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thursday april18, 2013 vol XXIV issue 16 • humboldt county, calif. FREE

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On The atertront Now A national symposium provides afresh view for Humboldt's oceanfront future

By Ryan Burns

6 VA waiting game 8 Look, a new guy! 16 Over the hill and on the road 23 The planet gets a day 25 Gosh, godwits 29 Way to ruin relationships

2 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

table of 4 Mailbox 4 Poem Mountain Poem

6 News The Long Wait

8 Blog Jammin’ 10 On The Cover On The Waterfront Now

16 Get Out! Remodeling Our Wheel Estate

17 McKinleyville Arts Night Friday, April 19, 6-8 p.m.

18 The Hum Our Green Earth

20 Music & More! 22 Home & Garden Service Directory

23 Calendar 28 Filmland Black Hero, Whitewashed

29 In Review a book

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29 Workshops 31 Seven-o-Heaven cartoon by andrew goff

32 Field Notes The Most Expensive Lighthouse (Part 1)

33 Sudoku 33 Crossword 34 Marketplace 37 Body, Mind & Spirit 39 Real Estate This Week

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013

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April 18, 2013 Volume XXIV No. 16

North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2013 CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 21,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 350 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed / $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

publisher Judy Hodgson judy@northcoastjournal.com editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg carrie@northcoastjournal.com art director Holly Harvey production manager Carolyn Fernandez staff writer/a&e editor Bob Doran bob@northcoastjournal.com calendar@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Heidi Walters heidi@northcoastjournal.com staff writer Ryan Burns ryan@northcoastjournal.com staff writer/assistant editor Grant Scott-Goforth grant@northcoastjournal.com contributing writers John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Barry Evans, William S. Kowinski, Mark Shikuma, Amy Stewart graphic design/production Lynn Jones, Alana Chenevert, Drew Hyland production intern Kimberly Hodges general manager Chuck Leishman chuck@northcoastjournal.com advertising Mike Herring mike@northcoastjournal.com advertising Colleen Hole colleen@northcoastjournal.com advertising Shane Mizer shane@northcoastjournal.com advertising Karen Sack karen@northcoastjournal.com office manager Carmen England classified assistant Sophia Dennler mail/office:

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 PHONE: 707 442-1400 FAX:  707 442-1401

press releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com letters to the editor letters@northcoastjournal.com events/a&e calendar@northcoastjournal.com music thehum@northcoastjournal.com production ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com sales ncjournal@northcoastjournal.com classified/workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

on the cover:

Photo by Ryan Burns. Illustration by Holly Harvey.

Music Matters

continue to seriously develop, often by taking classes at CR whenever schedules   allow: morning, noon or night.  UnfortuEditor: nately, the benefits of this life-long learnI discovered my love of music in a ing do not show up on a spreadsheet. It’s community college class over 45 years ago such a loss to the community to no longer (“Re-Imagining CR,” April 11). I was not a be a priority in the California “commumusic major. Since moving to Humboldt nity” college system. Perhaps College of County in the mid 1970s, participating in the Redwoods could be the exception to music and musical theatre, often through this unwise decision. courses at CR, has sustained me all of Karen Elfers, Arcata my adult life as a great joy and  effective   stress-reliever.  Editor: For many of us in the community, muI emphatically agree with the April 4 sic/theatre is an avocation, not our “day letter (“Audit CR,” Mailbox) complaining job.” Yet it’s a part of ourselves that we of College of the Redwoods cutting its arts and music programs! I’ve played the violin all my life. When I moved up here, I expected the community college to have an   orchestra program. But it Everything is better in the mountains didn’t. I couldn’t transfer to HSU as a music major Everything is glowing (where they DO have a The clouds are better — more pronounced full orchestra and a music The lichen POP major program) from a community college that Top-lit trees shimmer and smile while didn’t!? Stout purple irises wave from the sidelines of Humboldt is an art    Alderpoint Road rich community. Arts Alive, music festivals, galleries, poetry readings, A lone turkey with a pink-blue head manages traffic, ballet and theaters. Yet     and we stop as directed for our CR doesn’t have a proper orchestra program. CutApril first dip in the Eel ting music and arts programs would be doing We’re overdue for a good baptizing a huge disservice to our The firm swift spank of cold mountain water on community and future Our bareness is a proper welcome to springtime church generations! It doesn’t matter where a person’s Absolve us, Eel! from; we as a people Absolve us of the sins of zombie vampire humanity, have always been better Cast away the darkness, we adore your light! for those that think outside the box. Jim Henson (puppet master); Danny Resting ashore, we see Elfman (movie score A pair of jays announce the news with flashes of blue composer); Johnny Depp A black and yellow ess of garter snake passing silently (actor); Thomas Gibson (“Hotchner” in Criminal A splash! of sturgeon (salmon?) sparkling and then Minds, Juilliard scholWe slip back in to the cold arship); Peter Jackson (director and producer); L. Frank Baum (author of Duly absolved The Wonderful Wizard We return to the warm rocks of Oz); Benny GoodThe sky groans loudly — trails, oh, contrails… man (big band leader, We resume our shared and deliberate forgetfulness singer); Ella Fitzgerald (African-American vocalAnd a pair of blessed bees consecrates our chests ist); Quentin Tarantino (breakthrough direc— Emily Hobelmann tor); Oprah Winfrey (TV personality); Alex Haley

Mountain Poem

4 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

(author of Roots); the list goes on! How can we live in a world were imagination and creativity aren’t valued as much as other disciplines? Meghan E. Doty, Eureka  

Railroad(ed) Editor: I attended the public hearing in Eureka City Council chambers on March 29 (“Political Reality 2013,” From the Publisher, April 4). Linda Atkins raised an important point about the process: Caltrans has these grants available every year. There was not the rush that David Hull insisted on. His mea culpa rang phony with me: he hadn’t worried about the timeline to apply for the grant because he assumed (!) the city had a template for applying for these kinds of grants. Linda pointed out that the deadline was April 2 but stressed that this was a manufactured crisis because the grants are available every year. My question: How can $17,500 in “staff time” be spent between Friday, March 29 and Tuesday, April 2? Whose money is the Caltrans grant, anyway? I keep coming back to a certain question I have asked myself many times recently: How dumb do they think we are? Do they really think we aren’t paying attention? I’ve watched David Hull in action about economic planning several times since his separation from the Harbor Commission. As I listened to his presentation on Good Friday and Linda’s recurrent protests that the process was wrong, I smelled a rat but could trace the source of the stench. Thank you for connecting the dots. Now, what are we political junkies going to do about the “disinterest” in campaign finance reform? Hollie Klingel, Eureka  

Just loving that community organizer Editor:   Thank you for your enlightening cover story on “HumCPR Rising” (March 28) and publisher Judy Hodgson’s subsequent follow up on Lee Ulansey. I never knew Mr. Ulansey was such a successful community organizer who was able to bring so many diverse groups together for a common cause. It almost reminds me of that man from Chicago who got his start as a community organizer before his foray into politics.   Matthew Owen, Eureka

Cartoon by joel mielke

Editor: Not sure what the intent of Ryan Burns’ “HumCPR Rising” and Publisher Judy Hodgson’s “Political Reality 2013” was; instead of vilifying Lee Ulansey, it made him out to be a shrewd community organizer. In her “My Bully Pulpit” article (May 17, 2012) Ms. Hodgson made some endorsements for the June 2012 elections. Regarding Estelle Fennell, she said, “I’m very leery of this kind of lobbyist being elected to the board.” Yet, she endorsed Mark Lovelace for supervisor, a former lobbyist for Healthy Humboldt. Ms. Hodgson never endorsed a candidate for the 1st District race, and when questioned, avoided answering. Her reasons are OK, yet Mr. Ulansey’s declining to being interviewed is not. Where was NCJ‘s investigative reporting when Kaitlin Sopoci-Belknap, a founding member of Local Solutions and Democracy Unlimited of Humboldt County was elected to a county seat? Or the article on Blue Lake Casino or Bill Pierson, the largest political contributors in Humboldt County, between 2002 and 2010? Could this be due to the fact they are one of NCJ‘s largest advertisers and Ms. Hodgson doesn’t want to bite the hand that feeds her? Ms. Hodgson claims HumCPR spent “an enormous amount of money that now influences the daily and weekly politics of Humboldt.” The campaign 460s show that HumCPR has never given any political candidate a single check, and unlike NCJ, has never made any endorsements in local elections. Lee Ulansey and HumCPR did not win the “super majority” on the Humboldt County Board of Supervisors or the Eureka City Council. All the winning candidates and their dedicated team of

volunteers presenting a positive message resonated with the voters. Having a different political view is one thing, writing “hit pieces” and calling it news is another. Perhaps the NCJ should change its name to “Judy’s Journal.” John Chiv, Eureka Editor: Charley Custer was very concise in describing the Journal’s “high-piled righteousness” in Ryan Burns initial piece on HumCPR. It was further expounded on when your publisher followed up with her droning on about Mr. Ulansey declining to provide her an interview. Who was it that said, “silence is the only thing that can’t be misquoted”? I’m not affiliated with HumCPR, but if they helped elect some candidates that are not in lock step with the no-growth, big-government, anti-business agenda that has prevailed here for a long time, good for them. The voters obviously had their own reasons to vote the way they did, based on the information the candidates provided them, in spite of the Journal’s endorsement of alternate candidates. After all, President Obama never fails to remind us that elections have consequences? Perhaps, just maybe, your editorial board is out of touch with a larger percentage of your readers and advertisers than you realize on this issue? Kenneth Daer, Kneeland

Write a letter! Please try to make your letter no more than 300 words and include your full name, place of residence and phone number (we won’t print your number). Send it to letters@northcoastjournal.com l northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013

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Spacious and pleasing — but where are the doctors? photo by heidi walters

The Long Wait

Veterans get antsy as Eureka’s new VA clinic struggles to keep docs By Heidi Walters

heidiwalters@northcoastjournal.com

I

t’s soothing inside the new Veterans Affairs’ outpatient clinic in Eureka, with its muted chocolate-and-tan patchwork of wood-toned paneling and floors, soft-blue painted walls, and pamphlet-stuffed racks sprinkled throughout the lobby and hallways. On a recent afternoon, April sun brightened the windows and a few people sat in the

lobby waiting area. A clerk was telling a man, 60-ish, that as soon as the clinic gets more doctors — two more are supposed to come on soon — she could schedule him an appointment. She asked, “Would you like to make an appointment to go to the clinic in San Francisco?” He said maybe, and they talked a bit more. After him, another, older man stepped

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up. No, he said (when it came to that), he didn’t want to go to San Francisco. Would he like to be seen by a nurse? No, he wanted a doctor. This is not an unusual scene these days at the new VA clinic, a remodeled former Safeway on Harris Street that opened for its new life as a medical hub in October. Doctor after doctor has quit since then, according to Judi Cheary, public affairs director for the San Francisco VA Medical Center, which oversees the Eureka clinic and five others. “The patients are justifiably frustrated,” she said. Among them are Philip Sanders, a Vietnam veteran who raises beef cattle and timber out in Orleans. In January, he said, he was told he’d have to wait until April 1 for his annual physical and some lab work his cardiologist wanted done. But as his appointment neared, in late March, he received a card from them saying his April 1 appointment had been canceled and “we will contact you to reschedule.” He called a few days later, but still couldn’t get in. “I can’t wait any longer,” he said. “So I’m making an attempt to make an appointment with a private physician.” Kneeland resident John Mitchell, who was on the USS Pueblo when it was captured by the North Koreans in 1968, said he was told to wait for his regular checkup — a month away — to be seen for a flareup of his irritable bowel syndrome. The San Francisco clinic offered him a nextday appointment — down there. And a free shuttle ride. Huh-uh, he said. “Drive six hours, spend the night in a motel?” he said. “And the shuttle — that’s the trip to hell. You get on this bus and they only stop in Ukiah — the only pit stop. And most old guys like me, we gotta go to the can more than once on the way to San Francisco.” Especially when the bowels are goofy. He decided to ride the illness out. Scotty McClure, an Army veteran who lives in Benbow, said he really liked the doctor at the clinic he saw last year, when

he had pneumonia. She spent 55 minutes with him. But then she quit; he said he heard she had a family emergency. Since then, he’s had a cancer scare — some suspicious nodules on his lungs. After the second CT scan, he said, he had to wait 35 days before he finally got in to see a doctor at the clinic. That was last week, and it was good news: no cancer. But he’d fretted over a month, during which time he said he called the clinic “30 to 40 times” to try to set up an appointment. “The doctor I saw [last week] told me three doctors have quit, and that she’ll be leaving, too” McClure said. Sanders, the Orleans veteran, also has had some good experiences at the new clinic. He got in to see the optometrist right away. And the clinic’s medication service — run out of San Francisco, with medications mailed directly to his home — is “Johnny-on-the-spot,” he said. But trying to get in to see a primary care provider? It’s nothing like the old clinic, he said. “I never waited more than 10 minutes with the old set up,” Sanders said. Why? What’s going on? Cheary sounded frustrated last week as she talked about the shortage of primary care providers here, at the farthestflung clinic the San Francisco VA oversees. “We’re very much understaffed,” Cheary said. ���We’ve had a constant turnover since the doors opened in October.” The old clinic, on F Street, was run primarily by private contractors — three primary care doctors, one nurse practitioner and three medical clerks. It also had five mental health staff employed by the VA. The clinic offered primary care, mental health care, a pharmacy, laboratory tests, X-rays, telemedicine and homebased primary care services. The new clinic, operated by the VA, is supposed to offer the same, plus more: audiology, optometry, podiatry, prosthetics and, eventually, physical therapy. The goal, said Cheary, was to start off with seven primary care providers — a stillunspecified combination of doctors and

nurse practitioners. Plus, there would be a podiatrist, five registered nurses and five licensed vocational nurses; non-physician specialists in optometry, audiology and phlebotomy; telehealth technicians, administrative staff and clerks. Fully staffed, she said, the clinic should employ about 40 people. But from the start, she said, the clinic has never been fully staffed. The reasons vary. “We hired one doctor, and when we went to do his credentialing, we found he hadn’t exposed that his license had been suspended,” Cheary said. “We hired one woman — who was going to be chief — then she had a family illness and couldn’t relocate.” Other doctors have made it here, but then left — Cheary said she didn’t know how many, nor each one’s specific reason for leaving, but she didn’t think salary was the issue. The VA pays doctors between $170,000 and $195,000. There appear to be two main reasons, she said, that doctors have been hard to recruit and retain. One is workload. Eureka’s VA clinic served 4,814 veterans in fiscal year 2012, and handled 22,950 outpatient visits. Each doctor is expected to carry a workload of 1,100 patients. And the other? “Our primary challenge has been location — doctors not wanting to live in Eureka,” Cheary said. “Or, we had a case where the doctor wanted to live in Eureka but the family didn’t.” As of last week, the clinic employed two doctors and two nurse practitioners. It also is using a telehealth doctor based in Clear Lake. Staff in San Francisco are filling prescriptions and taking care of some other clerical duties. There’s an audiologist on board, and an optometrist and prosthetics specialist, but no podiatrist yet. One of the doctors is only here temporarily and will be leaving in a month. But some new hires are on the way, Cheary said. “We hope to have the chief MD coming in July,” she said. “And we have another

MD coming on board at the end of April. And another is coming the first of June. So then we’ll have six primary care providers. And we’re recruiting for an additional MD.” In the meantime, she said, clinic staff are telling people they can use the free shuttle for appointments in San Francisco. Many decline. Cheary said she doesn’t know how many existing patients have been put on hold, waiting for appointments. But she said 64 people are on a waiting list to become VA patients. She also was hesitant to say when the clinic would be fully staffed, because who can know if the new doctors will stay. Again, frustration crept into her voice. Her office has never run into this before. The Clear Lake clinic had a slow start, she said, but nothing like it’s been in Eureka. “When we opened the doors last October, we anticipated the staff we had recruited would come on board, and would stay,” she said. “We, in a million years, never would have anticipated the hiring challenges we’ve had. They’re unusal. They’re unexpected. But we have an obligation to our veterans, and we intend to meet that obligation.” Meanwhile, some patients, including Kneeland resident Mitchell, have called Congressman Jared Huffman’s office for help. “I’m 65,” Mitchell said, “and this tires me out. If you’re 80, you don’t have the energy to light a fire under these people.” Huffman said last Friday that his office has been working with the Eureka VA clinic for the past few months, and has helped six veterans get appointments. “But I’m sure there are more of them out there needing assistance,” he said. The San Francisco VA office assured him that issues in Eureka would be resolved by summer, Huffman said, and he intends to make the VA stick to that vow. Cheary noted that if any patients have gotten appointments, it isn’t because of a congressman intervening. The limited staff is taking patients by triage — urgent cases first, she said. l

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Blog Jammin’ TRAUMA / BY GRANT SCOTT-GOFORTH / APRIL 16, 1:33 P.M.

MEDIA / BY CARRIE PEYTON DAHLBERG / APRIL 16, 12:52 P.M.

After the Marathon

A New Journal-ista

Humboldt State University Professor Tasha Souza was stopped in her tracks by crowds fleeing explosions after finishing the Boston Marathon yesterday — a race she attended to honor a lost friend. Souza was unharmed, but the day was already a poignant one for her, because she’d been running in honor of her friend Suzanne Seemann, who was killed by a car while jogging with friends from the Six Rivers Running Club in September. “I’m physically OK,” Souza said, calling from Los Angeles while waiting for a flight home. “I went into the race a bit emotional.” After crossing the finish line, Souza said she was overcome with emotion while remembering her friend. “My plan was to go back to the finish line and because I was so upset, I decided to go back out and stretch and calm myself down.” Souza was two blocks away, walking back to the finish line from the Boston Common, when she heard the explosions. “We thought ‘was that a cannon? Was that thunder?’” she said. “That’s when I was stopped in my tracks. I’m lucky I didn’t see the carnage. I just saw people horrified, running towards me.” The bombing, which officials are calling a terror attack, killed three — including an 8-year-old boy — and injured more than 100 others. Arcata attorney Chris Hamer was registered for the event but didn’t attend — she’s been under the weather lately and hotels were too expensive. “This is the first time I have ever signed up for a marathon and not run it,” Hamer wrote in an email. “As it turns out, the explosions occurred about the time I probably would have been crossing the finishing line, if I had run the marathon.” Safely in Arcata, Hamer experienced firsthand some of the concern and confusion that followed the bombing, as people around the country scrambled to find out if friends and family were harmed. “Today’s Times-Standard lists my status as unknown,” she wrote. “I have now had 112 phone calls, texts, emails and Facebook messages asking if I am OK. I am sorry to cause so many people worry, but touched so many people cared.” Other runners from Humboldt County also are apparently OK, according to reports in the Lost Coast Outpost and Times-Standard.

We’re all happy to welcome Grant ScottGoforth, an Arcata native who will be writing, editing, comforting the afflicted and afflicting the comfortable along with the rest of us here at the North Coast Journal. You might recognize his byline from the Times-Standard (sorry, Kimberly Wear, but hat tip for spotting and growing local talent). Grant graduated from Humboldt State University in 2011 with a degree in journalism. He’s coming aboard with the title of staff PEACE PARK IN GARBERVILLE. PHOTO BY JACOB SHAFER. writer/assistant editor, and he’ll be helping with the production end of getting the paper of community angst — and waterballoonout each week, along with writing insightful ings — for many years now. It’s on county news and feature articles. You can reach him property. The Veterans of Foreign Wars used at grant@northcoastjournal.com to manage it. They got tired of the strain and, eventually, Encimer and his partner, ● Kathy Epling, took charge. They own Tiger ACTIVISM, GARBERVILLE, GOVERNMENT / Lily Books, near the park. They also are with BY HEIDI WALTERS / APRIL 15, 7 P.M. Veterans for Peace, and Encimer says the county signed an agreement allowing them Parks and Heck to manage the park. For about 2 ½ years, said Going to the Board of Supervisors meetEncimer in a call to the Journal today, they’ve ing tomorrow? To, perhaps, hear the depressbeen keeping the place picked up. And, he ing report on the state of our state’s roads says, they didn’t hear a peep from Public and their desperate repair needs? Works about this vacating business. He heard The report goes county by county, about it on KMUD radio. discussing embarrassing things like their PCI Encimer is especially incensed that after all (pavement condition index, where a new the meetings and involvement of the commuroad rates “100” and a failed road is a “0”). nity, this final proposal has wound up on the Humboldt County’s PCI was 64 in 2012, and consent agenda without a public hashing. according to the report, to bring Humboldt’s ● roads up to snuff in 10 years would requiring pouring $687 million into “pavement needs,” COPS, WIFI / BY BOB DORAN / $174 million into “essential components” and APRIL 11, 12:07 P.M. $119 million into bridges. Yep, our roads need Suddenlink Reward $10K almost a billion dollars. Roads. Important, but, snooze. Please just fix them. Remember a month or so ago when some Take heart: Paul Encimer, one of our denimrods cut off connections all over the voted outside agitators (he’s a Mendo man), county by chopping into Suddenlink’s fiber is going for possibly a much more lively item: optic cables? The $5,000 reward the comthe county public works staff’s recommendapany was offering to help catch the culprits tion to abandon the Jim Demulling Memorial just got doubled. Veterans Grove, a shady triangle of trouble “After conversations with the Sheriff’s and love between Highway 101 and Redwood Office, we agreed that doubling the reDrive in Garberville. Notes Public Works’ ward would be a compelling incentive for agenda document: members of the community who might have If the property is vacated, the property relevant information,” Suddenlink’s Humcan be utilized and managed in a more boldt County Director of Operations Wendy restrictive manner like other County properPurnell said in a written statement. ties … Possible restrictions could include ● hours of operation, as well as limitations on what types of uses are permitted. ENVIRONMENT, GOVERNMENT, RAILVacating the property also could make ROAD / BY RYAN BURNS / APRIL 10, 6:13 P.M. way for the county to lease or sell it. NCRA Tackles Legal Challenge, This grassy glade is otherwise known as Peace Park, and it and its constant swirl of Supports East-West Study homeless denizens have been the subject Today’s meeting of the North Coast

● READ FULL POSTS AND SEE PHOTOS AT

www.northcoastjournal.com/blogthing 8 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

Railroad Authority’s Board of Directors saw plenty of impassioned arguments, lots of squabbling over legalese and at least two cases of hurt feelings. The two most no-

table results were these: 1) The board voted 8-1 to delete key parts of a 2011 resolution, thus invalidating an environmental impact report that it filed just two years ago and which was financed with $3 million of public money from the California Transportation Commission, and 2) The board joined a long list of government agencies in approving a resolution in support of a feasibility study for the mythic east-west rail line, but only after scratching out some of the language and adding some terms of its own. By backing away from the environmental impact report, the board hopes to sidestep a legal challenge from two environmental groups — Friends of the Eel River and Californians for Alternatives to Toxics — that are suing the state agency, alleging that the report doesn’t comply with state environmental law. (See the groups’ letter to the board from a link on our website.) It’s also an apparent admission by the board that it has no plans in the foreseeable future to rebuild the north-south rail line through the Eel River Canyon, which has been out of commission since 1999. Hurt feelings No. 1: Scott Greacen, executive director of Friends of the Eel River, was offended by what he felt were derisive comments from board member John McCowen about environmental groups. But he was more offended by the board’s actions. Those groups weren’t the only ones upset. Leishara Ward, a transportation planner with the California Department of Transportation, stepped to the lectern to say that the board should either abide by the terms of the EIR or return that $3 million. In response, NCRA board members and staff made a curious argument: They said that even though they don’t believe their agency is bound to comply with the terms of the EIR, the $3 million in public funds that paid for it wasn’t a waste because, hey, there’s still a lot of good data in there. As NCRA legal counsel Chris Neary said, “The environmental impact report will stand as an informational document.” Hurt feelings No. 2: Board Chair Paul Kelley said he was annoyed that it took the Land Bridge Alliance, the organization pushing for an eastwest rail study, so long to approach the NCRA board. This was quickly smoothed over. At board member Bill Kier’s suggestion, language was added to the resolution stating that a) the feasibility study should include the existing north-south right-of-way as a viable alternative, and b) it should address financing for the project. Kier made a veiled reference to a certain local businessman who said in a radio interview last October that the whole project “pencils out” with private funding. Proponents are now advocating a public-private partnership, and Jan Kraepelien, one such proponent, suggested financing the study through the Headwaters Fund. ●

EDUCATION / BY HEIDI WALTERS / APRIL 10, 4:43 P.M.

