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thursday may 23,2013 vol XXIV issue 21• humboldt county, calif. FREE

6 Missing Bob 7 Not lovin’ that use of $100,000 8 Time for a turret? 20 Playing with pasta 36 The tribble with Star Trek

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

table of 4 Mailbox 4 Poem plainsong

6

From the Editor missing bob

7

Media Maven HUM-CPRA

8 News Finally, a facelift?

10 Blog Jammin’ 12 On The Cover humboldt at work

17 Home & Garden Service Directory

20 Table Talk the joy of hanDmade pasta (part 2)

Kinetic Grand Championship 2013 Special Insert

The Hum on hiatus this week. See from the editor on page 6

28 Music & More! 31 Calendar 35 Seven-o-Heaven cartoon by andrew goff

36 Filmland spock versus spock

37 Workshops 39 Field Notes what ain’t so

40 Sudoku 40 Crossword 42 Marketplace 46 Body, Mind & Spirit 47 Real Estate This Week

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013

3

Sausage Flap

May 23, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 21

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

Off the Rails

Editor: Hostage crisis afoot (“The Disappearing Railroad Blues,” May 16). The victims? Public-trust resources including a degraded river, a “ye-old” transportation corridor helping degrade said river, and the public. All victims are borderline comatose with multiple internal injuries leading to massive bleeding of soil, money and lost opportunity. Local agency and organization staffers work hard, too hard and with too few resources, to free the hostages and treat said victims. Riveting — not. More like bad TV. This crisis needs a SWAT team from Sacramento with backing from Congress, something, before we all die of old age. Wes, Noreen, Jared, you getting all this? How ‘bout you, Gov? Chris Turner, Arcata Editor: This was to me the best article regarding the North Coast railroad situation that I have seen since my retirement from my day job. The article accurately depicts the situation as I was exposed to them during my work years. Southern Pacific (NWP) really abandoned the system shortly after the 1964 flood. They essentially gave up maintenance at that point and spent very little resources to keep it up. The photos in the article by Mr. Burns are a typical example of the situation even as it existed after the 1964 flood. Upon the abandonment of the railroad by Southern Pacific, the private ownership that followed didn’t last too long and they devoted even less effort to maintaining it. Again, I think Mr. Burns has very accurately depicted the situation as it existed and as it exists now. That railroad cannot ever be restored in the Eel River Canyon because the right of way of the railroad is not sufficient to rebuild it consistent with current standards. Don Raffaelli, Eureka

Hate? Or Un-PC?

Editor: What gives HSU professor Stephens the right to decide what’s “hate speech” and what isn’t? (“Mapping #Hate,” Blog Jammin’, May 16.) I can well imagine what to her is hate speech is what others would call being politically incorrect. And how did she decide which parts of the country are more hateful than others? I have the sneaking suspicion that the parts with the large red blotches are the same ones that voted for someone other than Obama. Richard C. Brown, Eureka

Humboldt at Work photo contest winner. By Nadia King.

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Editor: Boy, the news circuit can be a real meat-grinder! All puns intended and all tongues in cheeks. The saucy plug (“Women and Song,” May 16) for the last Women’s Music Night left me sizzlin’! I hate to be thin-skinned, but my name, as though I were being quoted, appeared three times and I wasn’t even interviewed for the article. The most unfortunate reference was my so-called perception of the Moonstone Outreach Music Project, making it sound like chopped liver. Mark Noyes was legitimately offended and called me to chew the fat. In hindsight, (hind-quarters?) it may be the funniest thing I never said! Mark and I have mutually supported each other’s events and I have great regard for all he does to promote musicians in our community. He said himself in the referenced phone call, (and I properly quote), “I’d love to have more women play Moonstone Outreach!” OK gals! Come on out. Sunday was an amazing show at M.O. in Trinidad Town Hall. I saw Eclectica and they have gotten very tight with great material. And then the True Gospel Singers performed who are incredible. Where are you Trinidadians? Westhavians? McKinleyvillers? It’s a fabulous venue, Mark is a gracious host, it’s a $5 donation with food and wine, and the M.O. are a great bunch of folks and terrific musicians. Always best to check your sources, or you may print baloney and get a grillin’. Hogs & quiches. Maria Bartlett, Trinidad

Putting the Shoe on the Other Foot

Editor: Reading Jennifer Savage’s column (“Five Things,” May 16) on naming last week (which listed for example children’s names such as the poorly imaged “Huckleberry” or grossly misspelled “Leasaugh”), reminded me of a simple rule I always thought might help limit such practices. When a child turns 12, he or she gets to switch names with one of the parents. Sherman Schapiro, Blue Lake

Public Prayer? Read Russell

Editor: I am writing in support of Mrs. Carole Beaton’s and attorney Peter Martin’s lawsuit (“Tough on Prayer?”, Jan. 31) against

Plainsong Words that chant from the dust of the past tickle today’s heart like trout whispering to the water with veined and subtle fins. A single person, a single voice, gives a plaintive curl of smoke. Many voices run like fire through the soul. Words are clear and solitary in plainsong. There is no melody to sweeten or instruments to hide. Words are sung to nakedness, to bones, like the dry, sharp voice of the drum. And how beautiful is the stark word unbroken by damp sentiment or hollow promises. Plainsong is all backbone, calling us away from excess, hard and certain in its faith. — Robin Hodson Eureka city and Humboldt County officials who are attempting to utilize their authorities to unconstitutionally sponsor public prayer meetings and open governmental sessions with religious benedictions and invocations. City and county officials cannot use their authorities to sponsor prayer meetings without at first blush seeming to be at the same time bullies or autocrats. May I respectfully suggest that you read, on my Facebook site (www.facebook.com/anthony.barondess, posted on May 14), a summary of Nobelist Bertrand Russell’s thoughtful — and cogent — speech, delivered to the South London Branch of the National Secular Society in 1927, entitled “Why I Am Not a Christian.” I fully support the legal action against religious individuals’ opening governmental meetings with religious benedictions; and utilizing public money, time, stationery and efforts — with autocratic disregard for the hallowed secular Constitution of the United States of America — to sponsor public prayer meetings in the city of Eureka and county of Humboldt in the USA, in postmodernity in the 21st century. Anthony S. Barondess, Eureka

Muffet a Killer?

Editor: We don’t get over to our little house in Cutten as often as we’d like, so NCJ news

Save Moving Sale! SIT... SLEEP...

I tell this story for people who say they’re sure their dog has never killed anything. I wouldn’t have believed it myself if I hadn’t seen it with my own eyes but, as I say, this is a true story. Thanks for helping us keep up with all the news while we’re so far away — and NCJ does seem better than ever lately! Susan Campbell and Paul Katz, Tucson, Ariz. and Cutten

Early Deadline This Week!

Monday is Memorial Day — which means letters are due early this week. Send in your thoughts, gripes and opinions by Friday, May 24, at noon for publication in the May 30 issue of the Journal. And enjoy your three-day weekend.

Write a letter!

Please try to make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com . l

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gets to us slowly — through the mail. I suspect, however, that dogs are running loose up there even as we speak (“Unleashed,” March 7), so maybe this little story is still relevant. This is a true story. I’m walking one day with a friend, and our walk takes us across the gigantic ranch where I grew up. She brings her golden retriever, Muffet. Needless to say, Muffet is the happiest, most innocent, most nonkillingest dog ever. Though a dog lover and owner myself, I grew up on the ranch, where Rule 1 for a loose dog is “shoot to kill,” so I’m not in favor of Muffet off her leash but hey — not my ranch, not my dog — I can’t stop her. Picture Muffet bounding joyously. What kind of person would not be in favor of such joy, my friend’s look clearly says. Muffet scampers out of sight over a low hill, but bounds back quickly with a whistle, panting and ecstatic. She was gone less than two minutes. Shortly we see a man walking toward us over the same low hill. As he gets nearer, we see he’s holding something in his arms — a newborn lamb. A mangled, bloody, soon-to-be-dead newborn lamb, which he had just watched Muffet play with to death. Joyously.

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013

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editor

Missing Bob

M

any of you have heard that Bob Doran, the Journal’s arts and culture editor, suffered a stroke over the weekend and is being treated in Santa Rosa. His family is by his side there. We at the Journal, along with Bob’s many, many friends and fans, are all sending him our best wishes for a fast recovery. While he is recuperating, here’s how to reach us with your arts and culture news: For our print “Eight Days a Week” calendar or our online only calendar: Please submit these via our website. Go to the calendar page and click on “submit an event” in the upper right. You’ll need to register as a user the first time. Then you can just pretty much fill in the blanks. Feel free to phone me at 442-1400 x321 if you have any questions or any trouble using the interface. For our print “Music and More” grid: Please submit music listings via our website, using the same “submit an event” function. Our new website makes it especially easy for club owners and managers to submit several days’ worth —or even a month’s worth — of upcoming events. After we edit them, your music listings will appear in our online events calendar and in our grid. For advertisements in the grid, please email clubadvertising@northcoastjournal.com or contact Kim Hodges at 442-1400 x308. For classes and workshops: As before, to place a paid listing in our “Classes and Workshops” section, please contact Carmen England at 442-1400 x304 or carmen@northcoastjournal.com. For film news, contact Ryan Burns at 442-1400 x317, or ryan@northcoastjournal.com. For other music news that goes beyond

6 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

calendar and grid listings, please email music@ northcoastjournal.com. This week, The Hum is on hiatus. After that, while Bob recovers, we are going to be using guest writers for a column that previews some of the interesting music coming up each week. If you’d like to write a music column, please send a brief email outlining what you do now in the Humboldt music scene, along with two writing samples, to me at carrie@northcoastjournal.com. For theater, dance, visual arts, food and books: Please send press releases, photos, story suggestions and freelance inquiries to me, carrie@ northcoastjournal.com. And please do keep our regular freelancers on your email lists, too, including William Kowinski for Stage Matters and Ken Weiderman for Art Beat. That can go on unchanged. We are always looking for more people to review books and write about food and dance. If you’re interested, please send me a brief email describing your background in any of those areas and including two writing samples. During this crunch time, though, please note that we won’t routinely be entering information from your press releases into our events calendar. So if you’d like a calendar listing for a play, a dance performance or a book signing, please submit your information on our website, as outlined at the start of this column. You can search our online calendar first to see if it’s already there — lots of recurring events already have a place in there. Thanks so much in advance for your patience and your understanding. l

– Carrie Peyton Dahlberg editor@northcoastjournal.com

Hum – CPRA

E

verything seems topsy turvy. I find myself cheering Humboldt County Supervisor Mark Lovelace and siding with the government over a public records act battle. I haven’t felt this trippy since string theorist Brian Greene convinced me that existence is filled with infinite universes. Lovelace was the one supervisor who held out against a settlement between the county and the Humboldt Coalition for Property Rights that would pay local attorney Allison Jackson $100,000 in fees. As I am married to an attorney, who like Jackson is a former deputy district attorney, I could appreciate how nice a sum that is in Humboldt County for legal fees. To understand how bizarre all this sounds to me, first you have to understand that I have tried hard to disagree with Lovelace ever since we fought over a table at the Arcata Theatre Lounge. (It was my table!) Next you have to understand the facts of the California Public Records Act (CPRA) request that HumCPR made in 2011. It had asked the county to disclose all the money it spent to prosecute or defend itself against lawsuits, some of which HumCPR had filed. Lovelace told the Journal through email that he believed the county had complied in good faith to the public records request. According to the NCJ’s April 22 blog, Jackson at one point told the court that the county had provided insufficient records even though she hadn’t yet looked at the records. She wanted a breakdown of legal costs so detailed it would show attorney time sheets and where lawyers had gone for lunch. Jackson’s hourly cost breakdown should be interesting. As taxpayers will pick up the tab, it should be part of the public record. This story makes me uncomfortable in multiple ways. First, Supervisor Estelle Fennell voted for the settlement even though she spent three years on the payroll of HumCPR and recently appointed its executive director to the county Planning Commission. In this paper, Ryan Burns tied Supervisors Ryan Sundberg, Virginia Bass and Rex Bohn to HumCPR as well, through orchestrated campaign donations. Meanwhile, the idea of suing a government entity and then complaining about

how much taxpayer money is being spent on the lawsuits is sort of a weird take on SLAPP suits. SLAPP stands for “Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation.” They are generally slander or libel suits filed by corporations against people or organizations to stifle negative publicity campaigns on, say, unsafe products. Companies use them to frighten people and silence them. It’s a bully tactic. HumCPR seems to be doing strategic legal campaigns — using the California Public Records Act and then the suing over public records issues —to make it more and more difficult for the county to go after people like Bob McKee and the other owners of Tooby Ranch property for improper land development. That’s what this whole thing is really about. There are a bunch of landowners who want to be able to do whatever they want to do with their land, regardless of how it affects the rest of the people in the county. As a property owner, I see where they are coming from. But I don’t want the neighbors on either side of me to necessarily be able to do anything they want with their land. And I really don’t want them bullying the Arcata City Council so that my elected councilmembers are too afraid to take action needed for the benefit of the city at large. Then there’s Jackson’s legal tab. At $300 an hour, that would come to 333 hours. Granted, Jackson filed the lawsuit more than a year ago. But it’s a lawsuit over the California Public Records Act. It isn’t a murder trial. How much work could it entail? The law is pretty clear. You just have to document to a judge that the county didn’t make public what it should have made public. How many billable hours does that take? Here is what makes me feel even more uncomfortable. This is a really small community. Most people in government and the organizations that work with government know each other. Our kids play soccer together; our spouses know each other. Here you have a settlement agreement that involves a $100,000 payment to a local lawyer that was worked out by a bunch of people all tied to each other in numerous ways. I would feel much more comfortable if a judge had made that determination in a court of law.

That’s what Lovelace said. I could see people looking at this and saying: “What if we file a lawsuit that causes a small government agency such a headache they really want to settle. But before that happens we find a way to spend an enormous amount of time doing legal research on it? Then with the settlement will come a nice bill for services. Score!” Meanwhile, the whole suit was about transparency and yet the organization which filed it is a secretive organization. The thing I hate most in this world is a hypocrite. And that’s what bothers me most of all about this whole thing. I am all about transparency in government and full disclosure. So I should have been cheering on HumCPR’s fight all along the way. But I wasn’t. And that kind of makes me a hypocrite. So here is how crazy this whole thing is. At the end of it, I’m loving Mark Lovelace and disliking myself. Damn you HumCPR.

– Marcy Burstiner mib3@humboldt.edu Marcy Burstiner is chair of the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication at Humboldt State University. She plans to sue herself for libel for calling herself a hypocrite.

Offer expires 31 Dec 2013

will be closed Memorial Day, May 27th Please submit your copy by 4pm THURSDAY, MAY 23rd for the May 30th issue.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013

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See more photos at www.northcoastjournal.com Previous owners built a floor across the once-elegant Ingomar Theater and used it as a storage room. Terry Coltra dreams of restoring its grandeur – but that work will have to wait. Photo by Drew hyland

Some original staircases of imported French oak remain in the building.

Money may come soon to restore Carson Block building in Old Town Eureka By Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com

T

Drawing courtesy of the Northern California Indian Development Council.

Photo by Drew hyland

Finally, a Facelift?

he stucco is cracked and stained, with mustard yellow streaks dribbling over tan walls. One of three corner turrets is missing, pulled down years ago to make space for a neon sign. The roof leaks. For decades, Terry Coltra has hoped and dreamed about restoring the Carson Block building in Old Town Eureka, as visions have come and funding sources have gone. Now, although people involved murmur anxiously that they don’t want to jinx

The new (old) look for the Carson Block building.

anything, a deal is close to done for $8 million in seismic retrofits and a new-old façade, one that captures the look of the early 1900s. “I’ve been working on this for 27 years, so it’s about time,” said Coltra, executive director of the Northern California Indian Development Council. The council bought the Carson Block building in 1986, after Coltra approached the then-owner about expanding a gift shop his group operated on the first floor. Instead, he was offered the whole place.

The council paid $800,000 for a threestory hulk at the corner of Third and F streets, complete with musty halls, lavishly carved oak bannisters and the husk of the Ingomar Theater, one of the few secondstory performance spaces of its era. Coltra figured he’d restore it, theater, exterior and all. “It has such great history,” he said. Since then, as cracks in the walls have deepened and stucco has flaked away, the building has housed the offices of psychologists, therapists, mediators and the Indian development council. On its ground floor, for more than 15 years, kids have splashed and poked and thumped on interactive exhibits at the Redwood Discovery Museum. Actors from the Ferndale Repertory Theatre have rehearsed on the third floor, saving themselves multiple trips to Ferndale. And an Ink People mural project has painted and dabbled under the gilt medallion where the theater chandelier once hung. Most of the occupants pay rent, but Coltra gives space gratis to the artists. He’s still not sure who will have to move, and for how long, once restoration work begins. To help make those decisions, Coltra said, the Indian development council will bring in a relocation consul-

tant, who will look at various ways the work could be staged to disrupt tenants as little as possible. That was a condition for one of the many grants and loans in the $8 million package. “In regard to the Discovery Museum, we may be able to get into that space, do what we need to, and get them back in within a week,” he said. That’s likely to be a relief to museum Executive Director Lynn Langdon, who hadn’t heard, until the Journal called, that the slow slog toward renovation is gaining speed. “I’ve been here three years, and when I first got here, they were talking about renovating the building,” she said. “Our board is like, ‘When they give us the boot, we’ll figure it out.’” She said the Indian development group has been a wonderful landlord, understanding when the museum hit its own financial bumps over the past year. Still, she added, “our ideal situation would be, we’d love a free, new place. But that’s like a pipe dream.” The timing of any disruptions for the building’s dozen or so tenants should become clearer in the next few months as Coltra puts the final pieces of funding

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in place. Right now, the development council has $1.5 million in hand from the California Cultural and Historical Endowment to pay for bringing the building’s façade back to its 1917 look. (It would be too costly to try to recreate the elaborate 1892 façade, and more of the 1917 materials are still around, buried under newer layers.) Another $1.5 million loan is coming from a coalition of four local agencies, the Humboldt Area Foundation, the Headwaters Fund, the Redwood Region Economic Development Commission and the Arcata Economic Development Corporation (AEDC), which is servicing the loan. Each is kicking in $375,000, and the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs is guaranteeing 90 percent of the loan, reducing the risk for the local organizations. The money will be enough to make the place earthquake safe and to leave a strong framework inside where one day — when more money can be found — the theater, too, could be restored. Assembling the complicated loan package is “kind of a big deal,” said Ross Welch, executive director of AEDC. “It’s the second time we’ve done it, and I’d like to do more of these.” All that local money, though, is contingent on bringing down the fiscal big game, a $5 million behemoth that seems likely — and here’s where everyone squirms a little and talks about crossed fingers — to come through by late July. The money is expected to come from a state Community Development Block Grant aimed at reducing blight in small, relatively low-income communities. Coltra and Welch are both hopeful, partly because the grant effort is fairly far along. So after years of hoping, how close is this to really happening? “Pretty darn close,” said Welch. “I’m about 80 percent confident,” said Coltra. No matter what, Coltra said, work on the leaky roof has got to get going, and it will start in August. That could be done without ousting any tenants. Then, in early 2014, the seismic retrofit and façade work could start. When it’s all over, about nine to 11 months later, the building will be earthen red, with copper bands around the base of each turret and a greenish metal roof that will evoke the oxidized copper of the original roof. The stucco will be gone, replaced with wood and terra cotta bricks. And the third turret will be back, its windows facing south, west and east, just as they did in 1892. l northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Blog Jammin’ MUSIC / DANCE/BY GRANT SCOTTGOFORTH/MONDAY, MAY 20, 5:44 P.M.

