photographer Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/news editor Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com arts & features editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Dev Richards calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Jennifer Savage, Ken Weiderman graphic design/production Miles Eggleston, Lynn Jones general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com Kim Hodges kim@northcoastjournal.com marketing & promotions manager Drew Hyland office manager Carmen England bookkeeper/receptionist Meadow Gorman maIl/OffIce:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONe: 707 442-1400 faX: 707 442-1401

ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover: Ocean View Cemetery. Photo by Heidi Walters.

Faire Thee Well

Editor: Good day to all of the Lords and Ladies of the North Coast Journal. As founder of the Excalibur Medieval Tournament and Market Faire I send words of praise and gratitude for your coverage of our event. And many thanks to Jennifer Fumiko Cahill for the wonderful Sept. 26 article “Going Medieval” and her blog post as well. The Faire was full and happy on our sunny Saturday and even those brave souls that came out on Sunday had a wonderful if wet time at Arcata’s Mad River Hospital Field. Although the rain may have dampened our cloaks it certainly didn’t dampen the spirits of those who braved our Humboldt County liquid sunshine. The Knights of the American Jousting Alliance even put one a special display of their horsemanship by skiing across the mud behind one their trusty steeds. You can see a picture on the Journal’s blog. Thanks again to the North Coast Journal for your coverage of local events. Mary Dorman, Arcata

Jesus Abuse

Editor: Kudos to Bill Herman and Jean Damon for their letters in the Sept. 26 issue. I agree with the sentiments expressed. Jesus is not to be conveniently used by people when it suits their agenda. John Chiv, Eureka

‘Is-ism’

Editor: I’m willing to admit I may be incorrect. It’s been over 20 years since I last taught English 100 or substituted in a local high school, junior high school, or middle school English/language arts class. But your recent lead story title “Water’s for Fighting” (Sept. 19) left me befuddled. I further admit that due to a time crunch, I have not yet read the article. I can’t figure out if Mr. Scott-Goforth’s title meant “water is for fighting,” or was he somehow indicating that fighting belongs to water, or water belongs to fighting? I’m sorry, but unless something has changed, that looks wrong to my eye (and yes, my style manuals are from the era during which I was teaching, and my Strunk and White is not at hand, so if there has been an update in the arena of apostrophe usage, I missed it). I did not feel compelled to comment until reading the current Media Maven (Sept. 26), and seeing the same phenom-

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

“Now he can siphon off his big retirement

enon. Ms. Pike claims from the state after having accomplished her “background’s in print journalism.” absolutely nothing while the students and She later goes on their parents pay higher and higher tuition. to say “Eureka’s TV audience” in one Oh, how I loathe the slugs and worthless paragraph, indicating slime at the top of the California university the viewing audience belonging to or system.” residing in Eureka. In — Sam Camp, commenting on Rollin Richmond’s the next paragraph retirement on the Journal’s Facebook page. she says “Eureka’s not even…” to mean “Eureka is not even…” She wants to have her grammatical cake and eat it, too. Why not just say “is” where appropriate? What is so terrible, ever seen a robin get his beak stuck in so difficult, so painful about using the the stuff? Oh, reason 12! It kills more than full two-letter word? I realize this use of earthworms. One is forced to wonder the apostrophe is an attempt to have the about what sicko frame of mind wants written word mimic the manner in which to entomb the soil in this way in the first we speak. It’s folksy. Let’s drop the ‘g’ in a place? If you really, really want to kill few words, too, since that’s what it sounds weeds, just use cardboard. Mulch over it. like when we talk. Thank you, Genevieve! As a matter of fact, maybe we should Carol Moné, Trinidad write the entire edition in text lingo. Think of all the paper we would save if we would stop spelling out all these pesky words. Barbara A. Boerger, Eureka Editor: I was reading the “Best of Humboldt” choice list (see page 7) and did not see anything in relation to conscious living/ Editor: health topics. I am sure most of us would Genevieve Schmidt needs to add love to see a “Best of Healthy Humboldt” reason number 11 to her very enjoyable that includes massage therapists, docrant against hideous landscape fabric: It tors, healthy restaurants, healing schools/ does not go away (“Why I Hate Landscape institutions, yoga teachers/classes, martial Fabric,” Sept. 19). After it shreds into a arts, meditation teachers/classes, etc. for disgusting tangle, somebody has to pull the benefit of all beings! it up and haul it to the landfill where it Michael Damico, Fortuna remains forever and a day. Also, have you

A Better Best

Worse Than Weeds

Child’s Play  

through autumn air the children make their froggy leaps  into frosted pools of leafy joy  spent summer shade splashes red as windblown cinders  soft as ash and laughter lapping at the edge of  evening – Steve Brackenbury

Pissed-o

Editor: Brief research into the history and etymology of the word pesto reveals a different story than opined in the recent article, “Pesto Goes Rogue” (Sept. 19). Like many culinary icons pesto derives its name from the vessel in which it is originally made (paella, catapalana, terrine, tart, etc.), in this case the mortar and pestle. Pesto is the past participle of the Italian verb pestare, to pound. The naming of the bowl and its various outputs came therefrom. In fact, the first herbal, garlic and oil paste made and employed by the Romans was called morteum. While basil was likely an ingredient in some of those original herbaceous blends, continued on page 6

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013

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the week in WEed continued from page 4

Green-eyed Cops

CartooN by Joel mielke

By Ryan Burns

the credit for using solely Ocimum basilicum pounded with these other ingredients into a paste we would recognize today as Pesto Genovese is generally given to the Provence region of France and the preparation called pistou. The word basil derives from the Greek basileus, meaning king, and I am a huge fan — it is indeed the king of herbs. Please do not mistake my defense of language as an assault on the throne! Language evolves, but not always for the better. Many people, including most chefs and culinary celebs, say carmelize instead of caramelize. There is no such thing as carmel, therefore nothing can be carmelized. The biblical Mt. Carmel has nothing to do with Maillard process, the scientific term for caramelization or browning.

Confusing matters more, chefs’ creative linguistic license further distances many diners from culinary comprehension and competency. But, presumably, people reading TT participate in food awareness, education, preparation, and may have dined out enough to come across myriad pesto recipes ranging from the true king to an entire court of others: parsley, sundried tomato, cilantro, edamame, roasted pepper, etc. Twenty-five years ago this was cutting edge, not today. Raymond Norman, Eureka

Write a letter!

Please try to make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com l

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North Coast Coast JourNal Journal• •thursday, Thursday,oCt. Oct.3, 3, 2013• northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 2013 6 North

We get a lot of press releases here at the Journal, a steady drip of emails announcing everything from ribbon-cuttings to dance recitals to (let’s see what’s at top of my inbox here) a Holiday Gift Guide pitch for German-made electric irons. (Eat your heart out, Clark Kent.) Our favorites by far are law enforcement press releases. It’s not that we’re sadists who relish crime reports. (OK, maybe a little; we’re journalists, after all.) It’s more about the cadence of those hard-boiled cop compositions — sordid dramas relayed in just-the-factsma’am language. Recently we started noticing a new dramatic thread being woven into releases from the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office: Pot bust reports that used to just list plants, pounds and weapons seized suddenly began enumerating the environmental damage at illegal outdoor grow sites. Scattered rat poisons, seeping fertilizers, illegal timber harvesting and stream diversions have become major characters in these outlaw tales. Was this a calculated attempt to pander to the information gatekeepers in the liberal media? Not according to Lt. Steve Knight with the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. He said the department began including environmental information after a wakeup call in the form of a scientific study — namely a 2012 academic paper by UC Davis biologist Mourad Gabriel. His study outlined the effects of rodenticide poisoning on the carnivorous Pacific fisher, a candidate for the endangered species list, and revealed the scale of damage being done by large-scale growers. “That was the catalyst where everybody went, ‘Whoa,’” Knight said. Local agencies had seen destruction from marijuana grows before, “but not to the scale we’re seeing,” Knight said, “not with the quantity of marijuana being grown out there, not with the amount of water being sucked from streams, and not when they’re running D8 Cats through these creeks and rivers like they are now.” The destruction is particularly irksome in the context of threatened species such as the fisher and the California condor, which the Yurok Tribe and others are working to reintroduce on the North

Coast. Following some interagency strategizing, state agencies including Cal Fire and the Department of Fish and Wildlife have been taking a more active role in weed busts, too, often pursuing prosecution for environmental crimes. “Unfortunately,” Knight said with refreshing candor, “the environmental side is primarily misdemeanors, whereas the cultivation’s a felony.” Now that’s a crime. Elsewhere: • Prop. 19 take two? Last week a group called the California Cannabis Hemp & Health Initiative got clearance from the California Secretary of State to start gathering signatures on a petition that could legalize pot at the ballot box next year. The initiative, which would license and tax commercial weed sales and require case-by-case review of nonviolent marijuana convictions, comes on the heels of a new poll by the nonpartisan Public Policy Institute of California showing a record 52 percent of Californians (and 60 percent of likely voters) now favor legalization. • The U.S. Supreme Court announced Tuesday that it will hear a case that began with a 2008 pot bust here on the North Coast. CHP officers in Fort Bragg responded to an anonymous 911 call from someone claiming that a Ford F-150 had just run him or her off the road. After finding and following the truck, officers pulled it over and found two brothers and four big bags of weed. At issue is the constitutionality of arresting someone based solely on an anonymous tip. • Bank of America announced last week, after conferring with its lawyer army, that it will accept marijuana-related deposits from the Liquor Control Board in Washington State, where weed-for-fun is now legal. Individual dispensary owners across the country are still shit out of luck, though, disallowed under federal law to use banks. ●

FOOD & DRINK

ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT, RECREATION Best live-music venue Best place to shoot pool Best karaoke Best band Best musician Best club DJ Best place for a weekend getaway Best day trip with kids Best swimming hole Best festival Best farmers market vendor Best day hike

310 F St. Eureka CA 95501 707.442.1400 northcoastjournal.com

Best Humboldt vista that never gets old Best place to kill time browsing Best thing to bitch about in Humboldt Best Humboldt place you miss from back in the day Best place to propose Best last meal in Humboldt Best cop

Best clothing store, men or women Best children’s clothing store Best shoe store Best eyeglass store Best jewelry Best vintage/used clothing store Best antique/secondhand store

THE RULES & MORE

Best free pile

We’ve got it good here in Humboldt — good food, good beer, good people. Every year we ask Journal readers to help us sort the best from the good. Where do you get great sushi every single time? What mechanic do you trust to fix your car? Where’s the best vista you never get tired of? Let’s do this thing! Head over to northcoastjournal.com to fill out the ballot online — it will save you time and us the anguish of trying to read your handwriting. VOTING CLOSES OCT. 7 AT 5 P.M. Yes, we will pull the plug at that precise moment. Please be specific. (Hunan’s — which one?) NEW RULE THIS YEAR: Ballots with fewer than 15 answers will not be counted. OLD RULES: Play fair. Campaigning to win is great, but duplicating ballots or otherwise cheating the system is just mean. Don’t do it.

Best head shop Best musical instrument store Best tattoo artist Best nail artist Best hairdresser Best place for mani/pedi Best spa Best bicycle shop Best sporting goods store Best car repair shop Best computer repair store Best bookstore Best place to buy a mattress Best horticultural supply store for barely legal plants Best garden center for totally legal plants Best bank/credit union

Tell us what makes Humboldt the BEST place on earth! Write in your choices on this official form, then slap a stamp on it and mail it to us. OR save the stamp and bring it to our office during business hours. OR be the truly Hum-tastic social networker we know you are and fill out the form online at northcoastjournal.com.

HUMBOLDT

2013

Best bar to take a date Best dive bar Best sports bar Best happy hour Best bloody mary Best eatery on a budget Best restaurant when money is no object Best hangover breakfast Best food truck Best sushi Best Asian Best Mexican Best Italian Best vegetarian/vegan Best pizza Best burger Best place to get late-night food Best sugar fix Best brewery Best winery Best bakery Best coffee house Best eats in SoHum

BONUS ROUND

SERVICES & STUFF

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, oct. 3, 2013

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m.northcoast journal.com

RESTAURANTS, MUSIC, EVENTS, MOVIE TIMES, ARTS LISTINGS, BLOGS

RIGHT ON YOUR PHONE

OBERON CO-OWNER ROY KOHL WON’T LET ANYONE PLAY HIS UPRIGHT GRAND PIANO IN THE OBERON GRILL BECAUSE OF MUSIC LICENSING FEES. PHOTO BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH

The Day the Music Died

Why small businesses must pay mega-pop stars or drop local bands By Grant Scott-Goforth newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

A

t home, or in your car, radio’s free. You may have to sit through some insufferable ads between songs, or you may feel compelled to donate to your local public station, but once you’ve bought the box, you can hear all the songs you want from the airwaves. But turn on a radio for customers in your boutique clothing store, plug in your iPod for your café clientele, or invite a local accordionist to entertain diners at your restaurant, and all of a sudden you have to pay up. Not to that accordionist, necessarily, or the local radio station you’re jamming to — but to one or more national agencies that collect fees on behalf of hundreds of thousands of songwriters around the world. Those agencies say fees are necessary for songwriters to be properly paid for their creative works. But the fees can be hefty, and some small business owners argue that they end up hurting local musicians who lose gigs when venues drop live music to save money.

8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Joe Filgas, the owner of two Café Nooner restaurants in Eureka, recently canceled ongoing live performances at his Henderson Center restaurant when the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) pressured him to begin paying licensing fees. ASCAP, a nonprofit based in New York City, is the oldest and perhaps best known songwriters’ organization, representing 470,000 members. It was founded in 1914, and during the next 25 years two more associations sprang up: SESAC, which originally stood for the Society of European Stage Authors and Composers, and now is a privately owned for-profit group; and Broadcast Music, Inc., founded by broadcasters to offer a cheaper alternative than ASCAP, representing 600,000 songwriters. Filgas knew about licensing fees when he bought the Old Town Café Nooner at the end of 2011. He signed up for a commercial service that covered his licensing fees to play satellite radio in the restaurants and to host live music — or

so he thought. Then, he said, “harassing and sneaky” phone calls started coming in asking employees what music, karaoke or other events they were holding at the restaurant. He suspected the calls were from licensing associations. ASCAP sent letters to Café Nooner. “We kept throwing them away because we were covered,” Filgas said. The restaurant played canned music during regular hours and hosted live bands during Arts Alive. In late 2012, Filgas opened Café Nooner 2 in Henderson Center and local musicians began to play there. About a month ago, with calls and letters from ASCAP continuing to come in, Filgas contacted the company that provided his satellite radio license and discovered he had been wrong: He was not licensed to host live music at the restaurants. It was time for a quick and difficult decision: Continue live music at both restaurants for $2,300 a year? “It’s nice to have live music, but I don’t think it necessarily draws people into your restaurant,” he said. “A lot of the restaurants are providing that as a luxury to the customer and not passing that cost onto the customer.” Filgas opted to pay $1,000 a year to continue live music once a month during Arts Alive at the Old Town restaurant. That doesn’t include the $35 a month he pays to pipe in the radio at both locations. He said at least one of the musicians who had been playing his restaurant was upset about the loss of a gig, but understood his position. That musician was Anna Hamilton, a guitarist who has been playing in and around Humboldt County for decades. Losing a gig at the Café Nooner forced her to continue using food stamps, she said, and it wasn’t the first time pressure from licensing agencies put her out of work. In the past, she’s picked up a venue’s ASCAP fees out of her own pocket — and she’s considering that again, if she can pool some money from like-minded musicians. Three years ago, Oberon Grill also discontinued live music because of licensing fees, co-owner Roy Kohl said. Still, he estimated the restaurant has received more than 100 calls in the last five years from licensing agencies, and said he suspects the groups use “secret shoppers” to spy on the restaurant. ASCAP has 35 teams assigned to monitor venues all over the U.S., both by phone and in person. Who do these teams contact? Just about every business you can think of that plays live or canned

music: gyms, farmers markets, restaurants, retail stores — the list goes on. Halsey Ray, a guitarist and songwriter from Fortuna, said it’s “absurd” for venues to get upset about licensing fees. “That gets used by venue owners a lot as a reason why they shouldn’t have to pay us. Or why a pitcher of beer or a meal is worth five hours of performance.” It’s a misconception, Ray said, that ASCAP is an “evil, greedy, giant” corporation shaking down small business owners and screwing over musicians. True, ASCAP collected $600 million in domestic license fees in 2012, according to its website, but it paid out $444 million of that to its American members. Ray admitted that licensing organizations can be heavy-handed at times, with threats of lawsuits and pressure on business owners. It’s a little overboard to charge musical instrument shops in the off chance a customer lays into a Zeppelin riff while testing out a guitar, he said, but “I understand what the fees are for and I like the principle.” Tough-mindedness helps songwriters who are hemorrhaging money everywhere else. Plus, playing covers of someone else’s tunes is the way working musicians make a living in a place like Humboldt, he said. Casinos, weddings, private gigs — “The bands I play in where we actually make money: cover bands.” Ray has been playing and writing music for “quite a long time.” He’s a member of BMI — though he says he’s never collected royalties, because he hadn’t registered any songs until recently — and he plans to become an ASCAP member in the next year or so, when he’s polished some of his material. And there is, of course, one loophole for musicians and the venues who want to host them — limiting the playlist to original song. Café Nooner’s Filgas is planning two live music events at his Henderson Center location with artists who have agreed to play only original material. He is comfortable with a verbal guarantee — “I’ve talked to both of them in depth,” he said. “I’m going to be there. I know what their sets are going to be.” But that’s not a realistic solution for most venues, said Ray. If a band promises to play no covers, then launches into “November Rain,” the venue owner is still liable. That could lead to legal disputes and bad blood between venues and musicians. At Six Rivers Brewery in McKinleyville, which pays $5,000 a year in licensing fees, co-owner Meredith Maier looks on music

as another amenity for her customers. “It’s like putting flowers on the table.” Six Rivers, which has a full bar and stage area, is more of a music destination than Café Nooner, and it’s a larger building. ASCAP determines its live music licensing fees by a pair of factors: the occupancy of the building and whether a venue charges admission. Maier said the fees were a “big blow” when she and Talia Nachshon bought the brewery in 2004. Early on, they were doing bigger shows and more music, but they’ve since toned that down — focusing on being a good stop for traveling and local bands, while offering a small guarantee for each gig. She is dubious about ASCAP, though, echoing a common criticism that it benefits mega-pop stars but does little for small, struggling local and touring bands. “It’s kind of a racket to be honest — I’m not 100 percent sure how much money trickles down to the band,” she said. ASCAP vice president of licensing Vincent Candilora said the royalties paid to its members are based on a complex metric of census studies, sample studies and digital monitoring of more than 2,500 radio stations. The artists with a bigger chunk of those markets — as well as those who play venues like sports arenas, amusement parks and some larger concert halls, which report what they play — get a bigger share of the royalties. In that world of radio conglomerates and pop stars, it’s difficult to imagine your favorite Humboldt County bands making much off royalties. Until they’ve hit the big time, maybe. Sara Bareilles, whose picture is splashed across the ASCAP website, is quoted giving the agency this endorsement, “I’ve always felt really well-taken care of like, human-to-human.… I just feel like these are people who actually care about what happens to me.” Eric Sampson, a Los Angeles songwriter and session musician who grew up in Humboldt, estimates he gets 25 percent of his income from royalties collected by ASCAP. Sampson owns a recording studio and is a producer and engineer as well as a full-time musician, living in a city where plenty of musical gigs can lead to royalty payments. For him, “It’s quite necessary to be involved in at least one of those associations,” not only for royalty payments but because they fight for musicians’ and songwriters’ rights. And if you listen to music, you’ve gotta care at least a little about musician’s rights. Right? ●

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Blog Jammin’ OUTDOORS / BY HEIDI WALTERS / TUESDAY, OCT. 1 AT 2:30 P.M.

Curtains for the Redwoods

Yep, they’ve shut ’em down, our lovely, looming patches of redwoods within the federal government’s jurisdiction — for who knows how long. Redwood National Park is one of the 401 national parks that closed today, along with numerous other federal outfits, as the federal government powered down after Republicans and Democrats failed to agree on a spending bill. Included in the fallout: 102 park employees are furloughed, leaving eight employees to handle security and emergencies; visitor facilities, trails, backcountry areas, picnic areas and roads — except Highway 101, Highway 199 and Bald Hills Road — are closed; park programs are canceled — including a ranger-led program that 115 school kids were planning to partake in this week; and the resource management program is suspended, which nixes a prescribed burn that was planned in the Bald Hills. That last one seems worrisome. Notes the news release: “To not perform the burn within this rare window of weather conditions and moisture levels may have many future ecological impacts.” Here’s a bright spot: The shutdown does not affect the state parks conjoined with Redwood National Park: Jedediah Smith Redwoods, Del Norte Coast Redwoods and Prairie Creek Redwoods state parks. ● COMMUNITY / BY LINDA STANSBERRY / MONDAY, SEPT. 30 AT 5:11 P.M.

Cal Fire Crash

Cal Fire Engine 1267 overturned while navigating a steep curve just above Old Hindley Ranch Road near Honeydew this afternoon. Division Chief Charles Hanes said that at this time the cause of the accident was not immediately known, although brake failure seems likely. Three Cal Fire personnel were taken by ambulance to Redwood Memorial Hospital with minor injuries. Hanes says that the crew was fine, just “shaken up.” Engine 1267 belongs to the Mattole Station and was one of several engines that responded to a fire on Landergen Road. The fire began around 2:30 p.m. Local residents reported that the flames were “almost burning up the solar panels” on the hill above their house, and that they saw wildlife running for safety. The fire was extinguished with the aid of a helitack crew which doused it with fire retardant. ●

ENVIRONMENT/NATURAL RESOURCES / BY HEIDI WALTERS / MONDAY, SEPT. 30, AT 4:35 P.M.

Crazy Klamath

When the Klamath River’s mouth goes south, like it did late this summer, it can make for a wild ride, says Sara Borok, a state fish and wildlife biologist. Instead of dashing straight into the ocean as it does when the mouth opens on the north end of the spit, the river cuts a channel that runs long and narrow parallel to the ocean before emptying into it. This narrow channel is highly vulnerable to changing river flows — it opens here, then nearly closes, then opens over there. It makes everyone crazy. During low flows — like in early August and off and on last month, when it was around 2,800 cubic feet per second — the narrow spit begins silting shut, the river trickles over the spit, and the fish — we’re mainly talking fall-run chinook — bunch up at the ocean door waiting for the water to rise so they can come in. The fishermen, meanwhile, complain about the “slow bite.” During high flows everyone pushes in like a Wal-Mart sale door-rush. The fish crowd upstream to do their spawn thing, and fishermen line the easy-pickin’s channel to haul in a winter’s worth of suppers. “This is just rumor, but my crew is telling me that on Friday a big load of fish came in — maybe 10,000 to 50,000 fish,” says Borok. “That’s what some fishermen told them.” Very high flows — like today, with the river at a whopping 22,800 cfs as of midday, and climbing, following the weekend’s rain dump — the fishermen cry their eyes out up on the highway. The RV parks are flooded, the boat ramps are flooded, the roads down to the mouth are flooded. And the big fish swarm in and slip unhindered up the thick, concealing river. “The water is high all the way up the river,” says Borok. She thinks these super high flows likely will cut a nice, deep channel and the mouth will stay in the middle of the spit, and open, for the rest of the season. And she says there are probably at least 100,000 of the 272,000 expected Chinook yet to enter the river. So no more cryin’. (For more on one moment of this crazy, see our Sept. 5 story about combat fishing at the mouth.) ●

RAIN DIDN’T DETER FAIRE-GOERS AT SUNDAY’S MEDIEVAL FAIRE — JOUSTERS ARE “MUD-SKIED,” A RARE MEDIEVAL PRACTICE ABOUT WHICH MUCH IS WRITTEN AND LITTLE IS KNOWN. PHOTO BY TONY SMITHERS

COMMUNITY / BY GRANT SCOTTGOFORTH /SUNDAY, SEPT. 29 AT 12:49 P.M.

MARIJUANA / BY GRANT SCOTTGOFORTH / FRIDAY, SEPT. 27 AT 2:04 P.M.

Longtime KHSU host and friend of the community Ben Tankersley died Tuesday. He was 93 years old. If you ever heard Ben talk, you know who he was. His Friday morning classical music program, “A Musical Offering,” aired for most of 26 years between 1985 and 2011. Two years ago, Ben retired and moved to North Carolina to be closer to his daughter Terran. During his quarter-century in Arcata he was actively involved with the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, the ACLU, Planned Parenthood, Hospice of Humboldt, the Arcata Pool — the list goes on. Needless to say, he touched a lot of lives.

A series of massive busts on timber and public lands in SoHum brought down more than 20,000 marijuana plants and 600 pounds of pot — a value of $21 million, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Deputies found a house being used for drying and processing by following a trail of marijuana leaves from one of the grow sites. Read the Sheriff’s Office press release at www.northcoastjournal.com/blogjammin. ●

A Musical Offering

$21 Million Pot Bust

MEDICAL / HEALTH / BY LINDA STANSBERRY / THURSDAY, SEPT. 26 AT 1:10 PM

Who You Gonna Call?