EDUCATION, SPORTS / BY HEIDI WALTERS / APRIL 10, 4 P.M.

BUDGET, FORTUNA / BY HEIDI WALTERS / APRIL 9, 4:48 P.M.

More Lovin’ on CR

Safe! (CR Baseball)

Fortuna Facing Cuts

Well, amid all the sad talk of budget cuts and squinched offerings for students, the good money-news keeps a-comin’. First it was a vow from the community to round up the money to keep the college’s baseball program going. Now it’s a windfall for the college’s gerontology care program. According to the college, its Health Occupations Programs will be injected with $250,000 from the law firm Janssen Malloy LLP, of Eureka — the firm that helped whip Skilled Healthcare in a class-action lawsuit and has won court-approval to give some of the settlement money to CR to raise more nurses. (But just because the settlement was reached, the nursing home troubles continued, as the Journal reported last year.) As part of the settlement, Skilled Healthcare has to meet legally mandated minimum staffing levels. That’s why the law firm wants to direct money to CR’s geriatric nursing program. CR’s Dean of Health and Emergency Response Occupations, Dr. Pat Girczyc, said CR educates about 75 percent of Humboldt County’s registered nurses and the majority of its licensed vocational nurses.

After much ballyhooing from the stands — and promises from community members to raise some dough — College of the Redwoods plans to bring back baseball. The college’s 46-year-old intercollegiate baseball program was benched a couple years ago, in one of the college’s budget-trimming moments. Men’s soccer was cut, too, and so far the college hasn’t announced its reinstatement. (Women’s soccer also took a seat last fall, but that was because the program couldn’t get enough players; a person on the phone today at CR’s athletic department said unofficially that women’s soccer is back and “they’re heavily recruiting right now.”) Defenders of the baseball and soccer programs attended a recent board of trustees’ meetings — coaches noting the worthiness of athletics for young minds and bodies, high school soccer players pining to be on the CR team, former players, and others. Baseball’s comeback will depend mightily on those fundraising promises, said a news release from the college, to pay for such things as “equipment, field improvements and travel.” Ante up, ball fans.

The City of Fortuna is facing a $435,669 shortfall this coming fiscal year and will have to make what a news release from the city today calls “significant cuts to the City budget”: “The City Council is resolute about addressing this financial situation at the earliest possible opportunity and is prepared to make tough decisions to regain the very conservative budgeting practices that led to the development of solid reserves for the City over the past 20 years. The Council has also stated that use of reserves to provide services over the next fiscal year is not desired and will only be the last option.” Regan Candelario, who has been the city manager since September last year, said by phone this afternoon that where the cuts might occur has not been decided yet. He said staff will be looking at all areas of city government for ways to trim expenses. Candelario said some charts will be up by the end of today on the city’s website detailing “some basic stuff about recent increases in health care costs, retirement benefits, gas” and so on.

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9

On The Waterfront Now A national symposium provides a fresh view for Humboldt’s oceanfront future By Ryan Burns

T

hey came from Portland, Maine, and Portland, Ore., from the Chesapeake Bay and the Florida Keys. They came from all walks of water-dependent life: commercial fishermen from San Diego, nonprofit conservationists from the Puget Sound, urban planners from Maryland and many more. From up and down the eastern and western seaboards came government engineers, policy makers and scientists along with private consultants, ship builders and entrepreneurs. All were among the several hundred people who gathered in Tacoma, Wash., late last month to talk about ways to protect and improve working waterfronts and waterways. Over the four days of the Third National Working Waterfronts & Waterways Symposium — the first one ever held on the West Coast — this diverse group of folks met in conference rooms to share stories, information and ideas. They gave PowerPoint presentations and mingled, munching on corn chips and hummus. They heard talks from panels of experts, a speech from U.S. Sen. Patty Murray of Washington and, at a seafood banquet, a song of blessing from a Puyallup Tribe elder. The Journal was there, along with a few others from Humboldt County, and the symposium provided a rare opportunity to view our local waterfront in a national context. Oceanfront communities big and small are facing the same

inter-related challenges, trying to strike a balance between commerce, the environment and public access in the face of globalization, environmental declines and rising sea levels. And here’s the surprising picture that emerged: Sure, Humboldt County has its challenges, and we could certainly learn a few things from what’s being done elsewhere. (You’ll find some examples below.) But in many ways our harbor- and ocean-related activities can serve as a model for getting along, showing how planning and collaboration can prevent paralyzing conflict. This is no mean feat given the legacy of different, often conflicting uses along Humboldt County’s 100-plus miles of coastline (as the Aleutian geese fly), and particularly in and around our harbor, the second-largest natural bay in California. Whether it’s the North Coast stakeholders group that hammered out a unified proposal for the Marine Life Protection Act or the collaborative planning effort that could expand aquaculture in Humboldt Bay, people in Humboldt County have been solving problems better than we sometimes imagine. Which is a very good thing, considering the challenges on the horizon.

It was a cold, gray morning

in Tacoma, and wind gusts were tossing frigid mists outside the Hotel Murano while Sarah Garcia stood in one of the beige-carpeted conference rooms to

EUREKA’S WATERFRONT REVITALIZATION PROJECT HAS GIVEN THE CITY A NEW BOARDWALK AND FISHERMAN’S TERMINAL, BUT MANY OF THE NEARBY STOREFRONTS AND LOTS REMAIN VACANT. PHOTO BY RYAN BURNS

10 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

deliver one of the more captivating presentations of the week. Garcia, who has soft features and a calm authority, is the director of economic development for the port of Gloucester, Mass. Like Humboldt Bay, Gloucester’s port has a long and colorful history, dominated by working fishermen, and that history is often invisible to visitors. (The big exception was The Perfect Storm, the book and movie about Gloucester fishermen who were swept to sea during a hurricane.) “People say, ‘Gloucester is like a veiled woman; she could be beautiful but you’re not sure,’” Garcia said. In an effort to unveil her, the port authority came up with an idea for an interactive harbor walk that leads tourists and locals in and out of the working waterfront, up to the town’s civic center, stores and museum and down the city’s Sicilian main street before looping back to the waterfront. The tour is enhanced not only by 42 little pillars with informational plaques (called “story moments”) but also with short, entertaining videos that can be viewed on a smart phone or tablet. Garcia explained how it works: You download a free app (which cost the port authority $20,000 to have developed) and then scan a QR code at the entrance to the “HarborWalk.” Up pops a YouTube video with a friendly female narrator who instructs you to point your phone at a nearby parking

lot and shake it. Suddenly, on the screen, the drab parking lot fills with confetti, followed by a montage of images from a festival called Fiesta, which takes place on the spot each June. And with that, the tour has begun. Each video directs you to the next stop, where you can watch another short video. One tells you about the annual Greasy Pole competition, where contestants (often inebriated) attempt to walk across a long, slippery power pole suspended above the bay and grab a flag at the far end before splashing into the water, 20 feet below, to the wild cheers of revelers. The video shows highlights and slip-flail-splash lowlights set to opera music. Another clip directs you to a dory, a 16-foot rowboat, that’s stationed on a pier. You can work the oars and blow a conch shell while watching the harrowing tale of Howard Blackburn, a fisherman who survived a brutal storm in a boat that size in 1883. The 2 ½-mile walking tour covers the history, economics and cultural events of the port. “We wanted to tell the whole story,” Garcia said. And since it was launched last August, the project has started to change that story. “A commercial business owner said he saw business

THE WORKING WATERFRONT IN TACOMA, WASH., INCLUDES INDUSTRIAL AND SHIPPING FACILITIES, TWO SUSPENSION BRIDGES AND TOURIST ATTRACTIONS SUCH AS THE MUSEUM OF GLASS, WHOSE HOT SHOP VENTS THROUGH A PROMINENT STEEL CONE. PHOTO BY RYAN BURNS

go up 20 percent after the walk went in,” Garcia added. Jim Brennan, a Seattle-based landscape architect, was impressed by Garcia’s presentation. “That was so intriguing, and I thought that kind of approach for Eureka was an interesting idea,” he said in a follow-up phone interview. Brennan got to know our county seat after the city hired him to revitalize its channel dock and boardwalk, which now include new pedestrian plazas. He also designed the Eureka Fisherman’s Terminal building. Brennan said that a similar harbor walking tour in Eureka could highlight the city’s Victorian architecture, Native American history, the bay’s industrial history, the Madaket harbor cruise and more. Videos could show highlights from the kinetic sculpture race and the Perilous Plunge. And the city could promote the whole thing to both locals and travelers. “There really are an awful lot of tourists on Highway 101 coming through the redwoods,” Brennan said. “It’s just a matter of how you capture them, bring them off of the 101 and into Eureka, because it really is a delightful place.” He’d driven through the city for years without realizing it sits on the water.

Eureka is currently trying to bring more people to that waterfront by landing a tenant for a seafood café in the fisherman’s terminal building (a business in Shelter Cove is reportedly interested) and permitting a hotel next door. Community Development Director Robert Wall said the city is finishing up an environmental impact report for the hotel. A challenge for the city, Wall said, is that so much waterfront land is zoned coastal-dependent industrial, which means it’s reserved for businesses that depend on the waterfront. That has frustrated other business applicants hoping to locate there. (Lost Coast Brewery was one recent example.) “But you have to balance that with the importance of [that zoning],” Wall said. He explained that there’s only so much land to go around with the deep water and port facilities that can support coastal-dependent industrial use. While the city so far lacks a formal walking tour, it’s making progress on walkability with the recent completion of a section of new trail that leads south from Truesdale Avenue (near the Bayshore Mall) and along the Elk River waterfront to Herrick Avenue at the south end of Eureka. Wall said that environmental work is underway for two more sections of the “Hikshari Trail” that will extend it another 2 ½ miles to the boardwalk on C Street. The plan is for the trail eventually to extend all the way to Target on the northeast edge of town.

A favorite phrase among

speakers at the conference was “the triple bottom line.” Again and again, in talking about different types of projects, presenters mentioned this three-pronged apcontinued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013

11

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proach, which incorporates the “three pillars” of modern project planning: people, planet and profit.   It came up during the full sessions held each morning, when coffeefueled participants gathered at round tables in an enormous conference room and learned about big-picture concepts such as the National Working Waterfront Network, a collaborative problem-solving alliance whose early projects include economic and environmental work in Trinidad Harbor. The three pillars stood tall later each day, during smaller sessions that ranged from tips on getting mitigation credits for removing creosote-treated harbor pilings to advances in seawall engineering, climate change issues, conflict resolution and more. The term’s ubiquity reflects a growing acknowledgement that social, ecological and economic values don’t have to conflict — that, in fact, they’re inseparable when it comes to activities on working waterways and waterfronts. The tone was set on the symposium’s first night with a screening of Ocean Frontiers, a documentary about new approaches — and unlikely alliances — in ocean management. And here’s where one validation of local practices came in (though not explicitly): One of the film’s four segments tells the story of Iowa farmers who learn that nitrogen and phosphorous from wayward fertilizers have been leeching into the Mississippi River and flowing into the Gulf of Mexico where they’ve created a dead zone the size of Massachusetts. In an attempt to remedy the problem, the concerned farmers (and they were concerned, after taking a fishing field trip to see the damage) have taken a trick from Arcata’s playbook: building wetlands to create natural filtration systems. (One farmer was especially proud of the longneck swans that had found his ponds — reminiscent of the egrets and herons that perch at our local filtration ponds in the Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary.) This sort of collaborative approach is the specialty of John Hansen, an Oaklandbased nonprofit organizer who gave a presentation outlining his work as coordinator of the West Coast Ecosystem-Based Management Network. That’s another term — “ecosystem-based management” — that came up frequently, and like the “triple bottom line” it refers to interconnectivity between nature and human activities. Hansen’s network is a partnership of eight community-based initiatives focused on achieving environmental goals

12 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

The HarborWalk in Gloucester, Mass., takes visitors on a guided tour with informational kiosks and YouTube videos you can watch by scanning QR codes with your smartphone or tablet. Photos courtesy of the City of Gloucester, Mass.

The C Street Market Square, a Eureka Redevelopment Agency project that opened in 2010, features a wide pedestrian plaza, art sculptures and the ticket office for Madaket harbor cruises. photos by ryan burns

while considering social factors. They range geographically from a restoration plan for southern California’s Santa Monica Bay to an environmental protection effort in northern Washington’s San Juan Islands. Just about smack-dab in the middle is the Humboldt Bay Initiative, a collaborative effort that in the past six years has helped the Humboldt region land more than half a million dollars in grant funding, plus thousands of in-kind hours from local groups. The agencies involved came up with a strategic plan to address sea level rise, combat invasive species and promote sustainable development. The successes came in part because more than 80 participants — from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management and the Army Corps of Engineers to HSU, local nonprofits, the Wiyot Tribe and more — have agreed to a set of shared goals. And the approach is

guided by the principles of “ecosystembased management.” “So instead of only conservation goals there are often socio-economic goals as well,” said Becky Price-Hall, a watershed coordinator with the City of Trinidad who’s helping lead the initiative. The sea-level rise project started with a meticulous inventory of Humboldt Bay’s shoreline by environmental planner Aldaron Laird (see “Aldaron’s Walkabout,” Jan. 5, 2012). Now, local governments are

Crab pots are stacked outside the Eureka Fisherman’s Terminal, where seafood gets processed and loaded into trucks for distribution. Photo by ryan burns

The terminal, completed in 2006, includes a 17,000-squarefoot wharf, jib cranes, a truck-loading dock and space for a restaurant, though none has moved in. Photo by Bob Doran

using a $250,000 grant from the California Coastal Commission to figure out how to deal with the planet’s expanding oceans, which are projected to rise at least six inches by 2030 and a full foot by 2050. Dan Berman, director of conservation for the Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation and Conservation District, said that new high-resolution elevation maps, created with laser imaging technology, will help Eureka, Arcata, the county and other jurisdictions predict the impacts of rising seas. The 101 corridor between Arcata and Eureka is one particularly vulnerable spot, along with the Jacobs Avenue levee on Eureka’s north side and Hookton Slough near College of the Redwoods. And each of those areas is managed by a different government. “We need to have a coordinated approach to how we handle this,” Berman said. “We’ll sit down with the planning and public works staff from governments around the bay to figure out what this means for policy.” On another project, Price-Hall is working with Craig Benson, a watershed coordinator with the Redwood Community Action Agency, to improve water quality and salmonid habitat in Trinidad and Humboldt bays. She said that the strategic plan developed through the Humboldt Bay Initiative helped grease the wheels for a grant from the California Department of Conservation, which is funding the project.

Another hot topic at the

symposium was marine spatial planning, or MSP (the acronyms were flying). This refers to a process for mapping out who’s using a given waterway when and where. It’s like a land-use map for the ocean, and it allows for informed decision-making that balances ocean activities such as energy, recreation, conservation and industry. “We in Rhode Island consider marine spatial planning a way to plan our own destiny,” said Jennifer McCann during her symposium presentation. McCann, who works for the University of Rhode Island Coastal Resources Center and Rhode Island Sea Grant, explained how MSP helped the state governor work with scientists and fishermen to find a good spot for the offshore wind turbines he wanted built. “We’re considered the Saudi Arabia of wind,” McCann quipped. MSP has also been used in the development of marine protected areas on both coasts, including the underwater ocean parks established here in California through the Marine Life Protection Act. And on that issue, people from Humboldt can speak with authority. Jacque HostlerCarmesin, CEO of the Cher-Ae Heights Indian Community of the Trinidad Rancheria, drove up to Tacoma to talk about her experience with the MLPS initiative. “Tribes were not consulted in the formation of the law,” she told a room-full continued on page 15

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First floor of the Annex 2013 Foggy Bottom Milk Run

Larry and Agatha Nord

Meet our neighbors

From right to left: Kim Sweet Betsy Davison Robyn Petrusha Eva Backus Laura Bringhurst

Agatha & Larry Nord, Cal Courts Annex A bar, a restaurant, cigarettes and racquetball? A Federal Magistrate, an attorney and a new job in the District Attorney’s office? Those were a few of the elements of the first Cal Courts. When smoking was necessarily banned, one member complained saying, “You’re going to ruin this club!” Well, the bar and the restaurant are now a thing of the past too, and Cal Courts’ motto, “A Lifestyle for a Lifetime” refers to strictly health and fitness. Larry, an attorney and former Federal Magistrate, and his wife

Agatha relocated to Humboldt County in 1968, and as many other folks have done, Larry and Agatha decided to stay. They opened Eureka Cal Courts in 1982. In 2003 Agatha and Larry — with their partner Glenn Wallace — saw some interesting potential in an old boarded up butcher shop in Cutten. They bought the building and after a thorough refurbishing and refitting it was opened in 2004 as The Annex. Free weights, cardio and workout machines and a large group exercise room fill the bright interior. “Thankfully

Murphy’s is just down the street, ” says Agatha. “Anything we may run out of is a short walk away. The Murphy’s staff is knowledgeable and everyone is just delightful.” The Annex’s clients can get their grocery shopping done right after their workout! Murphy’s offers local organic produce and is well stocked with locally made products, too! You have lots of choices for a fit and healthy lifestyle at Murphy’s.

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14 North Coast Journal • Thursday, april 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

continued from page 13 Oyster Farmer,” April 5, 2012.) of symposium attendees. Tribal leaders One person impressed by the project on the North Coast heard that tribes in is Paul Dye, the Nature Conservancy’s the rest of the state had been left out of director of maritime conservation for the process entirely. “We asked for the Washington state. “I thought that was a process to slow down and began meeting wonderful example of thinking proactively with other stakeholders,” Hostler-Carmeabout who you want in your bay, and then sin said. doing something at the public level that She explained how, through a long facilitates that,” Dye said. process of collaboration and compromise, Dye believes the North Coast that as maregion managed rine industries to develop a consolidate and unified proposal fewer people on the locamake their living tion of marine on the water, protected areas coastal commu— a challenge nities on both that has proved shores have been elusive in other losing their concoastal regions. nection to the After reocean. turning home “A good fishto Trinidad, ing and aquaculHostler-Carmeture industry will sin said that she support waterwas impressed front infrastrucwith how the ture and keep symposium wove that working together many waterfront alive,” of the difficult he said. “And challenges she I believe that faces daily. The it needs to be Trinidad Harbor The “rack and bag” oyster farms on Humboldt there for coastal is home to 17 Bay already supply most of the oysters sold communities commercial crabin California, and there’s ample room for to care about bers, and it has expansion. Photo by Heidi Walters. conservation and a modest but imthe ocean.” portant salmon Perhaps the most ambitious plan for season beginning on May 1. Hostlerour waterfront (not counting the eastCarmesin talked about the difficulty of west rail project, which is still just an idea) balancing environmental stewardship with is also being spearheaded the Harbor economic development to the satisfacDistrict. That would be the potential tion of government regulations and tribe purchase and transformation of the members. decommissioned Samoa pulp mill into People, planet, profit. a marine research and innovation park The triple bottom line was also ad(“Reincarnating the Pulp Mill,” Jan. 31, 2013). dressed by Harbor District Commissioner The current vision includes a multi-use Mike Wilson, who impressed symposium dock, an aquaculture business park and a participants with his presentation about renewable energy research and innovation expanding mariculture in Humboldt Bay. center managed by HSU’s Schatz Energy He explained how students at HSU helped Research Center. But so far, the Harbor identify more than 2,600 acres of potenDistrict hasn’t committed to purchasing tial area for expanding oyster farms in the the mill, and the environmental challenges bay, and how the district then brought that would come with it. together oyster farmers and environmenWith that project, like so many others, tal groups before moving ahead. Humboldt County will continue searching Last month the Harbor District submitfor harmony between people, planet and ted applications to pre-permit 300 new profit. We’ll keep arguing about trails and acres for mariculture, which it could then rails, big box stores and dioxins, fishing lease out to interested farmers. “So if we regulations and tribal rights. But it’s helpmake it through this permit process we’ll ful to realize that the same arguments are basically double the jobs on Humboldt happening in lots of other coastal comBay related to shellfish culture — and the munities, and that when we’re at our best revenues,” Wilson explained to his audiwe can sometimes reach consensus. l ence. (For more see “The World Is Yours, northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013

15

GET OUT!