Arkley Center Closing The Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, the downtown Eureka fixture of dance and symphony, announced it will close for an indefinite period of time. Theater manager Carly Robbins confirmed that the news was handed down from Security National — Rob Arkley’s real estate and investment company — last week, but said any further information would have to come the company directly. Dance performances are scheduled through June. In a press release quoted by the Times-Standard, but not sent to the Journal, Security National indicated the theater will close in July for repairs and is expected to reopen in 2014. Back on New Year’s Day, Arkley told KINS radio that he was moving Security National’s headquarters from Eureka to Louisiana to avoid getting “whacked” by California taxes. Security National has apparently been laying off employees. It’s unclear what restoration is needed. Rob and Cherie Arkley bought the theatre in 2003 and finished restoring the exterior

of the building in 2005, according to the center’s website. The interior was completed two years later. Since then the theatre has been the home of North Coast Dance and the Eureka Symphony and hosted occasional pop acts like the “best ABBA tribute band in the world” and local sensation Sara Bareilles. ● CRIME/BY RYAN BURNS/MONDAY, MAY 20, 2:15 P.M.

Parents of Murder Victim: ‘Her Light Will Always Shine’ In the midst of grief over the death of their 18-year-old daughter Christina, Stewart and Tina Schwarz of Eureka are trying to find solace and inspiration from her memory. Despite the sudden and tragic loss, her mom said, “Her light will always shine.” Tina Schwarz said her daughter embraced life and encouraged others to do the same. “That’s one thing we can carry with us — to live life to the fullest,” Tina Schwarz said this morning. Early Saturday morning, Eureka High

DR. DENNIE SCHULTHEIS ANNOUNCES HIS “RETIREMENT” FROM HUMBOLDT COUNTY MEDICINE. Time has come for changes. Thanks to those teachers who gave so others could learn and grow — the moms, dads, uncles, aunties, colleagues, etc. Thanks to the families’ vision of, and sacrifice for the creation of United Indian Health Services, Inc. Making a community takes many and some who contribute without knowing. I will be working with UC Davis and with DQ-University. Those who travel, know or want their family to visit either campus, you will be able to contact me. My son is to stay locally with his fiancée, as he just finished fire training, while my daughter is to graduate high school in June 2014 with sights and good prospects for college. Like I would tell the kids when dropping them off for school and for sports: 1) Try Your Best! Because even if you come up short, at least in your own mind, you gave it your all. Failing is more character-building than winning. 2) Learn Lots!! People can take things away from you, but they can’t take away who you are, nor what you learn, so guard both and add to them when you can. 3) Have Fun!!! Even in the worst of times, laughing at ourselves is therapeutic and at other times, just plain fun. Do things just for the h@ll of it, for fun. (I would tell them, approach life in that order) The following is for her, she knows who…….. Times, they change! CHOICES — we all have them… Even the strength of mineral/rock is broken down by water. What once was, is what once was. Not wanting to stay, rather wanting to play, but not willing to pay. Gotten what was wanted — freedom to be touched by others, believing that what was smothers. Leap frog from one to one, till in the end it was done! River water, cracked rock falls. Currents snatch away to ripped tides; and no longer can a voice be heard when calls… -PEER WERK SEE CHECK’-HEYHEYNA=DS=

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

CHRISTINA SHWARZ

School senior Christina Schwarz and 27-year-old Alan “Sunshine” Marcet were murdered inside the house at 2457 Eye Street in Arcata. Later that day, following a brief but intense manhunt, officers arrested Bodhi Tree, a 28-year-old with a criminal history, and booked him into the Humboldt County Jail on two counts of murder. Christina Schwarz was just two weeks shy of graduating from Eureka High School. She had planned on attending MiraCosta Community College in San Diego County in the fall, where she wanted to study kinesiology. Eventually she wanted to become a flight attendant. “Her dream was to travel the world,” her mom said. During a family vacation to Costa Rica, Christina picked up the local expression “pura vida,” which translates literally to “pure life” but is used more broadly to express happiness and a positive attitude. Christina’s dad, Stewart, has the saying embroidered on a hat. Friends described Christina as optimistic and life-affirming. “She was very outgoing, and she wanted everything life had to offer her,” said Veronica Santiago, who grew up with Christina and knew her since they were both 6. “She wanted to dance and sing all of the time ... a really happy person.” Santiago said Christina often encouraged people to, “manifest your destiny.” An avid swimmer, Christina started going to the Cal Courts swimming pool with her dad at age 2, and she met many of her best friends while competing on the Eureka High swim team. In an online profile, Christina said she also enjoyed nature, meditation, reggae and dancing. Her senior project was to clean blue-green algae from the banks of the Eel River, the profile states. Through tears, her father could only say, “She will be missed.” We have yet to speak with any friends or relatives of Alan Marcet, who went by the name Sunshine DayDreamer. His hometown is listed as Flint, Mich., on his Facebook profile, where friends have been

ALAN “SUNSHINE” MARCET

posting artwork, photos and messages of love. A slideshow with photos of Marcet, along with information about a memorial celebration at Moonstone Beach, can be found on the Journal’s website. ● ENVIRONMENT/NATURAL RESOURCES /BY RYAN BURNS ON FRIDAY, MAY 17, 5:10 P.M.

Meet the Rat Poison Rep Worried about Your Health You may have heard that the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously passed a resolution urging local businesses to stop selling rodenticides. (The poisonous chemicals, which are often used in outdoor marijuana grows, have been killing Pacific fishers and poisoning dozens of other wildlife species locally.) But did you see this? A man by the name of Hal Ambuter, who represents multinational pharmaceutical company Reckitt Benckiser LLC, makers of d-CON rodent poisons, wrote a letter to the board expressing his deep, heartfelt and not-at-all self-serving concerns about the resolution. Out of the pristine goodness of his heart, Mr. Ambuter urged the board to “consider the serious unintended consequences” of discouraging sales of the poisons his company makes. This foolish resolution, he writes, “could have a profound impact on Humboldt County consumers by forcing them to choose from inferior, potentially more expensive, and possibly more dangerous pest management approaches.” The Board of Supervisors and various environmental groups have pointed out that a good way to keep rodents off of your marijuana stalks is to put a bowl of fresh water out, since that’s what the rodents are looking for. But as we all know, bowls of water are incredibly dangerous and prohibitively expensive. How many kids must drown in outdoor

CRIME/BY RYAN BURNS/THURSDAY, MAY 16 (PLUS UPATES)

Hitchhiker Kai Arrested The “homefree” hitchhiker known as Kai (real name Caleb Lawrence McGillvary) has been arrested on suspicion of murder. According to news reports McGillvary was being held in connection with the death of 73-year-old New Jersey attorney Joseph Galfy Jr. McGillvary, who lists his home as Eureka on Facebook, shot to fame in February after giving an amusingly manic TV interview describing how he’d used a hatchet to save three people from a driver with a Christ complex. He described his childhood as abusive in a recent Facebook post, and on Tuesday, the same day Galfy’s body was discovered, McGillvary suggested in another post that he had been drugged and sexually assaulted the previous night. ● MARIJUANA/BY RYAN BURNS/ WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 4:23 P.M.

Study: Weed Can Fight Diabetes, Make You Thinner

Can firing up a joint help prevent diabetes? Are stoners skinnier than nonstoners? A new scientific study suggests

GOVERNMENT/BY RYAN BURNS/WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 12:31 P.M.

NCRA Lawsuits Dismissed

READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

that, yeah, dude. Tooootally. Regular marijuana smokers have better blood sugar control, which can reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study from the American Journal of Medicine. Not only that, but the stoners studied had thinner waists and higher levels of “good” HDL cholesterol than non-tokers. These results are a bit surprising given marijuana’s famous side effects. But science! ●

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing

water bowls before we say “enough”? It’s far safer to keep using rodenticides, which only poison about 17,000 kids per year, according to a letter sent to Mr. Ambuter last year by the Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA, in its shortsightedness, has moved to ban 12 d-CON mouse and rat control products because they fail to comply with safety measures aimed at protecting children, pets and wildlife. Meanwhile bowls of fresh water (sometimes known as “aquatic death traps”) go completely unregulated. Cynics might suspect that Mr. Ambuter only cares about money, since he referred to us as “consumers.” But that’s ridiculous. Certainly if he cared about the profits of his employer (which reached more than $10 billion last year) he would have mentioned it in his letter. Let us not make the mistake of ignoring the altruistic warnings of Mr. Ambuter, who has been accused by naysayers of “scare mongering,” “obfuscation,” “false heroics” and spreading “misinformation.” Alas, such is the plight of the truth-teller. Thank you, Mr. Ambuter, for looking out for us vulnerable consumers.

A pair of lawsuits against the North Coast Railroad Authority have been dismissed by a Marin County judge, who ruled that federal law has precedence over state environmental regulations when it comes to railroad operations. Friends of the Eel River and Californians for Alternatives to Toxics (CATs) filed separate suits against the NCRA two years ago, challenging an Environmental Impact Report on resumed rail service between Napa and Willits. The nonprofits alleged that the EIR violated the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). Friends of the Eel said the report should have addressed the NCRA’s entire line, from Schellville near the north end of San Pablo Bay all the way north to Arcata. (The line is currently active only from Schellville to Windsor, in Sonoma County.) But with today’s ruling, which confirms a tentative ruling made last week, Judge Roy O. Chermus sided with the NCRA, whose lawyers argued that CEQA didn’t apply because railroad operations are the jurisdiction of the federal Surface Transportation Board, which had already granted the agency permission to resume service. For more on these lawsuits and the current state of the NCRA, see “Disappearing Railroad Blues” in the May 16 Journal. ●

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

11

Humboldt “

RUNNER UP JOSÉ FRANCISCO HERRERA COMMANDS A LUSH VAT OF GOODNESS-IN-THE-MAKING AT THE LOLETA CHEESE FACTORY. PHOTO BY JON EXLEY THE WINNER THE SAWDUST FLIES AS COLIN BILLINGS, OF ALWAYS FAIR TREE CARE, LAYS HIS STIHL BLADE INTO A TREE IN MIRANDA. PHOTO BY NADIA KING

RUNNER UP PETE BRAND, OWNER OF THE ELK RIVER NURSERY IN EUREKA. PHOTO BY CARRIE PEICHEL

12 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

W

ork,” some of us grumble. “I gotta go to work.” Sigh. Sob. Why?! The more content among us might answer, “Maybe you should find something to do that you love.” Good advice. But perhaps Maya Angelou’s take is sounder: “Nothing will work unless you do.” Hence we sew, saw, chop, shape, deliver, grow, husband, heal, teach, research, create, soothe, feed, cuddle, count, protect, defend, sell, explain. And from our clever hands and minds emerge sugar-crusted berry pies and babies, firewood and houses, cheese and flowers, robots and medicines, informed citizens and, yes, princesses. And nearly everything more. Surely our human world would not work as it does without many of these things. And so we sent you, our readers, into the Humboldt world to photograph your neighbors — or yourselves — at work. You did a good job. It was a contest, so here are the finalists.

HONORABLE MENTION CHRISTOPHER EDWARDS, MICHAEL MARTELLA, GRAHAM CHARLESTON AND DYLAN STREETER, OF CHARLESTON TREE SERVICES, TAKE DOWN A 6-FOOT-DIAMETER REDWOOD FOR A HOMEOWNER IN FRESHWATER. PHOTO BY GRAHAM CHARLESTON

at Work

HONORABLE MENTION YESENIA RAMIREZ, OF EUREKA PEDIATRICS, HOLDS NEWCOMER JAYMES WATKINS. PHOTO BY EMILY DALTON

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HONORABLE MENTION AFTER A MORNING GUIDED TRIP AT TRINIDAD, KAYAK ZAK’S EMPLOYEES MICHAEL KIELE AND RUSTY THE DOG TAKE POWER NAPS IN BETWEEN HANDLING RENTAL CUSTOMERS AT BIG LAGOON. PHOTO BY MARNA POWELL

continued on next page

11544 DYERVILLE LOOP RD.

943-3498 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

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continued from previous page

HONORABLE MENTION DENNIS SULLIVAN, OF WESTERN WEB, INC., MAKES SURE OUR PAPER COMES OUT PRETTY BY PULLING COPIES AND CHECKING REGISTRATION. PHOTO BY KEVIN BELL

JESSIE BELL WHIPS UP SOME ORGANIC VEGGIE SOUP AT COASTAL GROVE CHARTER SCHOOL. PHOTO BY KATIE ELDER

GARY BLASI, RIGHT, OWNER AND SKIPPER OF THE PARTY BOAT SEAWEASEL, FILLETS HIS CHARTER CUSTOMERS’ CATCH UNDER THE WATCHFUL EYE OF STATE FISH AND WILDLIFE AGENT BRET CHASE. PHOTO BY CAPT. BLIGH

APRIL MARTIN LEADS A CLASS AT OM SHALA YOGA IN ARCATA. PHOTO BY JESSICA BROWN

DAN BREWER: POET, PRUNER AND HUMBOLDT COUNTY’S “KNIFE GUY.” PHOTO BY JAMES BECKER WORKING AS A MOMMY — WITH HARLOW AND JESSICA CEJA. PHOTO BY MOLLY HAWKINS

PIE! GLENDA HOWARD (LEFT) AND MARGIE JACKMAN MAKE PIES FOR THE WESTHAVEN BLACKBERRY FESTIVAL, A FUNDRAISER FOR THE WESTHAVEN FIRE DEPARTMENT. PHOTO BY JANINE S. VOLKMAR

SUZY HAGGERTY OF HAGGERTY DESIGNS FLORAL STUDIO. PHOTO BY SUZY HAGGERTY

14 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

AUNNA CABECEIRA, WITH HUMBOLDT COUNTY ANIMAL SERVICES IN MCKINLEYVILLE, CUDDLES A RATHER STYLISH LITTLE CHIHUAHUA — WHO STILL NEEDS A NAME, BY THE WAY. PHOTO BY CHERI ESPARZA

CALIFORNIA CONSERVATION CORPS’ MARTIN “RED HAT” SCHUMACHER AND CREW LEADER MIKE “YELLOW HAT” JOYER BUILD A TRAIL AT HUMBOLDT AREA FOUNDATION’S PROPERTY OFF INDIANOLA ROAD. PHOTO BY CATHERINE PETERSON

continued on next page northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

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MATTHEW ST. CHARLES, OF GREAT MINDS PRODUCTIONS, CREATES A HIGH-DEFINITION TIME-LAPSE VIDEO OF TULIPS BLOOMING FOR ARCATA-BASED SUN VALLEY FLORAL FARMS. PHOTO BY RICK ST. CHARLES EVERY DAY – COME RAIN, SHINE OR EYE SURGERY – LOCAL SIGNMAKER ALAN CHILTON CREATES THE EEL RIVER BREWERY’S LUNCH SPECIALS BOARD. SOMETIMES HE ADDS WITTY SAYINGS AND THEMED DRAWINGS FOR COMMUNITY EVENTS. PHOTO BY NICOLE SCHWARTZ

JACKIE HANDEY RECONCILES THE BILLS AT REDWOOD ELECTRONICS CORP. PHOTO BY CATHERINE FREDRIKS

BUD LAIR, DJ MICLETTE AND BRIAN SPEELMAN CHANGE OUT A POWER POLE IN SHELTER COVE. PHOTO BY TODD NUSE

“NINETY-NINE BOTTLES OF BEER ON THE ...” — NO, WAIT, THAT’S LARRY KINYON, BOTTLING LINE OPERATOR AT LOST COAST BREWERY. PHOTO BY BRETT TRITTEN

continued on page 18

16 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

home & garden service directory

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THE NORTH COAST JOURNAL ASSUMES NO LIABILITY FOR SERVICES ADVERTISED. YOU MAY WANT TO VERIFY CONTRACTOR LICENSE NUMBERS AND PROOF OF INSURANCE FROM THE VENDOR OF YOUR CHOICE.

