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Bohemian

A creative powerhouse

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

tattoo & tarot studio

SOAK UP SONOMA Live Music | Local Chefs | Award Winning Wines

Now Open! Tuesday-Sunday 12-8pm

Sonoma’s own

Editor Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

News Editor Tom Gogola, ext. 106

12-4PM weekends through september

Staff Writer Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Calendar Editor Charlie Swanson, ext. 203

Contributors Dan Becker, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Aaron Carnes, James Knight, Goli Mohammadi, Tom Tomorrow

Interns JoshuOne Barnes, Jesse Bell

JULY 26 musician: nate lopez chateau charcuterie JULY 27 musicians: sony & jerry holland chateau charcuterie AUGUST 2 musician: coley n mikki nellies oysters AUGUST 3 musician: sony & jerry holland drums & crumbs southern cuisine AUGUST 9 & 10 musician: jonathan roniger the green grocer AUGUST 16 musicians: the smoken’ j’s the farmer’s wife AUGUST 17 musicians: sony & jerry holland drumbs & crumbs southern cuisine AUGUST 23 musician: kenya baker ultra crepes AUGUST 24 musicians: coley n mikki ultra crepes AUGUST 30 musician: kenya baker ultra crepes AUGUST 31 musicians: coley n mikki ultra crepes For a complete list of musicians and chefs through September visit www.ChateauStJean.com/events_calendar

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2014 Metrosa Inc. 8555 Sonoma Highway, Kenwood | 877-478-5326 | www.ChateauStJean.com

Cover photograh by Gregory Hayes. Cover design by Kara Brown.

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Tell Your Birth Control Story BY CYNTHIA TUTTELMAN

I

t’s time for flower geezers and feminist grannies to speak out about life before the birth control pill and Roe v. Wade. Young people today either take their reproductive rights for granted or are too busy trying to find a job and pay their college loans to consider the issue. Before the supremes march us back to the Dark Ages, we should educate the young about what sex was like before access to birth control and safe abortion. Young gay men and women can go online today and hear countless people of all backgrounds tell them how “it gets better.” If you’re older than a certain age, you might remember when people didn’t openly discuss cancer. In a world of pink ribbons and threeday marches, we no longer need the euphemism of “dying after a long illness.” We are bombarded with commercials for erectile dysfunction, yet we still haven’t normalized the open discussion of birth control and abortion. We aging boomers have spent too much time sharing tales of sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll, and not enough talking about life before reliable birth control and legal abortion. How many young people of today know the story of Sherri Finkbine? She was unwittingly exposed to Thalidomide while pregnant in 1962 and was unable to obtain an abortion in the United States. She traveled to Sweden for one but lost her job as the TV host of Romper Room as a result. Those of us in our 60s, 70s and 80s have stories of searching for a back-alley abortion, of friends who died of septicemia afterwards, or who were forced into marriage or homes for unwed mothers, or who were unable to pursue careers or education because of the inability to control pregnancy while still having a sexual life. Don’t let this shameful history repeat itself. Help reduce the stigma around this conversation. Sit down with your grandchildren and watch the excellent documentary When Abortion Was Illegal: Untold Stories. If you’re a young person, ask your grandparents about birth control in their day. Grandparents, give the gift of your own history. Go to Storycorps. org and record your story. Don’t focus on politics; your personal testimony is more powerful. If you can’t say it out loud, at least write it down. Don’t let your story be forgotten; bear witness instead. Cynthia Tuttelman is a retired physician living in Petaluma. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Rhyming and Stealing

Dylanologists (“Dylan Covers London,” July 30), amateur and professional, might do well to check out a line plagiarized from Dylan by the Old Crow Medicine Show. (They might first check out John Prine’s “Muhlenberg County”: “Daddy won’t you take me back to Muhlenberg County . . . / Mr. Peabody’s coal train done hauled it away.”) Supposedly, Dylan’s manager gave it to Old Crow, who now have their second hit with a Dylan rewrite. The questions are: What did Dylan send them? What year did John Prine write his great song? Old Crow definitely have released a song with a different chorus, but the writeovers from Prine’s to Dylan’s lyrics are mighty thin. The protagonist in “Sweet Amarillo” comes down from the “Mesabi Iron ore range” in place of “the Green River where Paradise lay,” where John Prine’s singer wishes to return. Give them both a listen and hear how the timing and placement of phrases and tune in each song overlaps and dovetails.

JOEY CONNOLLY Via online

They’re only words, the dictionary is full of them, pick some. “Cave dweller,” really? I bet if you ran all of John Grisham or Stephen King’s books through the right computer, it would turn out they stole it all from Bob Dylan. Some people have too much time on their hands.

MICHAEL MAXWELL Via online

First off, nobody is a bigger Bob Dylan fan than I am, but as the article suggest, swiping tidbits or parts of sentences from someone else’s book is nothing new. Years ago, Paul McCartney, although he was referring to music, claimed that everybody pinched from everybody else. Years ago, Dylan himself made the point that (I’m paraphrasing)

“all the great books have been written and all the great songs have been sung.” There are only 12 notes and 26 letters in the alphabet that I know of, so it’s pretty damn hard for anyone to be completely original.

The thing of it is, I’m sure that Bobby wouldn’t dig it if anybody lifted any of his stuff word for word, so why not just give the credit when and where it’s due? But I do believe plagiarism is different; it’s the taking of another’s idea and calling it your own. Now that’s stealing.

DAVID DALE Sonoma

Diverse or Not? “Rohnert Park, a city not known for its diversity” (“Chewy Tea,” July 23)—where have you been hanging out, Nicolas Grizzle? I’ve been reading and enjoying your point of view for quite a while now, but have to argue with you about this seemingly gratuitous and erroneous remark. As a former resident, and still a property owner in Rohnert Park, I find it to be one of the most diverse parts of Sonoma County, which is not known for its diversity. And I’m not talking about our frequent count of Latino families. I’m talking about a variety of ethnicities, visibly different from the white majority, black folks, Asian folks and brown folks too. It was one of the features of Rohnert Park that gave me some real satisfaction.