The van gets its first field test at swimmer’s delight park. Photo by Rees Hughes.

Remodeling Our Wheel Estate By Rees Hughes

outdoors@northcoastjournal.com

L from sushi to sandwiches, we’ve got you covered.

www.northcoastjournal.com

ong ago as a baby-faced innocent, I first read Jack Kerouac’s classic On the Road as I hitchhiked my way around Australia. Too naive to fully appreciate the nuance of Kerouac’s message, I embraced the superficial, carefree love of the walkabout. I liked to think that I was one of Kerouac’s people “who are mad to live … the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars.” There was far too much Kansas in me to be such a roman candle; perhaps a sparkler would define me better. The years have passed. Good years with no regrets. Lines have defined my face and gray suggests the wisdom that sometimes comes with age. My passion for travel has never disappeared, although it has been tempered for several decades by the responsibilities of life. And I am grateful that there are times the world still feels rich with possibility. With one daughter done with college and working in Los Angeles and our younger daughter finishing high school this June, I have found myself thinking about Kerouac. About his paean to the golden land ahead, where “all kinds of unforeseen events wait lurking to surprise you and make you glad you’re alive to see.” I started

16 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

looking at our aging and irrelevant minivan with new eyes. It had been relegated to the vehicular equivalent of the pasture, the transportation option of last resort. Maybe that old chassis had more adventure in it yet. A road trip across this amazing land of ours. Why not see if we can convert the van into a poor man’s (some who know me would phrase it as a “cheap man’s”) RV? We weren’t ready to step into the world of fifth-wheelers, wide bodies, pop-ups and sideouts. I had investigated the Volkswagen Eurovan, which hasn’t been available in the United States since 2003 and even used commands a hefty price. My friend Doug had advocated for a Sprinter van makeover, but it quickly became clear that there were too many zeros involved for a project that had to be considered highly speculative. After all, for 25 years most of our road trips have involved driving a beeline to San Francisco, Portland or Seattle. We don’t even know if we’ll like road trips (I can almost hear an audible gasp from Kerouac at such caution). When I first talked about it, I suspect our daughters feared that I would manage to locate an old VW Bus with an exterior ripe for painting. This would not be the first time I had managed to terminally embarrass them.

I pushed ahead. I am pretty certain that my wife, Amy, who has been my unwitting accomplice in this venture, was surprised when Rich and I removed the rear seats and added legs to a futon frame fitted for the van this past January. The foot of space under the futon frame created ample room for storage. That being said, there was no room for a toilet. And we’d have to be content with a small cooler and a Coleman stove. Although by early April there was still much left to do to transform this pumpkin into our carriage, it was time for us to channel our inner Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty and go spend a night out. A real field test. It was hard for Amy to feign enthusiasm. I suspect she had secretly hoped this day was at least a season away — if not an eternity. When the day arrived, my reminder was greeted with a whimper and a plea for postponement.  “No more delays,” I insisted. It was early evening when we drove south from Eureka armed with only a vague plan. The first splat of rain created a few additional misgivings. I tried to give things a positive spin. “Just think,” I mused, “rain would really be depressing if we were tent camping. We’ll still be warm and dry.” Big smile. We turned east on Highway 36. The clouds settled into the towering redwoods along the Van Duzen as we approached Swimmer’s Delight, an inviting county park best known as a summer refuge from the coastal gloom. On this night, we had our choice of every campsite except for that of the camp host. We backed into a site filled with the melodic chant of the nearby river. The trillium were in full display, and I surprised a deer as I emerged onto the gravel bar. This is a little taste of the peace of the simpler life of the traveler. When the mist became rain, we retreated to our cozy confines. We hung an LED lamp from a side hook, creating enough light for reading. Whereas the rain would have been worrisome in a tent and the bedding unimaginably burdensome with a backpack, life was good in our mobile unit. It was lights out by 9:30 p.m. “Better than I thought it would be on all counts,” Amy admitted on our way home the next morning. She did have a growing list of essential modifications. Tint the windows, make curtains, purchase a foam topper for the futon mattress for starters. (My list was substantially shorter than Amy’s.) We began talking about a multi-month journey, where the calendar and the clock take a backseat to the adventure itself. Recently I’ve noticed posters promoting a film version of On the Road that was just released nationwide last month. It is a bit difficult to identify with the fetching faces of Kristen Stewart, Sam Riley and Garrett Hedlund. Even the trailer reminded me that I really had little in common with Jack Kerouac, Neal Cassady, William S. Burroughs or Allen Ginsberg … all icons of the Beat Generation. Amy and I share more with William Least Heat-Moon and the old 1975 Ford Econoline that he converted into his “six-by-ten bedroom, kitchen, bathroom, parlor” and drove for three months along America’s Blue Highways. Our inaugural trip worked well enough that we have started to talk about friends we can visit and places we want to see. Fall colors in New England. Taos. Chicago. South Dakota’s Badlands. And who knows what we will discover along the way. As Kerouac observed, “The road must eventually lead to the whole world.” l If you would like to write a Get Out! Column, please email Journal editor Carrie Peyton Dahlberg at carrie@northcoastjournal.com

northcoastjournal.com

MckinleyvilL MckinleyvilLee aRts Night

Bayfront Restaurant One F Street, Eureka, CA 443-7489

Third Friday McKinleyville Arts Night Friday, April 19, 6-8 p.m.

Open Daily 11-9:30pm | BayfrontRestaurant.net

is presented by members of the McKinleyville business community and is open for all McKinleyville businesses to display the work of local artists. Receptions for artists, exhibits and/or performances are from 6-8 p.m. on the third Friday of each month. Call (707) 834-6460 or visit www.mckinleyvilleartsnight.com for more information.

MCKINLEYVILLE HIGH SCHOOL student Wendy Witte creates one of the pastel drawings on the school quad. Materials will be supplied for people who want to add their own bit of creativity during McKinleyville’s arts night. PHOTO COURTESY MCKINLEYVILLE ARTS NIGHT.

to

1 2 3

City Center Rd McKinleyville Shopping Center

Hiller Rd

4

Gwin Rd 5

McKINLEYVILLE Holly Dr

7

Sutter Rd

School Rd

0

500 ft

© NORTH COAST JOURNAL/Miles Eggelston

6

Central Ave

Nursery Way

Heartwood Dr

1. EUREKA-ARCATA AIRPORT 3561 Boeing Ave. Long-term exhibit coordinated by the Redwood Art Association, featuring eight local female artists: Regina Case, Natalie Craig, Joan Gold, Linda Mitchell, Kathy O’Leary, Linda Parkinson, Lien Truong and Roberta Welty. 2. SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave., #D (at the Eureka-Arcata Airport). Joe Garceau plays original music from 7-10 p.m., and an arts night after party begins at 8 p.m. 3. MCKINLEYVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 1300 Murray Road in the Multipurpose Room. Earth: A Hands-on Experience, featuring Pastels on the Quad and Earth Week posters created by students. Materials will be provided for those who would like to add to pastels on the quad with Justine Smith or to participate in an open ceramics lab with Jim Hannon. 4. MCKINLEYVILLE FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER 1450 Hiller Road. Loren Lavine, photographs of Italy, plus sea-themed special activities for children of all ages. 5. BLAKE’S BOOKS 2005 Central Ave. Anastasia Zielinski, mixed media. 6. CHURCH OF THE JOYFUL HEALER 1944 Central Ave. Spring Garrett, Rumpelsilkskin Designs: Upcycled neckties transformed into unique hats, bags and neckpieces 7. HUMSPA 1660 Central Ave., Suite C. Felicia Ambrosini: “Tripeclectic” paintings.

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“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.” Virginia Woolf

835 J Street, Arcata • 822-WISH Open For Dinner @ 5:30 pm Tues-Sun

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013

17

Our Green Earth

More Humboldt Green Week, other 4/20 action and Swedish folk masters By Bob Doran

bobdoran@northcoastjournal.com

A

nother weekend and we’re still green with Earth Day and 4/20 upon us — and with them comes more of Humboldt Green Week. The unstoppable force behind Humboldt Green Week is Juliet Ferri, who works most of the year for Northcoast Horticulture Supply. For three months leading up to Earth Day and 4/20, she switches jobs and devotes her time to Humboldt Green Week LLC, a business that emerged from NHS to coordinate the growing number of April events. As she put it simply, “We’re giving people things that are fun to do, things for families, for everyone” — green things — “for gardeners and the environment, for the community.” And the community has signed on, everyone from the North Coast Storytellers, who offer “Bedtime Stories and Lullabies” for kids Friday night at the Sweet Spot in McKinleyville, to the river and beach cleanup folks whose Olde Time Earth Day Hoedown on Saturday afternoon (post-cleanup) is co-sponsored by Green Week. It sounds like a great party with Gunsafe rockin’ some country and Striped Pig Stringband playing for square dancers and Nigella Mahal calling the moves. (Incidentally, Gunsafe plays at Five Eleven Friday with The Plumb Uglies). Another Green Week centerpiece is Sunday’s Silent Disco at Merryman’s Beach House at Moonstone Beach. It works like this: Dancers are given headphones that come with a choice of channels so you can switch between EDM producers/DJs. There’s no music in the air, just in your head. The Green Week version runs from 4-11 p.m. with pretty much every estab-

18 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

lished EDM DJ/producer in Humboldt participating, among them PsyFi, Touch, J-Sun, Zanapod, Razzle Dazzle, Hypha, Grasshoppa, MaddHatta, Motion Potion, OnHell, Cacao, Tæo, JMorg and Rhizae. There’s also an art gallery, beer and wine served by KMUD, and food from Moonstone Grill. Since parking is tight at the beach, you can’t drive there — there’s a free shuttle running from Cher-Ae Heights Casino and NHS in McKinleyville. As noted last week, HGW events are well underway. Thursday’s happenings run the gamut. Six Rivers Brewing has a familyfriendly early show (starting at 6:30 p.m.) with Silver Hammer laying down all the Beatles’ tunes your kids know and love. BrownChicken BrownCow StringBand has a Green Week show at the Jambalaya that night. While the band has roots in the mountains of West Virginia, the players basically live on the road, traveling from town to town playing what you might call post-bluegrass, an original mix of old-time Appalachian country, gypsy-jazz, Celtic and folk. BCBCSB is joined by friends from The Bucky Walters, now playing as Buckskin Wallet. (Expect cross-over and collaboration.) The green action at the Arcata Theatre Lounge that night is Midnite, the St. Croix-based reggae band led by brothers Vaughn and Ron Benjamin. You always hear about reggae being an international music. This week’s shows at the ATL are a good demonstration of that. Friday’s big ATL show features Alborosie, a reggae star from Italy backed by The Shengen Clan, plus opening sets from Humboldt’s own Woven Roots and Rude Lion Sound. Tuesday the ATL has a People Productions show with Katchafire, a hot all-

Maori reggae outfit from New Zealand. While it started as a Bob Marley tribute band, Katchafire is now its own thing, touring worldwide with original material. Opening is the Hawaiian roots reggae groove band Maoli. Returning to Green Week action, we have the funk/soul/R&B/hip-hop/electro collective Cherry Royale at the Red Fox Friday night. The five-piece group out of Atlanta plays nu-soul along the lines of Orgone and Soulive, with Ms. Alvetta Newby-Jones out front on vocals. Also green: Circus of the Elements’ second annual “Fire Fusion 4/20” at the Mateel, which, as you might guess, is on Saturday (April 20). There’s a fire arts theme overall, with a wildly eclectic array of other entertainment including the Jenifer Breeze Band, Asha Nan, Midnight Raid, Rooster McClintock and Absynth Quintet on the indoor stage (with Sherae O’Shaughnessy as emcee). Outdoors you have a circus full of elemental fire spinners and dancers plus belly dancing by Marjhani, Tribal Oasis, Megz and Chakeetz, Cosmic Goo with Mark Zachary, T-Hawk, Mad River Rounders, DJ Matt W and comedy by Ba-Dum-Chh (the funny folk also offer “An Evening of Liquor and Laughter” Thursday at the Palm Lounge). Also in SoHum, but unrelated to Green Week, Petunia and The Vipers return to their favorite local roadhouse, the Riverwood Inn, for one more honky-tonk Saturday night. Meanwhile in Arcata, Full Moon Fever returns to the Jambalaya for a green collection of Petty tunes. The ATL has a green thing with keyboard jammer Melvin Seals and JGB (as in Jerry Garcia Band). After jamming with Jerry for years, after the guitarist died, Melvin basically inherited his band to keep the flame burning. The Red Fox has DJs and barbecue all day Saturday including some rappers, a bunch of the EDM artists named above, and later on The Show Devils: Enigma (the puzzle-piece tattoo guy) and Serana Rose, doing freaky sideshow tricks alongside locals like Shea Freelove.  Humboldt Hospitality has a massive 420 party at the Eureka Inn with a couple dozen DJs, rappers and EDM producers spread around three stages, one in the Palm Lounge, another in the ballroom and a third poolside. The party even stretches to Sunday with an 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. mimosa brunch bass bash with Tariq, Touch and DJ Trey laying down beats. The Ocean Grove has what has to be the most seriously 420-ish event, The

Humboldt Mecca Cup. This one’s a judged bud/hash/dabs competition a la the Cannabis Cup, for smokers. As noted on the Mecca website, “Cup patrons must be at least 18 years of age and must present their 215 script at the door for access.” There’s also a music component (without the same cup entry requirements) featuring Jamaican dancehall reggae star Lutan Fya and those ambassadors of the Humboldt brand, Potluck. OK, let’s leave Green Week behind and move on to something completely different: a Wednesday night show at the Arcata Playhouse by Väsen, one of the top folk bands in Sweden. After hearing about the show and the band from friends, I got a call from fiddler/cellist Tristan Clarridge, who first learned about Väsen from his friend/mentor Daryl Anger. “He sent us an email and insisted we go see them; since then, we’ve seen them every time we could.” What does he like about the band and its members? To start with, they’re virtuosos: Olov Johansson on the Swedish nyckelharpa (a keyed fiddle), Mikael Marin on viola and Roger Tallroth on guitar. “And,” says Tristan, “there’s something about musicians who have played together for decades — it’s like the three of them are of one mind. They put out this highenergy wall of sound, but it’s grounded in traditional folk music. In Sweden that’s much more mainstream than it is here.” He continued, “They’re only in the states for a week; they had a free night, and they’re like the best band in the world, so we had to make sure they played Arcata.” Opening the show (of course), The Bee Eaters, with Tristan on cello, his sister Tashina on fiddle and Simon Chrisman on hammered dulcimer. More magic music. Don’t miss it. Also Wednesday: Built to Spill alt. rocks HumBrews; Infected Mushroom infects ATL. What else? Bassist Drew Mohr‘s latest band, Balls Deep, debuts Thursday at the Jambalaya. Perhaps the opposite: Chastity Belt, The Lost Luvs and Cliterate play Friday at the Palm Lounge. And Saturday is Missing Link Soul Night No. 18 at Humboldt Brews, “18K Gold Soulstravaganza!” We’ll end with one final Green Week happening: Friday night at the Logger Bar, after the Dell’Arte students present an evening of tragedy, the bar goes disco, and not silent, no EDM, more like old school ’80s disco ball music, to dance the sadness away. What else can you do? Bonus: $1 from each drink goes to Dell’Arte. Groovy. l

 

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013

19

entertainment in bold includes paid listings

clubs • concerts • cafés bands • djs • karaoke • drink & food specials • pool tournaments • and more venue THE ALIBI 744 9th St. Arcata. 822-3731

thur 4/18

fri 4/19

sat 4/20

Find us on Facebook

Menu at www.thealibi.com

Mammoth Salmon (Portland stoner rock) Doors @ 10:30pm $5 Eureka Brass Band Dance Party 9pm

ANGELINA INN Fernbridge 725-5200 ARCATA PLAYHOUSE 822-1575

Stories To Grow Your Heart On 7pm

Stories To Grow Your Heart On 2pm & 7pm

ARCATA THEATRE LOUNGE 1036 G St. Info line: 822-1220

Midnite (St. Croix reggae) 21+ 10pm $25/$28

Alborosie and The Shengen Clan (Italian reggae) 21+ 10pm $30/$35

Melvin Seals w/ JGB Doors @ 7:30pm $20/$25

BAR-FLY PUB 91 Commercial, Eureka 443-3770

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

www.facebook.com/LikeBarFly

Happy Hour everyday 4-6pm $1 off wells & pints

BEAR RIVER CASINO 733-9644 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

The Uptown Kings (blues for dancers) 9pm

707 (funk/alt. rock) 9pm

707 (funk/alt. rock) 9pm

PressureAnya (DJs) 9pm

BLONDIES Arcata 822-3453 BLUE LAKE CASINO 777 Casino Way, Blue Lake 668-9770

Open Mic 7pm Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

CAFE MOKKA 5th & J Arcata CHAPALA CAFÉ Eureka 443-9514 CHER-AE HEIGHTS 27 Scenic Dr. Trinidad 677-3611

Throwback Thursday DJ Night w/ Accurate Productions 9pm

CLAM BEACH INN McKinleyville

Kindred Spirits (bluegrass) 8:30pm

The Drones (Irish) all ages 8pm

Good Company (Celtic) all ages 8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

The Tumbleweeds (cowboy) 6-8pm

Hookah Stew (rock & pop) 9pm

Hookah Stew (rock & pop) 9pm

EUREKA INN PALM LOUNGE 518 7th St. Eureka 497-6093

Ladies Night with Presure Anya DJs 9pm

Chastity Belt/ Lost Luvs/ Cliterate 21+ FREE 9pm

Jenni & David and the Sweet Soul Band (soul rock) 9pm

FIVE ELEVEN 511 2nd Street, Eureka 268-3852

Open Tuesday-Sunday 5pm Food served until 10pm

Gunsafe/Plumb Uglies 21+ 10pm $1-$5 sliding scale

Saint John and the Sinners 21+ 10pm $1-$5 sliding scale

HUMBOLDT BREWS 856 10th St. Arcata 826-2739

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Buckskin Wallet 10pm $10

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

Missing Link 18k Gold Soulstravaganza 9pm $5

HSU Guitar Ensemble 8pm/$3/$7

HSU Opera Workshop $5/$10 8pm

HUMBOLDT STATE UNIVERSITY

Elixxer w/ Cestladore & Photon 7pm

STARSKATE / Tabor Mountain $2 8pm

THE INK ANNEX 47B West 3rd St., Eureka JAMBALAYA 822-4766 Arcata LIBATION 761 8th St. Arcata 825-7596

Balls Deep (funk/acid jazz) $5 10pm

Full Moon Fever (Tom Petty Tribute) 10pm $7

HSU Gutar Group 7-9pm

Brian Post (piano) 7-10pm

Jim Silva (guitar) 7-10pm

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

We got beer.

Acoustic Roots 7pm

Disco Dance Party 9pm $1 from every drink donated to Dell’Arte

www.facebook.com/LoggerBar

The Compost Mountain Boys (bluegrass) 6pm

Taqueria La Barca 5pm

DIPA Sale!

LIGHTHOUSE GRILL Trinidad 677-0077 LIL’ RED LION 1506 5th St Eureka 444-1344 LOGGER BAR 510 Railroad Ave. Blue Lake 668-5000 MAD RIVER BREWERY 101 Taylor Way Blue Lake 668-5680

Fire Fusion 420 $20/$30 3pm-1am

MATEEL COMMUNITY CENTER Redway MOSGO’S 2461 Alliance Rd. Arcata NOCTURNUM Eureka

Rudebrat, DeLphik, Masta Shredda

OCEAN GROVE Trinidad

The Humboldt Mecca Cup $3/$7 10pm

OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOC. 211 F St. Eureka 445-8600 PEARL LOUNGE 507 2nd St. Eureka 444-2017

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Experience: Fresh roasted coffee & espresso

International Folk Music 7-9:30 pm

DJ Lost (dance music) 10pm

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Fuego! Latino-Tropical Sound w/ Pressure Anya DJs 10pm

Cherry Royale (funk) 10pm

420 Humboldt Beats & BBQ 3pm

RED FOX TAVERN 415 5th St. Eureka

Karaoke Night 9pm-1am 21+

RED LION 1929 4th Ave. Eureka REDWOOD CURTAIN BREWING 550 South G St. Arcata 826-7222 REDWOOD RAKS 824 L St. Arcata 616-6876

Third Thursday Bluegrass Jam 6:30 PM

Start your weekend off right at Redwood Curtain!

Have you tried our CDA yet?