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continued from page 16

CHRIS NELSON, LEFT, AND DAVE BRAMLETT IN THE QUALITY CONTROL AREA OF REDWOOD ELECTRONICS CORP. PHOTO BY ROBERT HINDMAN

JONATHAN WELTSCH TRIMS UP HIS NAILS BEFORE BUILDING A FENCE AT SEQUOIA PARK ZOO. PHOTO BY MANDY DEVONS

KATHRYN BENSON GIVES THE PHOTOGRAPHER A PEDICURE AT LINDEN AND CO. SALON. PHOTO BY EMILY DALTON

FISHERIES BIOLOGIST PATRICK HIGGINS GETS READY TO DIVE INTO THE RUSSIAN RIVER TO SEE HOW JUVENILE CHINOOK SALMON AND STEELHEAD ARE USING BIOENGINEERED STRUCTURES — SUCH AS WILLOWS INTERTWINED WITH LARGE BOULDERS — THAT MAKE GOOD HABITAT AND BOLSTER BANKS AGAINST FLOODS. PHOTO BY DIANE HIGGINS

northcoastjournal.com NORTH COAST COAST JOURNAL JOURNAL •• THURSDAY, THURSDAY, MAY MAY23, 23,2013 2013 •• northcoastjournal.com 18 18 NORTH

home & garden

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19

The Joy of Handmade Pasta

I

(Part 2)

By Simona Carini

talkofthetable@northcoastjournal.com

n the beginning there is flour and water. Make the flour be semolina flour (ground durum wheat) and make the water warm. The pale yellow semolina flour may look as if it just stepped out of an impressionist painting, bathed in early morning sunlight. In the first act of the performance, you make the dough. With a fork, you spread the somewhat recalcitrant water through the flour. When there is no more free water, the fork exits, and your fingers come on stage. Your fingertips mix the semolina flour that is still dry with the semolina flour that is wet. At first, it feels like there is not enough water, but as the fingers coax the flour into getting wet, and as more of your hands participate in the performance, squeezing the crumbly mix, the dough comes together into a cohesive whole. The graininess persists for a while, but, as your hands fall into kneading — pushing the dough away from you with their heels and then gathering it back toward you in the soothing rhythm of a deeptissue massage — the dough becomes smooth. It is not a soft dough, but one with a strong personality, perfect prime material for shaping pasta. In about 10 minutes, when the dough feels smooth and firm while you knead it, and the graininess has become a distant memory, it is time to wrap the dough and let it relax. What happens next depends on your planned menu. And your menu depends, in turn, on the imagination of people who invented myriad pasta shapes. The modest appearance of this dough belies its enormous potential.

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20 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

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continued on page 22

Photo by Simona Carini

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northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013

21

continued from page 20 Pronouncing pasta names engages the mouth in a prelude to tasting. Fusilli and strascinati glide on the tongue, while orecchiette, trofiette and gnocchetti hop on it. You can let your imagination ride on the word. The musicality of the Italian language is displayed not only in inherently lyrical expressions, like poems and songs, but also in the names of everyday things, like pasta. The “Encyclopedia of Pasta” by Oretta Zanini De Vita contains entries for 310 types of pasta — made with various types of flours, with eggs or without, handmade and/or factory made. Each type is identified by a main name and, when applicable, alternative names. The same pasta shape can have different names in different regions, or even different towns. Sometimes the same name refers to two different types of pasta. Such proliferation can be a bit intimidating, if not maddening, for the visitor. While names are important, they should not distract you from enjoying the shapes — these celebratory expressions of human creativity in the pliable material that is pasta dough. Traditional shapes were taught by one generation

to the next, so the recipes tend to have strong family roots. There is a bit of space, though, for my “rootless” interpretation — and for yours. Instead of a mother, grandmother or mother-in-law, I consult recipes and sometimes online videos, and I usually add a personal touch. My adventure in the land of eggless pasta started with strascinati, which are made by shaping the dough into small cylinders, then dragging each one on the kneading board while pressing with your fingers. The movement thins the dough and gives it the shape of a cylindrical shell that shows in its cavity, as a special signature, the imprint of the shaping fingers. Shaping pasta by hand is patient work, but if you focus on each small piece of dough as if it were the only thing that matters in the moment, if you fully inhabit the sequence of gestures, then the process becomes a meditation of sorts. Each piece of pasta comes out a little different, personalized, unique. The amount of dough steadily decreases and the number of shaped pasta pieces increases, until you have a small army lined up ready to jump into the pot of boiling water. Maybe one day I will come up with a new pasta shape. In the meantime, with so many types of handmade pasta catalogued, not to mention the variations produced by using alternative types of flour, like chestnut flour or grano arso

(burnt wheat) flour, I see myself in happy exploration mode for the foreseeable future. If your fingers are craving some creative exercise, below is a recipe for strascinati that, in line with my philosophy of starting small expounded in my previous article on

pasta (see Table Talk Feb. 7), makes a manageable amount of dough. You can read about my adventures in handmade pasta on my blog, www.pulcetta.com. (Some of the posts include short videos of my hands shaping the pasta described.) ●

Let’s dough! A version of strascinati: “It is practically impossible to make sense of the Babel of strascinati in the regions of southern Italy,” writes Zanini De Vita. For the version I make, I use three fingers to shape the dough. Ingredients: 3 ½ ounces of semolina flour 1 ¾ ounces of warm water A pinch of salt Work the water into the flour, and knead the dough until it is smooth and firm, about 10 minutes. Wrap the dough in plastic film, and let it rest for 30 minutes or so. Shape the dough into a thick roll, then cut it into five to six pieces. Take one piece (leaving the others wrapped) and shape it into a roll about three-eighths of

CAP’N ZACH’S CRAB HOUSE XT U NE O Y E SE ON. SEAS CRAB

an inch in diameter. Cut each roll into segments about 1 ¼ inch long. While pressing with the three middle fingers along the length of each segment of dough, drag it toward you. This movement thins the dough and gives it the shape of a cylindrical shell (about 1 ½ inches long) that shows in its cavity the imprint of your fingers. Depending on how you move your hands, you will get strascinati that are the same width as the original cylinder of dough and have a narrow opening, or ones that are wider and more open, or something in between. “The shapes will depend on the particular gesture with which the dough pieces are rolled,” says De Vita. Lay out on a surface lightly dusted with flour. Repeat with the other pieces of dough. Makes two small portions (served as an Italian first course).

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COLEMAN LED Lantern

190 Lumens on high, 100 Lumens on low. 60 hours of run time on 4 D batteries. (0549-1209)

9999

$

24

$

88

CABIN CREEK Camping Machete 18 inch length. Carbon steel construction. Full length nylon sheath. (2502-0180)

7

$ 88 OR YOUR CHOICE! CABIN CREEK Camping Bow Saw Durable. 15 inch cross cut blade. Self-locking handle. (2502-0011)

COLEMAN Pack-A-Way 4 Person Table

COLEMAN Propane Twin Burner Stove

Sturdy rust-resistant aluminum frame. Lightweight for easy transport and set-up. Table: 35.5” x 22.75” x 28”. Benches: 36.5” x 10.75” x 16.25. Table stores inside bench seats. One-piece table. (0549-0486)

‘Perfectflow’ burner technology. 22,000 BTU. ‘Windblock’ system. Limited lifetime warranty. (8006777)

5888

$

ACE Propane

Twin Pack. 16.4 oz. Use for cooking, camping and lighting. (8250847)

6

$ 88

10999

$

Three Outlet Distribution Post 30” high. Allows use of economical 20lb Tank. Great for mounting a lantern. (2502-0405)

2488

$

Folding Arm Chair

Assorted colors. Weight limit 250 LBS. Cup holder & carry bag included. (8301087)

9

$ 88

24 North Coast Journal • Thursday, may 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

HOT PRIC E!

7

$ 88

OR YOUR CHOICE! CABIN CREEK Water Carrier Heavy duty polyethylene. On/Off Spigot. Sturdy carrying handle. Folds flat for storage. (2502-0002)

7

$ 88

OR YOUR CHOICE! CABIN CREEK Deluxe Map Compass Easy to grip rotating ring. 2 degree measurement for accurate readings. Built in magnifier. (2502-0166)

7

$ 88

RAPALA Fillet Knife

$

PUCCI Hook Filer

$ 88

1488

Full Tangs Scandinavian steel blade. Takes and holds an extra sharp edge. Fine tooled Laplander leather sheath. Includes sharpener! (0140-2605)

Pucci Shrimp Fly Rigs Most popular rock cod rig! Two fly tied on 60 LB leader. 45” leader. (1251-0867)

3 for

4

$ 98

MASTER SPIN Rod and Reel

Matched rod and reel - ready to fish. Medium action, great for salmon and steelhead. Red white & blue LED light. Activate when reel is spun. (0004-0259)

2488

$

SHIMANO Torium 20 Reel

Lightweight solidly-built saltwater reel. Perfect for live bait or bottom fishing. Super stopper Dartanium Drag system (0068-1794)

EAGLE CLAW Mooching Rigs

15888

$

70” green monofilament line. Lazer Sharp ® L182 nickle hook. Choose from slip tie or fixed tie. (0848-0346)

1

$ 48

Folding Crab Trap

24” x 21” x 12” size. 4 weighted gates. Heavy gauge black finish wire. (3170-0024)

2699

$

Shimano Torium 30 Reel (0068-1794) $16888 Shimano Torium 50 Reel (0068-0060) $24888 WILPALA Commercial Crab Ring

HOT PRIC E!

P-LINE Farallon Feather Rig

Best vertical jigs on the market. Perfect for cod & rockfish. Made with highest quality hooks & leaders. (1251-2203)

Commercial style. Rubber wrapped rebar construction. Two entrance tunnels. 27” round. (1963-0220)

8888

$

LUHR JENSEN Dodger SZ 0

1

$ 48

Legendary attractor for spoons, plugs & bait. Fish calling vibration built-in. Premium plating & polishing. (0285-1256)

9

$ 88

HOT PRIC E!

5

Ultra fine V-grit cutting edge. Comfortable glow handle. Hardened and tempered. (1251-2400)

PAUTZEKE’S Green Label Eggs

PANTHER MARTIN Deadly 6-pack

“Balls of Fire.” Proven by generations of successful fishing. (0844-0031)

3

$ 88

Your choice. “Pro Guide” or “Best of the Best.” Value pack of Panther Martin’s best selling lures. (0126-0242, 0763)

1288

$

FRABILL Teardrop Net

PUCCI Halibut Spreader Deluxe stainless steel spreaders. Proven Pucci quality. (1251-0882)

4

$ 48

Pro-grade used by the Frabill’s national pro staff team. Extra tough, extra strong 1¼ aluminum handles. 26” x 30” net with a 48” sliding handle. Corrosion-resistant anodized finish. (0341-5410)

3999

$

WILPALA Crab Gauge

Correct measurements for California, Oregon & Washington. (1963-0100)

1

$ 48

WILPALA Mesh Bait Bag

½” x ½” black mesh. Durable poly construction. For use in any crab pot or ring. (1963-0139)

3

$ 99

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, may 23, 2013

25

STEARNS Life Vests

Sizes from Child to XL. Durable nylon construction. USCG approved. (1267-0076)

1888

$

HOT PRIC E! IGLOO 100 QT Cooler

Holds 145 beverage cans or about 10-12 salmon. Lid supports 300 LBS. Durable hinges and handles. Marine white. (8105181)

99

$

88

Big Chief Smoker

Smoke up to 50 lbs. Front load design. 450 watt electric element. Five easy access racks. (0285-0218)

15888

$

CROSSMAN Pumpmaster Air Rifle

.177 Caliber Pellet/BB Rifle. Great for shooters of all levels. Holds up to 200 BBs. (81557)

LITTLE CHIEF Smoker

CALCUTTA Fishing Pliers

YES MOM, WE HAVE SAFETY GLASSES TOO.....

Aluminum and stainless steel construction. 20 LB capacity. Includes recipes. One year warranty. (84435)

Made from aircraft quality aluminum. Corrosion resistant. Carbide mono/braid cutter.

OR YOUR CHOICE!

88

$

1888

3888

$

88

$

CROSSMAN “Cricket” Air Rifle

Pink version of the classic Pumpmaster Airgun (0617-0330)

Electric Fish Knife

SMOKE HOUSE Chips or Chunks

#1 rated electric fish knife on the market! Extra sharp stainless steel blades. Heavy duty motor for longer life. Two year warranty. (121628)

24

$

1.75 LB bag. Hickory,cherry, alder, mesquite & apple. Chips & chunks. Great for smokers & barbeques! (8095952, 84437)

88

CROSMAN BBs 1500 count

4

HOT PRIC E!

3888

$

Copperhead steel BBs. User friendly. Resealable container. Easy to pour spout. (82770)

$ 98

2

$ 88

Sale: May 22th - 27th, Wednesday - Monday

HUMBOLDT’S HELPFUL HOME CENTER

839-1587

26 North Coast Journal • Thursday, may 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

442-5734

725-8647

(530) 629-2425

continued from page 19

continued on page 30

290 Briceland Rd • Redway, CA • (707) 923-2765

BUY 3 899

$

899

$

899

$

= GET 1 FREE!

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

27

entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI 744 9th St. Arcata. 822-3731

thur 5/23

fri 5/24

sat 5/25

Menu at www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Lord Ellis (Humboldt heavy rock) Mos Generator (WA stoner rock) 11pm

Sweet Can Circus $12/$10 7pm

Sweet Can Circus $12/$10 2pm & 7pm

Random Acts of Comedy $6 Doors @ 7:30pm

Labyrinth (Rated PG) Doors @ 7:30pm $5

Flow 2013: Arcata Arts Institute Fashion Design Program Showcase $30/$20 8pm

BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial, Eureka 443-3770

Thursday Madness: $8 pitchers 6pm til close. Free pool in back room

DJ Music Event (dance) 9pm

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Rebel Outlaw (rock) 9pm

The Road Masters (rock) 9pm

Reckless in Vegas (rock/alt.) 9pm

Dr. Squid (rock) 9pm in Wave

ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575 ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 668-9770 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm Karaoke w/DJ Marv 9pm

Karaoke w/Rock Star 9pm

Do you tweet obsessively?

CHER-AE HEIGHTS 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad 677-3611

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

707 (‘70s & ‘80s rock/funk) no cover 9pm

707 (‘70s & ‘80s rock/funkl) no cover 9pm

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 7th St. Eureka 497-6093

Dirty Thursday Ladies Night with Presure Anya DJs 9pm

facebook.com/ThePalmLounge

facebook.com/ThePalmLounge

So do we.

FIVE ELEVEN 511 2nd Street, Eureka 268-3852

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Live music on the weekends

Follow us. @ncj_of_humboldt

THE FORKS Willow Creek

Bob Dylan Bash: The Trouble, Miracle Show, Foggy Bottom Boys, Kulica 9pm

Beer & Buffet: Mad River Brewery w/Chris Parreira 6:30pm $30

Dirty Rats 9pm

Something for Everyone (various acts) 9pm

Brian Post (jazz) 7-10pm

Ali Chaudhary & Baron Wolfe 7pm

CENTRAL STATION 1631 Central, McK

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739

Hours Tuesday through Sunday 5pm until everyone’s gone Jimi Jeff & The Gypsy Band 8:30pm

INK ANNEX 47B W. 3rd St., Eureka

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com Kinski/LSD and the Search for God $6 7pm

JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata

DJ Red Old Skool Hip Hop Night $5 9pm

LIBATION 825-7596 761 8th St. Arcata LIGHTHOUSE GRILL Trinidad 677-0077 LIL’ RED LION 444-1344 1506 5th St Eureka LOGGER BAR 510 Railroad Ave. Blue Lake 668-5000 MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake 668-5680

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

It’s a bar.

We got beer.

Chief (soulful blues) 9pm

The LaPatinas 9pm

Steel Standing (pan band) 9pm

Bob Dylan Birthday Bash, Day 1 The Rezonators - 5pm

Food Trucks 5 nights a week

Awesome Dogs (food truck)

Experience: Fresh roasted coffee & espresso Itchie Fingaz (dance) 9pm

2 Gospel Singers (gospel songs) 7pm

MOSGO’S 2461 Alliance Rd Arcata NOCTURNUM 206 W Sixth St. Eureka OCEAN GROVE Trinidad OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com DJ Lost (dance) 9pm

Frank Lucky 7-10pm

PERSIMMONS GALLERY 923-2748

Local Artists Benefit $5/$8 9pm

RAMPART SKATEPARK 700 South G St., Arcata

Locust Furnace (metal) CD release party $3 8pm

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St Eureka RED LION 1929 4th St Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St., Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 616-6876 824 L Street, Arcata redwoodraks.com THE RITZ 240 F St. Eureka ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

Karaoke w/ Chris Clay 9pm Have you tried our new blend, the Oscar Robertson! Zumba Toning (with Ann) 5:30pm

SHAMUS T BONES 191 Truesdale St., Eureka 407-3550

Vino & Vinyl (wine & records) 9pm Falling Rocks (roots country swing) 7:30-9:30pm

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES 732 9th St. Arcata 822-0919

DJ music 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., McK

The Wandering Weenie Wagon is here, and we’re open until midnight! Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am Zumba with Mimi 4-5pm Buddy Reed (blues) 9:30pm

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

28 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

redwoodraks.com

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Open daily 11:30am-9:30pm

Come in for a great dinner!

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

JD Jeffries 7pm

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Tooesday/WuWei/Dirtbag $5 9pm

Visit us at www.sixriversbrewery.com SB Lounge (electronica duo) 7pm

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka 443-5696 WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Anna Hamilton (blues) 8pm

Find us on Facebook!

THE SIREN’S SONG 325 2nd St. Eureka SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McK. 839-7580

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Throwback Thursdays

DJ Itchie Fingaz (dance!) 9pm

BA-DUM-CHH Comedy $5 9pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed Band (blues) 8pm

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

All of the Mornings of the World $5 7pm

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Pt. 2 Doors @ 5:30pm $5

Voted Best Music Venue 2011 & 2012 Journal Best Of Humboldt readers’ poll!

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

facebook.com/arcatatheatrelounge

Closed Sundays

Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 Free pool

Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm-1am

Sunday Brunch 9am

Enter to win a Dodge Dart

Enter to win a Dodge Dart

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

Wild Wing Wednesdays: Chicken wings and $8 domestic pitchers 5pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

Free Pool $3 Wells

SB Lounge (electronica duo) 7pm

Happy Hour Monday thru Friday 5-7pm

Laura Cortese $12/$10 8pm

.m.

Quiz Night 7pm Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Enter to win our Aloha Vacation!

t se fas

Monday Night 9 Ball Tournament 8pm Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm Cocktail lounge in the historic Eureka Inn

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm No Covers (jazz duo) 8pm Martini Mondays $5 house Martini

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Closed Mondays.

