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thursday may 29, 2014 vol XXV issue 22 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

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7 Art GERD 8 The two LeValleys 10 Repurposing Buddhaville 18 Staging Les Miz 19 The new green 24 Feast underfoot 26 There will be ponies 30 Back to the X

2 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

table of

Humboldt Crabs Baseball

2014 Season

WEEKLY SCHEDULE

4 4

Mailbox Poem

7

Media Maven

8

DREAMS ARE LIKE THIS ART ATTACK

News

BIRDER TAKES A FALL

19 Table Talk

TEAM CILANTRO

20 Music & More!

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

24 Sudoku & Crossword 24 Get Out! FORAGING

10 Week in Weed

25 The Setlist

11 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover

26 Calendar 30 Filmland

15 Home & Garden

31 Workshops 39 Marketplace 42 Body, Mind & Spirit 42 Real Estate This Week

BUDDHAVILLE AT REST

‘BYE, FOLKS!’

SERVICE DIRECTORY

17

Bobarazzi

AROUND HUMBOLDT COUNTY

18 Stage Matters

BARITONES ON THE BARRICADES

FEELING LUCKY

Friday, May 30 2014 Opening Dinner, 6 PM Saturday, May 31 Fairfield Indians, 7 PM Sunday, June 1 Fairfield Indians, 12:30 PM www.humboldtcrabs.com

Crabs Ballpark 9th & F Arcata

FLASHBACKS

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

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May 29, 2014 Volume XXV No. 22

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2014 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com news editor Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com arts & features editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com calendar editor Dev Richards calendar@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Jennifer Savage, Ken Weiderman, Jessica McGuinty, Genevieve Schmidt contributing photographer Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com art director/production manager Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com graphic design/production Amy Barnes, Miles Eggleston, Carolyn Fernandez, Christian Pennington general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising manager Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com Terrence McNally terrence@northcoastjournal.com Tad Sarvinski tad@northcoastjournal.com marketing & promotions manager Drew Hyland office manager/bookkeeper Carmen England receptionist/classified assistant Michelle Wolff

MAIL/OFFICE:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401

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• on the cover:

Photo courtesy of Corky Cornwell

We’re Chagrined Editor: Hey, McGuinty! I just read your column in today’s Journal (“Hooters and Computers,” May 15), and I am writing about the letter from “Frustrated,” who was bothered by a co-worker’s faulty punctuation and wondered what to do about it. I thought your answer made some good points. But, because the issue was language and the impression it can make, I am writing to you, and I want to say this: You don’t leave copies laying around the office. You leave copies lying around the office. Sarah G Edwards, Arcata

Judy’s Right Editor: Judy Hodgson hit the nail on the head in last week’s column (“The Supes: A Retrospective,” May 22) suggesting the incumbent supervisors’ sudden change of heart is motivated by having challengers in the June 3 election. I contend that that is exactly why Virginia Bass was so eager to “facilitate” Kevin McKenny’s finally accepting the offer from Danco to develop the Downtowner Motel as senior housing, something they’ve long sought to do. The area that our county government has the most influence in is land use, and one of the greatest powers of a supervisor is appointments to the planning commission. The purpose of the commission is regulating land use in the community’s interest, where and how developers build so, for example, they can’t build a slaughter house next door to your home. Some areas may be zoned residential only or some single family only, which would not allow for apartments. In this way the government designates how communities and neighborhoods evolve, rather than leaving it up to the developers deciding based on profitability alone. Our current board has stacked the planning commission with the very developers it’s meant to regulate. That is, it has put the proverbial foxes in charge of the hen house. The most egregious example is the nomination of Lee Ulansey (founder of HumCPR) and then the appointment of Kevin McKenny, both by 4th District Supervisor Virginia Bass. McKenny has owned the blighted Downtowner Motel for years, promoting further decay of downtown Eureka. Now, two weeks before the election Supervisor Bass is asking us to credit her with putting together a deal for McKenny and a developer who claims he’ll get it fixed right up! Asking for credit here reminds me of the

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neighbor who, having set your barn on fire, is asking to be thanked for lending you her hose to put it out. Richard W. Salzman, Arcata

Last Minute Endorsements Editor: This campaign for 4th District supervisor is not about who is nicer but about who will truly support and build on the gifts of Humboldt County, bringing everyone to the table rather than just those with the most money or the loudest voice. Chris Kerrigan is about the next generation, which must be brought into the fold because the way we have always done things is not working. He is a new breed of politician who takes the risk of honesty, doesn’t take special interest money and asks the working people to come out and be heard. We need to encourage and support this young man who will give it all because he knows we must act now

Dreams are like this Our ornithology teacher is looking for a burrowing owl on a rocky ridge near Clam Beach. He scrambles up the wash of stones and scans the crevices between the boulders, searching for a flutter of feathers. Nothing. Mist dims the view. Rain begins to fall. Still no sign of the burrowing owl, save for a few pellets scattered across the slope. With heavy hearts, the class begins to walk back to the bus. I stay standing in the rain, binoculars pressed to my eyes. I know you’re out there somewhere, and someday, I will find you. — Amy Fontaine

and not later to save this unique and beautiful place we call home with sustainable jobs, care for our incredible environment and investment in our young people. Carolyn Ayres, Eureka Editor: The county needs someone like Chris Kerrigan on the board of supervisors to represent the general public. Virginia Bass accepted huge campaign contributions from developers, land speculators and related interests, then worked to scrap the general plan. Part of this involved installing these same people on the county planning commission. This is a big conflict of interest. It is also a slap to the many citizens who put in so many hours of work over the years into the general plan. Kerrigan has the necessary experience with eight years on the Eureka City Council and would be a much better bet to be responsive to the needs of a wider range of people in Humboldt County. Charles Minton, Bayside Editor: Chris Kerrigan deserves our votes for supervisor. All elections are values elections, and elections have consequences. One consequence is that we have to accept not only the candidate but his or her appointees. Chris Kerrigan advocates responsible development in areas with existing services. His appointees will, too. His opponent demonstrates her values by her longterm promotion of the founder of HumCPR for appointment to city and county planning commissions. HumCPR’s goal of removing constraints on rural development is well known. Converting resource land to residential amounts to climate change denial. Residences sprawling into increasing dry rural areas endanger lives and raise the cost of fire suppression. We cannot afford office holders whose values and funders require denial of climate change. Elections are about values, and they have consequences. I’m voting for the future. I’m voting for my grandchildren. I’m voting for Chris Kerrigan. I hope you will, too. Bob Service, Eureka Editor: Chris Kerrigan! Best candidate for 4th District supervisor. A city councilmember of eight years, he has energy, optimism, inspiring and thought-provoking civic ability and good judgment. Vote Chris! I remember when a liquid natural gas facility was proposed for Humboldt and many people were concerned. Chris was instrumental in organizing a special meeting which was well attended. Both sides were heard and we all benefited. I still appreciate the

Comment of the Week “I’m a little disappointed that the article didn’t suggest that students may prefer to take trim jobs because it’s temporary, you can do the work in one or two days, there’s no background check/application/waiting for an interview involved, and no long-term commitment. There’s more freedom with a schedule and you can be hooked up with a trim job last minute.” — “SilverSkies,” talking about last week’s Week in Weed that discussed student involvement in the marijuana industry.

opportunity that Chris helped to give to the citizenry to participate in a discussion on such an important and divisive issue. I was once presented with an issue involving a child. Chris set up a meeting with the city attorney and the situation was solved quickly. I’m impressed and grateful for his outstanding caring and involvement with real people’s issues and concerns. Vote Kerrigan! Ellen Bryant, Eureka Editor: Eureka and Humboldt County in general have been on the decline for many years. Local small businesses are going out of business at an alarming rate. Storefronts remain empty year after year. More and more buildings are becoming blight within our communities. Many of our streets are unsafe for both drivers and pedestrians, with little being done. Eureka has become a small town with big city problems. Is that what we want for ourselves and our families? The current establishment has had control for years and all we’ve seen is decline. Humboldt County used to be a beautiful, thriving, family-friendly community that was a destination spot for travelers. We can be that again. It’s time to invest in and revitalize our communities. We need people who are proactive with vision and common sense. Chris Kerrigan is and always has been that person. Randall Garrett Herzon, Eureka Editor: When I first met Chris Kerrigan in 2000, as he ran for city council, I was impressed with his vision for Eureka. He had a clear, focused vision of what a good and productive city Eureka could be. When I was elected to the city council myself, I found a council, manager and mayor (Virginia Bass) dedicated to protecting the status quo. That is, the council except for Chris Kerrigan. Chris has always fought for livable, “walkable” neighborhoods, traffic calming measures, expanding air service, and housing and employment opportunities in the core areas of Eureka. He knows that our economic future is tied to our quality of life. Safe streets,

neighborhoods, and enjoyable communities attract investment and job growth. He has a sustainable economic vision for Humboldt County, which includes manufacturing as well as promoting our wonderful environmental attributes and protecting them. Vote Chris Kerrigan on June 3. Larry Glass, Eureka Editor: As a locally born and raised individual, I have never written a letter to the editor. I am writing today because I have never been so excited to vote in a local election. My grandmother met Chris when he knocked on her door during his first election for Eureka City Council. He a made a great impression on her and won her vote. If she was still alive today, I’m sure she would be proud to vote for Chris for Humboldt County supervisor. Chris Kerrigan wants growth and development to take place inside the 4th District, benefiting our economy and environment, and creating livable, walkable and safe neighborhoods. Appointments have consequences, and I want a supervisor that will support the people they represent, rather than the special interests of a few. Please join me in voting for Chris Kerrigan for Humboldt County’s next 4th District supervisor. Thank you. Billy Cook, Erueka Editor: If you want to see the future that Virginia Bass has in mind for the 4th District you need to drive by Seventh and F streets in Eureka and take a good look at the Downtowner Motel. This eyesore and community blight has sat that way for the past 10 years that it’s been owned by Kevin McKenny. Don’t know the name? Well, he’s the person that Virginia just put in charge of planning our community’s future as a planning commissioner. It is time to change the course and bring new leadership to the board of supervisors. Vote Chris Kerrigan to lead the 4th District. John Wynands, Dinsmore continued on next page

ELECT EY N R O T T A DISTRICT The midnight release policy is still in place. The inmate now gets to choose. It is wrong. It is not the law. It is not leadership. 6 other counties have abolished this. We can too. Allan will work to put a stop to it. Maggie Fleming's solution of allowing inmates to sleep in the jail lobby is unacceptable. “I am voting for Allan Dollison because the DA’s office desperately needs proven leadership and executive ability.” ~ Warren Tindall

The DA’s office is understaffed and over-worked. Allan

will add 8-10 more attorneys to handle the case load. “I am voting for Allan Dollison because he will find the resources to hire the best and the brightest.” ~ Bob Service As a decorated veteran, we need a Veteran's Treatment Court. They are entitled to preference under the law. Allan is the only candidate who is committed to makeing this happen. Other counties have them. It is time for Humboldt, and with Allan's leadership he will deliver. “I am voting for Allan Dollison because he understands Justice must be tempered with compassion.” ~ JoAnne Davenport

dollisonforda.com

• Dollison for DA 2014 #1362714

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

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continued from previous page Editor: I am 88 years old and have voted for 67 years. I’ve never missed an election and I give much attention to whom I give my precious vote. Sharon Latour has all the needed qualifications for improving our way of life in our district. I’ve met her; she is a strong woman with leadership experience in the U.S. Air Force and in California communities. We need someone with the dynamic, friendly personality she projects. Sharon will never shirk her duty as an elected supervisor in the 5th District. She not only has ideas for changes in our district, but constantly asks those she speaks with what they would like to see improved. McKinleyville is growing rapidly and needs a strong supervisor to guide it in the way we citizens want to see it improve. I know that Sharon Latour is the person who will excel in this job. Bette Boyd, McKinleyville Editor: Humboldt County’s next district attorney will be the woman who will set the agenda for the county’s prosecution of alleged criminal acts, and will have discretion over the county’s civil legal authority.

Maggie Fleming is competent and experienced. She is a dedicated public servant. But I will be voting for Elan Firpo for district attorney. Elan is the candidate with both business management experience and recent, post-budget-realignment, hands-on legal experience; she is currently serving as deputy DA. I am a Paul Gallegos supporter. I share his opinion that Elan Firpo should be our new district attorney. Paul’s high level of idealism has served Humboldt County well. His acknowledged weakness is in the realm of organizational management. Elan’s many years of successful international business management will remedy the organizational and under-funding problems in the DA’s office. Please join me in voting for Elan Firpo for district attorney on June 3. Jim Lamport, Garberville Editor: Don’t let the DA’s office slip back to the Terry Farmer “good ole boy” network. Maggie Fleming was his deputy DA and is now supported by the same moneyed interests. DA is a fulltime job, but Maggie already quit her part-time DA job for more money and fewer hours. More concerning is that at county counsel, Maggie tried to avoid full disclosure on $3.5 million in legal fees for suing Southern Humboldt landowners. Maggie lost the transparency lawsuit to HumCPR.

The county had to pay legal fees. Thus, Maggie stands for more publicly funded “witch hunts” of upstanding citizens and lack of transparency. Rural Humboldt beware! I support Elan Firpo. Her commitment to civil liberties and transparency is heartfelt sincere, instead of lip service. Only Firpo is an experienced manager of personnel, budgets and priorities. She will keep Humboldt safe by pursuing repeat offenders. Vote Firpo for DA on June 3. Chris Weston, Phillipsville Editor: People need to ask the right question in the DA’s race. The DA is top cop, chief law enforcement officer in the county. One candidate is the choice of the sheriff and deputies. Having them choose their chief is like having the army decide who should be president. It undermines civilian authority and trust that law enforcement so badly needs to do its job well. Elan Firpo grew up in a law enforcement family, with both her dad and grandpa career CHP officers. So, she’s very familiar with the needs of law enforcement and, not surprisingly, has a stellar record working with them as a deputy district attorney. But Firpo, a libertarian, knows how to draw the line and act independently for us, too. We don’t need law enforcement unions telling us who should be DA. We need someone who will be district attorney of all Humboldt: Elan Firpo. Michael Evenson, Petrolia

Editor: Campaigns are tough. Getting elected is tougher. Staying with challenging situations is the toughest. Elan Firpo has taken on a difficult challenge at a difficult time because she cares deeply about our community. Elan Firpo was raised by a family of law enforcers and earned her law degree so that she could be a district attorney. She has articulated substantial plans to go after those with the most insidious intent: drug cartels, violent criminals and people who cause human and environmental damage. As an engineer, she managed hundreds of employees. She knows how to direct financial resources and teams toward successful outcomes. This campaign has demonstrated that Elan Firpo is relentless in her mission to fight for what is right while at the same time prosecuting Humboldt’s worst criminals. As former Humboldt County supervisors, we are supporting Elan Firpo because she is fiercely dedicated to her values, beliefs and the safety of our community. Julie Fulkerson and John Woolley

Correction

A guest views piece on Page 9 of the May 22, 2014 edition of the Journal, headlined “Vote Yes on Prop 42,” contained an inaccurate date for the June Primary Election. Election Day is June 3. l

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6 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

“SUPER TACO,” PAINTING BY RYAN SPAULDING

Art Attack

T

here is a painting that hangs in my living room of three musicians. My husband bought it from a local painter. That painting bothers me a little. That’s because the musicians are black and the artist is white. And we are white. Should that bother me? Clearly the artist appreciated musicians, as we do. I thought about that painting when I attended a forum a few weeks ago at Humboldt State University over a different piece of art called “Super Taco.” It is a large painting of four middleaged Latino workers in the kitchen of a fast food restaurant. The university hung it in the student cafeteria. That’s when the trouble began. Many Latino students staff the cafeteria. Some of them, and some other Latino students who ate at the cafeteria, saw the painting as this message from the university to them: This is the most we expect you will achieve. That was not the message artist Ryan Spaulding intended when he painted it. Spaulding was an HSU art student in 2013 when the painting won a juried art competition. As the university does each year, it bought the painting using a special President’s Purchase Award for that purpose. The university had purchased a piece of student art each year since 1988. Spaulding painted the kitchen workers from a photograph he had taken when visiting a fast food place, one very much like the fast food places he had worked. His idea, according to the art department, was to

paint people who are largely invisible in our society. He meant it as a tribute to the hard workers of the world. Spaulding is white. The university responded to the protests over the painting by moving it to the library, where it hung on a wall around the corner from a row of paintings of white university presidents in suits. The juxtaposition only reinforced the message: White men become presidents, Latino students become low-paid workers. Feelings about the painting were so strong that a forum to discuss it had to be moved because the room, which seats about 90, was too small. People couldn’t get in. I came out of the forum with a newfound realization of how widely a message can be interpreted. I was prepared to argue First Amendment — that to take down the painting was a violation of our free speech principles. But from the outset I found the First Amendment itself was up for interpretation. One student argued that we needed to dismiss First Amendment concerns because those in power used it to silence minority voices. The discussion moved on before anyone could respond — historically, at least, the First Amendment is the strongest protection minority voices have from suppression by those in power. One woman said that we shouldn’t look at this painting the same way we would one by the artist Diego Rivera. Again, the discussion moved on before anyone could point out that Rivera had

left the United States after Nelson Rockefeller destroyed a mural of his before it was completed, because Rivera had painted in it Vladimir Lenin and a worker’s May Day parade. But one student pointed out that the First Amendment didn’t apply in this case. No one had asked for the destruction of the painting or the money back from the painter. The issue, this student said, was who gets to decide what art gets hung up on the university’s walls. If it were your living room, she asked, could the government come in and force you to hang a painting you did not like on your wall? The First Amendment was written to stop the government from prohibiting speech, not for protecting government-sponsored speech. So the issue boiled down to this: Whose university is it? If the president’s office is the government and the students are the residents, should the government be able to dictate the art on the walls? Maybe the lesson the university should have taken from the forum — had President Rollin Richmond or Provost Bob Snyder attended it — was this: Maybe we should have a student art council to advise on art purchases and placements. Maybe the real issue was that Spaulding’s painting stood out not because it was the only painting in the cafeteria, but because it was one of very few paintings on campus that featured Latino people in them. If the university, which has a rapidly increasing Latino student population, had Latino-themed paintings hung throughout campus, perhaps this one painting wouldn’t have attracted so much hostility. But maybe the painting did what it was supposed to do. It made people consider the image of hardworking people in low

wage jobs and many found it disturbing. Art is not meant to be pleasant. If you want pleasant, you hang up a Thomas Kincaid. Art should provoke thought and pleasant does not do that. So do I ask that the painting in my living room be taken down, even though I wasn’t part of the decision to buy it or hang it there? It forces me to think about things I don’t necessarily want to think about; when a white person paints black people, is it appreciation and respect or exploitation? If I appreciate the painting for its beauty do I endorse that exploitation? Last year, we took our 7-year-old daughter to a ballet in San Francisco about the dancer and choreographer Vaslav Njinsky, which had themes of eroticism and homosexuality and was difficult to understand. The tickets came as part of a package with Cinderella. Afterwards I asked her to describe the ballet. She said: “That was art.” She knows that when she sees something someone created that she doesn’t understand, it’s probably art. And she has learned to appreciate it for the artist’s brave attempt to create something important, even though audiences might not like it. Ryan Spaulding painted a picture of people largely invisible in our society. And in doing so, he made us focus on how much we depend on a group of people to serve us food for wages too low for them to feed their own families. And that is not a pretty picture.

– Marcy Burstiner mib3@humboldt.edu Marcy Burstiner is chair of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication at Humboldt State University.

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RON LEVALLEY FILE PHOTO

A Birder Takes a Fall An embezzlement case closes providing little resolution By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

I A com p l e t e r e s o u r ce for k i d s o f a l l a g e s !

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8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

t was just two years ago that the local biology community stood in stunned disbelief as news spread that Mad River Biologists and its founder, Ron LeValley, were under investigation for embezzling almost $1 million from the Yurok Tribe. This wasn’t some backwoods outfit or a fringe biologist with a shady reputation. This was Ron LeValley, a man who, over decades on the North Coast, had developed environmental credentials that could stand with the best of them. Mad River Biologists, his Eureka-based consulting firm, had risen to the top of the profession over 30 years. When the state began the controversial process of implementing the Marine Life Protection Act, LeValley was selected as co-chair of one of the scientific advisory teams. LeValley also started a nonprofit, MRB Research, that was regularly awarded grants from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to conduct research on Western Snowy Plover populations, and he served on the boards of several others. From the outside, LeValley’s private life seemed in lockstep with his public persona as one of the North Coast’s standout biologists. He began bird watching in Humboldt County during a 12-week stopover when he served in the U.S. Coast Guard in 1970. He never stopped, ultimately joining the county’s exclusive 400 Club, a designation reserved for those enthusiasts who have recorded 400 or more species in the field. LeValley seemed to relish in sharing with others, sending out a daily birding picture dubbed “Outside My Window”

from his wildlife photography website, which boasted more than 90,000 images, and creating an audio cassette of bird calls for the amateur enthusiast. He even volunteered some weekends to lead trips for the Mendocino Coast Audubon Society. When fellow biologists spoke of LeValley, a graduate of Humboldt State University’s master’s program in biology, they used terms like “mentor,” “beyond reproach” and “exemplary.” So, when news of the investigation and LeValley’s subsequent arrest hit headlines, there was an air of disbelief. “There is no way that this is even possible,” C.J. Ralph, a research scientist with the U.S. Forest Service, told the TimesStandard in the days following LeValley’s arrest, echoing the sentiments of many. “With all the work they have done over many years — and Mad River Biologists has set a very high standard for intellectual and financial integrity — I have no doubt that when this finishes up, they will be found not to have done anything wrong.” Well, the whole thing is now finished up, and LeValley has admitted to doing plenty wrong, including setting in motion a scheme that saw Mad River Biologists submit dozens of fake invoices billing the Yurok Tribe for survey work it had never done. When checks would come back from the tribe, Mad River Biologists would take 20 percent off the top before routing the rest of the money back to then Yurok Tribe Forestry Director Roland Raymond. The survey work LeValley claimed his company performed was primarily supposed to be looking for habitats for the northern spot-

ted owl in order to determine what tribal properties could be logged without harming the federally endangered birds’ nesting habitats. It remains unclear whether Raymond and LeValley’s conspiracy affected timber harvest plans or led to the destruction of potential owl habitats. In a letter submitted to a federal court after LeValley followed Raymond’s lead and pleaded guilty to a single federal count of conspiring to embezzle from an Indian tribal organization, LeValley addresses his conduct publicly for the first time since his arrest. “I accept full responsibility for the offense that I committed,” LeValley writes. “I agreed to allow the false invoices from Mad River Biologists to be submitted to the Yurok Tribe for work that we did not do. I then gave most of the money paid to MRB by the tribe back to Roland Raymond, although I kept some of the money and used it for MRB’s operations.” In a memorandum to the court from the federal government arguing that LeValley should serve a year in federal prison, we learned that some of that money kept for “MRB’s operations” went to pay LeValley more than $55,000 in 2009 and 2010, and to finance the re-roofing of an employee’s home. LeValley writes that he was lured into the conspiracy by Raymond, who LeValley says told him the pilfered funds would be used to pay forestry and fire crews to the ultimate benefit of the tribe and its members. (According to court documents, Raymond used all the funds he received back from LeValley’s company to support his gambling and drug addictions.) “I was shocked when I found out the truth about where the money went and that the fire crews that were supposedly getting paid by this scheme did not exist,” LeValley wrote. But the feds make plain in their memorandum that LeValley can’t play the innocent victim card, noting that it cannot be said he was “entirely naïve, or duped, regarding the significance of the arrangement.” The U.S. Attorney’s Office notes that investigators found numerous e-mails between LeValley and Raymond in which LeValley expresses concern about their arrangement coming to light. The memorandum also details how LeValley ignored a kind of intervention staged by his staff. “The evidence shows that in 2009, certain MRB employees were concerned about illegality when they realized the tribal money was moving through MRB with no corresponding work being done,” the memorandum states. “They felt strongly enough about it that they convened an in-person meeting with LeValley, who had moved away to Mendocino. At

that meeting, the employees questioned the legitimacy of the false invoicing and encouraged LeValley to end the practice. … LeValley chose otherwise and continued the scheme through 2010 over his employees’ objections.” In the next year in which LeValley continued the relationship with Raymond they embezzled another $500,000, according to the memorandum. On May 20, a judge put the case to rest, sentencing LeValley to serve 10 months in a still-to-be-determined minimum security federal prison — less than a third of Raymond’s three-year sentence —and ordering him to join Raymond in repaying more than $850,000 to the Yurok Tribe. Tribal Chairman Thomas O’Rourke voiced outrage at the sentence, calling it a “slap on the wrist” and dubbing LeValley “a crook.” In some circles, this view of LeValley the “crook” has served to either create or reinforce doubts about the science underlying his work, whether it was charting out MLPA protection zones, staking out nesting grounds for the snowy plovers or working to protect Marbled Murrelets. After all, the thinking goes, if he forged invoices, who knows what other work Mad River Biologists simply may have not performed? In his letter to the court, LeValley notes that his “reputation has been ruined.” But — while one can imagine a crime like this rendering LeValley an outcast from the biology community — that doesn’t seem to be the case. When the Pacific Seabird Group — a nonprofit group dedicated to monitoring and conserving sea bird populations — held its annual meeting in Juneau, Alaska in February, LeValley not only attended (after receiving a grant from the court allowing him to leave the state while his sentencing was pending) but presented a paper on pelagic cormorants. Of the 80 or so letters that flooded the court on LeValley’s behalf, more than a handful came from colleagues who raved about his scientific knowledge, generosity and moral fiber. In the last two years, an image has emerged of LeValley as a birder and environmentalist who knowingly and systematically circumvented federal and tribal governments by pretending to do surveys designed to protect a federally endangered species, at least in part, to line his own pockets. Then there’s the image of LeValley the environmental scientist, lover and protector, engrained over decades of work. As LeValley prepares to voluntarily surrender himself to federal prison on July 1, the greater communities of Humboldt and Mendocino counties continue struggling to reconcile these contrasting images. l

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The Faces of Humboldt photo contest

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Pictures that capture the faces of HUMBOLDT COUNTY. Photos should be submitted as high-resolution jpgs via email to photocontest@ northcoastjournal.com between May 18 and June 20. Pictures must be the real thing — no photoshop, please — and taken within the entry period. Prize TBA. For more information, visit northcoastjournal.com. northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

9

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Buddhaville at rest By Heidi Walters

heidiwalters@northcoastjournal.com

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t was June 24, 2008, and lightning fires were raging in the southern Humboldt hills. Then came 450 law enforcement agents — federal, state and local — in some 200 vehicles busting onto the smoky scene. You remember Operation Southern Sweep, right? No? Well, a brief recap: The officers weren’t there to help douse the fires. They were there for Buddha — Robert “Buddha” Juan — and his band of homesteaders who’d bought shares in his Lost Paradise Land Corp. and begun building roads, plunking down structures and, in many cases, planting pot gardens in the gated subdivision called Buddhaville on some 2,000 rugged acres of former timberland straddling Humboldt and Mendocino counties. For two years agents from the California Bureau of Narcotics Enforcement, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the IRS, the U.S. Postal Service and other entities had been investigating what they thought to be an illicit, large-scale pot growing and distribution business led by Juan. The personnel-intensive sweep, which included a few houses in other local communities, yielded what locals considered a piddling amount of pot (around 10,000 plants) cash ($160,000) and firearms (30). Of the 40-some residents of Buddhaville, 10 were federally charged with growing a bit of pot, and received generally light sentences. Juan got five years in the pen for growing and for buying the land with a money order from the U.S. Postal Service. But what happened to the land? It’s come almost full circle, in a sense. After the sweep, the feds seized it through forfeiture. The booted-off homesteaders lost, collectively, as much as $1 million in down payments, monthly rents and work they’d put into the land, Juan told the Los Angeles Times in 2011. After a few years, the previous owners of these properties — Bob Barnum Sr. and the Mendes family — to whom Juan still owed money, were given back their respective parcels. About two years ago, the Sanctuary Forest Land Trust convinced New Island Capital, a San Francisco “green investment” firm, to form a company called Lost Coast Forestlands LLC to go in and buy up former timberlands in the Mattole and South Fork Eel watersheds.