Zumba Toning 5:30pm Blues Night w/Brian & Kimberli 8pm

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am

USA Dances $5 member/$10 non-members 7:30

Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm

THE RITZ 240 F St. Eureka

Petunia & The Vipers (swing) $10 9pm

RIVERWOOD INN Phillipsville ROBERT GOODMAN WINES 937 10th St. Arcata 826-WINE

Irish Sessions 9pm Kenny Ray and the Mighty Rovers (country swing) 7:30-9:30 pm

Lunch by the bay 11:30-4:00

SICILITO’S PIZZERIA Garberville

Karaoke 7-10pm

SIDELINES 732 9th St. Arcata 822-0919

DJ music 10pm

SILVER LINING 3561 Boeing Ave. McK

WESTHAVEN CENTER FOR THE ARTS

20 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

DJ music 10pm Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

Green Week w/ Silver Hammer (Beatles tribute) 6:30-10:30pm

Pressure Anya (dance) 9pm

www.sixriversbrewery.com

Open Sunday-Thursday 4-11pm Friday and Saturday 4pm-2am

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 8pm Ladies night ($1 off drinks) 8pm

Buddy Reed Band (blues) 8pm

DJ music 10pm

DJ music 10pm

Throwback Thursdays

Friday and Saturday lap dance specials

www.fabuloustiptop.com

TOBY & JACKS Arcata Plaza TIP TOP CLUB 6269 Loma Ave., Eureka 443-5696

DJ music 10pm McKinleyville Art Night w/ Joe Garceau 7pm Aber & Kim (jazz) FREE 8pm

THE SIREN’S SONG 325 2nd St. Eureka

THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley, Eureka 444-2244

Open Daily 11:30-9:30 Carlton Melton, White Manna, DSTMS

THE SHANTY 213 Third St. Eureka

SIX RIVERS BREWERY Central Ave. McKinleyville 839-7580

Brunch with Chris Parreira 11am-1pm

Donna Landry and Swing Set $7 7pm

SEWELL GALLERY 423 F St., Eureka SHAMUS T BONES 191 Truesdale St. Eureka 407-3550

Songwriters-in-the-round: Justin Gordon, Josh Price, Chris Parreira 9pm

Darius Brotman (jazz piano) 7pm

Katchafire Tuesday at the Arcata Theatre Lounge

sun 4/21

mon 4/22

tues 4/23

wed 4/24

www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Menu at www.thealibi.com

Find us on Facebook

Anna Hamilton (songs) 6-9pm

Blue Lotus (dinner jazz) 6-9pm Vasen w/ The Bee Eaters 8pm

The Goonies Doors @ 5:30pm $5

On the Web at www.arcatatheater.com

Katchafire w/ Maoli (New Zealand reggae) Doors @ 8pm $18

Worlf Famous presents Infected Mushroom Doors @ 9:30pm $30

Closed Sundays

Happy Hours 4-6pm $1 off pints/wells Pint Night 6pm-close $2 beer pints

Wing Special 1 lb. for $5 - Free pool

Karaoke with DJ Marv 9pm-1am

Sunday Brunch 9am

Enter to win $10,000!

Enter to win $10,000!

No Limit Texas Holdem Tournament 6:30pm

Quiz Night 7pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm

Karaoke with KJ Leonard 8pm

Prime Rib Mondays! $14.99 in Alice’s Steak & Sushi

Fat Tire Tuesdays $2.00 Fat Tire Pints

Wild Wing Wednesday 5pm to 11pm 25¢ wings $8 domestic beer pitchers

Karaoke w/Chris Clay 8pm 9-ball tournament 8pm

8-Ball Tournaments at 8pm

Karaoke with Chris Clay 8pm

FREE Pool $3 Well Drinks

Closed Sundays

No Covers (experimental jazz) 7-11pm

SB Lounge (electronica) 7-11pm

Happy Hour Monday thru Friday 5-7pm

Facebook.com/511fiveeleven

Closed Mondays.

Open Tuesday-Sunday 5pm Food served until 10pm

Family friendly dining.

All shows 21+ www.humbrews.com

Open daily noon-11pm until 2am most music nights

Head for the Hills

Built to Spill 9:30pm $25/$30

G ENTLEMEN ’ S C LUB 2 1 + O N LY

NEW HOURS & SCHEDULE

THE RITZ RESTAURANT & BAR

NOW OPEN FONDUE & ASIAN STYLE HOT POTS 240 F ST. EUREKA (707) 497-6294

STARTING MARCH 18, 2013

Monday – 2-for-1 DD lap dances Tuesdays – $1 off all beers all night long Wednesday – Couples Night Champagne Specials Thursday – Throwback Thursdays AFTER PARTY EVERY FRI. & SAT. NIGHT 2-4am

FABULOUSTIPTOP.COM CLUB: 443-5696 BAR: 443-6923

HSU Opera Workshop $5/$10 2pm J Caprice, Basstard, Derek Watts 10pm

9pm-2:30am Monday-Thursday 9pm-4am Friday & Saturday, Closed Sundays Northern California’s #1 After Party LADIES GET IN FREE! Every Friday & Saturday Night from 2-4am 2-for-1 Dances, & TWO Dancer Stages! Beer, Wine & Bubbly

King Salmon Exit, Hwy. 101, Eureka Rooster McClintock 9pm

Pressure Anya DJs 10pm

Farmhouse Odyssey 9pm

Buddy Reed (blues) 7-9pm Joe Garceau 5-7pm Don’t think of it as work Think of it as fun!

We also have liquor.

Repeat: We got beer.

myspace.com/ littleredlioneurekacalif

Sunday night potluck dinner 6pm

9 Ball Tournament 6:30pm signup - $5 play 7pm

Ping Pong 7pm-midnight

Wednesday Open Mic 7-10pm

All ages, all the time

Purl and Pour Come knit at 6:30pm

Fred and Jr (swing jazz)

www.madriverbrewingcom

Open Celtic Music Sessions 3-6pm WWW: Omega, Cassidy Blaze 10pm $5 Now serving beer and wine

Open Sunday-Thursday 7am-9pm Friday/Saturday 7am-10pm.

www.OldTownCoffeeEureka.com

Sunday-Thursday 4pm-2am Friday and Saturday 3pm-2am

www.pearlloungeeureka.com

Tequila Tuesdays muchas variedades

Open mic w/ Mike Anderson (music/spoken) 6:30pm www.pearlloungeeureka.com

It’s Happy Day and the Weenie Wagon is back!

Dry Hop Wednesday! Plus Nature’s Serving!

Breakdance with Reckless Rex Atienza 5-7pm $10

Live Band Swing Night 7-10pm $5

Beginning Salsa with Jessica & Trill 7pm Beginning Argentine Tango 8:15pm

Zumba with Mimi 9:30-10:30am West Coast Swing 7:30pm

Karaoke 7pm

m www.robertgoodmanwines.com

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

DJ Gobi presents Golden Era of Hip Hop 9pm

www.robertgoodmanwines.com

Dine early Check out our Sunsets

Open Mic/ Jim Lahman Band 7:00-10:00

Lunch Specials 11:30-4:00

Try one of our signature Cocktails

Thai food with a Laotian influence

Trivia Night! 8pm

Karaoke w/ DJ Marv 8-11pm

Southern Fried Chicken Night 5pm

Saint John Unplugged 8pm

Sunday Mimosa and Bloody Mary specials

Live music 7pm

ShugaFoot Band (jazz/blues) 7pm

Wednesday Happy Hour 4-6:30pm

Like us on Facebook

2-for-1 DD lap dances

2 Dollar Tuesdays $2 beer / $2 lap dances

Ladies/Amateur Night Ladies get in free!

307 2nd St. Old Town Eureka 269-0555

Good & Evil Twins Karaoke 8pm

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Locally Blown Glass

Blue Monday with Buddy Reed (blues) 7pm

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013

Happy Growler Day! Get your growler filled for less $$$

HBG • ROOR • Illadelph • Vaporizers

J Hornay and Skywriter 10pm

Humboldt Hoodies • Hats • Beanies • Tshirts

DacnceHall Mondayz $5 9pm

21

home & garden

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continued on page 25

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22 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

CLEAN IT UP FOR EARTH DAY Environmental organizations throughout Humboldt are hosting Earth Day trash clean-up parties on Saturday. Among them:  Mad River Alliance and EPIC on Mad River near Blue Lake, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. (889-2955)  Northcoast Environmental Center on Samoa Beach, 1-3 p.m. includes tsunami debris monitoring (822-6918)  Friends of the Dunes on the Manila Dunes, 9:30 a.m,-12:30 p.m.(444-1397)  Humboldt Surfrider on the North Jetty, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. (477-8283)  Humboldt Baykeeper at Palco Marsh, noon-2 p.m. (268-8897)  Sequoia Park Zoo at Sequoia Park, noon-2 p.m. (441-4263) Then from 3-7 p.m. volunteers and supporters gather for an Olde Time Earth Day Hoedown at the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center in Manila to dance to music by Gunsafe and Striped Pig Stringband.

THE HUMBOLDT FILM FESTIVAL once again brings independent and alternative short films to HSU with film screenings at the Van Duzer Theatre from Wednesday, April 17, through Saturday, April 20. Nightly programs include: animation and experimental, documentary and narrative films. Saturday’s Best of the Fest has festival winners selected by judges Corey Grant and Chevez Frazier, two filmmakers who shot Bigfoot: The Lost Coast Tapes in Humboldt County and are working on a sequel. They will speak at the screening.

18 thursday THEATER

It Was A Dark and Stormy Night. 7 p.m. Arcata High School, 1720 M St. Arcata High Drama presents a classic who-done-it mystery. josharbaugh1@gmail.com. Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind. 7:30 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium, 1915 J St. The EHS Players present 30 neo-futurist plays in under one hour. ehsplayers.com. 441-2508. A Harvest of Stones. 8 p.m. Carlo Theatre, 131 H St., Blue Lake. Tragic, poetic story of a farmer struggling to hold onto his land in the face of drought, debt and ecological disaster, presented by Dell’Arte second-year MFA students. Disco after-party fundraiser at the Logger Bar. meghan@dellarte.com. 668-5663. The Tempest. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Shakespeare’s classic work. $15/$12 students and seniors. ncrt.net. 442-6278.

MUSIC

E-LIXXER: A Night Of Electronic Music. 7 p.m.-midnight. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. EDM by Købé, TAEO, ONHELL, Photon and Cestladore. vjg9@humboldt.edu. Too Many Sopranos. 8 p.m. Studio Theater, HSU. Opera Workshop performs Edwin Penhorwood’s comic opera about four sopranos who go to hell to bring back tenors and basses (i.e. men) for the heavenly choir. $10/$5 students and seniors. Midnite. 10 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Bonus presents St. Croix’s premier roots reggae band for Green

Week, sponsored by NHS. Stevie Culture opens. $30/$28 advance. www.bonusman.info.

MOVIES

Humboldt Film Festival Day Two: Documentaries. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. The oldest student-run film festival around continues with a program of documentary films. $5. 826-4113.

LECTURE

Human Dimensions in Environmental Management. 5:30-7 p.m. BSS Room 166, HSU. Sustainable Futures Series presents Laurie Richmond on how natural resource dependent communities navigate political and ecological change. humboldt.edu/envcomm/speaker_series. 826-3653. An Adventure in Ghana. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Louisa Rogers on her time in rural Ghana, sponsored by Agricultural Cooperative Development International Volunteers in Overseas Cooperative Assistance, training tractor owners on business development. co.humboldt.ca.us/library/events. Three Dimensional Universes. 7:30 p.m. Science B Room 135, HSU. Kieval Lecture with mathematician Abigail Thompson of UC Davis on three-dimensional universes and knot theory.

ETC.

Redwood Region Audubon Society. Noon. Golden Harvest Cafe, 1062 G St., Arcata. Discuss conservation topics with others interested in environmental issues. Eureka Chamber Mixer. 5:30 p.m. Eureka Co-op, Fourth and B streets. Chamber of Commerce mixer. Your busi-

Swedish neo-traditional supergroup VASEN plays Wednesday at the Arcata Playhouse following an opening set by The Bee Eaters with Tristan and Tashina Clarridge.

ness card is the price of admission. 442-3738. Humboldt Bay Christian School Open House. 6:30 p.m. 70 Stephens Lane, Bayside. “Premier Night” showcasing the facilities and Christ-centered educational programs.

19 friday EVENTS

Godwit Days 2013. 3-7:30 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. A full week of bird and birding related displays, field trips, lectures and more. Opening reception 5-6:15 p.m. followed by two no-cost lectures: on owls and California condor research.

THEATER

Stories to Grow Your Heart On. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Lakota actor and storyteller Robert Owens-Greygrass tells inspiring original stories as well as Native American tales from Lakota and other tribes. $12/$10 children 12 and unde. 822-1575. Hello Dolly. 8 p.m. Ferndale Repertory Theater, 447 Main St. The classic matchmaker musical, music direction by Tina Toomata, choreography by Linda Maxwell, directed by Justin Takata. $18/$16 students. 800-838-3600. It Was A Dark and Stormy Night. 7 p.m. Arcata High School. See April 18 listing. Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind 7:30 p.m. Eureka High School. See April 18 listing.

The Tempest. 8 p.m. North Coast Rep. See April 18 listing. A Harvest of Stones. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte. See April 18 listing.

MUSIC

Pianist Darius Brotman. 7 p.m. Westhaven Center for the Arts, 501 S. Westhaven Drive. Darius Brotman plays cool jazz standards and originals. Guitars For Gamers. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Eclectic program includes music from spaghetti Westerns and video games. $7/$3 students and seniors. Too Many Sopranos. 8 p.m. Studio Theater. See April 18 listing. Alborosie, Woven Roots. 10 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Reggae from Italy and Humboldt, part of Green Week. $35/$30 advance.

DANCE

Humboldt Folk Dancers. 8-10 p.m. St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 1675 Chester Ave., Sunny Brae. World dance sponsored by Humboldt Folk Dancers. Teaching and request dancing, everyone welcome. $3. 839-3665.

MOVIES

Humboldt Film Festival Day Three: Narrative. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. The oldest student-run film festival around continues with a program of short narrative films. $5. 826-4113.

SPOKEN WORD

Poet Barbara Curiel. 2 p.m. HSU Library Fishbowl, 1 Harpst Street, Arcata. HSU professor Curiel reads from

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013

23

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Trashy Pot Talks You’ve heard the horror stories: Water illegally diverted from rivers and streams, harming fisheries. Rodenticide killing Pacific fishers — sleek, handsome forest characters that are federally protected. Torn up land polluted with fertilizers and more, and heaps of filth left by greedy dipshit humans — feces and trash and plastic piping and more. All in the aid of illicit marijuana grows out in our wild places. Then there are the indoor grows — massive suckers of energy and sometime causes of house fires. And, hell, step inside the body: Think inhaling that toxin-laced bud is good for you? Maybe some folks are growing weed with an eco-conscience. But many, many are not. If any of this concerns you, you’ll be happy to know that Humboldt State University is hosting its first-ever Earth Day Symposium on Marijuana and the Environment this Friday and Saturday. The symposium is called “Communities and Landscapes in the Balance: The Crossroads of Environmental Protection and Marijuana Agriculture.” And, yes, it is sponsored by the university’s new, Jimmy Kimmel-blessed Humboldt Institute for Interdisciplinary Marijuana Research, along with the sociology department, environher forthcoming poetry collection, Mexican Jenny and Other Poems.

FOR KIDS

Bedtime Stories and Lullabies. 6-8 p.m. The Sweet Spot, 1300 Hiller Rd. McKinleyville. North Coast Storytellers provide stories and music for the little ones as part of Humboldt Green Week. Pajamas welcome.

ETC.

Earth Day Pot Impact Forum. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Native Forum, BSS Building, HSU. Humboldt Institute for Interdisciplinary Marijuana Research presents “Communities and Landscapes in the Balance: The Crossroads of Environmental Protection and Marijuana Agriculture.” Eureka Sequoia Garden Club. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. First

ment and community program, Environmental Protection Information Center and the Salmonid Restoration Federation. On Friday, there will be talks. On Saturday, panels. Some of the topics include: Ecological data — what we know and what we need to know; Legal strategies to protect nature from marijuana crimes; Stories from the frontlines: reporting on the culture and practice of marijuana agriculture; Grassroots environmentalism and the marijuana industry: past, present and future; The ecological footprint of indoor marijuana agriculture; Plus many other sessions on public land management, private timberland impacts, environmental crimes, cultural and natural resource impacts on tribal lands, protecting fisheries, legislative updates and more. The symposium runs from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on both April 19 and 20, in room 162 of the Native American Forum, which is in the Behavioral Social Sciences Building. You can register at humboldt.edu/dee/hiimr/. Or just show up, dude; registration is recommended, but not required. — Heidi Walters Covenant Church Carriage House, 2526 J St., Eureka. Meeting features talk by photographer Gary Todoroff on improving the quality of garden pictures. E-mail mgoodwin@northcoast.com. 442-1387.

20 saturday EVENTS

Fire Fusion 4/20. 3 p.m.-1 a.m. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Music by Absynth Quintet, Rooster McClintock, Likwefi, Asha Nan, Jennifer Breeze, Mad River Rounders and Midnight Raid; comedy

by Ba-Dum-Chh, fire arts by Circus of the Elements. $30/$20 advance. Eureka Natural Foods Earth Day Celebration. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, 1626 Broadway. Live music, food, raffles, prizes. Olde Time Earth Day Hoedown. 3-7 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. $5. Godwit Days 2013. Headquaters at Arcata Community Center open 10 a.m. See April 19 listing.

THEATER

The Tempest. 8 p.m. North Coast Rep. Final performance. See April 18 listing. A Harvest of Stones. 8 p.m. Dell’Arte. See April 18 listing. Hello Dolly. 8 p.m. Ferndale Rep. See April 19 listing. Stories to Grow Your Heart On matinee. 2 and 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse. See April 19 listing. It Was A Dark and Stormy Night. 7 p.m. Arcata High School. See April 18 listing.

MUSIC

Songs of Travel. 2 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Free recital by baritone William Frazee with Felicia Oldfather on piano. Humboldt Harmonaires. 7:29 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. An evening of vaudeville featuring barbershop by the Harmonaires Chorus, Eureka High School’s Limited Edition and guest quartet 139th Street. $18. Melvin Seals and JGB. 8:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. $25. Jerry Garcia’s keyboad player and his soul band. 822-0966. Too Many Sopranos. 8 p.m. Studio Theater. See April 18 listing.

MOVIES

Humboldt Film Festival: Best of the Fest. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, HSU. Meet judges, Corey Grant and Chevez Frazier, two filmmakers from Illinois who made a Bigfoot movie here. $5. www.hsufilmfestival.com.

OUTDOORS

Fowler’s eBird Survey. 8:30 a.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway. Join Rob Fowler on his eBird site survey in Arcata’s Shay Park. 839-3493. Birding on the Arcata Marsh. 8:30-11 a.m. Meet at South I Street parking lot. Audubon field trip led by Michael Morris rain or shine. Bring binoculars for birding. Mad River Clean-up. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Stardough’s Cafe, 440 Railroad Ave., Blue Lake. Help Mad River Alliance with river clean-up. 822-2514. Trail Stewards in Manila. 9 a.m. Ma-le’l Dunes South parking lot, Manila. Trail Stewards work day. Gloves,

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24 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY APRIL 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

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home & gardenservice directory continued on page 27

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Dry Secure

For the Birds The birders are coming. Godwit Days are upon us, a time when Humboldt welcomes avian aficionados from far and wide, especially those obsessed with adding as many different birds as possible to their life lists. As the organizers note, the festival is held during the spring migration of the marbled godwit, one of many birds found locally. The week of activities, Thursday, April 18, through Tuesday, April 24, consists mainly of bird-watching tours, most of them in small groups, with expert guides helping visitors spot anything from shorebirds and spotted owls to warblers and quail. A few are free, but most require festival registration. Many tours are already full, but there are plenty of other things to do, even if you don’t get out into the bush with your binoculars. Headquarters for the 18th annual Godwit Days is the Arcata Community Center, where you’ll find bird- and nature-related vendors and exhibits, a student and professional bird art show and a silent auction (through Saturday) with birdy type items. There are even live birds of prey from Humboldt Wildlife Care Center so you can get up close and personal with raptors. Friends of the Arcata Marsh sponsor family

nature activities Saturday afternoon. The exhibition hall is open to the public free of charge on Friday 3-7:30 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The fest also includes a couple of public lectures: Friday starting at 6:30 p.m. at the community center, it’s a (free) two-parter with retired wildlife biologist Terry Schulz on “Owls I have Known, Confessions of a Genuine Strigiphile,” and Chris West, senior biologist with the Yurok Tribe, on the tribe’s work on reintroducing condors to the Klamath Basin. Saturday’s big day of birding culminates with a banquet followed by keynote speaker, Gary Langham, vice president and chief scientist of the National Audubon Society, speaking at the community center at 7:30 p.m. on “Creating an Audubon Guide to Future Bird Ranges: Implications for North American Bird Conservation.” Registered Godwit Days participants get a ticket when they sign up for the festival; others can purchase one at the community center for $10. For further details on all things Godwit Days call 707-826-7050 or go to www.godwitdays.org, where you’ll find a full schedule of tours and other activities. — Bob Doran

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tools and cookies provided. Manila Dunes Restoration and Clean-up. 9:30 a.m. Manila Community Center, 1611 Peninsula Drive, Arcata. Beach clean-up; gloves, tools and cookies provided. Surfrider Beach Cleanup. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. North Jetty — Samoa Dunes County Park. Clean up that beach! Remarkable Rhododendrons. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, adjacent to College of the Redwoods,

Eureka. Rhody expert Tim Walsh discusses HBG’s extensive collection and leads a tour. $10. www.hbgf. org. 442-5139. Arcata Marsh Tour. 2 p.m. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 600 S. G St. Jane Wilson leads free 90-minute tour of the Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary, focusing on marsh ecology. 826-2359. NEC Samoa Beach Cleanup. 1-3 p.m. Meet at Power

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013

25 25

continued from previous page Pole Parking Lot, Samoa. Northcoast Environmental Center’s beach clean up including Japan tsunami debris monitoring. 822-6918.

FOOD

Arcata Plaza Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Locavores delight: homegrown produce and meat, plants, flowers, food court. Andes music by Huayllipacha at 10 a.m. Aged To Perfection Live On-Air Wine Auction. 6 p.m. KEET-TV on-air benefit: bid on wine, food, vacation trips, etc.

SPORTS

5K Nature Fun Run. 8:30 a.m. College of the Redwoods, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, Eureka. Run through the Humboldt Botanical Gardens to support programs for CR students with disabilities. $20/$10 students and seniors. 6rrc.com. Redwood Rollers vs. Junction City Roller Dolls. 6 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairground, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Rock ’em sock ’em roller derby fun. Last local match until May. Get tickets early!

FOR KIDS

Humboldt Rocks! 1:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Meryl King, author of a local geology book for children, and members of Redwood Empire Gem and Mineral Society with a kid-friendly program on local geology. 269-1910.

ETC.