LAURIE LE’AH LIPPIN Guerneville

Antibiotics and Animals Right now animals all over the U.S. are being fed antibiotics on a regular basis to prevent illness. The World Health Organization recently warned that, due to this overuse of antibiotics, strains of bacteria are being created with the ability to resist the effects of our most powerful antibiotics. The first thing that needs to be done is to limit their use on factory farms. By treating farm animal illnesses when they occur instead of administering

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preemptive methods, we can slow the speed at which these bacteria develop immunities. At this moment, up to 80 percent of all antibiotics in the U.S. are sold for livestock, not for people. The government needs to introduce legislation that prohibits this drug abuse on farms. If we don’t act now, we will lose our ability to treat common illnesses like pneumonia, meningitis and infections from minor cuts.

DAMIEN LEDDY,

PUBLIC INTEREST RESEARCH GROUP Berkeley

Dept. of Corrections In last week’s news story, “The New Deal,” we incorrectly reported that Station Casinos closed casinos in the wake of the 2007 recession. The article also stated that Station Casinos was sued by UNITE HERE organizers in 2010. The union filed charges against Station Casinos with the National Labor Relations Board that year. The piece should also have noted that Station

Casinos came out of bankruptcy in 2011. Also, in last week’s cover story, “Dylan Covers London,” we incorrectly reported the name of the journal that ran Scott Warmuth’s essay, and the title of the essay. The essay ran in the New Haven Review, not the New Haven Register, and it was called “Bob Charlatan.” Also, Warmuth lives in New Mexico, not Arizona, as we mistakenly reported. Finally, in our Small Bites column last week, we mistakenly reported that the Laguna Fest is being held this year on Aug. 17 at Sebastopol’s Laguna Farm. The 2013 festival was on Aug. 17—and there won’t be one this year. Whoops. “We have decided to focus our efforts and energy into developing agri-tourisim, hosting Farm Tours throughout the season, rather than concentrating on one day,” says the farm’s Mari Levin. We regret the errors.

THE ED. Tangled Up in News Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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Rants

Fine Dining For Wild Birds

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Paper THE

DEBR IEFER Stop the Press Sonoma County violated county and state laws when it approved a 60,000-square-foot expansion of a printing press at a Buddhist retreat in rural Cazadero, say a group of residents who filed suit against the county July 24. “They need to have an [environmental impact report] to determine whether or not this printing plant should even be there,” says Coastal Hills Rural Preservation member Ward Anderson. The county? “We’re confident in the legality of the board’s decision,” says Sonoma County deputy counsel Verne Ball. The lawsuit cites a Timber Cover Fire District concern that firefighters aren’t equipped to handle a large emergency at an expanded Dharma Publishing facility at Ratna Ling Retreat. The county gave final approval to an industrial-use permit in late June; it allows for up to 122 people to live and work at Ratna Ling. The mission: print sacred Buddhist texts for distribution to Tibetan monasteries.

WE BE 3-D Bar Smith and Thomas Beckett’s Kickstarter goal for their router was $10,000; they received $80,000.

Router Rooters

Guerneville–based upstart carves an affordable niche in the new world of 3-D printing BY DAN BECKER

I

t’s so transformative to design something on the computer, and then be able to make it into a real object,” says 23-year-old Bar Smith, inventor of what could be the world’s most affordable CNC router. Operating like an automated sculptor, Smith’s CNC (computer numerical control) device allows

people to carve items out of raw materials like wood, plastic, foam and brick after they’ve designed the desired piece on a computer. Similar to a 3-D printer, which lays down materials and builds pieces from the ground up with lasers, a CNC router uses metal bits to whittle material into the desired shape. The router can create both two- and threedimensional pieces, “so there is an unlimited number of things you

can make,” says Smith, who moved to Guerneville after graduating from UC Santa Cruz this year. The desktop device could be used to carve phone cases, chess boards, nameplates—just about anything from material soft enough that it can be cut and small enough to fit on the machine’s working surface, Smith says. The biggest draw: affordability. Smith’s router costs less than $200, putting it at a ) 10

Opponents point to a dangerous combo: rural facility, many employees, small FD. “If you’ve got a fire, you’ve got 120 people heading in the other direction,” says Anderson. Access to the site is limited to one-way lanes in each direction. Expect a fight in county court within six months. “Cases settle quite frequently, but there hasn’t been any discussion in this case,” says Ball. “The applicant and neighbors are very adversarial.” —Nicolas Grizzle

Power Play After the outcry that followed Sonoma County supervisor Efren Carrillo’s April acquittal on a peeking charge, the supervisor will likely relinquish ) 10 The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Router ( 8

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tenth of the price of machines with similar capabilities—a big accomplishment for a 23-year-old and his friends. The invention has been met with global enthusiasm, and in May, Makesmith CNC (the start-up Smith founded with Thomas Beckett), garnered 800 percent of its Kickstarter funding goal. That’s a long way from a couple of years ago, when Smith, a Mill Valley native, was a soft-spoken engineering student with shaggy blond hair who wanted to turn computer models into physical objects.