The land trust would then seek a grant to pay the new landowner for conservation easements. The idea, says Noah Levy, the land trust’s lands program director, was to make it possible for these lands to remain timberlands (with strict conservation restrictions), at a time when timber had become less lucrative than development. Lost Coast Forestlands’ purchases included nearly 1,700 acres of the former Buddhaville. And last week, the California Wildlife Conservation Board voted to allocate $3.2 million to purchase easements from Lost Coast Forestlands LLC, which include the Buddhaville property and others embracing the headwaters of Indian Creek, a major tributary to the coho salmon-vital South Fork Eel River, and the Mattole River. The trust found the Buddhaville development “really worrisome,” says Levy, and had tried to buy the property or an easement from Juan long before it was raided. “It was unpermitted development, often temporary development,” he says. “There were people living in trailers, often, and there were [50 or more] sites developed for outdoor marijuana. They were diverting fair amounts of water from those creeks, and from springs that feed those creeks. They were driving back and forth on poorly constructed roads, sometimes right in creeks. There was a risk of much worse things than dirt washing into the creeks, though to our great relief we found close to zero evidence of any toxic or harmful substances having been spilled and no evidence whatsoever of rodenticide or of indoor grows using diesel indoor lights.” Much of the land’s been cleaned up, some by Barnum, who fixed roads and removed some of the “huge trash piles, broken greenhouses, degraded cheap cabins and trailers,” says Levy. The easement requires the new landowner to harvest incrementally over a 30-year time frame, widens buffers around creeks and other water sources and protects some mature stands and the few remaining old-growth. The landowner’s resident caretaker, and the land trust, will keep an eye on things. And the trees will grow and, the hope is, the land will recover. l

Blog Jammin’

NO FENCE COULD HOLD THIS OYSTER IN THE KINETIC RACE ON SATURDAY, MAY 24.

ENVIRONMENT

Klamath in Congress

Legislation introduced May 21 by California and Oregon senators would turn a trio of Klamath Basin restoration and water-use agreements into law — after many, many, many years of hair-tearing and deliberations among a broad array of Klamath river users including tribes, ranchers, fishermen and more. The Upper Klamath Basin Comprehensive Agreement, the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement and Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement together would settle water rights disputes, balance water uses and authorize removal of four dams on the Klamath, among other things. They need Congressional approval to move forward, and California senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer and Oregon senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley have given it that push, according to their joint news release. In a press release, North Coast Congressman Jared Huffman lauded the legislation’s introduction as a “milestone” in a “historic effort” that “provides a framework for ending decades of conflict through the biggest dam removal project in the United States and an ambitious restoration and water allocation program.” The bill now goes to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee for review. — Heidi Walters l BUSINESS

Last Day for McKinleyville’s Paul’s Live From NY Pizza

Well, hell. Now there will be no more reason to detour off the highway, en route from Patrick’s Point to Eureka, for a pint and slice at Paul’s Live From New York Pizza in McKinleyville. The tasty joint’s last day was May 23,

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and, we like to imagine, included lotsa tears in beers. On the phone from Paul’s Eureka location, owner Paul Amato shared this news, and more. He said his landlords, Dave and Dana Figueiredo, sold to CVS the building that houses both the McKinleyville Paul’s Live from N.Y. pizzeria and Figueiredo’s Video Movies, and gave Amato a 30-day notice (Amato says his lease is up June 1). If the sale news is true, CVS likely will put in a new pharmacy there (see our previous coverage of CVS’s purchase of the McKinleyville Lima’s Pharmacy). Dana Figueiredo declined to comment when we reached her by phone, and CVS said it has nothing to announce presently. Amato says he’s relocating all of the equipment from the McKinleyville restaurant to the former Porter Street Barbecue site on Samoa Boulevard in Arcata, where he plans to open a new pizzaria within the next four to five months. — Heidi Walters l MEDICAL

Care Home Shut Down, Owner Suspended

Cash Flows into Supes Races

The state has shut down Chamberlain’s Residential Care Facility for the elderly, at 3252 Lucia Road in Eureka, and suspended the license of the home’s operator, Gina Chamberlain, accusing her of numerous health and safety code violations, including taking a client’s prescription narcotics for her own use. The state’s “order of temporary suspension of license” was issued May 5, and the five residents of the six-client capacity home were relocated to other facilities before the home’s shutdown on May 8, says Michael Weston, spokesman for the Community Care Licensing Division of the state’s Department of Social Services.

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In its complaint requesting the suspension of Chamberlain’s license to operate, the state alleges that Chamberlain not only took a client’s drugs for her own use, but also told a client’s nurse practitioner that the client was taking prescribed hydrocodone “several times a day for weeks” even though the client wasn’t; locked a client in a bedroom and blocked the door with a baby gate; failed to give a client medication properly; overcharged two clients, a husband and wife, by $13,100; cashed $52,400 worth of checks from a client’s checking account; and took a client’s car and Rolex watch. The complaint requests that Chamberlain be prohibited “for the remainder of [her] life” from having anything to do with a state-licensed care facility. Chamberlain has the right to appeal the suspension before an administrative law judge, says Weston. The Journal’s attempts to reach Chamberlain were unsuccessful. — Heidi Walters l POLITICS The last batch of campaign finance report statements came in May 22 to the Humboldt County Elections Office, with the county’s four supervisorial candidates reporting raising a total of more than $108,000 in the filing period, which ran March 18 through May 17. That means an average of about $1,800 poured into local supes campaigns daily during the 60-day filing period, with incumbent 5th District Supervisor Ryan Sundberg leading the cash race, reporting donations totaling more than $41,000. If there was a surprise in the reporting period, it would have to be that 4th District challenger Chris Kerrigan outraised incumbent Virginia Bass for the period by

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more than $6,000. Kerrigan, who has made repeated mention on the campaign trail of being up against “big money” in the election, still trails Bass in year-to-date contributions (Bass reports having raised $42,863 to Kerrigan’s $39,744) and yearto-date expenditures, with Bass having shelled out $81,439 on the 2014 campaign trail to Kerrigan’s $35,921. For a more in-depth look at the reports, visit www.northcoastjournal.com. —Thadeus Greenson

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11

‘Bye, Folks!’ Humboldt’s king of TV commercials rides into the sunset. Can he be replaced?

By Grant Scott-Goforth

C

orky Cornwell, the boisterous, extroverted cellular phone hawker you know from decades of television advertisements, is retiring. Go ahead — let out a sigh. That might be a sigh of relief for one less brazen TV commercial, or a sigh of lament for the loss of one of the county’s most recognizable faces, a symbol of independence and commerce. Corky wormed his way into the hearts and minds of the North Coast with a calculated torrent of commercials with loud volumes and louder visuals. The rosy faced ex-timber man drove many people up the walls with his advertising regimen — including, at times, the national chain whose services he sold. But there was a certain charm to Corky’s willingness to be goofy, bizarre and outright obnoxious, not to mention his own acknowledgement that the commercials helped build a thriving business serving more than 12,000 customers. What is it about local TV commercials? They’re instantly recognizable — our media-trained eyes are attuned to the subtle visual differences between the images produced by a moneyed national ad company and those of a small local filmmaker. They are high concept, often matched in equal measure by low production values. Gaudy graphics? Usually. Discomfort in front of the camera? That, or an abundance of hamminess. Often they’re hastily written, shot in a dimly lit store and edited within hours of air time. And it shows. There’s something innately American about locally produced commercials. The make-something-of-yourself, I-did-itmy-way, big-fish-in-a-small-pond, damn-it-all glory of TV-era capitalism. The commercials are glorious, they’re changing, and, in some ways, they’re improving.

While producing TV

AFTER TWO DECADES OF PITCHING CELL PHONES AND DOMINATING THE LOCAL AIRWAVES, CORKY CORNWELL HAS RETIRED.

WHILE MANY LAUGHED, OR EVEN SCOFFED, AT CORNWELL’S COSTUMES, ANTICS AND PROPS, HE CREDITS HIS ONSLAUGHT OF COMMERCIALS WITH BUILDING HIS EMPIRE, WHICH GREW TO INCLUDE SIX STORES AND MORE THAN 12,000 CUSTOMERS.

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

commercials may not carry the same clout as, say, feature films, it’s one way for visual artists to stay in creative shape and make a living. It’s an opportunity to practice technical skills both in front

MALCOLM DESOTO, A ONEMAN PRODUCTION CREW, HAS PUT TOGETHER COMMERCIALS STRETCHING FROM “REALLY CHEESY” TO “SERIOUS AND SOMBER” FOR CLIENTS RANGING FROM LOCAL CASINOS TO THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE, TYPICALLY CHARGING BETWEEN $1,000 AND $2,000 FOR A 30-SECOND SPOT. PHOTO BY ACE ASELTINE

of and behind the camera — writing, filming, lighting, editing, acting — while putting out content that people see and recognize. Not only must commercial producers sell themselves to ad-curious businesses, they must sell that business’ products or services to the world. That means a certain understanding of the area and the people who populate it. Malcolm DeSoto can often be seen in Old Town Eureka with a crisp haircut and a camera tripod over his shoulder or a camera bag in his hands. He’s been producing commercials for six or seven years, mostly here on the North Coast. It’s pretty much a one-man job, he says, though he’ll enlist physical help when he’s actually shooting

a commercial. Writing, editing, special effects — that’s his wheelhouse. “For the most part it’s pretty solitary,” he says. Business was scarce when DeSoto first started — he even produced commercials for free for a while in order to build a client base. But now he has steady work, and commercials are his “bread and butter.” “I have a base set of clients that I do a lot of work for,” he says. “TV stations, other businesses, the film commission. I don’t have to do too much soliciting nowadays.” In larger markets, videographers get tapped to shoot music videos, indie films and other projects. Those kinds of opportunities are rare up here, meaning many producers turn to commercials or day jobs to make ends meet. DeSoto was hired to edit Eureka resident Maria Matteoli’s film The Wine of Summer, but his day-to-day work is largely local commercials. DeSoto’s clients range from casinos to the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office, and the tone of his work ranges from “really cheesy” to “serious and somber,” he says. Small companies rely heavily on his creativity, he says, while larger companies that have their own marketing departcontinued on next page

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13

continued from previous page

ments dictate the content and message of commercials. DeSoto says he typically charges between $1,000 and $2,000 to produce a 30-second TV spot — though he said that can vary greatly. Commercials produced by TV stations typically cost $375 to $500 — depending on the sophistication. DeSoto says he’s not interested in being a marketing expert. “Really, what I love is making things,” he says. “As far as demographics, airtime buys — that’s boring to me. I stick to production.” Montel Vanderhorck, a filmmaker, commercial producer and associate professor of digital media at College of the Redwoods, says the modern media landscape is changing the video advertising model, if only slightly. While the headache-inducing repetitiveness of the jingle/slogan/bombast type of commercial will never really go away, some businesses are turning toward more timeless and professional advertising that looks, well, less like advertising. Businesses want ads that won’t look dated in a few years, that can be shared online and that tell a story about the product, Vanderhorck says. There’s no 30-second time limit for online ads, no costs to post them on Facebook and company websites, where the hope is they will go viral. Look, for example, at the Humboldt Made ads produced by a variety of locals over the last several years. They live online and can easily be shared with prospective clients, distributors and customers at conventions or through social media.

Vanderhorck produces commercials occasionally, he says, but other full-time work keeps him occupied. He hears about gigs word-of-mouth, typically, and takes on the projects when he can give attention to detail. “It’s more of a way for us to support our filmmaking habit,” he says, “to pay for our own projects.” Most small businesses, Vanderhorck RICK ST. CHARLES (FAR LEFT) AND MATT ST. CHARLES (FAR RIGHT) TAKE ADVERTISING PHOTOS OF TREVOR HARPER OF says, turn to local TV HARPER MOTORS. RICK ST. CHARLES MADE COMMERCIALS FOR HARVEY HARPER UNTIL HE DIED SEVERAL YEARS AGO. stations, which have PHOTO BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH their own commercial production teams and TV station “if you want something quick package air time with production, pricand stupid,” he says, though he’s quick to ing out independent producers. “That’s got into the add, “people who work at the station are how they kind of keep the small guy cellular business in 1994 because he was underpaid and on a tight deadline. I’m not out,” he says. bored. After 32 years as chip buyer for trying to bash on them.” Rowdy Kelley worked for Channel 3 Louisiana Pacific, he retired — already a Vanderhorck thinks that higher-quality from 1997 to 2001, including a year on millionaire. “Cell phones was an area that productions will become more and more the commercial production team. He had some interest,” he says, adding he popular. “I don’t think people want to be said they would crank out a commercial never thought every person would carry the next Corky Cornwell,” he says. — talk with the client, write, shoot and one. “It just went nuts.” Actually, says Robin D’Aguanno, News edit the 30-second spot — in six hours. During a recent interview, Cornwell was Channel 3’s local sales manager, it’s just That doesn’t leave a lot of time for the in the midst of packing up the large office the opposite. creative juices to flow. Kelley left Chanin his Fourth Street Redwood Coast CelShe says business owners saw the value nel 3 to work on The Majestic when it lular building. Despite his insistence that in Cornwell’s larger-than-life — and therefilmed in Ferndale, and has been workthe office was sparsely decorated, photos, fore unforgettable — persona. “Everyone ing on national commercials and other memorabilia and trinkets still covered the wanted to be Corky,” she says. “It’s an projects since. walls and surfaces of the room. enthusiasm that’s infectious. Good, bad Vanderhorck says the quality of shootHe’s not nearly the blustery figure he or ugly.” n-cut commercials suffers. Turn to the cuts on television, but Cornwell is ani-

LOCAL TELEVISION COMMERCIALS COME IN ALL STYLES — FROM THE WHACKY OFFERINGS OF NORTHWOOD AUTO PLAZA (RIGHT) AND SOLE SAVERS (MIDDLE) TO THE RELATIVELY STRAIGHTFORWARD PITCHES OF MOORE’S SLEEPWORLD (FAR RIGHT) — AND COST ANYWHERE FROM $375 TO $2,000 TO PRODUCE.

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Corky Cornwell

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mated, hopping out of his chair to point out framed articles about his business and to explain the “tape measure trick” that convinced him to retire — again. Stretched out to 80 inches, Cornwell says that last 8 inches — he’s 72 years old — looks awfully small compared to all the inches that came before. He waxes political (“Uncle Sam’s got a pretty good hunk of [my money]”), laments the county’s embrace of environmentalism and its effect on the timber industry (“I still don’t like the spotted owls”), and boasts charmingly about his grandkids and pets (“We’re kitty people”). He’s retiring to focus on his family, travel in his new 40-foot RV, and — he hints — because things stopped being so cheery with U.S. Cellular. Cornwell built a small empire over 20 years as a U.S. Cellular agent, at one time commanding six stores and 12,283 customers (a number he rattles off from memory). He’s selling the business to another U.S. Cellular agent based out of Ukiah — a personal friend, he says. He won’t divulge the selling price, but not because he’s shy. “I would if I could — but I can’t,” he says. He’s happy to point out that he’ll never have to worry about money. Cornwell began running zany commercials shortly after he started Redwood Coast Cellular, starting out as an Uncle Sam character (“I want YOU to have a cell phone”) and later inhabiting whatever historical era or fictional universe appealed to him at the time. His favorite? The mad scientist commercial. You can tell from the photos in his office alone that Cornwell’s a nostal-

gist. He says he’s kept all of his costumes and props from 20 years of commercials — and he’s close to needing a third storage unit. Cornwell hired a video production company early on but quickly realized he could produce the videos himself — saving money. “I wrote all those commercials,” he says. “So I take full blame for that.” He credits the commercials for much of the success of Redwood Coast Cellular. By focusing on marketing himself, rather than the company or its parent company, U.S. Cellular, Cornwell says he became a recognizable icon that drew people into his stores. At one point, Cornwell, beaming in a pink button-up shirt, stands up and points to an empty spot over the doorway to his office. That, he says, is where he hung the framed obituary of Harvey Harper, the late owner of Harper Motors. Harper had, in the 1970s and ’80s, been infamous for his own wacky TV commercials. He wrestled alligators in the median between the north and southbound lanes of U.S. Highway 101, and became known for his willingness to be silly in the name of good business. “I’ve always looked up to Harvey,” Cornwell says. “My wish was that I could be the Harvey Harper of cellular phones. And I think I’ve come close to that.” If you watched TV between 1994 and 2014, Cornwell was inescapable. But along the way, Cornwell’s relationship with U.S. Cellular seemed to sour. He is hesitant to talk about it, but it’s clear

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The Faces of Humboldt photo contest

The Journal is looking for your best portraits. Pictures that capture the faces of HUMBOLDT COUNTY.

Photos should be submitted as high-resolution jpgs via email to photocontest@ northcoastjournal.com between May 18 and June 20. Pictures must be the real thing — no photoshop, please — and taken within the entry period. Prize TBA. For more information, visit northcoastjournal.com.

continued from previous page that the commercials were a sticking point. “U.S. Cellular is a real controller of the way you handle your company,” Cornwell said. And the company didn’t like his ads. Or, at least, it wanted him to tone them down. Cornwell hired DeSoto when he was first starting his production company. “He was just kind of doing it for the fun of it,” DeSoto says. “He didn’t care if they were silly or whatever.” But U.S. Cellular did, and Cornwell asked DeSoto to add some polish to the Corky brand. “He hired me to basically try to make more professional looking ads to fit within the guidelines of their corporate branding,” DeSoto says. U.S. Cellular franchises have an advertising co-op, DeSoto said, meaning they all pitch in to have certain branding designed and produced, and it’s expected to appear in local commercials. That didn’t last long in Cornwell’s case, DeSoto says. “I think he gave up and said ‘I’ll keep doing these weird ads until they fire me.’” Cornwell says he figured out a deal

— his company would provide cell phone service to News Channel 3 in exchange for commercial productions and air time. That way he wasn’t spending pooled money on the advertising that was so near and dear to his business. “There’s ways around everything,” he says. “You just have to be smart enough to know them.” That only lasted so long. “I feel that we could have done quite well if we’d been left alone a little bit more,” Cornwell says, appearing sad for the first time that morning. “I regret that I didn’t retire a year and a half ago. There’s just so much time that I owe to my family. When U.S. Cellular started to take control three years ago it stopped being as much fun as it should be.” Still, he insists, he’s leaving the business with “hope and visions of a wonderful retirement.” That leaves room on the airwaves for the next Corky Cornwell, the third coming of Harvey Harper. Who will it be, Humboldt? ●

continued from previous page

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Heavy-duty, galvanized steel construction. Designed for longevity. Grease fittings at pivot points. Telescoping steel tubing adjusts up to 20′ wide and up to 10′ tall. Works on any length greenhouse. Assemble and install with simple hand tools. Can be retrofitted to older greenhouses at anytime in the growing season. Optional PUSH ROD available for even more leverage on larger greenhouses or heavier tarp.

available at OPEN EVERY DAY 822-9888 76 South G. St., Arcata (Across from the Marsh) HUMBOLDT GROWN SINCE 1987

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

The Golden Arm™ tarp puller consists of two heavy duty pivoting steel arms. Each arm is mounted to approx. two cubic feet (three 90lb bags of Quick-Mix) concrete at either end of the greenhouse.

Available at your local garden supply shop or online @ www.harvestexcel.com To carry our products in your retail store, Call: 707 707-986 707-986 986-4430 986-4430 Email: sales@harvestexcel.com

boBaraZZI

Around Humboldt County Photos by Bob Doran northcoastjournal.com/bobarazzi

JERRI WAGNER JOYOUSLY CROSSES THE FINISH LINE OF THE 46TH ANNUAL KINETIC GRAND CHAMPIONSHIP ON THE ROLLING, SPINNING SCULPTURE “UP!” THE 42-MILE MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND TREK CONCLUDED ON FERNDALE’S MAIN STREET ON MONDAY, MAY 27.

NICARAGUA-BORN GUITARIST ANGEL FARGAS PLAYS FOR DINERS AT CARMELA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT IN MCKINLEYVILLE EVERY FRIDAY EVENING.

VIETNAM VET “DIGITAL” DAN LAWRENCE PREPARES TO LEAD THE HONOR GUARD IN FERNDALE’S MEMORIAL DAY PARADE.

Thursday, Thursday, May May 15th 15th thru thru Saturday, Saturday, May May 31st 31st

*Sales Excludes iComfort iSeries Student Packages / Sale Items

OUTLET 20% - 50% OF F

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SAVINGS ON

SOUTHERLAND northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

17

DANNY STOCKWELL AS VALJEAN, CRAIG BENSON AS JAVERT. PHOTO COURTESY NORTH COAST REPERTORY

Baritones on the Barricades

Les Miz sings at North Coast Repertory By William S. Kowinski stagematters@northcoastjournal.com

L

es Miserables, the musical now on stage at North Coast Repertory Theatre in Eureka, opened on Broadway with expensive grandeur. In his 1987 review, New York Times critic Frank Rich noted the revolving stage and the prodigious lighting and stage effects that included tilting towers and a floor that peeled back “to create the

illusion of a sprawling, multilayered Paris on the brink of upheaval.” This is the show that dazzled audiences for more than 6,000 performances and led to the sumptuous 2012 Hollywood film version. North Coast Rep performs it on a stationary stage with a single abstract set. No props much bigger than tables and chairs get moved around to set the

A complete resource for kids of all ages!

2014 ONLINE NOW!

Summer Camps and Activity Programs Visual and Performing Arts Nature and Science Sports, Athletics and Adventure

www.northcoastjournal.com/SOF2014

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

scenes. Yet this production is impressive and effective, as its focus rests almost entirely on performing the music and the story. The story is set in the early 19th century, based on the enormous novel by Victor Hugo, who was something of a French Charles Dickens. Hugo dramatized the lives of the poor and the effects of society’s injustices. He also reached a popular audience, as Dickens did, with extreme and memorable characters, rich historical context, occasional horror and forthright sentimentality. These themes and qualities, if not all of the plot twists, are in the musical as well. The NCRT production has assembled a stellar cast. In a rare local stage appearance, Dan Stockwell exhibits a notable vocal range as Jean Valjean, the central character. Craig Benson is commanding as his antagonist, Inspector Javert. Greta Stockwell is a sympathetic Fantine, Nanette Voss-Herlihy a sparkling Cosette. As Cosette’s lover, Jordan Dobbins deftly manages his transformation from a lovestruck student to a wiser and stronger young man. Perhaps accentuated by the lack of stage artifice, the central figures don’t dominate dramatically — the secondary characters have equally important moments. As the nefarious Thénardiers, Andrea Zvaleko and Tiggerbouncer Custodio provide darkly comic shenanigans. Luke Sikora has perhaps the most operatic singing part as the revolutionary leader Enjolras, which he performs with stirring effect. Some of the most thrilling vocal moments come from Jo Kuzelka as Eponine. They are only a few members of this skilled ensemble, which includes at least a half dozen actors and singers who’ve had principal roles in other local shows. A couple of relative newcomers exhibit precocious talent and stage presence that can’t be taught: Sylvie Benson as young Cossette and Aiden Vergen as a confident, capering Gavroche. The efficiency of the production alone inspires admiration and the audience’s confidence. In three hours of almost non-stop music, the coordination between the unseen 10-piece orchestra backstage and the singers and action on stage is virtually flawless. The orchestra itself is excellent. Angela GaliotoMarquez on violin and Kira Weiss on cello, in particular, produce heightened moments as singular as any of the singers. Under the direction of Elisabeth Harrington, the other players include Jonathan Webster, Levi Walls, Yuriah Lydon, Nicholas Durant, Leon Hamilton, Rebeca Ramos, Phil Sams, Melissa Gussin

and Cody Forbes. The efficiency is also to the credit of director and stage designer Calder Johnson, and the quality of musical performance to music directors Harrington and Voss-Herlihy. With crisp diction, the singers make themselves understood. For the uninitiated, the music (by Claude-Michel Shonberg, lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer) blends classical and modern influences (Bizet, Kurt Weill) with pop. I’ve heard it described as “cheesy in a good way.” Better than most ‘80s musicals, it has striking moments, and at worst it’s transparent and inoffensive. Stage limitations do have consequences. With few specific visual cues, it akes a while to figure out where some scenes are set. Relatively colorless costuming that makes a meaningful point in the lavish, original production makes characters hard to identify from time to time in this one, especially since some actors play several roles. Without effects, it loses some dramatic power and the singing alone can’t always maintain the illusion — at times the battle scene seems more like boys playing cowboys in the backyard. The lack of visual interest might also make the show seem longer. Serious devotees of this musical may notice that a few characters seem to have been cut or combined. But perhaps this paring down returns the show to its roots. It began as a concept album and a concert presentation in France, before producer Cameron Mackintosh (Cats, Phantom of the Opera) and the Royal Shakespeare Company turned it into a London-to-Broadway extravaganza. The NCRT production brings Les Miserables back to its essence and its origins, to the singers and the music. North Coast audiences may well be pleased and proud. Rae Robison designed costumes, Telfer Reynolds the lighting, Elizabeth Holverson the make-up, Laura Rhinehart the properties. Keili Simmons Marble is assistant director, and Kira Gallaway the stage manager, with Tyler Elwell backstage. Les Miserables is performed at NCRT weekends through June 21. 442-6278, www.ncrt.net.