Earth Day Pot Impact Forum. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Native Forum, BSS Building. See April 19 listing. Breakfast and Flea Market. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dow’s Prairie Community Grange, 3995 Dow’s Prairie Road, McKinleyville. Meet, eat and browse. dowsgrange@gmail. com. 840-0100. MS Walk 2013. 10 a.m. Eureka High School, 1915 J St. A 2k walk to help find a cure for multiple sclerosis. 800-344-4867. Community Media Center Orientation. 10 a.m.-noon. Access Humboldt Community Media Center, Eureka High School, Eureka. Learn about the CMC and other Access Media resources. Become part of the media. www.accesshumboldt.net. 476-1798. World Autism Awareness Event. 3-5:30 p.m. River Lodge, 1800 Riverwalk Drive, Fortuna. www.starfishhero. com. 601-6089. Stroll for Herbal Freedom. 3:30 p.m. Eureka Boardwalk. Walking demonstration for herbal rights and herbal freedom. highboldtage.wordpress.com.

21 sunday EVENTS

Breakfast in Bayside: Earth Day Edition. 8 a.m.-noon. Bayside Grange, 2297 Jacoby Creek Road. Gourmet Grange breakfast plus the sixth annual All Electric Vehicle Show, with information from the Redwood Energy Authority. Muic by the HSU Academy Fiddlers. $8/$5 students and seniors. Godwit Days 2013. Headquaters at Arcata Community Center open 10 a.m. See April 19 listing.

THEATER

Walking on Turtle Island. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Lakota storyteller Robert Greygrass conveys the indigenous experience through powerful stories of Turtle Island (America). Hello Dolly matinee. 2 p.m. Ferndale Rep. See April 19 listing.

MUSIC

Moonstone Performance Outreach. 1-8 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. Bring your singer/songwriter talent to share and enjoy with other performers and music lovers. $5. Sunday Jazz Jam with Kevin Danel. 2-4:30 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Guitarist from Vintage Soul and Vintage Jazz, plus wine, cheese and olives. Too Many Sopranos matinee. 2 p.m. Studio Theater, HSU. See April 19 listing. Silent Disco. 4-11 p.m. Moonstone Beach, Trinidad. Wireless headphone dance event with 14 local EDM DJs, part of Green Week. $25. College of the Redwoods Jazz Orchestra. 6 p.m. Willow Creek VFW Hall, 20 Kimtu Road. Music for swing dancers 7-9 p.m. Swing dance lessons at 6 p.m.

OUTDOORS

Southern Humboldt Community Park Hike. 9 a.m. Southern Humboldt Community Park, 934 Sprowl Creek Road, Garberville. Easy, two- to three-hour hour Audubon walk through Southern Humboldt Community Park. No dogs. Steady rain cancels. 444-8011. Birding on PALCO Marsh. 9 a.m. Meet in parking lot at foot of West Del Norte Street. Ralph Bucher leads Audubon birding trip through the Eureka (aka PALCO) Marsh. E-mail thebook@reninet.com. 499-1247.

ETC.

Soto Zen Priest Mark Lancaster. 8 a.m. Arcata Aikido Center 890 G St. Meditation at 8 a.m. Talk at 9:30 a.m. 826-1701. Eureka Mindfulness Group. 10 a.m. First Christian Church Eureka, 730 K St. Cindee Grace on “Everyone’s Innate Goodness.” Fragrance free, please. $3/$6 free will donation. 269-7044. Earth Day at the Zoo. Noon-4 p.m. Sequoia Park Zoo, 3414 W St., Eureka. Free admission all day, conservationbased activities between noon and 4 p.m. including face painting, red panda painting demonstration, watershed pollution prevention demo, music by Asha Nan. 441-4263. Redwood Coast Scrabble Club. 1-5 p.m. Couple Cups, 1603 G St, Arcata. Fun with words. New location this week only. 677-9242. Animism International. 4-6 p.m. Eureka Co-op, Fourth and B streets. Discussion of the merger of science and spirituality, trance states, entheogens and psychedelics, permaculture and more. www.animisminternational. org. 382-7566.

22 monday EVENTS

Eel River Brewing Earth Day. 2-7 p.m. Eel River Brewing Company, 1777 Alamar Way, Fortuna. Music by Compost Mountain Boys, tie-dye booth, bike show, earth-friendly businesses and nonprofits. 725-2739. Eel River Recovery Project. 6:30-8 p.m. Fortuna Monday Club, 610 Main St. Presentation of efforts to repair the Eel River.

DANCE

Friendship Circle Dance. 7-10 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Dancing to music from the 1930s-50s for those over 50. $4.

MOVIES

Switch. 7-10 p.m. Humboldt State University Van Duzer Theater, Arcata. Award-winning documentary moves

26 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY APRIL 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

past the politics to deliver the straight answers on energy. www.switchenergyproject.com. 512-861-6278. Trashed. 7 p.m. Siemens Hall, HSU. CCAT presents a documentary with Jeremy Irons discovering the extent and effects of global waste.

ETC.

Earth Day Award Ceremony. 4-6 p.m. Wharfinger Building, 1 Marina Way, Eureka. The Redwood Coast Energy Authority hosts a ceremony for the local schools Redwood Neighborhood Energy Challenge, with music by Guilty Apple. challenge.redwoodenergy.org. 269-1700. NAMI Support Group. 6 p.m. Fortuna United Methodist Church, 922 N St. Meeting facilitated by National Alliance on Mental Illness for families of those facing issues including bipolar, schizophrenia, PTSD, OCD, etc. Economic Fuel Finalist Presentations. 6-8:30 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room, HSU. Eight finalist teams present pitches and answer questions. www.economicfuel. org. 476-2780.

23 tuesday EVENTS

Good-bye Fhyre. 7 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Celebrating local activist and man-about-town Fhyre Phoenix wih music by Jesse Jonathan and DJ Fhyre. $10.

MUSIC

Katchafire. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Reggae from New Zealand. $18. www.peopleproductions.net. 923-4599.

MOVIES

Dark Passage. 6:30 p.m. Humboldt County Library, 1313 Third St., Eureka. Based on the Book “Shadows and Fog: San Francisco Noir” film series presents a crime tale starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauen Bacall.

ETC.

Pre-Lemonade Day Mixer. 4-5 p.m. Humboldt Area Foundation, 373 Indianola Road, Bayside. Learn how to partner with local non-profits as part of Lemonade Day 2013, held on Saturday, June 1. www.humboldt. lemonadeday.org. 845-0467. Lost Coast High Sizzler Fundraiser. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 1905 Fifth St., Eureka. Fundraiser at Sizzler for Lost Coast High with 15 percent of proceeds going to support student field trips. 442-2626. Economic Fuel Finalist Presentations. 6-8:30 p.m. Kate Buchanan Room. See April 22 listing.

24 wednesday

Harbor Working Group luncheon with presentation on the Humboldt Bay Artificial Reef Project. RSVP for lunch by Monday, April 22, S.munzell@Yahoo.com or 497-6137. Soroptimist Spring Salad Luncheon. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. St Mary’s Church, 1690 Janes Road., Arcata. Soroptimist International of Arcata’s annual spring salad luncheon. $12/$5 children 6 to 12. 822-0539. Dream Group. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, Eureka. Dream enthusiasts meet every other Wednesday to share dreams for problem solving, creative inspiration self-awareness. Seeking new members. For details and location, email blauhaus@rocketmail.com. 681-9970. Marketing Brown Bag. Noon-1 p.m. The Link, 1385 Eighth St., Arcata. Emanuel Rose of Strategic eMarketing leads participants through decision-making about best practices for distributing marketing content. the-link. us. 822-0597. Eureka Fair Wage Act Group. 6:15 p.m. Eureka Labor Temple, 840 E St. Help pass an ordinance requiring Eureka employers with 25 or more workers to pay a $12 minimum wage. fairwages.org.

25 thursday THEATER

Antigone. 7:30 p.m. Eureka High School Auditorium, 1915 J St. Eureka High Players present Sophocles’ classic tragedy. $8/$6 students and seniors. EHSPlayers. com. 441-2508. Proof. 7:30 p.m. Gist Hall Theater, HSU. Pulitzer Prize winning play about genius and madness, love and trust. $10/$8 students and seniors. hsustage.blogspot. com. 826-3928. Who Ya Callin Bozo? 8 p.m. Carlo Theater, 131 H St., Blue Lake. The eccentric absurdity of the character clown as performed by Dell’Arte students. Pay-what-you-can. www.dellarte.com. 668-5663. Skin Deep. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain, 220 First St., Eureka. Redwood Curtain presents a warm-hearted romantic comedy. $15. 443-7688.

MUSIC

René Marie’s “Experiment in Truth” Quartet. 8 p.m. Morris Graves Museum of Art, 636 F St., Eureka. Redwood Jazz Alliance presents the stunning jazz vocalist in concert with a top-notch band. $15/$10 students and seniors. www.redwoodjazzalliance.org. AM Jazz Band. 8 p.m. Fulkerson Recital Hall, HSU. Ensemble plays standards from Tommy Dorsey to the Average White Band. $7/$3 students and seniors. ●

northcoastjournal

MUSIC

Väsen and The Bee Eaters. 8 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. Neo-traditional Swedish acoustic trio with an opening set by Tristan and Tashina Clarridge’s nu-acoustic band. 822-1575. Infected Mushroom Fungusamongus Tour. 9:30 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Israeli trance music pioneers in concert. $30. www.worldfamousproductions.net. 822-9531.

ETC.

Humboldt Bay Artificial Reef Project. Noon-1:30 p.m. Samoa Cookhouse, Samoa Road, Arcata. Humboldt Bay

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home & garden

service directory

continued from page 25

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northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013

27

Black Hero, Whitewashed

Movie Times Film times reflect the most current listings as of Tuesday afternoon. As schedules at individual theaters sometimes change, we recommend calling ahead to avoid any inconvenience.

Broadway Cinema

707-443-3456 1223 Broadway Street, Eureka Times are for 4/19-4/25 unless otherwise noted.

OBLIVION 12:15, 2:15, 3:15, 5:15, 6:15, 8:15, 9:15 THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES 2:05, 5:25, 8:40 42 11:50, 2:50, 5:50, 8:50 SCARY MOVIE 5 12:20, 2:35, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35 EVIL DEAD 11:55, 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30 JURASSIC PARK 3D 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00 THE HOST 2:30, 5:30, 8:30 GI JOE: RETALIATION 3D 12:05, 5:10 GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D 4:00, 9:10 OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN 12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 9:20 THE CROODS 3D 2:40, 7:50 THE CROODS 2D 1:25, 6:40 Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 2D 2:00, 5:05, 8:05

Mill Creek Cinema

707-839-3456 *= FRI-SUN 1575 Betty Court, McKinleyville Times are for 4/19-4/25 unless otherwise noted.

OBLIVION 11:50*, 2:50, 5:50, 8:50 THE HOST 3:30, 9:15 42 12:10*, 3:05, 6:05, 9:05 SCARY MOVIE 5 12:25*, 2:40, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40 EVIL DEAD 12:05*, 2:20*, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 JURASSIC PARK 3D 12:00*, 3:00, 6:00, 8:55 GI JOE: RETALIATION 3D 4:10, 9:20 GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D 12:40*, 5:45 THE CROODS 3D 1:35*, 6:50 THE CROODS 2D 3:15, 8:20 Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL 2D 12:30*, 6:20

Minor Theatre 707-822-3456

1001 H Street, Arcata * = SAT.-SUN. ONLY Times are for 4/19-4/25 unless otherwise noted.

OBLIVION 42 THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES

12:30*, 3:25, 6:20, 9:15 12:15*, 3:10, 6:05, 9:00 2:20*, 5:25, 8:30

Chadwick Boseman stars as Jackie Robinson in 42.

By John J. Bennett filmland@northcoastjournal.com

Reviews

42. I’ve long felt a weird sense of nostalgia for baseball of bygone eras. It must be something about the grainy newsreel footage or the baggy uniforms or the increasingly ludicrous sideburns and moustaches of those old heroes of the diamond. Whatever the reason, I take far more pleasure in baseball’s past than in its present. Writer/director Brian Helgeland (who has too many “screenplay by” credits to list, including brilliant adaptations of L.A. Confidential and Mystic River) had all the potential for creating a Jackie Robinson biopic that would get me there, coming alive with the crack of the bat and the roar of the crowd, maybe even providing some much-needed cultural commentary. It tries, valiantly at times, but never quite makes it. At some point in the mid-1990s, Spike Lee and Denzel Washington tried to get a Jackie Robinson project off the ground, but nobody was willing to pony up the cash. This could spur a conversation about racial bias in Hollywood, particularly how it has affected Lee, one of the best known, most woefully under-funded filmmakers in the business. But this may not

Fortuna Theater

707-725-2121 * = SAT.-SUN. ONLY 1241 Main Street, Fortuna ** = FRI.-SAT. ONLY Times are for 4/19-4/25 unless otherwise noted.

OBLIVION 42 SCARY MOVIE 5 EVIL DEAD JURASSIC PARK 3D GI JOE: RETALIATION 2D THE CROODS

1:20*, 4:05, 6:55, 9:45** 12:50*, 3:50, 6:40, 9:25** 12:15*, 2:30*, 4:50, 7:15, 9:35** 1:10*, 4:10, 7:20, 9:30** 1:00*, 6:50 4:00, 9:40** 12:00*, 2:15*, 4:40, 7:00, 9:10**

Garberville Theater 707-923-3580

April 21 - 28 Sun Apr 21 - The Goonies (1985) Doors at 5:30 p.m., $5, Rated PG Thurs Apr 25 - Random Acts of Comedy Doors at 7:30 p.m., $6, All ages Sun Apr 28 - Madagascar (2005) Doors at 5:30 p.m., $5, Rated PG

766 Redwood Drive, Garberville

Oz THE GREAT AND POwERFUL

4/19-4/25: 7:30 EXCEPT 4/24: 6:30

arcatatheatre.com • 822-1220 • 1036 G St.

28 North Coast Journal • Thursday, april 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

A glossy biopic about Jackie Robinson soft-pedals racism

be the place. And there’s no point lamenting what might have been. Helgeland tells the story of Robinson’s rookie season with the Brooklyn Dodgers and the series of pivotal, contentious moves leading up to it. I understand the motivation here: A full biography would dilute the dramatic intensity of the story, and probably require more than one movie. But by narrowing the focus, there is an inherent risk — one that 42 unfortunately succumbs to. With such a short timeline there’s precious little room to contextualize personal motives or cultural mores. For example, after an awkward expository voice-over, the story jumps straight to Dodgers head executive Branch Rickey (an uncharacteristically hammy Harrison Ford), who summarily pronounces that he’s bringing a player from the Negro Leagues to the ball club. We get no insight into his thought process or the poisonous fog of race-hate hanging over America in 1947. With the notable exception of one team manager (Alan Tudyk as an epithetspewing cracker), there’s no life given to the antipathy and fear Robinson must have confronted constantly. Helgeland keeps the institutionalized racism of the day at arm’s length, suggesting rather than showing it. Even when some of Robinson’s teammates mount a petition to keep him from playing, they come off as merely ignorant and strange, rather than hateful or cruel. Helgeland paints a picture of human nature as inherently good but muddied occasionally by bad judgment and misplaced traditionalism. I admire his optimism, but it may not be the right attitude for the subject matter. 42 is a story about a sea-change in American race relations, with professional baseball as the microcosm. But the way it’s told feels too easy, too simple and sentimental. It has more than a few good things going for it, but more than anything the movie left me wanting more — more insight into Robinson’s character, more verisimilitude about the culture of the day, and more baseball. PG13. 128m.

GINGER & ROSA. My initial reaction, upon leaving the theater, was that I had just watched a 17-year-old girl cry for an hour and a half. Ginger (Elle Fanning) cries almost constantly, usually in that hoarse, seismic way that precludes conscious thought. Fanning makes it all-too-real, and that may be the highest praise I have for Sally Potter’s movie. The title characters are teenaged best friends in London circa 1962. Ginger is the child of bohemian intellectuals ill-suited to child-rearing. Rosa is the darkly sexual daughter of a working single mother. As the specter of nuclear holocaust looms, their very intimate relationship turns down a dark, painful corridor. The lead actresses (Fanning and Alice Englert) inhabit their roles with an almost disturbing naturalism, and the vagaries of teen life in a bombed out post-war landscape ring true. But the characters surrounding them (including a miscast Christina Hendricks as Ginger’s mother) are generally unsympathetic, if not completely unlikeable. As Roland, Ginger’s philandering philosopher of a father, Alessandro Nivola delivers a note-perfect, almost unwatchable performance of selfishness embodied and rationalized by intellect. There isn’t a moment in Ginger & Rosa that I can look back on with fondness, but fair enough. It’s a tough little story about an unpleasant time and place; I can’t say I’ll watch it again, or that it even resonated, particularly. But it is a strong, competently made movie, and it did provoke a reaction. PG13. 90m. — John J. Bennett

Previews

OBLIVION. Ha ha. Tom Cruise’s career led him to Oblivion. (Forgive me.) In this sci-fi adventure he’s part of a “mopup crew” on a future Earth that’s been destroyed by alien war. But he finds inhabitants (including Morgan Freeman) who make him question his mission. PG13. 126m. THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES. A tattooed Ryan Gosling stars as a motorcycle

stunt driver who starts robbing banks to provide for his baby and baby-mama. Directed by Derek Cianfrance, whose last film, 2010’s Blue Valentine, was an emotional wrecking ball. R. 140m. Get ready to do “The Truffle Shuffle.” On Sunday, Richard Donner’s 1985 kids’ adventure flick The Goonies (based on a story by Steven Spielberg) comes to the Arcata Theatre Lounge at 6 p.m. The Humboldt County Library’s latest “Based on the Book” film series has the theme “Shadows and Fog: San Francisco Noir.”  The series continues Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. (at the Eureka main branch) with Dark Passage (1947), starring Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. Hosted by Michael Logan. Free. On Earth Day (that’s Monday, btw), HSU students and faculty will host Switch, a documentary on the future of energy, including oil, fracking, nuclear and renewable sources. The film is screening at 250 college campuses across the country. It will show at 7 p.m. in the Van Duzer Theater. Tickets are free but should be obtained ahead of time at the HSU ticket office.

Continuing

THE CROODS. A prehistoric family must look for a new cave in this likeable animated comedy featuring the voices of Nic Cage and Emma Stone. PG. 96m. EVIL DEAD. This gory remake of the 1980s camp-horror classic about a group of young’uns, a cabin in the woods and a supernatural skin-bound book has less camp, more viscera. R. 91m. G.I. JOE: RETALIATION. Bruce Willis, “The Rock” and Channing Tatum play guys with big muscles and guns. They shoot stuff. PG13. 99m. THE HOST. Alien body-snatchers complicate another boring teenage love triangle from Stephanie Meyer, author of the Twilight series. PG13. 125m. JURASSIC PARK 3D. That 3D T-Rex made me spill my Diet Coke! PG13. 127m. OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN. White House action-thriller with a Secret Service agent (Gerard Butler) protecting the president (Aaron Eckhart) from evil Koreans. Yawn. R. 100m. OZ THE GREAT AND POWERFUL. James Franco stars as the young wizard-to-be in this visually rich but ultimately hollow prequel. PG. 130m. SCARY MOVIE 5. What’s scary is how many people pay money — genuine U.S. currency! — to watch this stuff. PG13. 85m. — Ryan Burns

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book This is How You Lose Her – Junot Díaz Riverhead Books

   Junot Díaz’s last work,  The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, won him a  well-deserved Pulitzer. His new collection of short  stories, This is How You Lose Her, sidesteps the  problem of topping that insurmountable work by  abandoning the epic for the episodic.  For a Pulitzer Prize winner, Díaz is startlingly  self-deprecating. To hear him tell it, he is a mediocre  but extraordinarily lucky writer whose sparse  bibliography reflects the few kernels of good material  gleaned from the crumpled reams of awful writing  he’s produced over the years. But Díaz’s humility and  aggressive self-editing are to our benefit, translating into sleek, unassuming prose and evident in the  painstakingly calibrated precision with which he  delivers his emotional coups de grâce.  By contrast, Díaz’s narrative also relies on a dense  mélange of Spanish and American slang and cultural  references as broad as Dominican history, American  science fiction and comic books. These references  are sometimes incomprehensible to anyone not, as  Díaz’s protagonist and alter ego Yunior are, DominicanAmerican nerds living in New Jersey. The result can be  daunting, but the benefit is that it situates Yunior with  vivid specificity, faithfully presenting a detailed crosssection of the unique cultural space he occupies.  With few exceptions, the stories in this collection  focus on the now familiar Yunior, who has appeared  in each of Díaz’s other works. With some overlap,  it picks up Yunior’s story where Drown left off and  proceeds to plot his life through the romantic relationships he forms and inevitably sabotages, mostly  by cheating. By design, the narrowed focus compels  us to view Yunior’s progression into manhood entirely  through the prism of his troubled love life, forcing  connections between his relationships with women  and the family scenes that comprise several stories.    And the stories are rife with explanations for  Yunior’s inability to form healthy attachments: the  adulterous father who abandons him; the player  brother, abusive even while battling cancer; the  relationship, at 16, with a woman decades his senior.  We can pity him his childhood and commiserate with  him in his heartbreak. But in the end, nothing quite  absolves Yunior of his inveterate adultery.  Some have criticized the collection as an implicit  endorsement of male misbehavior, and while it’s true  that Díaz never offers a full-throated disavowal of  Yunior’s womanizing or the sexism inherent in his  perspective, the collection is undeniably critical of  them. For contrast, take Tucker Max, whose stories  read like the fantasies of mildly sociopathic frat boys,  tales of sexual exploit that end crowing bare-chested  on the beer pong table, another notch in their  bottle-opener. Díaz, on the other hand, fades out on  an aging Yunior, self-flagellating with the memories  of his blown romances, belatedly repentant and  utterly alone. — Anthony Correale

List your class – just 50 cents/word per issue! Deadline: Monday, noon. Place online at www.northcoastjournal.com or e-mail: classified@northcoastjournal.com. Listings must be paid in advance by check, cash or Visa/MasterCard. Many classes require pre-registration.