Open Tuesday-Sunday 5pm Food served until 10pm

Family friendly dining.

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

DGS Sundaze $5 10pm

rve

.m.

a d8

1p to 1

ak

Bre

Always great food — and the best cocktails. The Alibi crew cares about you. Please drink responsibly. Restaurant open from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m. 744 9th St. on the Arcata Plaza 822-3731 www.thealibi.com

The Getdown (All-Start Funk) 8pm Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm

HBG • ROOR • Illadelph • Vaporizers

wed 5/29

Menu at www.thealibi.com

tues 5/28

Find us on Facebook

FREE PACK OF ROLLING PAPERS WITH ANY $20 + GLASS PURCHASE (WHILE SUPPLIES LAST)

ARCATA  987 H ST.  707-822-3090 WWW.HUMBOLDTCLOTHING.COM

Locally Blown Glass

mon 5/27

sun 5/26

Humboldt Hoodies • Hats • Beanies • Tshirts

Kinsey Thursday at Ink Annex

JD Jeffries (classic rock/oldies) 5pm Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun! FREE BBQ! Sawmill Joe (Colorado) 5pm All Age Venue - No Cover www.madriverbrewing.com

We also have liquor.

Repeat: We got beer.

Memorial Day! Drink specials for all service men and women.

Ping Pong Night

Happy Memorial Day

Green & Lilac (alt. folk) 6pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif Happy Hour Every Day 5-7pm $3 well drinks, daily beer specials The return of Papa Houli and The Fleas (tropical) 6pm

Open Mic 7-10pm Antiserum/ Helicopter Showdown $20 9:30pm Rude Lion Sound (reggae) 8pm Old Timey Music Jam 1 pm

Open Sunday-Thursday 7am-9pm Friday/Saturday 7am-10pm.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm

Sunday-Thursday 4pm-2am Friday and Saturday 3pm-2am

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Happy Growler Day! Get your growler filled for less $$$

Blue Monday with Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm

It’s Happy Day and the Weenie Wagon is back!

Dry Hop Wednesday Plus Nature’s Serving!

Breakdance with Reckless Rex Atienza 5-7pm $10

Live Band Swing Night 7-10pm $5

redwoodraks.com

Breakdance Class 4:30-5:30pm

Find us on Facebook!

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Find us on Facebook!

Salsa! (dance) 9pm

Have a signature cocktail in the bar!

Open daily 11:30am-9:30pm

Check out the Sunset from our bar!

Come have lunch 11:30-4:00

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm Trivia Night 8pm

Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm w/ sushi

Sunny Brae Jazz 9pm w/ fried chicken

Chef’s Cut Wednesday’s!

Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

Live music 7pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7pm

No Covers (jazz duo) 7pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

29

continued from page 27

continued on page 32

WOOD FENCING • Flexibility • Variety of Styles • Natural Beauty • Privacy

5660 WEST END RD., ARCATA LICENSED-BONDED • CA CONTRACTOR #808339

RUSS@HUMBOLDTFENCE.COM

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

McKinleyville’s 45th annual Pony Express Days kick off Wednesday, May 29, with a CLAM CHOWDER COOK-OFF. Starting at 5:30 in Pierson Park, enjoy live music and kid fun while sampling the chowders and voting for your fave.

The Arcata Playhouse Family Fun Series wraps up its 2013 season with San Francisco’s SWEET CAN CIRCUS theater troupe this Friday and Saturday. The show includes circus skills of aerial silks, acrobatics, slack rope and hula hoops.

No, HICKEY FEST isn’t (necessarily) a suction-kissing party; it’s the threeday music festival held Memorial Day weekend across from StandishHickey State Recreation Area near Leggett. Featuring more than 30 bands including Sea of Bees and Warm Soda (pictured), the fest starts Friday and offers camping, microbrews, food and music on the banks of the Eel.

23 thursday THEATER

The Finals. 8 p.m. Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. An evening of 10-minute plays created and performed by Dell’Arte’s Class of 2013 as a culmination of their yearlong studies. Pay-what-you-can. www.dellarte.com. 668-5663 Ext. 20. Next to Normal. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Pulitzer Prize-wining rock musical about a family coping with mental illness with music by Tom Kitt, book and lyrics by Brian Yorkey. $18-20. www.ncrt.net. 442-6278.

FOOD

Mafia Murder Mystery Dinner. 5 p.m. Fortuna High School, 379 12th St. Humboldt Regional Occupational Program’s Fortuna Culinary Arts Club presents a fourcourse gourmet dinner and a you-solve-it murder mystery. $15, $25 for two, kids under 10 $7. schatfield@ fuhsdistrict.org. 725-4461 ext 3029.

MEETINGS

Garberville Community Recognition Awards Dinner. 5 p.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Members of the Garberville community will be honored for their contributions to the town. $30. www.mateel. org. 923-2613.

OUTDOORS

Sierra Club Redwood National Park Hike. 9 a.m. Safeway, Arcata, 600 F St. Five-mile hike from Lyons Ranch to historic Long Ridge Sheep Shed and the Home Place. Bring water, food; prepare for wind and sun. Carpool from Safeway or meet 9:45 a.m. at Kuchel Visitor Center, off Highway 101 one mile south of Orick. No dogs. Rain cancels. mgroomster@gmail.com. 668-4275.

SPORTS

North Coast Tsunami F.C. Soccer Tryouts. 5 p.m. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Road. Try out for the National Premier League’s summer session. For people 23 and younger plus a limited number of older players. exleyranch@saber.net. 499-3703.

24 friday DANCE

World Folk Dance. 8-10 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. Humboldt Folk Dancers event, dances taught, no experience required. $3. g-bdeja@sbcglobal.net. 839-3665.

MUSIC

Hickey Fest. The Peg House, 69501 Highway. 101, Piercy. Three day independent music festival featuring 30 bands including Sea of Bees, Warm Soda, Quinn DeVeaux, Sun Hop Fat, The Blank Tapes and Ash Reiter. Advance admission: $45 for 3 days including camping, or $60 if purchased onsite. Advance individual day passes are $15 for Friday only, and $25 each for Saturday or Sunday only ($25 and $35 respectively if purchased onsite). ashreiter@ gmail.com. hickeyfest.wordpress.com. 831-334-6286.

THEATER

The Finals. 8 p.m. Carlo Theatre, Blue Lake. See May 23 listing. Next to Normal. 8 p.m. North Coast Rep. See May 23 listing.

Sweet Can Circus. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Playhouse Family Fun Series concludes with three surreal shows by the San Francisco-based circus theater troupe using aerial silks, acrobatics, slack rope, hula hoops and the music of EO, the one-man orchestra. $12. $10 kids 12 and under, $40 family of four or more. 822-1575.

FOOD

Garberville Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church St. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. EBT, Cal-Fresh and WIC accepted. 672-5224.

GARDEN

Edible Communities. 7 p.m. The Link, 1385 Eighth Street, Arcata. Talk and discussion on edible landscaping in public spaces sponsored by Transition Humboldt. Preceded by informal potluck at 6 p.m. Free. transitionhumboldt.org.

25 saturday MUSIC

Hickey Fest. The Peg House, Piercy. See May 24 listing.

THEATER

The Finals. 8 p.m. Carlo Theatre, Blue Lake. See May 23 listing. Next to Normal. 8 p.m. North Coast Rep. See May 23 listing. Sweet Can Circus. 7 p.m. and 2 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See May 24 listing.

EVENTS

Flow 2013. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Runway-style fashion show presented by students of Arcata Arts Institute fashion design class. www. arcatatheatre.com. Kinetic Grand Championship. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Three-day 41-mile human-powered all terrain art vehicle race. See special pull-out section in this edition. kineticgc@gmail.com. www.kineticgrandchampionship. com. 733-3841. Portuguese Holy Ghost Celebration. 6 p.m. Portuguese Hall, 1185 11th St., Arcata. Dinner and dance in the spirit of the Holy Ghost Portuguese Celebration, featuring Luso Tones, a Portuguese band from San Jose. Free. vadenhoffman@gmail.com. 362-0384.

FOOD

Arcata Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Near Arctata Plaza, Eight, Ninth and I streets. Locavores’ delight: fresh vegetables and fruit from local producers, food vendors, plant starts, flowers, live music every week at 10 a.m. Free. humfarm.org. 441-9999. Humboldt Hill Grange Breakfast. 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Humboldt Grange 501, 5845 Humboldt Hill Road, Eureka. Home style breakfast. $5, $3 child. 442-4890. Whitethorn Winery Memorial Day Wine Tasting and Open House. 1 p.m. Whitethorn Winery, 545 Shelter Cove Road, Whitehorn. Wine, art and music featuring Pinot Noir vineyard comparisons, current releases and barrel tastings and art from First Fig Gallery and Lisa’s Studio.

OUTDOORS

Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife

continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

31

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Giant Bugs! Bicycles! It’s Race Time Your source for the finest hardwoods & wood working supplies

PHOTO BY BOB DORAN

REDWOOD PICNIC TABLES Manufactured here at Almquist Lumber using FSC certified redwood From the Arcata Community Forest

5301 Boyd Rd., Arcata • Just off Giuntoli Lane at Hwy 299 825-8880 • www.almquistlumber.com

MEMORIAL DAY SALE

It’s not often you see grown men pedaling giant insects through the middle of Old Town, but this is one of them. The Kinetic Grand Championship (the Sculpture Race, to most people) has been rolling along, in one form or another, for over 40 years now (probably due to a lack of friction, yes, physics!). Every Memorial Day weekend, northern and southern Humboldt County are united over their love for person-propelled, papier mache machinery. This year promises to be as kinetically captivating and ridiculously rivalry-filled as always. Think of the Grand Championship as an Iron Man triathlon but with bicycle lobsters and a DIY flare. Competitors will pedal, float and coast through a 42-mile track, starting at the Arcata Plaza and ending in the Victorian Village of Ferndale. In case you’re unaware, 42 miles is a lot of miles. This is a distance most Humboldtians won’t drive, let alone self-propel themselves through. There’s a show in Eureka, and you live in Arcata? Too far. A multi-city, semi-manic, threeday parade?! Yes, please. The race kicks off at the noon whistle on Saturday, May 25, from the Plaza in Arcata. From there, entrants trundle through the dunes in Manila to the infamous, 100-foot sand dune that is “Deadman’s Drop.” Have you ever bicycled through sand? In a giant dragon? This is no easy feat, but some of these racers have been perfecting their sand-pedaling skills for years, and the competition is fierce. The first day of racing ends at the Gazebo in Old Town Eureka, with bars convenient-

ly located in all surrounding areas. After a long day of dragon-pedaling, everyone needs a cold drink. Day two picks up right next to where day one left off. At 10 a.m., the sculptures take to the waters of Humboldt Bay at the Wharfinger Building, finally lending credence to the idea of a fish needing a bicycle. Once across the water, they cross the Samoa Bridge and head to Hookton Hill, where they pedal for about a mile up a fairly steep incline (7 percent; ask your engineer friends what that means. I know I did). The competitors end the day with a much deserved, private camp out. Rested and relaxed from their night in tents and sleeping bags, the racers start the last leg at the mouth of the Eel River. Here, they cross through the mud and sludge of Morgan Slough, finally ending on dry and solid ground. After 1 p.m. the sculptures start to cross the finish line on Main Street in Ferndale. Once they’ve crossed the finish line, it’s generally a minglefest right up to the Glorious Final Awards Dinner at the Ferndale Fireman’s Hall. Spectators are welcome to view and cheer along most of the race track, but extra caution must be taken to ensure the safety of the racers and the accompanying traffic. Basically, keep your spectating to the rural, backwoods part of the race, or the starts and finishes of each day. Avoid following the sculptures as they travel along major roadways. Safety first! And let the kinetic festivities begin! — Dev Richards

(closed Memorial Day)

NEW & USED

2ND & A • FACING THE BAY • OLD TOWN EUREKA MON-SAT 10-5:30 • SUN 11-5 • 707-443-3161

northcoastjournal.com 32 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Folk Instruments Books & Accessories

www.wildwood.ws

Available on Beautyrest World Class & ComforPedic beds.

Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Meet a trained guide at the Interpretive Center on South G Street for a 90-minute walk focusing on the ecology of the marsh. Free. 826-2359. Friends of the Dunes Lanphere Dunes Restoration. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Pacific Union School, 3001 Janes Road, Arcata. Join your community in the restoration of the Lanphere Dunes area. Gloves, tools and cookies will be provided, but please wear closed-toed shoes and bring drinking water. suzie@friendsofthedunes.org. 444-1397. Mattole Stream Restoration Hike. 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Sanctuary Forest Office, 315 Shelter Cove Road, Whitethorn. Learn about river geology, fish habitat and restoration efforts in a one-mile hike in the Mattole River headwaters. sanctuaryforest.org. 986-1087.

ETC

March Against Monsanto. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. People protesting genetically modified food are marching at the same time at various locations worldwide today. A Humboldt march will start outside the county courthouse. Plant and Yard Sale for Humboldt Mediation Services. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Plants, high quality gently used books, furniture, household goods, clothing and more to benefit Humboldt Mediation Services. Stop by 609 J St., Arcata (three blocks off the Plaza), before, after or during the Kinetic Race. 445-2505.

26 sunday ART

Trinidad Artists’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Murphy’s Market parking lot, Main and View avenues, Trinidad. Art and crafts from local artisans, live music, barbecue. 834-8720.

MUSIC

Bayside Grange Music Project. 5-9 p.m. From 5-7 p.m. anyone playing any instrument with any ability is invited; 7-9 p.m. people with wind instruments for Bandemonium. Donations. gregg@relevantmusic.org. www.relevantmusic.org/Bayside. 442-0156. Hickey Fest. The Peg House, Piercy. See May 24 listing. Laura Cortese Trio. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. New England fiddler/songwriter with her string trio touring in support of a new CD, Into the Dark. Lyndsey Battle and Cory Goldman open. $12, $10 under 13. 822-1575.

THEATER

Next to Normal. 2 p.m. North Coast Rep. See May 23 listing.

EVENTS

Kinetic Grand Championship. See May 25 listing.

FOOD

Whitethorn Winery Memorial Day Wine Tasting and Open House. 1 p.m. Whitethorn Winery. See May 25 listing.

GARDEN

Open Garden. 1 p.m. Fickle Hill Old Rose Nursery, 282 Fickle Hill Road, Arcata. Stop and smell the roses. On-site parking for those with limited mobility. Free. 826-0708.

MEETINGS

Whales, Life and Lifetree. 7 p.m. Lifetree Cafe, 76 13th St., Arcata. Saving Valentina, a short film about an attempt to rescue a whale from a fishing net, will be shown as part of a discussion about the majesty and mystery of nature. Free. info@lifetreecafe.com.

ETC

Trinidad Memorial Lighthouse Anniversary Ceremony. 2 p.m. Trinidad Head Memorial Lighthouse, Trinity Street. The 18th annual ceremony begins with bagpipe music and a flag raising by Boy and Girl Scouts. Families who have lost members at sea are invited to meet and share refreshments at Trinidad Town Hall afterward. 677-3816.

27 monday DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing for people in their 50s and older. $4.

EVENTS

Kinetic Grand Championship. See May 25 listing.

ETC

Cosmic Visions Yoga. 10 a.m. Dow’s Prairie Grange, 3995 Dows Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Beginners and advanced students re-establish their connection to the source through breath work, movement and asana. BYO mat. Pay what you can. www.dowsprairiegrange.org. Qigong. 11 a.m. Arcata Veterans Memorial Building, 1425 J St. Traditional Chinese meditative exercise, similar to Tai Chi, easy to do, healthy for body, mind and soul. Free. 822-5254. Shake a Veteran’s Hand. 12-3 p.m. Clarke Historical Museum, Third and E streets, Eureka. Memorial Day event — meet our veterans. Bring photos of the veterans in your family and the museum will scan them and provide you with a digital copy. www.clarkemuseum.org.

continued on next page

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kath.almy@gmail.com www.katherinealmy.com northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

33

29 wednesday

continued from previous page

28 tuesday FOOD

Fortuna Farmers’ Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets. Fresh, local produce, meats and cheeses. Plenty of garden starts available as this year’s market gets going. Miranda Farmers’ Market. 2-5 p.m. Miranda Gardens Resort, 6766 Avenue of the Giants. Farm-fresh produce, etc. www.mirandagardens.com. 672-5224. Shelter Cove Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Shelter Cove, Machi Road. Local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods. 672-5224.

ART

SCRAP Humboldt Volunteer Training. 9 a.m. SCRAP Humboldt, 101 H St. Suite D, Arcata. Volunteers needed for SCRAP Humboldt, Humboldt’s creative reuse center. Apply online at www.scraphumboldt.org. free. www. scraphumboldt.org.

EVENTS

Pony Express Days Clam Chowder Cook-Off. 5:30-7:30 pm, 1705 Gwin Road, McKinleyville. The 45th annual Pony Express Days is a five-day event with a Clam Chowder Cook-off, Fireman’s Muster (fireman games), Pony Express Dance and Saturday’s Parade down Central Avenue that meanders into Pierson Park. mckinleyvillechamber@ gmail.com. 839-2449.

30 thursday

OUTDOORS

Slower-speed Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary. Meet at Klopp Lake at end of South I Street. Easy 45-60 minute walk geared to persons with limited mobility. Free.

SPORTS

North Coast Tsunami F.C. Soccer Tryouts. 5 p.m. McKinleyville High School, 1300 Murray Road. See May 23 listing.

ETC

Humboldt Cribbage Club. 6:15 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Play some cards. $7. 444-3161.

MOVIES

After Earth Reception and Sneak Peek. 6:30-10 p.m. Broadway Cinema, 1223 Broadway, Eureka. The Humboldt-Del Norte County Film Commission presents a reception with local beverages and appetizers, a tribute to short local films and a sneak peek screening of M. Night Shyamalan’s After Earth. $20. filmcommission@ rreelinc.org. 825-7600.