FORMER KHSU CLASSICAL HOST BEN TANKERSLEY DIED AT 93 YEARS OLD LAST WEEK. PHOTO BY DWAIN GOFORTH

Cal Fire Capt. Eric Ayers of Mattole Station doesn’t want another call like the one his crew responded to in July of this year. The victim crawled “quite a ways” along the river bar and then was transported an additional eight miles to the county road before emergency personnel were contacted. He had a severe neck injury and “should not have been moved in the first place.” Roughly six hours elapsed between the time of injury and the time first responders were able to treat him. Ayers suspects the victim was involved in some illegal activity, and he doesn’t care. “Our mission is to provide public safety to the citizens of this state. We’re not in the realm of investigating illegal grows. We respond to medical or fire emergencies. It’s not our intention to bring police action on anyone.” Ayers says that many people don’t

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogjammin READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

seem to understand Cal Fire’s role and mission. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) is a state organization with stations in many rural communities, where it often works alongside volunteer fire departments to provide wildland fire suppression and emergency response. According to its official website, “beyond its wildland fire fighting role, Cal Fire answers the call more than 350,000 times for other emergencies each year.” “We’re first responders,” Ayers said. “If you’re injured or in danger, we’re there to help. We don’t care if you have a grow operation going on. Let us help you. The only time we would contact law enforcement is if there was an immediate danger to our personnel, such as an active shooter incident.” He adds that in rural communities such as the Mattole helicopter rescue is a vital part of helping those in need get to medical care within what’s called “The Golden Hour.” If victims can be in surgery within an hour of injury they have a much better chance of surviving. Cal Fire encourages rural residents to have the GPS coordinates for their property written down to give to dispatchers. Got it? It doesn’t matter where you are or what you’re doing there: In the case of an emergency, please don’t move the victims. Stabilize them, then call 911. Capt. Ayers and his colleagues are here to help.

FOR PHOTOS AND VIDEO OF A FIRE THAT CLAIMED A EUREKA HOME MONDAY, VISIT THE JOURNAL ONLINE AT WWW.NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM.

MEDIA / BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH / TUESDAY, SEPT. 24 AT 5:31 P.M.

New T-S Publisher

Eureka’s “paper of record” has a new publisher. On Oct. 1, Paula Patton will make the jump from Marysville, where she published the daily newspaper The Appeal-Democrat and three weekly newspapers serving the Central Valley north of Sacramento. Read the full announcement at www. northcoastjournal.com/blogjammin. ●

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The Humboldt State University president sent the announcement out via email this morning: I write to inform you that I have decided to retire at the end of this academic year. I have enjoyed my years serving you and believe that we have made real progress at the university over my years of leadership, despite the state’s economic struggles. Formal announcement of my retirement will be made at the CSU Board of Trustees later today and a public announcement will be issued shortly after. In coming weeks, the Chancellor and Board of Trustees will share information about the process for selecting a new president. Read the full public statement at www. northcoastjournal.com/blogjammin. ●

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Dead and Disconnected The sad, frustrating case of John Cooper-Gulch-Swamp Doe (and other abandonments) By Heidi Walters

W

illiam Cody Waldron’s birthday came and went three Mondays ago, on Sept. 23. If he is alive, he is now 71 years old and, quite likely, drunk. But chances are he is not alive. Chances are, he is mystery corpse “John CooperGulch-Swamp Doe,” found burned ABOVE AND RIGHT THE PARTIALLY BURNED HOMELESS beyond recognition on March CAMP WHERE JOHN COOPER-GULCH-SWAMP DOE DIED. 14 in a swampy homeless camp WHOEVER LIVED HERE WAS OBSESSED WITH TRAGIC DEATHS. THE ONES ABOVE RECORD CHILD DEATHS. 100 yards off of 14th Street in PHOTOS COURTESY THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY CORONER’S OFFICE. Eureka where it dips into Cooper Gulch. Jail- and hospital-release papers, a prescription bottle and the moment is all of these — John Cooperother items at the site strongly suggest Gulch-Swamp Doe — and of a deputy it was Waldron’s camp. But agents at the coroner’s effort to figure out who he is. It’s Humboldt County Coroner’s Office have a frustrating case with few good leads and yet to positively identify the body. They a lot of dead ends. Even the one strong continue to try, but in the meantime the lead, that this Doe might be William Cody body has had to be cremated. And the Waldron, if proven correct likely won’t reashes must be buried — and will be, just lease the remains from their pauper’s grave. as soon as there are enough other indiWaldron’s disconnection from the world gent remains to fill the eight urn spaces in seems to have begun long ago. “Lawn Niche 10, Row 10” of the county’s two-acre indigent burial ground at Ocean down 14th View Cemetery. Street saw the flames and smoke coming There will be no markers on this shared from deep in the gulch that early March grave — just the same unwatered grass morning and radioed City Cab dispatch, that lies over the rest of the county plot, which has a hotline to Eureka Police and which is in an older section of the cemHumboldt Bay Fire. It was 3:48 a.m. Soon, etery developed before the advent of aufirefighters were pushing through a dense tomatic sprinklers. It turns green when the tangle of alder, vines and brushy underrains come and yellow when they don’t. growth, their feet sopping in the wet There are a few other John and Jane ground. The fire was a burning camp. They Does in this plot. But most of the indigent doused it with hand tools and buckets of interred here have their own names listed water from the nearby stream. Then they in the cemetery’s records; their next-ofsaw the charred human body. They called kin simply didn’t have the money to pay the police department and the coroner. for their cremation — $695 to $2,100, By 4:20 a.m., Coroner Dave Parris had these days, depending on the mortuary. made the rough slog to the camp and was Or, they had no next-of-kin. jotting down initial observations. But it These county-buried indigents are was too dark and swampy; the scene innot the only decedents abandoned by vestigation was postponed until daylight. fortune or by kin. In a spare crypt inside Deputy Coroner Charly Van Buskirk got a private mausoleum a short walk from the call at 6:26 a.m. to go out there. Now the pauper’s ground at Ocean View rest, it was his case. indefinitely, the urns of 60 former loved On a recent Tuesday in the coroner’s ones whose kin paid Ocean View to have office on I Street in Eureka, Van Buskirk them cremated but never came back sat in the small office he shares with two for their ashes. In storage units, closets, other deputy coroners, Roy Horton and garages sit yet more forgotten urns; Trevor Enright. All three were busy with sometimes, someone turns them in to the phone calls, Van Buskirk’s mostly inquiries coroner’s office. about two unrelated overdoses during the These tales of abandonment vary by previous night. degree: Too poor. Elderly and alone in the A wooden artist’s model slumped in world. Forsaken. Forgotten. Unknown. one corner of his desk, next to a small, This is the story of a dead man who at

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THE MAUSOLEUM WHERE OCEAN VIEW CEMETERY ADMINISTRATOR DON MCCOMBS KEEPS 60 URNED REMAINS WHOSE KIN PAID FOR THEIR CREMATION BUT THEN ABANDONED THEM AT THE CEMETERY. PHOTO BY HEIDI WALTERS

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

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go in and we all met at the 14th Street dip and went in.” The one-person camp was wellestablished. There were ditches diverting the gulch’s numerous streamlets around the camp. The charred body — on its back, one leg folded up as if relaxed in sleep, one arm reaching up as if to touch the sky, or a face — lay on what appeared to have been a sleeping area; there were burned bits of a tent, mattress and wood pallets. Nearby, a cooking area had four cook stoves and a number of propane bottles — including one attached to a stove that had exploded. A sauce pan hung from a rope. Plastic bins held more items. And all around were personal touches. A birdhouse. Candles. Angel figurines attached to sticks. Small American flags. A compass. plastic skeleton. A postcard with a Mickey Plastic decorations, including two big Mouse skull-and-crossbones logo on green frogs. And, at about chest level, a it was tucked into a mirror on the wall web of strings strung between leaning beside him; the same logo was on his alder limbs around the camp. The strings computer screen. The wall in front of his had newspaper clippings attached to desk held a whimsical them with clothespins, whale batik created by bag clips and document a friend of his. Behind clips — “articles reporthim a black-and-white ing tragedies around photograph loomed: the country,” said Van the Golden Gate Bridge Buskirk. “Deaths. Car under construction in accidents.” the 1930s. Van Buskirk, Van Buskirk brought a burly middle-aged up one photo showing man with brown eyes a large collage of newsand a cheerful face paper clippings mixed dominated by a walrus with childish drawings, moustache, said he likes all covered in colorit because it’s a period ful stickers — hearts, piece — and because smiley faces, crosses, the bridge was built rainbows, butterflies, in less than five years. flowers, stars. Some of That’s fast for the size the drawings had fat, ABOVE THE DEC. 14, 2012, MUGSHOT of the undertaking, and pale blue writing on OF WILLIAM CODY WALDRON. THIS he’s a man who apprecithem, including a recurWAS THE LAST TIME HE WAS BOOKED ates efficiency. ring phrase: “blessed INTO THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY JAIL. PHOTO COURTESY THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY In between calls, miracles.” These clipSHERIFF’S OFFICE. Van Buskirk recounted pings were all news the details of the reports of child deaths. lingering Waldron case — it’s been six A missing boy found dead. An infant killed months, and still no breakthrough. He by her mother. Children perished in a fire. referred frequently to a thick report on There were loose papers strewn around his desk and flipped through photothe camp, as well, with other people’s graphs on the computer that he and names on them. A lot of these, said Van Enright took at the scene. Buskirk, looked like children’s homework. After he got the call that March mornIt’s possible the loose papers were simply ing, Van Buskirk, Enright and Eureka police part of the camp owner’s fuel stash. officers met to study maps and satellite Another batch of papers, however, photos to see if they could find an easier yielded the most promising clue as to way into the gulch than the approach who the deceased might be. They were from 14th Street. the only papers protected in plastic, and “That didn’t help,” Van Buskirk said. “At they all had the same name on them. 9:07 a.m., we decided that was the way to continued on next page

DR. PAUL DOMANCHUK OPTOMETRIST

or northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013

13

continued from previous page They included jail release papers and medical release papers dated Aug. 31, 2012. These contained the same birth date. On the medical release papers, from St. Joseph Hospital, someone had written: “Special advice for William Waldron: Stop drinking or you will die.” Van Buskirk also found a prescription bottle for Vicodin prescribed to Waldron by an emergency room physician. Fire department personnel gathered everything up and hauled it out.

Van Buskirk answered an-

other call and talked for a while with the mother of one of the overdose cases. He is one of four coroner’s officials who try to make the final connections for those who die unknown. Beyond collecting evidence at the site of death, the coroner and three deputy coroners reach out to friends and acquaintances, scour databases both public and private, and prowl the Internet. Usually, their searches are swift and fruitful. Sometimes, though, they are more like the saga of John Cooper-GulchSwamp Doe. After they left the swamp, fire crew took the personal possessions to the

coroner’s office and the body to the hospital to be X-rayed for bullets and signs of blunt trauma; none were found. A pathologist did an autopsy. A blood sample was sent to a lab to run a drug toxicology screening. The body’s lower and upper jaws were removed and sent to a local forensic dentist to chart the teeth. Another blood sample was preserved for DNA analysis — it would be sent to the California Department of Justice if the dental charting yielded nothing. Then the body was refrigerated at the coroner’s. And Van Buskirk’s search began, Ocean View Cemetery Administrator Don McCombs at the mausoleum where he is storing 60 abandoned urns in a spare crypt. Photo by Heidi Walters

much of it at his computer here in the coroner’s office. He focused on two main tracks: looking for Waldron’s next of kin, with whom the body’s DNA sample could be compared to see if there was a match; and for Waldron’s dental records, to compare with the body’s dental chart. First he checked with the jail, where he learned that Waldron was well-known: He’d been arrested multiple times yearly between 2002 and 2012 — 14 times in 2012 alone — mostly for being drunk in public and mostly by Eureka police. But the nextof-kin space on each booking document was blank. Addresses in Eureka and Fortuna that Waldron had given were dead ends. And it was the same story with the hospital’s records. Van Buskirk called the few Waldrons in the local phone books; nobody claimed him. Van Buskirk broadened the search. He looked up Waldron on a private database

named TLO Online Investigative Systems. The database compiles information from over a person’s lifetime: phone numbers, criminal records, utility records, vehicle and property records, housing records (including evictions, liens, foreclosures), court records, emails. It isn’t complete, however, and can suck in bad information with the good. Buskirk gleaned a list of names and phone numbers connected with Waldron from that site. “I cold-called about 15 to 20 people,” he said. None of them knew Waldron. “So then I checked with the public guardian’s office. The public defender. Probation and parole. Conflict counsel.” None had records of a next of kin for Waldron. He checked the state’s electronic death registration system to find death certificates of any Waldrons who died in Humboldt County. There was one — Jerry Waldron. Van Buskirk called Jerry Waldron’s daughter; she said William

The county’s indigent burial ground at Ocean View Cemetery. The county places no markers on the graves. Sometimes, family or friends will later scrape up the money for a marker. Photo by Heidi Walters

14 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

left At the county coroner’s office, looking up William Cody Waldron on a private database called TLO Online Investigative Systems. far left Humboldt County Deputy Coroner Charly Van Buskirk has been trying for more than six months to identify a burned body discovered in a homeless camp in Cooper Gulch. Photos by heidi walters

known man gone missing, an unknown man found dead. It’s rare to not solve a case like this. “I’ve been with this office since 1990,” Van Buskirk said. “In that time, we’ve only had 24 cases where we couldn’t identify a person.” Cody Waldron was no relation. “So I discussed it with Coroner Parris and we decided to put out a press release,” he said. The release, dated March 22, described the fire incident, noted the need to find Waldron’s next-of-kin to help identify the body, and asked that anyone with such information contact Van Buskirk. One guy called to say he worked with Waldron at a resort in Honeydew in the early 1980s. He thought Waldron was from the Bay Area. A woman called who said she was an “heir searcher,” and that she’d found records of a same-age Waldron born to a woman named Violet; married to Christin J. Owen in San Mateo in 1971; and divorced in 1976. Those leads, though promising, took Van Buskirk to more dead ends. He asked the U.S. Social Security Administration for help. On April 8, a woman in that office sent a letter to Waldron’s last-known address. On Sept. 11, Van Buskirk heard from her that the letter to Waldron had come back unclaimed. She told him she had the name of a possible next of kin, but no address. In the meantime, Van Buskirk filed a death certificate for the dead man, using the name John Cooper-Gulch-Swamp Doe to distinguish him from other John Does, and on July 30 the body was cremated at Pierce Mortuary (the county contracts with several local mortuaries for cremations). Van Buskirk hasn’t given up. He is calling every dentist listed in local directories to find out if they have dental records for Waldron; recently he enlisted the help of the Humboldt-Del Norte Dental Society. And if it turns out the body is not Waldron? Then it will be up to the state Department of Justice’s missing/unidentified persons unit to find a match for the dental and DNA information. The mystery will have doubled — a barely

But what happened

that early morning in the swamp? The autopsy revealed the cause of death to be inhalation of products of combustion — carbon monoxide and other toxins released from burning plastic — indicating Doe did not die before the fire started. An arson investigator concluded the fire likely started in the cooking station, said Van Buskirk. Investigators think Doe was standing when the fire started, or just before; under the prone body they found string and two large gorilla clips — the sharpedged, metal kind that would have been uncomfortable to sleep on, Van Buskirk said. Perhaps he had been putting up more newspaper clippings. “There are two scenarios we’ve come up with,” Van Buskirk said. “One is, the fire starts, he’s overcome by products of combustion and he falls over. The other is that he passes out, drunk” — and knocks over a propane stove, starting the fire. Van Buskirk noted that the position of Doe’s limbs — the arm thrust upward, the bent leg — did not indicate anything about what he might have been doing before he died; fire animates a dead body, moves its limbs. The toxicology report revealed the dead man had a blood alcohol content of 0.32. No other substances were detected. The high blood alcohol content would be consistent with a man like William Cody Waldron, who between 2002 and 2012 had more than 500 contacts — some resulting in arrest — with the Eureka Police Department, according to police spokesperson Mary Kirby. Jail booking records show he also was picked up a few times by county Sheriff’s deputies and Arcata police. With scant exception, the charges were “drunk in public.” Humboldt County Sheriff’s Lt. Dean Flint, who began working in the county continued on page 17

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continued from page 15 jail in 1987 and now oversees its staff, remembers Waldron. Some people called him Wild Bill. “I was just with a bunch of guys, talking about the old days in the jail, and his name came up,” Flint said over the phone one recent Friday. “Someone said, ‘I heard he died.’ We haven’t seen him in a long time.” The last time Waldron was booked in the county jail was Dec. 14, 2012, for public intoxication and probation violation. In his mug shot, he looks grim and shaggy. His Santa-bushy beard is gray, his blue eyes are sunk deep and there’s a hard set to his mouth. Flint, on the phone, described him as being lean, muscular and street savvy. He said Waldron once told him he’d been a boxer. But Waldron wasn’t mean. Flint’s voice softened as he recalled a typical interaction at the jail with Waldron. “He was pretty gruff sounding, and sometimes he could be pretty belligerent when he was brought in,” Flint said. “He’d say, ‘I’ll fight all you guys!’” and bunch up his fists. “Then he’d wink at you and slap you on the back. But if you were new and didn’t know him, it could get your adrenaline up.” When he sobered up, Waldron would

“I’ve been with this office since 1990. In that time, we’ve only had 24 cases where we couldn’t identify a person.”

Meanwhile,

rise and say something like, “Hey, the remains that the knuckleheads,” to county coroner’s office the staff. He’d wink think are Waldron’s will at the female ofrest in the county burial ficers and tell them ground at Ocean View they were pretty. Cemetery, sprawled “But it was never across a knoll in southinappropriate,” Flint western Eureka. added. “It was more On a warm, sunny, like, ‘Hey, you sure eucalyptus-scented have a pretty smile,’ day in September, or, ‘I’m sure you cemetery administrator have a lucky man at Don McCombs strolled — Charly Van Buskirk home.’” toward a sweep of Waldron was smilawn — the county’s ley when he wasn’t plot — passing first by drunk, Flint said. He a row of large, granite wasn’t the sort of guy who’d spit on you mausoleums. He paused at the last mausoor blame you for his troubles. “And when leum. Inside it are stored the urned remains he would leave it would not be unusual of 60 people whose families paid for their for him to say, ‘Sorry if I was a jerk last cremation but never returned for them. night.’ And you don’t get that a lot.” The oldest dates back to 1934. McCombs He was courtly and even sensitive, has tried everything to repatriate them — it seems, when he wasn’t fist-bunching, even mailing them to their kin’s last-known fall-down drunk. But who knows why he address. They all came back, unclaimed. lapsed in and out like that, why he frayed McCombs, a tall, middle-aged man with his connections until they broke? a full cap of brown hair and sad brown Maybe somebody will come forward, eyes, is troubled by these abandonments. someday, who can tell us. And by others stuck in similar post-death

burial-limbo — at mortuaries, at the coroner’s office, in storage units and emptied houses. Once, he stumbled upon the urn of a friend’s remains, in a house he was considering buying. “What people don’t realize,” McCombs said, “is cremation isn’t the end-all. You have to do something with them once they’re cremated. And if you don’t do it, it becomes somebody else’s problem.” His 60 urns will stay in the mausoleum indefinitely. But the roughly 100 abandoned urns at the coroner’s — some from the days when the coroner kept cremains for families to pick up, others turned in by community members — are finally getting buried. Veterans’ remains go to the Igo Veterans Cemetery in Redding. The rest go to the county plot. Every time McCombs opens a new eight-urn niche to bury indigents in the cremation section of the county plot, he opens another eight-urn niche beside it and fills it with those old coroner’s urns. They, too, will get no markers. And there they will stay. In the orderly but crowded company of others abandoned, or poor, or alone, or — as in the case of John Cooper-Gulch-Swamp Doe — possibly forever unknown. ●

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humboldt county’s comprehensive guide to , green building green living and more

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

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19

ABOVE “GOTH GIRL BIKE” LEFT “THE GOLDEN GLASSES” ART BY ORR MARSHALL

An Extraordinary “Oddist” Orr Marshall takes his time By Ken Weiderman artbeat@northcoastjournal.com

I

f you’re a regular at Eureka’s Arts Alive!, you’ve surely seen him. He’s the older guy with a ponytail wearing a full motorcycle helmet and pausing to examine each and every work of art he comes across. His signature monthly appearance may be unmistakable, but underneath that magenta and

silver helmet, the artist Orr Marshall is anything but predictable. For more than 40 years, Orr Marshall has steadily produced a set of refined sculptures, paintings and drawings that defy categorization. From overblown hood ornaments to dramatic black and white India ink drawings to meticulously

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

detailed six-foot-high Japanese blockprint inspired paintings, Marshall’s art casts a wide net. His work spans genres and mediums in an enviable, effortless way, blending the many sources of his inspiration into a collection of work that embodies the extravagances of creativity and visual imagery. Inspired by dreams, travel and family, he follows his muse from start to finish with very little deviation. For Marshall, time is critical. It’s not uncommon for him to work for more than two years on a painting. That’s two years on one painting. Some have taken up to three. He’s not a man in a hurry, and he produces his works with the exactitude of a scientist. For example, when working digitally, he couldn’t get the right shade of blue. Rather than settle for a replacement, he painted his preferred hue onto paper, photographed it and loaded it into the program. While some artists line up several works at once and jump from one to the other, Marshall concentrates on just one thing as much as he can. “People talk about attention deficit disorder these days. It makes me think that what I have is attention surplus disorder!” he says, “I keep working and working and I can’t stop until I’ve worked months or years on something and I’ve finished it.” Such in-

tense focus and planning sometimes leads to an intense attachment to the work. It’s not uncommon for Orr to sell only prints of his work or even to buy back a painting that was sold years before. One such painting, “The Golden Glasses,” was sold to a friend in the early ’80s and recently reacquired by Marshall. A product of three years’ work, the 5-footlong image of a woman wearing shades teems with thousands of acrylic dots. Layers of mustard, ochre, lime and chartreuse combine in an expanding half-tone pattern of eye shapes over the eponymous glasses, while squiggly swaths of turquoise and tangerine define the woman and the background. There isn’t a straight line in the painting. Standing in front of it can be hypnotizing, if slightly dizzying. His newest piece, “Goth Girl Bike,” is an apt example of Marshall’s process from inspiration to completion. At the local coop, he happened to park his bicycle next to a black bike wrapped completely in black lace. A red rose adorned each corner of the basket, which was topped with a white skull. Fascinated, Marshall soaked it all in, thinking, “I’d never seen anything that so clearly identified the type of person who owned the bike.” He never saw the rider, and set out to imagine who it might be. Back home in his Eureka studio, Marshall made a few sketches, playing around with the angle of the bike and the position of the figure. As with most of his larger works, he then drew each component with exacting detail, putting them together like puzzle pieces before moving on to the final drawing. The finished product is a sexy cycling fantasy of lace and leather. Seen from a low angle, Marshall’s imagined rider sports thigh-high boots, dready hair and a crucifix on her chest. Feathery fringe and intricate fishnets contrast with the strong, thick forms of the bike, emphasizing the femininity of its owner and highlighting Marshall’s illustration skills. “I’m just hoping that the owner of the bike still lives in Eureka,” he says with a wink, “and that she sees this drawing.” If you’d like to see “Goth Girl Bike” and a few dozen other pieces, head to the Sewell Gallery during October to see his show, Orr Marshall: Oddworks. A number of affordable prints will be on sale, as well as some original paintings never before shown on the North Coast. A reception will be held during Eureka’s Arts Alive! on Oct. 5 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ●

TRINIDAD + FORTUNA NEXT PAGE

“More to Be Revealed” by Rob Hampson is at Five Eleven Saturday. Can’t get enough? More of his work is down the block at Orange Cup Coral Salon.

First Saturday Night Arts Alive! Saturday, Oct. 5, 6-9 p.m. Presented by the Humboldt Arts Council and Eureka Main Street. Opening receptions for artists, exhibits and performances are held the first Satruday of each month. For more information, phone Eureka Main Street at 442-9054 or go to www.eurekamainstreet.org 1. EUREKA INN 518 Seventh St. Lauren Cogan Jones, mixed media. 2. HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL at the Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St. Performance Rotunda: Music by Chris Parreira and Friends. William Thonson Gallery: “19th Annual Junque Arte Competition & Exhibition,” various artists, juried by SCRAP Humboldt. Atrium & Rotunda Gallery: Selections from the HAC permanent collection. Homer Balabanis Gallery: Humboldt Artist Gallery featuring representational and abstract paintings, prints, jewelry, photographs and ceramics. Anderson Gallery: “Night Meditations,” Wayne Jiang, paintings. Knight Gallery: “Numina,” Corey Drieth, paintings and drawings. Floyd Bettiga Gallery: “Meet Morris.” Youth Gallery: selected works from the Children’s Author and Illustrator Festival. 3. EUREKA THEATER 612 F St. Showing cartoons and serving popcorn. 4. REDWOOD ART ASSOCIATION 603 F St. “For the Love of Art and Architecture,” exhibition exploring structural shapes and design. 5a. MEGARA’S 521 Sixth St. Lauren Katz, animation art. 6. DALIANES 522 F St. Redwood Decorative Artists, decorative painting. 7. F ST. FOTO GALLERY at Swanlund’s Camera 527 F St. “Emerging Photographers,” Daniel Southard,

Brittney, Cathey-Adams, Chloe Hawkins, Mariah Sarabia, Rhianna Gallagher, Art Barab, Aaron Morris and Bryn Roberson. 7a. THE LOCAL 517 F St. Sergio Guzman, handcrafted bottle openers. 8. SACRED PALACE BOUTIQUE 516 Fifth St. Music by Ron Villagrana. 8a. EUREKA STUDIO ARTS 526 Fifth St. “Ghost Opera,” Brent Eviston, an ongoing project that explores crumpled paper. Eviston will also give a drawing demonstration. 9. MIKKIMOVES’ LIVING ROOM GALLERY 805 Seventh St. “small town: BIG ART,” Monica Topping, calendar launch and photos, including pieces from many of the featured artists. Calendar artists include Peggy Loudon, Rae Robison, Laurel Skye, Scott Hemphill, Scott Cocking, Elizabeth Berrien, Linda Wise, Christina Anastasia, Darin Mitchell, Duane Flatmo, Colin Vance and Matt Filar. A portion of sales will benefit the Arcata Arts Institute. Music by Ken Lawrence and Steve Smith of Dream Ticket. 10. EUREKA SPA AND SALON 601 Fifth St. Complimentary hair chalking, braiding, stress fix ritual. Artist TBA. 11. ROSE’S BILLIARDS 535 Fifth St. Music by Mark Hayes, acoustic guitar.