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His budget, Smith soon found, was too tight for the ambition. The story of how he ended up with $80,000 to distribute his invention to engineers, hobbyists and designers is a testament to patient perseverance. As he searched the internet a couple of years ago to research his project, Smith realized he would have a hard time affording the parts to build the machine he wanted, let alone purchase a fully assembled device. The budgetary confines forced him to economize on his project in a way pro designers are not familiar with, he says. Given Smith’s modest financial

means, many people, and even some professors, scoffed at his idea to build a CNC router, Smith recalls. He brushed them off. “Anytime you’re doing something that no one’s done before, people just assume that it hasn’t been done because it can’t be done,” Smith says. “In the first year, I thought, ‘Well, I probably can’t build the whole machine, but I can at least prove that I was right about this specific part being possible,’” Smith says. “And then someone would be like, ‘Well, this next part won’t work.’ And I thought, ‘OK, well, I’ll make that part work just to win that argument.’” As Smith worked, he realized he was getting close to a fully built homemade CNC router. He plowed on and finished the job, and figured he would build routers for himself and a few friends. “Then I thought, ‘Well, maybe we should do a Kickstarter—then we could make a lot of them,’” Smith says. Smith consulted Beckett, his housemate and fellow student at the time, and the two sketched out a business plan. One morning, the partners posted a listing on Kickstarter and set a $10,000 goal to fund the purchase of two laser cutters. Beckett then went to work. “I got back nine hours later and our project was funded,” Beckett says. The Kickstarter campaign eventually attracted 400 backers from about 40 countries, who contributed more than $80,000. Two weeks ago, the partners picked up a pair of laser cutters at the port of Los Angeles. Now they’re geared up to manufacture CNC router kits and ship them to Kickstarter backers who pledged $195 and up. “We’re trying to keep up with the people who want [the router],” says Justin Beirold, a former Cabrillo student now at UC Berkeley who is also doing marketing for Makesmith. “At this point, we’re not even trying to attract people to our product,” says Beirold. “Right now, people are just coming to us, like, ‘This is awesome, I want one!’”

DEBRIEFER

(8

his role on the board of Sonoma Clean Power (SCP). County supervisor David Rabbit recommended on Aug. 5 that Carrillo become the alternate to Susan Gorin, who remains the county’s representative in the multi-municipality SCP venture. The vote was taken after our Tuesday deadline, but several factors pointed to its approval (an updated story can be found online at Bohemian.com). The county needs to make room for Cloverdale vice-mayor Bob Cox, after that city voted to join SCP last month. Carrillo was appointed to SCP in February, but has faced numerous calls to step down. In June, the Santa Rosa city council called for Carrillo’s removal after utility customers reported they were opting out of SCP because of him. SCP spokesperson Kate Kelly says the decision doesn’t necessarily have to do with the controversy surrounding Carrillo. “If I had to guess, I would say that Susan Gorin is our chairwoman—and I think that it would be unlikely to unseat the chair,” she says. Petaluma and Rohnert Park are the last holdouts to join SCP and have until January to decide. “We hear that both of them are going to be considering it later this fall,” says Kelly.—Nicolas Grizzle

Walk On A partnership between Sonoma County and the Sea Ranch Association resulted in justreopened public access to Walk On Beach in the Sea Ranch area of coastal Sonoma. The county negotiated with the homeowner association to forge an agreement wherein the county moved part of its trail onto a Sea Ranch common area. The county will maintain the trail for 20 years under the deal with the homeowners group. —JoshuOne Barnes

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SWEET AND SOUR POWER SHED’s Ryan Birre prepares a shrub at the restaurant’s ‘fermentation bar.’

Shrub Love The old-fashioned drink is all the rage

T

he beverage world is a notoriously trendy one (see energy drinks, bubble tea, kombucha), but who saw a powdered-wig-era drink storming the scene? And one made with a healthy dose of vinegar, no less. Shrubs are the buzzworthy bevy of 2014, a fruit-and-vinegar-based drink that dates back to colonial

times. Shrub is derived from the Arabic word sharbah, which means “a drink”; “sherbet” and “syrup” also stem from the word. A modern-day shrub isn’t a drink in itself but a syrup to which you add sparkling or still water. The vinegar helps preserve the syrup and adds a tart component to what could otherwise be a cloying drink. Healdsburg’s SHED was one of the first restaurants to offer shrubs in the North Bay. They’re served

BY STETT HOLBROOK at the “fermentation bar,” along with beer, wine, kombucha and water kefir. Though not all shrubs are fermented, Gillian Helquist, SHED’s food and beverage manager and resident shrub maker, let’s hers ferment for two to three days. “I’ve been really blown away by how many people are looking for shrubs,” she says. Helquist likes to pair the fruit with complementary herbs and spices. Vegetables can work too.

The best I tried was a carrotcoriander shrub made with ricewine vinegar. Coriander is related to the carrot, so the two meld well. She also made a great peachlemon verbena shrub spiked with Champagne vinegar. SHED shrubs go for $4. Some customers she’s met call shrubs “farmers’ lemonade,” a drink made from whatever fresh fruit is in abundance and needs to get used up before it gets too ripe. Other customers from the Midwest and Texas say they like to add bourbon to theirs. Vodka or rum would be good too. But at its best a shrub is about enjoying and extending the life of seasonal fruit. The sugar and vinegar in the drink means it will keep in the refrigerator for up to six months, so you can enjoy a taste of summer well into winter. “Shrubs for me are about utilizing what fruit is abundant and on its way out,” says Helquist. “It’s a form of preservation.” Making your own shrub is easy. Start with a pound of ripe (or even overripe) fruit. Peaches, blackberries and strawberries are particularly good right now. Wash and quarter the fruit (blackberries don’t need to be cut) and place in a large bowl. Add one to two cups of sugar, depending on how sweet you want it. Work the sugar in with your hands, but not so much the fruit becomes a pulp. Helquist recommends a pinch of salt to accent flavors, which will also help draw out liquid. Let the mixture macerate on the counter for two to three days, stirring a few times a day. You want it to start to ferment, and you’ll see bubbles start to appear. Next, add your vinegar of choice. Rice wine and white wine vinegar are light and somewhat neutral. Sherry and balsamic vinegar will add their own flavors. After adding the vinegar, combine and strain the mixture, and store in a bottle. Then pour a little of your shrub into a glass and top with water and ice, and enjoy. SHED. 25 North St., Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

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Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y Cafe Cape Fear Cafe. $$. Comforting atmosphere and Southern-kissed California flavors. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; Mon-Tues and Fri, lunch and dinner; WedThurs, lunch. 25191 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.9246.