First Presbyterian Church of Eureka Presents W. Paul Young, author C. Baxter Kruger, author & theologian

4 events - free May 31 - June 2, 2013 Friday, May 31st 7:00pm Saturday, June 1st 9:30am - 1:00pm Special Event: Youth/Family Event 7:00pm Sunday Services 9:00am & 10:30am

Our Gift to the Community!

All are Welcome!

For more information: 707-443-4897 or www.eurekapresby.org

34 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

EVENTS

Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center 20th Birthday. May 30, 6-9 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Reception and panel discussion moderated by Alex Stillman marking the 20th anniversary of the dedication of the Arcata Marsh Interpretive Center. Limited space, RSVP by 5 p.m. May 25. eservices@cityofacata.org. 826-2359. Pony Express Days Fireman’s Muster. 5:30 p.m. Ray’s parking lot on Central Avenue. See May 29 listing.

ETC

Disability Employment Luncheon. 11:45 a.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. The Northwest Committee for the Employment of Disabled People hosts a luncheon recognizing the work of people who employ and support those with disabilities, and individuals who are employed. Please make reservation by May 24. $18. 362-8026.

Heads Up…

Be BikeSmart. The Humboldt Bay Bicycle Commuters Association offers kids free two-hour BikeSmart training sessions weekends throughout the summer. Classes are small and are arranged to meet the schedules of applicants. Free helmets provided to those who need them. Call Rick Knapp at 445-1097 or go to humbike. org for information. Be Bear Aware. May is “Be Bear Aware” Month. Campers and those living in bear country should take precautions. Purchase and use a bear-proof garbage container. Don’t leave groceries, animal feed or trash in your car. Leave your bird feeders empty until winter. Harvest fruit off trees as soon as it is ripe and pick up fallen fruit. Keep doors and windows closed and locked. Campers: Never

keep food or toiletries in your tent. Store food (including pet food) and toiletries in bear-proof containers or in an airtight container in the trunk of your vehicle. Clean your barbecue grill after each use. More advice at www.wildlife.ca.gov/news. Volunteer opportunities, contests and more. Be a Mateel Festival Volunteer. The Mateel is looking for volunteers to help with the Summer Arts and Music Festival and Reggae on the River. There are many different positions needed to be filled by people like you. Contact volunteer coordinator Michele Wood at 923-3368x32 or volunteers@mateel.org. ●

You live in Humboldt. So do we. Let’s be friends :)

OPEN HOUSE

MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND SAT , SUN , MON 11-6PM 2 MILES SOUTH OF MYERS FLAT. FROM AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, TAKE ELK CREEK RD. 4 MILES, STAY TO RIGHT.

11544 DYERVILLE LOOP RD.

943-3498

will be closed Memorial Day, May 27th Please submit your copy by 4pm THURSDAY, MAY 23rd for the May 30th issue. northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013

35

MovieTimes Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

1223 Broadway St., Eureka, (707) 443-3456 Epic Fri: (2:10, 4:45), 5:35, 7:20, 9:40; Sat-Mon: (11:35a.m., 2:10, 4:45), 5:35, 7:20, 9:40; Tue-Thu: (2:10, 4:45), 5:35, 7:20, 9:40 Epic 3D Fri-Thu: (12:20, 2:55), 8:15 Fast & Furious 6 Fri-Thu: (11:55a.m., 1:55, 3), 5, 6:05, 8:05, 9:10 The Great Gatsby Fri-Thu: (2), 5:15, 8:25 The Hangover Part III Fri-Thu: (12:55, 1:45, 3:30, 4:25), 6, 7, 8:40, 9:30 Iron Man 3 Fri: (2:50), 5:55, 9; Sat-Mon: (11:45a.m., 2:50), 5:55, 9; Tue-Thu: (2:50), 5:55, 9 Iron Man 3 3D Fri-Thu: (2:20), 5:25, 8:35 Oblivion Fri-Thu: (12:25, 3:25), 6:20, 9:15 Star Trek Into Darkness Fri-Thu: (12, 3:10), 6:15, 9:20 Star Trek Into Darkness 3D Fri: (2:40), 5:45, 8:50; Sat-Mon: (11:40a.m., 2:40), 5:45, 8:50; Tue-Thu: (2:40), 5:45, 8:50



Mill Creek Cinema

1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville, (707) 839-2222 Epic Fri-Mon: (12:40, 2:25, 3:15), 5:45, 7:30, 8:20; Tue-Thu: (3:15), 5:45, 7:30, 8:20 Epic 3D Fri-Mon: (11:55a.m., 4:55); Tue-Thu: (4:55) Fast & Furious 6 Fri-Mon: (12, 3), 6, 9:05; Tue-Thu: (3), 6, 9:05 The Great Gatsby in 3D Fri-Thu: (2:45), 9:10 The Great Gatsby Fri-Mon: (11:45a.m.), 5:50; Tue-Thu: 5:50 The Hangover Part III Fri-Mon: (1:45, 4:20), 6:55, 9:30; Tue-Thu: (4:20), 6:55, 9:30 Iron Man 3 Fri-Thu: (2:50), 8:55 Iron Man 3 3D Fri-Mon: (11:50a.m.), 6:10; Tue-Thu: 6:10 Star Trek Into Darkness Fri-Mon: (12:05, 3:10), 6:20, 9:20; Tue-Thu: (3:10), 6:20, 9:20 Star Trek Into Darkness 3D Fri-Mon: (2:20), 5:25, 8:30; Tue-Thu: 5:25, 8:30

 

Minor Theatre

1001 H St., Arcata, (707) 822-3456 The Great Gatsby Fri: 5:20, 8:30; Sat-Mon: (2:10), 5:20, 8:30; Tue-Thu: 5:20, 8:30 The Hangover Part III Fri: (4:20), 6:50, 9:20; Sat-Mon: (1:50, 4:20), 6:50, 9:20; Tue-Thu: (4:20), 6:50, 9:20 Star Trek Into Darkness Fri: (3:05), 6, 8:55; Sat-Mon: (12:15, 3:05), 6, 8:55; Tue-Thu: (3:05), 6, 8:55

Fortuna Theatre

1241 Main St., (707) 725-2121 Epic Fri: 6:30; Sat-Mon: (1:15), 6:30; Tue-Thu: 6:30 Epic 3D Fri-Sun: (3:50), 9; Mon-Wed: (3:50); Thu: (3:50), 9 Fast & Furious 6 Fri: (4), 6:50, 9:40; Sat-Sun: (1, 4), 6:50, 9:40; Mon: (1, 4), 6:50; Tue-Wed: (4), 6:50; Thu: (4), 6:50, 9:40 The Great Gatsby Fri: (3:40), 6:40, 9:40; Sat-Sun: (12:30, 3:40), 6:40, 9:40; Mon: (12:30, 3:40), 6:40; Tue-Wed: (3:40), 6:40; Thu: (3:40), 6:40, 9:40 The Hangover Part III Fri: (4:50), 7:10, 9:30; Sat-Sun: (12:10, 2:30, 4:50), 7:10, 9:30; Mon: (12:10, 2:30, 4:50), 7:10; Tue-Wed: (4:50), 7:10; Thu: (4:50), 7:10, 9:30 Iron Man 3 Fri: (4:10), 7, 9:45; Sat-Sun: (12:40, 4:10), 7, 9:45; Mon: (12:40, 4:10), 7; Tue-Wed: (4:10), 7; Thu: (4:10), 7, 9:45 Star Trek Into Darkness Fri: 6:35; Sat-Mon: (12:20), 6:35; Tue-Thu: 6:35 Star Trek Into Darkness 3D Fri-Sun: (3:35), 9:35; Mon-Wed: (3:35); Thu: (3:35), 9:35

Garberville Theatre

766 Redwood Drive, (707) 923-3580 42 Fri-Tue: 7:30; Wed: 6:30; Thu: 7:30

“Dude, gross. You really oughta wash behind those things.”

Spock versus Spock

J.J. Abrams makes another slick Trek, hold the cheese

By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS. My personal investment in all this Star Trek business is pretty minimal. Years ago, I burned through the first four or five movies over the course of a languorous, lost afternoon. I enjoyed the experience, but I chose those movies because they were the only ones in the house where I was staying. I’ve seen enough of the original series to know

May 24-31 Fri May 24 - Labyrinth (1986) Doors at 7:30 p.m., $5, Rated PG Sun May 26 - Harry Potter & The Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (2011) Doors at 5:30 p.m., $5, Rated PG-13 Wed May 29 - Sci Fi Night ft. Mesa of Lost Women (1953) Doors at 6 p.m., All ages, Free Fri May 31 - Willow Creek by Bobcat Goldthwait, Doors at 7 p.m., $7, Mature Audiences Only

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

36 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

what a Tribble is, and to kind of understand the Kobayashi Maru. But I’m by no means an acolyte. I get that J.J. Abrams is Hollywood’s new king of nerds, and I dig his style, though I prefer Super 8 (2011) to his Star Trek. The former, a pitch-perfect ode to early Spielberg, amounts to about 7/8 of a great movie. Because it’s a tribute, Abrams was able to borrow visual cues aplenty from his forbearer. In the process he out-Spielberged Spielberg and made a movie that looks even better, with all its lens flares blazing, than Close Encounters of the Third Kind or Jurassic Park. Plus, he’s one of the few monster directors working who can hang onto the childlike enjoyment of story that’s so vital, and yet increasingly rare, to movie-making. So Abrams has the credentials, and the proven chops, to take on something as contentious as re-imagining Star Trek. In his hands, the franchise’s well-known characters have authentic emotions, plausible reactions and believable motivations. And the new batch of actors brings them convincingly to life. Abrams clearly loves these characters, and the care and devotion he’s taken with them show in every frame.

With his reverence of Gene Roddenberry’s vision, he hasn’t tried to outsmart the originals. Rather, the first movie in his rebooted series used an alternate universe model that allows the original characters to comfortably co-exist with their new Hollywood versions. The device comes into play again this time around, allowing Leonard Nimoy and Zachary Quinto to interact, Spock to Spock. This, for Trekkies, must be like putting two awesome mirrors face to face. But the aesthetic elements I so enjoyed in Super 8 are nowhere to be found. Granted, it wouldn’t do to crib Spielberg’s look, again. But now that he’s been called upon to invent his own visual style, Abrams doesn’t quite pull it off. He’s got the best sets, costumes, and effects a huge budget can buy, but his camerawork is generally uninspired. This would seem a minor complaint in light of all the movie’s positive attributes, but I think it gets at why Abrams’ vision never fully engages me. After a brisk, admittedly dazzling opening sequence, Kirk’s (Chris Pine) headstrong leadership lands him in trouble with Starfleet (no spoiler). After a disciplinary hearing, he and Spock are separated and assigned to work under other, more established captains. But almost immediately, a shadowy super-soldier (Benedict Cumberbatch) starts waging war on Starfleet, then retreats to a deserted corner of the Klingon home world. Kirk’s command is reinstated and the Enterprise is sent to find and destroy the assassin. Once they track down their prey, it becomes clear that not everything — or everyone — is as it would seem. At about this point I realized that this is essentially the plot of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982) with a few updates and revisions. I’m not sure how purists will feel, but I found it a fun, future-retro maneuver on the part of the writers. As I mentioned, the top-notch production level creates an enveloping atmosphere that draws us in and holds us. The actors take on their roles with exhilarating commitment and enjoyment; the writing is spot-on, with inventive structure, funny jokes and gripping suspense; but somehow the movie keeps us at a remove. The experience, at least from my seat, is a lot like the look: clean, streamlined, snappy, modern — and maybe a bit dull for all of that. It feels too futuristic, too imagined, not grounded enough in the real stuff of the story. Even when cleverly incorporating elements of the first round of movies — the Nimoy cameo, a Tribble, the plot of Khan — Into Darkness sacrifices their now-dated warmth and quirks in favor of overarching modernism. I can’t fault Abrams for the choice; he’s actively reinventing a half-century-old sci-fi program for new

generations. I (so rapidly becoming a relic myself) just wish he had retained some of the semi-shabby aesthetic of the old Treks. PG13. 132m. — John J. Bennett

Previews

THE HANGOVER PART III. I don’t know about you, but as I get older each new hangover is more regrettable than the last. Then again, when you’re out with the likes of Zach Galifianakis, Ed Helms and Bradley Cooper, it just might be worth it. R. 100m. FAST & FURIOUS 6. Behold the shiny surfaces of waxed automobiles, custom rims and the heads of actors Vin Diesel, Dwayne Johnson and Tyrese Gibson! Observe the vacant eyes of “actor” Paul Walker! Witness two more hours of fast cars and crash-boom shoot-em-ups! PG13. 130m. EPIC. In this 3D computer-animated adventure from the creators of Ice Age and Rio, a girl gets shrunk and discovers a magical, hidden world in small-scale nature — sounds like Alice in Wonderland meets Fern Gully. PG. 102m. Want to see David Bowie rocking Tina Turner hair and singing with creepy Muppets? Of course you do! Wander into the Labyrinth (1986) Friday at 8 p.m. at the Arcata Theatre Lounge. PG. 101m. On Sunday at 6 p.m., the ATL wraps up its boy wizard retrospective with Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2. PG13. 130m. Next Wednesday’s Sci-Fi Pint and Pizza Night brings us Mesa of Lost Women, a 1953 flick about “a race of deadly spiderwomen luring men to their death.” I kid you not; this thing won an award for “Most Primitive Male Chauvinist Fantasy.” Doors at 6 p.m.

Continuing

42. This Hollywood biopic about baseball color-barrier-breaker Jackie Robinson is so glossy it all but glosses over the issue of racism. PG13. 128m. THE CROODS. A Stone Age family must look for a new cave in this likeable animated comedy featuring the voices of Nic Cage and Emma Stone. PG. 96m. THE GREAT GATSBY. Baz Luhrmann’s frantically schizo adaptation of the literary classic plays like an uninspired soap opera. PG13. 142m. IRON MAN 3. Billionaire playboy/superhero Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) must battle panic attacks and terrorist/ stereotype The Mandarin (Ben Kingsley). PG13. 130m. OBLIVION. Tom Cruise! Sci-fi! Mediocre! Kinda pretty, though. PG13. 126m. PAIN & GAIN. Hollywood schlockmaestro Michael Bay directs this explosive take on hostage-taking Miami muscleheads (Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson). R. 129m. — Ryan Burns

l

Wisdom of the Earth

Weekend Seminar • July 27 & 28 List your class – just $4 per line, per issue! Deadline: Friday, 5pm. Place your ad online at classified.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts

EUREKA STUDIO ARTS. We’re participating in NORTH COAST OPEN STUDIOS THIS YEAR! Register during the event and receive a one−time 10% discount on ALL of our classes and workshops. Lots of paintings for sale too! eurekastudioarts.com. 526 Fifth St., (707) 440−9027. (AC−0523) HANDBUILDING FOR BEGINNERS & INTERMEDI− ATES. $90. Thurs.s, 10 a.m.−Noon. (5 weeks) June 27 −July 25. With Otamay Hushing. Focus on basic techniques with slabs and coils as applied to a variety of projects.Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0613) KNITTING−BEGINNERS & SOCKS, & SPINDLE SPINNING. Starting May 28, 29 & June 3 at HSU’s Center Activities. Taught by Crystal Estelle−Dobbs. Information 826−3357, http://bollweaveryarns.com/classes (AC−0530) MORRIS GRAVES MUSEUM OF ART. Week−long workshops for children, teens, and adults exploring drawing, painting, sculpture, and mixed media. Sessions begin June 24. humboldtarts.org. 636 F Street, Eureka. (707) 442−0278 (AC−0613) NORTH COAST ARTS. July 8−19. Intensive work− shops taught by Humboldt State University art faculty within the well−equipped HSU art studios. Workshops in ceramics, painting, photography, jewelry, sculpture, graphic design, printmaking, maskmaking, bookmaking. Designed for beginners and advanced professionals. Register by June 21 to reserve your space. Optional academic credit is also available. For more details, fees and to register: www.humboldt.edu/northcoastarts or call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Educa− tion at 826−3731. (AC−0613) TILE MAKING. $180. Mon.s, 6−8 p.m. June 24−Aug. 26 (10 weeks) With Marilyn Allen. Enjoy this deco− rative, yet functional, art form while exploring a variety of tile−forming and surface−decorating techniques. For all levels. 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0613) WHEEL THROWING 1 & 2. $180. Tues.s, 7−9 p.m. JunE 25−Aug. 27. With Bob Raymond. Learn the basics or perfect your wheel−throwing technique. With 40 years’ experience, Bob is an inspiration to students. All levels. Fire Arts Center, 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (AC−0613)

Communication

MAJESTY & MYSTERY OF NATURE. Celebrate na− ture and consider how human interaction is im− pacting the environment at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., May 26, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672−2919, www.campbellcreek.org for more info.