12. SEWELL GALLERY FINE ART 423 F St. “Oddworks,” Orr Marshall. John Motian, oil paintings. Music by Tim Randles Trio. Beverage service benefits Coast Grove School. 12a. NORTH COAST DANCE 426 F St. Costume sale. 13a. SIDEWALK GALLERY at Ellis Art and Engineering, 401 Fifth St. Rachel Grusin, mixed media. 14. AMIGAS BURRITOS 317 Fifth St. Winners of “Barns of Humboldt County” photo and art contest. Coffee shop side: “Ocean Scenes,” Vince Cavataio, photography. 14a. HUMBOLDT REPUBLICAN CENTRAL COMMITTEE 311 Fifth St. D. Nickleson Miller, wildlife paintings. 15. PRIMATE TATU 139 Fifth St. “Old School Art,” Michael Arneson. Also $25 cancer ribbon tattoos to raise money for childhood cancer research and care. 16. BAR FLY PUB AND GRUB 91 Commercial St. Marnie Schneider, artwork. Art from Kathleen Bryson’s private collection. 17. CHERI BLACKERBY GALLERY and THE STUDIO 272 C St. “Inter Galaxies,” Deanna Dutra, abstract acrylic paintings. 17a. C STREET STUDIOS & HALL GALLERY 208 C St. “Fabric Visions,” Dana Jones. 18. SAILOR’S GRAVE TATTOO 138 Second St. Tattoo related art, antiques and memorabilia. 18b. MANTOVA’S TWO ST. MUSIC 124 Second St. Music by Angel Fargas, guitarist. 18c. THE BLACK FAUN GALLERY 120 Second St. “Birds,” Allison Curtis, paintings. 19. STEVE AND DAVE’S First and C streets. Marni Schneider, photography. 19a. REDWOOD CURTAIN 220 First St. (Main Entrance Through Snug Alley). Sharon Millman, acrylic on canvas, landscape and portrait paintings, based on photographs of friends and family members. 19b. GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St. Ron Thompson, oils. 20. CHAPALA CAFE 201 Second St. Kylan Luken, photography. 20a. GOOD RELATIONS 223 Second St. Noelle Cox, oil paintings. 21. HUMBOLDT HERBALS 300 Second St. Carrie Elizabeth Wachter Martinez, acrylics. Live painting throughout the evening. Music by Ken Collins, acoustic guitar and vocals. 21a. FOREVER YOUNG 308 Second St. Sydney Visser, photographs. Refreshments and drawings. 22. THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Ste. 102 Scott Hemphill, sculptures. 22a. BRENDA TUXFORD GALLERY 325 Second St. “Maskibition,” annual juried show featuring performances and art masks. 22b. ALTERNATIVE BUILDING CENTER 325 Second St. “Motion and Light,” Jan Scurfield, photographs. Music by Kingfoot. 22c. RUSTIC WEST TRADING CO. 339 Second St. Glenda Noel, pottery. Katya Newman, wire art. Liz Farrell, jewelry. Christine Siverts, watercolors. 23. CIARA’S IRISH SHOP 334 Second St. Sam and Angela Lundeen, oil paintings. 24. CLARKE HISTORICAL MUSEUM Third and continued on next page

Hosting small works by Sonny Wong

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continued from previous page

E streets. “Humboldt State Turns 100,” new exhibit featuring Susie Baker Fountain and the first graduating class, HSU’s first Olympian Elta Cartwright, the Indian Teacher and Personnel Program and KHSU. 25. STUDIO 424 424 Third St. James Reid and Mark McKenna, photography. 26. SHIPWRECK 430 Third St. Dimitri Tokarsky, repurposed functional art. 27. CAFÉ NOONER 409 Opera Alley Jimmy Culian, photography. Music by The Living Rooms. 27a. CLARKE PLAZA Third and E streets. Live painters and dancers from Lighthouse Fortuna/Arcata, headed by Elizabeth Holloway. Music by Steve Clark and Denise Fraga, contemporary folk/rock. 28. HUMBOLDT BAYKEEPER 211 E St. “Lower Colorado River,” Cynthia Hooper. Music by Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers. 28a. RAMONE’S 209 E St. Alex Felt, watercolor, ballpoint pen and acrylic portraits. Music by Chicken Dinner, old timey cowboy music. 29. BOOKLEGGER 402 Second St. Stewart Moskowitz, book signing and original artwork for the children’s book Vincent van Goat. 30. TRUCHAS GALLERY/LOS BAGELS 403 Second St. “Dia de Los Muertos, Day of the Dead,” Greta Turney. 31. BELLE STARR 405 Second St. Paula Anderson. 31a. NORTH SOLES 407 Second St. Abbie Perrott, pastel watercolors. 32a. OLD TOWN SQUARE Humboldt Domestic Violence Services 33. HSU FIRST ST. GALLERY 422 First St. “Forest Invisible,” Young Suh, photographs.

“Eight Photographers from California’s North Coast: A Moment in Time,” Julie Clark, Ricardo Febré, Nicole Jean Hill, Vaughn Hutchins, Suk Choo Kim, Ellen Land-Weber, John Mahony and William S. Pierson. 34. BAYFRONT RESTAURANT F St. Plaza Richard Duning, paintings. 35. LIVING THE DREAM ICE CREAM #1 F St. Kathryn Stotler, mixed media. 36. EUREKA FABRICS 414 Second St. River Hughes, home decor and apparel. 37. THE LITTLE SHOP OF HERS 416 Second St. Harley Demarest, dark and spooky works Julie Clark’s eerie “Smile” is part of “A Moment in Time: for Halloween month. 37a. YARN 418 Second St. Allison Eight Photographers from California’s North Coast” at Jones Marsh, photographs. First Street Gallery. 38. TREASURE TROVE 420 Second St. Bongo, acrylic paintings. 39. NATURE GEAR 226 F St. Artwork from Studio S. 38a. EUREKA BOOKS 426 Second St. Friends of the 40. THE WINE SPOT 234 F St. Frank Speck, oil Library will have wine and books available for on canvas. sale from the Author Festival. 41. OLD TOWN JEWELERS 311 F St. Alan Sanborn’s 38b. RIVERBEND CELLARS & MORE 434 Second St. Critic Class. Sonny Wong, small works. 42. COCO & CUVEE 531 Third St. Jennifer 38c. MANY HANDS GALLERY 438 Second St. “Half Backman-Stone, acrylic on canvas, watercolor Embalmed: Anthropomorphic Taxidermy and and mixed media. Natural Curiosities,” Simone Smith. 43. DISCOVERY MUSEUM Corner of F and Third streets. Kids Alive program drop-off 5:30 p.m. Humbo to 8 p.m. Call for reservations 443-9694. ldt Bay 44. AMERICAN INDIAN ART GALLERY 241 F St. 34 OCTOBER 2013 Joseph Thompson Martinez, chain mail jewelry. 35 44a. OLD TOWN ART GALLERY 233 F St. Lisa 1st St 33 See Old Town Landis. Detail Map 44b. HUMBOLDT BAY COFFEE 526 Opera Alley. Snug Alley Romano Gazebo Shiek vs. Wong, artwork. Music by One Wise 22c Gabriel 32a 22 22a 22b 30 49 49a 50 50b 31 31a Sound, featuring Vidagua. to 58 2nd St 52 53 54 55 23 29 36 3737a3838a38b38c 47 21 21a 46. OLD TOWN COFFEE and CHOCOLATES 211 F St. 46 Imperial 28a Square 51 28 27 “Surrealistic Space Creatures,” Angie. Music by Opera Alley 44b 39 44a Soulful Sidekicks, acoustic duo. Clarke 39a 44 24 27a Plaza 42 56 40 43 47. OLD TOWN ANTIQUE LIGHTING Corner of to 57 3rd St 25 26 Second and F streets. “Let’s Eat,” Jan Hollander, 41 watercolor still life paintings. Humbo ld Bay 49a. FIVE ELEVEN 511 Second St.tRob Hampson, 34 large format oil paintings. Artwork 25% off dur4th St OCTOBER 2013 ing Arts Alive weekend. 35 DOWNTOWN 12 50. WOLF DAWG 525 to 1516 1st St 12b 19 19a 33 Second St. “Photo Wars,” OLD TOWN 10 11a 13a 14a 14 national winners thus Detail 5th St Snug Alley 8 8a far. Music by John David Romano Gazebo 7a 22c Gabriel Young Conspiracy. 32a 7 22a 22 22b 30 49 49a 50 50b 19b 20 20a 31 31a to 58 HARD50b. HUMBOLDT 2nd St 38c 38a 36 37a 6 18c 18b 52 53 54 55 47 23 29 37 38 38b 21 21a 5a 18 WARE 531 Second St. Lane 46 Imperial 28a 6th St Square 51 28 27 Thomsen, wood turning. 17a 4 Opera Alley 44b 39 44a 3 51. PARASOL ARTS 211 G St. Clarke 39a 44 Morris 27a 24 Plaza Thomas Hunt, mosaic art. Graves 172 42 56 40 43 Museum to paintings. 57 3rd St Andrew Daniel, to 9 500 ft 7th St 26

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52. HUMBOLDT BAY TOURISM CENTER Second and G streets. Linda Mitchell, paintings. 53. ORANGE CUP CORAL SALON 612 Second St. Rob Hampson, abstract oils. 54. PIANTE 620 Second St. “Water Ways,” Becky Evans, mixed media painting and sculpture. 55. SMUG’S PIZZA 626 Second St. Brandon Garland, pen and ink drawings. 56. ORIGIN DESIGN LAB 621 Third St. “Metal and Leather: Women’s Accessories.” Athena Rose Ortega’s Ruin and Redemption wearable art from up-cycled materials. Marnie Jane Cooper, designer for Jane Cooper and MarnieBugs. 57. STUDIO S 717 Third St. Artists’ choice. 58. ADORNI CENTER 1011 Waterfront St. Lisa Polack, photographs. Stephanie Pyne, mixed media. Mariana Krattiger, water and acrylic. Paul Rickard, watercolors. ●

Fortuna’s First Friday Oct. 4, 6-9 p.m. Find art, music and fun in downtown Fortuna on the first Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Artists interested in participating should contact fortunadowntown@ sbcgobal.net. BARTOW’S JEWELERS 651 12th St. Charles Fred Reed, photography. COAST CENTRAL CREDIT UNION 1814 Main St. Paula Anderson, Louise Bacon-Ogden, Haley Hicks, Paula Redtfledt, Abbie Perrott and Natalya Drew. Demonstrations, food and drink (ends at 7:30). DAKOTA’S DESIGNS 1040 Main St. Dakota Daetwiler, Bobbi Bennetzen and Richard Leamon, oils, acrylics, photography and live painting by Dakota Daetwiler. EEL RIVER BREWING COMPANY 1777 Alamar Way. Oktoberfest celebration with live German music. FORTUNA ART & OLD THINGS 1026 Main St. Elona Engelke, Halloween folk art. HOPPY’S FROYO 1551 Main St. Jan Carter, mural. Live music. L’S KITCHEN 734 10th St. TBA. MAIN STREET ART GALLERY & SCHOOL 1006 Main St. Chuck Bowden, portrait miniatures on polished clay poker chips. MCLEAN FOUNDATION 1336 Main St. Steve Helton, oil paintings. PRECISION INTERMEDIA 1012 Main St. Music by DJ2012. THE HUMBOLDT CORNER 899 Main St. Grand opening. Jed Stoll and Matt Cascio, live glassblowing. RAIN ALL DAY BOOKS 1136 Main St. Fortuna Art Council artists. STREHL’S FAMILY SHOES & REPAIR 1155 Main St. Redwood Decorative Artists from Eureka and Fortuna, paintings. TACO LOCO 955 Main St. Richard Leamon, oil paintings. ●

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Trinidad Art Night Friday, Oct. 4, 6-9 p.m. The last Trinidad Art Night of the year! 1. TRINIDAD TRADING COMPANY 460 Main St. Locally crafted art. Music by Kahish Kverda. 2. WINDANSEA 410 Main St. Local art and gifts. 3. TRINIDAD MUSEUM 400 Janis Court at Patricks Point Dr. “Large Baskets from the Permanent Collection,” and “Photographs of Native Americans of Northwest California.” Visual art by Lee Taylor Walashek, and J. Goldsborough. Music by Terrapin Breeze. 4. OCEAN GROVE 480 Patricks Point Drive. Afterparty! Music by Guns and Barrels and Likwefi, surf music. Doors open at 9 p.m. Admission $5. 5. CL LEATHERS 490 Trinity St. Music by Joe Garceau and Brett the Truck on the mobile stage. 6 TRINIDAD ART GALLERY 490 Trinity St. The gallery cooperative welcomes two new members, Patricia Sundgren Smith and Donvieve. Music by JD Jeffries and Michael Stewart. 7. SAUNDER’S PARK start of Patricks Point Drive. Fire dancing by Circus of the Elements

at 8:45 p.m. Bocce balls available at the museum and Salty’s. 8. THE LIGHTHOUSE GRILL 355 Main St. Chuck Vanderpool, California scenic photographs. 9. SALTY’S 322 Main St. Models presenting jewelry by Midori Designs and Essence Torres, as well as local fashion. Outside music and firepit. 10. THE EATERY 607 Parker St. Gus Clark, painting and mixed media. Douglas Beck, wood carving. Music by For Folks Sake. Appetizers. 11. TRINIDAD TOWN HALL 409 Trinity St. Christy Chandler presents “Mermaid Harvest” bath salts. Singing by Sahja Eden 6 p.m. Piano and vocals by Jerry Thompson 6:30 p.m. Hot blues by The Lost Dogs 7:30 p.m., followed by open mic. 12. BEACHCOMBER CAFE 363 Trinity St. Thao presents art by Trinidad students. Music by Howdy Emmerson, harp. 13. OCEAN WAVE HEALING ARTS STUDIO behind Beachcomber. TBA 14. SEASCAPE RESTAURANT AND PIER 1 Bay St. Jim Welsh, marine paintings. 15. TRINIDAD B&B 560 Edwards St. Sam Lundeen, Trinidad Landscapes. 16. MOONSTONE CROSSING 529 Trinity St. “Reid’s Weeds,” Kathy Reid. Wine Tasting. ●

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23

Are you in the

Huckleberry-Apple Pie

wedding

My mother’s famous huckleberryapple pie once earned $75 at an auction. It was worth every dollar. I risk temporary estrangement sharing her recipe, even though she’s confident that nobody can replicate her results. King or Golden Delicious Apples are a good place to start, and be sure to let the syrup soak into the apples before you cook the pie. And I’ve just lost out on Christmas presents for the next five years.

or

party biz? Be a part of the North Coast’s most complete wedding & party guide! 2014 edition hits newsstands in early January. Call 442-1400 to speak to a rep today.

Ingredients and method: Prepare pastry for a double crust pie and place the bottom crust in a pie pan.

I’m your huckleberry. Photo crediT Linda stansberry

Hounding for Huckleberries By Linda Stansberry

1 quart apples, peeled and sliced 1 pint huckleberries 1 1/2 to 2 cups sugar 1/4 cup tapioca 1/3 stick of butter Mix the fruit, sugar and tapioca in a bowl. Pour the filling into the unbaked piecrust, dot it with butter and cover it with the top crust. Bake the pie at about 375 F (Mom uses a wood stove) until the juice starts bubbling through the holes of the upper crust, about 20 minutes.

tabletalk@northcoastjournal.com

T

here is no shortage of huckleberry products out there: I have encountered huckleberry candy and huckleberry barbecue sauce, and last week I drank some huckleberry tea. They’re all disappointing. Nothing matches the taste of an actual, freshly picked huckleberry. These tiny blue-black orbs take forever to ripen, but they have a unique tangy-sweet flavor that makes them perfect for pies and other pastries. Huckleberry season is a time of day-long expeditions into the brush, of secret spots on hillsides where there’s just the right amount of sunshine to bring the fruit to fruition, of dodging poison oak and the occasional close encounter with a bear competing for our common prize. It’s a time when whole families gather around the day’s harvest — not to eat, but to begin the monotonous process of removing the tiny stems and leaves. Maybe it’s the sheer hard work that goes into harvesting huckleberries that makes them so delicious. Through centuries of pop culture, the word “huckleberry” has been synonymous with a certain type of American character: wild and unrefined yet undeniably charming. Think Huckleberry Finn or Huckle-

24 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

berry Hound. Huckleberries are hicks. But they’re the kind of hicks you want to have as neighbors. And they are everywhere! Nothing seems to grow as prolifically as huckleberry brush. It’s some of the first vegetation to show up after an area’s been burned, and it specializes in growing on steep hillsides that force you to perform yoga poses when you pick. Huckleberry brush is no treat to wade through, either. Its branches are stiff and wiry and stubborn — they both whip against your arms and tangle up your feet. Ticks are omnipresent. You return home scratched and sunburnt and with what is often a paltry prize for your efforts. I was both intrigued and skeptical, therefore, when presented with a fancy “huckleberry harvester.” The device is plastic and metal, with looped tines resembling a bear’s claw, and a scoop underneath. While the idea of scooping up berries rather than pinching them one by one from the bush was exciting, I had little doubt that it would increase the amount of leaves and debris in the harvest. I took the harvester out to Manila, where bushes line the path between the gun range and the Ma-le’l Dunes area. Coastal berries are larger and ripen

earlier in the year, but they are also rather mealy and lack the inimitable tanginess of their inland cousins. For novice pickers, it should be noted that huckleberries in Humboldt often grow alongside twinberries, also known as bearberry honeysuckle. Huckleberries have deep green, waxy leaves while twinberries’ leaves are lighter, resembling those of a raspberry. Huckleberries are delicious. Twinberries are poisonous. If you’re not sure — don’t pick it! To my great surprise, the harvester was a success! The claw slid neatly along the branches of the bush and popped the berries off one by one, leaving most of the leaves. Within in an hour I had come close to filling my little plastic container. Granted, the harvester didn’t distinguish from the ripe, the almost ripe and the green, and there were still plenty of leaves and pine needles in my bounty, but I was impressed! I took the huckleberries back to my friends’ house where (after rinsing them) I proudly offered them up for dessert. They were a little dismayed at having to pick out the leaves themselves, but what do you want? This hick has better things to do. l

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50% OFF

50% OFF

LITTLE CHIEF ELECTRIC SMOKER

121776

ALL OUTSIDE GARDEN PLANTS

ALL FOUNTAINS

The new SodaStream Fizz takes home soda making to the next level. Make sparkling water for 25 cents per liter and soda for 25 cents per can. 30 flavors. Ready in 30 seconds. Fizz’s digital Fizz Chip monitors CO2 left in the carbonator and carbonation levels. Contents: SodaStream Fizz home soda maker, Reusable CO2 carbonator (makes approx. 60L). Reusable BPA-free carbonating bottle. SodaStream Sodamix Sampler Pack (6 regular and 6 diet sodamix trial sized samples). Red (124647) Metal White (133649) Blue (124648) Silver (124647) $ 99

REG. $799 99

CAST IRON DUTCH OVEN 12QT (125600) REG. $99.9 .......... SALE $46.99 ... That’s $53 OFF! CAST IRON RED SPECK 12QT DUTCH (125599) REG. $99.99 .......... SALE $46.99 ... That’s $53 OFF! CAST IRON RED SPECK 15.5” FRY PAN (125593) REG. $89.99 .......... SALE $34.99 ... That’s $55 OFF! CAST IRON 6PC SET (125614) REG. $69.99 .......... SALE $41.99 ... That’s $28 OFF!

TRAEGER WOOD PELLET TEXAS GRILL 36,000 BTU’s. 646 square inches of cooking space (19” x 34”). High tech auger fed burner. Electric auto start ignition. Multi-position digital thermostat control. EZ drain grease system. Durable powder coat finish. Assembled dimensions: 49”H x 59”W x 22” D (8306367)

SALE $89988 REG. $1,019 99

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, oct. 3, 2013

25

YOUR CANNING HEADQUARTERS

NESCO SNACKMASTER ENCORE FOOD DEHYDRATOR 500 watts. 4 trays. Patented Converga-flow drying system forces air down the exterior of the trays. No need to rotate trays. Top mount fan. Adjustable thermostat. Expandable to 12 trays. Includes: 1 fruit roll up sheet, recipe and instruction booklet. (6192298)

THE ALL-AMERICAN PRESSURE COOKER 15.5 QT 915 Features professional

quality, extra heavy duty cast aluminum construction. Geared steam gauge. Stay-cool bakelite top handle. Pressure regulator weight with settings of 5, 10 and 15 psi. Smooth, easy to clean satin finish. (125021)

$

73

SALE 206 $

Off

99

SALE 67 $

REG. $79 99

NESCO/AMERICAN HARVEST SNACKMASTER ADDA-TRAY REG. $15.99 ............................................. SALE $11.99 NESCO/AMERICAN HARVEST ADD-A-TRAY COOKING TRAYS REG. $26.99 ....................... SALE $18.99

FOOD DEHYDRATOR VEGIKILN 6 TRAY

REG. $279 99

PRESTO PRESSURE CANNER & COOKER

120933

23 qt. Deluxe pressure gauge. Capacity 24 half pints, 20 pints, 7 quarts. Includes canning, cooking rack $ and instruction/recipe book. (68534) $ 99

SALE 16399 $

SALE 10999

REG. $199 99

REG. 129

KERR MASON JARS Box of 12, half pint (8 oz) wide mouth jars. Includes jars, bands, lids and directions for home canning. (62495)

BALL MASON JARS Box of 12, pint (16 oz) Includes bands and dome lids. (62295)

SALE $999 REG. $12 99

SALE $999 REG. $11 59

CANNER 33QT Ceramic on steel. Includes cover and rack. Lifetime limited warranty. Complies with OSHA and EPA. (62275)

WESTON HEAVY DUTY 9” FOOD SLICER High quality, 8 5/8” rotary stainless steel blade. Stainless Steel food tray tilts out for easy cleaning. Removable blade for easy cleaning. Quiet running motor. Corrosion resistant coated steel and aluminum housing. Adjustable thickness control. Sturdy base and suction cup feet. Food pusher with teeth for controlled slicing. On/Off Safety Switch. (12092)

BALL FRESH PRESERVING KIT 21 quart enameled water bath canner. Holds up to 7 quart jars. Includes chrome plated canning rack, a 4-piece utensil set with jar lifter, lid lifter, funnel and $ 99 bubble remover and headspace tool. Blue porcelain REG. $74 99 color. (6187850)

SALE $13599 REG. $169 99

Professional quality electric meat grinder for home use. Brushed stainless steel meat grinder housing. Die cast Waring Pro meat grinder hopper. Easy on/off switch with reverse function. Powerful 500 watt Waring Pro motor. Three meat grinder cutting plates: fine, medium, and coarse. 2 meat grinder sausage attachments. 5 year motor warranty. (6058150)

REG. $45 99

SALE $8799

SALE 63

REG. $103 99

BALL STAINLESS STEEL WATER BATH 21 QT .7” Canner. 21 quart capacity. Holds up to 7 quart jars. Tempered glass lid with two steam vents. Silicone covered handles. Includes canning rack that holds small and large jars. (6187876)

SALE $7599 REG. $84 99

MEAT GRINDER MANUAL #22 6183446 SALE $49.99 FREEZER TAPE DISPENSER 214858 SALE $11.99 SAUSAGE CASING 38 MM EDIBLE 124862 SALE $33.99

FOX RUN FOOD PRESS WITH PEDESTAL PRESS FOOD

#10 MEAT GRINDER 3PC FUNNEL KIT 124869 SALE $9.99 SAUSAGE CASING 19MM EDIBLE 124860 SALE $31.99 MAHOG CASING 2.5” X 20” FIBROUS 124864 SALE $27.99

GUN BEEF JERKY KIT 6167878

SALE 23 $

SALE $1899

99

REG. $23 99

REG. $27 99

NORPRO SAUCE MASTER 1951 For vegetables, fruits, and purees. Includes recipe and instruction booklet. Hopper size: 8 in. diameter x 3 in. deep. 90 oz. capacity. (127440)

SALE 49 $

99

REG. $61 99

ORIGINAL JERKY SPICE $6.99 JERKY GUN JR REPLACE TERIYAKI JERKY SPICE 6PK TUBES 124866 SALE $11.99 6132781 SALE $6.99 JERKY GUN REPLACE HOT & SPICY JERKY SPICE TUBES 124865 SALE $14.99 6PK 6062418 SALE $6.99

26 North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Canning is no more difficult than many other types of food preparation, and it allows you to enjoy the delicious flavors of fresh produce all year long. Grow your own, or buy locally; you’ll be able to lower your grocery bills, support sustainable lifestyles, and manage your family’s nutrition all at the same time. It’s a great way to be creative in the kitchen as well! In just a few easy steps, this guide will teach you the simple art of canning.

PREPARING THE JARS

Visually examine your glass preserving jars and two-piece caps. Wash the jars, lids, and bands in hot soapy water. Rinse well. Dry bands. Heat the jars and lids in hot water until ready to use (do not boil). Jars need to be hot to prevent breakage when hot food is added. Lids need to be hot to activate the sealing compound. However, boiling lids will cause seal failure. Leave bands at room temperature for easy handling.