Chicama Peruvian Grill Peruvian. $-$$. Tantalizing menu of authentic cuisine. The ceviche’s already a hit. 3345 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.570.2057.

and operated with superfresh ingredients and a full kids’ menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 701 Sonoma Mt Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.765.9800.

Asian-Italian. $$. Southeast Asian street food served alongside rustic Italian in unique two-in-one restaurant. Heart-warming Italian from Forchetta, while Bastoni’s focuses on Vietnamese and Thai. Lunch and dinner daily. 6948 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.9500.

Returning to its original small, five-table location next to the Raven Theater, this Healdsburg mainstay continues to have inventive menus in a cozy setting. Lunch and dinner; closed Mondays and Tuesdays. 117 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1302.

Jennie Low’s Chinese.

A fusion of Wine Country and California cuisines, the menu features ingredients sourced from Corks own garden along with local Sonoma County farmers and purveyors.

$-$$. Light, healthy, and tasty Cantonese, Mandarin, Hunan, and Szechuan home-style cooking. Great selection, including vegetarian fare, seafood, and noodles. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. Two locations: 140 Second St, Ste 120, Petaluma. 707.762.6888. Vintage Oaks Shopping Center, Rowland Ave, Novato. 415.892.8838.

20% Wine Club Member Dining Discount

LoCoco’s Cucina Rustica Italian. $$-$$$.

Open daily for Lunch and Dinner Brunch on weekends Tasting Room Open Daily

Authentic rustic-style Italian with a touch of Northern California, and a favorite with those in the know. Get the cannoli! Lunch, Tues-Fri; dinner,

5700 Hwy 116 • Forestville • 707.887.3344 • www.Corks116.com

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Thai. $$. Family-owned

Ravenous Cafe & Lounge American. $$$$.

Superb Japanese favorites with modern twists like greentea cheesecake and wakame snow-crab caviar salad in a martini glass. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 1367 McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.789.9296.

Newly renovated to reflect the rustic charm of the property.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600.

Forchetta / Bastoni

Gohan Japanese. $$-$$$.

Celebrating Our 5th Year Anniversary!

Tues-Sun. 117 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.2227.

Sea Thai. $$. An oasis of exotic Bangkok with some truly soul-satisfying dishes. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Fri; dinner, Sat. 5000 Petaluma Blvd S. 707.766.6633.

Tonayan Mexican. $ Truly wonderful Sonoran-style classics at rock-bottom prices. The enormous El Jefe combination can’t be beat. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Raleys Towne Center, Rohnert Park. 707.588.0893.

Volpi’s Restaurant Italian. $$-$$$$. Festive atmosphere teams with great traditional Italian dishes at one of county’s oldest eateries. Accordion in the speakeasy if you’re lucky. Dinner daily. 124 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.2371.

Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly executed dishes that sing with flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 6770 McKinley St #150, Sebastopol. 707.523.4814.

MARIN CO U N T Y Arigatou Japanese Food to Go Japanese. $. Cheap, delicious and ready to go. Lunch and dinner daily. Miracle Mile Plaza, 2046 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.453.8990.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Bubba’s Diner Homestyle American. $-$$. Comforting Momma-style food like fried green tomatoes, onion meatloaf and homey chickenfried steak with red-eye gravy in a restaurant lined with cookbooks and knickknacks. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; breakfast and lunch, Tues. 566 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.6862.

Copita Tequileria y Comida Mexican. $$.

Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

California-inspired preparation of traditional Mexican fare, including spit-roasted chicken, homemade tamales and “eight-hour” carnitas. Some ingredients are sourced from the restaurant’s own organic garden. Lunch and dinner daily. 739 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.7400.

Wolf House Californian. $$.

Hilltop 1892 American.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$.

$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500.

N A PA CO U N TY Carpe Diem Wine Bar Californian. $-$$. Right in the heart of downtown Napa, Carpe Diem’s contemporary and innovative menu includes a variety of seasonal flatbreads, an ostrich burger, the famed short-rib sliders and much more. Over 45 wines by the glass, six draft beers and an impressive reserve wine list round out this warm, inviting space. Dinner daily. 1001 Second St., Napa. 707.224.0800.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788. Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and

Beer Dinner Baeltane Brewing has teamed up with HopMonk Tavern Novato for a night of artisanal suds and plates of paired offerings from the HopMonk kitchen. Let’s skip right to the “Finale”: the dish artfully brings breakfast and dinner staples to a whole other level; it’s not a savory, but it is a quasi-dessert, if seen in a certain, pieeyed light. That’s already too much information, for now—so let these be a gentle and delicious distraction. The Baeltane beer dinner opens with a schnozzle of the Novato brewer’s signature Biere de Gardinere. A proper appetizer pairing follows, grilled cantaloupe with prosciutto and blue cheese with the Novato brewer’s “Venus in Blue Jeans,” a strong Belgian ale. A seafood manicotti swims with another Belgian-style concoction, the Fleuret ale, and the Black Spot porter is a stoutly pal of the charred flank steak entrée that’s served with some freakin’ carrots and a petite spinach, feta and beet salad. Yum. Burp. The dinner is Aug. 24 at the HopMonk Tavern, 224 Vintage Way, Novato; $65 covers everything. including tax and gratuity. But does that really cover everything? Ah, the “Finale”! Brew-diners will imbibe the brewer’s Beleriand Barleywine beer. Say it three times fast before you plow into those crispy-fried chicken wings over buckwheat waffles.—Tom Gogola

eekda y Every W

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6780 Depot/McKinley St, Sebastopol > 707.823.3144 www.woodfourbrewing.com > facebook.com woodfourbrewing

Architectural Glass s Furniture s Fruit Labels s Garden Antiques s Toys & Dolls A s

dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Summertime

& the shopping is easy

Antique Society

On Sebastopol’s Antique Row (Hwy 116) ÓÈÈ£ÊÀ>Ûi˜ÃÌiˆ˜ÊÜÞÊ-œ°ÊUÊÇäÇ°nә°£ÇÎÎ £ääÊ`i>iÀÃtÊ"ÕÀÊÓx̅ÊÞi>Àt