THE SEX TALK. For parents of kids of all ages. Get clear and comfortable with what to say, when, and how much for each stage of development. Bring your fears, your hopes and your sense of humor to this fun and informative workshop with Diana Nunes Mizer. Sun., May 26, Noon−2 p.m. $10 Call or text to reserve a space (775) 313−7332 consciousparentingsolutions.com (CMM−0523)

Dance/Music/Theater/Film

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings June 3− 24, 7−8 p.m., Pan Arts Network, 1049 Samoa Blvd., Suite C. $50, (707) 407−8998, info@panarts network.com (DMT−0530) DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Group & private lessons in ballroom, Latin, swing & club dance in Humboldt County. We make dancing fun! www.dancewithdebbie.biz, (707) 464−3638 and on Facebook (DMT−1226)

Get Certified in Medicinal Aromatherapy at NorthCoast Essentials How to use essential oils in massage, acupuncture And energy work Essential oils for personal health and well-being $475; register by 6/27 and save $25

For information: (707)502-4883 sales@northcoastessentials.com 920 Samoa Blvd. • Arcata Cooper Bldg., 2nd floor Suite 221

REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616−6876. (DMT−1226) RIGHT HAND GUITAR WORKSHOP WITH ANGEL FARGAS. Every Saturday in June, 11 a.m−1 p.m., at Mantova’s Two Street Music, Eureka. $250 Course Package includes: Method Book, Music Stand, Foot Stool, and Via Hand G. Learn the "5 roles," including harmonics, strumming and percussive," that you can develop with your right hand. RSVP at anthony@mtsmusic.com or 445−3155. (DMT−0523) WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30−7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832−9547, Christina, 498− 0146. (DMT−1226)

Fitness

AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non−violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826−9395. (F−1226)

Art of Knitting Noni Flowers with Nora J. Bellows, author of Noni Flowers July 20-21, 11:00 am – 6:00 pm A two-day workshop covering how to make exquisite knitted flowers for embellishing felted or fabric accessories, like hats, purses, or pillows, or for adorning the top of a gift box. Saturday covers foundational techniques used for virtually every flower in her book; Sunday covers how to make more intricate flowers, including wiring and embellishment. Prerequisite knowledge: knit, purl, increase, decrease, work in the round on double pointed needles, tension control, and a rudimentary understanding of gauge. Cost: 225.00 + materials

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

BEGINNING TO ADVANCED GROUP PILATES. In− crease your potential through a Mindful move− ment practice at Arcata Core Pilates Studio! Begin− ning−Advanced group Pilates mat classes, reformer classes and Privates training sessions Mon.−Sat. Trainers are certified from Stott Pilates, an interna− tional certification agency Where modern princi− ples of exercise science and rehabilitation are studied. Questions or to sign up Call 845−8156 or email arcatacorepilates@gmail.com or visit: arcatacorepilatesstudio.com DANCE−FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9−10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825−0922. (F−1226)

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Get the summer lowdown at northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com• • NORTH North COAST Coast JOURNAL Journal •• THURSDAY, Thursday,MAY May23, 23,2013 2013 northcoastjournal.com

37 37

continued from previous page NIA−DANCE FUSION. Modern dance/fitness for all abilities. Mon.s, 6−7 p.m., Studio of Dance Arts Eureka. Wed.s, 5:30−6:30 p.m., Redwood Raks Arcata. $5 drop−in, $50/12 classes (707) 441−9102. (F− 1226) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata. Contact Justin (707) 601−1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F−1226) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Tech− niques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822−6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (F−1226) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon−Fri 5−6 p.m., 6−7 p.m., Sat 10−11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata.com, 825−0182. (F− 1226) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6−7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6−7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845−4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (F−1226) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Starting in May, Fri. 4−5 p.m. at Redwood Raks. (F−1226)

Kids & Teens

ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn self− confidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit− (707) 822−6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense.com (K−1226) CERAMICS FOR TEENS, AGES 13−17. $85 (Two 5 week classes offered), Mon.s, 9−11 a.m. June 24−July 22 & July 29−Aug. 26. With Jessica Eden. Adventure with clay; Learn various hand building and wheel throwing techniques. 520 South G St., Arcata. (707) 826−1445, www.fireartsarcata.com (K−0613) EARLY CHILDHOOD MUSIC. Enjoy making music with your child! Summer Session−5 Thur. May 30− June 27 @ D St. Neighborhood Center. Classes for Babies 3−3:30, Toddlers 3:45−4:15, Preschoolers 4:30 −5. Register with City of Arcata 822−7091. Check our Facebook page! (707) 601−0694 info@redwoodmusikgarten.org www.redwoodmusikgarten.org (K−0523)

IS YOUR KID’S ROOM A MESS? Learn a Toy Sim− plifying Formula to clear out the excess and create a nurturing space for your child to sleep and play. Wed., May 29, 6−8 p.m. $10 Call or text Diana Nunes Mizer to reserve a space (775) 313−7332, consciousparentingsolutions.com (K−0523) PAGEANT ON THE PLAZA. This summer the Arcata Playhouse is offering a two−week adventure in the creation of outdoor spectacle and performance. Week one includes classes in Movement, Music, Stilts, Puppetry. Week two create a show! July 8− 20, 9 a.m.−3:30 p.m. Ages 9 − 16, $300 Call 822−1575 to register today! SUMMER CAMP. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation. Join us for roller skating, arts and crafts, sports, field trips and more at Camp Perigot for children 5−13 year olds. Mon.−Fri., June 17−Aug.23, 8 a.m.−5:30 p.m. at Perigot Park. Very affordable and every camper receives a free breakfast and lunch! Full− day or half−day options. Scholarships available. Register today! Find registration materials at www.bluelake.ca.gov or call Kara Newman, 668− 5932, for more information. (K−0815) SUMMER THEATER WORKSHOPS AT THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE! June 24−28, 2 classes for kids ages 7− 9, 9 a.m−Noon. Fantastic Fairy Tales. 12:30−3:30 p.m., Clowning for Kids. 2 classes for kids ages 10−14. 9 a.m −Noon, Commedia and Mask Performance. 12:30−3:30 p.m. Improv in Action. $100 for one class, $75 for a second class. More info and registration at 822−1575! (K−0620)

Languages

INTRO TO RUSSIAN LANGUAGE & CULTURE 1. For those with little or no knowledge of the Russian language. Natalia Novikova will help you become familiar with the Cyrillic alphabet, basic reading and writing, and everyday communication. Mon− days/Wednesdays, June 3−26, 5:30−7:30 p.m. $125. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Educa− tion at 826−3731 to register, or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (L−0523) MORE EASY CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH. Mon.s, June 3−24, 5:30−7:30 p.m. $78. CR Community Education, 333 6th St. A quick, fun way for people who already have an elementary knowledge of Spanish to better develop their conversational skills. Gain communication tools for personal enrichment, daily interaction, or travel preparation. Visit us online at http:www.redwoods.edu, visit the community education link. Call 269−4000 to register. (LA−0523)

Lectures

ARCHITECTURAL TREASURES OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY. Sat., June 1, 3:30−6 p.m.; Fri., June 7, 5−7:30 p.m.; Sat., June 15, 9:30 a.m.−3:30 p.m. $75. CR Community Education, 333 6th St., Eureka. Join Ray Hillman on a lively lecture and field trip walking tour of our region. Influence of England and Queen Victoria, Victorian social life, and progres− sion of architectural styles of the 19th century. Visit us online at http:www.redwoods.edu , visit the community education link. Call 269−4000 to register.

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

BALD HILLS RD. FLORA: FROM REDWOOD FOREST TO GRASSLAND. Sat., June 1, 8 am−5 pm, $50 Field Course. Come to the Del Norte coast for a memorable day of botanizing. Become acquainted with several different plant communi− ties and see wildflowers in their spring glory all on one road, in one day! Class intro. at the Redwood National Park South Station, then take a short hike on the Lady Bird Johnson Interpretive Trail. Group will then explore Oregon white oak woodlands and coastal prairie grassland as we progress up Bald Hills Rd. For more info. or to register go to www.thesfi.org or call (541) 597−8530 (L−0530) FOOD SAFETY. Learn the basics of selecting ap− propriate nutritious foods, storage and preparation of edible supplies, especially in an emergency, when there is no power. Presented by HSU Region− al Training Institute, Community Disaster Prepared− ness. Wed., June 12, 2−4 p.m. at Rohner Rec Hall in Fortuna. $25. Pre−registration required: www.humboldt.edu/rti/foodsafety or call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education at (707) 826−3731. (L−0530) UPSTAIRS/DOWNSTAIRS IN THE REDWOOD FOREST. Sun., June 2, 8am− 5pm., $50. Explore a variety of old−growth redwood forests alluvial flats of Prairie Creek State Park and the uplands within Ladybird Johnson Grove. Learn about management techniques that seek to restore second−growth redwood forests to old−growth−like conditions. Includes a visit to the oldest thinning project within Redwood National and State Parks. Hear about the most recent redwood canopy studies. Redwood National and State Parks. Register at www.thesfi.org or call (541) 597−8530 (L−0530)

50 and Better OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826−5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes (O−1226) AMENDS, THE 12 PRINCIPLES OF FORGIVENESS. This course can help you free yourself from resent− ment, anger, blame, guilt and regret, and let go of the past while creating joy and peace in the present. With Sharon K. Ferrett. Thurs., June 13, 5−7 p.m. and Sat., June 15, 10 a.m.−3 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 (O− 0606) BEGINNING BIRDWATCHING. Interested in bird− watching, but don’t know where to start? Get a primer on choosing a field guide and optics, tips on identifying birds from Louise Bacon−Ogden. This OLLI class will be held at at Garberville Civic Club. Sat., June 15, 10−11:30 a.m. and 12:30−2 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880 (O−0606) COVERING THE BALD HILLS. Visit former sheep ranches and observe wildflowers and wildlife in this area of Redwood National Park. With Jerry and Gisela Rohde. Sat., June 15, 8:30 a.m.−4:30 p.m. $75/ OLLI members, $100/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 (O−0606) CULTURAL HISTORY OF EUROPE. Discuss the im− portance of cultural symbols and memory in his− torical analysis of Eastern and Central Europe. With Elena Matusevich. Wed., June 12−26, 2−4 p.m. $45/ OLLI members, $70/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 (O−0530)

FAST FOOD, SLOW FOOD. Growing a Year ’Round Kitchen Garden. Learn to grow an organic, low maintenance kitchen garden with Terry Kramer. Held at the Humboldt Botanical Garden. Tues., June 11 & 18, Noon−2 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 (O−0530) FILMS OF PRESTON STURGES. See and discuss films directed by Preston Sturges (may include The Great McGinty, The Lady Eve, Hail the Conquering Hero). With Philip Wright. Thurs., June 13−July 25, 6− 9 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0606) FLOODS OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA. Examine the history, weather and geology that contributed to extreme rainfall and flood events with historian Jerry Rohde and meteorologist Nancy Dean. Mon. in Ferndale, June 24 and July 1, 3−5 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0613) GARDENING FOR BIRDS. Love birds and garden− ing? Learn what to plant to attract a larger variety of birds into your backyard. With Louise Bacon Og− den. Tues., June 11, 1−3 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 (O−0530) GENTLE YOGA FOR OLLI. Learn yoga with focus on both floor and standing poses for strength, balance and flexibility at any age. With Patricia Starr. Mon., June 17−July 1, 1:30−3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 (O− 0606) HERBS ON THE NORTH COAST. Learn about herbal folklore and discuss types of perennial and annual herbs that do well in our region. With Doris Hicks. Sat., June 15−29, 10 a.m.−noon. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 (O− 0606) INK, BRUSH, PEN, FROM EAST TO WEST. Create a series of unique drawings using ink media with Julie McNiel. Fri., June 21, 6−8 p.m. and Sat., June 22, 1−5 p.m. $60/OLLI members, $85/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0613) INTRO TO ELECTRIC BICYCLES. Explore these light electric vehicles and how they work. With Mike Turek. Thurs., June 20 & 27, 10 a.m.−Noon. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0613) ISLAMIC PRISMS, LEGITIMACY & AUTHORITY. This course focuses on Muslims in China, Syria, Morocco and Turkey and topics such as education, women and orthodoxy/heterodoxy. With Tom Gage. Thurs., June 13−27 and July 11, 2−4 p.m. $50/ OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0606) KAYAK OYSTER TOURS. Explore dune ecology, restoration, preservation and oyster farming while in a kayak at the Ma−le’l Dunes. With David LaFever and Dave Fuller. Includes safety/kayak lesson and equipment. Sun., June 9, Noon−3 p.m. $85/OLLI members, $105/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 (O− 0523) OLLI AT HSU SUMMER OPEN HOUSE. Sat., June 8, 1−3 p.m., on the Humboldt State University Cam− pus: Great Hall, College Creek Complex. Member tour of HSU Human Performance Lab, meet OLLI faculty, and register for Summer classes. Free park− ing. Learn more about this community of learners age 50 and better. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0606)

Field notes QUEENS MARRYING NORTH, ARAGONESE SIS− TERS. Investigate the influence of aristocratic women who have changed history. With Tom Gage. Tues., June 11−July 9, 2−4 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880 (O−0530) REDWOOD & RAILS. Railroading in Humboldt County from its beginnings in Arcata in the 1850s through its development with logging lines and the Northwestern Pacific Railroad, and concluding with visits to buildings, bridges, equipment and more remaining of this once extensive and vital means of transportation. With Ray Hillman. Fri., June 14 and 21, 6−8:30 p.m. and Sat., June 22, 9 a.m.−4 p.m. $70/OLLI members, $95/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0606)

Spiritual

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6−7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826−1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo.com, or Travis, 616− 5276. www.arcatazengroup.org. (S−1226) KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direc− tion of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442−7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S−1226)

REDWOOD PARKS COAST HISTORY TOUR. Gyon Bluffs, Gold Bluffs and False Klamath Cove. Join Ranger Jim Wheeler for a virtual tour of the history of three places along the coast of Redwood National and State Parks, and hear three indepen− dent Yurok stories about the last huge tsunami produced by the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Wed., June 26, 2−4 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0613)

SHAMANIC JOURNEYING. Sat, June 1, 12pm−6:00 p.m. $99. Learn the shaman’s soul journeying tech− nique for personal healing and spiritual growth with Michal Mugrage. Contact 407−7192 or soul− nurturer@gmail.com to register. (S−0530)

TAKE IT SLOW, TAKE THE TRAIN. Learn the ins and outs of train travel with Louise Bacon−Ogden and David Ogden. Fri., June 14, 2−4:30 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0606)

Sports & Recreation

TAKE OLLI OUT TO THE BALLGAME. Humboldt Crabs Baseball. Explore the 69−year history of Humboldt Crabs baseball with Randy Robertson. Includes a ticket to a day game and a behind−the− scenes look at ballpark operations and an oppor− tunity to meet the players and coaches. Lunch provided by the HSU Alumni Association. Sun., June 23, 10 a.m.−3 p.m. $40/OLLI members, $65/ nonmembers. OLLI: 826−5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0613) THE MATHEMATICS OF HAND−KNITTED FABRIC. Are you an intermediate or advanced knitter accustomed to working from patterns, but want to develop free styles of your own? Understand the geometry of knitted stitches is the key to creating garments of your own personal taste and artistic eye. With Janette Heartwood. Tues., June 18 and 25, 10 a.m.−noon. $40/OLLI members, $65/nonmem− bers. OLLI: 826−5880 (O−0606) WALKING TOUR, TRINIDAD HEAD LIGHTHOUSE & GRANITE CROSS. Trinidad Museum Society presents a walking tour of the 1871 Trinidad Head USCG lighthouse, and the 1913 granite cross at the top. With Patricia Fleschner. Fri., June 14, 2−4 p.m. $30/OLLI members, $55/nonmembers. OLLI: 826− 5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O−0606)

Pets & Animals

BIRD AWARENESS. Mon.−Sat., June 17−22. Learn how to identify and enjoy our feathered friends through lecture and in the field in the 40th year of this summer bird watching course with Dr. John Hewston. Register early; class size is limited. $120, $50 additional for optional credit. Call HSU College of eLearning and Extended Education to register: 826−3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended (P− 0613)

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./Sat., 6:30−9:30 p.m., Sun. 2−5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30−9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668−5932 or find us on facebook at parks−rec@bluelake.ca.gov. (SR− 1226)

Therapy & Support

FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk−in support group for anyone suffering from depres− sion. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m −7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839−5691. (TS−1226) FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496−2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com (TS−1226) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATION− SHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845−8973 (TS−1226)

Vocational

CERTIFICATE IN FACULTY PREPARATION, TEACH− ING IN HIGHER EDUCATION. Pursuing a teaching career at a community college or university? Break through the competition with a Faculty Prepara− tion Certificate that can enhance your pedagogical knowledge and demonstrate your readiness to teach in a college environment. This online pro− gram offers an introduction to the roles and re− sponsibilities of teaching in higher education and specifically addresses teaching, learning and tech− nology issues in the college classroom. This is a three−semester, 12−unit certificate program that starts July 8. For full course descriptions, deadlines, fees and more information, visit www.humboldt.edu/facultyprep or contact Hum− boldt State University College of eLearning & Ex− tended Education at (707) 826−3731 or extended@humboldt.edu.

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Our nearest star, the sun, phOtOgraphed in extreme ultraviOlet by nasa’s sOlar dynamics ObservatOry. nasa phOtO

What Ain’t So By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

J

ames Bond’s favorite drink was champagne (neither shaken nor stirred). He imbibed 65 glasses in the books and movies, compared with 40 vodka martinis. Unless you combine bourbon and scotch whiskies (my father-in-law is having a fit) for 95 total. If you like fine legal distinctions, you can claim there are 46 states in the United States. Legally, Virginia, Kentucky, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts are commonwealths, not states. The nearest star isn’t Proxima Centauri, whose light takes about four years to reach us. It’s the Sun, eight light minutes away. Harry S. Truman’s full middle name is S, because his parents wanted to honor both his grandfathers, Anderson Shipp Truman and Solomon Young. It’s always formally followed by a period. Just two galaxies are visible to the naked eye, not billions and billions: our own Milky Way plus the Andromeda Galaxy, over 2 million light years away. Add two more if you’re in the Southern Hemisphere, where the Magellenic Clouds (dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way) are visible. A Welshman, not the Frenchman Nicolas Oresme, nor the Italian Leonardo Fibonnaci, gave us the equal sign (=). Robert Recorde (1512-1558) was a physician and mathematician from Tenby, Wales. After an illustrious career, he was sued and died in debtor’s prison. The first person to circumnavigate the globe wasn’t Ferdinand Magellan (he died en route). It may have been the remains of his crew, led by Juan Sebastián Elcano. Or Enrique de Malacca, “Henry the Black,” Magellan’s Malaysian slave, who accompanied the Portuguese navigator on all his voyages. The question hinges on whether

Enrique made it home after being left on Cebu in the Philippines in 1521, still 1,500 miles short of Malacca (present day Melaka in western Malaysia), which he’d left 10 years earlier. Johannes Gutenberg wasn’t the inventor of movable type for printing. That honor goes to the Chinese innovator Bi Sheng, around 1050, who used ceramic tablets. The oldest existing metal movable-type book is the last volume of the Jikji, a Korean Buddhist anthology, dated to 1377. Gutenberg’s system — which required far fewer symbols! — was invented independently around 1450. Prayer doesn’t correlate with improved surgical outcomes. The largest study on intercessory prayer (Templeton Foundation/Herbert Benson, 2006) based on 1,802 coronary artery bypass patients, showed major complications and 30-day mortality rates in 52 percent of those who received prayer and 51 percent of those who did not receive it. America may not have been named after Portuguese navigator Amerigo Vespucci. The name of rival candidate, Richard ap Meryk (1455-1503), anglicizes to Amerike. As a wealthy merchant and high sheriff of the English port city of Bristol, he sponsored Venetian Zuan Chabotto/ John Cabot’s voyage to Newfoundland (or Maine, maybe) in 1497. Sauerkraut and lemons, not limes, were standard issue to British sailors to prevent scurvy, which is caused by a deficiency of vitamin C. Weight-for-weight, limes (whence “limey” for a Brit) contain half the vitamin C of lemons. l Barry Evans (barryevans9@yahoo.com) would rather be a limey than a lemony. Or a sauerkrauty.