Coming Up:

Members of Dell’Arte International School’s graduating class of 2014 present The Finals: an evening of 10-minute plays as their final projects, May 29 through May 31 at 8 p.m. in the Carlo Theatre. Audience members are asked to make comments and give grades. 668-5663, www.dellarte.com. l

Team Cilantro Come to the green side Cilantro Dip Ingredients and method: 1 bunch cilantro, roots trimmed off 2 green onions, finely chopped 4 oz. cream cheese, softened 1 pint light sour cream zest of 1 lemon juice of 1/4 lemon salt Gently rinse the cilantro and pat it dry with a paper towel. With a sharp knife,

THE MEXICAN MOJITO. VIVA CILANTRO.

PHOTO BY JENNIFER FUMIKO CAHILL.

By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill tabletalk@northcoastjournal.com

C

ilantro is the Adam Sandler of the herb world: You love it or you hate it. Apparently, whether it tastes like the joyful rush of summer or something you’d use to get engine oil off your hands is at least partly genetic. One hopes that, along with curing cancer, scientists will one day find a cure the cilantro-aversion-afflicted so that every man, woman and child can enjoy a steaming bowl of pho with its proper garnish.

Part of me wants to believe people who hate it can change. Maybe you weren’t born this way — maybe you just haven’t met the right dish. Have you tried changing? I’ll pray for you. Even if you haven’t drunk the green Kool-Aid, you may want to drink this. Likhi Tanski, the bartender at Gabriel’s in Eureka, took up the challenge of concocting a cilantro cocktail for us. Not such a wild idea, since some gins, like Hendrick’s, are made with the stuff. Tanski came up

with a Mexican mojito ($7). He muddled a few leaves in the bottom of the glass and filled it with ice. He kept other leaves whole and shook them with ice, some pale gold St. Germain (a fragrant elderflower liqueur that’s sweet enough to skip the usual sugar), a generous splash of Herradura Silver tequila and a squeeze of lime. Strained into the glass with a sprig of cilantro and a curl of lime zest, it tastes garden fresh and lightly sweet, like a snap pea off the vine with the zip of lime and the mild flavor of the herb. If you can still hate cilantro in this, there is no hope for you. And yet, even for those of us who want to roll around in heaps of cilantro like a dog in a leaf pile, for whom there is never quite enough room in a soft taco,

chop the leaves and stems as finely as possible. Save a sprig for garnish. Mix the softened cream cheese and sour cream in a large bowl until smooth. Add the lemon zest and juice and mix well. Finally, mix in the green onion and cilantro. Salt to taste, keeping in mind whether you’ll be dipping sweet spears of red bell pepper or salty chips. Cover and chill before serving.

sometimes that big bouquet of fluffy leaves goes unused. Recipes only call for so much of the stuff, and in a week the delicate leaves whose perfume we inhaled with rolled-back eyes at the farmers market go all black and slimy. Cilantro, Chinese parsley, coriander — whatever your name is, you deserve better. Use up the rest of the bunch, stems and all, with this simple dip. There are those who will look at the sour cream and cream cheese and wonder about subbing in Greek yogurt to make it healthier. Not a problem. If it’s nonfat, just make sure to strain off the water and dry the washed cilantro well. The dip will be runnier, but still yummy and very nice as a garnish for soup or grilled meats. ●

The Sea Grill Always serving you the finest and freshest of our local catch Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489

316 E ST. • OLD TOWN, EUREKA • 443-7187 DINNER MON-SAT 5-9 •LUNCH TUE-FRI 11-2

Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

19

ARCATA + NORTH EUREKA + SOUTH ON NEXT PAGE

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID venue

THE ALIBI 744 Ninth St., Arcata 822-3731 ARCATA COMMUNITY CENTER 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway 822-7091 ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 1251 Ninth St.,822-1575

thur 5/29

fri 5/30

835 J Street Arcata (707) 822-9474 3foodscafe.com open at 5:30 tues-sun April-May – Art by Sierra Martin Check out our facebook page for news and specials!

sun 6/1

m-t-w 6/2-4

The Mighty Ducks (film) 5:30pm $5, All Ages

[T] ClownsNotBombs Spaghetti Western (theater) 7pm $5 [W] Sci-Fi Night w/ Zontar, the Thing from Venus (film) 6pm Free w/$5 food/bev, All Ages

Jazz Night 7pm Free

[M] Quiz Night 7pm Free

Tech N9ne w/Krizz Kaliko, Freddie Gibbs, et al. (rap) 8pm $25

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St., 822-1220

3 foods cafe

sat 5/31

CV and Billions & Billions (rock) 10pm $5

Tommy (film) 7:30pm $5

Open Mic BLONDIES 822-3453 7pm Free 420 E. California Ave., Arcata BLUE LAKE CASINO Karaoke w/KJ Leonard WAVE LOUNGE 8pm Free 777 Casino Way, 668-9770 CAFE MOKKA 495 J St., Arcata 822-2228 Karaoke w/DJ Marv CENTRAL STATION 839-2013 9pm Free 1631 Central Ave., McKinleyville CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO Fusion w/Accurate Productions FIREWATER LOUNGE DJs 9pm Free 27 Scenic Drive, Trinidad 677-3611 CLAM BEACH INN 839-0545 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville CRUSH 1101 H St. #3, Arcata 825-0390 Jimi Jeff’s Open Jam THE FORKS (530) 629-2679 8:30pm 38998 Hwy 299, Willow Creek Phil Lesh & Friends HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St., Arcata 826-2739 (live webcast) 4:30pm Price TBA HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY 1 Harpst St., Arcata 826-3928

Random Acts of Comedy (improv) 7:30pm $6

Vintage Rock N’ Soul (rock) 9pm Free

Silver Hammer (Beatles) 9pm Free

Joe and Me (Greek) 8pm Free

Good Company (Celtic) 8pm Free [W] Open Mic with Jimi Jeff 8pm Free

The Smashed Glass (folkpunk) Doug Fir and the 2x4s (rock) 9pm Free 9pm Free Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 10pm Free

Rita’s on Harris

$2 Well Drinks Extremo Happy Hour 4-5pm

& Regular Happy Hour Rita’s on 5th Street $4 Jumbo Margaritas $2 Pints & Full Size Drinks Regular Happy Hour M-Sa 3-5pm Rita’s in Arcata $2 Pints • $3 Margarita M-F 3-5pm Eureka 1111 5th St • 443-5458 427 W. Harris St • 476-8565 Arcata 855 8th St. Suite 3 • 822-1010

RitasCafe.com

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

[T] Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free [W] Blues Explosion (open jam) 8:30pm Free [T] Game Night 5pm Free

Phil Lesh & Friends (live webcast) 4:30pm Price TBA Eureka Symphony Finale 7pm $20, $5

Eureka Symphony Finale 7pm $20, $5

®

HAPPY HOURS

Karaoke w/KJ Leonard 8pm Free

HUNGRY? Use the GPS on your phone to see nearby spots, or search by neighborhood, type of food, price or even those that feature local ingredients. It’s all there.

m.northcoastjournal.com

arcata • blue lake •mckinleyville trinidad • willow creek venue

thur 5/29

clubs, concerts and cafés fri 5/30

‘70s Party with King Maxwell Motherlode w/Dj Logic, Bill JAMBALAYA (DJ) 9:30 pm $5, $3 Summers (funk) 10pm Price TBA 915 H St., Arcata 822-4766 LARRUPIN 822-4766 1658 Patricks Point Drive, Trinidad La Musique Diabolique (jazz) LIBATION 7pm Free 761 Eighth St., Arcata 825-7596 LIGHTHOUSE GRILL 677-0077 355 Main St., Trinidad Songwriter Circle of Death IV The Blackberry Bushes LOGGER BAR 668-5000 10pm Free Stringbrand 9pm Free 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake MAD RIVER BREWERY Fred and Jr. (jazz) The Living Rooms (acoustic) 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake 6pm Free 6pm Free 668-5680 MOSGO’S 826-1195 2461 Alliance Road, Arcata OCEAN GROVE 677-3543 480 Patrick’s Pt. Dr., Trinidad No Covers (jazz) Lao-Tzu’s Army (rock/funk) REDWOOD CURTAIN BREW 8pm Free 8pm Free 550 South G St. #6, Arcata 826-7222 Sam Sidwell (TBA) ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 9pm Free 937 10th St., Arcata 826-WINE Rude Lion Sound (DJ) DJ Music SIDELINES 10pm $2 10pm $2 732 Ninth St., Arcata 822-0919 SILVER LINING 839-0304 3561 Boeing Ave., McKinleyville SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave., McK 839-7580 SUSHI SPOT 839-1222 1552 City Center Road, McK. DJ Itchie Fingaz TOBY & JACKS (glitch/hip-hop) 9pm Free 764 Ninth St., Arcata 822-4198

sat 5/31

Submit your events online! Deadline noon Friday

sun 6/1

m-t-w 6/2-4

DGS Sundaze (EDM DJs) 9pm $5

[M] The Getdown (local funk) 9pm [W] The Whomp (DJs) 9pm $5 [W] Aber Miller (jazz) 6pm Free

Ali Chaudhary, Baron Wolfe (jazz) 7pm Free Cadillac Ranch (alt. country) 9pm Free

[T] Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm Free Kelly Busse (vocals) 5pm Free Potluck (food) 6pm Free

[W] Open Mic 8pm Free [M] DJ Itchie Fingaz 6pm Free [T] Chris Jamison (folk) 6pm Free [W] Pints for NonProfits (Friends of the Dunes) All Day

The Only Alibi You’ll Ever Need!

Open Daily 8am - 2am

Bradley Dean (rock/country) 4pm Free [M] Dancehall Mondayz w/Rude Lion 9pm $5 Johnny Azari (alt. blues) 8pm Free Anna Hamilton (blues) 9pm Free Sidelines Saturdays w/Rude Lion 10pm $2 Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free Savage Henry Stand Up Comedy 9pm $5 DJ Music 10pm Free

Open Mic w/Chris Parreira 7:30pm Free

Trivia Night 8pm Free

[W] Salsa! (lessons + dance) 9pm $5 [T] Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Free [M] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 8pm Free [M] Anemones of the State (jazz) 6pm Free [W] Reggae Wednesdayz w/Rude Lion 10pm Free

744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

HAPI HOUR

DAILY DRINK SPECIALS

$2

Pints $3 Well Drinks $5 Hot Sake Flasks $6 Martinis Special Hapi Menu OPEN @ 4PM Yakitori • Mini Rainbow Poke Spicy Jalapeno Hamachi Plate ...and MUCH MORE!

ENDS

5:30PM

At the Hotel Arcata 708 8th Street Arcata • (707) 822-1414 • www.tomoarcata.com

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email your tip (Is it a burger? A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for the Hum Plate blog. Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

21

Restaurant 301 & Carter House Inns 301 L St, Eureka (707) 444-8062

EUREKA + SOUTH

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT GRID

Happy Hour Mon-Fri, 4-6pm

venue

thur 5/29

BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial St., Eureka 443-3770 BEAR RIVER CASINO 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta 733-9644

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm Free

ARCATA + NORTH ON PREVIOUS PAGE

fri 5/30

Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free Hunter & The Dirty Jacks (rock) 9pm Free Ballroom: Rusty Evans & Ring of Fire (Cash tribute) 7pm $25

BENBOW LAKE REC AREA 1600 Hghway 101 Benbow 95542 CHAPALA CAFÉ 201 Second St., Eureka 443-9514 CUTTEN INN 445-9217 3980 Walnut Drive, Eureka

*LIMIT TWO PER CUSTOMER

FROM OUR BAR MENU: HUMMUS • FRIED CALAMARI FILET SLIDERS • DEVILED EGGS 301 STYLE • FISH TACOS • ARTISAN CHEESE PLATE • CARTER DOG

www.carterhouse.com

✩ W O M E N -O W N E D ✩ G ENTLEMEN ’ S C L U B

Nightly 6pm-3am

2 1 + O N LY

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923 King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka

12~ BEERS ~

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free

sat 5/31

m-t-w 6/2-4

Summer Arts and Music Festival 9:30am-10pm $15, $25

[M] Summer Arts and Music Festival 9:30am-10pm $15, $25

[W] Bar-Fly Karaoke 9pm Free

Austin Alley & the Rustlers (country/rock) 9pm Free Summer Arts and Music Festival 9:30am-10pm $15, $25 The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm Free

[T] Dale Winget (acoustic) 6pm Free

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 Seventh St. 497-6093

Shugafoot (jazz) 9pm Free

Staff Infection (rock) 9pm Free

EUREKA THEATER 612 F St., 845-8795 GALLAGHER’S IRISH PUB 139 Second St., Eureka 442-1177 INK ANNEX 442-8413 47B w. Third St., Eureka

Pressure Anya Shuffle Dance Party (DJs) 10pm TBA

Escape Fire (film) 6pm Free Seabury Gould and Evan Morden (Irish) 7pm Free Antisect and Whitehorse (punk/metal) 7pm $14

Papa Paul (folk) 7pm Free

Cory Goldman and Raising Grain (bluegrass) 7pm Free

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St., Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St., Eureka 444-2017 THE PLAYROOM 11109 Main St, Fortuna 725-5438 PERSIMMONS GALLERY 1055 Redway Dr., Redway 923-2748

sun 6/1

[W] Comedy Open Mikey 9pm Free [T] USGGO (funk improv) 9pm Free

[W] Open Mic w/Mike Anderson 7pm Free Rude Lion (reggae) 10pm Free 3-Legged Dog (rock) 7pm Free

Pressure Anya (DJs) 10pm Free

Fiddle and Pine (bluegrass) 7pm Free

[T] Karaoke w/DJ Marv 9pm Free [W] Chris McCurdy, Peter Childs (folk) 7pm Free

It’s here! 2014 WEDDING & PARTY GUIDE

ON draft

FIND IT NOW ON NEWSSTANDS AND AT LOCAL WEDDING & PARTY RETAILERS

Fresh, farm to table products made same day in house.

HALF OFF COVER, Before 10 p.m. INSIDE VENUES | JEWELRY | GOWNS & TUXEDOES | FLOWERS | BAKERIES AND MORE

Search the complete directory online at northcoastjournal.com/wedding

22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

For Reservations call 268-3852 Open at 5pm Tues.-Sat. 511 2nd Street • Old Town Eureka

eureka • fernbridge •ferndale • fortuna garberville • loleta • redway venue

RED LION HOTEL R.J. GRIN’S LOUNGE 1929 Fourth St., Eureka 445-0844 SHAMUS T BONES 407-3550 191 Truesdale St., Eureka THE SHANTY 444-2053 213 Third St., Eureka THE SIREN’S SONG TAVERN 325 Second St., Eureka 442-8778 THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244 THE WINE SPOT 497-6236 234 F St., Eureka

thur 5/29

clubs, concerts and cafés

fri 5/30

sat 5/31

Find live music and more! sun 6/1

m-t-w 6/2-4

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 9pm Free, 21+

Happy Hour

Falling Rocks (country) 7pm Free Savage Henry, Comedy Open Mic 9pm Free Brian Laidlaw (folk) 8pm Free

The Haunt (DJs) 9pm Free

Swan Sunday (eclectic and request) 8:30pm Free Lorelle Meets the Obsolete (rock) 10pm Donations Accepted

Buddy Reed and the Rip It Ups (booty shakin’ blues) 10pm Free Michael Dayvid (acoustic) 6pm Free

4-6pm Tues.-Sun. Daily Specials Lunch • Dinner

[T] These Pilgrims, Hollow Down (folk/psyche) 9pm Free [T] The Opera Alley Cats (jazz) 7:30pm Free [W] USGGO and No Covers (jazz) 7:30pm Free

OLD TOWN EUREKA 516 2nd St. 443-3663 www.oberongrill.com

Ear Emporium Locally Handmade Earrings, Gauges & more.

WHO: Brian Laidlaw WHEN: Thursday, May 28, 9 p.m. WHERE: The Siren’s Song Tavern TICKETS: Free

1073 H St., Arcata

822-PLUG

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

23

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

GET OUT!

SALAD AT YOUR FEET: MINER’S LETTUCE.

PHOTO BY LINDA STANSBERRY

©2014 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

UP AND UP ACROSS 1. Noms de plume 8. Discovery Channel subj. 11. Big lug 14. Try to score on a wild pitch, say 15. Its atomic symbol is Sn 16. Gun, as an engine 17. Like Knights Templars 18. “If you can find a better car, buy it” speaker 20. Alcoholics Anonymous, e.g. 22. GPS heading 23. Aqua ____ (gold dissolver) 27. Central Florida city 32. Friend to Leonard, Sheldon and Howard on “The Big Bang Theory” 35. Texter’s “That’s hilarious!” 36. Chinese appetizer array 40. Terra warmer 41. Site on the National Mall 42. One way to be dry

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

DOWN 44. -nik kin 45. 1997 Missy Elliott album that went platinum 47. Catch-22 49. Vet, e.g. 50. Over 50% of U.S. presidents: Abbr. 51. They’re always done by one 53. “Treasure Island” author’s monogram 56. Honest ... or a description of the circles in this puzzle’s grid 64. Go crazy (about) 67. Paint the town red 68. Big time 69. No longer playing: Abbr. 70. Found fault with 71. Hunky-dory 72. Medium strength? 73. Locale in a Neil Simon play

1. Second Amendment subject 2. Pig-roasting occasion 3. Clouseau, e.g.: Abbr. 4. Just ___, skip and jump away 5. Prefix with gram 6. Mideast moguls 7. Religious subgroups 8. Use a swizzle stick 9. “Arrivederci” 10. Acquire, as debt 11. Curve 12. Muscle mag topic 13. Mendes of Hollywood 19. It can be found under TUV 21. Frobe who played Goldfinger 24. Become lax 25. “I wish!” 26. Bowling lanes 27. Some footnotes 28. Dos y dos 29. Attractiveness 30. Elle’s counterpart 31. Bldg. units 33. Not very much 34. Savior in a Bach work

37. Deafening 38. Iams competitor 39. ____ Nui (Easter Island) 43. It may be held by one on deck 46. Sizable garden 48. Fizzle (out) 52. [So boring!] 54. Fortunate 55. “Hill Street Blues” actor Joe 57. When many ballots are cast: Abbr. 58. URL starter 59. “East of Eden” twin 60. Attachment on the end of an arrow that holds it in place on a bowstring 61. John Wayne nickname 62. ____-friendly 63. Walkers, in brief 64. Genteel gathering 65. Playmate of Piglet 66. Shade of black

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO SUNBLOCK

www.sudoku.com

MEDIUM #29

24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Foraging

A cook gone wild By Linda Stansberry outdoors@northcoastjournal.com

I

f you know what to look for, the world is your kitchen cabinet. Foraging in the spring can be a hungry affair compared to fall’s bounty of fruit, mushrooms and assorted edibles in full fruition. No worries — spring rains mean new growth and some tender sprouts that are only edible this time of year. Basket in hand, we head to the woods, the marsh and the side of the road. Time to take full advantage of nature’s cupboard. You’ll need some hiking shoes, a trowel, gardening shears and a pair of gloves. A plant identification book is also highly recommended, as even experienced foragers occasionally make mistakes in identifying plants. Please don’t eat anything you’re not absolutely sure of, and when you do pick a plant, do so carefully. Grabbing wildly may mean mixing in leaves of poisonous plants. In the interest of biodiversity and neighborliness, it’s best to only forage a few plants from each patch. After all, spring has sprung and we need to leave the bees some flowers to practice their lovin’ on! First up, the “eat sparingly” section. Plenty of plants are edible, but that doesn’t mean you can fill your belly with them. Wood sorrel is a good example. That’s the stuff with lovely, dark green leaves tinged with pink coating the floor of our redwood forests that everyone mistakes for clover. It has a tangy, piquant flavor and makes a nice addition to a salad or a fine garnish for a slice of strong cheese. But eat too much of it (say, more than a handful) and you’ll be high-tailing it for the nearest comfort station. Sorrel is high in vitamin C, as are the needles of some other conifers. Light

green and tender, new fir needles are great to pluck, chew and spit while hiking. They have a delightful, tart and zesty flavor that makes your mouth brim with saliva. Pine or fir needles and sorrel can also be steeped into tea — a nice alternative to those high-carbon-footprint oranges you’d buy at the grocery store. This time of year, the young shoots and leaves of stinging nettles can be harvested (gloves!) from marshy areas and boiled or steamed. Tea made from boiled nettle tops is a traditional remedy for arthritis, but you’ll want to consult your doctor first. Stinging nettles should not be eaten raw. Also in the wear-your-gloves section are thistles. Once you peel away the prickly exterior of a young, not-yet-flowering one, inside you’ll find a juicy snack, kind of like celery. If you’re in a pinch, you can also boil and eat the older stalks, although they’re rather stringy. Berries are just coming into season, with some bushes on the coast still bearing winter huckleberries. Salal, blackcaps and wild gooseberries will be along presently. But the sweetest treat of the early season is wild strawberries. About the size of your fingernail and infinitely more toothsome than their gigantic commercially produced cousins, wild strawberries are flirts that always leave you wanting more. Again, there are no belly-fillers in the world of spring foraging, but dock and miner’s lettuce can do a good job of staving off hunger pangs. Dock leaves are a staple for roadside foragers throughout North America. It’s a hardy, distinctive plant that grows well in disturbed soil. The seeds can also be ground into flour, although it’s a labor-intensive process. Miner’s lettuce (purslane) is a little more delicate, although it’s prolific in this region this time of year, and delicious. Its name is attributed to the Gold Rush miners who ate it to prevent scurvy. It can be gathered by the fistful in shady, moist spots, and every inch of it is edible from the juicy stalk to the bittersweet flower. High in vitamin C and iron, it makes an excellent salad and is also great food for baby chicks. A final word of warning: wash everything well. There’s something so holistic and right about picking something from the ground and sticking it straight into your mouth, but unless you’re picking it from just outside your door, you should probably wait. Nature’s cupboard has more than a few dogs peeing in it and uncouth louts spitting on it. Wash twice, wash well and enjoy the bounty. l

THe seTlIst Rose Hell, Keil la Chinga and DiZee-C at The Logger Bar. If you’re unfamiliar with the SCOD events, they work like this: “Four individuals on one stage, four mics, four guitars, beers, songs, turns taken. Like a live playlist of awesomeness.” (Description from the event’s Facebook page, where you can also get in on some vanpooling action. Check it out, Eurekans.) Show’s 21-and-over, starts at 10 p.m. and is brought to you by the letter “F” for fun, fine and free.

Friday #1: Americana

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

WHO: The Blackberry Bushes WHEN: Friday, May 29, 9 p.m. WHERE: The Logger Bar TICKETS: Free

Feeling Lucky Key words for a good time By Jennifer Savage

The next night brings another opportunity to hang out in Blue Lake’s finest drinking establishment. The Blackberry Bushes are really, really good and I’m not just saying that because they’re crashing at my house. Jes Raymond and Jakob Breitbach met in the rainy bottom of the Puget Sound, but their music channels the sweetest and most haunting aspects of American traditional. Joined by Bay Area native Julian Stocking on the upright bass, The Blackberry Bushes are playful and sophisticated virtuosos. Last time they played the Logger, the other musicians in the audience were overheard murmuring things like, “Wow.” Show starts at 9 p.m. and is 21-and-over.

Friday #2: Electronic

Wrye’s album cover is a sadly generic rendition of a video gamesque bombshell with a skull face and – what is that, a machete? – that I suppose is meant to illustrate the sexy horror potential of the music about to be unleashed. Fortunately the music is suitably danceable, especially, I imagine, if you chemically alter your consciousness beforehand. Joining Wrye at Siren’s Song for The Haunt is DAT-1, who produces minimalist and shadowy tracks with an experimental edge, perhaps best suited for listening to through heavy headphones in a dark room. The supernatural vibes start at 9 p.m. and all ages are welcome.

Saturday #1: Swing

Kenny Ray & the Mighty Rovers would like you to please enjoy some toe-tappin’ roots-honky-tonk-country-swing in a benefit for the Bayside Grange’s Kitchen Fun. If you don’t know how to swing dance – and you really should, especially if you’re of the male persuasion, because the ladies, they love to dance! – show up before 7:15 p.m. so you can get in on the lesson action. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., music starts at 8 p.m. Admission is $8 per adult, $5 per student, at the door. All ages!

Saturday (and Sunday) #2: Fest

thesetlist@northcoastjournal.com

Thursday #1: Poetry

San Francisco’s Brian Laidlaw returns to the Siren’s Song. You may remember Laidlaw from his last visit – he’s a poet who fell into the wayward musician life via creative writing courses at Stanford University. Over the years he’s acquired an MFA at the University of Minnesota and won buckets of awards and honors for his ability to put words together in a most pleasing way. The show is free, starts at 9 p.m. and is all ages.

Thursday #2: Metal

The show happening down the way at the Ink Annex is also all ages – it’s a Place-

bo gig – and that’s where the similarity ends. Think metal, metal, doom, metal. The heaviness is represented by two Australian bands, Whitehorse and potential band-name-of-theyear nominees Pneumatic Slaughter, plus two from SF, Sutekh Hexen and Common Eider, along with Houston’s From Beyond. Five bands for $10. The madness begins early, 6:30 p.m. No drugs or booze, please.