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Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Keller’s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

Salmon Caesar Salad & Sauvignon Blanc

Primitives s Jewelry s Lighting s Kitchen Tools s

Sushiholic Japanese. $$-

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SMALL BITES

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

$$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Wineries

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA CO U N TY Ancient Oak Cellars Finally, you can taste wine and stock up on manila envelopes all in one place. Fine estate Pinot and Chard, but Pagnano Zinfandel is the jewel, packed with luscious boysenberry fruit. Step with care around the crystal outside the “No wine beyond this point” sign. 637 Fourth St., (inside Corrick’s stationery store) Santa Rosa. Monday–Saturday, 11am– 5pm, Friday 11am–7pm (live music), Sunday noon-5pm. $10 fee. 707.536.1546.

Deerfield Ranch Winery (WC) The finest wine caves this side of the highway. Twenty-thousand-square-foot underground lair is perfect for keeping wine and wine tasters cool on a summer’s day. Watch for giraffes. 10200 Sonoma Highway, Kenwood. Daily 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $10-$15. 707.833.2270.

Prix Fixe Prix Fixe Specials Sp ecial s Thur Tues–Thur T ues –Th

John Tyler Wines For decades, the Bacigalupis have been selling prized grapes to the likes of Chateau Montelena and Williams Selyem. Now, the third-generation wine growers offer the pick of the vineyard in their own tasting room, brandnew in 2011. Graceful Pinot and sublime Zin. 4353 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open dail,y 10:30am–5pm. Tastings $10. 707.473.0115.

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10 years 10 years strong! s t ro n g ! O r iginal Owners O w ne rs Original

3883 Airway Drive Ste 145, Santa Rosa 707.528.3095 www.chloesco.com M–F, 8am–5pm

es alades NORTH N ORT H INDIAN INDI A N CUISINE C U ISINE

70 7.53 8 .33 6 7 707.538.3367 5522 M Mission ission Circle, Ci rcle, Santa Sa nt a Rosa Ro s a (at (a at H Hwy w y 12 & M Mission i ssion Blvd.) B l v d .)

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Quinoa & Roasted Carrot Garden Niçoise French Green Lentil Full Catering Orchard Harvest Menu Available Salade Verte

Martinelli Winery Only in the 1980s, after hiring a consultant, did Martinelli begin to make A-list wines, but it’s still a funky red-barn establishment at heart. Martinelli Winery, 3360 River Road, Windsor. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.525.0570. Preston Vineyards Ask many locals which is their favorite winery, more than a few will tell you they’re huge fans of quirky Preston. Limited picnicking facilities, organic vegetables and homemade bread for sale. On Sundays, the bread is fresh and the Italianstyle jug wine, Guadagni,

flows. 9282 W. Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am– 4:30pm. 707.433.3372.

Roadhouse Winery Dudes abide at this casual, fun spot. Pinot, Zin, Grenache are hot. 240 Center St., Healdsburg. Daily 11am–7pm. 707.922.6362.

Sonoma Valley Portworks Although it’s a small-time crime to call a wine “port” what wasn’t made in Portugal, it’s all on the level here at the home of DECO California Port. Everybody gets a button: “Lick my glass!” 613 Second St., Petaluma. Thursday–Monday, noon to 5pm. No fee. 707.769.5203.

Truett-Hurst Newly planted biodynamic estate features patio seating, gardens, steelhead habitat, plus frisky goats and sheep. Taste brambly Zin and “Burning Man” Petite Sirah in airy, barnlike house, furnished with rough-hewn recycled materials. 5610 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting, 11am–5pm daily, no fee. 707.433.9545.

Viansa Winery Large and filled with crosspromotional products, a deli and a pseudo-Italian marketplace. 25200 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.935.4700.

N A PA CO U N TY August Briggs Winery Tasting room is a white barn lit by skylights and often staffed by the owner’s wife or mother. 333 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. Open Wednesday–Monday, 11am–5pm. 707.942.5854.

Charles Krug Winery Founded 1861, and owned by the Peter Mondavi family since only 1943, Krug is among Napa’s most historic wineries. Taste award-winning Sauvignon Blanc and reserve Cab in unassuming low building across from the original stone winery. Ask about the Johannesburger Riesling. 2800 Main St.,

St. Helena. Tasting daily, 10:30am to 5pm. Fees vary; complimentary for “Napa neighbors.” 707.967.2229.

Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345. Opus One Future archaeologists may conclude that this earthen mound located in the center of Napa Valley was intended to inter this society’s finest bottles for the exclusive use of winepharaohs Baron Philippe de Rothschild and Robert Mondavi in their afterlife; meanwhile, it’s available to the teeming masses. 7900 St. Helena Hwy., Oakville. 707.944.9442. By appointment daily, 10am–4pm. Tour and tasting, $60–$90; tasting only, $40. 707.944.9442.

Patz & Hall In a Napa business park, this highlyregarded brand’s tasting room may look corporate-slick, but the spotlight is on the dirt farmers who make it all happen. Pinot and Chardonnay. 851 Napa Valley Corporate Way, Ste. A, Napa. Wednesday– Sunday, 10am–4pm. Seated tastings 10:30am, 1pm and 3pm. Tasting fee, $20–$40. 707.265.7700.

Robert Biale Vineyards Was it the high scores that attracted the horde, or the excellence of the wine? It’s a chicken-and-egg type of question, but “Black Chicken” is neither chicken nor egg; it’s a bottle of Zinfandel. 4038 Big Ranch Road, Napa. By appointment daily, 10am– 4pm. Tasting fees $20–$35. 707.257.7555.