PREPARING THE CANNER

Boiling Water Canner (for high-acid foods such as tomatoes, fruit, and pickles). Fill half full with hot water. Keep water at a simmer, covered with lid, until ready to use. Steam Pressure Canner (for low-acid foods such as vegetables and meats). Fill with 3” to 4” of hot water. Keep water at a simmer until ready to use. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for further information.

PREPARING THE RECIPE

Always start with a current tested recipe. Prepare recipe as stated–do not make changes. Adding or changing ingredients can affect pH and heat penetration. However, you can safely add dry spices or flavored oils.

FILLING THE JARS

WARING PROFESSIONAL MEAT GRINDER

SALE $3899

3 pc. set includes: press, stand and pestle. Stainless steel & wood pestle. (62291)

99

STEP-BY-STEP CANNING

6PK 6132724 SALE

Ladle the hot food into hot jars, leaving the appropriate headspace as specified below. Headspace is the space between the top of the food product and the top of the jar. 1” for low-acid foods (vegetables, meats, seafood, and poultry). 1/2” for high-acid foods (fruits, tomatoes, pickles, and salsa). 1/4” for fruit juices and soft spreads (jams, jellies, marmalades, etc.). Incorrect Headspace: Too much headspace will result in less vacuum. Too little headspace may result in food being forced under the lid. Fill jars one at a time to maintain correct Initial Temperature. Initial Temperature (IT) is the temperature of the food when it is ladled into a jar and immediately capped. IT is a factor for heat penetration and is critical for product sterility. Filling and capping jars in an assemblyline fashion causes the product to drop below the required fill/ cap temperature. Insufficient IT could lead to an unsafe product. Remove air bubbles. Run a nonmetallic spatula between food and jar. Press back gently on food to expel air bubbles. Repeat 2 to 3 times around jar. Air bubbles around food pieces may not be readily visible. Failure to remove air bubbles will increase headspace and cause insufficient vacuum.

CAPPING THE JARS

Wipe rim and threads of jar with a clean, damp cloth. Center hot lid on jar, allowing sealing compound to come in contact with the jar rim. Apply band and adjust until fit is “fingertip tight.” Bands only function to hold the lid in place. If band torque is too tight, the lid will not vent properly. If band torque is too loose, the lid will not be held tight enough to the jar to make a proper seal.

HEAT PROCESSING

Place filled, sealed jars on rack. Place rack into canner. Process for method and time indicated on current, tested recipe, adjusting for altitude. Correct time and temperature are important to ensure a safely preserved food product. Boiling Water Canner Method Lower rack of filled, sealed jars into water. Be sure jars and caps are covered by 1” to 2” of water. Bring water to a gentle, steady boil. Process for the time indicated in recipe. Upon completion of processing, turn off heat and remove lid. Let jars stand for 5 minutes. Steam Pressure Canner Method Lock lid into place. Bring water to a boil. Once a steady stream of steam is escaping from the vent pipe, vent for 10 minutes. Place weight on vent. Bring pressure to 10 lbs (at or below 1,000 feet altitude). Process for time indicated in recipe. Upon completion of processing, turn off heat. Let pressure return to 0 naturally, then wait 2 minutes. Open vent and remove canner lid. Let jars rest for 10 minutes.

SEALING

Remove jars from canner and set upright on dry towel to cool. Do not retighten bands–it may interfere with the seal. Let jars cool, undisturbed, for 12 to 24 hours. Check seal. Lids should not flex up and down when center is pressed. Remove bands and try to lift lids off with fingertips. If the lid cannot be lifted off, it has a good seal.

STORING

Clean jars and lids. Remove bands for storage. Label each jar. Store in a cool, dry, dark place for up to 1 year. Content provided by Ball Canning

“Bring your painting projects inside!” -Zarron

ACE ROYAL LATEX INTERIOR FLAT WALL PAINT (1964824) REG. $23.99 Sale $21.88

ACE ROYAL LATEX INTERIOR EGGSHELL WALL PAINT (1969146) REG. $26.99 Sale $24.88 ACE ROYAL LATEX INTERIOR SATIN WALL PAINT (1964667) REG. $26.99 Sale $24.88 ACE ROYAL LATEX SEMI GLOSS INTERIOR WALL & TRIM (1965425) REG. $27.99 Sale $25.88 1 GALLON. ULTRA WHITE BASE. INTERIOR USE ONLY. 25 YEAR DURABILITY. EXCEPTIONAL SPATTER RESISTANCE. EXCELLENT ADHESION. WASHABLE/STAIN-RESISTANT. NON-YELLOWING/NON-TOXIC. SOAP AND WATER CLEAN-UP.

SPRAY & FORGET ROOF CLEANER CONCENTRATE 1 Gal. Makes up to 10 gallons. Removes roof algae (black streaks) and moss. No rinsing required. Biodegradable. Contains no bleach, hydroxides (Lye) or acid. (1307776)

SALE $3999 REG. 42 $

DQB DRIVEWAY APPLICATOR BRUSH

Is your asphalt driveway cracked, faded, stained, or otherwise not complementing the beauty of your home? Close up those cracks and give it a nice, fresh, black “just like new” appearance again.

30 SECONDS OUTDOOR CLEANER 1 Gal. Cleans algae, moss, mold, and mildew growth and the spores. Sodium hypochlorite (bleach), biodegradable $ 99 surfactants, trisodium phosphate. (7130834)

SALE 10 REG. $13 99

ACE DECK/FENCE/ PATIO SPRAYER

SALE 21 $

99

REG. $24 99

SPRAY & FORGET 32 oz. Algae stain remover. For use on walkways, patios, flower pots, brick, siding, stucco, and more. (1307784)

1

Remove weeds, rocks, dirt, and other obstructions from cracks in the asphalt.

2

Fill large holes using blacktop patch and filler

3

Clean oil off of driveway with the oil cleaner if you have stubborn stains.

4

Apply the asphalt cleaner like ACE BLACKTOP & CONCRETE CLEANER.

5

Thoroughly pressure-wash the surface. Wait until driveway is completely dry.

6

Use a driveway squeegee to apply BLACK JACK DRIVE COTE SEALER.

Moss, mold, mildew and algae stain remover. ½ gal. Makes 3 gallons. Covers 375-1125 sq. ft. California compliant. Cleans exterior surfaces with no pressure washing, scrubbing or rinsing required. Non-caustic, non$ 99 acidic, non- bleach formula (1409036)

SALE 22 REG. $26 99

CWF-UV CLEAR WOOD FINISH WITH UV RESISTANCE 1 Gal. Natural Tone (Clear). Restores natural beauty to weathered wood. Protects against sun and moisture. Mildew resistant finish. Soap and water cleanup. 4 year warranty on siding and 2 years $ 99 on decks. (1226729)

SALE $1299 REG. $14 99

SALE $599 REG. $8 49

3M WOODWORKING, SANDING, AND FIBERGLASS RESPIRATOR

1 Gal. For fences, decks & siding. A clear, penetrating finish that protects exterior wood from water damage. (1260843)

SALE 23 $

REG. $27 99

99

Driveway filler & sealer. 4.75 Gal. Renews the look of the driveway. Contains sand particles to help fill in small cracks in the surface. Enhanced with $ latex for durability Lasts 5 years. (1392059) $ 99

SALE 1999

BLACK JACK DRIVE-MAXX 700 Gel driveway filler and sealer. 4.75 Gal. 7 years durability. No-stir gel formula. Renews blacktop surfaces. Latex enhanced for longer life. Contains sand particles to fill in small cracks Coal tar free. (1436955)

SALE $2399 REG. $30 99

ACE BLUE CLEAN PRESSURE WASHER ELECTRIC 1600 Psi. Easy to use, safety lock trigger gun. Easy to handle. Easy to store. (1408269)

SALE $6999

For woodworking jobs, sanding and for fiber glass insulation projects. 95% filtration efficiency against solid & liquid aerosols that do not contain oil. Cool flow valve for easy breathing & cool dry comfort. NIOSH approved N95. Carded. (2109072)

BLACK JACK CRACK-STOP Elastomeric crack filler. 3.6 Quarts. Expands and contracts with driveway surface. Fills cracks $ 99 1/2” to 3/4” wide. Won’t track in summer REG. $13 99 temperatures. (1439645)

SALE $599

SALE 10

REG. $8 99

SALE 22 CWF-OIL EXTERIOR CLEAR WOOD FINISH

BLACK JACK DRIVE KOTE 500

REG. 25

2 pack. Protects against lung damaging dust, silica, insulation and plastic dusts. Approved by N10SH/MSHA. Carded. Discovery CON, NBR, SUP, EXP. (22079)

WET & FORGET

REG. $10 99

1 Gal. Heavy duty, ready to use product for effective cleaning of asphalt and concrete driveways. (17431)

3M SANDING RESPIRATOR MASK

REG. $19 99

SALE $799

ACE BLACKTOP AND CONCRETE CLEANER

RESEAL THAT BLACKTOP, HERE’S THE SUPPLIES TO DO IT RIGHT!

SALE $1599

REG. $25 99

18” wide head. 48” vinyl coated metal handle. 2” palmyra bristles. Built in squeegee. Wood block. (12468)

Here’s How:

99

2 Gal. Includes Total Spray Control shield. Includes 3 nozzles-fine, medium and coarse. (1008176)

HURRY, BEFORE THE WEATHER GETS RAINY

ACE SUPREME 6 PIECE TRAY SET WITH TEFLON Includes 2 Ace Supreme 3/8” nap roller covers, Supreme 2” angle sash paintbrush, Trimline Edger, 5 wire roller frame, and a deep well red plastic tray. 1309715

SALE $1199 REG. $14 99

QUIKRETE COMMERCIAL GRADE BLACKTOP PATCH 50 lb. bag. High performance asphalt cold patch specifically formulated for permanent repairs to potholes and cracks over 1” wide in asphalt pavement. D.O.T. approved. 56 bags per pallet. Receive a 11% discount with purchase of pallet. (5401310)

SALE $1099 REG. $12 99

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, oct. 3, 2013

27

Don’t forget to check out our web page at www.mckinleyvilleace.com for a calendar of all our live events, demonstrations & classes.

LIVE EVENTS CALENDAR OCT. 4TH 11AM-2PM

BACONFEST BACON DIPPING UNIQUE COMBINATIONS.

Ever try bacon with chocolate? It may surprise you! Join the fun with Patty and get a special event discount pricing from our housewares dept.

OCT 12TH 11AM & 3PM

ZWILLING J.A. HENCKELS KNIFE SKILLS TRAINING

Sign up at mckinleyvilleace.com or in our store. $20 Registration for class & receive $20 Instore purchase credit towards a Zwilling J.A. Henckels knife purchase.

OCT. 5TH

OCT. 12TH 1PM

BACON FEST

Come join us at the Blue Lake Bacon Fest & get special in-store savings deals!

OCT 5TH 1PM

BISON GROW “HOW TO SUPERCHARGE YOUR SOIL” by David Reynoza

Learn how to supercharge your soil & what makes Bison Grow work so well. Special fantastic pricing on Bison Grow at the show!

OCT. 12TH 1PM

YES I CAN, CANNING SENIMAR by Marlene from The Kitchen Store

BISON GROW “HOW TO SUPERCHARGE YOUR SOIL”

NOV 2ND ALL DAY

INTERIOR PAINTING & DRYWALL REPAIR DEMO

by the Magficent Zarron

NOV 16TH 11AM-3PM

SAUCE SAMPLING

by Sweet Mamma Janisse of Bless My Soul Café. www.sweetmamajanisse.com

by David Reynoza

Learn how to supercharge your soil & what makes bison grow work so well. Special fantastic pricing on bison grow for at show!

OCT 19TH 12, 1PM & 3PM

PATTY CAKES IS BACK.

This time she is making apple pies the Patty Cakes way special. Yumm!

NOV 16TH

WEBER, BBQ TURKEY COOKING By Weber Company.

OCT. 26TH 11AM-3PM

COOKIE DECORATING

With Edie Baker, owner of EdeBee’s Sweet Treats & More. Join the fun, enjoy the goodness!

NOV 23RD ALL DAY

POULTRY & PORK COOKING DEMO

By KC of Word Of Mouth BBQ

NOV. 2ND 1PM & 3PM

COOKIE DECORATING

Patty Cakes is back with stuffed pork tenderloin.

2197 Central Ave, McKinleyville, CA 95519

839-1587 HUMBOLDT’S HELPFUL HOME CENTER

28 North Coast Journal • Thursday, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

www.McKinleyvilleAce.com

southeast asian cuisine

Thai • Lao • Vietnamese corner of 4th & L Eureka • 443-2690

OPEN

5-

at. n.-S o M .• 10 p.m

• We cater, too! •

Ch

err

yB

los

som

Beer & Sake on 18th St., between G & H, Northtown Arcata 826-1988

Dear Humboldt,

What’s your food crush? Share it on Instagram and then share it with us! Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com or tag #humplate.

Yours always, NCJ

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013

29

clubs concerts cafés

ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue BLUE LAKE CASINO WAVE LOUNGE 777 Casino Way, 668-9770 CENTRAL STATION 1631 Central, McK 839-2013 CHER-AE HEIGHTS FIREWATER LOUNGE 27 Scenic Dr., Trinidad 677-3611 CLAM BEACH INN 839-0545 4611 Central Ave., McK THE FORKS Willow Creek (530) 629-2679 LOGGER BAR 668-5000 510 Railroad Ave. Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 668-5680 OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad SILVER LINING 839-0304 3561 Boeing Ave. McK

HAPPY HOUR Mon.-Sat. 4-6pm

$2 12 oz. beer $2 OFF Sake $ 1 OFF Small Plates

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm

fri 10/4 sat 10/5 northern humboldt | willow creek Simple Creation (reggae/rock) 9pm-1am FREE

S.I.N. & Service Night w/Accurate Productions DJs 9pm FREE

Vintage Rock N’ Soul (R&B/dance) 9pm FREE

Vintage Rock N’ Soul (R&B/dance) 9pm FREE

m-t-w 10/7-9

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm

[M] Buddy Reed & the Rip It Ups (dancy blues) 8pm FREE

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm FREE

[T] Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm FREE

Kindred Spirits 10:30pm Jenni & David and the Sweet Soul Band (funk/blues) 9pm FREE Marching Lumberjacks Gunsafe Peeping Thomas 45th Reunion Jam 7pm FREE (face-melt country) 9pm FREE 9pm FREE

Jimi Jeff’s Open Jam 8:30pm

Matt Pless & Francie Moon (Maryland folk punk) 6pm

Guns and Barrels w/Likwefi 9pm $5 Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm-midnight FREE DJ Itchie Fingaz 9pm FREE

Pressure Anya DJ Duo (Top 40) 9pm FREE

The Movers & the Shakers 9pm FREE

Open Mic w/Jerry Thompson, Mark Noyes, et al. 6-10pm FREE Roystorm Hayotis & Joanne Rand (meditative rock) 9pm $10

2013

TRINIDAD TOWN HALL 409 Trinity St. WESTHAVEN CNTR ARTS 501 Westhaven Dr., 677-9493

24th Anniversary Party w/The Hill 6pm

Have you voted? Voting closes Monday, Oct. 7 at 5 p.m.

See

sun 10/6

Karaoke w/DJ Marv 9pm Free

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave., McK 839-7580

reservations recommended 475 I STREET • ARCATA 822-2241

HUMBOLDT

thur 10/3

Find live music and more!

PAGE 7 or

northcoastjournal.com

2013 Humboldt County Fair Results 2012 Chardonnay DOUBLE GOLD, BEST OF SHOW WHITE 2010 Cabernet Sauvignon GOLD 2009 il montaggio (Italian blend) GOLD 2010 Sangiovese GOLD

WOOHOO!

YOU’RE THE BEST!

Award-winningwines wines since since 1976 1976 Award-winning

4241 Fieldbrook Road, Fieldbrook

839-4140

www.fieldbrookwinery.com

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

[T] Dogbone (feral jazz) 6pm FREE, Ben Rice Brando (American) w/ (American roots) 5-7pm FREE [W] Cynthia Alysia Gibbs 6pm FREE [M] Rude Lion Dancehall Mondayz 9pm $5 [T] Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm-midnight FREE [M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm, Trivia Night 8pm FREE [T] Sunny Brae Jazz 8pm, [W] Dogbone (feral jazz) 8pm

DISCOUNT TURKEY BAGS

continued on next page

venue THE ALIBI 744 9th St., 822-3731 ARCATA COMM. CNTR 321 Dr. MLK Jr. Pkwy, 839-7063 ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 9th St., 822-1575

thur 10/3

fri 10/4

arcata

sat 10/5

sun 10/6

m-t-w 10/7-9

Ancient Warlocks w/Greco (Euro-pop) 10:30pm $5 Folklife Singalong/Joel’s Song Circle 7-10pm FREE

John Elliott w/Eleanor Murray (album release) 8pm $10/$8/$6 Leftover Salmon (bluegrass/rock) 8pm $25

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St., 822-1220 BAYSIDE GRANGE 2297 Jacoby Crk Rd., 442-0156 BLONDIES Open Mic 7pm FREE 420 E. California Ave. CAFE BRIO 791 8th St. CRUSH 1101 H St., 825-0390 FULKERSON RECITAL HALL, HSU 1 Harpst St., Arcata Bronze Radio Return HUMBOLDT BREWS (American roots) 9:30pm $10 856 10th St. 826-2739

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm FREE

Sara Milonovich & Greg Gambetta Anderson of Daisycutter (ItalianBeppe acoustic) 8pm $12/$10 [T] Claudia Quintet 8pm $15/$10 (fiddler/guitar) 8pm $12/$10 Random Rab w/Cedar Miller & Sci Fi Night A Bucket of Blood Little People 9:30pm $25/$20 (1959) 7:30pm FREE Music Project: Open Play 5-7pm, Wind Instruments 7-9pm

Murder Americana 8pm Lemon Lemon Cherry 6:30pm FREE

Jazz Night 7pm FREE

REDWOOD RAKS 824 L St., 616-6876

Blues Night (lessons/dance) 8-10pm $5

550 S. G St. Suite 14 (Back Door) • Arcata (707) 382-0948 • Open M-F 10am to 5pm

(Located in Bayside Industrial Center – Southeast Corner)

Ishe Dube Mr. Music CD Release Paty 9pm

Pine Hearts 8pm (alt. bluegrass from Olympia)

[T] Game Night (boardgames) 5pm FREE [T] Van Cliburn Gold Medalist (classical piano) 8pm $45/$25/$15

HSU Symphonic Band & Jazz Orchestra 8pm $8/$5

JAMBALAYA 915 H St., 822-4766 MOSGO’S 2461 Alliance Rd. REDWOOD CURTAIN BREW 550 South G St., 826-7222

[M] Quiz Night 7pm FREE

[M] The Getdown (local funk) 7pm, [T] BA-DUM-CHH Comedy Open Mic 9pm $3, [W] Worth w/Small Axe Ensemble 9pm [W] Jay Dancing Bear (acoustic) 5pm FREE

DGS: Sundaze (EDM DJs) 9pm $5 Open Mic 7pm

King Corduroy (Southern Soul) 9pm FREE 1st Friday Folk Dance Party 7:30pm $5

Redwood Coast Belly Dance Festival

@ncj_of_humboldt

[M] Trivia Night 8pm [M[ Swing (lessons/dance) 7-10pm $5, [T] West Aftrican Dance w/live drumming 5:30-7pm

Redwood Coast Belly Dance Festival

Fine Wines Fine Wines

Spirits

Beer

Soda

Spirits

Beer

northcoastjournal

Soda

Premium Tobacco

Premium Tobacco

DOWNTOWN PLAZA 786 9TH STREET ARCATA

NORTHTOWN

(right over the footbridge)

1644 G STREET • ARCATA • 822-1865

Daily Drink Specials

Restaurant 8am -11pm

Live music every Saturday night

Russian Standard VODKA

19

$

99

1.75 Liter 2 1 + O N LY

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013

31

$2

venue

thur 10/3

fri 10/4

sat 10/5

sun 10/6

ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. 826-WINE

Anna Hamilton (folk/blues) 9pm FREE

DJ Gobi (spinning vinyl) 9pm FREE

Aaron Kimball 9pm FREE

Open Mic Sundays w/Chris Parreira 7pm sign up/8pm FREE

Rude Lion Sound: Krunk & Hip Hop 10pm $2

DJ Music 10pm $2

Sidelines Saturdays w/Rude Lion 10pm $2 DJ Music 10pm

SIDELINES Arcata Plaza 822-0919 TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza

DJ Itchie Fingaz (glitch & hip hop) 9pm FREE

VAN DUZER THEATRE, HSU

CARTER HOUR Mon-Fri, 4-6pm ½ off bar menu 5-6pm www.carterhouse.com

Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell 8pm $65/$35

NEW & USED

HBG GLASS

All HBG GLASS pieces 15% off for the entire month of October

ARCATA  987 H ST.  707-822-3090  BAYSHORE MALL  707-476-0400 WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM EUREKA

Locally Blown Glass

Humboldt Hoodies • Hats • Beanies • Tshirts

Featured Artist:

m-t-w 10/7-9

[M] Roots & Culture Reggae w/DJ Tu Aura 9pm FREE, [T] Chubritza (folk) 9pm [W] Salsa! (lessons/dance) 9pm $5 [W] Dancehall Wednesdayz 10pm FREE

eureka

The Last Match BAR-FLY PUB Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm (classic rock) 9pm FREE 91 Commercial, 443-3770 The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) CHAPALA CAFÉ 6-8pm 6-8pm 443-9514 CUTTEN INN 3980 Walnut Dr., Eureka The Redwood Dixie-Gators DALIANES (New Orleans Jazz) 6pm 522 F St., Eureka 445-3245 Shugafoot Tango Dancing Late Night w/Sherae ft. Space EUREKA INN - PALM LOUNGE (jazz emsemble) 9pm FREE (live piano/DJ) 8pm FREE Biscuit & No Covers 9pm FREE 518 7th St. 497-6093 Seabury Gould & Evan Mordan Pappa Paul Charlie Sweet GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB (Irish) 7pm FREE (folk) 7pm FREE (folk/originals) 7pm FREE 139 2nd St. Eureka LIL’ RED LION 1506 5th St., 444-1344 Chris Parreira & Friends MORRIS GRAVES MUSEUM 6-9pm FREE 636 F St., 442-0278 Dirty Thursday w/Pressure Electric Gravy’s Hip Hop NOCTURNUM Anya DJ Duo 9:30pm FREE Open MIc 9pm 206 W. 6th St., 498-7388 The Soulful Sidekicks OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. Jenni & David and the Sweet Soul Band (funk/blues) 7pm FREE (acoustic electro) 7pm FREE 211 F St. 445-8600

www.wildwood.ws

*LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER

HBG • ROOR • Illadelph • Vaporizers

Deadline is noon Monday

ENTERTAINMENT GRID continued from previous page

MARTINI*

Submit your events online!

clubs concerts cafés

Restaurant 301 & Carter House Inns 301 L St, Eureka (707) 444-8062

Folk Instruments Books & Accessories

[W] Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm

[T] Dale Winget (acoustic) 6pm FREE [M] No Covers (jazz improv) 8pm FREE [W] Ginger - Soulful Sidekicks 7pm FREE [W] Karaoke 9pm FREE

[W] Doing Damage Tour (EDM DJs) 10pm $8 [W] Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 6:30-8:30pm FREE

Happy Hour 4-6 Tues.-Sun. with

Daily Specials Lunch • Dinner We Have fun in the bar

Proudly accepting

Eureka High Logger Card & St. Bernard’s Crusader Discount Card! Buy any X-Large or Jumbo Pizza at full price,

get Medium 2-topping FREE! 1604 4th & Q Sts. • 444-9681 • biglouiespizza.com

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

OLD TOWN EUREKA 516 2nd St. 443-3663 www.oberongrill.com

venue

PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St., 444-2017 RED LION HOTEL’S LOUNGE 4th & V St., 445-0844 ROSE’S BILLIARDS 191 Truesdale St., 407-3550 SHAMUS T BONES 191 Truesdale St., 407-3550 THE SHANTY 213 3rd St., 444-2053 THE SIREN’S SONG 325 2nd St., 442-8778

thur 10/3

fri 10/4

F.L.I.R.T. w/DJ Morgan D’Vinity 9pm

sat 10/5

sun 10/6

m-t-w 10/7-9

DJ Jsun 10pm Chris Clay’s Karaoke 9pm-1am FREE Mark Hayes (acoustic) 6pm FREE

Falling Rocks (roots/swing) 7:30pm FREE

THE SPEAKEASY BAR 411 Opera Alley 444-2244 ANGELINA INN 725-5200 281 Fernbridge Dr., Fortuna Karaoke w/Chris Clay BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 8pm FREE 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta CECIL’S BISTRO 923-7007 773 Redwood Dr., Garberville EEL RIVER BREWERY 725-2739 ERB-I-N-G-O 7pm FREE 1777 Alamar Way, Fortuna MATEEL COMM. CNTR 59 Rusk Ln., Redway, 923-3368 Outlaw Stance PERSIMMONS GALLERY (ragtime/bluegrass) 7pm FREE Garberville, 923-2748 RIVERWOOD INN 943-3333 2828 Ave. Giants, Phillipsville ROHNER PARK 11th & N St., Fortuna, 845-4995

Does your business have a happy hour?