The Mateel Community Center hosts the 38th annual Summer Arts and Music Festival at Benbow Lake State Recreation Area in Southern Humboldt this weekend featuring over 100 acts by entertainers local and international, plus more than 150 handmade craft and food booths, the Generation Green alternative energy area, an all-media fine art show, belly dance temple, kid zone and the new Summertronica E-music tent. The official Summer Arts and Music Festival program guide arrived in your May 15 Journal and you can find more in the calendar section of this week’s issue or visit mateel.org for the full scoop.

Thursday #3: Disco

Over in A-town, Humboldt Roller Derby DJ King Maxwell invites you to experience musical, sexual and political liberation via a 1970s dance party showcasing the best “funky degenerate good dancing songs.” Disco, funk and soul will be the order of the night, which begins at 9:30 p.m. and is a mere $3 or, if you have a friend, two for $5. Also, 21-and-over.

Thursday #4: Death

We’ve come full round to the Songwriter Circle of Death IV, featuring TheBoredAgain, Gabe

Etc.

WHO: Wrye WHEN: Friday, May 29, 9 p.m. WHERE: The Siren’s Song Tavern TICKETS: Free

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

S

ometimes switching gears from reading the news to writing about music requires a sort of conscious cognitive dissonance. “Damn, people are messed up,” says my brain, reeling from shootings and kidnappings and other various expressions of hatred and instability. “Look at all the fine shows happening this week,” says my brain, hoping people will seize opportunities for joy, community and dancing. What say you, dear readers?

Full show listings in the Journal’s Music and More grid, the Eight Days a Week calendar and online. Bands and promoters, send your gig info, preferably with a high-res photo or two, to music@northcoastjournal. com. l

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

25

Beef up your heckling skills for Crab’s season! It’s opening weekend and the Humboldt Crabs face the Fairfield Indians for two games, Saturday, May 31 at 7 p.m. and Sunday, June 1 at 12:30 p.m. ($8 adults, $6 students and seniors, $4 kids under 12). You once again have a legitimate reason to say, “backdoor slider.”

29 thursday ART

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Drawing, painting, mixed-media, sculpting and more. Free.

MOVIES

Escape Fire. 6-8:30 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. Aligning Forces Humboldt invites you to a screening of the documentary about American healthcare. Followed by a panel discussion with local health care directors. Free. edickinson@hdnfmc.com. www.theeurekatheater.org.

MUSIC

Musaic. 7 p.m. Trinidad Library, 380 Janis Court. Weaving musical traditions from Eastern Europe, Mexico, Scandinavia and Ireland. Stay after the concert to learn two easy Balkan folk dances. Free. www.MusaicMusic.com. Tech N9ne. 8 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Krizz Kaliko, Freddie Gibbs, Jarren Benton and Psych Ward Druggies are all headlining rappers on the Independent Grind Tour. $25.

THEATER

Carlo Finals. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. The students of the Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre perform a series of 10-minute plays created and performed by the Class of 2014. Donations accepted. www.dellarte.com. 668-5663. Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. The iconic musical about Jean Valjean’s quest for redemption. $18-$20. 442-6278.

EVENTS

People with Disabilities Luncheon. 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. The Northwest Committee for Employment of People with Disabilities Recognition presents a lunch in honor of people who live and work with disabilities. $18. www.ci.eureka. ca.gov/depts/pw/wharfinger/default.asp. 725-5929.

Finally, clowns and cowboys can come together for a common cause. ClownSnotBombs presents a wacky circus adventure about pasta, pioneers and pratfalls. Spaghetti Western plays at the Arcata Playhouse on Tuesday, June 3 at 7 p.m. ($5). How many clowns can they fit into one stagecoach?

MEETINGS

Lost Coast High Open House. 7-8:30 p.m. Lost Coast High, 3400 Erie, Eureka. If you’re interested in enrolling your fourth to 12th grader, visit the free, public charter school. Free. 407-0517.

OUTDOORS

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Have a drink and enjoy a slow ride around the bay on the Madaket. $10. 445-1910. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. Tour the bay with the Captain of the Madaket as your guide. Learn about the history and wildlife of Humboldt Bay. $18, $16 seniors and kids under 17, $10 kids under 12, free to kids under 4. 445-1910. Sunset Paddle. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. The guided tours focus on the natural and cultural history of Humboldt Bay. Tours meet two hours before sunset. Please register in advance by the Monday before your paddle date of choice. $40. hbac@humboldt.edu. www.humboldt. edu/hbac. 443-4222.

ETC

Cribbage Group. Every other Thursday, 6-8 p.m. New Wine Church, 1180 Evergreen Road, Redway. Please bring a board, if possible; refreshments will be served. Free. lizcarey333@icloud.com. 497-8281. Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. Join fellow knitters, crocheters, weavers, spinners and other fiber artists as they socialize and work on their current projects. 442-9276.

30 friday DANCE

World Dance. 8-10 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Arcata. Teaching and request danc-

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Go ahead, peek. Artists all over the county invite us to snoop around their workshops to see where and how they work during North Coast Open Studios (free). The artistic voyeurism runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 31 to Sunday, June 1 and Saturday, June 7 to Sunday, June 8.

ing. $3. g-b-deja@sbcglobal.net. www.stalbansarcata. org. 839-3665.

MOVIES

Tommy. 7:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. He sure plays a mean pinball.(Rated R) $5. www.arcatatheater.com/.

MUSIC

Eureka Symphony Finale. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. The night’s program has an Americana theme and features soloist Clara Lisle. $20 general, $5 students.

THEATER

Carlo Finals. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 29 listing. Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 29 listing.

EVENTS

Viva la Pizza y Vino!. 6-8 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Wine and dine with featured California wines and local specialty pizzas. Enjoy music from the accordion/guitar duo, Squeezebug. All proceeds benefit the Humboldt Arts Council’s Youth Art Education Programs. $25. janine@humboldtarts.org. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.

FOR KIDS

Friday Fun Skating. 6-8:30 p.m. Eureka Muni, 1120 F St. Skate with your friends and family. $4 youth, $4.75 adults. ci.eureka.ca.gov/depts/recreation/youth/ roller_skating.asp. 441-9181.

OUTDOORS

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See May 29 listing. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See May 29 listing.

SPORTS

Eight Ball Tournament Night. 7 p.m. Rose’s Billiards, 535 Fifth St., Eureka. Come and compete for prizes in a BCA rules double elimination tournament on 7-foot Diamond tables. $1 off of beers for tournament play-

ers. $5 plus $3 green fee. guy@rosesbilliards.com. www. rosesbilliards.com. 497-6295. Fast Break Fridays. 7-9 p.m. McKinleyville Recreation Department, 1656 Sutter Road. Open access to the basketball courts for teens 13-17. $1. mckinleyvillecsd. com/parks-recreation. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. Have a blast and get some exercise at the same time. $5.

31 saturday ART

North Coast Open Studios. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Countywide, Locations throughout Humboldt County. More than 150 artists open their studio doors to share their work and inspirations with the public. Free. contact@northcoastopenstudio.com. www.northcoastopenstudios. com. 442-8413.

BOOKS

Book Reading and Art Making. 2-4 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Richard Duning, artist and author, presents a reading followed by art experiments. $5, $2 seniors and students, free to children 17 and under. janine@humboldtarts.org. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278.

DANCE

Swing and Sway with Kenny Ray. 7-11 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. An evening of swing dancing with toe tappin’ roots-country, honky tonk and big band swing. This event is a benefit for the Grange Kitchen Fund. $8, $5 kids. admin@baysidegrange. org. www.baysidegrange.org. 822-9998.

MOVIES

The Sandlot. 9-11 p.m. Los Bagels, Arcata, 1061 I St. Bring a comfy chair or favorite blankey, snack on some free popcorn and enjoy the Movies under the Mural

series. Free. brandon@losbagels.com. www.losbagels. com. 822-3483.

MUSIC

Eureka Symphony Finale. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Humboldt State University, Arcata. See May 30 listing.

THEATER

Carlo Finals. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte, 131 H St., Blue Lake. See May 29 listing. Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 29 listing.

EVENTS

A Night in Hollywood. 6-9 p.m. River Lodge Conference Center & Commercial Kitchen, 1800 Riverwalk Drive, Fortuna. Proceeds from the silent and live auctions, dinner and dancing will benefit Redwood Preparatory Charter School. Guests are encouraged to dress up Hollywood-style. $50. timberwolf@redwoodprep.org. www.redwoodprep.org. 682-6149. Museum Grand Re-opening. 1-4 p.m. HSU Natural History Museum, 1242 G St., Arcata. Enjoy the new location with activities, refreshments and a ceremony at 2. 826-4479. www.humboldt.edu/natmus. Summer Arts and Music Festival. -June 2, 9:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Benbow Lake State Recreation Area, 1600 Highway 101. Highlighting more than 100 diverse performances on four stages, over 150 handmade craft and food booths, a kids’ zone, a Belly Dance Temple and more. $15 per day, $25 for the weekend, fee for kids under 12. www. mateel.org/summerarts.html. 923-3368. Up in Smoke Beer and BBQ Competition. Noon. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. A showdown of grilled pork ribs and chicken thighs. Peoples choice winners will be announced at 4 p.m., prizes will be awarded to the backyard barbequers and bragging rights will go to the best of the pros. Free entry, $5 for 5 taster tickets, $50 for BBQ competitors. clarkehistorical@att.net. www.clarkemuseum.org. 445-3037.

FOR KIDS

Ocean Play Day. 10 a.m.-noon. Trinidad School, 300

Trinity. Games, a giant inflatable whale, raffle prizes and more for families with children zero to five years old. Sponsored by Trinidad Community Transition Project and First 5 Humboldt. Free. Story Time. Every other Saturday, 11 a.m. Rio Dell Library, 715 Wildwood Ave. Join us for stories, songs, and games for early readers and parents. Free. riohumml@ co.humboldt.ca.us. 764-3333.

FOOD

Arcata Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Free. www.humfarm. org. 441-9999. Charles Washington Soul Food Dinner. 4 p.m. Veterans Memorial Building, 1018 H St., Eureka. The Eureka Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) will host this event, with food prepared by Shirley Powell and entertainment provided by Lorna Bryant. $20 Adults; $7.50 for children 12 and under. 268-8287.

MEETINGS

North Coast Mensa Forum. 12-1:30 p.m. Samoa Cookhouse, 908 Vance Ave. Newsman Hank Sims talks about Lost Coast Outpost on the Internet and media landscape. www.samoacookhouse.net. 445-2276.

OUTDOORS

Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Audubon Society Arcata Marsh Tour. The tour guide this week is Pat Bitton. 8:30-11 a.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, South I St. Bring your binoculars and have a great morning birding. Meet the trip leader in the parking lot at the end of South I Street (Klopp Lake) in Arcata, rain or shine. Free. www.rras.org/calendar. Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See May 29 listing.

Up in Smoke

Close your eyes and breathe deeply — can you smell the smoldering briquettes, sizzling meat and fervent competition? You’re catching a whiff of the Up in Smoke Beer and BBQ Competition (free entry, $5 for 5 taster tickets, $50 for competitors), a suds-soaked grilling contest. The contest kicks off at noon on Saturday, May 31 at the new garden at the Redwood Acres Fairgrounds. While the contestants vie to grill-up the best chicken, pork and beef ribs, you can revel in their culinary efforts. Tastings are only available for the first 200 attendees, so make sure to get there before the grills cool down. Eel River Brewery, Lagunitas, Mad River Brewing and Redwood Curtain Brewing will all be on site with tap beers to quench your thirst. KWPT will be blasting classic rock throughout the day for the grown-ups, and there’s a free kid’s area for the little ones. You can walk off your full bellies on a tour of the new garden, complete with green-thumb demonstrations. At 4 p.m., the winners will be announced, crowds will cheer and the day will wrap up. Pig out guilt-free, because all proceeds for the event benefit the Clarke Historical Museum and the Redwood Acres Friends of the Fair. You’re eating for a good cause. — Dev Richards

Trillium Dance Studios & THE INK PEOPLE PRESENT

Amazon SPRING PRODUCTION 2014 CHOREOGRAPHY BY ARTISTIC DIRECTOR ERIN MCKEEVER & TRILLIUM INSTRUCTORS

HSU’S VAN DUZER THEATER

&

SATURDAY

JUNE 7 at 6 P.M.

SUNDAY

JUNE 8 at 2 P.M.

Purchase tickets online: www.TutuTix.com or by phone: (855) 222-2TIX SEATING: Adults $15, Child/Senior $10 RESERVED SEATING: SEATING: Adults $13, Child/Senior $8 GENERAL SEATING: General Seating tickets are also available at Threadbare Dancewear in Arcata & at the door For more info call 822-8408 or info@TrilliumDance.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

27

Ballet Heritage CELEBRATING THE HISTORY OF CLASSICAL BALLET & BALLET AMERICANA FRI. JUNE 6 at 10am* & 7pm SAT. JUNE 7 at 7pm SUN. JUNE 8 at 2pm *Exhibition for Local Elementary Schools Only

Ikolo Griffin, Director Nancy Call, Ballet Mistress

Grass Grab. 9:30 a.m. Lanphere Dunes, Lanphere Road, Arcata. An easy, family friendly event with hand-plucking of small invasive annual grasses. No tools needed. Gloves provided. Free. 444-1397. Lanphere Dunes Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Pacific Union School, 3001 Janes Road, Arcata. Help remove invasive and non-native annual grasses. Gloves, tools and cookies provided. Bring water. suzie@friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See May 29 listing.

SPORTS

Barrels by the Bay. 8 p.m. Humboldt County Fairgrounds, 1250 Fifth St., Ferndale. Saddle up to watch some barrel racing. Covered arena and plenty of seating. Email for sign-up information. Free. barrelsbythebay@ gmail.com. www.victorianferndale.com. Public Skating. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Firemen’s Pavilion, 9 Park St. See May 30 listing.

1

sunday

ART

Art Talk with Vaughn Hutchins. 2-3 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. The photographer discusses his use of large format cameras in our local

Redwoods and in Yosemite National Park. $5, $2 students and seniors, free to kids 17 and under. janine@ humboldtarts.org. www.humboldtarts.org. 442-0278. North Coast Open Studios. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Countywide, Locations throughout Humboldt County. See May 31 listing.

MOVIES

The Mighty Ducks. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Gordon Bombay (Emilio Estevez) coaches a ragtag peewee hockey team as part of his DUI sentence. He teaches them to win, they teach him to love. $5. www. arcatatheatre.com.

MUSIC

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 442-0156.

THEATER

Les Misérables. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 29 listing.

EVENTS

Humboldt Flea Market. First Sunday of every month, 9 a.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. It’s like searching for buried treasure. $1. www. redwoodacres.com. Oyster and Tri-Tip Barbeque. 12:30-4 p.m. Moose

Art Immersion

442-7779

A-Z

400+ Locations

MEETINGS

Animism International. First Sunday of every month, 4 p.m. North Coast Co-op, Eureka, 25 Fourth St. Inquisitive thinkers are invited to a reading and discussion group. Free. animisminternational@gmail.com. www. northcoastco-op.com. 382-7566.

ETC

Eureka Mindfulness Group. First Sunday of every month, 10 a.m.-noon. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. Heal your body and mind, practice meditation with Cindee Grace. Fragrance free, please. Donations accepted. 269-7044. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Tiles, letters and triple-word scores, oh my! 677-9242.

THE 2014 COMPLETE RESTAURANT GUIDE

RESTAURANTS

Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. 503-828-7421. Freshwater Grange Breakfast. First Sunday of every month, 8-11 a.m. Freshwater Grange, 49 Grange Road, Eureka. Breakfast, conversation and locals served fresh. Craft supplies for sale upstairs. Proceeds go to the building fund. $5 adults; $3 kids. www.jfloss.com/ grange/visitors/visitors.html. 442-7107. Potluck Dinner. 6 p.m. The Logger Bar, 510 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Bring a dish to share with friends old and new. Free. www.facebook.com/LoggerBar.

Dune Restoration. First Sunday of every month, 1-4 p.m. Lake Earl Wildlife Area, 2591 Old Mill Road, Crescent City. Ensure that a lush island of the most diverse native dune plants can survive and spread, providing homes and food for native animals. Free. 954-5253. Family Fun Day Paddles. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Bring all of your friends and family for a paddle along the Eureka Waterfront and explore the marine environment of Humboldt Bay. No experience required and all paddling equipment will be provided. $20 adults. Free for children. hbac@humboldt.edu. www.humboldt.edu/ hbac. 443-4222.

NorthCoastDance.org

m.northcoastjournal.com

FOOD

OUTDOORS

Tickets at NCD

The complete directory, on newstands & online:

Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Raise money for the Cutten-Ridgewood Student Foundation while enjoying great food, music from The HiLL and more. $15 oyster/ tri-tip dinner, $5 hot dog dinner. www.cuttenridgewood. org/. 441-3930. Summer Arts and Music Festival. 9:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Benbow Lake State Recreation Area, 1600 Highway 101. See May 31 listing. Trinidad Artisan’s Market. This week features guitar from M.C. Bruce. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Trinidad. Local art and crafts, live music and barbecue right next to Murphy’s Market. Free. 834-8720.

Break out your cargo shorts — festival season is here. On May 31 and June 1, the Mateel Community Center will transform the Benbow Lake State Recreation Area into a four-staged, vendor-filled celebration of all things cultural and crafty. The 38th annual Summer Arts and Music Festival ($15 per day, $25 for the weekend, free for kids under 12) features over 100 performers, including The Pimps of Joytime, Berel Alexander, The Lyndsey Battle Trio and more. There’s a genre for everybody, from jazz to funk. There’s even a youth stage featuring clowns and circus acts for the kids in attendance.

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

The music should be enough to draw you to SoHum, but the festivities go farther with more than 150 vendors selling their wares and sharing their skills, including art, jewelry and chair massages. There’s a zone dedicated to kids with a bouncy house, activity tent and circus lessons. If you’re jealous of the bouncy house (sometimes being an adult is the worst), take comfort in the multiple booze stands and food booths. The gates open at 9:30 a.m. and close at 10 p.m. on both days, so you’ll have plenty of time to absorb the art and music. — Dev Richards

2 monday DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older with live music featuring tunes from the 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s. Refreshments are served during break. $4. 725-5323.

MUSIC

Humboldt Folklife Society Sing-along. First Monday of every month, 7 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Come sing your favorite folk, rock and pop songs of the ‘60s with Joel Sonenshein. Songbooks are provided, just bring your voice. Free. joel@asis.com. 839-7063.

Joel’s Song Circle. First Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. Joel provides song books and accompanies the group on guitar. All you need to bring is your voice. Free. 839-7063.

EVENTS

Meditation Party. 6 p.m. Om Shala Yoga Center, 858 10th St., Arcata. Come fill your heart with peace and love. Donation suggested. davidsandercott@gmail. com. 310-663-9879. Summer Arts and Music Festival. 9:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Benbow Lake State Recreation Area, 1600 Highway 101. See May 31 listing. Wolf Night Teach-in. 6-8 p.m. D Street Neighborhood Center, 1301 D Street, Arcata. Prepare for the Fish and Game Commission hearing on Wednesday, June 4 with a film screening, guest speakers, sign making and tips on speaking to the Commission. Free. www.wildcalifornia. org/blog/speak-up-for-the-future-of-californias-graywolves. 822-7711.

MEETINGS

Bayside Grange Monthly Meeting. First Monday of every month, 7 p.m. Bayside Grange Hall, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Lively conversation, noshing and discussions about the restoration and program diversity of the Bayside Grange. Free. hallmanager@baysidegrange. org. www.baysidegrange.org. 822-9998.

ETC

Cribbage Lessons. 5:30-7 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Brush up on your cribbage skills or learn how to play. Free.

3 tuesday MUSIC

Fortuna High School Spring Concert. 7-9 p.m. Fortuna High School, 379 12th St. Featuring performances from the Jazz Express, Symphonic Band, Camarada Singers and Glee Choir. Donations accepted. smcclimon@ fuhsdistrict.org. 725-4461. Ukulele Play and Sing Group. First Tuesday of every month, 1:30 p.m. Humboldt Senior Resource Center, 1910 California St., Eureka. All genres of music, from “Greensleeves” to “Hound Dog.” If you can carry a tune and play a stringed instrument, come party with us. We have extra songbooks. Donations appreciated. veganlady21@yahoo.com.

THEATER

Spaghetti Western. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. ClownSnotBombs presents a circus adventure into the absurd that follows a band of travelers as they bring the power of pasta to the western frontier, featuring acrobatics, comedy and more. $5. stevenwevenclown@yahoo.com. www.clownsnotbombs.com. 408-515-2801.

FOOD

Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Wildberries Marketplace, 747 13th St., Arcata. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts and flowers every week. Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Fortuna Main Street, Main Street. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts. Free.

ETC

HU Chant. First Tuesday of every month, 7-7:30 p.m. Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. Chanting HU everyday can help you understand yourself and why things happen the way they do in your life. Free. Meetup.com. www.miraclesinyourlife.org. 444-2536.

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. 4443161.

4

Pony Express Days. Central Avenue, McKinleyville. See June 4 listing.

FOOD

wednesday

MOVIES

Sci Fi Pint & Pizza Night. 6:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Enjoy some classic, goofy, b-grade science fiction and horror on the big screen. Free with $5 food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheater.com. Zontar, the Thing from Venus. 6 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Sci Fi pizza and pint night features the 1966 thriller about rocket scientist who makes contact with a creature from Venus. Free with $5 food or beverage purchase. www.arcatatheatre.com.

EVENTS

Pints for Non-Profits. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Mad River Brewing Company & Tasting Room, 101 Taylor Way, Blue Lake. One dollar from every pint sold is donated to Friends of the Dunes. www.madriverbrewing.com. Pony Express Days. . Central Avenue, McKinleyville. The five-day festival includes a cook-off, fireman’s muster, dance and parade down Central Avenue that rolls right into the big Family Festival in Pierson Park. Free, $10 for dance. www.mckinleyvillechamber.com/pony-expressdays. 839-2449.

FOR KIDS

Playgroup. 10 a.m. Discovery Museum, 501 Third St., Eureka. Playtime in the museum that provides children and families with great resources. Free. info@discoverymuseum.org. www.discovery-museum.org. 443-9694. Story Time. 1 p.m. McKinleyville Library, 1606 Pickett Road. Liz Cappiello reads stories to children and their parents. Free.

OUTDOORS

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See May 29 listing. Dune Restoration Training. First Wednesday of every month, 5-6:30 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. Train to recognize native and non-native plants and then come back to work on your own time. Bring water and wear work clothes. Tools and gloves are provided. 444-1397. Guided Nature Walk. First Wednesday of every month, 9 a.m. Richard J. Guadagno Visitor Center, Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, 1020 Ranch Road, Loleta. This 2-mile walk is open to the public and is a great way to familiarize yourself with local flora and fauna. Binoculars are available at the visitor’s center. Free. www.fws.gov/ refuge/humboldt_bay. 733-5406. Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See May 29 listing.

SPORTS

Humboldt Crabs Baseball. 7 p.m. Arcata Ballpark, Ninth and F streets. The Humboldt Crabs versus the Valley Bears. $8 adults, $ students and seniors, $4 kids under 12.

5 thursday ART

Art for Teens. 4:30-6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. See May 29 listing.

THEATER

EVENTS

Les Misérables. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See May 29 listing.

Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Fresh local produce, straight from the farmer. www. humfarm.org. 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3:30-6:30 p.m. McKinleyville Safeway Shopping Plaza, Central Avenue. Fresh local vegetables, fruit and flowers straight from the farmer. Also fresh barbecued meats and live music.

MEETINGS

Human Rights Commission. First Thursday of every month, 5 p.m. County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. This month’s agenda includes the use of public property and prison conditions. Free. 668-4095. Humboldt County Beekeepers Association. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Agriculture Center, 5630 South Broadway, Eureka. Dick LaForge and Garrett Brinton talk about different styles of keeping bees. $2. 845-3362.

OUTDOORS

Cocktail Cruise. 5:30 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See May 29 listing.

Narrated Bay Cruise. 1, 2:30 & 4 p.m. C Street Market Square, Foot of C Street, Eureka. See May 29 listing. Sunset Paddle. Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. See May 29 listing.

ETC

Sip and Knit. 6 p.m. NorthCoast Knittery, 320 Second St., Eureka. See May 29 listing.