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

39

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS

1. Snoop ____ 5. “Tuesdays With Morrie” author 10. Some school play attendees 14. ____ Blizzard (Dairy Queen offering) 15. Michelle’s predecessor 16. “Splender in the Grass” director Kazan 17. Fearful people talk smack about a diner’s request? 20. Mao ____-tung 21. “T.J. Hooker” actor Adrian 22. Has a novel experience? 23. Cryer in a sitcom 24. “It was the beginning of the Eighties when ____ started to become unbearable”: Keith Richards

DOWN

1. “Hey ... stop that!” 2. Buried treasures 3. Richard of “Brooklyn’s Finest” 4. White House web address ending 5. Graduates 6. Zap 7. Melville’s Billy 8. “Either you do it ____ will” 9. “Live ____” (Taco Bell slogan) 10. Jeter and Jacobi 11. Director of the last episode of “M*A*S*H” 12. Fizzled out 13. Asian outbreak of 2003 18. EPA concern

26. Enormous people talk smack about a flower that blooms in the fall? 34. Where pastrami may be put 35. Some wedding guests 36. A, in Abruzzi 37. Droids, e.g. 38. Words to live by 39. Vitamin also known as PABA 40. “East” on a grandfather clock 41. Native parka wearer 42. ____-Grain cereal bars 43. Relaxed people talk smack about a job opening? 46. Fusses 47. Chicago trains

48. Windows button 51. Dandy 53. Film villain who sings “Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer, do!” 56. Counsel’s request for an order to talk smack about a young woman? 60. Arab nation that’s not in OPEC 61. “____ ears!” 62. Info in an apartment ad 63. “Baywatch” actress ____ Lee Nolin 64. Kardashian/West as a tabloid twosome 65. ____ moss

19. Black-and-white swimmers 23. Blue birds 24. “I have a good ____ ...” 25. Analogy words 26. Something to talk about 27. Home of Bollywood 28. Bring up the rear 29. Light touch 30. Next 31. Half of an ice cream flavor 32. El Dia de Martin Luther King, Jr. falls in it 33. Arrested 38. Award coveted in “Mad Men” 39. Partner of “ifs” and “ands” 41. Supplement

42. “Frasier” character 44. Yacht site 45. 90% off? 48. Unwanted cloud 49. Hefty volume 50. ____ early age 51. Cappuccino feature 52. How doodles are often drawn 53. Take on 54. No longer in port 55. It tests reasoning skills: Abbr. 57. Suffix with beat or neat 58. “OMG! Spare me!” 59. It can be hard to refold

HARD #25

www.sudoku.com

Solution, tips and computer program at

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

NORTHCOAST COASTJOURNAL JOURNAL• •THURSDAY, THURSDAY,MAY MAY23, 23,2013 2013• northcoastjournal.com • northcoastjournal.com 40NORTH 40

DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Classes with Jane Bothwell & Allison Poklemba. Petrolia Seaweeding Weekend. June 8−9. Learn how to identify, ethically harvest, and prepare local sea vegetables. $150. High Country Herb Weekend. Aug. 2−4. Strengthen plant ID skills and practice ethical wildcrafting techniques. $250. (707) 442−8157, www.dandelionherb.com (W−0606) FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer. Find out what Rolfing can do for you. (541) 251−1885 (W−1226) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441−9175. (W−1226) REIKI TRAINING. Group and Individual Instruction Available for Children, Teens, and Adults. Attune− ments, Theory, and Practice. New Classes Each Month and Free Drop−In Reiki Treatment every Sunday from 1−3 at Sun Yi’s Academy in Arcata. Visit www.humboldtreikilady.com for more infor− mation or call (707) 845−0238, Christy Robertson, Reiki Master, Teacher. (W−0704) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Daytime classes begin June, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650−Hour Therapeutic Massage Certi− fication will prepare you for Professional Certifica− tion in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident profes− sional massage therapist. Call 822−5223 for infor− mation or visit arcatamassage.com (W−1226) VISITING YOGA INSTRUCTOR JEANIE MANCH− ESTER. At Om Shala & Inner Freedom Yoga. Fri., June 14−Sun., June 16. Explore myth, asana, breath and meditation to access the truth of who we are and the great potential that lies within. Full weekend $130 by 6/7, $150 after. Classes priced individually as well. Om Shala Yoga, 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com or Inner Freedom Yoga, 890 G St., Arcata Plaza. 440 −2111, www.innerfreedomyoga.com (W−0523) YOGA THERAPY FOR NECK, SHOULDERS & UPPER BACK. At Om Shala Yoga. With Peggy Profant. Sun., June 2, 2−4:30 p.m. No experience required! $25 by 5/26, $35 after. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825−YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W−0523)

NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC AUCTION

classified@northcoastjournal.com

Wellness & Bodywork

©2013 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

continued from previous page WORKING WITH ELDERS IN MEDIATION & FACIL− ITATION. 2−day advanced workshop focusing on Elders and their extended families in times of diffi− cult decisions. Sponsored by Humboldt Mediation Services. Led by Barbara Proctor J.D. Program Di− rector, Center for Human Development, Pleasant Hills, Ca. BBS credits available. June 21−22. Ad− vanced registration required. $325, non−profit rate $250. Information and Registration (707) 445−2505, www.humboldtmediationservices.org (V−0530)

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700 −21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the Civil Code. The undersigned will sell at a public auction by competitive bidding on the 31st of May 2013, at noon, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at South Bay Mini−Storage, 2031 Eich Road, Eureka, County of Humboldt, State of California, as follows. Items to be sold include but are not limited to the following: Unit #209 Lloyd Parker−air compressor, fishing rod, hand cart, bike, boxed items Unit #242 Lawrence Neumann−tent, folding chairs, household items Unit #323 Jerry Brown − Super bowl mirror, floor jack, furniture, boxed items Unit #440 Leona Hayden−small refrigerator, boxed items, suitcases Unit #441 Brian Festag−oak dinning rm set, wake board, TV, stereo & speakers Unit #606 Rene Reeves − furniture with mirror Unit #626 Ronald Skillings−furniture, big screen TV, weight bench, tables Unit #661 Christopher Buskirk− oak table, chairs, doll house, boxed items Unit #754 Steven Buskirk − hand tools, sleeping bag, boxed items Purchases must be paid for at the time of purchase in cash only. All purchased items are sold "as is" and must be removed from the premises within 24 hours. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of a settlement between owner and obligated party. Bring a flashlight and padlock(s) Dated this 15th of May 23 and of May 30 2013. CA BOND NO. 0336118 5/16, 5/23,5/23/2013 (13−147)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−000262 The following person is doing Busi− ness as BOO BAH BLUE at 3565 J St., Eureka, CA. 95503. Renee Hanks 3565 J St. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by An In− dividual. The registrant commenced to trans− act business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Renee Hanks, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 26, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/2013 (13−133)

legal notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00215

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00252

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00264

The following person is doing Busi− ness as PATKI ENTERPRISES at 4683 McKinnon Ct., Arcata, CA. 95521. Jacquelyn Dyer 4683 McKinnon Ct. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An In− dividual. The registrant commenced to trans− act business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/5/ 2013 /s/ Jacquelyn Dyer, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 5, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following persons are doing Business as LOST COAST MOTOR− SPORTS at 4665 West End Rd. Arca− ta, CA. 95521 Andrew Duncan 4803 Wells Dr. Eureka, CA. 95503 Scott Homen 950 Courtyard Circle Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to trans− act business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/ 2013 /s/ Andrew Duncan This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 23, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as SWEET FIELDS FARM at 1387 Janes Rd., Arcata, CA. 95521. Lauren Margaret Herstead 1387 Janes Rd.. Arcata, CA. 95521 The business is conducted by An In− dividual. The registrant commenced to trans− act business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/ 01/2013 /s/ Lauren M. Herstead This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 29, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/2013 (13−130)

The following persons are doing business as WOLF DAWG at 525 2ND St., #101, Eureka, CA 95501. Amy Wolfe 2580 Central Ave, #47 McKinleyville, CA 95519 Viola Wolford 910 Courtyard Dr., #H Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by Copartners. The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a. /s Amy Wolfe. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 3, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/2013 (13−129)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00241 The following persons are doing business as ST. JOSEPH HEALTH at 3345 Michelson Drive, Suite 100, Irvine CA. 92612−0693. St. Joseph Health System 3345 Michelson Drive, Suite 100 Irvine, CA. 92612−0693 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to trans− act business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/9/2012 /s/ Shannon Dwyer, Secretary This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 17, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/2013 (13−127)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00257 The following person is doing Busi− ness as IMAGINE MORE! at 2904 California St., Eureka, CA. 95501. Yvonne Becker 2904 California St. Eureka, CA. 95501 The business is conducted by An In− dividual. The registrant commenced to trans− act business under the fictitious business name listed above on 1993 /s/ Yvonne Becker This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 24, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30/2013 (13−134)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00278

5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/2013 (13−131) 5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30/2013 (13−139)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00248 The following person is doing Busi− ness as O B D PLUMBING at 2019 Campton Rd., Eureka, CA. 95503. Darrell Burden 2019 Campton Rd. Eureka, CA. 95503 The business is conducted by An In− dividual. The registrant commenced to trans− act business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/3/ 2003 /s/ Darrell Burden. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 19, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/2013 (13−128)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00258

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13−00282

The following persons are doing Business as ST. JOSEPH HERITAGE HEALTHCARE at 279 E. Imperial Highway, Suite 770, Fullerton, CA. 92835, Orange County. St. Jude Hospital Yorba Linda 279 E. Imperial Highway, Suite 770 Fullerton, CA. 92835, California The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to trans− act business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/ 28/2013 /s/ C.R Burke, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 26, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing Busi− ness as EMERALD TRIANGLE APIARIESat 45630 Hwy 36, Spc.1. Bridgeville, CA 95526. Ernie Lee Smith 45630 Hwy. 36, Spc. 1. Bridgeville, CA 95526 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name listed above on n/a /s/ Ernie Smith This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on May 8, 2013 CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6 (13−146)

5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30 (13−137)

www.northcoastjournal.com

Did you know that the North Coast Journal’s website includes governmental public notices? Find out when there are Humboldt County public hearings by clicking on “Legal Notices” at northcoastjournal.com

DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL 1105 6TH STREET, SUITE C EUREKA, CA 95501 707−445−7229 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF WILLIAM NORTON LUNT, CASE NO. PR130142

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARTHA HAVLIC, CASE NO. PR130141

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: WILLIAM NORTON LUNT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by STEPHEN WILLIAM LUNT in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE re− quests that STEPHEN WILLIAM LUNT be appointed as personal representative to administer the es− tate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. A HEARING on the petition will be held on June 6, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a con− tingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the per− sonal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal de− livery to you of a notice under sec− tion 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowl− edgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LAWRENCE O. EITZEN SB# 47733 816 THIRD STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443−2209 May 6, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/2013 (13−143)

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Date of Filing Application: MARTHA HAVLIC April 24, 2013 A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been To Whom It May Concern: filed by SUSAN J. HILTON in the Su− The Name of the Applicants are: perior Court of California, County AMY ESTELLA WOLFE, VIOLA JEAN of Humboldt. WOLFORD THE PETITION FOR PROBATE re− The applicants listed above are ap− quests that SUSAN J. HILTON be plying to the Department of Alco− appointed as personal representa− holic Beverages Control to sell alco− tive to administer the estate of the holic beverages at: decedent. 525 2ND ST. THE PETITION requests the dece− EUREKA, CA 95501−5107 dent’s will and codicils, if any, be Type of License Applied for: admitted to probate. The will and 40 − On−Sale Beer any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/2013 (13−140) THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the In− FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME dependent Administration of Es− STATEMENT 13−00294 tates Act. (This authority will allow The following person is doing busi− the personal representative to take ness as J.B. FABRICATION at 240 many actions without obtaining Belleview Ave., Rio Dell, CA 95562. court approval. Before taking cer− Justin P. Barrington tain very important actions, howev− 240 Belleview Ave. er, the personal representative will Rio Dell, CA 95562 be required to give notice to inter− The business is conducted by An ested persons unless they have Individual. waived notice or consented to the The registrant commenced to proposed action.) The independent transact business under the ficti− administration authority will be tious business name listed above on granted unless an interested person n/a. files an objection to the petition /s Justin P. Barrington. and shows good cause why the This statement was filed with the court should not grant the authori− County Clerk of Humboldt County ty. on May 16, 2013. A HEARING on the petition will be CAROLYN CRNICH held on May 30, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at Humboldt County Clerk the Superior Court of California, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6, 6/13/2013 (13−148) County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at our fictitious business the hearing and state your objec− name statement will expire tions or file written objections with five years from the date it was the court before the hearing. Your last filed with the County Clerk. appearance may be in person or by You have 40 days from the your attorney. expiration date to renew your IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a con− FBNS with the County. A new tingent creditor of the decedent, statement does not need to be you must file your claim with the published unless there has been court and mail a copy to the per− a change in the information resonal representative appointed by quired in the expired statement. the court within the later of either If any changes occur then you (1) four months from the date of must file a new FBNS and have first issuance of letters to a general published again. personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Within 30 days from the stamped Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from refiling date, you must begin the date of mailing or personal de− publishing the statement in the livery to you of a notice under sec− newspaper. If you publish it in tion 9052 of the California Probate the North Coast Journal for the Code. Other California statutes and required four weeks, on the last legal authority may affect your day of publication a “proof of rights as a creditor. You may want publication” will be sent to the to consult with an attorney knowl− County Clerk to complete the edgeable in California law. filing process. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− The cost for running your ested in the estate, you may file ficticious business name in the with the court a Request for Special LEGAL NOTICES ➤ NORTH COAST JOURNAL Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of is a flat $55 fee. an inventory and appraisal of estate CONTINUED assets or of any petition or account ON NEXT PAGE as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice is available from • THURSDAY, MAYthe 23,court 2013 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL form clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: CHRIS JOHNSON HAMER SBN 105752

Y

442-1400

41

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person inter− ested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: CHRIS JOHNSON HAMER SBN 105752 STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, LLP 381 BAYSIDE ROAD ARCATA, CA 95521 (707) 822−1771 May 3, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/2013 (13−142)

tingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the per− sonal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of CONTINUED PREvIOUS PAgE. first issuance of letters to aFROM general personal representative, as defined the petition, you should appear at in section 58(b) of the California the hearing and state your objecProbate Code, or (2) 60 days from tions or file written objections with the date of mailing or personal de− the court before the hearing. Your livery to you of a notice under sec− appearance may be in person or by tion 9052 of the California Probate your attorney. Code. Other California statutes and IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a conlegal authority may affect your tingent creditor of the deceased, rights as a creditor. You may want you must file your claim with the to consult with an attorney knowl− court and mail a copy to the peredgeable in California law. sonal representative appointed by YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court within four months from the court. If you are a person inter− the date of first issuance of letters ested in the estate, you may file as provided in Probate Code section with the court a Request for Special 9100. The time for filing claims will Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of not expire before four months from an inventory and appraisal of estate the hearing date noticed above. assets or of any petition or account YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept as provided in Probate Code section by the court. If you are a person 1250. A Request for Special Notice interested in the estate, you may form is available from the court file with the court a Request for clerk. Special Notice (form DE-154) of the ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: filing of an inventory and appraisal CHRIS JOHNSON HAMER SBN of estate assets or of any petition 105752 or account as provided in Probate STOKES, HAMER, KAUFMAN & KIRK, Code section 1250. A Request for LLP Special Notice form is available 381 BAYSIDE ROAD from the court clerk. ARCATA, CA 95521 ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: (707) 822−1771 LEON A. KARJOLA May 2, 2013 ATTORNEY AT LAW SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA 732 FIFTH STREET COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT EUREKA, CA. 95501 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/2013 (13−138) (707) 445-0804 May 2, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT REMY FRANCOIS SAULNIER 5/23, 5/30, 6/6/2013 (13-150) CASE NO. PR130161 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, AMENDED contingent creditors and persons ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR who may otherwise be interested in CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. the will or estate, or both, of: REMY CV130165 SUPERIOR COURT OF FRANCOIS SAULNIER CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET filed by DENISE M. JOHNSON EUREKA, CA 95501 in the Superior Court of California, PETITION OF: County of Humboldt. SILVIA PATRICIA SILVEY THE PETITION FOR PROBATE TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: requests DENISE M. JOHNSON be Petitioner: SILVIA SILVEY for a de− appointed as personal representacree changing names as follows: tive to administer the estate of the Present name decedent. DESTINY FAITH SILVEY−THOMSEN THE PETITION requests the deceto Proposed Name dent’s will and codicils, if any, be DESTINY FAITH SILVEY admitted to probate. The will and THE COURT ORDERS that all per− codicils are available for examination sons interested in this matter ap− in the file kept by the court. pear before this court at the hear− THE PETITION requests authority ing indicated below to show cause, to administer the estate under the if any, why the petition for change Independent Administration of of name should not be granted. Any Estates Act. (This authority will allow person objecting to the name the personal representative to take changes described above must file a many actions without obtaining written objection that includes the court approval. Before taking certain reasons for the objection at least very important actions, however, two court days before the matter is the personal representative will be scheduled to be heard and must required to give notice to interested appear at the hearing to show cause persons unless they have waived why the petition should not be notice or consented to the proposed granted. If no written objection is action.) The independent admintimely filed, the court may grant istration authority will be granted the petition without a hearing. unless an interested person files an NOTICE OF HEARING objection to the petition and shows Date: June 14, 2013. good cause why the court should Time: 1:45 p.m. not grant the authority. The address of the court is: A HEARING on the petition will be Same as noted above, Dept. 8 held on JUNE 6, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. Date: May 2, 2013 at the Superior Court of California, Filed: May 3, 2013 County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Street, Eureka, in Dept. 08. Judge of the Superior Court IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of 5/9, 5/16, 5/23, 5/30/2013 (13−141)

legal notices

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF MARILYN IRMA PEEPLES, aka MARILYN I. PEEPLES, CASE NO. PR130140

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MAR− ILYN IRMA PEEPLES, aka MARILYN I. PEEPLES A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by LESLIE PEEPLES and RICK PEEPLES in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE re− quests that LESLIE PEEPLES AND RICK PEEPLES be appointed as per− sonal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the In− dependent Administration of Es− tates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking cer− tain very important actions, howev− er, the personal representative will be required to give notice to inter− ested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authori− ty. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 30, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a con− tingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the per− sonal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from North Coast JourNal • thursday, May 2013 • northcoastjournal.com NORTH COAST JOURNAL MAY 23,23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com the date of mailing or personal de−• THURSDAY, livery to you of a notice under sec− tion 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and

42 42

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CITY OF ARCATA

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT $38,962.56 - $47,359.24/yr.