[M] T-Bone Shuffle Open Mic Jam w/Jim Lahman Band 7pm FREE [W] Nik Turner w/White Manna & CV 9pm $7 The Pine Hearts (bluegrass) 9pm FREE All Ages

LaPatina’s w/Jeff DeMark 9pm FREE

Shugafoot (jazz ensemble) 9:30pm FREE

Buddy Reed & the Rip It Ups (blues) 9pm FREE

eel river | southern humboldt

[M] Lemon Lemon Cherry (folkjazz) 7pm FREE [T] Shugafoot (jazz ensemble) 7pm FREE, [W] No Covers (jazz) & friends 7pm FREE

Anna Hammilton (blues) 5pm Loren & the Roustabouts 9pm

The Journal’s Cocktail Compass is a FREE app, available for iPhone and Android phones. Coming this fall. • Browse listings of bars and restaurants • Happy Hour countdown timer • Find the current happy hours closest to you

Frank Lucky (guitarist) 7pm FREE Oktoberfest w/Guy Smith & The German Band 5pm Comedy Cabaret: Rick Pulido Andrew Nickatina w/Krayzie w/Diego V. Curiel 8pm $10 Bone of Bone Thugz 8pm $30 Barbados artist David Kirton (reggae/pop) 7pm FREE Mark Hummel & the Blues Survivors (blues) 9pm $15 Doug Fir & the 2x4’s (rock) noon FREE

[W] Way Out West (country) 7pm FREE

[W] John Hardin w/didgeridoo 7pm FREE

Want your event in the Music & more Grid? Submit online by noon on Monday.

• Get routing directions • One-touch location calling

Medieval Festival of Courage

OUT AND ABOUT? Use the North Coast Journal’s mobile website to find all the info you need! Restaurants, Arts Listings, Events, Movie Times, Best of Humboldt: It’s all there. m.northcoastjournal.com

A Family Weekend of Stories, Skill, Amusements, Medieval Morsels, Treasures, Knights and Royal Horses Celebrating Agricultural Traditions

OCT. 5 & 6, 2013 Christie’s Pumpkin Patch & Corn Maze in Blue Lake

JOUSTING 12:30 pm & 3:30 pm daily by the Knights of Mayhem ENCHANTED VILLAGE TOUR Saturday 10 am-Noon (first 200 children) PARZIVAL’S QUEST/ COSTUME CONTEST Sunday 1:30 pm (first 150 children)

medievalfestivalofcourage.org northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013

33

You’d Better Sit Down Thursday is a doozy By Jennifer Savage thehum@northcoastjournal.com

Q

uickly — if you’re an early bird who picked this up on Wednesday, know that the Jambalaya has Shigeto, Beacon and Nitemoves tonight. You dig electronica, minimalist R&B-influenced instrumentation and explorations of the way simple melodies and rhythms can grow into more complex relationships? Great. You’ll want to be there. Showtime’s at 10 p.m., more info at jambalayaarcata. com.

Tonight (Thursday): Decisions, decisions

I will now tell you about tonight, but first you might want to sit down if you’re not already. Do you need a cup of coffee or a sandwich? Because for some reason, Thursday is nuts with shows. Okay. Ready? You’ve got your known quantities — Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell at the Van Duzer, Leftover Salmon at the ATL — and then three other options that all sound promising.

2. Singer-songwriters at the Playhouse

Complicating matters are two Arcata shows. Fortunately start time for both is 8 p.m., so if you moderate your Mad River beer intake, you can zip over to A-town where West Coast singer-songwriters John Elliott and Eleanor Murray celebrate a dual album release at the Arcata Playhouse. Now, Elliot’s name might not ring familiar at first, but his music certainly should — it’s been soundtracked by Grey’s Anatomy, One Tree Hill and Californication. Anais Mitchell fans will know Elliot as Hades from Mitchell’s “California

3. Alt-bluegrass in Arcata

And on to your other A-town option! Olympia’s The Pine Hearts provide an ideal soundtrack to fall with their version of alt-bluegrass at Redwood Curtain Brewing Company, along with locals Raising Grain. A little bit of longing, a fair bit of back-porch, a suggestion of get-up-anddance, that’s The Pine Hearts. Just right for a rain-scented North Coast night. And it’s free. (Note: If Thursday’s choices dizzy you, know that The Pine Hearts also play The Siren Song on Friday at 9 p.m.)

Saturday! Euro-pop and stoner rock at the ’bi

Flagstaff’s Greco provide the Euro-pop and Seattle’s Ancient Warlocks (!!!) bring the stoner rock at the Alibi Saturday night for another $5, 21-and-over show that’ll keep you up late as the music doesn’t start till 11 p.m. or so. Fans of Kyuss and Queens of the Stone Age should make a point to get out to this for some agreeably primitive, hypnotic rock that’ll make you do that thing where you close your eyes and shake your head to the droning beat.

1. Folk punk in Blue Lake

Singer-songwriters at the Playhouse, Saturday version

WHO: Sara Milonovich WHEN: Saturday, Oct. 5, 8 p.m. WHERE: Arcata Playhouse TICKETS: $15, $13 members

34 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

photo courtesy of the artist

First up, Matt Pless and Francie Moon infuse Mad River Brewing Company with Maryland folk punk starting at 6 p.m. Regarding Pless, “punk” in this sense is another word for “quirky” a la Jonathan Richmond — as a sort of category, not a soundalike — with songs like “Mad Child’s Lament” (“she shuts her eyes and all the world drops dead”). The way Pless blends sincerity and rawness appeals. Give a listen at mattpless.bandcamp.com/album/ tumbleweed. The opening track on Moon’s Morning Red album, a rough and haunting track called “Carolina Mountains” raised the hair on my arms, arrested me. Goddamn, but I love that feeling. Get tingly at franciemoon.bandcamp.com and then in person at the beloved Blue Lake venue.

Sings Hadestown” tour. His new effort, Good Goodbyes, is the eighth in a series of albums expanding preconceived ideas of what folk, pop and rock music can be. Elliots’ influences encompass a corresponding diversity — Bruce Springsteen, Guns ‘N’ Roses, Michael Jackson, Wilco, Radiohead and, natch, fellow Minnesota native Bob Dylan. Murray has shared the stage with artists including Tune-yards, Mountain Man and Kimya Dawson — appropriate companions for someone whose music similarly resists easy labeling and knits jazz rhythms with Appalachian melodies. The title track of her new album, Bury Me Into the Mtn, is both melancholic and comforting. Just exquisite. Please note, if you are sensitive of soul or recently brokenhearted, you may find yourself especially, as they say, moved. Tickets are $10 general, $8 Playhouse members and $6 students. See arcataplayhouse.org for more.

Also on Saturday, fiddler and singersongwriter Sara Milonovich returns to the Arcata Playhouse. Milonovich is also a successful composer and bandleader, as well as a sought-after accompanist. Quick bio summary: “She began playing when she was 4 and by 9 was leading her

own band, left school at 16 to hit the road, found a busy career as an accompanist and collaborator with such artists as Richard Shindell, Pete Seeger, Eliza Gilkyson, Cathie Ryan, Mountain Quickstep and Antje Duvekot.” Clearly the woman has cred. Joining Milonovich are multi-instrumentalist Greg Anderson and New York singer-songwriter Liana Gabel. Doors at 7:30 p.m., showtime at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 general, $13 Humboldt Folklife Society and Arcata Playhouse members and are available at Wildwood Music, Wildberries or 822-1575. For more, visit arcataplayhouse.org.

Tuesday jazz fix

The new Redwood Jazz Alliance concert season continues on Tuesday, Oct. 8 at the Arcata Playhouse with the Claudia Quintet, the New York-based “post-jazz” ensemble led by drummer and composer John Hollenbeck. Based on what major media outlets have to say about this band and the RJA’s stellar track record when it comes to bringing jazz geniuses to Humboldt County, I feel safe in saying that if you’re into cutting-edge jazz music, you’ll want to go to this show. Show starts at 8 p.m., tickets are $15 general, $10 student or senior. More info at arcataplayhouse.com.

Tuesday, cont. Why not go to Hayfork?

The listing reads, innocuously, “Bay Area bands performing acoustic sets, rowdy sing-a-longs and shenanigans.” Intriguing, right? And then one looks at the band names — Thee Hobo Gobbelins and Ghost Town Gospel — and curiosity grows. A listen to Thee Hobo Gobbelins both intrigues and terrifies in a Nightmare-Before-Gypsy-Music kind of way. Then a zip to Ghost Town Gospel’s page shows a song titled “Drown Me in Bourbon” and shades of DM3 have one seriously considering driving out to Hayfork — Hayfork! Yes, I know, I know. Yes, it’s all a bit Twin Peaks-y. But this could be the weirdest night you’ll ever have, so I had to tell you. Gig’s at Northern Delights coffeehouse, starts at 8 p.m. and is free.

Upcoming shows to know

Heartthrob rockers The Blakes return to Hum Brews, Thursday, Oct. 10, Hank 3 tears up the Mateel, Wednesday, Oct. 16 and Todd Clouser lands in the Jambalaya, Monday, Oct. 21. Advance tickets available to all shows available via the respective venues’ websites.

Etc.

Send your event listings and high-res photos to music@northcoastjournal.com. Rock on! •

3 thursday Music

Emmylou Harris & Rodney Crowell. 8 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Harris performs with songwriter Crowell. $65, HSU student $35. carts@humboldt. edu. 826-3928. Folklife Singalong. First Thursday of every month, 7-10 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Bring your voice, everything else is provided. Free. 839-7063.

leyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Every Thursday. Fresh local vegetables, fruit and flowers straight from the farmer. Also fresh barbecued meats and live music. Lyndsey Battle plays this week. Soup and Salad Luncheon. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Knights of Columbus Hall, 741 Sixth St., Eureka. Three different homemade soups, a variety of salads and fresh baked bread to stay or to go. Proceeds and raffle benefit Hospice of Humboldt. $9.

Meetings

Human Rights Commission Monthly Meeting. First Thursday of every month, 5 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. This month’s agenda includes Ordinance 2488, which restricts access to public facilities, and living conditions and facilities for Humboldt County’s homeless. Free. 668-4095.

Musaic, Chubritza and other musicians. All ages and dance levels are welcome. $5. ckurumada@aol.com. www.humboldtfolkdancers.org. 822-8045.

MUSIC

Parker String Quartet. 7:30 p.m. Calvary Lutheran Church, 716 South Ave. Eureka. Eureka Chamber Music Series presents the award-winning ensemble playing Beethoven, Shostakovich and Mendelssohn. A reception follows. $30, $5 stuents. 445-9650.

Lecture

“Highway.” 7 p.m. Humboldt Grange, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Historian Jerry Rohde tells the story of the the “Route through the Redwoods,” the stretch of road from Richardson Grove to Del Norte County. Free. 498-0801.

Theater

You Can’t Take it With You. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Written by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman and directed by Mack Owen. An eccentric tale about the absurdity of family.

Events

Harvest Fiesta. 5 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Music, food and family festivities. Food and drink prices vary. nancygeorge32@gmail. com. 672-5224.

Food

John Elliott. 8:30 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Debut of the new album, Good Goodbyes, with Eleanor Murray as the show opener. $12, $10 advance, $7 students. Leftover Salmon. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Bluegrass, rock, country and Cajun/zydeco. $25. www.arcatatheatre.com.

For Kids

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Ink People’s drop-in drawing, painting, mixed-media, sculpting and more for teens. Free. 726-9048. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum, 517 Third St., Eureka. Stories, crafts, songs and dance for children 3-5. Space is limited, so call ahead. $2.

Food

College of the Redwoods Farmers Market. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road. Shop produce grown by students at the college’s 38-acre Bianchi Farm in Shively. Market is held in front of the campus bookstore. Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. Music from Dave and Bill this week. www.humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:15-6:30 p.m. McKin-

Etc

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and other fiber artists as they socialize and work on their current projects. 442-9276.

4 friday Art

Arts Fortuna. First Friday of every month. Fortuna Main Street, Main Street. Free. 845-2038. Arts Trinidad. Last one of the year! 6-9 p.m. Trinidad Art, 490 Trinity St. Art and music in central Trinidad. Free. trinidadart95570@gmail.com.

Dance

Tango. 8 p.m. Palm Lounge, Eureka Inn, 518 Seventh St. Tango to live piano music and DJ Lee, or just enjoy the dancing from your seat. Special farewell evening for musician Cynthia Brando. Free. World Dance Party. First Friday of every month, 8 p.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. The Humboldt Folk Dancers invite the public for an easy dance lesson and international dance music played by

Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. EBT, Cal-Fresh and WIC accepted. 672-5224.

Outdoors

Humboldt Bay Boat Tours. 9 a.m. Humboldt Baykeeper, 217 E St., Eureka. Humboldt Baykeeper is offering free natural history boat tours of the north Humboldt Bay every weekend through the summer. The boat can accommodate up to five people. Make reservations one week in advance. Free. 268-8897.

Sports

Eight Ball Tournament Night. 7 p.m. Rose’s Billiards, 535 Fifth St., Eureka. Come and compete for prizes in a BCA rules double elimination tournament on 7-foot Diamond tables. $1 off beers for tournament players. $5 plus $3 green fee. guy@rosesbilliards.com. rosesbilliards. com. 497-6295.

5 saturday

. nd

a gu tl or est p performer from

Those spunky 4-H kids know how to raise livestock that are both adorable and tasty. Hit up their lamb barbecue fundraiser on Sunday in Rohner Park for lamb, pork, beef, goat and chili for $10 or $35 for a family of four. Stay and socialize or get it to go.

It’s safe to say we’ve all had enough twerking. Moves will be far more timeless at the Redwood Coast Belly Dance Festival starting at 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday in Arcata’s Creamery Building ($5 donation, kids free). Cash and tiaras go to winners of the Jewel of the Redwoods belly dance contest. Tiaras, people. That’s class. pe ci al

You’ve totally imagined yourself on Antiques Roadshow saying, “Well, I picked it up at a rummage sale.” Here’s your chance to find the weird curio that’ll make you rich and famous. The Humboldt Sponsors Rummage sale is taking up four buildings at Redwood Acres on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. It’s in there somewhere.

,s eh b y performances, workshops, rub

soloist competition, shopping, live music, drumming and more! All ages. $5 weekend pass, kids free. dance@shoshannaland.com. www.redwoodraks.com. 616-6876.

Music

HSU Symphonic Band & Jazz Orchestra. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. HSU Symphonic Band performs the third movement of Giroux’s “Culloden” and Biebl’s “Ave Maria.” The Jazz Orchestra plays Hank Mobley’s “This I Dig of You” and tunes of the Count Basie and Duke Ellington bands. $8, $5 kids and seniors, free for HSU students. http://HSUMusic. blogspot.com Random Rab Live with Cedar Miller and Little People. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Instrumental electronic and hip-hop music. $25 general; $20 advanced: $15 early bird. www.worldfamousparty.com. Roystorm Hayotis and Joanne Rand. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. A meditative-rock experience with undertones of Native American spirituality and Manabu teachings. Double CD release. $10 suggested donation. 677-9493.

Theater

You Can’t Take it With You. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Oct. 4 listing. Our Town. 7:30 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. Thornton Wilder classic. Call for details. brad@ ferndale-rep.org. 786-5483.

Events

Humboldt Sponsors Rummage Sale. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Four buildings of bargains on house wares, furniture, electronics, tools, books, clothing, jewelry, toys and sporting goods, including new items donated by local merchants. www.redwoodacres.com. Apple Harvest Festival. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rohner Park, 11th and N streets, Fortuna. An old-fashioned downtown fair with street vendors, pie, a barbecue, live music and free hayrides! How do you like them apples? Free. fbid@sunnyfortuna.com. sunnyfortuna.com/festivals/ apple. 725-3959. Arts Alive. First Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, F and Second streets, Eureka. Art, and a heap of it. All around Old Town, Eureka. Free. www. eurekamainstreet.org. 442-9054. Big Lagoon School Extravaganza. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Big Lagoon Union Elementary School, 269 Big Lagoon Park Road, Trinidad. Local artists and crafters, flea market, baked goods, book sale and gently used children’s clothing. 677-3688.

Dance

Redwood Coast Belly Dance Festival. 11 a.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Belly dance

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013

35

For Kids continued from previous page Hoptoberfest. 1-5:30 p.m. Perigot Park, 312 South Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Have one for the kids at a beer festival to benefit the Blue Lake Education Foundation. Sample 15 regional beers and enjoy music from The Brendas, Vanishing Pints, Peeping Thomas and Kindred Spirits. $25 advance, $30 gate, $5 non-drinkers. Kinetic Kouture 7 p.m. Eagle House Victorian Inn, 139 Second St., Eureka. Get out the glue guns, it’s time to rock your recycling for glory. Call for information on competing. $10, $7 with non-disposable cup. 786-3443. Medieval Festival of Courage. 10 a.m. Christie’s Ranch and Pumpkin Patch, 2870 Glendale Drive, Blue Lake. Travel back in time for weekend of family amusements, skills, treasures, morsels, petting zoo, archery, jousting, aerial dance and much more at this fundraising festival! Enchanted Village Tour on Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon for the first 200 children. $5 adults, $3 Children, age 2 and under are free. 825-8804. Native Plant Sale. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Find a selection of beautiful, hardy, wildlife-friendly native plants for your yard. www. baysidegrange.org. 826-0259. Pastels on the Plaza. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. This überlocal event is sponsored by area businesses to support North Coast Children’s Services and features more than 100 artists chalk drawing on the plaza during the Arcata Farmer’s Market. Free. www.ncsheadstart. org. 825-1302. Wine by the Sea. 3-6 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Indulge in wine tasting and live music with a view at a benefit for Friends of the Dunes. $25 advance, $30 door, $20 members, $25 members at door.

KEET’s Kids Club. 12-2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Kids ages 2 to 8-years-old are welcome to come and learn critical reading and comprehension skills. Activities include PBS Kid’s programming, reading a short story, art activities and a free book. October’s book is Peter’s Chair by Ezra Jack Keats. Free. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278 x. 201. Worldwide Day of Play. 12-3 p.m. Hiller Park, 795 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Get off the couch for relay races, disc golf, lawn games, a tot lot for kids 0 to 5, an obstacle course, kick ball, whiffle ball, soccer activities and more. Free. 839-9003.

Food

Arcata Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts, flowers, live music every week at 10 a.m. The Delta Nationals play this weekend. Free. humfarm. org. 441-9999. Bacon Fest. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sapphire Palace, Blue Lake Casino, 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake. Bacon samples, bacon reipes, bacon contests and bacon. $20, $15 with Player’s Club card. info@bluelakecasino.com. 668-9770.

Outdoors

Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Tour. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I Street (end). Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding! Meet the trip leader in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. The tour guide this week is Cindy Moyer. Free. rras.org/calendar.html. Hammond Trail Work Day. First Saturday of every month, 9-11 a.m. Hammond Trail, Mad River Bridge, Arcata. Work on a water drainage project, remove

How you like them apples? The Apple Harvest Festival in Fortuna pays there’ll be live music, an apple wood barbecue, weekend-long tribute to the humble, versatile, hayrides, and free cider and apple tasting all weekuniversally loved apple. Right now, someone is end starting at noon. Take a bite of Bellflower, objecting and saying he or Spitzenberg, Mutsu and she hates apples. Wrong. Jonagold — all of which You’re forgetting apple would have been better pie, apple-smoked bacon, names for Kim and Kanye’s caramel apples, apple kid. fritters, apple martinis Strongs Creek Plaza (oh, don’t turn your nose is hosting free kids’ acup — we saw you in the tivities, including a pony ’90s), green apple Jolly carousel and face painting Ranchers and Gwyneth from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Paltrow’s kid. (How can Saturday. What else do you hate a child?) Fight kids like? Fire trucks. The it all you want, but the volunteer fire department apple will win you over has you covered with one way or another. engine rides and demonFrom 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. strations. You know, Jaws of on Saturday, Main Street Life, a military helicopter will be taken over by an landing. And where there’s apple-centric street fair smoke, sometimes there’s with no end of delights, pulled pork — proceeds including apple desserts, from sandwiches and such pulled pork and a bouncy You can see why Eve went for it. go to families who lost house. When that ends, homes to fire and to supyou can roll up on the roller skating party in port firefighting families. So do your part and eat Rohner Park’s Firemen’s Pavilion at 5 p.m. ($4, all some pork. ages). Been a while since you skated? There’s no Pop back down to Main Street on Sunday from 11 shame in hugging the wall. a.m. to 3 p.m. and shop the Harvest Market for proOver at Clendenen’s Cider Works, which you duce and crafts. And maybe one last speeder ride. can get to and from via speeder car or hay wagon, — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Glue Gun Show

Does this look trashy? Good. The Kinetic but you do have to bring your own model(s). Kouture: Fashion with a Re-purpose battle 5. You may enter up to three designs. Things royale is going down at 7 move quickly, so you’ll p.m. Saturday at the Eagle probably need one model House Inn ($10, $7 if you per creation. BYO non-disposable cup). In 6. Anyone can enter, this benefit for the Kinetic but minors need a guardUniverse, contestants glue, ian to sign a waiver. sew, rip and recycle refuse 7. Avoid materials for the runway, hoping to that can damage the be crowned Trashionista ballroom or make a mess. Gloriosa. 8. You can bribe the Are your fingers twitchjudges, but remember ing? Here’s a rundown of we’re trying to eliminate the rules from the Rutabaga waste here. Royal Family: Somewhere, Tim 1. All materials must be Gunn’s eyebrow is all the repurposed or recycled. way up in his hairline. 2. Things like thread, glue, Just be ready to go big, and fasteners can be new, dumpster-diving divas, but don’t push it. The judges because last year’s winner 2012 winner Plastica the Sea Witch are looking for interesting made Lady Gaga look and 2011 winner Queen Denise. use of materials. like a flight attendant. 3. You must show up by 5 Call 786-3443 or email p.m. for a pre-show run-through. Then you can go kineticgc@gmail.com for more info. backstage and get ready. And make it work. 4. You do not have to model your own designs, — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill graffiti, pick up trash and paint bollards. Dress for work. New volunteers welcome. Contact for meeting place. sbecker@reninet.com. humtrails. 826-0163.

Sports

Can I Kick It?. 12-6 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Form a team or sponsor one for Six Rivers Planned Parenthood’s kickball fundraiser. Free. www.srpp.org. 442-2961. Sail-a-thon Fundraiser. 1-4 p.m. Madaket, 1 C Street, Eureka. Calling all sailors! Sponsored sailboats will race a set course. Spectators can watch from the Eureka boardwalk while enjoying food, beer and live music. Proceeds go to rebuilding The Golden Rule. Contact the Madaket for sponsorship information. www.humboldtbaymaritimemuseum.com. 208-540-0374.

Etc

Women’s Peace Vigil. 12-1 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Dress warm and bring your own chair. No perfume, please. Free. 269-7044.

6 sunday Dance

Redwood Coast Belly Dance Festival. 10 a.m. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio. See Oct. 5 listing.

Movies

Frankenweenie. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. A stop-motion animated comedy-horror family film directed by Tim Burton. Rated PG. $5. www. arcatatheatre.com.

Music

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic. org/Bayside. 442-0156. Beppe Gambetta. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Italian acoustic guitarist. $15 General;$13 Members. 822-1575.

Theater

You Can’t Take it With You. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Oct. 4 listing. Our Town. 2 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See Oct. 5 listing.

Events

Apple Harvest Festival. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rohner Park. See Oct. 5 listing. Medieval Festival of Courage. 10 a.m. Christie’s Ranch and Pumpkin Patch. See Oct. 5 listing.

Food

4-H Lamb BBQ. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Rohner Park, 11th and N streets, Fortuna. Barbecued lamb, pork, goat, and beef, along with chili, salad, rolls, cupcakes and a beverage. To-go boxes are available! $10, $35 for families of four. friendlyfortuna.com. 445-7351. Freshwater Grange Breakfast. First Sunday of every month, 8-11 a.m. Freshwater Grange, 49 Grange Road, Eureka. Breakfast, conversation and locals served fresh. $5 adults; $3 kids. www.jfloss.com/grange/visitors/visitors.html. 442-7107.

Meetings

Animism International. First Sunday of every month, 4-6 p.m. North Coast Co-op, Eureka, 25 Fourth St. Topics will be drawn from The Way of the Shaman by Michael Harner. Discussion includes the merger of science and spirituality, the use of entheogens in spiritual practice, permaculture principles and sustainable food systems, trance states, shamanic journeys and more. Free. AnimismInternational@gmail.com. animisminternational. org. 382-7566.

Outdoors

Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge Tour. First Sunday of every month, 9 a.m. Richard J. Guadagno Visitor Center, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. Join Redwood Region Audubon Society for a two to three-hour public field trip. The tour takes a leisurely pace for enjoying the birds. Beginners more than welcome. Call Jude Power or David Fix for more information. Free. harrieth6@gmail.com. www. rras.org/calendar.html. 822-3613.

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013

37

Sports

7

monday

Dance

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older, with live music featuring tunes from the 1930s-50s. $4. 725-5323.

Humboldt Folklife Society Sing-along. First Monday of every month, 7 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Come sing your favorite folk, rock and pop songs of the ’60s with Joel Sonenshein. Songbooks are provided, just bring your voice. Free. joel@asis.com. 839-7063.

Events

Apple Harvest Festival. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rohner Park. See Oct. 5 listing.

For Kids

Missoula Children’s Theatre Auditions. 4 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. This year’s show is The Secret Garden, with room for 60 K-12 performers. Plan to stay for the full two hours, with some cast members staying later for rehearsal. www.mateel. org/renthall.html. 923-3368.

Food

College of the Redwoods Farmers Market. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. College of the Redwoods. See Oct. 3 listing.

8 tuesday

Sandlot Baseball. 1 p.m. Sandlot league that’s been around for seven or eight years in Arcata — all skill levels — open invite hardball. Games are every Sunday on the field behind the CHP station in Arcata. 18-plus. Bring glove. universal_justin_2@hotmail.com. 497-9594.