Heads Up…

Fortuna’s Art and Wine in the Park is looking for artists to display and sell their work at the summer festival Sunday, June 8. 725-9261. Redwood National and State Parks is seeking public opinion about paving 2.6 miles of Bald Hills Road. 465-7300. SCRAP Humboldt is looking for competitors for the Rebel Craft Rumble. 633-8349. The Humboldt Community Breast Health project is selling vacation raffle tickets at the Arcata farmer’s market until June 7. The Six Rivers National Forest is looking for volunteers to spend the summer as campground hosts at one of the four ranger districts. www.volunteer.gov. l

Giddyap! McKinleyville doesn’t slack when it comes to hoedowns. Some towns might dedicate one night to barn dancing and gallivanting, but Mack commits to a full five days of shindiggin’. Pony Express Days runs from June 4 to June 8, with events all over town. It all starts with the Chili Cook-Off in Pierson Park on Wednesday, June 6 at 5:30 p.m. The crowd judges the cooks, so be prepared to devour a lot of chili. The Pilot Rock Ramblers round out the evening with some bluegrass and country. Take the rest of the night off to digest; you’ll want to be ready for the fireman’s muster on Thursday, June 5 at 5:30 p.m. in the Ray’s Food Place parking lot. Firefighters from all over Humboldt County will compete in the bucket brigade relay and the hose coupling relay. The weekend starts early with the Farm Fest on Friday, June 6 from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at A&L Feed. Stick around for the barn dance at 8 p.m. ($10). Peruse the local crafter booths for demonstrations of soap making, beekeeping and more while you sip some beer and enjoy some live music. The heart of the festival is on Saturday, June 7, with the parade down Central Avenue at 11 a.m., followed by the festival at Pierson Park from noon until 4 p.m. Spend the afternoon dancing to some live music from local bands and playing in the horseshoe tournament. You can’t have Pony Express Days without ponies, so check out the Gymkhana events that run at the Mckinleyville Rodeo Grounds on Saturday, June 7 and Sunday, June 8. Granted, they’re horses and not ponies, but you shouldn’t look a Gymkhana horse in the mouth. — Dev Richards

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

29

MovieTimes Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 Fri-Wed: (3:10), 8:55; Thu: (3:10) Blended Fri-Sun: (11:50a.m., 2:40), 5:30, 8:20; Mon-Thu: (2:40), 5:30, 8:20 Godzilla Fri-Thu: (2:50), 8:50 Godzilla 3D Fri-Thu: (11:55a.m.), 5:50 Maleficent Fri-Sun: (11:35a.m., 1:15, 3:50, 4:40), 6:10, 8:45, 9:45; Mon-Thu: (1:15, 3:50, 4:40), 6:10, 8:45, 9:45 Maleficent 3D Fri-Thu: (2), 7:15 Million Dollar Arm Fri-Thu: (12:20, 3:15), 6:15, 9:05 A Million Ways to Die in the West Fri-Thu: (12:30, 3:20), 6:25, 9:15 Moms’ Night Out Fri-Thu: (12:40), 6:30 Neighbors Fri-Sun: (11:45a.m., 2:10, 4:45), 7:10, 9:40; Mon-Thu: (2:10, 4:45), 7:10, 9:40 The Other Woman Fri-Thu: 6:45, 9:25 The Railway Man Fri-Thu: (1:25, 4:05), 6:50, 9:30 Rio 2 Fri-Thu: (1:35, 4:10) X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri-Thu: (12, 3), 6:05, 9:10 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D Fri-Sun: (11:30a.m., 2:30), 5:35, 8:35; Mon-Thu: (2:30), 5:35, 8:35



Mill Creek Cinema

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 Blended Fri-Sun: (1, 3:45), 6:30, 9:10; Mon-Wed: (3:45), 6:30, 9:10; Thu: (3:45), 6:30 Godzilla Fri-Thu: (3:10), 9 Godzilla 3D Fri-Sun: (12:10), 6; Mon-Thu: 6 Maleficent Fri-Sun: (12, 1:30, 3:30), 5:15, 6:55; Mon-Thu: 3:30, 5:15, 6:55 Maleficent 3D Fri-Thu: (2:40), 7:45 Million Dollar Arm Fri-Thu: 8:50 A Million Ways to Die in the West Fri-Sun: (12:40, 4:05), 6:05, 9:30; Mon-Thu: (4:05), 6:05, 9:30 Neighbors Fri-Sun: (2:15, 4:40), 7:10, 9:40; Mon-Thu: (4:40), 7:10, 9:40 X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri-Sun: (12:20, 3:20), 6:20, 9:20; Mon-Thu: (3:20), 6:20, 9:20 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D Fri-Sun: (11:50, 2:50), 5:50, 8:50; Mon-Thu: (2:50), 5:50, 8:50

 

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 Belle Fri: (3:20), 5:50, 8:20; Sat-Sun: (12:50, 3:20), 5:50, 8:20; Mon-Thu: (3:20), 5:50, 8:20 Godzilla Fri: (2:50), 5:40, 8:35; Sat-Sun: (12, 2:50), 5:40, 8:35; Mon-Thu: (2:50), 5:40, 8:35 X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri: (3:10), 6:10, 9:10; Sat-Sun: (12:15, 3:10), 6:10, 9:10; Mon-Thu: (3:10), 6:10, 9:10

BOOM-CHICKA-WOW. SUPER HEROES GO SUPER FLY.

Flashbacks

Future is rocky, Railway stops short By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST. As a fledging geek dipping a toe in the ocean of comics, the X-Men were too much for me. Ditto the whole Marvel Universe, but the X-Men in particular were so many, each with his or her own convoluted origin story, all entangled in myriad plotlines across an incomprehensibly wide world. It was more than I could take in back then, and it’s getting to be more than I want to deal with now, as yet another gigantic sequel comes rumbling into the multiplex. Still, I got a lot out of 2011’s X-Men: First

Fortuna Theatre

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 Blended Fri: (4), 6:50, 9:45; Sat: (12:55, 4), 6:50, 9:45; Sun: (12:55, 4), 6:50; Mon-Thu: (4), 6:50 Godzilla Fri: (3:20), 6:30, 9:15; Sat: (12:20, 3:20), 6:30, 9:15; Sun: (12:20, 3:20), 6:30; Mon-Thu: (3:20), 6:30 Maleficent Fri: (4:35), 7, 9:20; Sat: (12, 2:15, 4:35), 7, 9:20; Sun: (12, 2:15, 4:35), 7; Mon-Thu: (4:35), 7 A Million Ways to Die in the West Fri: (4:05), 7:10, 9:45; Sat: (1:20, 4:05), 7:10, 9:45; Sun: (1:20, 4:05), 7:10; Mon-Thu: (4:05), 7:10 Neighbors Fri: (4:15), 7:20, 9:45; Sat: (1:30, 4:15), 7:20, 9:45; Sun: (1:30, 4:15), 7:20; Mon-Thu: (4:15), 7:20 X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri: (3:45), 6:40, 9:30; Sat: (12:10, 3:45), 6:40, 9:30; Sun: (12:10, 3:45), 6:40; Mon-Thu: (3:45), 6:40

Garberville Theatre

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 Neighbors Fri-Tue: 7:30; Wed: 6:30; Thu: 7:30

May 30 June 4

Fri May 30 - Tommy (1975) Doors at 7:30 p.m. $5 Rated R Sat May 31 - Random Acts Of Comedy Doors at 7:30 p.m. $6 10+ Sun June 1 - The Mighty Ducks (1992) Doors at 5:30 p.m. $5 Rated PG Wed June 4 - Sci Fi Night ft. Zontar, the Thing from Venus (1966) Doors at 6 p.m. All ages Free w/food & Bev Purchase arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Class and last year’s The Wolverine. Days opens on a bleak near-future Earth, where mutants are relentlessly hunted by unstoppable machines called sentinels. One small group of rebels stays in the fight by time traveling in the midst of battles to forewarn themselves of attack. Professor Xavier (Patrick Stewart), Magneto (Ian McKellen), Wolverine (Hugh Jackman), et al. catch wind of the group’s methods and track them down in a last ditch effort to save their race. They’ve traced the beginning of the mutant apocalypse to a day in 1973, when Mystique (Jennifer Lawrence) assassinated the arms tycoon Dr. Bolivar Trask (Peter Dinklage), who developed sentinel technology. Their hope is to send one of their own back in time to stop the assassination. Of course, the only one who can physically survive the journey (it’s complicated) is Wolverine, so he’s off. He seeks out a young Xavier (James McAvoy) who, having shuttered his school and abandoned his powers, seeks solace mostly in the bottoms of bottles. He reluctantly agrees to help, and they go on to liberate young Magneto (Michael Fassbender) from a top-secret government prison. (The set-piece sequence wherein they make their daring escape, aided by Peter Evans as Quicksilver is one of the movie’s highlights.) Once they’ve got the band back together, it’s off to Paris to intercept Mystique at the

Vietnamese peace accords. But of course nothing can be that simple. Although I’m not entirely convinced by director Bryan Singer as a visual stylist, or even as a storyteller, he knows how to hold together a multi-hundredmillion-dollar production. The cast is as top-loaded with prominent talent as any we’re likely to see this year. The effects are second to none, and the 1970s look and feel are executed well. But the future sequences are noisy, dark and hard to follow. Characters are thrown at us with no introduction, only to then launch in to painful expository monologues. The first act rushes from scene to scene but stills feels slow. The movie finds its footing midway through, and then it’s smooth sailing until the climax, which gets drawn out beyond its ability to sustain tension. But the lead performers give it all they’ve got, and there are enough moments when the action and the production design make Days of Future Past an enjoyable distraction. PG13. 131m. THE RAILWAY MAN. Once upon a time, we saw a lot more of these movies: period dramas about a tortured protagonist, often with a violent history. I’m not sure whether our tastes have changed, or if the entertainment business has shifted our perspective with what it offers, but this feels like it came from a long time ago. It’s 1980. Eric Lomax (Colin Firth), railroad enthusiast, meets Patti (Nicole Kidman) on a train, naturally. They fall in love and get married, but there is darkness in Eric that he refuses to discuss. He has night terrors, can’t pay his bills and reacts with violence in inappropriate situations. Patti seeks out Eric’s friend Finlay (Stellan Skarsgard) for insight, but he won’t reveal much, either. Gradually, through flashback, we learn that Eric was a soldier in the British Army Signal Corps when Singapore fell to the Japanese in 1943. He was taken prisoner, along with thousands of others, and conscripted as a slave laborer to build a railroad through Thailand. During this period, he was singled out and tortured. In the 1980 timeline, Finlay informs Eric that his primary tormenter (Hiroyuki Sanada) is still alive and provides him with the man’s whereabouts. Eric sets off to exact his revenge. Again, this is decidedly old-fashioned stuff. The cinematography is pretty and lush and conventional. The performances are strong and the characters troubled and nuanced. The ideas explored in the script — the meaning of revenge, the capacity for forgiveness, the ability of the human mind to survive trauma — are important, and the film comes close to the

GRAND OPENING June 7 • 10 a.m.-5 30 p.m.

psychological realism in terms of the toll of war. But The Railway Man is weakened by its moral middle-ground and the tameness its “happy ending” requires, which undermines its other successes. R. 116m. — John J. Bennett

Previews

BELLE. Gugu Mbatha-Raw stars as the peculiarly privileged and disenfranchised daughter of a British admiral and a slave in pre-abolition England. PG. 104m. MALEFICENT. Angelina Jolie borrows Lady Gaga’s wardrobe and cheekbones as the fairytale villainess in a dark retelling of Sleeping Beauty. PG. 98m. A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST. A farmer (Seth MacFarlane) tries his trembling hand at gun slinging in a duel with a black-hatted Liam Neeson. R. 116m.

Continuing

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2. Andrew Garfield’s sassy Spidey battles Electro (a glowing Jamie Foxx) and his frenemy Harry Osborne (Dane DeHaan) in a seriously fun sequel to the reboot. PG13. 143m. BLENDED. A Sandler-Barrymore romcom in which a mismatched pair of single parents get together for the kids on a tropical vacation. PG13. 117m. GODZILLA. The big guy returns with puny, human co-stars Aaron TaylorJohnson and Ken Watanabe. The effects impress, but there’s too much going on to focus on the lizard and its destructive glory. PG13. 123m. MILLION DOLLAR ARM. John Hamm trades highballs for baseballs in this sweet and well-crafted Disney sports movie about an agent trying to turn young, Indian cricket players into Major League pitching stars. PG. 124m. MOMS’ NIGHT OUT. Zany adventures ensue when a group of mothers take the evening off, leaving the kids with the dads. Because men taking care of children is just crazy talk. PG. 99m. NEIGHBORS. Suburban parents (Rose Byrne and Seth Rogen) go to war with the frat next door and their oft-shirtless prankster leader (Zac Efron) in this crude but effective comedy R. 97m. THE OTHER WOMAN. Cameron Diaz, Leslie Mann and Kate Upton are women done wrong by a clichéd plot and a thrown-together script. PG13. 109m. RIO 2. Endangered macaws Blu and Jewel are back for franchise cash — ahem — and to find long-lost family in the Amazon. It’s a mess, but a colorful one the kids seem to like. G. 101m. — Jennifer Fumiko Cahill ●

List your class – just $4 per line per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your online ad at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

CERAMICS FOR OLDER KIDS, AGES 7−12. Bob Raymond will take your kids on an adventure with Clay. They will create various hand building projects and learn wheel throwing techniques on the potter’s wheel. Four 5−week classes offered. Mon: June 23−July 21 or July 28−Aug. 25; Tues: June 24−July 22 or July 29−Aug. 26. Class time 3−5 p.m. $80 each. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (K−0612) FUSED GLASS JEWELRY FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERMEDIATES. Sat’s., June 21 & 28, 10 a.m.−noon. Tues’s., July 15 & July 22, 1:30−3:30 p.m. In this two day workshop you will learn how to make your own pendants and earrings. With the use of color and dicrohic glass, mosaic butterflies, and decals, Joele Williams will guide you through the process of cutting, designing, and wire wrapping. For inter− mediate students hand etching dicrohic glass will also be introduced. $50/$35 members. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0529) GLASS FUSING. With Trace Gilbraith. Sat., May 31, 1:30 p.m.−3:30 p.m. and Wed., June 4, 5:30 p.m.−7:30 p.m. $40/$25 members ($15 materials). Learn the basics of glass fusing while creating a unique work of art in this one day introductory workshop. Create a 6" square or tile. No experience or cutting required. 520 South G St. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0529) GLASS MOBILE SUNCATCHERS. Joele Williams, Sun’s., June 22 and 29, 5:30 p.m.−7:30 p.m. Sat’s., July 19 & 26, 10 a.m.−noon. Create something beautiful and unique! Joele will guide you through the process of creating a glass mobile suncatcher. You will learn cutting, decorating, and wire wrapping techniques. Basic use of tools, materials, and safety will be covered. $50/$35 members ($15 materials fee). 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826− 1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0529) HANDBUILDING FOR BEGINNERS & INTERMEDI− ATES. With Otamay Hushing. Join us for fun with handbuilding clay projects. Bring your own ideas or try out some new ones. Thurs., June 26−July 31, 10 a.m.−noon. $185. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445 www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0612) POTTERY CLASS FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERME− DIATES. With a focus on Utilitarian Form and Decoration. Weds., June 25−Aug. 27, 7−9 p.m. Complete introduction to basic wheel−throwing techniques. For intermediate students Bob Raymond will assist in mastering utilitarian forms and demonstrating a variety of decorative styles and techniques. $185. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0612)

POTTERY CLASS FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERME− DIATES. Peggy Loudon. Thurs., June 26−Aug. 28, 5:30−7:30 p.m. Complete introduction to basic wheel−throwing techniques. Perfect for beginning and returning students. $185. 520 South G St. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0619)

Exquisite Handmade Stained Glass

CERAMICS FOR YOUNGER KIDS, AGES 7−12. With Amanda Steinebach. Children will have a great time creating with clay. Sat’s., 9:30 a.m.−11 a.m. June 7−July 25 and July 26−Aug. 23 Fee: $75 per class. Fire Arts Center. 520 South G St. Arcata, (707) 826−1445 www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0529)

Your local stained glass specialists.

POTTERY CLASS FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERME− DIATES. Tues., June 24−Aug. 26, 7−9 p.m. With Bob Raymond. Learn the basics or perfect your wheel− throwing technique. Ideal for new and continuing students. $185. 520 South G St. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0610) POTTERY CLASS FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERME− DIATES. Wed., June 25−Aug. 27. 3 classes offered: 9− 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m.−1:30 p.m., intermediate 2 p.m.−4 p.m. Join Peggy Loudon for this complete intro− duction to basic wheel−throwing and glazing tech− niques. Perfect for beginning and returning students. $185. 520 South G St. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC−0612)

RETAIL STAINED GLASS Supplies • Materials Monthly Classes

Open Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 820 N St., Arcata (9th St. Entrance)

(707) 633-6266 • jsgstudios@gmail.com

www.jsg-studios.com

FREE VBS! July 7th-July 11th

Ages 3 - 11½ 9am - 12pm Youth & Jr. High Bible Camp Ages 11½ -18

Communication

DOCTOR DANGERS EXPLORED AT LIFETREE CAFÉ. The dangers of medical mistakes will be discussed at Lifetree Café Sun., June 1, 7 p.m. Titled Doctor Danger: What Every Patient Needs to Know. Corner of 13th & Union, Arcata. Lifetree is a Conversation Cafe. Free. (707) 672−2919. (CMM−0529) JOURNEY TO JOYFUL PARENTING. Learn how to bring out the best in yourself and your child with Diana Nunes Mizer of Conscious Parenting. Topics include bedtime struggles, age appropriate expec− tations, tantrums, communication, and hectic schedules. There will be time for questions, answers and sharing. You will leave uplifted, inspired and empowered to become more of the parent you strive to be. $10 per person $15 per couple or sliding scale. Registration required. Instructor: Diana Nunes Mizer Phone: (775) 313− 7332. Date: June 1, July 6, Aug. 3, Oct. 5, Nov. 2, Dec. 7. 12−2 pm. Conference Room C1 at St. Joseph Hospital, Eureka. SIBLING 101. Becoming a sibling for the first time is a very special event and we have a class designed just for the big brother or big sister in your family. This fun and interactive class for 3 to 6 year olds teaches them what it’s like to have a new baby in the home, what babies eat, how they communi− cate and much more. A brief tour is included and children will receive a complimentary prize and an award certificate. $5−$15 per person, sliding scale. Instructor: Diana Nunes Mizer. Phone: (775) 313− 7332. June 1, July 6, Aug. 3, Oct. 5, Nov. 2, Dec. 7, 2:30−3:30 p.m. Conference Room C1 at St. Joseph Hospital, Eureka.

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Snacks & Fun are included!

Arcata First Baptist 1700 Union Street, Arcata

822-0367

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Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Adults & kids ages 8 and up. Contact Justin (707) 601-1657 Text or Phone. 1459 M. St. Arcata. northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com northcoastfencing.tripod.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

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Dance/Music/Theater/Film

DANCE WITH DEBBIE: Do you want to know a dance for romantic love songs and ballads? Then our Eureka Nightclub two−step is for you! Try a group Salsa class in Eureka or Arcata. Private lessons also available. We make dancing fun! (707) 464−3638, debbie@dancewithdebbie.biz www.dancewithdebbie.biz (DMT−0529)

DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−0529)

50 and Better

Home & Garden

AMENDS: THE TWELVE PRINCIPLES OF FORGIVE− NESS. Practicing forgiveness can lead to greater health, a sense of well−being, and healthier rela− tionships. Engage in the process of writing, asking questions, shifting perceptions and learning to tell your story from a new perspective. With Sharon Ferrett. Thurs., June 12, 5−7 p.m. and Sat., June 14, 10 a.m.−2 p.m. OLLI members $50/nonmembers $75. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0605)

MEDIA PRODUCTION TRAINING. Access Humboldt offers media production training covering camera work, pre−production, lighting, audio, and studio production. Call 476−1798 or visit www.accesshumboldt.net (DMT−0731)

TINY HOME BUILDING WORKSHOP. July 7−21 (weekdays). Ever want to build a Tiny Home? DIY building experience Building a Tumbleweed Home on a trailer. Learn every step in building an 18 ft tiny home. Email for details, humshane@gmail.com (HG−0619)

MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multi−track recording. (707) 476−9239. (DMT−0529)

Kids & Teens

REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−0626) STEEL DRUM CLASSES. Beginning Wkshp: 10 a.m.− noon May 17, $25. Weekly Beginning: Fri’s. 11:30 a.m. −12:30 p.m., May 9−30, $50. Beg/Int, Mon’s 7−8 p.m. Youth Band: Thurs’s. 4:30 p.m.−5:30 p.m. 5/8−5/29, $40. Pan Arts Network 1049 Samoa Blvd. Suite C, (707) 407−8998. panartsnetwork.com (DMT−0529)

Fitness

HEALTHSPORT ACADEMY PERSONAL TRAINER PREP COURSE JUNE 2014. Have a Passion for Fitness? Ready to Take the Next Step? Gain the know−how and experience to make personal training a career with HealthSPORT Academy’s Summer Intensive Course. Weekends from June 1− 22, at HealthSPORT By the Bay, 411 First St, Eureka. Sign up at any HealthSPORT location. For more info. contact Kate at kreynolds@healthsport.com NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−0724) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F−0626) YOGA AT ARCATA CORE PILATES. Achieve your core potential with our new classes! Power Yoga with Sasha, Mon. & Wed., 6:30 p.m. Acro Yoga with Anna & Lucia, Tues, 7 p.m. Yoga for All with Stephanie, Wed., 7:45 a.m. Kundalini Yoga with Bree, Thurs., Noon. See website or call for more info. 845−8156, arcatacorepilatesstudio.com. (F−0529) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. (707) 845−4307 marlajoy.zumba.com (F−0828)

14TH ANNUAL MOONSTONE BEACH SURF CAMP. Water enthusiasts of all levels will enjoyably learn the aquatic skill necessary for all types of surfing while being immersed in lifeguard water safety, surf etiquette and beach and ocean awareness. Ages: 8−up. June 23−27, July 7−11, July 21−25, Aug. 4−8, at Moonstone Beach. Cost: $195, full four−day session. moonstonebeachsurfcamp.com, (707) 822−5099 (K−0619) AQUATICS CAMP. Get ready for one of the most well−known summer camps in Humboldt County! Exciting activities, including flatwater kayaking, canoeing, surfing, stand up paddling and sailing! Staff teaches water safety, environmental educa− tion and promotes positive group development. Session I: June 23−27. Session II: July 14−18 . fee: $285 *enquire about daily rates. Discount Program Fee: $265 for full week when registering participant for more than one camp, or more than one family member! Fee Includes camp staff, transportation, aquatic equipment, daily snacks and food for the camp out beginning with Thurs. dinner. Age Limit: 10 − 14 years old . Contact: 826−3357. Website: Humboldt.edu/centeractivities. (K−0619) FREE VBS. Gospel Light’s Sonrise National Park VBS. Ages 3−11 1/2. July 7−July 11. 9 a.m.−12 p.m. Arcata First Baptist, 1700 Union Street, Arcata. (707) 822− 0367. Youth and Jr. High Bible Camp Ages 11 1/2−18. Snacks and Fun are included! (K−0626) HUMBOLDT BAY AQUATIC CENTER KIDS CAMP. Session I: July 7−11. Session II: July 28−Aug. 1. Come out for a week of exploration and fun on Humboldt Bay! Campers will learn kayaking and water safety skills, as well as a respect for the wonderful marine environment that we have in Humboldt Bay. Activities include general kayak instruction and rescue techniques, Humboldt Bay ecology and history of Old Town Eureka Water− front, and a variety of games and skill−building exercises. If you have any questions, contact the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center at (707) 443−4222. (K−0619) TEEN STRENGTH & CONDITIONING CAMP. Open to all teen athletes, includes exclusive, individual− ized training in the areas of plyometrics, speed development, strength development, power development, agility, Olympic lifting and flexibility. Ages 13−19. Two sessions: June 16−July 11 and July 14− Aug. 8 (2 training sessions each day). HSU Student Rec Center. Cost: $80 per session. Contact: 826− 4519. (K−0619)

32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−1225)

CONSCIOUS LIVING FOR LIFE ENRICHMENT. Through discussion and practice exercises, class participants will focus on how to change ingrained habits to take greater control of their thoughts and actions and live more consciously in the present. With Jane Woodward. Wed’s., June 18−25, 1 −4 p.m. OLLI members $45/nonmembers $70. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0612) CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING: AN INTRO− DUCTION. Explore and develop writing about real stuff− profiles of interesting people or places, or moments from your life. With Heal McKnight. Tues’s. and Wed’s,, June 10−25, 6−8 p.m. OLLI members $65/nonmembers $90. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0605) FREE MEDICARE WORKSHOPS. Offered by Area 1 Agency on Aging’s trained HICAP counselors the second Thurs. of every month through Aug. Hour− long workshops make Medicare understandable. Drop by second floor conference room at A1AA, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Supplementing Medicare, 4−5 p.m., June 12. On deck: Medicare Prescription Drug Plans, July 10, 4−5 p.m. (O−0605) HEADWATERS SALMON PASS HIKE. Join Julie Clark for ranger−led hike which covers redwood ecology, watershed restoration and the endangered species of the Headwaters Forest Reserve. See the largest intact stand of ancient redwoods within the Reserve on this moderate level hike. Mon., June 16, 10 a.m.−1 p.m. OLLI members $10/nonmembers $35. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0612) IMPRESSIONISM FROM THE NATIONAL GALLERY & BEYOND. Focus on the figurative and landscape painting of the major impressionist artists. Paint− ings from the National Gallery in Washington will be emphasized. With Ron Johnson. Tues’s., June 10− 17, 6−8 p.m. OLLI members $45/nonmembers $70. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0605) LIBRARY SERVICES WORKSHOPS. Join Librarians Katie LaSala and Carly Marino for a tour of the HSU library to learn about its collections, computer lab use, understanding call numbers, finding scholarly articles, using eBooks, navigating the website, and using research guides. Thurs., June 12, 10 a.m.−Noon or Mon., June 16, 2−4 p.m. Free to OLLI Members. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826 −5880 (O−0605) WRITING ABOUT FOOD. Review a local restaurant, hone food writing vocabulary and share the expe− rience of eating in writing. With Evelyn Hampton. Tues’s. and Thurs’s., June 10−19, 10 a.m.−12:30 p.m. OLLI members $65/nonmembers $90. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0605)

LIFE & FILMS OF CHARLIE CHAPLIN. Join Philip Wright to screen and discuss notable films from Charlie Chaplin, considered to be one of the greatest filmmakers in the history of American cinema. Wed’s., June 11−July 9, 6−9 p.m. OLLI members $75/nonmembers $100. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0605) THE JONATHAN LYONS FAMILY IN THE BALD HILLS. 1860s to 1960s. Participate in an historical presentation and discussion of three generations of the Jonathan and Amelia Lyons Family. This course includes a field trip to the Lyons’ home place, Elder, in the Bald Hills of Redwood National and State Parks. With Jim Wheeler. Fri., June 13, noon−2 p.m. and Sat., June 14, 9 a.m.−4 p.m. OLLI members $75/nonmembers $100. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0612) YOGA WITH OLLI. Improve balance, strength, flex− ibility and concentration with yoga for all levels and body types. With Laurie Birdsall. Gentle Yoga on Mon’s., June 9−30, 1:30−3 p.m. in Eureka. OLLI members $65/nonmembers $90 or Yoga in Fortuna on Tues’s, June 10−24, 10−11 a.m. OLLI members $30/ nonmembers $55. OLLI: www.humboldt.edu/olli, 826−5880 (O−0605)

Pets & Animals

BIRDING: TIPS AND TRIPS. Join Gary Bloomfield to become more familiar with Humboldt County breeding birds. Classroom discussions follow each day’s field trip, with tips and information on bird identification. Mon.−Sat., June 16−21 (Mon./Fri./Sat., 9 a.m.−noon; Tues./Wed./Thurs., 8 a.m.−3 p.m.). Fee: $120. One unit of optional academic credit in NRx112 is available for an additional $50. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/ extended (PA−0529)