Arts & Crafts EUREKA STUDIO ARTS. April Workshop: “Plein Air Landscape Painting” with Stock Schlueter April 19-21. Join him for one, two, or three days of painting fun and pay only for the days you attend. Details and sign-up at eurekastudioarts.com. 526 Fifth St., (707) 440-9027. (AC-0418)

DANCE WITH DEBBIE. Group & private lessons in ballroom, Latin, swing, & club dance in Humboldt county. We make dancing fun! www.dancewithdebbie.biz, (707) 464-3638 and on Facebook. (DMT-1226) REDWOOD RAKS WORLD DANCE STUDIO, ARCATA. West African, Belly Dance, Tango, Salsa, Swing, Breakdance, Jazz, Tap, Modern, Zumba, Hula, Congolese, more! Kids and Adults, 616-6876. (DMT-1226) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (DMT-0606) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (DMT-0606)

EUREKA STUDIO ARTS. April Workshop: “The Young Media Makers of All Ages” with Barbara Domanchuk April 27 & 28 Learn to produce and edit a one-minute video for your blog, webpage, Kickstarter or YouTube in this fast-paced, informative weekend. Register at eurekastudioarts.com. 526 Fifth St., (707) 440-9027.(AC-0418)

WEST AFRICAN DANCE. Tues.s, Thurs.s, 5:30-7 p.m., at Redwood Raks, Arcata. All levels welcome. Live drumming. Dulce, 832-9547, Christina, 498-0146. (DMT-1226)

MAKING PHOTOS 2. Wed’s., April 24-June 5, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $85. CR Eureka Downtown Site at 333 6th Street, Eureka. Explore the artistic side of taking photographs with Jesse Pearson. Large body of work will be created and demonstrated in a local public venue. Making Photos 1 is not a prerequisite. View us online at www.redwoods.edu, click the Community Education link. Call (707) 269-4000 to register (AC-0418)

SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginneradvanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (DMT-1226)

GLASS FUSING, DESIGNING PART SHEETS, ART GLASS & IMAGERY. $60/$40 members (materials cost depends on size of project made). Wed., May 1, 5:30-8:30 p.m. or Thurs., May 2, 1-4 p.m. Follow up to surface design and Part Sheets workshops, and will focus on incorporating previously made art glass into distinctive and dynamic fused work. Intermediate class, requires glass fusing background. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata. com. (AC-0425) GLASS FUSING, LUNCHEON PLATES & SERVING PLATTER. $125.00/$ 105 members (materials fees $60 and up). Tues./ Thurs., May 7 & 9, 5:30–8:30 p.m. or Wed./Fri., May 8 &10, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Create a unique luncheon set, including two 6” luncheon plates and a matching 10��� serving platter in this two day workshop. Intermediate workshop, requires glass fusing background. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0425) HAND BUILDING. $ 90 (5 weeks). With Otamay Hushing. Thurs.s, 10 a.m.-Noon, May 9-June 6. Flexible format to encourage creativity. Focus on basic techniques with slabs and coils as applied to a variety of projects. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (AC-0425)

GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (DMT-0606)

THE WA! AN ECSTATIC DANCE JOURNEY. At Om Shala Yoga. With Michael Furniss. Sat., March 16, 7:30-9 p.m. Put your body in motion and still the mind to a wave of world-beat music in a safe and sacred space. No experience or “dancing grace” necessary. $10. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (DMT-0418)

Fitness

BOOTY LUV. A FUN-ctional combo of yoga, Pilates, barre, kickboxing and a bit of dirty dancing. Sat., April 27, 12:30-3:30 p.m. $40/$35 for students. Reservations required. Arcata Core Pilates, 901 8th St., Arcata. (707) 845-8156, arcatacorepilates.com (F-0418) HUMBOLDT CAPOEIRA ACADEMY. Spring Session Feb. 1-June 15. Classes for Kids, Adults and Beginners. Martial Arts, Music and Acrobatics. Helps to improve strength, flexibility, coordination and self-control. Rental Space Available. For full class schedule visit www.humboldtcapoeira.com. (707) 498-6155, 865 8th St., Arcata. (F-0606) continued on next page

Communication

HOW TO CATCH A LIAR. Practical ways to tell if someone is telling you the truth will be explored at LifetreeCafe this week, Sun., April 21, 7 p.m. 76 13th St., Arcata. 672-2919, www. campbellcreek.org for more info. (CMM-0418)

Computers

ADOBE CS5 PROJECT WORKSHOP. Get individualized instruction as you create a project of your choice, from start to finish, using one or more of the Adobe applications Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign or Dreamweaver. Create that newsletter, logo, website or digital art projects with guidance from an experienced designer. With Annie Reid. Thurs., April 25-May 9, 6:30-9 p.m. and Sat., April 27 and May 4, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $175. Pre-registration required. Call HSU College of eLearning & Extended Education to register, 826-3731 or visit www.humboldt.edu/extended. (C-0418)

Dance, Music, Theater, Film

BEGINNING STEEL DRUM. Mon. evenings, May 6-27, 7-8 p.m., Pan Arts Network,1049 Samoa Blvd, Suite C. $50, (707) 407-8998, info@panartsnetwork.com (DMT- 0502)

For the Love of Color: Gina Wilde, Alchemy Yarns

April 27th, 11am to 6 pm

Learn techniques for working with dynamic color from the creative color artist behind fabulous Alchemy yarns. Find your own dazzling color palette through fun, fast and enlightening color exercises and create a gorgeous ascot scarf during class. Choose from an outrageously colorful and decadent treasure trove of Alchemy stash and create a unique palette with Gina for your future projects. Cost $115.00 + materials

Call 707.442.9276 or www.northcoastknittery.com NorthCoast KNittery 320 2nd St. between D&E, Eureka Space is Limited!

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northcoastjournal.com • North ••Thursday, NORTHCoast COASTJournal JOURNAL THURSDAY,april APRIL18, 18,2013 2013 • North Coast northcoastjournal.com northcoastjournal.com

continued from previous page AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching nonviolent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido.org, info@northcoastaikido. org, 826-9395. (F-1226) INTRO TO WOMEN’S FENCING. May 2-30. $75. Preregistration required. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0425) NIA-DANCE FUSION. Modern dance/fitness for all abilities. Mon.s, 6-7 p.m., Studio of Dance Arts Eureka. Wed.s, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Redwood Raks Arcata. $5 drop-in, $50/12 classes (707) 441-9102 (F-1226) NORTH COAST SELF DEFENSE ACADEMY. Come learn your choice of Gracie Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Techniques, Filipino Kali, Jun Fan Stand Up Kickboxing, & Muay Thai/ MMA Sparring. Group and private sessions available 7 days a week for men, women and children; all experience and fitness levels welcome. Call or visit (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St., Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense. com (F-1226) SUN YI’S ACADEMY OF TAE KWON DO. Classes for kids and adults, child care, fitness gym, and more. Tae Kwon Do Mon-Fri 5-6 p.m., 6-7 p.m., Sat 10-11 a.m. Come watch or join a class, 1215 Giuntoli Lane, or visit www.sunyisarcata. com, 825-0182. (F-1227) NORTH COAST FENCING ACADEMY. Fencing (with swords!). Improve your mind and body in a fun, intense workout, and a very chill environment. Ages 8 and up. 1459 M St., Arcata, contact Justin (707) 601-1657 text or phone, or email northcoastfencingacademy@gmail.com (F-0606) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba.com (F-1226) ZUMBA WITH MIMI. Put the FUN back into your workout! Latin & Pop music, sure to leave you sweaty and smiling! Wed. & Fri. 9:30 a.m. at Redwood Raks in the Old Creamery Building, Arcata. Tues. & Thurs. 9:30 a.m., Fri. 5:30 p.m., Humboldt Capoeira Academy, Arcata. (F-1226)

Kids & Teens

CUB CLUB MINI MIGRATORS. At Sequoia Park Zoo. For 5-7 year olds on Sat. May 11. Join us for a wild adventure at the zoo. Call 441-4263 or visit sequoiaparkzoo.net for info (K-0425) HIP HOP DANCE CREW. Have your child learn the art of hip hop dance! Give your child confidence & a creative energy outlet. 4 week class for ages 5-9, Wed.s, 6:30-7:15 p.m. starting 4/24, $25. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0418) LITTLE DRIBBLERS BASKETBALL. Learn & practice basic skills such as dribbling, passing & ball control for age 5-7. Emphasis is on fun with focus on fundamentals. Class offered Sat.s, beginning 4/27, 10-10:45 a.m. $25. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0418) MUSIC & MOVEMENT. Encourage children to use their imagination as they develop motor skills, body awareness & natural movement. Ages 1½-2½, John Ryan Youth Center, 1653 J St., Eureka. Sat.s, beginning 4/20, 9:30-10:15 a.m. $25. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0418) SO YOU THINK YOU CAN DANCE. Express yourself through dance! Learn & practice simple routines for a performance at the end of this 6 week class for family & friends. Ages 5-8. At Ryan Center, Sat.s, beginning 4/20, 10:30-11:15 a.m. $25. Register online at www.eurekarecreation.com or call 441-4244 for more info. (K-0418) CERAMICS FOR OLDER KIDS, AGES 7-12. $80 (Two 5 week classes offered). May 6-June 3 & May 7-June 4. Mon., 4-6 p.m., Tues., 4-6 p.m. With Bob Raymond. Adventures with clay; Learn various hand building and wheel-throwing techniques. Fire Arts Center, 520 S. G St, 826-1445. www.fireartsarcata.com. (K-0425) PAGEANT ON THE PLAZA. This summer the Arcata Playhouse is offering a two-week adventure in the creation of outdoor spectacle and performance. Week one includes classes in Movement, Music, Stilts, Puppetry. Week two create a show! July 8-20, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Ages 9 - 16, $300 Call 822-1575 to register today! (K-0627) SUMMER THEATER WORKSHOPS AT THE ARCATA PLAYHOUSE! June 24-28, 2 classes for kids ages 7-9, 9 a.m-Noon. Fantastic Fairy Tales. 12:30-3:30 p.m., Clowning for Kids. 2 classes for kids ages 10-14. 9 a.m -Noon, Commedia and Mask Performance. 12:30-3:30 p.m. Improv in Action. $100 for one class, $75 for a second class. More info and registration at 822-1575! (K-0620)

DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class ! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (F-1226)

ACTIVE KIDS = HAPPY KIDS. Come learn self-confidence, discipline and respect while gaining true life skills through martial arts. North Coast Self Defense Academy is offering two introductory lessons for only $14 with this ad. Call or visit- (707) 822-6278 or 820 N St, Building #1 Suite C, Arcata www.northcoastselfdefense. com (K-1226)

Home & Garden

Lectures

AMERICAN CLAY WORKSHOPS. at ABC’s new location in Old Town, Eureka. Fri., May 3. American Clay Application Basics class, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., covering wall prep, basic application, and finishing techniques. $150, comes with certificate of completion and 10% off American Clay Coupon. For those experienced with American Clay application, Sat., May 4, Artistic Techniques class, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $80. Save $30 if you sign up for both classes. Space is limited, contact ABC at (707) 445-4733 or info@abcgreenbuilding.com for more information or to register. (HG-0425) BASIC HOME REPAIR. Sat’s., May 4-18, 8:30 a.m.-Noon. $75. First class meets at CR Eureka Downtown Site at 333 6th Street, Eureka. Join us for a fun, practical class on basic home repair. View online at www.redwoods. edu, click the Community Education link. Class fills fast, call (707) 269-4000 to register today. (HG-0418)

WEALTH BUILDING INVESTMENT STRATEGIES. Free Seminar! Premier Financial Group is dedicated to helping our community achieve financial peace of mind. Come to our free educational seminar on Wed., May 8, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Humboldt Bay Aquatic Center, 921 Waterfront Dr., Eureka. This is a non-sales seminar. RSVP at (707) 443-2741 or online at www.premieradvisor. com. (L-0502)

Over 50

OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE (OLLI). Offers dynamic classes for people age 50 and over. Call 826-5880 or visit www.humboldt.edu/olli to register for classes. (O-1226)

30 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

WHAT’S AFLOAT IN HUMBOLDT BAY? Learn about trawlers, trollers, former govt./naval craft, pleasure boats, the oyster fleet and more of the vessels moored in the bay’s two major marinas. With Ray Hillman. Fri., May 3 5:30-8:30 p.m. and a fieldtrip on Sat., May 4, 9:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. $50/OLLI members, $75/nonmembers. OLLI: 826-5880, www.humboldt.edu/olli (O-0425)

Spiritual

VOLUNTEER TRAINING FOR HOSPICE OF HUMBOLDT. Hospice of Humboldt offers patient care and grief support volunteer training April 27 & 28, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. This eight hour introductory training provides information on how you can become part of the patient care team and bring specialized support to patients and families at a time when care matters the most. For more information, call (707) 445-8443 ext. 355 or visit our website www. hospiceofhumboldt.org. (V-0425)

KDK ARCATA BUDDHIST GROUP. Under the direction of Lama Lodru Rinpoche. We practice Tibetan meditation, followed by discussion. All are welcome. For more info contact Lama Nyugu (707) 442-7068, Fierro_roman@yahoo.com. Sun’s 6 p.m, Community Yoga Center 890 G St, Arcata. Our webpage is www.kdkarcatagroup.org (S-0502)

CAREGIVER TRAINING. Area 1 Agency on Aging offers FREE 42-hour course in Willow Creek. Prepare for new career, take better care of loved ones, request employment referrals. Sessions held Thurs.s 5-8 p.m. and Sat.s, 9 a.m.–4 p.m., May 11-30. Homework due at first session. Call (707) 443-4363 to schedule registration. (V-0509)

TAROT AS AN EVOLUTIONARY PATH. Classes in Eureka, and Arcata. Private mentorships, readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442-4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com (S-0228)

Wellness/Bodywork

ARCATA ZEN GROUP MEDITATION. Beginners welcome. Sun., 8 a.m. North Coast Aikido Center, on F St. between 8th and 9th in Arcata. Wed., 6-7 p.m. at First Christian Church, 730 K, Eureka, ramp entrance and upstairs; newcomers please come 5 minutes early. Sun. contact, 826-1701. Wed. contact, barryevans9@yahoo.com, or for more info. call (707) 826-1701. www.arcatazengroup. org. (S-0606)

Sports/Recreation

TENNIS CLASSES & LESSONS. Classes & Lessons for all Ages & Abilities taught by a certified USPTA Pro. Find out more at www.humboldttennisclub.com or call (707) 616-4781. (SR-0418) SENIOR SOFTBALL. 50’s and 60’s plus league needs players. Must be at least 49 to play. www.humboldtseniorsoftball.com Call Brad Golding (707) 982-3223 (SR-0502) ROLLER SKATING. Blue Lake Parks & Recreation Fri./ Sat., 6:30-9:30 p.m., Sun. 2-5 p.m. Adult Skate: 2nd Sun. of every month, 6:30-9:30 p.m. To schedule birthday parties, call 668-5932 or find us on facebook at parks-rec@ bluelake.ca.gov. (SR-1226)

Therapy/Support

DO YOU HAVE A PROBLEM WITH FOOD? Overeaters Anonymous can help. Join us Sat.s, 10 a.m., HSU Student Services building. www.northcoast.oar2.org (TS-0509) ESSURE SUPPORT GROUP. For women who have had Essure and are experiencing a decline in health, you are not alone. Offering support and resources. Tamara, (707) 498-9447. (TS-0425) FREE DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP. Walk-in support group for anyone suffering from depression. Meet Mon.s 6:30 p.m -7:45 p.m, at the Church of the Joyful Healer, McKinleyville. Questions? Call (707) 839-5691. (T-1226) FREE GAMBLING TREATMENT. Call (707) 496-2856 Shawna Bell, LMFT, MFC #47122 www.norcalrecoveryservices.com. (T-1226) SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (T-1226)

Vocational

CAREGIVER TRAINING. Area 1 Agency on Aging offers FREE 42-hour course in Eureka. Prepare for new career, take better care of loved ones, request employment referrals. Sessions held Tues.s and Thurs.s, 6-9 p.m., May 7-June 4, 2013. Homework due at first session. Call Caregiver Services at (707) 443-4363 to schedule registration. (V-0502)

DANDELION HERBAL CENTER. Wild Foods Class & Banquet with Jane Bothwell. Sat., May 4, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Come discover the abundance of wild edibles that surround you! $65. Petrolia Seaweeding Weekend with Allison Poklemba & Jane Bothwell. June 8-9. Learn how to identify, ethically harvest, and prepare local sea vegetables. $150. (707) 442-8157, www.dandelionherb.com (W-0502) FORREST YOGA WORKSHOPS, ANATOMY & HANDSON ASSISTING. With nationally renowned visiting instructor, Brian Campbell. At Om Shala Yoga. April 19-21. Yoga instructors receive 20% discount. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www.omshalayoga.com (W-0418 FIRST DEGREE REIKI CLASS. In this one day class participants receive first degree Reiki attunements, information about the history and practice of Reiki, and practice giving and receiving Reiki treatments. Visit www.humboldtreikilady.com for more info and registration. New classes each month at Sun Yi’s Academy in Arcata. Next class 4/20 Noon-4 p.m. $100 (W-0418) FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. With Lee Tuley, Certified Rolfer. Find out what Rolfing can do for you. (541) 251-1885 (W-1226) AYURVEDIC MASSAGE TRAINING & CLEANSING RETREATS. With Traci Webb and Myrica Morningstar, Training meets five weekends (Fri-Sun). May 17-July 14. Learn over 16 Ayurvedic Massages and Herbal Body Therapies for Career Enhancement and Self-Healing (Deadline: April 26). Group & Personal Cleansing Retreats: July 17-Aug. 11. Call for details. NCBTMB Approved CE Provider. REGISTER: Northwest Institute of Ayurveda: www.ayurvedicliving.com, info@ayurvedicliving.com, (707) 601-9025. (W-0425) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (W-1226) SPRING NUTRITIVE CLEANSE. At Om Shala Yoga. With Amy Aiello. Sun., April 28, 1-4 p.m. Cleanse for your individual body type. Food lists, recipes, self-care instructions and herbs will be provided. $65 by April 22, $75 after. 858 10th St., Arcata. 825-YOGA (9642), www. omshalayoga.com (W-0418) START YOUR CAREER IN MASSAGE THERAPY! Daytime classes begin June, 2013 at Arcata School of Massage. 650-Hour Therapeutic Massage Certification will prepare you for Professional Certification in California, and the National Exam. Our comprehensive program prepares your body, mind and heart to become a caring, confident professional massage therapist. Call 822-5223 for information or visit arcatamassage.com (W-1226) ●

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

classified@northcoastjournal.com

Humboldt Bay Tourism Center is Humboldt County’s newest and most innovative Visitor Services Agency.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/10/2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. T.S. No.: 2012F007 A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranted, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession , or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principle sum of the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: Lisa St. John Duly Appointed Trustee: Professional Trust Deed Services Recorded 10/20/2008 as Instrument No. 2008-24846-5 in book –, page – of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Humboldt County, California. Date of Sale: 5/2/2013 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: In the main lobby of Ming Tree Realtors, 509 J Street, Suite #1, Eureka, CA 95501 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $230,581.50 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 2310 Fischer Lane Eureka, CA 95503 A.P.N.: #305-271-007 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand

that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 707-268-1205, using the file number assigned to the this case 2012F007. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Dated: 4/8/2013 Professional Trust Deed Services P.O. Box 115 Eureka, California 95502 Sale Line: (707) 268-1205 s/: Karen Mesa, Agent 4/11. 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-114)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00220

The following persons are doing business as CUTTEN MINI STORAGE at 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA 95503, 4060 Campton Rd., Eureka, CA 95503. Cutten Mini Storage, LLC. 4060 Campton Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Thomas E. Sutton, Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County

Seeking Services & Partnership to represent Humboldt County on the Redwood Coast. Go to www.HumboldtBayTourismCenter.com for detailed Proposal. Submit your bids on or before May 1, 2013 by 5pm. For all submissions please address questions from web-site (and any other Proposal information) in an email to our Lead Concierge Liz Valls at Liz@hbtc.info 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-112) on April 8, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9/2013 (13-115)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00221

The following persons are doing business as REDWOOD APARTMENTS at 2341 Fern Street, Eureka, CA 95503, 4060 Campton Rd., Eureka, CA 95503. Redwood Apartments, LLC. 4060 Campton Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Thomas E. Sutton, Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 8, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9/2013 (13-116)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00222

County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 2, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/2013 (13-107)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00207

The following person is doing business as BLACK LIGHTNING MOTORCYCLE CAFE at 440 F St., Eureka, CA 95501. Jeffrey S. Hesseltine 420 Tanglewood Rd. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 7/1/2013. /s Jeffrey S. Hesseltine. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 2, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/2013 (13-109)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00169

The following persons are doing business as BRICK & FIRE at 1630 F Street, Eureka, CA 95501. KGJ Partnership LLC. 1630 F St. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/2013. /s D. James Hughes, Member. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on April 9, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

The following person is doing business as MUSIC FOR MUSIC at 12859 Torrey Pines, Auburn, CA 95602. Martin Francis McLean 6360 ½ Longview Rd. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Martin McLean. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 18, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk

4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9/2013 (13-117)

4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-103)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00205

The following persons are doing business as WOODFOOT SURFCRAFT at 3144 C St., Eureka, CA 95503. Lucas David Davisthornton 3144 C St. Eureka, CA 95503 Gretchen Arina Anderson 3144 C St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 5/1/2012. /s Gretchen Arina Anderson. This statement was filed with the

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00187

The following person is doing business as FANCY THAT! FINE CATERING at 1675 Hannah Ct., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Michelle Mei-Ling Foster 1675 Hannah Ct. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/26/13. /s Michelle Foster.

legal NOTICES ➤ continued on next page

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013

31

Field notes

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00148

continued from previous page. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 26, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-102)

Bella Vista quarry, McKinleyVille, aBout 1885.

national archiVes

The Most Expensive Lighthouse (Part 1) By Barry Evans

fieldnotes@northcoastjournal.com

I

n 1792 Captain George Vancouver, sailing north toward Alaska, gave the name “Dragon Rocks” to a reef six miles west of the nearest land, which he called “Point St. George” and which is now the site of Crescent City’s airport. By the time the steam side-wheeler Brother Jonathan foundered on the rocks on July 30, 1865, three months after the end of the Civil War, navigation charts were identifying the hazard by its present name, “St. George Reef.” The Brother Jonathan disaster, in which 225 lives were lost, prompted the Lighthouse Board to request funds to build a lighthouse on the reef. It took 17 years for the initial funds to come through and another 10 before the light shone for the first time. The direct predecessor of the St. George Reef light was the Tillamook Rock lighthouse, which Scottish engineer Charles Alexander Ballantyne completed in 1881 off the northern Oregon Coast. The next year, supported by a $50,000 appropriation from Congress, Ballantyne surveyed St. George Reef and chose the one-acre Northwest Seal Rock as the best construction site for what would become the most inaccessible lighthouse in the United States. The very quality that made the metamorphic rock so desirable as a foundation, its toughness, would also make it a nightmare to drill. However, in one hectic summer season of work, drillers and dynamite-blasters completed the base for the pier. By October 1883, when winter storms forced a hiatus in construction, the previously smooth rock had been sculpted into a stepped pyramid core ready to receive the first granite blocks for the lighthouse base. And that’s where Humboldt County played its part. Ballantyne originally thought granite would have to be shipped all the way from San Francisco Bay. In December 1883 he heard of

a source of first-quality granite on Bella Vista Hill, on the north bank of our Mad River, near present-day St. Maru Lane in McKinleyville. The location of the rock could hardly have been more convenient. Lumberman John Vance had recently completed his Mad River Railroad, from Essex (between Arcata and Blue Lake) across the river to a wharf on the Mad River Slough, taking it right past the Bella Vista Hill. Ballantyne contracted with an ex-captain of the Army Corps of Engineers, A.H. Payson, to quarry great chunks of granite and skid them down the hill to be loaded onto railroad skips. From there they were shipped by rail to the Mad River Slough and then barged, skips and all, down Humboldt Bay to Paysonville. A plaque (suitably set into a block of granite) at the Samoa Boat Ramp Park parking lot on the North Spit memorializes the site of Paysonville. It’s pretty idyllic now, but it must have been a scene of wild activity starting in 1884. Payton employed a gang of Italian stonecutters to offload the raw granite blocks and cut them down to exact size, allowing a tolerance of no more than three-sixteenths of an inch (in tough-as-nails granite!). The finished blocks weighed nearly three tons on average, while the largest tipped the scales at twice that. Construction on the lighthouse proper began in the spring of 1884. The first batch of a total of 1,339 dressed granite blocks was winched from a ship to the freshly hewn Northwest Seal Rock, where workers anchored the stones to bare rock with brass dowels that measured 2½ inches in diameter. By the end of that construction season, 13 rows had been set in place with sturdy mortise-and-tenon joints. l The saga of St. George’s Reef light continues next week.