Music

Movies

Night of the Demon. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Jacques Tourneur’s underrated film starring Dana Andrews and Peggy Cummins is the second in the Keep Calm: Paranormal England classic film series. Hosted by Michael Logan. Free. 269-1962.

Music

The Claudia Quintet. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. The New York City ensemble’s sound explores the edge without alienating the mainstream. $15, $10 students and seniors. rja@redwoodjazzalliance.org. 633-8385. Ukulele Play and Sing Group. 1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. All genres of music, from “Greensleeves” to “Kansas City,” “Cupid” to “El Paso.” If you can carry a tune and play a stringed instrument, come party! Free. Donations appreciated. veganlady21@yahoo.com. Van Cliburn Gold Medalist. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, 1 Harpst St., Arcata. Vadym Kholodenko, winner of the Van Cliburn medal performs classical piano. $45, $25 children, $15 HSU students. carts@humboldt. edu. 826-3928.

Events

HUMbucks Monthly Exchange. Second Tuesday of every month, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Event to exchange goods and services using HUMbucks, a non-monetary, local exchange system. jugglerseth@gmail.com. www.baysidegrange.org. 834-9019.

Food

Eureka Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town Gazebo, Second and F streets, Eureka. Fresh, local produce direct from the farmer. Music from Hauyllpacha this week. Free. 441-9999. Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Farmers Market, 10th and Main streets. Fresh, local produce, meats and cheeses. Miranda Farmers Market. 2-5 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Farm-fresh produce, etc. www.mirandagardens.com. 672-5224. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Shelter Cove, Machi Road. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. 672-5224.

Etc

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. 444-3161.

520 South G Street Arcata, CA 95521 (across from the Marsh Interpretive Center)

707-826-1445 fireartsarcata.com

38 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

9 wednesday Movies

SciFi Pizza and Pint Night. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Every week, the Arcata Theatre Lounge plays an old science fiction movie. Main feature

Smudge Factor

Nope. Not competitive at all. Photo by Bob Doran

continued from previous page

Pastels beat chalk any day. As a medium, pastels have all the artistic cred of oil paint and all the childhood fun of crayons and finger painting combined. Pastels on the Plaza is back in Arcata Saturday — what, already? Yes, the weather this summer threw you off, but it’s October now. Put your hoodie back on and accept it. Once again, businesses are shelling out $100 to $200 for sidewalk real estate, and artists are crouching down to draw temporary works of art. (Tip: Wear gloves when you smudge your colors, folks — unless you want to lose your fingerprints and go do some crime.) Proceeds benefit Northcoast Children’s Services and all they do for pregnant women and little kids around Humboldt and Del Norte. Speaking of kids, if you have them in your life, you know that the world is their canvas — walls, the hardwood floors you just re-did, the couch, vital documents, anything suede — and you’ll be happy to let them do their tagging outside for a change. Cups of pastels go out to little Banksys who want to give it a try on the walkways. The artists aren’t competing, and no prizes are given. But let’s be real. There will be neck craning, border hogging and vying for pedestrian attention. And with all those color-saturated squares, who can help trying to choose a favorite? It all happens during the farmers market, so you can turn your grocery run into a little outdoor museum visit — strolling the plaza in the fresh air, listening to music and gazing down at the fleeting masterpieces at your feet. And judging — silently judging. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

starts at 7:30 p.m. This week: A Bucket of Blood. Free with food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

Meetings

Native Plant Society Meeting. 7:30 p.m. Six Rivers Masonic Lodge, 251 Bayside Road, Arcata. “Conifers of the Pacific Slope.” Local author, educator and explorer Michael Kauffmann presents a photographic journey from Baja California to British Columbia. www.northcoastcnps.org. 822-2015.

Outdoors

Sea Scouts. Second Wednesday of every month. Woodley Island Marina, 601 Startare Drive, Eureka. Learn to sail! The Humboldt Bay Sea Scouts is recruiting new members for their co-ed sailing program for ages 14 to 20. Sea Scouts combines the adventure of sailing with maritime tradition. $5 a month. 633-8572.

SportS

MovieTimes

Hardcourt Bike Polo. 6 p.m. Highland Park, 100 Highland Ave., Eureka. Like regular polo, but with bikes on a tennis court. Bring a bike and helmet to join in. Mallets provided. Free. daryl_witmore@yahoo.com. 541-531-6671.

10

Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

thursday

Lecture

Guest Speaker Nathan Hultman. 5:30 p.m. Gist Hall 218, Laurel Drive, Arcata. Part of the Sustainable Futures speaker series, his research focuses on energy technology transitions, clean technology and international climate policy. Free. serc@humboldt.edu. 826-4345.

Spoken Word

The Siren’s Song Poetry Slam. Second Thursday of every month, 7:30 p.m. The Siren’s Song Tavern, 325 Second St., Eureka. The only local competitive poetry show on the North Coast. Come early to sign up. Open mic in the first half for all those just getting their feet wet. Music and feature by DJ Gobi. Hosted by A Reason to Listen. $5. areasontolisten@gmail.com. www.thesirenssongtavern. com. 530-448-9458.

theater

You Can’t Take it With You. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre. See Oct. 4 listing. Our Town. 7:30 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater. See Oct. 5 listing.

On the GTL with JGL.

Man Up

Don Jon tells the truth about sex filmland By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

For kidS

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church. See Oct. 3 listing. KEET Kids. 10 a.m. Humboldt Botanical Gardens, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods Campus, North Entrance, Eureka. A morning of pumpkin and fall themed activities and stories for families and kids. Free. info@hbgf.org. www.hbgf.org. 442-5139. Young Discoverers. 10:30 a.m.-noon. Discovery Museum. See Oct. 3 listing.

Food

College of the Redwoods Farmers Market. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. See Oct. 3 listing. Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. See Oct. 3 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:15-6:30 p.m. See Oct. 3 listing.

etc

Humboldt Grange 501 Potluck. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Humboldt Grange, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Grange Women’s Auxiliary meets at 6 p.m., potluck at 6:30 p.m., Grange meeting 7:30 p.m. nanettespearschade@gmail.com. 443-0045. Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery. See Oct. 3 listing.

Heads Up ...

Information and applications for Artist in Residence are now available at the Westhaven Center for the Arts. Applications due before Nov. 8, 2013. For questions visit wcaexhibits@gmail.com or call Ann at 677-0128. Applications due before November 8. HomeWork Hotline returns to the airwaves on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons at 4:30. KEET-TV’s live, local, weekly program is hosted by local teachers who answer math and science questions called in by local students. Arcata’s Historic and Design Review Commission has two vacancies. Commissioners attend two meetings a month, on the second and fourth Wednesday at 4 p.m. Applications for this commission are due by 5 p.m. on Oct. 30. l

Reviews

DON JON. My affinity for Joseph Gordon-Levitt predisposed me to enjoy this, his debut as writer-director. Add in the ubiquitous trailer with its hypnotic repetition and slick pacing, and I had set up some mighty high expectations. The actual movie is entertaining and enjoyable, and I liked it very much, but in a different way than I thought I would. Jon (Gordon-Levitt), a latetwenty-something New Jersey bartender, divides his daylight hours between working out, attending Mass and cleaning his apartment. By night, he hits the clubs with his boys, never failing to take home an attractive young lady. But in spite of his sexual conquests and impressively disciplined lifestyle, Jon still struggles to fill an internal void. His efforts at personal work involve nearly immeasurable amounts of Internet porn and masturbation. Then a knockout named Barbara (Scarlett Johansson) in a slinky red dress plays hard to get and gets her hooks in him. Convinced he’s found The One, Jon starts playing by her rules, adjusting how he navigates the world. When he can’t kick his porn habit, the couple find themselves at an impasse. This upheaval and a tentative friendship with an older woman (Julianne Moore) send Jon down

the uncomfortable, unfamiliar road of self-reflection and bring about seismic changes in his life. I figured Don Jon would be funny and bright and lively, which it is. But as a writer and director, Gordon-Levitt exercises impressive restraint to make this a much more mature, nuanced meditation on adulthood and contemporary culture than I’d anticipated. The script is more sweetly sad than outright funny, and it speaks volumes about modern sexual mores, especially with our easy access to information and to each other. It uses porn as an indicator of the false intimacy of modern media and explores the way it shapes our desires. Jon is unsatisfied by the vast amount of sex he has, mostly because Internet porn enables him to manufacture an ideal, unlikely sexual interaction. Only able to lose himself in solo trysts, his real-life liaisons feel less genuine, less intense than what he can watch on his laptop. Without pandering, Gordon-Levitt creates authentic characters in an all-toobelievable scenario. We all know a guy like Jon, and most of us love him and hate him at the same time. Ditto the real girls who inform Johansson’s character,

“We all know a guy like Jon, and most of us love him and hate him at the same time.”

continued on next page

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 Blue Jasmine Fri-Thu: 6, 8:35 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 Fri-Thu: (12:05, 2:40, 3:45), 5:10, 7:40 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 3D Fri-Thu: (1:25), 6:10 Despicable Me 2 Fri-Thu: (1, 3:30) Don Jon Fri-Thu: (12, 2:20, 4:40), 7:05, 9:30 The Family Fri-Thu: (12:20, 3), 5:45, 8:25 Gravity Fri-Thu: (1:45), 6:35 Gravity 3D Fri-Thu: (12:45, 3:10, 4:20), 5:35, 8, 9:10 Insidious: Chapter 2 Fri-Thu: (1:20, 4:05), 6:50, 9:25 Lee Daniels’ The Butler Fri-Thu: (11:55a.m.), 5:40 Prisoners Fri-Thu: (1:30, 4:55), 8:20 Riddick Fri-Thu: (2:50), 8:40 Runner Runner Fri-Thu: (2, 4:10), 6:45, 9 Rush Fri-Thu: (12:15, 3:15), 6:15, 9:15 We’re the Millers Fri-Thu: 8:50



Mill Creek Cinema

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 Fri-Sun: (1:15, 3:45), 6:15; Mon-Thu: (3:45), 6:15 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 3D Fri-Thu: 8:40 Don Jon Fri-Sun: (2, 4:20), 6:40, 9; Mon-Thu: (4:20), 6:40, 9 The Family Fri-Sun: (12:50), 6:30; Mon-Thu: 6:30 Gravity Fri-Thu: (4:55) Gravity 3D Fri-Sun: (12, 2:20), 7, 9:20; Mon-Thu: 7, 9:20 Insidious: Chapter 2 Fri-Sun: (12:35, 3:10), 5:45, 8:20; Mon-Thu: (3:10), 5:45, 8:20 Lee Daniels’ The Butler Fri-Thu: (3:30) Prisoners Fri-Sun: (1:40), 5:05, 8:30; Mon-Thu: 5:05, 8:30 Runner Runner Fri-Sun: (12:10, 2:30, 4:40), 7:15, 9:35; Mon-Thu: (4:40), 7:15, 9:35 Rush Fri-Sun: (12:05, 3), 5:55, 8:50; Mon-Thu: (3), 5:55, 8:50 We’re the Millers Fri-Thu: 9:10

 

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 Gravity Fri: (4:40), 7, 9:20; Sat-Sun: (2:20, 4:40), 7, 9:20; Mon-Thu: (4:40), 7, 9:20 Prisoners Fri: 5:15, 8:30; Sat-Sun: (2), 5:15, 8:30; Mon-Thu: 5:15, 8:30 Thanks for Sharing Fri: (4), 6:30, 9; Sat-Sun: (1:30, 4), 6:30, 9; Mon-Thu: (4), 6:30, 9

Fortuna Theatre

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 Fri: (4:50), 7:15, 9:30; Sat: (12:10, 2:30, 4:50), 7:15, 9:30; Sun: (12:10, 2:30, 4:50), 7:15; Mon-Thu: (4:50), 7:15 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 3D Fri: (5:40), 8; Sat-Sun: (1, 3:20, 5:40), 8; Mon-Thu: (5:40), 8 Gravity Fri: (4:45), 7, 9:20; Sat: (12:05, 2:25, 4:45), 7, 9:20; Sun: (12:05, 2:25, 4:45), 7; Mon-Thu: (4:45), 7 Gravity 3D Fri: (5:30), 7:45; Sat-Sun: (12:50, 3:15, 5:30), 7:45; Mon-Thu: (5:30), 7:45 Prisoners Fri: (4:15), 7:30; Sat-Sun: (1, 4:15), 7:30; Mon-Thu: (4:15), 7:30 Runner Runner Fri: (5), 7:20, 9:40; Sat: (12:20, 2:40, 5), 7:20, 9:40; Sun: (12:20, 2:40, 5), 7:20; Mon-Thu: (5), 7:20

Garberville Theatre

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 The World’s End Fri-Tue: 7:30; Wed: 6:30; Thu: 7:30

northcoastjournal.com•• North North Coast Coast JourNal Journal •• thursday, Thursday, oCt. Oct. 3,3, 2013 2013 northcoastjournal.com

39

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continued from previous page

a maddening combination of allure and selfishness. It’s this authenticity in the writing, and the relatively tame visual style of the direction, that took me by surprise. I figured Don Jon would exist as an exercise in style, a manufactured backdrop for editing tricks and over-sized characterizations. While the New Jersey setting and accents do add an element of otherworldliness, the performances are subtle and naturalistic. The visual style is clean, decidedly old-fashioned and artful without trying too hard. To me, the real strength of this movie lies in the writing. Gordon-Levitt is able to say more about romance and masculinity in the modern age with this little comedy than most writers would even attempt. Even if his debut doesn’t go down as a breakthrough, he has written one of the most concise, self-aware screenplays of the year. R. 90m. RUSH. The shrieking exhaust of a race car at redline sounds to me like sweet, heavenly music. So no surprise, I liked this movie a lot. But something in the execution let me down. The 1976 Formula One racing season was defined by the rivalry between two opposites: hard-charging, life-of-the-party Brit James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and prickly, surgically precise Austrian Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl). Both bought their way into the big leagues as privateers and then distinguished themselves with talent and tenacity. They quickly became the guys to beat on race day and played a riveting game of cat and mouse on the way to the championship. In an era when death was more the rule than the exception in top-tier motorsport, their vastly different approaches heightened the drama. Director Ron Howard (and producing partner Brian Grazer) imbue Rush with all their signature bravado and gorgeous detail. Hemsworth, Bruhl and an excellent ensemble cast do impressive work

Oct. 4 Oct. 9 Fri Oct 4 - Chris Clay’s Karaoke, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Happy Hour ‘til 9 p.m., Free, All ages Sun Oct 6 - Frankenweenie (2012), Doors at 5:30 p.m., $5, Rated PG Mon Oct 7 - Monday Night Football, Doors at 5:15, Free, All ages Wed Oct 9 - Sci Fi Night ft. A Bucket of Blood (1959), Doors at 6 p.m., All ages, Free

(707) 822-5191 1265 Giuntoli Lane Arcata, CA 95521

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

40 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

bringing their characters to life. The quiet dialogue scenes are just as compellingly watchable as the white-knuckle racing sequences. But I found myself wishing for a smaller, more 1970s style approach to the filmmaking. Granted, the look of the production, the feel of 1976, comes through in every frame. But the quickcutting and big-guitar soundtrack play against it distractingly. Ultimately this is a popcorn movie in the 1990s sports-action mold, where I wished for a more contemplative, smaller experience. Being almost great makes it all the more disappointing, though still exceedingly entertaining, even if you don’t give a damn about racing. (Movie/ gearhead spoiler: look for the missing spark plug in the combustion chamber shots.) R. 123m.

Preview

GRAVITY. Sandra Bullock and George Clooney are adrift in space. But it’s Sandra — they won’t kill her, right? Right? PG13. 90m. RUNNER RUNNER. Ben Affleck and Justin Timberlake go 5 o’clock shadow to 5 o’clock shadow in a tropical crime thriller. R. 91m. THANKS FOR SHARING. Hulk try keep pants on. Mark Ruffalo stars in a rom-com about sex addicts trying to get by without getting off. R. 112m.

Continuing

BLUE JASMINE. Cate Blanchett is a socialite on the cusp of a breakdown who slums it with her sister in this well made Woody Allen drama. PG13. 98m. CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2. The 3D sequel goes a little Dr. Moreau when food creatures populate an island and hero Flint (Bill Hader) has to stop them. PG. 95m. DESPICABLE ME 2. Gru (Steve Carell), the girls and the minions are back and saving the world in this fun animated sequel. PG. 98m. INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2. Style, story and a satisfying scare in director James Wan’s haunted family follow-up. PG13. 106m. LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER. Moving Civil Rights era tale with Forest Whitaker as a White House butler through the decades. PG13. 132m. PRISONERS. Wrenching masterpiece with Hugh Jackman as the father of a missing child and and Jake Gyllenhaal as the detective out to find her. R. 146m. RIDDICK. Vin Diesel entertains as the genetic oddity/anti-hero battling bounty hunters and bad weather on a dark, barren planet. R. 119m. WE’RE THE MILLERS. Implausible drug smuggling comedy wastes the usually funny Jason Sudeikis and Jennifer Aniston. R. 110m. •

The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light Paul Bogard, Little, Brown and Company

In his new book, nature writer Paul Bogard tracks the shifting dynamics of darkness in the western world. As he travels through Paris and Vegas, through Bryce Canyon and the Canary Islands, Bogard meets with engineers, janitors, astronomers and park rangers who are each challenged by unending illumination. While his journey reveals the impact of light across the West, Bogard doesn’t suggest that we return to a medieval Dark Age, only that we consider which lights are actually useful, and which do harm. He learns about unshielded “security lights” that make crime easier, speaks with night shift workers about their unending fatigue and talks with biologists about light’s impact on crepuscular and nocturnal creatures. With minister David Saetre, he ponders the peculiar human fears that propel us to seek more light even when it blinds us. But rather than writing an indictment of light’s pollution, Bogard takes a lesson from Quebec’s first Starry Sky Reserve and its mission of reconnecting people to the dark. His meetings with dozens of dark sky advocates are each place-based and emotionally tangible. Whether walking the Parisian night with a light engineer, visiting Austin’s bats with a biologist or talking witchcraft with Sark Island’s astronomy … he ponders society president, Bogard allows each person’s dark the peculiar longing to come through, human fears uniquely voiced on the that propel us page. to seek more As Bogard travels, there are moments light even when I wish he could slow it blinds us. down: to spend a full week at the Gran Telescopio Canarias and wait out the fog at MontMégantic. Yet what I found most reassuring in his research was the breadth of intriguing people working toward darker skies. Their stories suggest that communities can improve light spillage, creating an almost immediate return for both wildlife and human stargazers. The End of Night is an organic read for long autumn evenings, inspiring us to close the cover between chapters, go outside, and find what can be seen in the dark. — Maia Cheli-Colando Paul Bogard gives a free public lecture in HSU’s Native American Forum on Oct. 10 at 5 p.m. Call the English department for more information. 826-3758.

SUBMIT BEST PRACTICES IN MANAGEMENT: INCREASING EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE. Part of a new series, "Best Practices in Management" with Janet Ruprecht, this workshop presents the five compo− nents of emotional intelligence (EQ) and why good guys finish first. This workshop is inspired by Daniel Golement’s work on leadership and emotional inte−lligence. Fri., Oct. 18, 8:30 a.m.−12:30 p.m. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (CMM−1010) KEY QUESTION ABOUT RELIGION EXPLORED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ. Is there one true religion? Or many? These questions will be discussed at Life− tree Café on Sunday, Oct. 6, 7 p.m. Lifetree is a conversation café located on the corner of Union and 13th St., Arcata. (CMM−1003)

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

FUSED GLASS JEWELRY FOR INTERMEDIATES. Learn advanced techniques to bring your fused glass jewelry to the next level. Learn to hand etch dicrohic glass with various design elements. Create pendants & earrings then learn to wire wrap, make your own bails & earring hooks. Fee: $50/$35 members, $15 materials. 2 workshops offered, Sat’s 10 a.m−noon. WS #1−Oct 5 & 12. WS #2−Nov 9 & 16. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−1003) FUSING GLASS JEWELRY FOR BEGINNERS. Two day workshop you will learn how to make your own pendants & earrings, use of color and dicrohic glass, mosaic butterflies, & decals, cutting, designing, and wire wrapping. Sun. 5:30−7:30 p.m., Oct 6 & 13. Fee: $45/$30 members, Materials included. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−1003) INTRO. TO GLASS FUSING. $35 ($15 materials) One day introductory workshop. Sat. 10−noon, Oct 19. Learn the basics of glass fusing while creating a unique work of art. In this workshop create a 6"square plate or tile. No experience or cutting required. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−1003) STUDIO LAB FOR BEGINNERS & INTERMEDIATES. Thurs’s 5:30−7:30 p.m. 1 day $25, 2 days $ 45, all 4 days $85 Oct. 17 − Nov. 7. Open Lab provides hands on instruction to guide you through the use of the Fire Arts Center’s glass studio. Basic use of tools, materials, & safety will be covered. Lab is intended to further your creative process with fused glass & use the shared space of the open studio effec− tively. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−1003)

PARENT/CHILD COMMUNICATION WORKSHOPS. Six Rivers Planned Parenthood health educators will present a Parent/Daughter Workshop for 9−12 year old daughters & their parents, Thurs., Oct. 10, 5:30−7:30 p.m., at our Eureka Health Center. Work− shop aims to foster positive attitudes about girls’ bodies & the changes to look forward to during puberty. Health educators will also present a Parent/Son Discussion Group for 6th−8th grade boys & their parents on Thurs., Oct. 17, 6−8 p.m. at our Eureka Health Center. Discussion group will focus on topics including puberty, relationships, peer pressure, & responsibility. Pre−registration required, $10−20 sliding scale fee, scholarships are available. Snacks will be provided. To register or for more info., call (707) 442−2961 or visit our website at www.srpp.org. (CMM−1010) WRITING BOOKS FOR CHILDREN. If you love chil− dren’s literature and have an interest in writing or illustrating children’s books, award−winning author Michael Elshohn Ross will present useful writing and publishing tools. Sun., Oct. 20, 10 a.m.−5 p.m. Fee: $60. Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (CMM−1010)

Computer

INTERMEDIATE MICROSOFT EXCEL. Go beyond the basics and explore powerful tools including Auto Filter, PivotTables and advanced formulas and functions. Analyze data lists utilizing sorting, filtering and subtotals. With Joan Dvorak. Mon’s, Oct. 14−Nov. 4, 6−8 p.m. Fee: $75. Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (CMP−1003) INTRO TO ADOBE DREAMWEAVER. Learn essen− tials of website design in a step−by−step explo− ration of this dynamic web design application. With Annie Reid. Tues./Thurs., Oct. 15−29, 6:30−9 p.m. Fee: $135. Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (CMP−1003)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings, Oct. 7− Nov. 4, 7−8 p.m. and Fri. mornings, Oct. 11−Nov. 1, 11:30 a.m−12:30 p.m. Fee: $50. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C, Arcata. (707) 407−8998. info@panartsnetwork.com (DMT−1031)

your

MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi−track recording. (707) 476−9239. (DMT−1226)

CALENDAR EVENTS

REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−1226)

ONLINE

northcoastjournal.com OR BY

STUDIO OF DANCE ARTS. Offering classes in Ballet, Pre−School Creative Ballet, Broadway Style Jazz and Irish Step Dance. We are the home of the Irish Company Dancers. 7 5th St. Eureka (707) 442− 1939 (DMT−1010)

E-MAIL

calendar@northcoastjournal.com

Fitness

AIKIDO. Aikido is a beautiful, powerful, yet non− aggressive martial art that provides an effective method for developing our human potential. You will gain center, balance, coordination, flexibility, self−confidence and fluidity as well as insight into deeper meaning in your life. Beginning enrollment is ongoing for both kids and adults! Come observe anytime. The dojo entrance is off the F St. parking lot behind the Arcata Plaza. Adult class every weeknight 6 p.m.; kids Mon, Wed. 4 p.m. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826−9395.(F−1226)

PRINT DEADLINE: Noon Thursday, the week before publication

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DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−1226) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−1226) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F− 1226) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. & Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/ $4 Grange members. Every Tues. & Thurs Vector Pool, Aqua Zumba 9:15 a.m. (3289 Edgewood Rd, Eureka). Every Tue. at Trinidad Town Hall 12 p.m.& every Thur. at Eureka Vets Hall 12 p.m. Marla Joy (707) 845−4307. marlajoy.zumba.com (F−1226) continued on next page

HUMBOLDT VOTE ON PAGE 7 OR NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM

2013

Communication

Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

Weaving on the Knitters Loom Weave a sampler while learning basics in rigid heddle weaving such as how to choose yarn, calculate yardage, warp the loom, along with techniques for even edges, plain weave, lace weaves, pick-up weaves, and texture. Instructor will work with you in first session to select and purchase appropriate yarns (not included) at Northcoast Knittery. Use of looms during class included in cost. Sat, Nov. 9, 9am-5pm and Sun, Nov. 10, 9 am-12:00 noon. Cost: 95.00 + materials

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013

41

continued from previous page ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Dance fitness to Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Mon, Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks World Dance Center in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. $5 class or $50 for 11 class pass. First class free!