Spiritual

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Arcata & Eureka. Beginners welcome. ARCATA: Sun’s 7:55 a.m. At NorthCoast Aikido on F Street (entrance in alley between 8th and 9th, upstairs). Call 826− 1701 or visit arcatazengroup.org. EUREKA: Wed’s 5:55 p.m., First Methodist Church, enter single story building between F & G on Sonoma St, room 10. Call 845−8399 or barryevans9@yahoo.com for more information. (S−0626) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−0529) TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S−0529) YOU’RE INVITED TO A HU CHANT! Would you like to feel real peace? Heal your heart? Cope with change? HU (hue) is a sound vibration that connects you to the Divine. Tues. May 6, 7−7:30 p.m., (and every first Tues. of the month) Jefferson Community Center, 1000 B St., Eureka. All are welcome for free. 444−2536, miraclesinyourlife.org (S−0529)

statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Leon A. Karjola, CSB# 69056 Attorney at Law Leon A. Karjola 732 Fifth Street, Suite E Eureka, CA. 95501 (707) 445−0804 May 12, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

legal notices Sports & Recreation

AMERICAN RED CROSS LIFE GUARD TRAINING & CERTIFICATION. SIGN UP NOW ! Classes will be June 22, 24, 25, 26 & July 1, in Willow Creek. Class limited to nine students. Ages 15−Adult. great job skill: lifeguards are in high demand. For more info. Call Dream Quest (530) 629−3564 or email dreamquestwillowcreek@hotmail.com (SR−0530)

Therapy & Support

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS. We can help 24/7, call toll free 1−844−442−0711. (T−0529) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon’s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−0529) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS? Confidential help is available. 825−0920, saahumboldt@yahoo.com or (TS−0529) SMOKING POT? WANT TO STOP? www.marijuana−anonymous.org (T−0731)

Vocational

CHILD ABUSE MADNATED REPORTER TRAINING. With Cara Barnes, MA, and Jed Mefford, MSW. Fri., June 13, 8:30 a.m.−4:30 p.m. $30 fee includes lunch. $25 additional for nursing or education academic credit or MFT/LCSW CEUs. Pre−registration required by June 9. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V−0529) DECOLONIZING SOCIAL WORK WITH INDIGE− NOUS COMMUNITIES. This online course is for current social workers and community members who work with indigenous communities. Instructor: Serenity Bowen. Course runs June 9− Aug. 1. Fee: $433.50 (includes 1.5 units of credit in SW 420). This course also meets a prerequisite of the online MSW program. To enroll, call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826− 3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (V−0529)

Wellness & Bodywork

CANDLELIGHT HOT STONE YOGA & LIVE SOUND HEALING. At Om Shala Yoga. With Artemisia Shine. Fri., May 30 and June 6. 1st, 3rd, & 5th Fri’s. monthly. 7:30−9:30 p.m. $20 drop−in. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W−0529) COURSE IN CONSCIOUSNESS. Learn meditation and gain greater clarity, happiness and peace in your life. Course covers several classic yogic paths to enlightenment and beginner techniques such as mantras. With David Sandercott. Tuesdays June 10− July 15, 6−8 p.m. Fee: $69. To enroll, call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (W−0529) YOGA ALIGNMENT CAMP: TRANSFORM YOUR PRACTICE. At Om Shala Yoga. With Peggy Profant. Mon.−Fri., June 16−20, 1−3 p.m. Five days to immerse in Anusara alignment principles. Learn for the first time or refresh your skills. $125 or $108 if paid by May 31. 858 10th St. & 890 G St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com. (W−0529)

DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell. High Country Herb Weekend with Jane & Allison Poklemba. June 5−7. Come join us on the top of the world with majestic mountains, lakes and wildflowers at this special botanical preserve. Beginning with Herbs, Sept 17−Nov 5, 2014, 8 Wed. evenings. Learn medicine making, herbal first aid, and herbs for common imbalances. Register online www.dandelionherb.com or call (707) 442−8157. (W−0529) NEW CLIENTS $20 OFF EACH SESSION FOR UP TO THREE SESSIONS!! MyrtletownE Healing Center, 1480 Myrtle Ave, Eureka. A hidden gem on Myrtle in Eureka. Specializing in therapeutic bodywork. We will assist you on your road to recovery, help you work through that chronic pain issue, or give you that full body support with wellness massage. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, abdominal massage, lymph drainage, lomi−lomi and more! You are worth it, call today! 441−9175. Now offering Deeksha − free community meditation. Sundays at 5. (W−0529) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY. Now enrolling. Daytime classes start September 2 at Arcata School of Massage. 650−Hour Thera− peutic Massage Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822−5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W−0529) T’AI CHI WITH MARGY EMERSON. Two programs: Traditional Long Form (Wu Style) and T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis. Eight−week term starts June 24. Begin by the third week. Daytime begin− ning classes meet at 1049 C, Samoa Blvd., Arcata (Samoa & K). Upper level classes and Wed. evening beginning class call for location. Visit a class with no obligation to pay or enroll. Call 822−6508 or e− mail margaretemerson@att.net for summer schedule and fees see www.margaretemerson.com for other details. (W−0626) YOGA. At Om Shala Yoga. 7 days a week. 7:30 a.m. −7:30 p.m. More than 50 classes to choose from! Summer Special: 10 classes for $99. See website or call for details. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642). www.omshalayoga.com. (W−0529)

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AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JON MARCUS NICHOLS CASE NO. PR140131

the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor ➤of the dece− dent, you must your claim with LEGALfile NOTICES the CONTINUED court and mailONa copy the NEXTtoPAGE personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Connie Miller Koshkin Law Firm 1116 Eleventh Street Arcata, CA. 95521 (707) 822−2800 May 23, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, JON MARCUS NICHOLS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by STEVE SCHEFFLER In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE 5/15, 5/22, 5/29/2014 (14−152) requests that STEVE SCHEFFLER Be appointed as personal represen− tative to administer the estate of NOTICE OF PETITION TO the decedent. ADMINISTER ESTATE OF THE PETITION requests the dece− BEVERLY B. PARKE dent’s will and codicils, if any, be AKA BEVERLY BRYANT PARKE admitted to probate. The will and CASE NO. PR14139 any codicils are available for exami− To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, nation in the file kept by court. contingent creditors and persons THE PETITION requests authority to who may otherwise be interested in administer the estate under the the will or estate, or both, BEVERLY Independent Administration of B. PARKE, aka BEVERLY BRYANT Estates Act. (This authority will PARKE allow the personal representative to A PETITION FOR PROBATE has take many actions without been filed by SARA K. PARKE obtaining court approval. Before In the Superior Court of California, taking certain very important County of Humboldt. actions, however, the personal THE PETITION FOR PROBATE representative will be required to requests that SARA K. PARKE 5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−166) give notice to interested persons Be appointed as personal represen− unless they have waived notice or tative to administer the estate of NOTICE OF PETITION TO consented to the proposed action.) the decedent. ADMINISTER ESTATE OF The independent administration THE PETITION requests the dece− RICHARD CHARLES STORRE authority will be granted unless an dent’s will and codicils, if any, be CASE NO. PR140124 interested person files an objection admitted to probate. The will and To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, to the petition and shows good any codicils are available for exami− contingent creditors and persons cause why the court should not nation in the file kept by court. who may otherwise be interested in grant the authority. THE PETITION requests authority to the will or estate, or both, RICHARD A HEARING on the petition will be administer the estate under the CHARLES STORRE held on May 29, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Independent Administration of A PETITION FOR PROBATE has the Superior Court of California, Estates Act. (This authority will been filed by REID STORRE County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth allow the personal representative to In the Superior Court of California, Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. take many actions without County of Humboldt. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of obtaining court approval. Before THE PETITION FOR PROBATE the petition, you should appear at taking certain very important requests that REID STORRE the hearing and state your objec− actions, however, the personal Be appointed as personal represen− tions or file written objections with representative will be required to tative to administer the estate of the court before the hearing. Your give notice to interested persons the decedent. appearance may be in person or by unless they have waived notice or THE PETITION requests the dece− your attorney. consented to the proposed action.) dent’s will and codicils, if any, be IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a The independent administration admitted to probate. The will and contingent creditor of the dece− authority will be granted unless an any codicils are available for exami− dent, you must file your claim with interested person files an objection nation in the file kept by court. the court and mail a copy to the to the petition and shows good THE PETITION requests authority to personal representative appointed cause why the court should not administer the estate under the by the court within the later of grant the authority. Independent Administration of either (1) four months from the date A HEARING on the petition will be Estates Act. (This authority will of first issuance of letters to a held on June 19, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at allow the personal representative to general personal representative, as the Superior Court of California, take many actions without defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth obtaining court approval. Before fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. taking certain very important from the date of mailing or IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of actions, however, the personal personal delivery to you of a notice the petition, you should appear at representative will be required to under section 9052 of the California the hearing and state your objec− give notice to interested persons Probate Code. Other California tions or file written objections with unless they have waived notice or statutes and legal authority may the court before the hearing. Your consented to the proposed action.) affect your rights as a creditor. You appearance may be in person or by The independent administration may want to consult with an your attorney. authority will be granted unless an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a interested person files an objection fornia law. contingent creditor of the dece− to the petition and shows good YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by dent, you must file your claim with cause why the court should not the court. If you are a person inter− the court and mail a copy to the grant the authority. ested in the estate, you may file personal representative appointed A HEARING on the petition will be with the court a Request for Special by the court within the later of held on JUNE 5, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of either (1) four months from the date the Superior Court of California, an inventory and appraisal of estate of first issuance of letters to a County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth assets or of any petition or account general• personal as NORTHrepresentative, COAST JOURNAL •Street, THURSDAY, northcoastjournal.com Eureka, inMAY Dept:29, 8. 2014 as provided in Probate Code section defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of 1250. A Request for Special Notice fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days the petition, you should appear at form is available from the court from the date of mailing or the hearing and state your objec− clerk. personal delivery to you of a notice

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INCLUSIVE; Humboldt Meridian; thence South YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN− on the East line of said Survey TIFF: STANWOOD A. MURPHY, JR. 1712.99 feet to the North line of the AND PAMELA J. MURPHY AS CO− right of way of the Northwestern TRUSTEES OF THE STANWOOD Pacific Railroad; thence along said AND PAMELA MURPHY FAMILY right of way line South 25 degrees TRUST U/T/A/ DATED NOVEMBER 16 1/2 minutes West 353.40 feet to a 28, 2000, AS AMENDED; point which is distant 1928.3 feet NOTICE! You have been sued. The North and 150.8 feet West from the court may decide against you Southeast comer of said Section 18; without your being heard unless thence leaving right of way line and you respond within 30 days. Read running North 6 degrees 42 minutes the information below. You have 30 East 270.62 feet; thence North 77 CALENDAR DAYS after this degrees 21 minutes West 234.50 summons and legal papers are feet; thence North 951.53 feet; served on you to file a written thence West 227.59 feet to the response at this court and have a West line of said Tide Land Survey; copy served on the plaintiff. A thence along West line of said Tide letter or phone call will not protect Land Survey as patented, as follows: you. Your written response must be North 1 degree East 228.30 feet; in proper legal form if you want the North 7 degrees West 396 feet; and court to hear your case. There may North 16 degrees West 145.2 feet to be a court form that you can use the North line of said Tide Land for your response. You can find Survey; and thence East 660 feet to these court forms and more infor− the point of beginning. ALSO a right mation at the California Courts of way for road purposes 20 feet Online Self−Help Center wide along the West side of the (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), course North 951.53 feet above your county law library, or the mentioned, for the full length of courthouse nearest you. If you said course with the East line of cannot pay the filing fee, ask the said 20 foot strip extended to the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If course above given as North 77 you do not file your response on degrees 21 minutes West. time, you may lose the case by EXCEPTING, however, from the default, and your wages, money, lands herein described, all minerals, and property may be taken without petroleum, oil, gas and other hydro further warning from the court. carbons, with rights of way and There are other legal requirements. other rights of use of the land in You may want to call an attorney exploration, mining, marketing and right away. If you do not know an utilizing said excepted substances, attorney, you may want to call an as excepted in Deed from Mitchell attorney referral service. If you Dorr Realty Company to Eureka cannot afford an attorney, you may Shipbuilders, Inc., dated February be eligible for free legal services 27, 1945, recorded in Book 273 of from a nonprofit legal services Deeds, Page 107. BEING a portion of program. You can locate these the Northeast Quarter of Southeast nonprofit groups at the California Quarter and Southeast Quarter of Legal Services Web site Northeast Quarter of Section 18, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Township 4 North, Range 1 West, California Courts Online Self−Help Humboldt Meridian. PARCEL TWO: Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/self− That portion of State Swamp and help), or by contacting your local Overflowed Land Survey No. 124 as court or county bar association. described in Patent issued by the NOTE: The court has a statutory lien State of California to Waterman for waived fees and costs on any Field January 12, 1891 and recorded settlement or arbitration award of January 19, 1891 in Book 12 of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Patents, Page 151, and that portion court’s lien must be paid before the of Lots 2 and 3 in Section 17, Town− court will dismiss the case. The ship 4 North, Range 1 West, name and address of the court is: Humboldt Meridian, which lies 5/15, 5/22, 5/29/2014 (14−148) SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, Northerly and Westerly of the COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 Fifth Westerly line of the right of way SUMMONS Street, Eureka, CA 95501 The name, heretofore conveyed to the Eel CASE NUMBER: DR140193 address, and telephone number of River and Eureka Railroad Company NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff (now Northwestern Pacific Railroad JON RIEWERTS, ALSO KNOWN without an attorney is: Richard Company) by Deed recorded AS JON EDMUND RIEWERTS Smith, Harland Law Firm LLP, 622 H December 1, 1882, in Book 7 of AND JON E. RIEWERTS, AS Deeds, Page 47. PARCEL THREE: TRUSTEE FOR THE FINN, ALLEN, Street, Eureka, CA 95501, (707) 444− 9281 Date: April 24, 2014 This action Tideland Survey No.101 described in RIEWERTS, GOODWIN TRUST, is a Quiet Title action to determine the field notes thereof as follows: ALL UNKNOWN SUCCESSORS title to that real property that is BEGINNING at a point 8.70 chains TRUSTEES TO JON RIEWERTS, located in Humboldt County and is West of the Northeast corner of ALSO KNOWN AS JON described as follows: That real the Southeast Quarter of Southeast EDMUND RIEWERTS AND JON property situate in the County of Quarter of Section 18, Township 4 E. RIEWERTS, AS TRUSTEE FOR Humboldt, State of California, North, Range 1 West, Humboldt THE FINN, ALLEN, RIEWERTS, described as follows: PARCEL ONE: Meridian; thence West 8 chains to GOODWIN TRUST, WHO ARE BEGINNING at the Northeast the margin of low water mark on SUED AS DOES 1−10 AND ALL corner of State Tide Land Survey Humboldt Bay; thence following PERSONS CLAIMING BY, No. 101, on the East line of Section the margin of low water mark THROUGH, OR UNDER SAID 18, Township 4 North, Range 1 West, North 21 1/2 degrees East, 10 chains; TRUST AND DOES 11−50, Humboldt Meridian; thence South North 13 1/2 degrees East, 13 chains; INCLUSIVE; on the East line of said Survey North 1 degree East, 10 chains; YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN− 1712.99 feet to the North line of the North 7 degrees West, 6 chains; TIFF: STANWOOD A. MURPHY, JR. right of way of the Northwestern North 16 degrees West, 2.20 chains AND PAMELA J. MURPHY AS CO− Pacific Railroad; thence along said to a subdivisional line; thence East TRUSTEES OF THE STANWOOD right of way line South 25 degrees 10 chains to the East line of said AND PAMELA MURPHY FAMILY 16 1/2 minutes West 353.40 feet to a Section 18; thence South 28 chains TRUST U/T/A/ DATED NOVEMBER point which is distant 1928.3 feet to the margin of Humboldt Bay; 28, 2000, AS AMENDED; North and 150.8 feet West from the thence following the same South 28 NOTICE! You have been sued. The Southeast comer of said Section 18; degrees West, 4.20 chains; South 42 court may decide against you thence leaving right of way line and degrees West, 5 chains; South 23 1/2 without your being heard unless running NorthMAY 6 degrees 42 minutes degrees West, 5 chains, to the place NORTH COAST JOURNAL 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com you respond within 30 days. Read • THURSDAY, East 270.62 feet; thence North 77 of beginning. EXCEPTING therefrom the information below. You have 30 degrees 21 minutes West 234.50 all of the minerals, petroleum, oil, CALENDAR DAYS after this feet; thence North 951.53 feet; gas and other hydrocarbons that summons and legal papers are thence West 227.59 feet to the may be in or under the above consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on JUNE 5, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept: 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Laurence A. Kluck, CSB#123791 Mathews, Kluck, Walsh & Wykle, LLP 100 M Street Eureka, CA. 95501 (707) 442−3758 May 6, 2014 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

legal notices

34

North 13 1/2 degrees East, 13 chains; North 1 degree East, 10 chains; North 7 degrees West, 6 chains; North 16 degrees West, 2.20 chains to a subdivisional line; thence East 10 chains to the East line of said Section 18; thence South 28 chains to the margin of Humboldt Bay; thence following the same South 28 degrees West, 4.20 chains; South 42 degrees West, 5 chains; South 23 1/2 degrees West, 5 chains, to the place of beginning. EXCEPTING therefrom all of the minerals, petroleum, oil, gas and other hydrocarbons that may be in or under the above described lands, with such rights of entry and rights of way as are necessary or convenient to be used for exploration, drilling and mining for said substances and for utilizing and for transporting the same; including the right to use so much and such parts of said lands as are necessary or proper for derricks, workshops, roads, pipe lines, tele− phone lines and other structures required for the work of exploring for such substances and mining and marketing the said substances produced from said lands, as reserved by Mitchell Dorr Realty Company, a Michigan corporation, in Deed recorded April 10, 1945, in Book 273 of Deeds, Page 107, in the office of the County Recorder of said County. ALSO EXCEPTING therefrom those portions thereof conveyed by Deeds recorded in the office of the County Recorder of said County, as follows: (a) Deed to A. LaRocca & Sons recorded August 19, 1946, in Book 284 of Deeds, Page 328. (b) Deed to Garbudd Lumber Corp., a California corporation, recorded December 19, 1950, in Book 153 of Official Records, Page 350, under Recorder’s Serial No. 13356. (c) Deed to Grace L. Call, a married woman, recorded January 16, 1951, in Book 156 of Official Records, Page 385, under Recorder’s Serial No. 586. (d) Deed to Vita Sea Corporation, a Nevada corporation, recorded April 8, 1953, in Book 245 of Official Records, Page 587, under Recorder’s Serial No. 4464. PARCEL FOUR: A right of way for road purposes 20 feet wide along the east side of the course "North 951.53 feet" as described in the deed to Garbudd Lumber Corp. above mentioned, the full length of said course. While it lacks a street address, this property is also known as a portion of Humboldt Assessor Parcel Number 305−171−15. 5/8, 5/15, 5/22, 5/29/2014 (14−141)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME AMANDA RESECKER− BOYD CASE NO. CV140261 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 PETITION OF: AMANDA RESECKER− BOYD TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: AMANDA RESECKER− BOYD For a decree changing names as follows: Present name AMANDA RESECKER− BOYD To Proposed Name AMANDA BUZICK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for

BOYD TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: AMANDA RESECKER− BOYD For a decree changing names as follows: Present name AMANDA RESECKER− BOYD To Proposed Name AMANDA BUZICK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 4, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Date: April 24, 2014 Filed: April 24, 2014 /s/ W. Bruce Watson Judge of the Superior Court 5/8, 5/15, 5/22. 5/29/2014 (14−138)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME JESUS JACOB FUENTES CASE NO. CV140279 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 PETITION OF: JESUS JACOB FUENTES TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: JESUS JACOB FUENTES For a decree changing names as follows: Present name JESUS JACOB FUENTES To Proposed Name ERIC JETER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 23, 2014 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 8 Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Date: May 8, 24, 2014 Filed: May 8, 2014 /s/ W. Bruce Watson Judge of the Superior Court 5/15, 5/22. 5/29, 6/5/2014 (14−151)

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON THE PRELIMINARY BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2014/15 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Preliminary Budget of the Humboldt No. 1 Fire Protection District of Humboldt County for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2014, is available for review at the following time and place for inspec− tion by interested taxpayers: Humboldt No. 1 Fire Protection District Headquarters 533 C Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Monday− Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., and That on JUNE 04, 2014 at 5:00 p.m., at Humboldt No. 1 Fire Protection District Headquarters 533 C Street, Eureka, California, the Board of Directors will meet for the purpose of fixing the fiscal budget, and that any taxpayer may appear at said time and place and be heard regarding the increase, decrease, or omission of any item of the budget, or for the inclusion of additional items. PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF HUMBOLDT NO. 1 FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT /S/ Kathi Hendricks Secretary of the Board 5/22, 5/29/2014 (14−157)

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code. The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 6th of June, 2014, at 11:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at INDIANOLA STORAGE, at 673 Indianola Cutoff, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California. The following units will be sold: Unit # 111 − Abram Stark Misc −Household items Unit #152 − Anthony Thompson Misc. Household items Unit # 289 − Tahni Morris Misc.− Househole items Unit # 307 Jackie Campbell Misc. Household items Purchases must be paid for (cash only) and removed at the time of the sale, with the unit left broom clean. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Owner reserves the right to bid. Call 442− 7613 Indianola Storage, Jerry Avila, Bond # 0327592 5/29, 6/5/2014 (14−165)

hiring?

LEGAL NOTICES CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00322 The following persons are doing Business as SOL SISTERS BAKING COMPANY, Humboldt, at 39010 Hwy. 299, Willow Creek, CA., 95573, PO Box 1604, Willow Creek, CA. 95573 Jaclyn R. Smith 42175 Hwy 299 Willow Creek, CA. 95573 Marjorie B. Salas 201 Poney Creek Rd. Hawkins Bar, CA. 95563 The business is conducted by A General Partnership The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 05/15/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Jaclyn R. Smith, Co−Owner/ Operator This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 16, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12 (14−156)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00332 The following person is doing Busi− ness as HUMBOLDT POWER AND WATER and HIGH LIFTER PUMP SERVICE, Humboldt, at 1155 Redway Drive, Redway, CA., 95560, PO Box 1640, Redway, CA. 95560 Theodore W. Horner 155 Redway Drive Redway, CA. 95560 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Theodore W. Horner, Jr., Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 20, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00307

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00257

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00301

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00336

The following persons are doing Business as HUMBOLDT ANIMAL RESCUE TEAM . Humboldt, at 3954 A Jacobs Avenue, Eureka CA., 95501, PO Box 7236, Eureka, CA. 95502 Humboldt Spay/ Neuter Network 3954 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA. 95501 CA. #2574699 The business is conducted by A Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 02/25/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Jennifer Raymond This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as LIVE2DIVE SCUBA COMPANY, Humboldt, at 1005 J Street, Eureka, CA., 95501 Daniel J. Heinen 1005 J Street Eureka, CA. 95501 Ida D. Heinen 1005 J Street Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 07/01/2013 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Dan Heinen, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 07, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as PAPA MURPHYS TAKE ’ N’ BAKE PIZZA, Humboldt, at 686 F Street, Suite C., Arcata, CA., 95521, Humboldt, 1940 Central Ave., McKi− leyville, CA. 95519, AI #ON 1845097 Brencam, Inc. 1940 Central Ave. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by a Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Brencam, Inc., Kathryn L. Hodge, Vice President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 16, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as BELLE STARR CLOTHING, Humboldt, at 863 H St., Arcata, CA., 95521 Susan K. McIntyre 1812 McFarland St. Eureka, CA. 95501 Eddie A. Morgan 1812 McFarland St., Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Susan McIntyre, Owner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 5, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as FILIGREE CAKE COOKIES & PASTRIES, Humboldt, at 2585 1/2 Eye Street, Arcata, CA., 95521 Carin M. Sorisio 2585 1/2 Eye St. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 5/14/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Carin Mari Sorosio, Owner, Sole Proprietor This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

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5/22, 5/29, 6/5, 6/12 (14−158)

5/8, 5/15, 5/22, 5/29/2014 (14−146)

5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/2014 (14−145)

ABANDONMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00140

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00338

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00289

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00262

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00286

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 14−00300

The following persons are doing Business as HUMBOLDT SOUP COMPANY, Humboldt, at 603 E Street, Eureka, CA., PO Box 1304, Eureka, CA. 95502 Christine A. Silver 1388 Leslie Rd. Eureka, CA. 95503 William R. McKenzie 1388 Leslie Rd., Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by a General Partnership The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 04/15/2014 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Christine A. Silver, Partner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 29, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as NORTH COAST FROZEN YOGURT, Humboldt, at 1553 City Center Rd., McKinleyville, CA., 95519, PO Box 80, Salyer, CA. 95563 Shawn P. Bolton PO Box 80/ 14 Salyer Ln. Salyer, CA. 95563 Elizabeth A. Bolton PO Box 80/ 14 Salyer Ln. Salyer CA. 95563 The business is conducted by A Married Couple The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Shawn P. Bolton This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 17, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as TRADE WIND EXCHANGE. Humboldt, at 39032−4 Hwy 299, Willow Creek CA., 95573 Summer C. Adams PO Box 921 71 Gambi Ln. Willow Creek, CA. 95573 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Summer Adams This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 29, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as SALT & SPRAY CONSTRUCTION, Humboldt, at 4156 Bush Ave., McKinleyville, CA., 95519, Alex C Smeloff 4156 Bush Ave. McKinleyville, CA. 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on 7/31/12 I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Alex Smeloff This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 02, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing business as HUMBOLDT SPAY/ NEUTER CLINIC, Humboldt, at 3954 A Jacob Avenue Eureka, CA., 95501, PO Box 7236, Eureka, CA. 95502 Humboldt Spay/ Neuter Network 3954 A Jacobs Avenue Eureka CA. 95501 CA. #2574699 The business is conducted by A Corporation The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on n/a I declare the all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the registrant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s/ Jennifer Raymond, Executive Director This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 21, 2014 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

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5/8, 5/15, 5/22, 5/29/2014 (14−142)

5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−163)

5/8, 5/15, 5/22, 5/29/2014 (14−140)

5/15, 5/22, 5/29, 6/5/2014 (14−147)

5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19/2014 (14−160)

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35

legal notices NOTICE OF PROPERTY TAX DELINQUENCY AND IMPENDING DEFAULT Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3351, 3352

I, John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, State of California, certify as follows: That at close of business on June 30, 2014 by operation of law, any real property (unless previously tax-defaulted and not redeemed) that have any delinquent taxes, assessments, or other charges levied for the fiscal year 20132014, and/or any delinquent supplemental taxes levied prior to the fiscal year 2013-2014 shall be declared tax-defaulted. That unless the property is completely redeemed through payment of all unpaid amounts, together with penalties and fees prescribed by law or an installment plan is initiated and maintained; the property will become tax-defaulted and may be subsequently sold at a tax sale in satisfaction of the tax lien. That a detailed list of all properties remaining tax-defaulted at the close of business on June 30, 2014, and not redeemed prior to being submitted for publication, shall be published on or before September 8, 2017. That information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption of tax-defaulted property will be furnished, upon request, by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector at 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, California 95501 (707) 476-2450. I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 23rd , 2014. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 29th, June 5th, and June 12th , 2014.