Vermeil Wines Pair the Chardonnay with baked brie en croute, if you’re having that kind of Super Bowl party. Also rare Charbono from OnThEdgle Winery, and late harvest Sémillon, perfect for potato chips. 1255 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Sunday–Thursday, 10am–5:30pm; Friday– Saturday, 10am–8pm. Tasting fee, $12. 707.341.3054.

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Tofanelli Family Vineyards wasn’t born to follow BY JAMES KNIGHT

M

any a self-styled Napa Valley rancher, rusticating after a corporate career, might like to have Vince Tofanelli’s look. Perched on the tailgate of a vintage Toyota Land Cruiser at the edge of a vineyard, wearing a straw hat over wavy gray hair, Tofanelli could be a hippie farmer or veteran blues man, but mostly looks the part of the thirdgeneration grape grower that he is.

Not many would envy the look of his vineyard. Instead of Cabernet Sauvignon neatly confined by miles of steel and wire, dry-farmed, head-trained vines sprawl every which way. Established by Vince’s grandparents, Sebastian and Irene DiGiulio, in 1929, the ranch is planted in Zinfandel, Petite Sirah and Charbono, with idiosyncratic patches of Grenache and Burger, and the odd Cinsault in between. When the new regime rolled up old vineyards like this, Tofanelli’s land became an island, a living museum. For him, doing something radically different meant staying exactly where he was, becoming its curator. “This was the time of Earth Day, of back to the land,” Tofanelli explains, reflecting on his grandparents, who had always lived on the land, with a milk cow and chickens in the yard. “They didn’t have a word for organic, but they were living it.” No Napa origin story being complete without an André Tchelistcheff cameo, it was the maestro who advised Tofanelli to plant Charbono, of all things, when it was about as fashionable as disco. Tofanelli’s 2012 Charbono ($40) has exotic aromas of spice, ripe arbor grapes and fig, and a characteristic standoff between acidity and tannin that makes Charbono an interesting guest at the dinner table. Brimming with olallieberry wine and boysenberry fruit flavor, with fresh tobacco notes, the 2011 Zinfandel ($35) is plush and toasty, without heat. The photograph on the label shows Irene, gamely posing on the 1915 Harley Davidson that the couple rode to San Francisco to elope. Tofanelli shares a tasting room in Calistoga with Barlow, Hindsight, Kenefick Ranch and Zacherle, where you may taste at the bar, or buy the 2013 Sémillon ($28) by the glass and hang out in the courtyard out back. With a savor of ground Herbes de Provence, the 2012 Grenache ($40) smacks of licorice and strawberry; it’s lively, bright and earthy. It’s nice to find that for his efforts, Tofanelli is not only preserving historical curiosities, but is also offering delicious wines that are anything but rustic. Up Valley Vintners, 1371 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. Monday– Thursday, noon–6pm; Friday–Sunday, noon–8pm. Wines by flight, glass and half glass. $15, by appointment for all Tofanelli wines plus Vince. 707.942.1004.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Old Is New

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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24-Hour Band Performances! NorBay Nominee Live Performances! NorBay Winners Announced! Gold Records Awarded! Beer, Wine and Great Food! It's All Happening at the 2014 NorBays! Saturday, August 16th HopMonk Tavern 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol $10, All Ages, Door 8pm, Show 8:30pm

bananasmusic.com

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

SITTIN’ PRETTY

A signature South of Heaven ’54 Chevy sedan sits super low in front of the garage, with a primered ’47 Ford coupe in the background.

Just South of Heaven The makings of Craig Ahart’s classic hot rod shop

T

BY GOLI MOHAMMADI | PHOTOGRAPHS BY GREGORY HAYES

ucked neatly behind one of the lush curves on Burnside Road in Sebastopol lies the unexpected: a big, badass custom shop called South of Heaven. Owned and operated by Craig Ahart, the 3,000-square-foot shop is housed in a massive two-story barn that he hand-built about 11 years ago, with a specific eye toward making it appear as vintage as the classic cars he specializes in modifying.

For 38-year-old Ahart, the devil is in the details, and custom means custom everything. No detail is too small to go unnoticed, and he’s been known to spend hours on something as minor as a mirror bracket, just to get the right lines. And it shows. While Sonoma County has no

shortage of classic cars, Ahart’s designs are recognizably unique, a perfect blend of appreciation for traditional lines, the unmistakable influence of low-rider culture and his signature style. The works of art rolling out of South of Heaven may not ) 20 bear the candy-coated,

Just South of Heaven ( 19

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 6-1 2, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

Sunday Aug 31

Tributes to Johnny Cash and Patsy Cline by World-Renowned Musicians

Rusty Evans and His Ring of Fire www.rustyevansringoffire.com

and Joni Morris www.jonimorris.com

Live performance at the 5th Annual MAGNOLIA TERRACE SUMMER MUSIC SERIES on Maple Lawn in San Rafael Festival Type Ambiance, Bring Blankets and Low Lawn Chairs, No Outside Alcohol except Corkage for Wine & Champagne. DOORS: 12:00 Noon, Music: 1:00pm TICKETS: $25 door or in Advance at Red Devil Records, 894 Fourth Street San Rafael. INFO: Contact Nick Fitch at 415.721.7661 or karryfitch@yahoo.com

SHOP OF CHOPS Jorge Vega works away at one end of the garage, where a ’41 Hudson and a ’51 Ford pickup await their turns.

flashy look of mainstream hot rods, but they’re no less eyecatching. Ahart describes the shop’s style as “low-budget hot rods” and aims to build “a car you own, not that owns you.” “There are a lot of older cars out there you don’t ever see,” he notes. To Ahart, if you can’t enjoy driving your car because you’re too busy preserving it, that takes the fun out of it. Now 20 years into the game, this self-taught artisan has made a name for himself. His cars have won awards and graced the pages of hot-rod magazines. Ahart’s passion for the build developed early in life, and he largely credits his grandfather, electrical engineer Jack Ghilardi. “My mentor is this guy right here,” Ahart gestures toward a framed picture, each finger of his right hand bearing a tattooed spark plug. He adds, “He was

basically my dad. He was the nicest guy ever.” Ghilardi bought Ahart power tools when he was 10 and taught him how to use them. “Instead of toys and stuff, he’d show up with a stack of lumber,” Ahart reminisces, “and he just knew what I wanted.” Though his grandfather’s main hobby was fishing, he did have an affinity for cars, having built a Model T from scratch as a young man. Ahart recalls Ghilardi tasking him with painting a ’68 Plymouth Barracuda, only to gift it to him. Much to Ghilardi’s dismay, his grandson turned down the gift; Ahart knew early on that muscle cars were not the type of classic vehicle that fueled his fire.