Languages

INTRO TO JAPANESE, PART 2. Basic Japanese grammar structure, vocabulary and writing systems. Focus on useful conversational skills. With Mie Matsumoto. Mon./Thurs., Oct. 28−Nov. 11, 5:30 −7:30 p.m., Fee: $125 ($50 additional for one unit of optional credit). Pre−registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (L−1017)

50 and Better OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−1226) ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT. With Richard Paselk. Explore von Humboldt’s early life, his South American expedition, scientific accomplishments and state−of−the−art instruments. Thurs., Oct. 10, 10 a.m.−noon, $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmem− bers. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1003) DIGITAL STORYTELLING: REMEMBERING IN THREE IMAGES. With Eileen McGee. Bring your story to life! On a computer, you will use three photos or drawings, add movement and layers of music and/or sound effects. Digitally create a personal story about a place, special person or life transition. Thurs., Oct. 17−31, 10 a.m.−1 p.m. $75/ OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1010) DISCOVERING YOUR INNER WISDOM WITH SOULCOLLAGE® With Marilyn Montgomery. An intuitive, expressive art process in which you con− struct a card deck that becomes a personal visual journal. You don’t have to be an artist to enjoy the process designed for both beginners and those with experience in the process. Thurs., Oct. 17− Nov. 21, 3−5 p.m. $80/OLLI members, $105/non− members. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1010) GENTLE YOGA IN FERNDALE. Increase health and flexibility in body and mind with Laurie Birdsall. All levels welcome. Tues’s and Thurs’s, Oct. 22−Nov. 7 , 10−11 a.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1017)

FINGERPAINTING ON YOUR IPAD: THE NEXT LEVEL. For those students who enjoyed the first OLLI iPad painting classes, artist Claire Iris Schencke will take you to the next level. The first class taught students to walk on the touch screen; this class will teach you how to dance! Thurs., Oct. 17 & 24, 2−6 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/non− members. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1010) INTRODUCTION TO STEEL DRUMS. Learn to play short tunes and hear a brief history of the origins of the steel drum. All levels welcome. With Kate Lang−Salazar. Fri.s, Oct. 4−25, 10−11:30 a.m. $75/OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1003) JUDGING THE SUPREME COURT. With Dr. JeDon Emenhiser. Discuss the role of the Supreme Court in American governance and evaluate its decisions in controversial cases from the 19th century to the present Mon.s, Oct. 7−21, 3−5 p.m. $55/OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1003) MID−LIFE & BEYOND. With Debbie Hatch. Horm− ones, sex, relationships, empty nests, osteoporosis, nutrition and vitamins. Menopause is the prime time to evaluate your personal health and to make a plan to be your best throughout your life. Mon.s, Oct. 7−21, 6−8 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880.www.humboldt.edu/ olli (O−1003)

PILATES PLUS FOR OLLI. With Joanne Fornes. Build a stronger, healthier body. Improve posture, bal− ance and flexibility with the elegant, flowing movements of Pilates. Wed., Oct. 16−Nov. 20, 10:30 a.m.−noon. $70/OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1010)

WRITING AS A SPIRITUAL JOURNEY. Allow your writing practice to be an adventure into surprising and unexplored territory. With Bonnie Shand. Tues’s, Oct. 22−Dec. 3, 1−3 p.m. $80/OLLI members, $105/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1017)

RUSSIAN ALASKA: 1730 TO 1870. Beginning with the history of the historic site Fort Ross in Mendo− cino County, Laurent Cleenewerck will share about the Russian colonization of Alaska in the 1700s and 1800s, as well as the legacy of the Russian era to present day. Thurs., Oct. 17−31, 10 a.m.−noon. $55/ OLLI members, $80/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli

WRITING YOUR LIFE. With Suzanne Samberg. Write about what makes us who we are−the moments, events, people, comedies and tragedies. Choose one of two sessions in GARBERVILLE Wed., Oct. 16−Nov. 6 or Eureka Thurs., Oct. 17−Nov. 7, 1−3 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1010)

SENIOR ACTION COALITION. Use your knowledge and experience to take action on pressing issues affecting older adults. Seniors, boomers welcome. Grassroots, non−partisan, current focus health care. Meetings held third Wed. of every month, 11:30 a.m.−1:30 p.m. at Jefferson School, 1000 B St. For more information, e−mail psa@a1aa.org or call (707) 442−3763. SEQUOIA PARK ZOO: A CENTURY OF HISTORY AND THE EXCITING FUTURE OF CALIFORNIA’S OLDEST ZOO. With Gretchen Ziegler and Amber Neilson.Participants learn about operating a modern zoo through lectures, behind−the−scenes tours, animal encounters, and other engaging activities. Sat., Oct. 5−19, 9 a.m.−noon, $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1003)

MOVING YOUR WORDS: A WRITING CLASS. With Suzanne Samberg. Develop ideas, expand your imagination and move your words out of your brain and onto paper. Choose one of two sessions in GARBERVILLE Wed., Oct. 16−Nov. 6 or Eureka Thurs., Oct. 17−Nov. 7, 3:30−5:30 p.m. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1010)

SEVEN MAJOR INTERGOVERNMENTAL ORGANI− ZATIONS. With Laurent Cleenewerck. An in−depth discussion of some of the most influential interna− tional organizations. Tues., Oct. 15−Nov. 5, 10 a.m.− noon. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1010)

NORTH COAST AVIATORS. Delve into the history & development of aviation on the North Coast by local pioneers. With Marc Matteoli. Wed’s, Oct. 23 & 30, 4−6 p.m. $45/OLLI members, $70/nonmem− bers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli

TAI CHI MADE EZ FOR BEGINNERS. Learn a short version of Tai Chi made up of simple, smooth, circular movements designed to stretch, limber, tone and strengthen the body. With Glenda Hesseltine. Mon’s, Oct. 22−Nov. 25, 3−4:30 p.m. $70/ OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1017)

OUR PATHWAYS TO HEALTH. Marion Love and Toni Martin co−lead this class. Developed by the Stanford University Chronic Disease Self−Manage− ment Program with focus on supporting partici− pants to make achievable goals and improve health. Mon.s, Oct. 7− Nov. 11 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. $5/OLLI members only. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1003)

TELLING OUR STORIES. Ali Freedlund will cover the basic elements of story and storytelling including purpose, character development, style, and delivery of oral telling. Wed.s, Oct. 9−Nov.6, 2− 4 p.m. $75/OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1003)

GENTLE YOGA. With Patricia Starr. Learn yoga with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. Mon.s, Oct. 7−21, 1:30−3 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1003)

OUR WWII HOME FRONT. With Ray Hillman. Through lecture, slideshow, artifacts and an exten− sive field trip, learn what was going on along the Humboldt County coast during WWII. Fri., Oct. 11, 5:30−8 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 12, 9:30 a.m.−2 p.m. $65/ OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1010)

TRADING THE PALATE: HUMANITY, PLANTS & EVOLVING CUISINE. Join Philip Wright in exploring the origins of our most revered crops−including tomatoes and coffee−and how these plants have influenced cuisine, trade and civilization. Wed., Oct. 16−30, 6−8 p.m. $55/OLLI members, $80/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1010)

HUMBOLDT COUNTY FOLKLORE. With Renee Ross. Myths, tales, jokes, foodways, legends, music, tweets, games, art, music, clothing, and a lot more. This class will look at local folklore in all its different forms. Tues.s, Oct. 8−29, 10 a.m.−noon. $65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880. www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1003)

PHOTOGRAPHY 101: BEYOND SNAPSHOTS. Learn helpful techniques to improve photographic skills through lectures, videos, demonstrations, assign− ments and critiques. With Lorraine Miller−Wolf. Tues’s, Oct. 22−Nov. 19, 4−6 p.m.$65/OLLI members, $90/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1017)

USING GENETICS FOR GENEALOGY RESEARCH. Explore the basic terminology and concepts used by genetic genealogists, explore the realities of the science, common myths and fallacies. With Michael Cooley. Sat., Oct. 19, 1−4 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−1017)

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Spiritual

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Arcata & Eureka. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sun’s 7:55 a.m. At NorthCoast Aikido on F Street (entrance in alley between 8th and 9th, upstairs). Call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. EUREKA: Wed’s 5:55 p.m., 730 K Street upstairs. Call 845−8399 or barryevans9@yahoo.com. (S1226) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−1226) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S1226) WARRIOR DHARMA SERIES IN ARCATA. W/Frank Berliner, Professor of Contemplative Psychology at Naropa University, Boulder CO. The profound teachings of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche are presented through lively informal talks, guided meditations, and personal interaction. Introduc− tion: Fri. Oct. 4, 7−9 p.m. Warrior Dharma Program Dancing with Hope & Fear: Sat. & Sun. Oct. 5−6, 9 a.m − 5 p.m. Reception to follow. Fee: $150. For more info., location, & register call (707) 822−4737.

Sports & Recreation

ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation, Fri./Sat. 6:30−9:30 p.m, Sun. 2−5 p.m. Halloween Theme Skate: Fri. Oct. 25−Sun. Oct. 27. Dress in costume and receive $1 discount! Zombie Adult Skate: Sun. Sept. 13, 6:30−9:30 p.m. Dress like a Zombie and receive $1 discount! Planning a party? Call 668−5932 for info. Like us on Facebook at "Blue Lake Roller Rink"! (SR−1226)

Therapy & Support

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−1226) FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496−2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com (TS−1226) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS ? Confidential help is available. 825−0920 or 845−8973, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−1226)

file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LAURENCE A. KLUCK CSB #123791 MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & WYKLE, LLLP 100 M STREET EUREKA, CA. 95501 (707) 442−3758 September 11, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

legal notices Vocational

CHILD ABUSE MANDATED REPORTER TRAINING. With Cara Barnes, MA, and Jed Mefford, MSW. Fri., Oct. 25, 8:30 a.m−4:30 p.m. Fee: $30, includes lunch. $25 additional for nursing or education academic credit or MFT/LCSW CEUs. Pre−registration req− uired. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V−1017)

Wellness & Bodywork

"OUR PATHWAYS TO HEALTH" FREE HEALTH WORKSHOP. Workshops help individuals with long term health conditions, gain tools to manage their symptoms, learn to partner with their provider, and develop and achieve mini−goals in an encouraging and helpful environment. They are a mixture of health education and peer support and are not chronic condition specific. Meet one day a week for six weeks. Anyone living with a chronic health condition is encouraged to participate, as are family members and/or caregivers. New work− shops start in: Willow Creek, Tues Oct. 1−Nov. 5, 2− 4:30 p.m. Eureka, Fri, Oct. 4−Nov. 8, 2−4:30 p.m. McKinleyville, Sat, Oct. 5−Nov. 9, 11 a.m−1:30 p.m. Please call to register or for more info. Space is limited. Aligning Forces Humboldt: (707) 445−2806, Ext. 4. (W−1003) ARCATA CORE PILATES Is happy to now offer Yoga classes with Sasha Milsis,and Adult Ballet with Katie Kanzler. Call for more information. 845−8156 (W−1031) CANDLELIGHT HOT STONE YOGA & LIVE SOUND HEALING. At Om Shala Yoga. With Artemisia Shine. Fri., Oct. 18 & 1st & 3rd Fri’s monthly. 7:30− 9:30 p.m. $18 drop−in. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825− YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W−1010) DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Festival of Herbs. Visiting Teacher Series: Oct. 2013−Apr. 2014. Meets first weekend of each month. Rosemary Gladstar, Candis Cantin and more! Individual classes now available. 10 Month Herbal Studies Program: Feb.− Nov. 2013. For the serious herb student. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442− 8157. (W−1031) EASING PAIN WITH MINDFULNESS MEDITATION. Oct. 20, 10 a.m−noon. Donations accepted but not required. Eureka Mindfulness 730 K St., Eureka. Fragrance−free, wheelchair−accessible. 269−7044. (W−1003) ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS PRESENTS COMPLIMEN− TARY EDUCATIONAL CLASSES. Every Weds. 5:30 p.m. October 9: Spiritual Life−Coaching with Alena Hrabcakova October 16: doTERRA Essential Oils Series with Alicia Hashem and Stephanie Pearlston. 1639 Central Ave., Ste. A, McKinleyville. (707) 839−7772. For more information visit us at www.essentialelementsspa.com (W−1003) ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS WELLNESS CLASSES: YOGA & PILATES. Mon.−Fri. 9:30 a.m & 5:30 p.m. Please see our website for our regular schedule. All class− es include community use of our sauna 30 minutes prior to class. $15 drop−in and discounted passes, with no expiration. 15% discount for Students and Seniors. 1639 Central Ave., Ste. A. McKinleyville. (707) 839−7772. For more info. on services and classes visit www.essentialelementsspa.com or email info@essentialelementsspa.com. (W−1017)

OCTOBER ROLFING SPECIALS. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer −10 series includes one free session. ALSO call now for free body analysis consultation. (541) 251−1885 (W−1226) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Daytime classes begin January 2014 at Arcata School of Massage. 650−Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822−5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W−1226) TAI CHI PLUS. Breathwork, acupressure meridian massage, meditation, sound healing included with traditional Tai Chi movement and Qigong practices. Daily, Mon.− Fri., morning, afternoon, and evening classes available in 6 cities, Westhaven, Arcata, Eureka, Ferndale, Fortuna, and McKinleyville. For more info. call Glenda (707) 268−3936 or email gkhesseltine@yahoo.com. See website taichiforeveryone.net (W−1031) TUES. & THURS. AFTERNOON MASSAGE WITH DIANE DAVIS. Enhance your Pilates or yoga prac− tice or just unwind and relax with a massage ses− sion at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! Nationally certi− fied since 1997, Diane is trained in Hawaiian Lomi Lomi, Myofascial Release, Swedish, Craniosacral, Acupressure and Reiki. Questions? Call (707) 268− 8926 to schedule an appointment. VISITING YOGA INSTRUCTOR JEANIE MANCH− ESTER. At Om Shala Yoga & Inner Freedom Yoga. Oct. 11−13. Explore myth, asana, breath and medita− tion to access your truth and potential! Full weekend cost: $130 if by 10/4, $150 after, each class priced individually as well. Om Shala Yoga, 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642) www.omshalayoga.com (W−1010) YOGA FOR ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS. At Om Shala Yoga. With Christine Fiorentino. 4 session series on Tues & Thurs, Oct 8−17, 7:15−8:30 p.m. Learn in a safe and supportive environment. No experience or flexibility required! $55 if by 10/1, $70 after. Must register by 10/7. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825− YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W−1003) YOGA THERAPY FOR LOW BACK PAIN, SCIATICA & HIPS. Om Shala Yoga. W/Peggy Profant. Sun., Oct. 6, 2−4:30 p.m. Find relief from pain! No yoga experience is necessary, workshop really is for every body ! $35. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W−1003)

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF IRENE A. VOSS CASE NO. PR130264

personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES D. POOVEY CSB # 83955 DAVIS & POOVEY, INC. ATTORNEYS AT LAW 937 SIXTH STREET EUREKA, CA. 95501 (707) 443−443−6744 SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: IRENE 9/29, 10/3, 10/10/2013 (13−256) A. VOSS, IRENE AGNES VOSS, AND IRENE VOSS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has NOTICE OF PETITION TO been filed by ELOISE SHAHA ADMINISTER ESTATE OF in the Superior Court of California, SUE CAROLE DILLON, County of Humboldt. AKA SUE C. DILLON THE PETITION FOR PROBATE CASE NO. PR130282 requests ELOISE SHAHA be To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, appointed as personal representa− contingent creditors and persons tive to administer the estate of the who may otherwise be interested in decedent. the will or estate, or both, of: SUE THE PETITION requests the dece− CAROLE DILLON, AKA SUE C. dent’s will and codicils, if any, be DILLON admitted to probate. The will and A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been codicils are available for examina− filed by MICHELE DESPRES LOVE− tion in the file kept by the court. LESS in the Superior Court of Cali− THE PETITION requests authority fornia, County of Humboldt. to administer the estate under the THE PETITION FOR PROBATE Independent Administration of requests MICHELE DESPRES LOVE− 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−269) Estates Act. (This authority will LESS be appointed as personal allow the personal representative to representative to administer the take many actions without NOTICE OF PETITION TO estate of the decedent. obtaining court approval. Before ADMINISTER ESTATE OF THE PETITION requests the dece− taking certain very important DOROTHY AMY SMITH, AKA dent’s will and codicils, if any, be actions, however, the personal DOROTHY M. SMITH, AKA admitted to probate. The will and representative will be required to DOROTHY SMITH any codicils are available for exami− give notice to interested persons CASE NO. PR1130274 nation in the file kept by court. unless they have waived notice or To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, THE PETITION requests authority consented to the proposed action.) contingent creditors and persons to administer the estate under the The independent administration who may otherwise be interested in Independent Administration of authority will be granted unless an the will or estate, or both, of: Estates Act. (This authority will interested person files an objection DOROTHY AMY SMITH, AKA allow the personal representative to to the petition and shows good DOROTHY M. SMITH, AKA take many actions without cause why the court should not DOROTHY SMITH obtaining court approval. Before grant the authority. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has taking certain very important A HEARING on the petition will be been filed by MICHAEL ERNEST actions, however, the personal held on October 10, at 2:00 p.m. at VALK representative will be required to the Superior Court of California, in the Superior Court of California, give notice to interested persons County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth County of Humboldt. unless they have waived notice or Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE consented to the proposed action.) IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of requests MICHAEL ERNEST VALK be The independent administration the petition, you should appear at appointed as personal representa− authority will be granted unless an the hearing and state your objec− tive to administer the estate of the interested person files an objection tions or file written objections with decedent. to the petition and shows good the court before the hearing. Your THE PETITION requests the dece− cause why the court should not appearance may be in person or by dent’s will and codicils, if any, be grant the authority. your attorney. admitted to probate. The will and A HEARING on the petition will be IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a codicils are available for examina− held on October 24, 2013 at 2:00 contingent creditor of the tion in the file kept by the court. p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− deceased, you must file your claim THE PETITION requests authority fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 with the court and mail a copy to to administer the estate under the Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. the personal representative Independent Administration of IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of appointed by the court within four Estates Act. (This authority will the petition, you should appear at months from the date of first allow the personal representative to the hearing and state your objec− issuance of letters as provided in take many actions without tions or file written objections with Probate Code section 9100. The obtaining court approval. Before the court before the hearing. Your time for filing claims will not expire taking certain very important appearance may be in person or by before four months from the actions, however, the personal your attorney. hearing date noticed above. representative will be required to IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept give notice to interested persons contingent creditor of the dece− by the court. If you are a person unless they have waived notice or dent, you must file your claim with interested in the estate, you may consented to the proposed action.) the court and mail a copy to the file with the court a Request for The independent administration personal representative appointed Special Notice (form DE−154) of the authority will be granted unless an by the court within the later of filing of an inventory and appraisal interested person files an objection either (1) four months from the date of estate assets or of any petition to the petition and shows good of first issuance of letters to a or account as provided in Probate cause why the court should not general personal representative, as Code section 1250. A Request for grant the authority. defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− Special Notice form is available A HEARING on the petition will be fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the court clerk. held on October➤ 17, at 2:00 p.m. at from the date of mailing or legal NOTICeS ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: the Superior Court of California, personal delivery to you of a notice CONTINued ON NexT page LAURENCE A. KLUCK CSB #123791 County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth under section 9052 of the California MATHEWS, KLUCK, WALSH & Street, Eureka, in CTRM 8. Probate Code. WYKLE, LLLP IFthursday, YOU OBJECT to the 3, granting Other California statutes andJOURNAL legal North Coast JourNal oCt. 3,2013 2013 of northcoastjournal.com • •NORTH COAST •• THURSDAY, OCT. 100 M STREET northcoastjournal.com the petition, you should appear at authority may affect your rights as EUREKA, CA. 95501 the hearing and state your objec− a creditor. You may want to consult (707) 442−3758 tions or file written objections with with an attorney knowledgeable in September 11, 2013 the court before the hearing. Your California law.

43

representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good Continued from not cause why the court should previous page. grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 17, at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in CTRM 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: ROBERT D. PRIOR CSB #28272 ATTORNEY AT LAW PO BOX 23 EUREKA, CA. 95502 (707) 443−4573 September 16, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

legal notices

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF GENEVA WASSO BELL CASE NO. PR1300000

representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 24, 2013 12, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: Probate Room: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: WILLIAM T. KAY, JR., SBN 59581 LAW OFFICE OF WILL KAY 628 H STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445−2301 September 30, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: GENEVA WASSO BELL, aka GENEVA W. BELL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JANICE L. CONN AND BARBARA L. BISHOP in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that JANICE L. CONN AND BARBARA L. BISHOP be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the dece− dent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. 9/26, 10/3, 10/10/2013 (13−261) A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 24, 2013 12, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: Probate Room: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−270) tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the Arearepresentative 1 – No Expired Terms personal appointed by the court within the laterTerms of Area 2 – No Expired either (1) four months from the date of first issuance letters toTerms a Area 3 – Noof Expired general personal representative, as Area 4 – No58(b) Candidates defined in section of the Cali− Probate Code, orand (2) 60 days Roberts Area 5 –fornia Richard L. Myers Kenneth from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of California UIHS Board of Directors approved thetheList of Certified Candidates on Probate Code. Other California September 24, 2013 in accordance with UIHS Election statutes and legal authority may Policy. Also in accordance affect your rights as a creditor. with the UIHS Election Policy, this notice servesYouas the official posting. may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept 10/3/13 (13-265) by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for North Coast Journal • Thursday, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com Special NoticeOct. (form3,DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate

United Indian Health Services ELECTION NOTICE

List of Certified Candidates for 2013 Election

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file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: WILLIAM T. KAY, JR., SBN 59581 LAW OFFICE OF WILL KAY 628 H STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445−2301 September 30, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−270)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF CARL LELAND BARLOW, AKA CARL L. BARLOW, AKA LEE BARLOW CASE NO. PR130268 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: CARL LELAND BARLOW, AKA CARL L. BARLOW, AKA LEE BARLOW A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by KATHRYN C. LELAND, aka Kathryn b. BRAMBANI, aka KATHRYN M. BRAMBANI in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests KATHRYN C. LELAND be appointed as personal representa− tive to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examina− tion in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 10, at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal

deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: CATHERINE M. KOSHKIN, ESQ. CSB #149503 KOSHKIN LAW FIRM 1116 ELEVENTH STREET ARCATA, CA. 95521 (707) 822 −2800 September 16, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/19, 9/19, 10/3/2013 (13−251)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF BERNICE MABLE LANEY CASE NO. PR130280 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: BERNICE MABLE LANEY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by JERRY LEE LANEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests JERRY LEE LANEY be appointed as personal representa− tive to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act.(This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representa− tive will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The indepen− dent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 26, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. EIGHT. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LEON A. KARJOLA, CSB #69056 ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA. 95501 (707) 445−0804 SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−264)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00485 The following persons are doing Business as AARON’S SALES & LEASE OWNERSHIP at 2029 Broadway, Eureka, CA. 95501 Pacific Furniture Systems, LLC 5909 West Loop South Bellaire, TX. 77401, Texas The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Fariborz Tahami Operating Manager This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on August 29, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3/2013 (13−240)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00486 The following persons are doing business as EUREKA STOVE AND FIRESIDE SHOP at 331 7th St., Eureka, CA. 95521 Joann K. Garber 669 Montgumery Loleta, CA. 95551 Barton R. Garber 669 Montgumery Loleta, CA. 95551 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 04/19/2013 /s/ Joann Garber This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 03, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH

669 Montgumery Loleta, CA. 95551 Barton R. Garber 669 Montgumery Loleta, CA. 95551 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 04/19/2013 /s/ Joann Garber This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 03, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24/2013 (13−263)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00497 The following persons are doing Business as TIMEOUT SPORTS PUB at 1095 S. Fortuna Blvd., #E, Fortuna, CA. 95540 Timeout Team, Inc. 1095 So. Fortuna Blvd., #E Fortuna, CA. 95540 The business is conducted by A Corporation The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Rebecca Coulombe, Secretary This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 19, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10/2013 (13−250)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00494 The following persons are doing Business as 3 FOODS CAFE at 835 J St., Arcata, CA. 95521 Jennifer Horrigan Shipman 1890 Golf Course Rd. Bayside, CA. 95524 Laura Duttweiler 1801 Ashdown McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by A Limited Partnership The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 10/1/2013 /s/ Jennifer Horrigan Shipman This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 05, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3/2013 (13−243)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00501 The following person is doing busi− ness as CHILDREN’S COTTAGE PRESCHOOL at 1807 Harrison Ave. St., Eureka, CA. 95501 Rose McCutchen 1610 Sunny Ave. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 1/14/2008 /s/ Rose McCutchen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 10, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24/2013 (13−266)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00518

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00502 The following person is doing busi− ness as CHILDREN’S INFANT TODDLER CENTER at 900 Hodgeson St., Eureka, CA. 95503 Rose McCutchen 1610 Sunny Ave. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 8/5/2013 /s/ Rose McCutchen This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 10, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24/2013 (13−267)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00488 The following persons are doing Business as LITTLE CAESARS PIZZA at 906 West Avenue, Eureka, CA. 9550, 1738 Germaine Drive, Yuba City, CA. 95993 Singh Brothers, LLC 1738 Germaine Drive Yuba City, CA. 95993, California The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Satnam Singh, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 03, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/12, 9/19, 9/26, 10/3/2013 (13−241)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00510 The following person is doing Busi− ness as MOLECULAR AWAKENING at 600 F St., Ste. 3−821, Arcata, CA. 95521 Daniel John Throckmorton 600 F St, Ste. 3−381 Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 9/12/2013 /s/ Dan Throckmorton This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 12, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10/2013 (13−249)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00518 The following persons are doing Business as CAFÉ NOONER TOO! at 2910 E Street, Eureka, CA. 95501, CAFÉ NOONER at 409 Opera Alley, Eureka, CA. 95501 Café Nooner, LLC 2910 E Street Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 10/1/2013