NOTICE OF IMPENDING POWER TO SELL TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY

Revenue and Taxation Code Section 3361, 3362

Pursuant to Revenue and Taxation Codes sections 3691 and 3692.4, the following conditions will, by operation of law, subject real property to the Tax Collector’s power to sell. 1) All property for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for five or more years. 2) All property that has a nuisance abatement lien recorded against it and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. 3) Any property that has been identified and requested for purchase by a city, county, city and county, or nonprofit organization to serve the public benefit by providing housing or services directly related to low-income persons and for which property taxes and assessments have been in default for three or more years. The parcels listed herein meet one or more of the criteria listed above and thus, will become subject to the Tax Collector’s power to sell on July 1, 2014, at 12:01 a.m., by operation of law. The Tax Collector’s power to sell will arise unless the property is either redeemed or made subject to an installment plan of redemption initiated as provided by law prior to close of business on the last business day in June. The right to an installment plan terminates on the last business day in June, and after that date the entire balance due must be paid in full to prevent sale of the property at public auction. The right of redemption survives the property becoming subject to the power to sell, but it terminates at close of business on the last business day prior to the date of the sale by the Tax Collector. All information concerning redemption or the initiation of an installment plan of redemption will be furnished, upon request by John Bartholomew, Humboldt County Tax Collector, 825 5th Street, Room 125, Eureka, CA 95501, (707) 476-2450. The amount to redeem, including all penalties and fees, as of June 2014, is shown opposite the assessment/parcel number and next to the name of the assessee.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION The Assessor’s Parcel/Assessment Number (APN/ASMT), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map, if applicable, and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the assessor’s office.

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2006, FOR THE TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2005-2006: Assessor’s Assessment No 013-201-006-000 511-091-035-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Matson Jeff, 3440 Harrison Ave/Eureka Tretten Scott, 1379 Pedroni Rd/McKinleyville

Amount to Redeem By June 2014 $ 4,435.93 $ 4,112.46

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2007, FOR THE TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2006-2007: Assessor’s Assessment No 109-042-039-000 110-021-031-000 004-196-007-000 109-331-031-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Cardenas Ruben, 767 Spring Rd/Shelter Cove Etter Franklin R, 379 Hillside Dr/Shelter Cove Squires Floyd E III & Betty J, 241 Wabash Ave/ Eureka York Tommy A & Pauline N/Fonseca Keolanalani J & Lehua K K , 554 Parsons Rd/Shelter Cove

Amount to Redeem By June 2014 $ 1,500.71 $ 1,318.34 $ 5,865.94 $ 3,081.81

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2008, FOR THE TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2007-2008: Assessor’s Assessment No 032-034-022-000 109-191-007-000 514-132-005-000 314-141-013-000 522-291-026-000 109-292-024-000 530-061-022-000 081-021-008-000 508-161-011-000 008-232-012-000 109-251-024-000 105-193-008-000 105-193-009-000 105-193-010-000 316-172-019-000 526-062-058-000 503-381-034-000 220-081-013-000

Assessee’s Name & Amount to Redeem Property Address By June 2014 Barnick Richard & Lea A, 351 Sprowl Creek Rd/ $ 7,917.51 Garberville Barnick Richard & Lea A , 133 Eileen Rd/Shelter Cove $ 3,579.93 Bedell Wendell D & Morton Amber $ 1,565.33 Botiller Brian V, 6810 Butler Valley Rd/Kneeland $ 18,617.51 Grable Michael L Sr, 245 Horse Linto Rd/Willow $ 8,051.50 Creek Hopkins Freida J, 635 Upper Pacific Dr/Shelter Cove $ 5,752.81 Lapiers Gary B & Marrollee $ 1,047.50 Leck Dylon, 231 Myers Ave/Myers Flat $ 4,597.07 Lowell Rebecca L, 1774 Ocean Dr/McKinleyville $ 19,650.00 Monda Michael J, 3346 High St/Eureka $ 5,707.49 Perkins Memi C, 29 Thistle Ct/Shelter Cove $ 2,435.93 Schlecht Christopher R $ 4,471.22 Schlecht Christopher R, 560 Front St/Petrolia $ 5,052.49 Schlecht Christopher R $ 2,695.56 Schwed Joel $ 6,763.09 Velasco David $ 1,037.70 Warvi Lois, 512 Ridge Rd/Arcata $ 2,019.78 Wilson Patrick $ 3,599.62

PROPERTY TAX DEFAULTED ON JULY 1, 2009, FOR THE TAXES, ASSESSMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2008-2009: Assessor’s Assessment No 525-281-012-000 110-071-008-000 216-382-060-000 109-101-025-000 507-091-021-000 109-121-018-000 520-084-013-000 201-252-001-000 108-133-019-000 109-281-020-000 053-153-008-000 053-103-021-000 109-183-017-000 109-183-018-000 111-012-002-000 109-281-037-000 109-321-004-000 109-331-038-000 203-383-019-000

Assessee’s Name & Amount to Redeem Property Address By June 2014 Achamire Eva M C/Achamire Homer D, Cotton $ 3,026.75 Anthony W/Cotton Russell E Acojedo Rogelio P, 274 Willow Glen Rd/Shelter Cove $ 2,608.87 Anderson Mark A, 5355 Rancho Sequoia Dr/ $ 3,882.95 Alderpoint Antonelli Mattie F C, 802 Wolverine Way/Shelter $ 2,592.84 Cove Backman Mark W & Susan L, 3058 Alliance Rd/Arcata $ 2,633.50 Bailey Thomas A, 190 Mink Dr/Shelter Cove $ 2,763.58 Baker Rodney A, 48 Hansen St/Orick $ 1,396.25 Barcelos Tracie M, 2810 McDermott St/Alton $ 2,725.51 Barker Hans, 3916 E Chemise Mt Rd/Shelter Cove $ 8,268.10 Barnes Claire, 130 McMains Ct/Shelter Cove $ 3,721.13 Barnett Michael L, 242 1st Ave/Rio Dell $ 9,597.74 Barnett Michael L, 460 2nd Ave/Rio Dell $ 14,797.94 Birchfield Bill & Billie Jo/Birchfield Julie A, 641 Spring $ 1,854.01 Rd/Shelter Cove Birchfield Bill & Billie Jo/ Birchfield Julie A, 651 Spring $ 1,854.01 Rd/Shelter Cove Bleuler Barbara G Tr, 592 Upper Pacific Dr/Shelter $ 3,095.34 Cove Bourikian Robert & Varakian Nona $ 2,528.60 Bourikian Robert & Varakian Nona, 7875 Shelter $ 2,394.25 Cove Rd/Shelter Cove Bourikian Robert & Varakian Nona, 141 Telegraph $ 2,538.17 Creek Rd/Shelter Cove Boyd Perry & Jewel, 3280 Matthew Ln/Fortuna $ 2,102.58

36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

Assessor’s Assessment No 031-181-006-000 005-074-005-000 109-341-035-000 109-341-034-000 109-311-002-000 109-362-007-000 404-031-005-000 522-301-005-000 300-052-002-000 111-061-019-000 110-021-058-000 110-261-039-000 525-291-008-000 110-201-022-000 109-041-023-000 109-211-036-000 002-082-001-000 002-231-004-000 506-051-003-000 506-061-026-000 506-061-027-000 506-112-006-000 506-121-001-000 110-021-002-000 203-092-053-000 515-331-033-000 510-231-029-000 510-081-024-000 214-021-005-000 220-291-002-000 109-211-033-000 529-361-010-000 110-231-038-000 109-362-004-000 053-141-037-000 001-047-008-000 110-071-002-000 111-051-019-000 529-361-030-000 006-311-009-000 110-211-036-000 110-211-037-000 006-073-028-000 205-011-001-000 109-241-018-000 109-311-047-000 110-151-014-000 110-181-017-000 110-211-032-000 534-193-007-000 111-112-006-000 002-231-003-000 109-261-031-000 109-362-028-000 033-011-019-000 300-041-014-000 095-081-022-000 302-071-090-000 081-021-001-000

Assessee’s Name & Amount to Redeem Property Address By June 2014 Branstetter Dennis & Steve & Terri, 667 Herbert $ 8,458.66 St/Ferndale Briggs Janice L & Michelle M, 1920 J Street/Eureka $ 2,031.00 Bukovsky Martin E J & Mellie A, 144 Willow Glen Rd/ $ 2,624.46 Shelter Cove Bukovsky Martin E J & Mellie/ Morgan Melinda, 124 $ 2,705.67 Willow Glen Rd/Shelter Cove Bukovsky Martin E J & Mellie A/ Morgan Melinda, $ 2,743.53 8025 Shelter Cove Rd/Shelter Cove Busters Ventures III LLC Co 45 Dolphin Dr/Shelter $ 13,970.34 Cove Chapman Dallas G $ 845.90 Christie Kevin L, 41 Ash Ln/Willow Creek $ 5,403.87 Cloninger Heidi L, 1940 Holly St/Eureka $ 9,251.24 Coastal Covers II Inc, 21 Fir Ct/Shelter Cove $ 28,563.78 Coastal Covers II Inc, 383 Parsons Rd/Shelter Cove $ 5,056.40 Cook Cassandra M, 174 Forest Rd/Shelter Cove $ 2,719.92 Cordova Gilbert & Genevieve $ 6,296.27 Crews Calvin F/Crews John T, Crews Robert L/Crews $ 2,667.51 William C, 2081 Toth Rd/Shelter Cove CS Paradiso Holdings LLC Co, 391 Beach Rd/Shelter $ 3,216.18 Cove CS Paradiso Holdings LLC Co, 107 Otter Ln/Shelter $ 2,545.00 Cove CUE E V LLC, 2010 First St/Eureka $ 12,383.53 CUE E V LLC $ 6,009.01 CUE IV LLC $ 1,685.32 CUE IV LLC $ 1,030.59 CUE IV LLC $ 548.11 CUE IV LLC $ 6,398.91 CUE IV LLC $ 8,529.88 Dean Paul, 7813 Shelter Cove Rd/Shelter Cove $ 2,105.82 Dick Eugene F & Bonnie S, 2800 Campton Hts Dr/ $ 4,439.45 Fortuna Dodd Jesse, 67 Berry Rd/Trinidad $ 4,309.88 Eanni Jo E, 2454 Penn Ave/McKinleyville $ 5,355.91 Eanni Joemma, 2771 Central Ave/McKinleyville $ 3,502.94 Enzenbacher Dennis J, 2875 St Hwy 254/Phillipsville $ 6,852.99 Fair Anthony, 5148 Blue Slide Creek Rd/Redway $ 36,180.63 Fink Maureen, 156 Otter Ln/Shelter Cove $ 2,659.33 Floria-Gale Beth E, 448 Ferris Ranch Rd/Orleans $ 12,268.11 Foster Nicholas S, 1709 Toth Rd/Shelter Cove $ 2,311.99 Foxy Avenue Clips Inc, 27 Dolphin Dr/Shelter Cove $ 13,830.41 Foyster Barry F/Foyster Brian F $ 529.12 Fulton Ronald & Lilly Carolyn F, 821 Summer St/ $ 1,628.51 Eureka Funesto Lamberto & Georgia, 196 Willow Glen Rd/ $ 1,160.21 Shelter Cove Gabinay Elmer H & Angelynne S, 794 Redwood Rd/ $ 5,282.73 Shelter Cove Gale Beth $ 14,314.93 Gauvaln Gwendolyn D, 2495 Hillside Dr/Eureka $ 2,364.87 Gibbs Benjamin E S & Carpenter Seth O, 640 Forest $ 2,634.12 Rd/Shelter Cove Gibbs Benjamin E S & Carpenter Seth O, 268 Burns $ 2,634.12 Ct/Shelter Cove $ 20,483.89 Gomez Ana M & Lyda Kathee/ FDR Family Living Tr/L&M Family Living Tr, 1605 Gates St/Eureka Haberstock Craig R/ Haberstock Annette A/ $ 12,650.12 Haberstock Raymond G Haifa Iyad A, 840 Telegraph Creek Rd/Shelter Cove $ 3,165.62 Hakimzadeh Debora 247 Otter Ln/Shelter Cove $ 2,853.18 Hakimzadeh Debora, 2409 Toth Rd/Shelter Cove $ 2,689.41 Hakimzadeh Debora, 1055 Hillside Dr/Whitethorn $ 2,914.53 Hakimzadeh Debora, 290 Burns Ct/Shelter Cove $ 2,441.30 Hart Lani A & Kelley Richard N $ 9,363.45 Hirst William L Jr $ 2,617.91 Hollenbeck Shelley M $ 9,561.19 Holmes Leslie J, 952 Telegraph Creek Rd/Shelter $ 3,022.12 Cove Hudson Carolyn K Tr $ 2,419.40 Hurd Pearl $ 1,761.67 Jacobsen Michael R & Darlene H, 4265 Excelsior $ 3,270.85 Rd/Eureka Jenkins Danielle $ 2,211.00 Johnson Betty L Tr $ 714.46 Keener Jill, 201 Boy Scout Camp Rd/Myers Flat $ 2,672.89

LEGAL NOTICES CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE Assessor’s Assessment No 110-121-007-000 216-133-010-000 016-222-011-000 203-382-012-000 109-331-029-000 212-162-015-000 021-281-005-000 525-261-007-000 204-381-029-000 109-192-041-000 529-032-030-000 109-101-021-000 306-111-007-000 105-162-003-000 109-341-022-000 309-161-002-000 310-051-009-000 310-082-001-000 310-083-003-000 310-083-006-000 310-084-001-000 310-084-002-000 109-241-041-000 217-251-003-000 522-511-013-000 509-132-004-000 109-281-006-000 301-082-055-000 031-151-006-000 509-162-023-000 109-341-027-000 109-141-022-000 201-112-005-000 203-051-044-000 110-151-005-000 110-291-024-000 109-182-041-000 205-031-061-000 205-071-039-000 111-052-050-000 109-061-012-000 109-061-014-000 110-281-023-000 109-051-002-000 010-281-024-000 001-102-005-000 008-144-017-000 215-181-019-000 215-181-015-000 108-221-004-000 002-063-005-000 001-066-002-000 001-066-003-000 005-053-006-000 111-112-013-000 111-161-014-000 111-161-049-000 006-312-008-000 008-143-015-000 107-044-001-000 002-132-008-000

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Kelly Monica, 299 Pepperwood Dr/Shelter Cove Kercher Sterling & Sandra/Caballero Kevin R, 10373 Alderpoint Rd/Garberville Kneaper Mark A & Linnea M Tr, 2901 Hubbard Ln/ Eureka Knight Barry W Suc Tr, 3121 Matthew Ln/Fortuna Koehler Richard D III, 563 Parsons Rd/Shelter Cove Layman John E, 311 Logan Rd/Miranda Levine Zachary, 1080 8th St #9/Arcata Marshall Jacquelyne J McKay Peter H & Sandra L McLean John 415 Spring Rd/Shelter Cove Meade Dennis Miers Robert E, 758 Wolverine Way/Shelter Cove Nasca Phillip R, 2409 Meadow Ln/Eureka Neikirk Jonathan O, 227 Evergreen Way/Petrolia Nguyen Anh & Dinh, 6929 Shelter Cove Rd/Shelter Cove Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Niles Robert L Oblena Leolin D Oliver Jessi ONeill William J Tr, 145 Hillcrest Way/Willow Creek Pallin Manuel A & Irene, 2040 Nelson Rd/ McKinleyville Parrish Bishop P 3rd, 80 Shaller Ct/Shelter Cove Parsons Thomas & Machado Ashley, 310 Higgins Ave/Eureka Perkins Kim , 725 Washington St/Ferndale Phillips Melissa E , 1300 Quail Run Ct/McKinleyville Pirzadeh Dara, 36 Willow Glen Rd/Shelter Cove Porreca Paul V, 1383 Telegraph Creek Rd/Shelter Cove Premo Francine Etal/Premo Cheryl J/Premo Cyndi L/Premo Diana/ Premo Marchelle/Premo Marlena A, 291 Orchard Ln/Fortuna R & T Black Development/ Gess Cathy L/Gess Jerry J/ Poletski Dama/Poletski Richard A, 489 Kendall Ct/Fortuna Rezapour Gassem & Arellano-Raith Jennie V, 2380 Toth Rd/Shelter Cove Rezapour Gassem, 153 Combs Rd/Shelter Cove Rillamas Carl D & Brenda A, 670 Spring Rd/Shelter Cove Rio Dell Pilar LLC Rio Dell Pilar LLC Roberts Lynn E, 495 Seafoam Rd/Shelter Cove Roberts Lynn E & Sylvia A, 159 Raintree Circle/ Shelter Cove Roberts Lynn E & Sylvia A, 171 Raintree Circle/ Shelter Cove Roberts Mike, 158 Blueridge Rd/Shelter Cove Sakata Michael D & Mildred M Tr, 2122 Telegraph Creek Rd/Shelter Cove Schrack Heidi A, 3429 E St/Eureka Security National Offices LLC, 311 5th St/Eureka Shelley Tim E & Connie J, 3566 Glen St/Eureka Shiningstar Tara, 550 Harris Creek Rd/Whitethorn Shiningstar Tara, 450 Harris Creek Rd/Whitethorn Smalley Gene H/Smalley Steven P/ Doyle Sandra C Squires Floyd E & Betty J, 1637 3rd St/Eureka Squires Floyd E III & Betty J, 216 3rd St/Eureka Squires Floyd E III & Betty J, 218 3rd St/Eureka Squires Floyd E III & Betty J, 1623 G St/Eureka Stack Paul W & Elenita Stanley Carwin T, 56 Haven Ct/Shelter Cove Stanley Carwin T, 17 Cove View/Shelter Cove Stevens Lois A, 2440 Hillside Dr/Eureka Thomas Corinne E Tr, 3559 Cottage St/Eureka Toews Arlo E & Dylan A, 3000 Cartwright Rd/ Honeydew United Property Holdings LLC, 2223 4th St/Eureka

Amount to Redeem By June 2014 $ 3,853.43 $ 3,515.55 $ 44,954.01 $ 10,662.62 $ 2,099.52 $ 2,074.61 $ 13,378.18 $ 1,903.30 $ 18,100.99 $ 1,957.23 $ 4,420.90 $ 2,523.94 $ 2,479.74 $ 1,857.51 $ 2,886.48 $ 6,367.57 $ 2,551.87 $ 314.44 $ 199.50 $ 380.36 $ 344.17 $ 344.17 $ 5,070.81 $ 7,260.65 $ 29,381.21 $ 3,499.65 $ 2,443.42 $ 1,699.09 $ 8,057.52 $ 6,390.28 $ 3,228.09 $ 3,800.22

Assessor’s Assessment No 210-191-011-000 511-182-006-000 109-131-048-000 216-252-003-000 216-261-058-000 216-252-001-000 216-252-004-000 109-211-017-000

Amount to Redeem By June 2014 $ 4,842.42 $ 7,046.92 $ 2,947.41 $ 1,471.78 $ 4,708.42 $ 2,698.91 $ 2,106.76 $ 2,680.01

I certify or (declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.,

2014

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County, California, on May 23rd, 2014. Published in the North Coast Journal on May 29th, June 5th, and June 12th , 2014. , 5/29, 6/5, 6/12/2014 (14-167)

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COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Child Welfare Services System Review We are seeking agencies to design and conduct a System Review of Humboldt County Child Welfare Services and participating agencies. This review will combine quantitative and qualitative methodologies to explore questions specific to the unique attributes of the communities within Humboldt County.

$ 4,242.29

Please see the website: http://www.co.humboldt.ca.us/rfp/ Or Contact Lisa Rix at Lrix@co.humboldt.ca.us Or (707) 476-4763

$ 6,539.32 $ 1,408.71

Proposals to be received by 5:00 p.m. on July 31, 2014 at the address listed above. Proposals received after this date will not be considered. Faxes will not be accepted. No additional information or documentation will be accepted from proposers after the proposal due date.

$ 2,178.62 $ 3,436.16 $ 41,072.95 $ 105,772.74 $ 8,779.64 $ 2,743.36 $ 2,743.36

Assessee’s Name & Property Address Vance Robert, 40400 St Hwy 36/Bridgeville Williams Greg & Rust Garry, 2309 Arthur Rd/ McKinleyville Williamson Peter, 62 Muskrat Circle/Shelter Cove Wyatt Dale & Venus, 360 Main St/Alderpoint Wyatt Dale L & Venus, 298 Sixth St/Alderpoint Wyatt Dale, 335 Third St/Alderpoint Wyatt Dale, 335 4th St/Alderpoint Zandi Abrahim, 21 Teri Ln/Shelter Cove

5/29, 6/5, 6/12, 6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 7/10, 7/17/14 (14-153)

A co m p l e t e r e s o u r ce f o r ki d s o f a l l a g e s ! ■

■ ■

Summer Camps & Activity Programs Visual & Performing Arts Nature & Science Sports, Athletics & Adventure

ONLINE NOW

www.northcoastjournal.com/SOF2014

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$ 3,653.02 $ 2,592.84

PUBLIC NOTICE OF A DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT (EIR)

$ 32,300.67 $ 14,934.32 $ 2,332.55 $ 17,240.46 $ 3,070.62 $ 32,264.44 $ 6,994.25 $ 9,388.93 $ 2,204.57 $ 11,829.14 $ 5,516.18 $ 1,999.42 $ 2,616.63 $ 3,679.16 $ 3,824.90 $ 15,808.86

The Humboldt County Association of Governments (HCAOG) has prepared a Draft Program Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the Humboldt Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) 2013/14 Update, also known as “VROOM” (Variety in Rural Options of Mobility). The Draft EIR is available for review at the HCAOG office, and on the HCAOG website at: www.hcaog.net/documents/regional-transportation-plan-rtp-2013update-vroom. Public comments must be received, in writing, by 5 p.m. on Monday, July 7, 2014. Submit written comments to: Oona Smith, Senior Planner HCAOG 611 “I” Street, Suite B Eureka, CA 95501 Fax: (707) 444-8319 E-mail: oona.smith@hcaog.net

$ 251,466.63

5/29/2014 (14-164)

What’s your food crush? We’re looking for the best kept food secrets in Humboldt. Email your tip (Is it a burger? A cookie? A fried pickle?) and we’ll check it out for the Hum Plate blog. Email jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

37

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NOTICE OF AGREEMENT TO PURCHASE TAX-DEFAULTED PROPERTY FOR DELINQUENT TAXES (PURCHASE BY AN ENTITY OTHER THAN A CITY) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, in accordance with the provisions of Division 1, Part 6, Chapter 8 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code (and the written authorization of the State Controller), that an agreement, a copy of which is on file in the office of the Board of Supervisors of Humboldt County, has been made between the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors and Resort Improvement District No 1 and Shelter Cove Sewer and other Facilities Maintenance District No 1. and approved by the State Controller, whereby Humboldt County will sell to Resort Improvement District No 1 and Shelter Cove Sewer and other Facilities Maintenance District No 1. under the terms set forth in said agreement all of the real property hereinafter described, which is subject to the power of sale by the Tax Collector. The effective date and time of the agreement shall be June 11, 2014 at 5:00 pm. If the property is not redeemed according to law before the effective date and time of the agreement, the right of redemption will cease and the Humboldt County Tax Collector, pursuant to said agreement, will sell said property to Resort Improvement District No 1 and Shelter Cove Sewer and other Facilities Maintenance District No 1. If the property is sold, parties of interest, as defined in Section 4675 of the California Revenue and Taxation Code, have a right to file a claim with the county for any proceeds from the sale that are in excess of the liens and costs required to be paid from the proceeds. If excess proceeds result from the sale, notice will be given to parties of interest pursuant to law. For information as to the amount necessary to redeem or other related issues pertaining to the property described in this notice, contact John Bartholomew Tax Collector of Humboldt County in the State of California.

PARCEL NUMBERING SYSTEM EXPLANATION The Assessor’s Parcel Number (APN), when used to describe property in this list, refers to the assessor’s map book, the map page, the block on the map, (if applicable), and the individual parcel on the map page or in the block. The assessor’s maps and further explanation of the parcel numbering system are available in the assessor’s office. The properties that are the subject of this notice are situated in Humboldt County, California, and are described as follows: ITEM NO 1 2 3

ASSESSOR’S PARCEL NUMBER 109-141-014-000 109-141-015-000 109-291-023-000

4

110-121-014-000

5

110-211-046-000

LAST ASSESSEE NAME Philip M Gunkel Philip M Gunkel Lincoln Trust Co FBO Jeff Ryan Ajmal Sediqe Maryam Salhi Wahid Sediqe Renee M Weaver

I certify (or declare), under penalty of perjury, that the foregoing is true and correct.

John Bartholomew Humboldt County Tax Collector

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ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE.