Learning by Doing Raised by his mother in Marysville, Calif., Ahart never had much money growing up. “It was

21

The Cost of Custom The biggest challenge in the business, according to Ahart, is that people often underestimate the cost of a custom build. “New people are floored,” he ) 22 says. “They can’t believe

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

just me and her,” he says, “but she was a badass mom.” He recalls a pivotal moment in his teens when a Mervyn’s ad featuring a little red pickup caught his eye. The truck seemed accessible to him, and he remembers thinking, “I could have something like that.” Ahart started learning by doing, developing unconventional building techniques along the way. “I was really intimidated by cars at first,” he recalls. “I didn’t know the slang of how you talk about things.” Though his friends didn’t work on cars, Ahart became an influence, and they too got involved. Tough times call for tough measures, and though he’s not proud of it, Ahart and his friends “used to rip off junkyards, because we had no money to buy parts.” He started seriously working on cars at the age of 17 and completed his first full build, a

1950 Chevy pickup, at 19. “It was all about how low I could get that tire sucked into that fender—that was my main goal.” When he was 21, Ahart’s mom moved to Bodega Bay, and he rented and lived in her garage. Around the same time, he started working at Coast Auto Body in Bodega with owner Rick Karcher (the shop later moved to Valley Ford), where he met Greg Passalaqua. The two fueled one another, and Passalaqua encouraged Ahart to open his own shop. Ahart decided to give it a try. If it worked, he figured, great, and if not, he’d end up with a solid workshop. In 2002, Ahart and his mother bought a property on Burnside Road that originally came with a house built in 1936 and a garage, which Ahart turned into a granny unit for his grandmother. He built the workshop space in 2003, and in 2005, South of Heaven was born, outfitted with tools that once belonged to Ahart’s and Passalaqua’s grandfathers. Though Passalaqua is no longer involved in the shop, they remain friends. Lifelong builder Jorge Vega, 33, works closely with Ahart at the shop. “I couldn’t do it without him,” says Ahart. Vega shares Ahart’s passion and is driven by seeing their clients get amped by the results they produce. “I’m happy to be part of the journey of making their dreams come true,” says Vega. Their third team member is apprentice Devin Grieb, 26, who is learning from the pros the best way how: by doing everything they don’t want to do. Ahart hopes to one day pass his knowledge on to his two sons, Dallas and Travis, eight and six.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 6-1 2, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22 Just South of Heaven ( 21

DREAM RIDE Craig Ahart has put countless hours into this stunning custom ’79 Harley-Davidson Shovelhead,

including the hand-built, stylized seat and sissy bar.

how much it costs to do stuff. People familiar with cars at least have an idea.” There’s a difference between getting an estimate for a repair and getting one for custom work. It would be like going to a sculptor, wanting to commission a piece of art, and expecting an estimate. It just doesn’t work that way. “It’s not easy putting a price on some of the things I do,” Ahart says, “because I don’t know how long it’s going to take.” To build a car from scratch takes anywhere from $30,000 to

$50,000; the engine alone can run $12,000. South of Heaven has gotten more into the practice of buying cars than modifying and selling them, but they still do custom work with clients who understand the cost of craftsmanship. In 2011, Ahart founded South of Heaven’s private car club, the Filthies. The club’s 17 members meet once a month in the “clubhouse,” a beautifully handcrafted hangout area Ahart built, complete with a full bar, on the second story of the shop barn. They show off their vehicles

together at car shows and host events, like the upcoming Rods and Kustoms Drive-In on Aug. 23 in Valley Ford, which is open to the public and will feature live bands, a drive-in movie, food, vendors and a pedal-car raffle, in addition to having custom hot rods and motorcycles on display. But make no mistake: the club is not in search of new recruits. Filthies member Bennie Wagers says, “We’re firing, not hiring.” Ahart adds, “We don’t really care to have any more members. You have to know someone and put in time at the shop. You can’t just join.”

Next Up For the future, Ahart wants nothing more than to build more cars. “All I want to do is flood everywhere with hot rods.” But a point of contention for him is the lack of camaraderie between local builders. “I’m not intimidated by any other builders,” he says. “Builders should have no problem with other builders. We all have the same goal of trying to get cooler cars on the road.” Yet he says that on several occasions he was not well received in other

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CUSTOM CRUISER Heads can’t help but turn when the ’54 Chevy rolls, complete with professional pinstriping by Filthies member Taylor Schultz.

shops. “You can feel that they’re uncomfortable, or something’s wrong,” he says. “I wish it wasn’t like that.” Today, the South of Heaven property has no shortage of nostalgic eye candy. Numerous classic rides in various stages of modification can be seen on the lot, from a stunning 1927 Roadster (that arrived “in a pile for $400”) to the ’34 Plymouth coupe that’s next on Ahart’s list. Of this collection, only two are Ahart’s: a ’54 Cadillac sedan (modded into a two-door convertible) and his “daily

driver,” a ’36 Dodge pickup. And if you’re wondering what his tools of choice are for this level of craftsmanship, the answer is surprisingly simple: big hammers. “A heel dolly and a hammer are the two main things that I use—and a pair of pliers. I use big hammers.” His reputation for being able to precisely shape metal with just hammers precedes him. When asked what his favorite build has been so far, Arhat thinks for a moment and answers, “I don’t feel like I’ve done it yet.”