Final Filing Date: 4:00 p.m. May 30, 2013. Performs a wide variety of complex administrative and support functions within assigned department. The current vacancy is in the Public Works department, which includes the Engineering, Corporation Yard, Parks, and Transit divisions. Includes a generous benefit package. Application materials are available at www.cityofarcata.org; Arcata City Manager’s Office, 736 F Street, Arcata, or (707) 822-5953. EOE.

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body, mind

& Spirit see page 46

Medical Assistant  Medical Biller  CPA Medical Office Receptionist Registered Nurse  HR Manager Experienced AP/AR Full Charge Bookkeeper Accounting Manager

MEDICAL BILLER 1 F/T Arcata MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 2 F/T Crescent City DIRECTOR OF NURSING 1 F/T Arcata REGISTERED NURSE 1 F/T Willow Creek MEDICAL ASSISTANT 2 F/T Arcata We are also seeking the following providers:

FAMILY PRACTICE/INTERNAL MEDICINE MD 3 F/T Arcata, Eureka, Crescent City

PSYCHIATRIST 1 F/T Crescent City Go to www.opendoorhealth.com for online application

Opportunities CLIENT ADVOCATE. PT/On Call. North Coast Rape Crisis Team. Provides info & nonjudgmental support via crisis line coverage for two weekends/mo + sharing holidays. Stipends paid on call stand−by shifts + $12/hr during response time. 443−2737 for info. EOE. (E−0530)

ENROLLMENT & MATCH SUPPORT SPECIALIST (FT) Bach Degree in social svcs or related. Case mgmt exp pref. Cover letter, résumé, & 3+ non−personal references EMAIL: info@ncbbbs.org MAIL: POB 5510 Eureka 95502 More info: www.ncbbbs.org

Opportunities

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ADULT DAY HEALTHCARE OF MAD RIVER. 2 positions open: Nurses Aide F.T. current or previous CNA preferred. Activity Coordinator Assist. P.T./on call. App/job desc. at Adult Day Health Care of Mad River (directly behind Mad River Hospital). email: adhc@madriverhospital.com (E−0523)

CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED NOW! Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live w/you. Earn up to $3,600 tax−free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on−site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/ GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt ! (707)442− 4500 #14, www.camentorfha.com (E−1226)

AIRLINE CAREERS. Begin here. Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial assistance available. Post 9/11 GI Bill accepted. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 1− 888−242−3214 (E−0523)

CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT. FT/benefits to work in rural health clinic. Experience preferred. Willing to train the right person. Paramedics/CNAs also considered. www.shchd.org (E−0523)

AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECU− RITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record, Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite A, Eureka. (707) 476− 9262. (E−0606)

HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Non− medical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. 442−8001. (E−1226)

Seeking Employment CARDIAC SONOGRAPHER FOR HIRE. Available July 1. Bachelor of Science. Board Certified. Resume available. mimi_dills@yahoo.com (E−0530)

CONTINUED ON next page

OUT AND ABOUT? Use the North Coast Journal’s mobile website to find all the info you need! Restaurants, Arts Listings, Events, Movie Times, Best of Humboldt: It’s all there. m.northcoastjournal.com

DOLCE MIA @ COSTCO RETAIL/WHOLESALE SALES REPRESENTATIVE Looking for a new full− or part−time career that fits your Eureka lifestyle? As a Dolce Mia rep, you can have it all, loving where you live, and loving what you do. We’re seeking outgoing, energetic, high−achieving individuals to start a career as Dolce Mia @ Costco sales representative. With Eureka as your home base, you’ll travel for 10−day stretches to Costco’s all over Northern California, selling our popular natural beauty line to consumers on the busy Costco floor. Return home and put your feet up and enjoy your big check! Your first assignment usually starts at home. We have an event going on right now in Eureka. Contact us today!

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43

the marketplace from sushi to sandwiches, we’ve got

PUBLIC AUCTIONS Vintage AB Battle Creek enamel stove, antique pump organ from Carter House, carved Asian dining room furniture, Ethan Allen & other wood furniture, antique snow shoes, cedar chest, Toro lawn mower, guitar w/case, violin, camping, fishing, kitchen items and MUCH MORE! RD

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Clothing

macsmist@gmail.com

Merchandise LINEN & GLASSWARE 1/2 PRICE. May 21−25. Yellow Tagged Clothes 25¢. Dream Quest Thrift Store: Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams. Next door to Wil− low Creek Post Office & Farmer Browns. (M−0523)

ď “ď ˇď Ąď Šď Žď łď€ ď †ď Źď Ąď ´ ď ?ď •ď ´ď °ď Żď łď ´ ď ‡ď Ąď ˛ď ¤ď Ľď Žď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛ ď ‡ď Ľď Žď Ľď ˛ď Ąď Źď€ ď “ď ´ď Żď ˛ď Ľ  ď ‡ď Ąď ˛ď ¤ď Ľď Žď€ ď ƒď Ľď Žď ´ď Ľď ˛  ď “ď ´ď Ąď ´ď Ľď€ ď ˆď ˇď šď€ ď€łď€ś ď ?ď Šď Źď Ľď ­ď Ąď ˛ď Ťď Ľď ˛ď€ ď€ąď€šď€Žď€ľ ď ƒď Ąď ˛ď Źď Żď ´ď ´ď Ąď€ ď żď€ ď ?ď °ď Ľď Žď€ ď€šď€­ď€ś

Pets & Livestock

PLACE YOUR PET AD! 20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

NEW LOCATION in Old Town

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop @gmail.com

Auto Service YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMER− GENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442−GLAS, humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (S−1226)

Cleaning CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 839− 1518. (S−1226)







ď “ď Ąď Źď Ľď ł

ď “ď Ľď ˛ď śď Šď Łď Ľ

ď “ď Żď Źď ľď ´ď Šď Żď Žď ł

Garden & Landscape PROFESSIONAL GARDENER. Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825−8074, taichigardener.com (S−1226)

ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non−toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. (707) 822−7819. (S−1226)

Computer & Internet 707-840-0600

ď ?ď Ąď Łď Šď Žď ´ď Żď łď ¨ď€  ď °ď Ľď Ąď Łď Ľď€ ď Żď Śď€ ď ­ď Šď Žď ¤ď€  ď łď Šď Žď Łď Ľď€ ď€ąď€šď€šď€łď€Ž ď Šď Šď ­ď€ ď …ď Źď Śď Ľď ˛ď ¤ď Šď Žď Ť ď ˇď ˇď ˇď€Žď ­ď Ąď Łď łď Śď Żď ˛ď ´ď ¨ď Ľď ­ď Ąď łď łď Ľď łď€Žď Žď Ľď ´

on Page 47 44 North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

707-826-1806

“Clothes with Soul�

Come on in!

Autos

Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice

116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Mon. & Tues.

Miscellaneous     

Computer & Internet

FLASHBACK

THURS. MAY 23RD 5:45 PM

you covered.

now mobile friendly!

Art & Design

Clothing

Auctions

overwhelmed with sTuff? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 4421400. Visa/MC

BIGFOOT EQUIPMENT & REPAIR HAS MOVED. 76 Country Club Dr., next to Farmer Brown’s Sup− ply. (530) 629−4067. (E−0530) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard mainte− nance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834−9155. (S−1226) your ideal employee may be a Journal reader. 442-1400. VISA/ MC. Place your ad onlinle at www. northcoastjournal.com ARE YOU HIRING? Place your ad here! 442-1400. VISA/MC. Place your ad onlinle at www.northcoastjournal.com

classified services Home Repair

Musicians & Instructors

ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499−4828. wiesner_eric@yahoo.com

MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, In− strument repair. Digital multi− track recording. (707) 476−9239. (M−1226)

AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use the heat in the air to heat your home− a proven technology− reasonably priced−Sunlight Heat− ing−$300 Federal Tax Credit−CA lic. #972834− (707) 502−1289, rockydrill@gmail.com (S−1226) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, just call. Contact 2guysand atrucksmk777@gmail.com, (707) 845−3087. (S−1226)

Legal

PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476−8919. (M−1226) GUITAR/PIANO LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermedi− ate. Seabury Gould 444−8507. (M −1226) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all pi− ano styles. Juilliard trained, re− mote lessons available. National− ly Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502−9469. (M−1226)

Other Professionals

    

        

  

HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/SCENIC TOURS. $199/hr. (707) 843−9599 redwoodcoasthelicopters@ gmail.com, www.redwoodcoast helicopters.com

Sewing & Alterations





 



   

    

 



 

Musicians & Instructors SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner−advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: (707) 441−1343 susielarain e@northcoastjournal.com

Other Professionals

Other Professionals

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAIN− MENT. Singer Songwriter. Old rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all kinds. 832−7419. (M−1226)

A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amaz− ing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birth− days, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499−5628. (S−1226)

STITCHES−N−BRITCHES. Kristin Anderson, Seam− stress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon−Fri., 8a.m− 3p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Ste 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 502−5294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches−n− Britches. Kristin360@gmail.com

LEATHER, BAG, SHOE REPAIR. In Trinidad. We stitch, sew, glue, riv− et, produce bags, belts, dog col− lars, horse tack, work clothes, upholstery, bar stools, benches, leather repair of all kinds. 490 1/2 Trinity Street, at Parker. Call (510) 677−3364. (S−0606) IN-HOME SERVICES

WORKING WITH ELDERS IN MEDIATION AND FACILITA− TION. 2−day advanced work− shop about Elders and their extended families in times of difficult decisions. Spon− sored by Humboldt Media− tion Services. Led by Barbara Proctor J.D. Program Director of the Center for Human Development, Pleasant Hills, Ca. BBS credits available. June 21−22. Pre−registration required. $325, non−profit rate $250. Information and Registration (707) 445−2505, www.humboldtmediationse rvices.org (S−0530 )

WRITING CONSULTANT/ EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com (S−1226)



 

     

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Get the lowdown ONLINE! NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, May 23, 2013

45

this week body, mind

this week

&Spirit Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer

 

Parent Educator

   

Treating Bulimia, Anorexia, Binge-Eating.

  

Kim Moor, MFT #37499

Call 441-1484

F Marny r Friedman E ~energy work~ E d o M 707-839-5910

707.445.4642 consciousparentingsolutions.com



ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668−5408. astro@salinarain.com, www.salinarain.com.

iamalso@hotmail.com

 

CHERYL JORDAN, LICENSED ES− THETICIAN. Organic facials, wax− ing & aromatherapy massage. Mention this ad and receive 25% off. Located at Beau Monde Sa− lon in Arcata. (707) 953−7619.

  HEAT THERAPY

+ 





ENERGY MEDICINE Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 822−5253

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, Uni− versity of Metaphysical Sci− ences. Bringing professional− ism to metaphysics. (707) 822 −2111

real estate





NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wake− field and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do preg− nancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441−9175. (MB−1226) STRAIGHTEN UP! Structural In− tegration Bodywork Series. Re− lieves chronic pain, eases move− ment, frees emotion. Good pos− ture can be natural! 31 years experience, Cecilie Hooper, 677− 3969

Place your ad online! body, mind

445-7715 1-888-849-5728

HUMBOLDT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SERVICES

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT:

classified.northcoast journal.com

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

RAPE CRISIS TEAM CRISIS LINE

445-2881 NATIONAL CRISIS HOTLINE

YOUR NEXT CLIENT may be a Journal reader. Offer your health services here in the Marketplace. 442-1400

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE

YOUR HEALTH RESOURCE may be listed here. Mention that you saw their ad in the Journal.

1-800-273-TALK SHELTER HOUSING FOR YOUTH CRISIS HOTLINE

BE A LIFE SAVER! Your blood donation is always needed!! Call the Northern California Community Blood Bank. Call for Bloodmobile schedule. 2524 Harrison St., Eureka, 443-8004

real estate 444-2273

this week

THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE−FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822−1676 (707) 822−5253 rowen_47@yahoo.com

IS GOOD HEALTH YOUR GOAL? Your future health resource or practitioner may be listed here. Tell them you saw their notice in the Journal.

FIND HOME IMPROVEMENT EXPERTS

FREE ROLFING CONSULTA− TION. With Lee Tuley, Certi− fied Rolfer. Find out what Rolfing can do for you. (541) 251−1885

46 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

HUMBOLDT CO. MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS LINE

this week LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN HEALTH from the inside out with Clinical Hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. 707−845−3749. www.HumboldtHypnosis.com.

GET WIRED FOR JOY! Learn simple, practical, neuro− science−based tools in a small, supportive group. Rewire stress circuits for better self−regulation, pro− moting vitality and joy, with Nancy Borge−Riis, LMFT, Cer− tified Emotional Brain Train− er. (707) 839−7920 and borgeriis@sbcglobal.net (707) 839−7920 borgeriis@sbcglobal.net

 

COMMUNITY CRISIS SUPPORT:

Starting on Page 19 10 home & garden

&Spirit

classified.northcoastjournal.com

“WE WORK FOR YOU.”

2850 E

(Hende 707

26

2355 C Mc 707

83

3 bed, home moun two wo

classified HOUSING Apartments for Rent EUREKA STUDIOS & 1BD/1BA APARTMENTS. 309 E St., in Old Town! On site laundry, OSRM, w/ c cat. Rent $415−$550, Vac 5/22. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444−9197. (R−0523) EUREKA 2BD/1BA APARTMENT. 1443 5th St., #2. Centrally located, shared yard, on site laundry w/c cat. Sec 8 OK. Rent $625, Vac 6/11. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197 (R-0523) 1BR/1BA ARCATA.Sunny, quiet, duplex, big yard, storage shed.Water, yard service provided. Quiet neighbors. Looking for considerate, mature renter. Available June 1. No pets, smoke, or grow. (707) 822-9310 michaelvz@suddenlink. net bodepropertymanagement. com (R-0523) ARCATA 2BD/1BA APARTMENTS. 1226-1236 L St. 3 units available. Walking distance from HSU & Plaza W/c cat. Rent $750, Vac 5/16. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197 (R-0523)

Houses for Rent EUREKA 3BD/2.5BA HOUSE. 1909 Roth Ct. Has jacuzzi tub in master bath, yard w/deck & patio, and garage. Rent $1450, Vac 5/27. www. ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0523) EUREKA 2BD/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE. 2610 Fairfield #2. With a view has Hook ups, carport space, w/c small pet. Rent $950, Vac 6/2. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197 (R-0523)

Vacation Rentals EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Moun− tain Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessi− ble. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986−7794, chemisemountainretreat.com (L− 1226)

Acreage for Sale

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center),

WILLOW CREEK REDUCED ! 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R−2 soils report and perk tested. Ap− proved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Prop− erty is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $85,000 will consider offers. (530) 629−2031

707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707

839-9093

Realtor Ads

www.communityrealty.net

$299,900

$215,000

3 bed, 2 bath, 1,865 sq ft home in sunny Blue Lake on extra large flat usable lot, many upgrades including roof, solar panels, most windows, remodeled kitchen, bedroom addition, shop

Great Eureka 1,914 sq ft duplex, one 1 bedroom unit and one 2 bedroom unit, both units were completely redone 7 years ago, the units have been occupied now for 6 years by the same tenants

$169,900 2 bed, 1.5 bath, 950 sq ft townhouse in Eureka, close to Henderson Center, fresh paint, laminate flooring, fenced sunny yard, alley access, washer and dryer included

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts.

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Houses for Rent EUREKA 2BD/1BA HOUSE. 3415 Albee St. Featuring yard, sunroom, detached garage, and hookups w/c pet. Rent $950, Vac 5/24. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444−9197. (R− 0523)

PLACE YOUR OWN AD AT: Comm. Space for Rent PARKING SPACES FOR RENT IN DOWNTOWN EUREKA LOT. S & W Properties. $40 per month per space. Call 443−2246, 499−6906. (R−0530) EUREKA DOWNTOWN OFFICE SPACE. Available at 7th & I Streets in Eureka. 650 sf. New paint and carpet. Great location. Parking & janitorial included. Call S & W Properties, (707) 499-6906. (R-0606)

■ FIELDBROOK SEARCHING FOR SECLUSION? Charming custom home will appeal to artists, writers and anyone looking for quiet and complete privacy. Nature views from every window. On a clear day you can see the ocean. This 13 acre parcel has a horse stall. Tack room with paddock. Big deck, great for entertaining. www.71tiptopridge.com MLS#237857 $588,000

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 • Broker GRI/Owner 1629 Central Ave. • McKinleyville • 707-839-1521 mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent

classified.northcoast journal.com

#01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435 Acreage for Sale Apartments for Rent Commercial Property for Sale Commercial Space for Rent Houses for Rent Realtor Ads Vacation Rentals

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2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013

47

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North Coast Journal 05-23-13 Edition