Humboldt County Resource Conservation District invites Bids for SALT RIVER ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT – PHASE 2A. Sealed Bids will be received by (and all bids should be mailed or delivered to) the office of GHD Inc., located at 718 Third Street, Eureka, California, 95501 until 4PM Pacific Daylight Time on MONDAY, JUNE 9, 2014 at which time they will be publicly opened. A mandatory pre-bid meeting is scheduled for THURSDAY, MAY 22, 2014 at 2PM at Riverside Ranch near Ferndale. The Contract Documents, including plans and specifications are available online at the HCRCD website: http://humboldtrcd.org/. Copies of the contract documents may also be obtained at the office of GHD Inc., at 718 Third Street, Eureka, California, 95501, upon a non-refundable payment of $40.00 for each set. In addition to the printed plans and upon signing of a waiver and release of liability, bidders may obtain selected CAD files for informational purposes only; the printed plans shall be the basis for the Contractor’s Bid. The work consists of furnishing all labor, equipment, and supervision for restoration of the Lower Phase 2A portion of the Salt River channel. The work generally includes grubbing, vegetation stripping, excavation, sediment hauling, water main replacement, placement of large wood habitat structures and seed/mulch application. Questions regarding the plans and specifications shall be submitted in writing to GHD Inc. or via email (to the emails listed below) and must be received by 5PM Thursday, June 5, 2014. Replies to such inquiries will be in the form of addendum or clarification that will be mailed to all plan holders who attended the mandatory pre-bid site meeting. General questions or requests for clarifications regarding various portions of the Plans may also be directed to Jeremy Svelha at (707) 443-8326, jeremy.svehla@ghd.com or to Travis James at (707) 443-8326, travis.james@ghd.com . Each proposal must be submitted on the prescribed form and accompanied by a certified check or Bid Bond in an amount of not less than 10 percent of the amount bid. Successful bidders will be required to furnish both a Payment Bond and Performance Bond in the full amount of the Contract Price. A conditional or qualified bid will not be accepted if it modifies the Plans or Specifications or method of work. In accordance with Public Contract Code Section 10263 and with concurrence of the project funding agencies the Contractor may be allowed to substitute securities for monies normally withheld by the owner to insure performance under this contract. This is a Public Works projects funded with CA Sate funds (Proposition 50, 84 and 1E). Therefore CA State prevailing wages will be required on the project. In accordance with the provisions of Section 1720 et seq. of the Labor Code, the Division of Labor Standards and Research has determined the general prevailing wage rates or wages and the employer payments for health and welfare, pension, vacation, travel time and subsistence pay as provided for is section 1773.8. These wages are set forth in the General Prevailing Wage Rates for this project, and are available for review at the office of GHD Inc., 718 Third Street, Eureka, CA and available from the California Department of Industrial Relations’ web site at http://www. dir.ca.gov/DLSR/PWD. Contractor will be required to comply with any changes in these wage rates as they are updated by the State government at no cost to the Owner. It shall be mandatory upon the Contractor and any Subcontractor to pay not less than the specified rates to all laborers, workers and mechanics employed by them in the execution of the Agreement pursuant to CA labor Code 1774. This contract is subject to state nondiscrimination and compliance requirements pursuant to Government Code, Sections 11135, 12940 and 12900 et seq.

APN 203-051-039-000.

Humboldt County Resource Conservation District 5630 South Broadway, Eureka, CA 95503 www.humboldtrcd.org

5/22, 5/29/14 (14-154)

Executed at Eureka, Humboldt County California, on May 16th, 2014 Published in North Coast Journal on May 22nd, May 29th & June 5th, 2014.

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED SEPTEMBER 16, 2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, a cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in §5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee, or his duly appointed representative. The sale will be made without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said deed of trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness in the property address or other common designation shown herein. Trustor(s): BLACK AND WEBB DEVELOPMENT, A GENERAL PARTNERSHIP, by Richard L. Black and Michael T. Webb, general partners. Deed of Trust recorded October 7, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-24043-5, of official records of Humboldt County, California. Date of Sale: June 25, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. (TEN A.M.) Place of Sale: At the front entrance to the county courthouse, 825 5th Street, Eureka, California. The purported property address of the subject real property, a vacant lot, is 401 Kendall Court, Fortuna, California 95540. Assessor’s Parcel Number 203-051-039-000. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold, and reasonable costs expenses, and advances, at the time of the initial publication of the notice of sale is $73,845.14. The Beneficiary may instruct the Trustee to make a credit bid on behalf of the Beneficiary for less than the amount owing, or to accept an initial cash bid for the less than the amount owing. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the purchaser shall be entitled only to a refund of the deposit paid, plus interest. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Beneficiary, or the Trustee. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on the real property offered for sale, you should understand that there are risks in bidding at a trustee auction. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. If you are the highest bidder at the sale, and there are senior liens affecting the property, you are or may be responsible for paying all senior liens before receiving clear title to the property. For the present sale, the Trustee believes, but does not warrant, that there are no senior liens. Prospective bidders must do their own research. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of existing liens affecting the property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. If you wish to learn whether the sale date has been postponed and, if applicable, the date, time, and place of the continued sale, you may call the Trustee at (415) 279-7397 or send an email to georgewynns@ gmail.com. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or occur close to the sale may not be immediately available by telephone or email. The best way to verify postponement is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: May 16, 2014. George S. Wynns, 124 Brewster Street, San Francisco, CA 94110, (415) 279-7397, georgewynns@gmail.com, Trustee for the Beneficiary.

5/22, 5/29, 6/5/14 (14-159)

5/22, 5/29, 6/5/14 (14-155)

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Clubs/Orgs FREE MEDICARE WORKSHOPS OFFERED BY AREA 1 AGENCY ON AGING’S Trained HICAP counselors the second Thursday of every month through August. Hour−long workshops make Medicare understandable. Drop by second floor conference room at A1AA, 434 Seventh St., Eureka. Next class: Supplementing Medicare, 4−5 p.m., June 12. On deck: Medicare Prescription Drug Plans, July 10, 4−5 p.m. IT’S COMING! Downtown Fortuna Citywide YARD SALE, Sat., June 7. Reserve a 12x12 space for $25. Questions: 407−9494. Registration form available at fortunadowntown.com. Also, LEMONADE BOOTHS $25.

Opportunities AIRLINE CAREERS. BEGIN HERE. Get trained as FAA certified Avia− tion Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job place− ment assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800− 725−1563 (AAN CAN) (E−0529) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Non−medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. (707) 362−8045. (E−0529)

Opportunities

Opportunities

Opportunities

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CITY OF ARCATA

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866

LEAD MECHANIC

eurekaca.expresspros.com

Framing Carpenters Receptionist ƒ Medical Biller Certified Electricians ƒ Laborers Parts Counter Sales Fund Developer

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES CHER-AE HEIGHTS CASINO

PART-TIME POSITIONS Janitor Cage Cashier, #3 Deli Crown Club, #2 Security Line/Prep Cook Host/Bus/Server FULL-TIME POSITIONS Cage Cashier Graveyard Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria Employment Applications available in Human Resources/ Seascape/Cher-Ae Heights Casino or our website at www.cheraeheightscasino.com Cher-Ae Heights is an alcohol and drug free workplace with required testing.

AVON. Earn extra income with a new career! Sell from home, work, online. $15 startup. For information, call: 888−770−1075 (Mon.−Fri., 9 a.m.−7 p.m. & Sat. 9 a.m.−1 p.m. central.) (Ind Sls Rep) (E−0605) AFRICA, BRAZIL WORK/STUDY! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269) 591−0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN) (E−0101)

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NOW HIRING Energy Specialist – Proposition 39 $3,006 - $4,662 monthly (plus Benefits), full time. Develop, implement, and report on Proposition 39 projects for Local Educational Agencies; provides direct energy management services, collaborates with other energy program staff and local providers, and maintains excellent customer focus. Program Assistant – Accounting and HR $2,304 – $3,574 monthly (plus Benefits), full time. Provides financial, bookkeeping, human resources, and clerical support services to ensure effective and efficient accounting and HR operations. Both positions open until filled. For job descriptions and application instructions, go to www.redwoodenergy.org/about-us/employment.

CERTIFIED MEDICAL CODER

Email your resume or any questions to info@mckeeverenergy.com No phone calls or drop-ins, please.

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CHILDREN’S MENTAL HEALTH COORDINATOR

1 F/T Arcata

Looking to enhance your career in the Solar and Electrical Construction industries?

CALIFORNIA MENTOR. CARE PROVIDERS needed NOW. Make extra money working from home, GREAT OPPORTUNITY. Special Needs Adults live with you. Earn up to $3600 tax−free/mo. Bring 4 references. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Sharon today for appt! (707) 442−4500 ext 16! www.camentorfha.com. (E−0529)

FISCAL ANALYST

2 F/T Arcata

JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN & AN APPRENTICE

Final Filing Date: 4:00 p.m. Monday, June 9, 2014. Provides lead direction to assigned staff; directs, coordinates and performs skilled mechanical repairs, maintenance and modifications of a variety of light and heavy duty diesel, gasoline, hybrid and electrical vehicles and equipment; and performs other related duties as assigned. Application materials available at: Arcata City Manager’s Office 736 F Street, Arcata; by calling (707) 822-5953; or at www.cityofarcata.org. EOE.

Assist in development of budgets & grant proposals, analyze revenue & expense, perform various accounting duties. Min 4 yrs exp in administration, accounting, information systems & budget analysis. Req Bachelor’s in Business w/ course work in accounting. F/T (partial yr, 11mo) M-F, Exempt $726.52- $800.98/wk. First Review Date: June 3.

MEDICAL BILLER

McKeever Energy & Electric, Inc. is seeking a

(1% Salary Increase 07/01/14)

**Arcata Main Office**

SITE ADMINISTRATOR

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$40,749.49 - $49,531.26/yr.

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1 F/T Arcata

CITY MANAGER CITY OF TRINIDAD The City of Trinidad seeks a part−time (approximately 60%) city manager with a strong history of hands−on public finance and budgeting, grant oversight and contract administration to manage city operations. Apply by 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, June 11, 2014 to City of Trinidad, City Manager Position, P.O. Box 390, Trinidad CA 95570. Applicants must submit a letter of interest, a current resume and three professional references. Addi− tional information can be found on the City’s website at trinidad.ca.gov.

classified employment

OFFICE MANAGER

1 F/T Crescent City

Support children, families & staff in a preschool/ playgroup setting in observing, consultation & developing behavior plans. Train parents & staff on social/emotional skills development. Require BA or BS degree or higher in Mental Health or related field. P/T (partial yr, 8-wk layoff): 28 hrs/wk (M-F); $17.50$19.30/hr. First Review Date: June 24.

MEDICAL ASSISTANT

INFORMATION SYSTEMS SPECIALIST

1 F/T Crescent City

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T McKinleyville

DENTAL HYGIENIST 1 F/T Crescent City

DENTIST 1 F/T Crescent City, 2 F/T Arcata, 1 F/T McKinleyville, 1 F/T Eureka (Spanish language required)

REGISTERED NURSE 1 Temp P/T Willow Creek, 1 F/T Crescent City

RN CLINIC COORDINATOR (SUPV) 1 F/T Willow Creek

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH DIRECTOR 1 F/T Arcata

FAMILY PRACTICE MD/DO 1 F/T Crescent City, 1 F/T Eureka, 1 F/T McKinleyville

OB-GYN 1 F/T Arcata

Visit www.opendoorhealth.com to complete and submit our online application

Oversee computers & information systems for NCS sites (i.e. phones, copiers, faxes, scanners, printers, audio visual equip). Req 2 yrs exp involving mgmt & maintenance of automated systems including VoIP, Windows Server 2012, Exchange 2010, SQL and VMware. Degree or Cert in Computer Science or related field pref. F/T (yr rd): 40 hrs/wk (M-F); $16.11-$16.91/hr. First Review Date: June 3. Submit Application, Resume & Cover Letter to: Northcoast Children’s Services 1266 9th St, Arcata, CA 95521. For application, job descriptions & more info, visit www.ncsheadstart.org or call 707-822-7206.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

39

the MARKETPLACE Opportunities

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Opportunities www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501

707.445.9641

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$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) (E−0529)

Child and Family Services Elder Case Worker, FT/Regular. Assists in needs assessment and development of appropriate case plan, initiates referrals, and support services to high risk elders; prepares status reports including recommendations to courts and agencies; may be required to review and case manage non-elder cases; and, assists in investigation of actual cases of elder abuse as required by law. Minimum Requirements: Bachelor degree; degree in Psychology, Behavioral Sciences, Social Work, Social Services or related field desired; knowledge of federal, state, tribal and local laws, regulations, statutes and ordinances; and, knowledgeable about the Indian Child Welfare Act. Open until filled.

Billing Office Manager, FT/Regular. Coordinates and supervises the overall functions of all KMC patient billing, cashiering, patient accounts file maintenance, and credit and collection of patient bills; reconciles accounts receivable and balances to general ledger control accounts as directed; directs the implementation of administration/approved billing, and collection policies. Minimum requirements: Bachelor’s degree (B.S.) in Business or related field is desired, from four-year college or university; however, experience in hospital patient accounting will be considered in lieu of college degree (5 years minimum experience); or equivalent combination of education and experience; Certification desired in one of the following certifications: Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS); Certified Professional Coder (CPC); Certified in Health Compliance (CHC); Certified Revenue Cycle Representative Program (CRCR); Certified Healthcare Financial Professional (CHFP); Fellow American College of Healthcare Executives (FACHE); or Fellow of the Healthcare Financial Management Association (FHFMA). Deadline to apply is 5 PM, June 6, 2014. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: hr.kmc@kimaw.org for a job description and application. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

40 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

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AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record. Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka (707) 476−9262. (E−0529)

Merchandise BOOKS & PUZZLES 1/2 PRICE. MAY 27−31. Dream Quest Thrift Store, where your shopping dollars helping local youth realize their dreams, Willow Creek. (530) 629−3006.

K’ima:w Medical Center,

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

Clothing

EDUCATION: EQUAL OPPORTUNITY TITLE IX For jobs in education in all school districts in Humboldt County, including teaching, instructional aides, coaches, office staff, custodians, bus drivers, and many more. Go to our website at www.humboldt.k12.ca.us and click on Employment Opportuni− ties. Applications and job flyers may be picked up at the Personnel Office, Humboldt County Office of Education 901 Myrtle Ave, Eureka, or accessed online. For more information call 445−7039. (E−0605)

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$

20.99

Must be 21 and over.

Opportunities

@ncj_of_humboldt

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THURS. JUNE 5 5:15 PM ď …ď łď ´ď Ąď ´ď Ľď€ ď †ď ľď ˛ď Žď Šď ´ď ľď ˛ď Ľď€Źď€ ď ˆď Żď ľď łď Ľď ¨ď Żď Źď ¤ď€ ď ?ď Šď łď Łď€Žď€Źď€  ď ?ď Źď ľď łď€ ď€ąď€šď€šď€ˇď€ ď ‹ď Źď Ąď ­ď Ąď ´ď ¨ď€ ď ?ď Źď Ľď Ąď łď ľď ˛ď Ľď€ ď –ď Ľď łď łď Ľď Źď€Źď€  ď€ąď€šď€šď€ˇď€ ď ƒď Ąď Źď Ťď Šď Žď łď€ ď ‚ď Żď Ąď ´ď€ ď ”ď ˛ď Ąď Šď Źď Ľď ˛ď€Źď€ ď€ąď€šď€šď€ˇď€  ď Šď Żď ¨ď Žď łď Żď Žď€ ď€¸ď€ ď ˆď ?ď ?ď ľď ´ď ˘ď Żď Ąď ˛ď ¤ď€ ď ?ď Żď ´ď Żď ˛ď€Ž Info & Pictures at

COUPON CLIPPERS NEEDED! Trade extra grocery coupons for $$$$$. All national brands requested. Free details. Please visit www.cashforcashoffs.com (AAN CAN) (M−0605)

WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on

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*ACOBS!VE%UREKAs 

Community BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13−18 for them to learn & grow in their own community. Contact the HC Dept. of Health & Human Services Foster Care Hotline (707) 441−5013, ask for Peggy

Got a few too many?

Sell them here!

20 words and a photo, in full color for only $25 per week. 442-1400 classified@northcoastjournal.com www.northcoastjournal.com

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Art & Design

Computer & Internet

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707-840-0600

    

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, call 845−3087, 845−3132 2guysandatrucksmk777 @gmail.com, (S−0529) MITSUBISHI HEAT PUMPS. Heat your house using 21st century technology. Extremely efficient, cheap to run, reason− ably priced. Sunlight Heating−CA lic. #972834. (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−0731)

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artcenterframeshop @gmail.com

Auto Service CASH FOR CARS. Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1−888−420−3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) (A−0717) YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMER− GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442−GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (S−0626)

Cleaning CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−0626) HUMBOLDT HOUSE CLEANING. Licensed & Bonded, #3860. (707) 444−2001 or (707) 502−1600. Top Rated Cleaning Service on Angie’s List in the State. First Time Cleaning 2 hours or more $10 off. (S−0731)

Musicians & Instructors GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning & intermediate. Seabury Gould (707) 444−8507. (M−0626) BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. (707) 832−7419. (M−0807) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nation− ally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−0529)

Other Professionals

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806 macsmist@gmail.com

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A’O’KAY CLOWN & NANI NATURE. Juggling Jesters and Wizards of Play present Perfor− mances for all Ages; A magical adventure with circus games & toys. For info. on our variety of shows and to schedule events & parties please call us at (707) 499−5628. Visit us at circusnature.com (S−0626)

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 northcoastjournal

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ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−0703) PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, www.taichigardener.com (S−0529)

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    

REASONABLE RATES Decking, Fencing, Siding, Roofing/Repairs, Doors, Windows Honest & Reliable, Retired Contractor (707) 267−0496 sagehomerepair@gmail.com

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SWAIN’S FLAT OUTPOST GARDEN CENTER UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT! ALL NEW INVENTORY!!! SOIL! AMENDEMENTS! FERTILIZERS! ANYTHING UNDER THE SUN! MILE 19 ON HIGHWAY 36 OPEN 9AM−7PM General Store (707) 777−3385 Garden Cnt. (707) 777−3513 outpostgardencenter @gmail.com

           

Musicians & Instructors PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−0529)

IN-HOME SERVICES

 Registered nurse support Personal Care Light Housekeeping Assistance with daily activities Respite care & much more

Other Professionals



707.825.7100

FD1963



WRITING CONSULTANT/ EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com (S−0807)

PROJECTS UNLIMITED Honey−Do’s are my Specialty. Living and Working in Arcata Area Since 1983 Bob Billstrom, Handyman (707) 822−7037 (707) 834−8059 tunesmith89@sbcglobal.net

Garden & Landscape

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837 H Street, Arcata, CA 95521

Other Professionals

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Computer & Internet

On the Plaza

classified SERVICES

Sewing & Alterations MRS SEW AND SEW. Mending, hemming, alterations. Fast turnaround. In Arcata. Jeans hem $10 (707) 499−3265

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

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insured & bonded

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HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/SCENIC TOURS. $245 per hour (707) 843−9599 www.redwoodcoast helicopters.com

Serving Northern California for over 20 years! TOLL FREE

1-877-964-2001

northcoastjournal.com/blogjammin

MORE BLOGS. EVERYDAY.

BLOGTHING + A&E + HUM PLATE

STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8 a.m.− 3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n−Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014

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body, mind

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EARTH RITE MASSAGE. Intuitive deep tissue massage from ORR Hotsprings CMT. 1 hour $50, 1 1/2 Hours $75. More information on facebook. Call Rick: (707) 499− 6033. Treat yourself or a loved one to healing touch. (MB−0529)

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111

Est. 1979

COMMUNITY CRISIS SUPPORT:

HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

 

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

    

HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

 

RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

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445-2881



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ROLFING SPRING SPECIAL 50% off first session plus free body analysis! (541) 251− 1885. (MB−0529)

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Kim Moor, MFT #37499

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www.sacredbodiespilates.com

707-268-0437

Wed & Sat 11-5pm

Starts June 24 • Traditional T’ai Chi • T’ai Chi for Back Pain and Arthritis

Additional Info: www.margaretemerson.com

Special discount for Seniors, SSI, Veterans & Students $

New Patients ONLY

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  

Medical Cannabis Consultants  

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104 230 WABASH APTS. 2/1 Units near bus lines, Carport, OSRM, Cat OK. Rent $675. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197, www.ppmrentals.com (R−0529) 2303 SUMMER ST. #3. 1/1 Upper Apt, Gas Range, Off−ST Parking, Cat OK. Rent $565. Vac 5/29. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197, www.ppmrentals.com (R−0529)

Search by food type, region and price. Browse descriptions, photos and menus. www.northcoastjournal.com

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758(027,21),71(66 Muscle Activation Techniques™:

Gym Memberships Personal Training

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featuring

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 

Offering Private Training and Small Group Classes in

�฀ Pilates �฀ Yoga �฀ ������฀������฀�����������฀ �����������฀��������� �฀ ���฀������฀�����฀�������฀�� �฀ ���฀������฀������฀���฀ ���������฀�����฀��������฀�� �฀ ����฀������฀�������฀����฀ ���������฀�������฀�� �฀ ������฀������������

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1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)

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SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center

Daytime Beginning Classes Meet at K & Samoa, Arcata All Others Call for Location

NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating.

with Margy Emerson

For Schedule And Fees:

1-800-273-TALK VIAGRA. 100mg, CIALIS 20mg. 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement! Discreet Shipping. Save $500. Buy the Blue Pill Now! 1−800−404−1271 (AAN CAN) (MB−0626)

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(707) 822-3018 info@truemotionfitness.com www.truemotionfitness.com 901 O St, Suite B, Arcata

WONDERFUL CUSTOM HOME ON SIX SUNNY ACRES OFF WEST END ROAD

KAREN ORSOLICS

816 2ND ST., EUREKA. Studio Rooms with Kitch− enette,Shared Bathrooms, All Utilities Pd., No Pets, $400/Month $600/Sec. Deposit. Call Preston, (707) 444−2199. GASSOWAY APTS, MCK. 2/1 Apts, Laundry, Carport, Small Pets, Rent $765, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 (R−0529)

ABSOLUTELY STUNNING

Cell: 707-834-1818 ArcataProperty.com “The best move you’ll ever make.” DRE License# 01200980

3 bedrooms, two baths, plus an office. End of the road privacy, yet minutes to Arcata and Blue Lake. Includes mother-in-law unit. Call Kris for more details! $659,000

42 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 29, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com

DRE License# 01438846 “Making Real Estate Dreams a Reality.” HumboldtCountyProperty.com Cell: 707-498-4429

KRIS SUNDEEN

3 bedroom, 2 ½ bath custom Victorian style home on over 1 ½ acres in WoodlandHeights. Call for more details. $519,000

classified HOUSING Houses for Rent

Vacation Rentals

IMMACULATE HOME IN THE REDWOODS − ARCATA. Fickle Hill Rd, $2000 per month, $2500 deposit. information at: http://www.americanproprentals .com/category/arcata. Contact: niki@americanproprentals.com (R−0612)

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VA C AT I O N R E N TA L 707

romantic 14 secluded acres rustic chic www.oysterbeach.info (707) 834-6555

Samoa Peninsula Eureka, CA default

IMMACULATE HOME IN THE REDWOODS − ARCATA. Fickle Hill Rd, $2000 per month, $2500 deposit. information at: http://www.americanproprentals .com/category/arcata. Contact: niki@americanproprentals.com (R−0522)

707

WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R−2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engi− neering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $89,900 will consider offers. (530) 629−2031

northcoastjournal

Roommates

Art & Collectibles Auctions Merchandise Baby Items Miscellaneous Clothing Sporting Goods

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Yours!

$895,000

4 bed, 2.5 bath, 2,177 sq ft comfortable Dows Prairie home located on 15 stunning private enchanting acres, dream shop, 2 stall barn w/tack room & loft, Strawberry Creek meanders through.

$235,000

4 bed, 2 bath, 1,772 sq ft Humboldt Hill home on an adventurous gardeners dream lot, waterfall & ponds with mature landscaping, corner lot, RV parking, shop, two wood stoves, craft room. An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

#01930997

707.834.7979

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

Eureka Single Family Home Enjoy the best of the old world with the new! This two bedroom home

classified.northcoastjournal.com NG:

www.communityrealty.net

Kyla Tripodi Realtor/Land Agent

Arcata, Eureka and rural properties throughout Humboldt County

LISTI

839-9093

707.83 4.3241

Housing/Properties

NEW

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

@ncj_of_humboldt

ALL AREAS − ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online list− ings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) (R−0717)

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center),

BEACHFRONT

1339 WILLIAMS. 1/1 Duplex, Garbage Paid, Carport, Fenced bkyard. Rent $640. Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444−9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0529) 301 W. DEL NORTE. 2/1.5 Craftsman Home, Porch, W/D Hookups, Pet OK Rent $900 Vac Now. Rental Hotline (707) 444− 9197 www.ppmrentals.com (R−0529)

Acreage for Sale

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Acreage for Sale Apartments for Rent Commercial Property for Sale Commercial Space for Rent Houses for Rent Realtor Ads Vacation Rentals

NEW

LISTI

NG!

elegantly combines original craftsman style with top of the line upgrades. Recently remodeled the main home features beautiful original hardwood flooring throughout, revamped original windows, upgraded plumbing and wiring, and new forced air heating. A gourmet kitchen with all new stainless appliances, including a professional Italian-made Bertazzoni stove! The second one bedroom unit has also been recently remodeled and includes the original claw-foot tub/shower, new appliances, gas ‘’woodstove’’, and a separate spacious laundry room. This home has a detached two car garage with alley access and an art studio space. Set in a quiet neighborhood near Henderson Center, shopping, and hospitals this home is the total package.

Dinsmore Land/Property

±567 Acres on Pilot Ridge Road with gorgeous views. This property boasts rolling meadows, old growth douglas fir trees, multiple springs, and Mad River frontage. One of a kind rare private property, call Kyla or Charlie for your private tour today!

$850,000

$359,000

Orick Land/Property

This ±40 acre parcel is located between Orick and Weitchpec on Bald Hills Road. It offers gorgeous Klamath River frontage! Clirliah Creek runs right through the parcel with hydro-electric potential! A flat has already been developed for you.

$175,000

2120 CAMPTON RD. STE #C – EUREKA, CA 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

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48 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 2014 • northcoastjournal.com


North Coast Journal 05-29-14 Edition