32 North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00193

The following persons are doing business as BIGFOOT EQUIPMENT & REPAIR at 76 Country Club Dr., Suite A, Willow Creek, CA 95573, P.O. Box 541, Willow Creek, CA 95573. Ready Davis 920 Newman Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Christopher Todd Hern 926 Newman Rd. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/2011. /s Ready Davis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 28, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk 4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-101)

  FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00143

The following person is doing business as NOTHING BETTER… LAWN & MAINTENANCE at 3172 Matthew Lane, Fortuna, CA 95540. Jessie Ray Genaro 3172 Matthew Lane Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jessie Genaro. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk           3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-97)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00145

The following persons are doing business as MAD RIVER BREWING COMPANY at 195 Taylor Way, Blue Lake, CA 95525, P.O. Box 767, Blue Lake, CA 95525. Mad River Brewing Co., Inc. 195 Taylor Way Blue Lake, CA 95525 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s James Crowell, Director. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 6, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk       3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-91)

The following persons are doing business as THE JOURNEY at 95 Belleview Avenue, Rio Dell, CA 95562, P.O. Box 236, Rio Dell, CA 95562. Assemby of God of Rio Dell 95 Belleview Avenue Rio Dell, CA 95562 The business is conducted by A Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Jeff Miller, President/Pastor. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 7, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk                    3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-90)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00168

The following person is doing business as OLD TOWN CARRIAGE CO. at 2nd & F Street, Eureka, CA 95502, 374 Columbia St., Brooklyn, NY 11231. Brendan Fearon 374 Columbia St. Brooklyn, NY 11231 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 3/25/13. /s Brendan Fearon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 18, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk                        3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-84)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00172

The following persons are doing business as GRUMPY GOAT WINGERY at 1902 C Ave., McKinleyville, CA 95519. Peter Thomas Olsen 1902 C Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 Christine Michelle Gorshe-Olsen 1902 C Ave. McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by A Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on 4/1/13. /s Peter Olsen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 19, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk                         3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-87)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 13-00175

The following person is doing business as LOTS OF PEPPER at 4100 Union St., Eureka, CA 95503. Christina Lewis 4100 Union St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by An Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name listed above on n/a. /s Christina Lewis. This statement was filed with the

County Clerk of Humboldt County on March 20, 2013. CAROLYN CRNICH Humboldt County Clerk                                                                                      3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-96)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130220 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: JESSE DOTY TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: JESSE DOTY for a decree changing names as follows: Present name JESSE DOTY to Proposed Name JESSE JAMES DOTY THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 16, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: April 4, 2013 Filed: April 4, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/2013 (13-113)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130201 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

PETITION OF: DANNY JOSEPH LOPEZ JR. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: DANNY JOSEPH LOPEZ JR. for a decree changing names as follows: Present name DANNY JOSEPH LOPEZ JR. to Proposed Name DANNY JOSEPH WHITE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

3/28, 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-95)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF NORMAN DELBERT MUDIE, AKA NORMAN D. MUDIE CASE NO. PR130123

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: NORMAN DELBERT MUDIE, NORMAN D. MUDIE, NORMAN MUDIE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by LINDA RAE WILBOURN in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests LINDA RAE WILBOURN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow

  

4/18, 4/25, 5/2/2013 (13-120)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF KELLI ELIZABETH MCFARLAND, CASE NO. PR130114

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: KELLI ELIZABETH MCFARLAND A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by ERIN ELLEN MCFARLAND ORTIZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ERIN ELLEN MCFARLAND ORTIZ appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under

4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-111)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ROSANNA CARR, CASE NO. PR130115

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: ROSANNA CARR A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by TAJ FRYE in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that TAJ FRYE appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very

legal NOTICES ➤ continued on next page

©2013 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

PETITION OF: PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner: PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL for a decree changing names as follows: Present name PAMELA DENISE TEN NAPEL to Proposed Name PAMELA DENISE WARWICK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 9, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 21, 2013 Filed: March 21, 2013 /s/ R.E. KOSSOW Judge of the Superior Court

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK! ACROSS 1. Executed 4. Careerbuilder.com listing 7. As good as usual 14. Blow away 15. Game with 108 cards 16. How some professional services are offered 17. 1992 Damon Wayans comedy 19. Dull answer to “What’s new?” 20. With it 21. Display setting for an electronic toy 22. Brother who appeared in none of the films starring his siblings Chico,

Harpo, Groucho and Zeppo 26. Comfort 27. Celebrity widowed in 1980 28. Dye holders 30. Dashboard Confessional genre 34. “Oh yeah?” 40. Corrected a timeline entry 41. Stop, to a sailor 42. Bun maker, perhaps 43. Spice in Indian cuisine 44. Al dente 46. Casino spot 47. It’s bad to be behind them 51. Sporting event with Shinto rituals

55. Herbal tea type 57. What a texter of “:-(“ might be 58. Set apart 59. Nadya Suleman’s nickname in the tabloids ... or an apt title for this puzzle 63. Grows bored with 64. Singer Corinne Bailey ___ 65. Ending for AriZona flavors 66. Like a deal that won’t happen again 67. You may leave them in stitches: Abbr. 68. Author

DOWN 1. Hoover, e.g. 2. ____ Jima 3. Not Rep. or Ind. 4. Mes after Mayo 5. Early afternoon hr. 6. Early man? 7. On deck 8. Formal occasion 9. From head ____ 10. U.S. president whose mother’s first name was Stanley 11. Preppy shirts 12. Battery terminal 13. Mindless 18. Electrician’s unit 21. “Vlad the ____” (1982 kids’ book about a baby vampire)

22. Busy people 23. Not realized 24. Dour 25. Like noisy fans 29. Gang follower? 31. Opposite of bien 32. 4 x 4, for short 33. Lord’s laborer 35. “I’ve been ____!” 36. Gardner of “The Barefoot Contessa” 37. Lure 38. Stiff-upper-lip sort 39. Get-up-and-go 41. Jon of “Mad Men” 43. Rock’s Motley ___ 45. Remains 47. Place to wash up

48. Romeo’s love? 49. They’re filled before shooting 50. Runaway success 52. One of Walt Disney’s 26 53. Partners 54. Hubbub 55. Gaston who managed the Toronto Blue Jays to World Series wins in 1992 and 1993 56. “Am ____ fat?” 59. Refinery material 60. “The Amazing Race” necessity 61. Poem of praise 62. The entire speaking cast of “Lawrence of Arabia”

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

MEDIUM #13

www.sudoku.com

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. CV130167 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501

the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 2, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LEON A. KARJOLA ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 FIFTH STREET, SUITE E EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-0804 April 3, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

Solution, tips and computer program at

4/4, 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-98)

the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 9, 2013, at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 08. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of the notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: WILLIAM T. KAY, JR. SBN 59581 LAW OFFICE OF WILL KAY 628 H STREET EUREKA, CA. 95501 (707) 445-2301 APRIL 12, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

CROSSWORD By David Levinson Wilk

NOTICE OF HEARING Date: May 14, 2013. Time: 1:45 p.m. The address of the court is: Same as noted above, Dept. 8 Date: March 25, 2013 Filed: March 25, 2013 /s/ W. BRUCE WATSON Judge of the Superior Court

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013

33

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE. important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 2, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: LEON A. KARJOLA ATTORNEY AT LAW 732 FIFTH STREET, SUITE E EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-0804 April 5, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/11, 4/18, 4/25/2013 (13-110)

AMENDED NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF JOSHUA D. ANDERSON, CASE NO. PR130093

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOSHUA D. ANDERSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by MICHELLE L. ANDERSON AND KATHLEEN REGLI in the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that KATHLEEN REGLI be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination

in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on May 2, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: BRADFORD C. FLOYD SBN 136459 LAW OFFICE OF BRADFORD C. FLOYD 819 SEVENTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 445-9754 March 29, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-106)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DENNIS A. MORGAN AKA DENNIS ALBERT MORGAN AND DENNIS MORGAN, CASE NO. PR130111

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DENNIS A. MORGAN, ALSO KNOWN AS DENNIS ALBERT MORGAN AND DENNIS MORGAN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DOREN ANTHONY MORGAN in the Superior Court of

California, County of Humboldt. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DOREN ANTHONY MORGAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 25, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept. 8. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: JAMES K. MORRISON MORRISON & MORRISON 3005 G STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 443-8012 March 28, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 4/4, 4/11, 4/18/2013 (13-105)

Y

our fictitious business name statement will expire

five years from the date it was last filed with the County Clerk. You have 40 days from the expiration date to renew your FBNS with the County. A new statement does not need to be published unless there has been a change in the information required in the expired statement. If any changes occur then you must file a new FBNS and have published again. Within 30 days from the stamped refiling date, you must begin publishing the statement in the newspaper. If you publish it in the North Coast Journal for the required four weeks, on the last day of publication a “proof of publication” will be sent to the County Clerk to complete the filing process. The cost for running your ficticious business name in the

NORTH COAST JOURNAL

is a flat $50 fee.

442-1400

COAST Journal JOURNAL• •Thursday, THURSDAY, APRIL 2013 • northcoastjournal.com North Coast April 18,18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com 34 NORTH

the Employment County of Humboldt

SENIOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELOR $3073 - $3942 mo. plus benefits

Provides substance abuse counseling to individuals, groups and families in an out-patient setting; facilitates support groups; participates in substance abuse prevention and education programs; directs the work of other staff. Must have two years of experience providing drug and alcohol counseling and education services and possess certification as an Alcohol and Drug Counselor by an organization approved by the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs. Valid California driver’s license required. Applicants must pass a background investigation. Filing deadline: Thursday, April 25, 2013. For application come to Human Resources, Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka or apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs Jobline: (707) 476-2357. AA/EOE.

CARE PROVIDERS needed NOW Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live with you. Earn up to $3,600 tax-free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on-site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt! 707-442-4500 #14 www.camentorfha.com

LEGAL OFFICE ASSISTANT I County of Humboldt $2,051-$2,632 Monthly

Performs clerical work and reviews and processes legal documents in various County legal and law enforcement offices. One year of general office experience is desirable; some knowledge of legal documents, forms and terminology is required. Must be able to pass a detailed background investigation. Filing deadline: April 24, 2013. Apply at Human Resources, Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St, Eureka or online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs 24 hr jobline: (707) 476-2357 AA/EOE

INVESTIGATOR (DISTRICT ATTORNEY) County of Humboldt $4,356 - $5,590 monthly, plus excellent benefits.

Conduct investigations for the District Attorney’s Office relating to felony, misdemeanor, juvenile, civil, conservatorship and related cases. Must possess a valid Basic POST Certificate. Desirable qualifications would include five years of experience as a peace officer in a law enforcement agency. Final filing date: Friday, May 3, 2013. For information and application contact County Human Resources, 825 5th Street, Room 100, Eureka, CA 95501. (707) 476-2349. 24 hr. Jobline (476-2357). www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs. AA/EOE

County of Humboldt

Office ServiceS SuperviSOr $3,027 - $3,884 Monthly

Responsible for planning, organizing, supervising, reviewing and evaluating the work of a group of office support employees. The work also includes performance of difficult, technical, complex or specialized office support work. Four years of office support or secretarial experience desired. Filing Deadline: Monday, April 29, 2013 Apply at Human Resources, Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka or apply online at www.co.humboldt.ca.us/jobs Jobline: (707) 476-2357. AA/EOE.

CONCIERGE TEAM MEMBER

Do you have extensive knowledge of local area attractions, rails, parks, lodging & dining? Interested in registering guests for our many tours and itineraries with speed and efficiency? Must be above 21 years old. Must provide California Food Handler Card and CPR/ First Aid cert. for employment within 30 days. 15-28 hrs a week $10 per hour plus gratuity.EOE/M/ F/D/V See website for more information.

www.HumboldtBayTourismCenter.com

TASTING ROOM TEAM MEMBER Are you a dynamic, personable individual who can entertain and serve guests in our Tasting Room Bar? Must be above 21 years old and have prior bartending or tasting room experience. Must provide Califronia Food Handler Card and CPR/ First Aid cert. for employment within 30 days. 15-28 hrs a week $10 per hour plus gratuity.EOE/M/ F/D/V

See website for more information.

www.HumboldtBayTourismCenter.com

Place your ad online www.northcoastjournal.com

CONTINUED ON next page

Rentals

Employment FINANCE SPECIALIST

Network Administrator Responsible for aiding in the design of network deployments; implementation of approved designs; and the constant upkeep and maintenance of all network resources. Must have 5 years exp in IT field and possess thorough understanding of networking hardware and technology protocols, potentially including but not limited to TCP/IP, DNS, DHCP, MX, SMTP, SSL, certificates, VPN, VRRP, VLAN, P-VLAN, STP, RSTP. Req exp with implementing, designing LANs, WANs, clusters, and MANs. For an application and more information please go to www.bearrivercasino.com or call 707-733-1900 x 167.

Full-time position performs a range of fiscal functions regarding accounts payable, payroll, and accounts receivables functions. Starts at $15.59/hr. Must be able to pass criminal history fingerprint clearance. Excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, holidays and paid insurance. Application and job description available at www.changingtidesfs.org, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501, or (707) 444-8293. Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to Nanda Prato at the above address by Wednesday, April 24th at 5 p.m. EOE

SEEKING

JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN

United indian HealtH ServiceS, inc. 1600 Weeot Way, Arcata, CA 95521 • (707) 825-5000

compliance/Qi administrative assistant PHV – FT – Must have AS degree & 2 yrs direct exp or HS Diploma or equiv. & 6 yrs related exp. In accordance with PL 93-638 American Indian Preference shall be given. Must have valid driver license & be insurable. UIHS is an alcohol & drug free workplace w/req’d testing. For qualifications go to www.uihs.org or call (707) 825-5000. Closes: 4/29/13 @ 5PM.

Please review application and apply on our website.

www.McKeeverEnergy.com

Now Hiring:

14 W. Wabash Ave. Eureka, CA 268-1866 eurekaca.expresspros.com

Insurance Agent Insurance Customer Service Medical Assistant • Receptionist Loan Officer • Office Assistant Painter• Construction Laborers

MAINTENANCE WORKER 1 F/T Eureka DIRECTOR OF NURSING 1 F/T Arcata REGISTERED NURSE 1F/T Eureka, 1 F/T Willow Creek LEAD MEDICAL ASSISTANT 1 F/T Eureka (Pediatrics) MEDICAL ASSISTANT 2 F/T Arcata,

1 F/T Eureka (Pediatrics), 1 F/T Crescent City

REGISTERED DENTAL ASSISTANT 1 P/T Crescent City,

2 P/T Willow Creek

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Eureka (Pediatrics),

1 F/T-Temp Mckinleyville

DENTAL RECEPTIONIST 1 F/T Willow Creek (32-40 hrs/week) TEEN CLINIC ADVOCATES (must be in high school) P/T Crescent City, McKinleyville, Arcata, Willow Creek

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH PROVIDER 1 P/T Willow Creek Call (707) 826-8633 ext 5140 Visit www.opendoorhealth.com

Senior GL Accountant • Accounting Supervisor Technical Writer • Construction Acct. Supervisor Controller • Medical Records Tech Medical Ins. Billing Clerk • Food Services Worker Geotechnical Engineer • Communications Coordinator General Manager -Media Insurance Agent Licensed California Class B Driver/Labor

707.445.9641 www.sequoiapersonnel.com 2930 E Street Eureka, CA 95501 AIRLINE CAREERS. begin here - Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial assistance available. Post 9/11 GI Bill accepted. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 1-888-242-3214. (E-0418) EXPERIENCED WINDOW CLEANING TECH/SUPERVISOR. Starting pay up to $14 per hour based on experience. Candidate must be able to lead crews and perform work at commercial and residential job sites, must be well versed in ladder and pole work. Call (707) 269-0180. (E-0425)

PHLEBOTOMIST/LAB ASSISTANT. Greet patients, collect and prepare specimens, place orders with reference lab, provide clerical support for lab. Current CA CPT cert. required. Full time with benefits. Jerold Phelps Community Hospital, Garberville. www.shchd.org. (E-0418) CARDIAC SONOGRAPHER FOR HIRE. Available July 1. Bachelor of Science. Board Certified. Resume available. mimi_dills@ yahoo.com (E-0530)

MACHINIST. Must be proficient in the use of lathe, milling machine & drill press and have exp in welding (arc & gas) and use of a cutting torch in order to fabricate, modify & repair parts. Must be able to cut multiple threads & perform straight & taper turning and have the ability to work from plans, sketches and verbal directions for precision layout work. Req’d to have own tools and able to work wknds and holidays as scheduled. Apply in person at Sierra Pacific Ind, 2593 New Navy Base Rd in Arcata, Mon - Fri, 9 AM - 4 PM or fax resume to ATTN: Anne (707) 442-4954. We are a drug and tobacco free work place. A verifiable SS# is req’d. EOE (E-0418) FACILITY SITE REVIEW NURSE. Temp to Hire. Completes Part C Site reviews for PCP’s. Includes assessment of physical accessibility. Communicates performance scores. Develops action plans as necessary. Current CA RN license. Work from home with frequent travel to Northern CA Rural Counties. For complete job description or to apply visit www.partnershiphp.org. AA/EOE (E-0425) OPENINGS AVAILABLE. Part Time & On-Call Case Managers, Mental Health Aides, Dietary Aides, Housekeepers. Needed for Mental Health Rehabilitation Center. Apply at Crestwood Behavioral Health, 2370 Buhne St, Eureka. (E-0425) CARE PROVIDERS NEEDED NOW. Make extra money, great opportunity. Special Needs Adults live w/you. Earn up to $3,600 tax-free/mo. Bring 4 references. Application on-site. Must have extra bedroom, HS/GED & clean criminal record. Call Jamie today for appt ! (707)442-4500 #14, www. camentorfha.com (E-1226) DRIVERS. CAE Transport. Weekdays/Sat.s, various day shifts. 21+ & clean driving record. Print application at www.cityambulance. com, send WITH COVER LETTER to personnel@cityambulance. com or 135 W. 7th St., Eureka, CA 95501. (E-0425) AMERICAN STAR PRIVATE SECURITY. Is Now Hiring. Clean record, Drivers license required. Must own vehicle. Apply at 922 E Street, Suite 209, Eureka. (707) 476-9262. (E-0509) HOME CAREGIVERS PT/FT. Nonmedical caregivers to assist elderly in their homes. Top hourly wages. 442-8001. (E-1226)

Hiring?

Post your job opportunities in www.northcoastjournal.com • 442-1400

ARCATA HOUSE FOR RENT $1300. 3 bedrooms 2 bathroom with beautiful new kitchen, stacking washer and dryer, 2 bedrooms with south facing windows, open living room kitchen, fenced yard, families with kids and dogs welcome, solid references required with deposit. Owner currently occupies. Available 6/1/13. (707) 498-8981. (R-0418) MCKINLEYVILLE 3BD/2BA HOUSE. 1184 Eucalyptus. Laundry rm w/ hook-ups, new flooring, dbl car garage. Rent $1325, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0418) EUREKA 2BD/1BA TOWNHOUSE. 631 L St. Garbage Pd. Enclosed patio, off street parking. Rent $795, Vac 04/26. www.ppmrentals. com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0418) EUREKA 2BD/1BA VICTORIAN HOUSE. 1015 I St. W/S Pd. Upgraded kitchen, fireplace, hookups, w/c pet. Rent $1100, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0418) EUREKA 3BD/1BA HOUSE. 2275 Summit Ridge Rd., Humboldt Hill. Recently remodeled, hook-ups, yard, carport, w/c pet. Rent $1150, Vac Now. www.ppmrentals.com, Rental hotline (707) 444-9197. (R-0418) CHARMING DUPLEX ON 1 ACRE. With indoor jacuzzi tub, large deck, beautiful views of meadow and Redwood forest. $800/ month. Some utilities included. 442-0952 (R-0418)

HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS.

Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedrm Apts.

Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $20,100; 2 pers. $22,950; 3 pers. $25,800; 4 pers. $28,650; 5 pers. $30,950; 6 pers. $33,250; 7 pers. $35,550; 8 pers. $37,850.

EHO. Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922. Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

Business Rentals DOWNTOWN OFFICE SPACE. Available at 7th & I Streets in Eureka. 650 sf. New paint and carpet. Great location. Parking & janitorial included. Call S & W Properties, (707) 499-6906. (BR-0502) Place your ad online in the Marketplace at www.northcoastjournal.com. 442-1400 VISA/MC.

northcoastjournal.com • North Coast Journal • Thursday, April 18, 2013

35

the Business Rentals Autos DANCE STUDIO RENTAL. Humboldt Capoeira Academy offers rental space for the performing arts, beautiful 2800 sq. f.t dance space offers hardwood floors, wall-to wall windows, full length mirrors, and dressing rooms. Convenient location is visible from the plaza, and will help you to promote your classes. Check with us for rates and availability. Contact Sarara at (707) 498-6155, or sararacdo@hotmail.com. (BR-1226)

Real Estate EUREKA FLORIST FOR SALE. $169,000, Plus inventory. Priced for quick sale. Turnkey, will train. 4434811, eurekaflorist.net. (RE-0425) REDUCED ! WILLOW CREEK PROPERTY. 1.33 acres, Willow Creek Community Service District Water, underground power & phone at property. R-2 soils report and perk tested. Approved septic system design by Trinity Engineering. Property is zoned RST. Property is located off Highway 299 on private road one mile east of Willow Creek. Ready to build. $85,000 will consider offers. (530) 629-2031 (RE-1226)

Lodging/Travel EVENT RENTAL. Chemise Mountian Retreat, a perfect natural environment for your wedding or event. King Range. Easily accessible. Solar powered, handicap friendly, new lodge. Information 986-7794, chemisemountainretreat.com (L-0502)

Auto PLACE YOUR AUTO AD!

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

Buy/Sell/Trade

YOUR ROCKCHIP IS MY EMERGENCY! Glaswelder, Mobile, windshield repair. 442-GLAS, Humboldtwindshieldrepair.com (A-0606)

Yard Sale 996 1 1th s t.

NEW

LO

Gentle Professional Grooming Since 1989

616 Second St. Old Town Eureka 707.443.7017 artcenterframeshop@gmail.com

2 APRIL AUCTIONS

FLASHBACK 116 W. Wabash 443-3259 Approx. 1-6 Closed Sun &Tues.

THURS. APRIL 18TH 5:45 PM Estate furniture & household misc. Lots of collectibles: Star Wars, Mickey Mouse, Dept. 56, baseball cards, lg. lot train misc., collector plates. Chain saw & other tools, art incl. Gilbert Williams originals & limited eds. & MORE!

SELECT PURSES, SHOES AND LEFTOVER MARCHES SALE OF HATS/TIES & SCARVES

“Clothes with Soul”

THURS. APRIL 25TH 5:45 PM Stickley & other estate furniture, Tiffany-style lamps, child’s sandbox & wood picnic table. Bird cage, household misc. + additions. BIG SALE! Info & Pictures at WWW.CARLJOHNSONCO.COM Preview Weds. 11-5, Thurs. 11 on

      

 

3950 Jacobs Ave. Eureka • 443-4851

le garage sa ›

Pets

this way

AKC GERMAN SHEPHERDS. Quality German lines. www.shermanranch.us, 541-281-6829. (P-0418) OODLES OF POODLES? NEED TO FIND THEM NEW HOMES? List them here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

Rummage

SALE 20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

• Grooming & Boarding by Linn •

own ld T

in O ION CAT

Buy/Sell/Trade 20 DOZEN BRAND NEW PRO V GOLF BALLS. $39/Dozen. 497-6618 (BST-0418) ALL LINGERIE, SLEEPWEAR AND CHILDREN’S CLOTHES 1/2 PRICE! April 16-20. Green Tagged Clothing 25¢ each! Dream Quest Thrift Store, Helping Youth Realize Their Dreams. (BST-0418) S.B. ROTHENBERG CLEAR WHISKEY BOTTLE. Oakland, CA 1895. No Dings. $500. 497-6618 TEMPUR-PEDIC FOR SALE. California King Tempur-Pedic mattress and box springs. This is the BellaSonna model and is about two years old. Entire set is in like new condition. This mattress is medium to firm support. Originally sold for approx. $5,000, selling for $2,000. Injuries from a recent accident are forcing us into a softer mattress. Text message to 845-4698 only. Available to view in the evenings. (BST-1226) THE BEAD LADY. For all your needs in beads! Glass beads, leather, shells, findings, jewelry. Kathy Chase Owner, 76 Country Club Dr. Ste. 5, Willow Creek. (530) 629-3540. krchase@yahoo. com. (BST-1226)

Pets

KITS • $7

PLACE YOUR PET AD!

310 F Street., Eureka, CA 95501 Phone 442-1400 • Fax 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com carmen@northcoastjournal.com

20 words and a photo, IN FULL COLOR

for only $25 per week! Call 442-1400 or e-mail classified@northcoastjournal.com

on Page 39 36 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

1701 Giuntoli Lane Arcata • groomingbyLinn.com • 826-0903

PRESA CANARIO PUPPIES Great for farm or ranch. Good family dog. Very loyal. Both parents on site. Ready to meet their new pack! (732) 581-2862. NorHum. $1000.

Services BIGFOOT EQUIPMENT & REPAIR HAS MOVED. 76 Country Club Dr., next to Farmer Brown’s Supply. (530) 629-4067. (S-0516) LEATHER, BAG, SHOE REPAIR. In Trinidad. We stitch, sew, glue, rivet, produce bags, belts, dog collars, horse tack, work clothes, upholstery, bar stools, benches, leather repair of all kinds. 490 1/2 Trinity Street, at Parker. Call (510) 677-3364. (S-0606) ST I TC H ES - N - B R I TC H ES I N MCKINLEYVILLE. Kristin Anderson, Seamstress. Mending, Alterations, Custom Sewing. Mon.-Fri., 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Bella Vista Plaza, Suite 8A, McKinleyville. (707) 5025294. Facebook: Kristin Anderson’s Stitches-n-Britches. Kristin360cedar@gmail.com (S-0502) AIR-SOURCE HEAT PUMPS. Use the heat in the air to heat your home, a proven technology, reasonably priced, Sunlight Heating-$300 Federal Tax Credit-CA lic. #972834. rockydrill@gmail.com, (707) 502-1289 (S-0627) HELICOPTER FLIGHT LESSONS/ SCENIC TOURS. $199/hr. (707) 8439599 redwoodcoasthelicopters@ gmail.com, www.redwoodcoasthelicopters.com (S-0627) 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. No job too big or small, just call. Contact 2guysandatrucksmk777@gmail.com, (707) 845-3087. (S-0425) CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING. Services available. Call Julie 8391518. (S-0606)

Services A’O’KAY JUGGLING CLOWN & WIZARD OF PLAY. Amazing performances and games for all ages. Events, Birthdays, Festivals, Kidszones. I’ll Juggle, Unicycle, & bring Toys. aokayClown.com, (707) 499-5628. (S-1226) PROFESSIONAL GARDENER . Powerful tools. Artistic spirit. Balancing the elements of your yard and garden since 1994. Call Orion 825-8074, taichigardener. com (S-0606) ERIC’S SERVICES. Home Repair, Maintenance, Affordable Prices (707) 499-4828. (S-0808) ALLIANCE LAWN & GARDEN CARE. Affordable, Dependable, and Motivated Yard maintenance. We’ll take care of all your basic lawn needs. Including hedging, trimming, mowing, and hauling. Call for estimates (707) 834-9155. (S-1226) ARCATA CLEANING COMPANY. The non-toxic cleaning solution for your home or office. 707-8227819. (S-0606) WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. 443-8373. www.ZevLev.com. (S-1226) TOO MANY TUBAS? Are your crowded shelves an earthquake hazard? List it all here. 442-1400. VISA/MC

Music

Services

Paul Windham, M.D.

General Practice Occupational Medicine 707.497.6342 1915 Harrison Ave., Suite A • Eureka

Accepting New Clients Harvey’s Harvey’s Ha H arvey’s a arvey y at

ALL UNDER ER HEAVEN HE H EA AV VE EN N

Old Town, Eureka 212 F St., 444-2936

&

Arcata Plaza 825-7760

BRADLEY DEAN ENTERTAINMENT. Singer Songwriter. Old Rock, Country, Blues. Private Parties, Bars, Gatherings of all Kinds. 832-7419. (M-0509) PIANO LESSONS BEGINNING TO ADVANCED ALL AGES. 30 years joyful experience teaching all piano styles. Juilliard trained, remote lessons available. Nationally Certified Piano Teacher. Humboldtpianostudio.com. (707) 502-9469 (M-0606) PIANO LESSONS. Beginners, all ages. Experienced. Judith Louise 476-8919. (M-0606) MUSIC LESSONS. Piano, Guitar, Voice, Flute, etc. Piano tuning, Instrument repair. Digital multitrack recording. (707) 476-9239. (M-0523) SAXOPHONE/FLUTE LESSONS. All ages, beginner-advanced, jazz improvisation, technique. Susie Laraine: 441-1343. (M-1226) GUITAR/PIANO/VOICE LESSONS. All ages, beginning and intermediate. Seabury Gould 444-8507. (M-0606)

&Spirit

FREE All Natural Essential Oil Hand Sanitizer/Air Freshener with $50 Purchase Featuring Wisdom of the Earth Essential Oils Undiluted

CommUnITy CrISIS SUpporT: 445-7715 1-888-849-5728

Humboldt domestiC ViolenCe serViCes

443-6042 1-866-668-6543

(707) 443-1104 humboldtcremation.com

Community

No membership required. Only funeral provider in Humboldt County to be certified by the Green Burial Council.

Legal Services Kathleen Bryson Attorney DUI & DMV Hearings Cultivation/Possession Juvenile Delinquency Misdemeanors & Felonies Former Hum. Co. Deputy DA Member of CA DUI Lawyers Assoc.

www.northcoastjournal.com

FREE CONSULTATION 732 5th Street, Suite C, Eureka, CA 95501 707.268.8600 kbesq@sbcglobal.net

SEX/ PORN DAMAGING YOUR LIFE & RELATIONSHIPS ? Confidential help is available. saahumboldt@yahoo.com or 845-8973 (C-1226) BECOME A FOSTER PARENT. Provide a safe and stable environment for youth 13-18 for them to learn and grow in their own community. Contact the Humboldt County Department of Health and Human Services Foster Care Hotline at 441-5013 and ask for Peggy. (C-1226) Take your MoM to go! Keep a copy at home, in your car, at work or check out the online version on your mobile device. It’s always available at www.northcoastjournal.com

Single Ingredient

Medicinal Grade

Tues, Thurs & Sat 10am to 4pm (707) 502-4883 920 Samoa Blvd • Arcata Cooper Bldg, 2nd floor Suite 221 sales @northcoastessentials.com

Humboldt Co. mental HealtH Crisis line

FD1963

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

body, mind

rape Crisis team Crisis line

445-2881

national Crisis Hotline

1-800 SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) national suiCide preVention lifeline

1-800-273-TALK

sHelter HousinG for YoutH Crisis Hotline

444-2273

NEED MORE CALM, LESS CRAZY? Clinical Hypnotherapist Dave Berman, C.Ht. Accepting new clients to reduce stress, anxiety, panic, phobias. (707) 845-3749. Mind/Body www.HumboldtHypnosis.com. (MB-0418) NEED MORE CALM, LESS CRAZY? CHERYLHypnotherapist JORDAN, LICENSED Clinical Dave ESTHETICIAN. facials, Berman, C.Ht. Organic Accepting new waxing to & aromatherapy clients reduce stress,massage. anxiety, Mention this ad and 25% panic, phobias. (707)receive 845-3749. off. Located at Beau Monde www.HumboldtHypnosis.com. Salon in Arcata. (707) 953-7619 (MB-0418) (MB-0523) CHERYL JORDAN, LICENSED FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. ESTHETICIAN. Organic facials, With Lee Tuley, Certifiedmassage. Rolfer. waxing & aromatherapy Find out what Rolfing can do 25% for Mention this ad and receive you.Located (541) 251-1885 off. at Beau(MB-1226) Monde Salon inGET Arcata. (707) 953-7619 (MB-0523) WIRED FOR JOY! Learn simple, practical, neuroscience-based FREE ROLFING CONSULTATION. tools in With Leea small, Tuley,supportive Certified group. Rolfer. Rewire Find outstress what circuits Rolfing for can better do for self-regulation, promoting vitality you. (541) 251-1885 (MB-1226) and joy, with Nancy Borge-Riis, GET FOREmotional JOY! LearnBrain simLMFT,WIRED Certified ple, practical, neuroscience-based Trainer. 707.839.7920 and borgtools in a small, supportive group. eriis@sbcglobal.net (MB-0418) Rewire stress circuits for better self-regulation, promoting vitality and joy, with Nancy Borge-Riis, LMFT, Certified Emotional Brain Trainer. 707.839.7920 and borgeriis@sbcglobal.net (MB-0418) NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1226)

NEW CLIENTS $10 OFF. Myrtletowne Healing Center 1480, #A Myrtle Ave. A Hidden Gem on Myrtle Ave., specializing in therapeutic massage. We will assist you on your road to recovery or work with you on that chronic pain issue. Swedish, deep tissue, trigger point, reflexology, acupressure, uterine centering, lymph drainage, lomi lomi, and more. Founders Hilary Wakefield and Sarah Maier are both Doulas, we do pregnancy massage as well! You are worth it, call today (707) 441-9175 (MB-1226) THE SPINE IS YOUR CONDUIT FOR LIFE-FORCE ENERGY. Open to the Alignment of Your Whole Self: Chiropractic by Dr. Scott Winkler, D.C. and Energy Work by Rebecca Owen. 822-1676. (MB-0919) COACHING FOR PERSONAL EVOLUTION WITH REBECCA OWEN. Access your wholeness by cultivating your Presence in the Now and learning to clear old patterns. 8225253. (MB-0919)

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013

37

&Spirit

FIGHT FLUS AND COLDS. doTERRA essential oils. Amazing results with no side effects. Maureen Brundage, (707) 4987749, www.californiadoterra. com, maureen@californiadoterra.com (MB-0516) HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing professionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822-2111 (MB-0606) ZUMBA WITH MARLA JOY. Elevate, Motivate, Celebrate another day of living. Exercise in Disguise. Now is the time to start, don’t wait. All ability levels are welcome. Every Mon. and Thurs. at the Bayside Grange 6-7 p.m., 2297 Jacoby Creek Rd. $6/$4 Grange members. Every Wed. 6-7 p.m. in Fortuna at the Monday Club, 610 Main St. Every Tues. at the Trinidad Town Hall, Noon and every Thurs. at the Eureka Vets Hall, Noon. Marla Joy (707) 845-4307, marlajoy.zumba. com (MB-1226) AIKIDO. Is an incredibly fascinating and enriching non-violent martial art with its roots in traditional Japanese budo. Focus is on personal growth and pursuit of deeper truth instead of competition and fighting. Yet the physical power you can develop is very real. Come observe any time and give it a try! The dojo is on Arcata Plaza above the mattress store, entrance is around back. Class every weeknight starting at 6 p.m., beginning enrollment is ongoing. www.northcoastaikido. org, info@northcoastaikido.org, 826-9395. (MB-1226) ASTROLOGY & TAROT. With Salina Rain: Readings, Counseling and Classes. Mon., 1:25 p.m. KHSU 90.5 FM. (707) 668-5408. astro@ salinarain.com, www.salinarain. com. (MB-0606) DANCE-FIT. Dance, aerobics & strength training all in one class! Mon., Wed. & Fri. 9-10 a.m First class is free. Drop in for $5 per class or 14 classes for $55. No Limits tap & jazz studio, corner of 10th & K st. Arcata. 825-0922 (MB-1226)

Energy Life Center HEAT THERAPY

+

ENERGY MEDICINE Open Mon- Sat

Call 442-5433 for an appt. 616 Wood St. ~ Eureka energylifecenter@gmail.com

body, mind

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

Do it Legally

Low Cost 215 Evaluation Center

Ongoing Classes Workshops Private Sessions Diana Nunes Mizer Parent Educator

All Renewals Starting At

$ 85

707.445.4642 www.consciousparentingsolutions.com

Renew Your 215 From Any Doctor or Clinic For Less Walk-ins Welcome Wed & Sat 12-6pm

SHAWNA BELL

Marriage & Family Therapist, MFC 47122

Special discount for Seniors, SSI , Veterans & Students New First Tim MMJ Patie e nts S

AVE

$ 50

with men tion of this ad

Lowest Price Evaluations in HC

HAS MOVED! Jessica Baker, Licensed Acupuncturist, Herbalist & Instructor 607 F Street in Arcata

Medical Cannabis Consultants

(707) 407- 0527 508 I Street, Eureka

Gambling Treatment • Trauma Recovery Addiction Treatment • Stress Management DOT/SAP (707) 496-2856 • shawnabmft@gmail.com 381 Bayside Road, Suite C • Arcata, CA 95521

norcalrecoveryservices.com

(across from HC Court House)

Wallet ID cards available (707) 826-1165

Services include Acupuncture, Facial Rejuvenation, Nutritional/Herbal Consultations and Classes

www.northcoast-medical.com

(707) 822-4300

GIT YER VALSSAGE! Swedish, Deep Tissue

& Therapeutic Massage.

4677 Valley West Blvd. Arcata

707-822-5244

Gift Certificates Available (707) 599-5639

Medical Cannabis Evaluations

Valerie Schramm

Certified Massage Therapist

Facilitating patient use of medical cannabis for over 10 years.

Looking for a romantic getaway?

Michael D. Caplan, M.D. Gary W. Barsuaskas, N.P.

Call for Walk-in Availability Veteran / Senior /SSI DiscountS

24/7 verification by greenlife, medical systems co n

fi d e n t i a l &

co

assionate mp

MENTION AD FOR DISCOUNT

Need some help around the house?

Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sat. 9 to 5; Sun. 1-5

725-9627

739 12th St., Fortuna

38 NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013 • northcoastjournal.com

The Wedding Guide is available at newsstands & wedding retailers throughout Humboldt & online at

northcoastjournal.com

sdireercvtiocrey see page 22

■ Dow’s Prairie

2850 E St., Eureka (Henderson Center), 707

269-2400

2355 Central Ave., McKinleyville

real estate

this week

Scan this code to see our listings online. Scan ad codes to visit our realtors’ websites directly.

BeautIful cuStOm hOme wIth dRamatIc entRy! Soaring ceilings in this lovely 2005 home. The cook’s kitchen adjoins a large dining area, the library/office has many built-in bookcases, and the master suite is downstairs. Includes a secondary, completely separate, home for rental or extended family. MLS#236296 $699,500

707

839-9093

www.communityrealty.net

real estate

Sylvia Garlick #00814886 Broker GRI/ Owner 1629 Central Ave., McKinleyville 707-839-1521 • mingtreesylvia@yahoo.com

FIND HOME IMPROVEMENT EXPERTS

$350,000

this week

4 bed, 3 bath, remodeled Blue Lake home, expansive second story addition consisting of the master suite, beautifully tiled master bath with Jaccuzzi tub, office space and walk-in closet

Zoom in on our online map to see this week’s featured properties.

Check out our Real Estate & Rental Listings in our Marketplace

$275,000

3 bed, 2 bath, 1806 sq ft great starter home in sunny Blue Lake, detached garage with shop with the possibility of a second unit, plenty of room to garden and enjoy the sun

$274,900

home & garden Starting on Page 22

April is Fair Housing Month

3 bed, 1 bath, 1,160 sq ft renovated home done with pride, a must see, downtown Eureka location with private yard, new plumbing, electrical, roof, seamless gutters, and dual pane windows

real estate

this week

An Association of Independently Owned and Operated Realty Brokerages

Charlie Tripodi Land Agent #01332697

7 0 7. 8 3 4 . 3 2 41

707.445.8811 ext.124

NEW DIRECT LINE - 24/7 - 707.476.0435

G!

IStIn

L neW

Smith River Land/Property +/-40 acres located in Smith River in del

norte County. this rare property features a small cabin, finished treehouse, orchard, developed gardening areas, year round creek, pond, and excellent Southern exposure.

$225,000

Blocksburg Land/Property

10 beautiful parcels located near Blocksburg. Combination of +/-80 & 160 acre GRade a properties featuring year round water, deed access, timber and amazing views. Call today for more information!

$350,000-$450,000 Brought to you by Robert J. Lawton

Indian Island Property/House

neW

LISt

InG!

Be one of the elite residents of this unique Gunther Island property with a one bedroom cabin. Boat accessible only. Perfect fisherman’s getaway.

$159,000

Humboldt Mortgage Company

www.humboldtmortgage.net • (707) 445-3027 Quality Financing Since 1964

2120 Campton Rd. Ste #C – euReka, Ca 95503

w w w. h u m b o l d t l a n d m a n . c o m

northcoastjournal.com • NORTH COAST JOURNAL • THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 2013

39

YOUR NORTH COAST HOT SPOT!!! 8-BALL & 9-BALL TOURNAMENTS/ FREE POOL NIGHTS/ KARAOKE/ DJ NIGHTS/ LIVE BANDS/ HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS DAILY/ GAME KINGS WITH CARDS & KENO/ THE FIREWATER VIP SECTION & SO MUCH MORE!!!

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North Coast Journal 04-18-13 Edition