The following persons are doing Business as CAFÉ NOONER TOO! at 2910 E Street, Eureka, CA. 95501, CAFÉ NOONER at 409 Opera Alley, Eureka, CA. 95501 Café Nooner, LLC 2910 E Street Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 10/1/2013 /s/ Joseph Mark Filgas, Manager/ Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 16, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−253)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00523 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HIGH TIDE PERMACULTURE at 1620 Charles Ave., Arcata, CA. 95521 Daniel Joseph Mar 2910 E Street Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Daniel J. Mar This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 16, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−257)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00527 The following person is doing Busi− ness as KEEPING VIGIL PRESS at 995 11th St., Arcata, CA. 95521 Susanna Gallisdorfer 995 11th St. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 9/9/2013 /s/ Susanna Gallisdorfer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 18, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−259) 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−259)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00531 The following persons are doing Business as SUNSHINE CAFÉ/ COUPLE CUPS at 1603 G St., Arcata, CA. 95521 Sunshine Unlimited LLC. 1603 G St. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 9/10/2013 /s/ Serg Mihaylo This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 18, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−258)

Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 9/10/2013 /s/ Serg Mihaylo This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 18, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26, 10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−258)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00541 The following persons are doing Business as REDWOOD PLANET MEDIA at 1270Haven Ln., Apt. 1, McKinleyville, CA. 95519 Redwood Planet Media 1270 Haven Ln., Apt. 1 McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by A Corporation The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 5/31/2013 /s/ Alan Peterson, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 24, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24/2013 (13−262)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00548 The following person is doing busi− ness as A TOUCH OF SILVER at 2530 Alliance, Arcata, CA. 95521 Ari Perlman 2530 Alliance Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 10/1/13 /s/ Ari Perlman This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 27, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 10/3, 10/10, 10/17, 10/24/2013 (13−268)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT R−13−00512 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ARCATA PILATES WORKS at 1499 Peninsula Drive, Arcata, CA. 95521 Linda Slater−Gilbert 1499 Peninsula Drive Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on 11/10/2013 /s/ Linda Slater−Gilbert This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on Sept. 13, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10/2013 (13−252)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. 12−00375

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. 12−00375 The following persons have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name CAFÉ NOONER Too! at 2910 E Street, Eureka, CA. 95501. The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on 6/20/2012 Joseph Mark Filgas 2640 Clay Rd. McKinleyville ,CA. 95519 Lorrena Lucille Filgas 2640 Clay Rd.McKinleyville, CA. 95519 This business was conducted by: Individual Husband & Wife /s/ Joseph Mark Filgas / Lorrena Lucille Filgas This state was files with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date Sept. 16, 2013 I hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26,10/3, 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−254)

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE NO. 11−00608 The following persons have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name CAFÉ NOONER at 409 Opera Alley, Eureka, CA. 95501 The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on 10/17/2011 Joseph Mark Filgas 2640 Clay Rd. McKinleyville ,CA. 95519 Lorrena Lucille Filgas 2640 Clay Rd.McKinleyville, CA. 95519 This business was conducted by: Individual Husband & Wife /s/ Joseph Mark Filgas / Lorrena Lucille Filgas This state was files with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date Sept. 16, 2013 I Hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

2640 Clay Rd.McKinleyville, CA. 95519 This business was conducted by: Individual Husband & Wife /s/ Joseph Mark Filgas / Lorrena Lucille Filgas This state was files with the HUMBOLDT County Clerk on the date Sept. 16, 2013 I Hereby certify that this copy is true and correct copy of the orig− inal statement on file in my office CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 9/26. 10/3. 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−255)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130558 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501, PETITION OF: ALEX KAI−EN KAO TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: ALEX KAI−EN KAO for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ALEX KAI−EN KAO to Proposed Name: ALEX KAI−EN EDGE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 30, 2013 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: September 11, 2013 Filed: September 11, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court 9/19, 9/26, 10/3, 10/10/2013 (13−247)

9/26. 10/3. 10/10, 10/17/2013 (13−255)

HUMBOLDT

VOTE! PAGE 7 or northcoastjournal.com

The following persons have aban− doned the use of the fictitious business name CAFÉ northcoastjournal.com NOONER Too! • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 at 2910 E Street, Eureka, CA. 95501. The fictitious business name was filed in HUMBOLDT County on 6/20/2012

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NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, August 2013. The mission will study Mars’ upper atmosphere starting in the fall of 2014. Photo by Tim Jacobs, courtesy of NASA

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Past, Present and Future By Barry Evans

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

27. “I gotta hand ____ ya ...” 28. Number of weeks per annum 29. ‘60s teach-in organizer: Abbr. 30. Vowel sound in “puzzle” 33. Bank nos. 35. Ubiquitous 2013 Internet meme ... and a hint to each set of circled letters 38. “The Man in the Crow’s Nest” poet T.E. ____ 39. Brief online messages 42. Welcome ____ 45. Sra.’s French counterpart 46. “Don’t go!” 47. Negative result that can’t be undone

1. Get back to 5. Rainy day planner? 9. Seven-time French Open winner Chris 14. Crate & Barrel rival 15. Small: Suffix 16. Where one’s name might go, on a form 17. HBO’s “Real Time” host 19. Gives up 20. ____ bargain 21. Sweet-talk 22. A high concentration of volcanoes allows Iceland to produce a lot of it

21. Overused expression 22. USO audience 23. Addis Ababa is its capital: Abbr. 24. Texter’s “However ...” 25. Bar mitzvah scroll 26. Part of MLB’s postseason 31. Proclaimed loudly 32. Tracey of sketch comedy 33. Letters in some church names 34. Tad 36. Matter of life and death: Abbr. 37. “At Last” singer James 40. Maestro’s gift 41. One of Beethoven’s nine: Abbr. 42. Not so spicy

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A T O O R P P N O U N K E E N S T

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Solution, tips and computer program at

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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1. Bone that’s part of a “cage” 2. Word with jump or bunny 3. Speed: Abbr. 4. Buddy 5. Novelist Zora ____ Hurston 6. Alternative 7. Starting squad 8. ____ Majesty 9. Yosemite peak 10. Old: Sp. 11. Provides funds for 12. Staggered 13. Law enforcement weapons 18. The “60” in “going 60”: Abbr.

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CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

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46 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

T

hat last breath you took? You can thank the Earth’s magnetic field for it. Without the field, researchers believe that solar wind (energetic protons and electrons streaming out from the sun) would have stripped much of the air from our planet long ago. For the field, you can thank the giant, molten ball of iron that comprises our planet’s core. And for the fact that it’s molten — so that it can slowly spin and churn like a lava lamp, creating a magnetic field — you can say a word of gratitude for the relatively large size of Earth. Who knew breathing was so complicated? Mars, at about one tenth the mass of Earth, wasn’t so lucky. Scientists have plenty of evidence that it, too, once had a molten metal core, and hence a magnetic field. However, because Mars is relatively small, its core cooled and is no longer churning and convecting. Without that churning iron core, Mars lost its magnetic field, leading to the loss of its atmosphere. This seems to account for Martian air pressure being less than one percent of what we experience here in Humboldt County, say. We know Mars once had liquid water, circa four billion years ago. Orbital photographs clearly show ancient dry riverbeds and alluvial fans, while our Curiosity rover has found water-formed clays and ancient water channels. After losing most of its atmosphere, Mars essentially froze. Scientists would love to understand the process better, especially if dreams of “terraforming” the Red Planet ever come to fruition. Quick primer on terraforming Mars: The idea is to pump vast quantities of greenhouse gases, such as carbon

dioxide and methane, into the Martian atmosphere. These would trap heat from the sun, causing the surface to warm up sufficiently to begin melting the permafrost that lies just beneath much of the surface. After raising Mars’ temperature by about 5 degrees Celsius, the process would become self-sustaining: the warmer the surface, the more melting would occur, releasing more gases and water vapor into the atmosphere. Liquid water would return, plants would bloom and colonists could walk around in shirtsleeves, with “rebreathers” on their backs to allow their survival in the largely carbon dioxide atmosphere. Of course, the long-term problem is that solar wind would strip away the newly minted air, which would eventually need replenishment. One way to estimate just how large a problem this might be is to analyze Mars’ atmosphere now. Later this year, NASA will launch a sophisticated Mars orbiter designed to do exactly that. The MAVEN, which stands for Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, is designed to analyze the Martian atmosphere and determine just how Mars lost its air and water to space. By the time MAVEN reaches Mars, in the fall of 2014, Curiosity will have given researchers a pretty clear picture of the thin air in Gale Crater. Between the two sets of readings from Curiosity and MAVEN, dreams of terraforming may get a little closer to reality. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo. com) hears the word “Mars” and thinks “terraforming.” Not this year, or next, but one day. You’ll see.

CONTINUED ON next page

Announcements

Opportunities

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STUDIO OF DANCE ARTS Seeking instructors that teach Tap, Mid−Eastern, Flamenco, Mo− dern, Ballroom, Hip−Hop, African and Martial Arts. 7 5th St. Eureka (707) 442−1939 (E−1010)

CALLING ALL LOCAL FOREST SERVICE RETIREES Do you miss your Forest Service co-workers? • Want to find out more about what’s currently happening on the Six Rivers National Forest? • Would you like to share your thoughts and ideas about what you would like to see on the Forest? If you answered yes to any of the above, here’s your chance to get involved. Six Rivers National Forest Supervisor, Tyrone Kelley invites you to a no-host luncheon October 29, at the Woodley Island Marina CafÊ from 11:30 am-1:30 pm.

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If you are interested in attending, please RSVP by EST SERVICE FOR October 22. Call the Supervisor’s Office in A RT M E N T A G RI C U L T Eureka (707) 442-1721.

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14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

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Accounting Assistant ƒ Medical Biller Technology Sales Rep ƒ Optician ƒ Plumber Carpenters ƒ Mechanic ƒ Cooks ƒ Bakery Assistant ƒ Delivery Driver default

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The CO-OP is seeking an experienced Bakery Production Manager to ensure the highest level of service possible to North Coast CO-OP’s internal and external customers. This position supervises bakery production operations, including the supervision of ten to twelve staff members. The Production Manager also assists and participates in the presentation, sale and inventory of bakery products at the production level, and provides product for retail areas of both the Arcata and Eureka store. Applicants must have experience in meeting objectives related to sales, margin and labor. We offer a full benefit package including PTO, health, dental and life insurance packages, a 401K with paid match, and many other perks. Please see the full job description at www.northcoastco-op.com. You can forward your resume and application to hr@northcoastco-op.com by 10/9/2013.

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707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501 default

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classified employment

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OFFICE COORDINATOR Center Activities University Center, HSU. Full-time position with benefits. For more information visit: http://tinyurl.com/ aoh9ylp First review: October 17, 2013 Open until filled.

**Arcata Main Office Opening**

HEALTH SERVICES MANAGER Provide leadership and oversight in the area of health & nutrition. Req a BA in a related field + 4 yrs exp. in family & children’s services, including 3 yrs exp. in supervision. Year Round, F/T, Exempt (Mon-Fri); $735.34-$810.71/wk Deadline: 10/14/13 Submit application, resume & cover letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 For additional information, please call 707- 822-7206 or visit our website at www.ncsheadstart.org default

is seeking a

receptionist/data entry person Part time help needed for reception, data entry, filing, and other office duties. Bookkeeping experience is a plus. Please send resumes to carmen@northcoastjournal.com 310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501

RN CLINIC COORDINATOR/SUPERVISOR 1 F/T Willow Creek

MEDICAL BILLER 1 F/T Arcata DENTAL/MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Arcata,

BECOME A MENTOR! California MENTOR is seeking committed people willing to share their home with an adult with developmental disabilities. We are seeking Mentors who have experience with insulin dependent diabetics & live in the McKinleyville/Arcata area. We offer a competitive monthly stipend & 24 hour support. Call Jamie at (707) 442−4500 ext. 14 jamie.mcgovern@thementornetwork.com (E−1226)

1 F/T Eureka

MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Arcata. 2 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T Willow Creek

LVN 1 F/T Eureka DENTAL HYGIENIST 1 F/T Crescent City BILLING DEPARTMENT FILE CLERK 1 F/T Arcata We are also seeking the following providers:

FAMILY PRACTICE/INTERNALMEDICINE MD 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T McKinleyville, 1 F/T Crescent City

PA/FNP 2 F/T Eureka PSYCHIATRIST 1 F/T Crescent City LCSW 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Arcata Visit www.opendoorhealth.com to complete and submit our online application.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Six Rivers Planned Parenthood seeks CEO to provide strategic vision and leadership to carry out its mission. Will oversee clinical, education and public affairs service delivery and operations management. BA required w/advanced degree preferred, non−profit experience including fund raising, 8−10 year’s relevant work/ managment experience required. Salary− competitive and dependent on prior experience. Excellent benefit package. To apply: send your resume and cover letter to Joanna Donat, Director of Human Resources, Six Rivers Planned Parenthood at humanresources@srpp.org Position open until filled. www.srpp.org

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013

47

the MARKETPLACE Opportunities

Art & Collectibles

Pets & Livestock

Art & Design

Computer & Internet

Legal

CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED NOW! Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live w/you. Earn up to $3,600 tax−free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on−site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/ GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt ! (707)442− 4500 #14, www.camentorfha.com (E−1226)

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HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045. (E−1226) default

J.B. Fabrication

Custom Welding & Artwork

BUY SELL TRADE livestock here! Special artwork for home or business. Custom work for your vehicle. (707) 498-1067

jbcustomfabrication@yahoo.com www.facebook.com/justin.barrington.96

Clothing

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707-840-0600

DRESSES, SKIRTS & SLEEPWEAR 1/2 PRICE. Oct. 1−5, Famous Quarter Rack. Dream Quest Thrift Store− Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams ! (C−1003)

20 words and a photo, in full color for only $25 per week. 442-1400 classified@northcoastjournal.com www.northcoastjournal.com

  

 

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals

Auto Service YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMER− GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442−GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (S−1226)

Art & Design

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−1226)

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

Garden & Landscape ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−1226)

2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small. Call 845−3132, 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com

Musicians & Instructors BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419. (M−1226) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner−advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: (707) 441−1343 susielarain e@northcoastjournal.com default

 JEANNIE’S CLEANING SERVICE. "Maid for the day" References available Call (707) 921−9424 or (707) 445−2644 jbates5931@yahoo.com $15/hour or by the job (negotiable)

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THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr. Ste. 5, Willow Creek. (530) 629−3540. krchase@yahoo.com. (BST−1226)

NEW LOCATION in Old Town

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OCt. 11-13 Fri. Noon-9pm Sat-Sun 9am-4pm

Moving & Storage

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Cleaning



Art & Collectibles

Pottery & Fused Glass Sale



           

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 116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Mon. & Tues.

 

Sporting Goods

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  



Community BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13−18 for them to learn & grow in their own community. Contact the HC Dept. of Health & Human Services Foster Care Hotline (707) 441−5013, ask for Peggy

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616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com

48 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, call 845−3087 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com, (S−1226) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499−4828. wiesner_eric@yahoo.com

On the Plaza

837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

@ncj_of_humboldt

PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, taichigardener.com (S−1226)

707.825.7100







MITSUBISHI HEAT PUMPS. Heat your house using 21st century technology. Extremely efficient, cheap to run, reason− ably priced. $300 Federal Tax Credit−Sunlight Heating−CA lic. #972834− (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−1226)

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

Apartments for Rent Houses for Rent

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Musicians & Instructors

Other Professionals

GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermedi− ate. Seabury Gould 444−8507. (M −1226) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all pi− ano styles. Juilliard trained, re− mote lessons available. National− ly Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−1226) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−1226) default

Other Professionals

Other Professionals

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    

EUREKA PEDIATRICS WELCOMES ALAYNE BENASSI, PEDIATRIC NURSE PRACTITIONER. Alayne joins us after gradu− ating from the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Her interests include general pediatrics, newborns and breastfeeding. She will soon be board certified as an International Lactation Consultant. PLEASE NOTE OUR NEW EUREKA OFFICE HOURS: M−TH: 8:30−7:30 PM FRI 8:30−5:30 PM SAT 9:00−12:00 (707) 445−8416 www.eurekapeds.com

     

   

  

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IN-HOME SERVICES

 Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more

RESTAURANTS, MUSIC, EVENTS, MOVIE TIMES, ARTS LISTINGS, BLOGS

TUTOR K−8 STUDENTS INCLUDING SPECIAL NEEDS. 15 years teaching exper., 5 credentials. Will teach from Scotia − Eureka, east− Carlotta. dpuzlr@gmail.com

Sewing & Alterations



m.northcoast journal.com

Serving Northern California for over 20 years! TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001 A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amaz− ing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birth− days, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499−5628. (S−1226) default

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        

ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668−5408. astro@salinarain.com, www.salinarain.com. (MB−1206)

THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE−FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 707−822−1676 (MB−0424) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822−5253

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

Est. 1979

     

 



 

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Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center All Renewals Starting At

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, Uni− versity of Metaphysical Sci− ences. Bringing professional− ism to metaphysics. (707) 822 −2111

$

80

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less

Walk-ins Welcome

Wed & Sat 11-5pm

insured & bonded



&Spirit

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CERTIFIED ROLFER ANGELA HART, B.A . Rolfing® Ten Series, Tune−up, injuries, Chronic Pain, Repetitive Motion Injury. (707) 616−3096 (MB−1121)

  

Advertise your business in The North Coast Journal. Call 442-1400

Bookmark the URL and it’s ready to go, right on your phone.

body, mind

classified SERVICES

STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8a.m− 3p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n− Britches. Kristin360@gmail.com LEATHER, BAG, SHOE REPAIR. In Trinidad. We stitch, sew, glue, rivet, produce bags, belts, dog collars, horse tack, work clothes, upholstery, bar stools, benches, leather repair of all kinds. 490 1/2 Trinity Street, at Parker. Call (510) 677−3364. (SA−1226)

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

NEED MORE CALM, LESS CRAZY? Clinical Hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. Accepting new clients to reduce stress, anxiety, panic, phobias. www.ManifestPositivity.com (707) 845−3749 (MB−1226) OCTOBER ROLFING SPECIALS With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer −10 series includes one free session. ALSO call now for free body analysis consultation. (541) 251−1885

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Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students $

New Patients ONLY

95

  

Medical Cannabis Consultants   

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        

classified.northcoast journal.com 

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HEAT THERAPY

@ncj_of_humboldt

+

ENERGY MEDICINE

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Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating.

Open Mon- Sat

4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata

Kim Moor, MFT #37499

707-822-5244

Call 441-1484

Parent Educator

Medical Cannabis Evaluations Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years. Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

Call for Walk-in Availability Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by greenlife, medical systems co n

707.445.4642 consciousparentingsolutions.com

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EUREKA− KING SALMON 2 bedroom house, fenced back yard, appliances, 1 small pet okay, $850 month, $850 deposit. Text or call (707) 951−7472 (R−1003)

EUREKA DOWNTOWN OFFICE SPACE. Available at 7th & I Streets in Eureka. 650 sf. New paint and carpet. Great location. Parking & janitorial included. Call S & W Properties, (707) 499− 6906. (R−1031)

Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.



Diana Nunes Mizer

Comm. Space for Rent

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts.



Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions

Houses for Rent

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

 

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Apartments for Rent

fi d e n t i a l &

c

passionate om

MENTION AD FOR DISCOUNT

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com default

COMMUNITY CRISIS SUPPORT:

HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

445-7715 1-888-849-5728 HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

443-6042 1-866-668-6543 RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

445-2881 NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

1-800-273-TALK SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, OCT. 6 1-4 PM

4 Bedroom, 3 Full Bath 11 Creekside Acres Private, secluded, gated entry Vaulted ceilings, redwood decking, cedar hot tub Finished basement, large garage, auto back-up generator Separate log cabin fronting Jacoby Creek Call for price. Cell: (707) 498-4429

50 North Coast Journal • Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

444-2273

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 2266 REDWOOD #F. 2/1 Apt, off street parking, on site laundry, w/c cat. Rent $760 Vac 10/5. www.ppmrentals.com Rental Hotline 444−9197 (R−1003) EUREKA APT BY THE BAY & OLDTOWN. 1 bdm/1ba, no smoking or pets, W/S/G paid. $700 month, $1000 dep. Ref. req. 445−4679 (R−1010)

Houses for Rent 2917 SPRING. 3/1 home, fenced backyard, hook −ups, w/c pet. $1095 Vac Soon. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−1003)

Vacation Rentals default

Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins WILDERNESS AREA

Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion. OPEN YEAR ROUND (530) 266-3505 (530) 531-5315

EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Mountain Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessible. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986−7794, chemisemountainretreat.com

COMMERCIAL SPACE IN ARCATA Ground floor retail space available $1700 or $3000 per month, size varies. Upper floor suites starting at $325. Great visibility, off street parking, close to the plaza! Call Linda Disiere (707) 845−1215

Comm. Prop. for Sale default

Comm. Space for Rent PARKING SPACES FOR RENT IN DOWNTOWN EUREKA LOT. S & W Properties. $40 per month per space. Call 443−2246, 499−6906. (R−1024)

3303 UNION. 2/1 home, fenced backyard, de− tached garage, hook−ups, w/c small pet. Rent $1000 Vac Now Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−1003) 3540 PINE 3 brm/ 1 ba. home, street parking, hook−ups, fenced backyard, w/c pet. Rent $1075 Vacant 10/16, Rental hotline 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com, (R−1003)

KRIS SUNDEEN

S&W PROPERTIES LLC. 2,740 sq ft building. Has been used as a charter school. 433 M Street downtown Eureka. (707) 443− 2246 for details. (R−1031)

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

RESTAURANT/GIFT SHOP in Myers Flat

DRE License# 01438846 Cell: 707-498-4429 HumboldtCountyProperty.com “Making Real Estate Dreams a Reality.”

“The best move you’ll ever make.” ArcataProperty.com Cell: 707-834-1818 DRE License# 01200980

KAREN ORSOLICS

70 Seat, fully equipped (Formerly Knight’s Restaurant) Modular home on property included THE OWNER WILL CARRY THE NOTE ON THIS PROPERTY TO A QUALIFIED BUYER. $250,000 Call for details. Cell: (707) 834-1818

Housing/Properties Arcata, Eureka and rural properties throughout Humboldt County. Over twenty locations at

classified.northcoastjournal.com ■ ARCATA SUNNY BRAE STARTER! This 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath home built in 1955 has a newly painted interior and laminate flooring. It is approx. 1200 sq ft with an attached 2-car garage. There is also a den/ office and a deep lot which allows for a nice view of the forest behind the home. This property would be good for a first time home buyer or as an investment property. MLS# 238566 $229,000

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

REDUCE

D!

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

HYDESVILLE 17 ACRES

HUGE PRIC E REDUCT ION!

Gorgeous & totally refurbished 4 bdrm, 4.5 bath Victorian farmhouse; 3 car garage with guest quarters above; large barn; cross-fencing; Water. $599,000

Broker/Owners Sharon Redd, Lic.# 00590960 Since 1977

Jim Redd Lic.# 00665810

$189,500

3 bed 1 bath, 1,128 sq ft Cutten home on dead end street, bright rooms lots of windows, formal dining, fireplace w/insert in living room, lovely fenced yard with tree house and out buildings.

$290,000

3 bed, 1 bath, 1,100 sq ft craftsman style home on one half acre in Cutten, wonderful outbuildings and shop, perfect for hobby’s and gardeners, newer roof, close to schools and shopping.

$319,900

2 bed, 1.5 bath 1,818 sq ft 1938 Farmhouse in Arcata, huge upstairs could be used for many things, giant old barn/attached garage and shop, many possibilities for this large piece of property.

444-9234 www.fourstarrealtor.com www.ranchagent.com

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

707.83 4.3241 Kyla Tripodi Realtor/Land Agent #01930997

707.834.7979

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Willow Creek Land/Property

+/- 160 Acres on Friday Ridge Road of terraced elevation with flats, moderately wooded, and multiple springs. Beautiful trinity River views and uSFS access to great end of the road privacy. Call kyla or Charlie tripodi today for your private tour!

$325,000

Orick Land/ Property

Rio Dell Land/Property

+/- 40 Acres located between Orick and Weitchpec on Bald Hills Road. this property offers gorgeous klamath River frontage! Clirliah Creek runs right through the parcel with hydro-electric potential! a flat has already been developed for you.

$225,000

+/- 34 Acres on Blue Slide Road, only 1 mile west of Rio Dell, just southeast of the historic town of Ferndale. This site has an attractive view of the Eel River, paved road frontage on Blue Slide Road, easy access to HWY 101, conifer trees and inspiring views, plus Slater Creek runs through the parcel. COC is on file - Get Your Building Permit NOW! Parcel could be annexed into the City of Rio Dell for possible sub-divides. Building sites, river and panoramic views with convenient access, as well as its close proximity to city limits make this an amazing bargain!

$215,000

2120 CamPtON Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, OCT. 3, 2013

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S.I.N. &Service Night Thursdays 6 pm to Close Let's get the party going! Get $1 .50 domestics or $2 well drinks with proof of service industry employment or military service and party the night away with Accurate Productions DJs.

TABLE GAMES GALORE!

BINGO BONUSES

SO MANY GAMES TO FILL THE LONGER NIGHTS. COME ON UP TO THE HEIGHTS AND PLAY OUR NEW 3 CARD POKER WITH 6 CARD BONUS, BONUS SPIN PROGRESSIVE BLACKJACK & DOUBLE DECK SPANISH 21.

GO, GO, GO ... THIS OCTOBER- RAINBOW HOT SEATS WEDNESDA ON THURDAYS YOU CAN DOUBLE YOUR BUY-IN. GRAB YOUR CALACAS AND HEAD ON UP TO THE HEIGHTS FRI. NOV. 1 FOR DAY OF THE DEAD COSMIC BINGO!


North Coast Journal 10-3-13 Edition