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

D A Y S P A S A N C T U A R Y

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NORTH N OR TH B BAY A Y BOHE BOH E EMI MI A N | A AUGUST UGU S T 6 6-1 - 1 2, 20 0 114 4 | BO H E M I AN AN.COM .C O M

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Crush C Cr CULTURE C

The week’s events: a selective guide

P E TA L U M A

Mellow w Yellow Yellow e

Born in Kingston Kingston, n,, Jamaica, Winston Foste Foster was raised in an orphanage and shunned due to his albinism.. But under un nder the moniker Y eellowm he went on to become a widely celebrated reggae and Yellowman, star. Embraced E aced by the gr Embr owing hip-hop scene of the ’80s and ’90s, Yellowman again fought dancehall star. growing the odds when a battle with skin cancer left his face disfigured. Following the ordeal, Yellowman re-invented him mself with mor re-invented himself moree socially co conscious material and rose to international fame. This week, Yellowman bring gs his dancehall style to tthe North Bay when he performs on Thursday, Aug. 7, at the Yellowman brings Theatre, e, 23 Petaluma Petaluma Blvd. Blvd. N., N , Petaluma. Pet Mystic Theatre, 9pm. $26–$30. 707.765.2121.

R O H N E R T PA R K

Cheek to Cheek The man who le left eft his heart in San Fr Francisco anc is nothing less than a national treasure, and though he just celebr ated his 88th 8 birthday y, consummate consumma entertainer Tony Bennett still has some tricks up his sleeve. Surprising celebrated birthday, everyone last month, m , Bennett announced announce that he’s collaborating with shock-pop queen Lady Gaga for an album of jazz standar ds titled Cheek to Cheekk, coming co out in September. While that sinks in, Bennett performs his classic standards ts this week with his daughter, dau catalogue of hit hits Antonia Bennett, on Friday, Aug. 8, at the Green Music Center, 1801 East Easst Cotati Ave., Ave., Rohnert Park. Pa 7:30pm. $25–$65. 866.955.6040. Center,

N A PA

The Et Eternal ternal Hipster Hips From ’60s San Fr From Francisco ancisco drummer to A Americana icon, musician Dan Hick tinually car ves out varied and versatile tunes. Hickss cont continually carves A ontmaan of Dan Hicks & the H Ass the fr frontman Hot Licks, the songwriter has kept his signatur signaturee soun sound relevant thr ars of rrecording ecording and tou ough 40 yea through years touring. Recently, Hick s, who gr ew w up in Santa Rosa and now lives in Hicks, grew Mill Valley, Valleyy, unde erwent tr eatment ffor or th underwent treatment throat cancer. Buoyed by the music of Fats W aller, he Waller, he’s recovered and back in fin orm and high spirits. spirits Dan Hicks & finee fform the Hot Lick p Satur dayy, Aug. 9, at City Winery, Lickss play Saturday, 1030 Main SSt., t., Napa. 8pm.. $25–$35.. 7707.226.7372.

SA N R A FA E L

Four F our N o Non-Sallys It began as a ccollaborative ollaborative experiment between ffour our solo music cians living in San Fr anc musicians Francisco. Over the last decadee and a half ’s transformed transfor half,, it it’s into a full-fledg ged band playing an ecle full-fledged eclectic and accessible ffolk-rock olk-rock with soulful ffour-part o harmonies. Bla me Sally rrevel evel in their ddiverse Blame backgr nd styles ffor or a wholly or ounds an backgrounds and original sound that bor rows fr om country y, Cel ti and borrows from country, Celtic classical. The bband and plays a special outd outdoors set with ffood ood by So ol Food on Satur dayy, Aug. Aug 9, at the Sol Saturday, Osher Marin JC CC,, 200 N. San Pedro Pedro Road, Roa San JCC, Raf ael. 7pm.. $20–$25. $220–$25. 4415.444.8000. 15.444.8000. Rafael.

—Charlie —C harlie Swanson Swanson

MAGIC IN THE AIR Broadway star Ben Vereen performs at Jack London State Park Aug. 9. See Concerts, p29.

FOR THE GOOD OF MANKIND Wrestler-turned-comedian Mick Foley no longer has to go to the ER after a night’s work.

Laugh Till It Hurts Ex-wrestler Mick Foley shows his funny side BY AARON CARNES

T

here is a scene in the 1999 wrestling documentary Beyond the Mat, where Mick Foley (aka Mankind), one of the film’s main subjects, takes a pretty gruesome beating during one of his matches.

The beating wasn’t unusual, but what’s eye-opening is finding out—from the behind-the-scenes glimpse of the match—just how real the carnage actually

was. Even more unsettling, the filmmaker taped Foley’s wife and kids’ reaction to the match. They were horrified. The film didn’t just show Foley’s high threshold for pain. It contrasted his crazy stage antics by showing that, off the mat, he is a kindhearted and loving family man who is bright, funny and wellspoken. Now that Foley is retired from wrestling, he’s done a lot more to show his wit and sense of humor. He’s a bestselling author,

comedian and spoken-word artist. “There are laughs to be had even during my most serious matches— even driving in an ambulance after losing an ear in Munich, Germany,” Foley says. “When I’m onstage, I feel very much like I did when I was in the ring, but without the late-night emergency-room visit.” Foley’s career as a wrestler didn’t last much past the release of Beyond the Mat. During routine doctor visits, he was strongly advised that he should quit, or

face potentially life-threatening injuries. In 1999, Foley published the bestselling memoir Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks. He took the opportunity to address politics and current affairs. Foley then tried standup comedy. “I was pretty good. It’s just that when I got to the Just for Laughs festival in Montreal, I realized that it might take 20 years to get as good as some of these guys, but even Louis CK couldn’t tell a story about finishing a match with his tooth stuck in his nose,” Foley says. “As the great Australian comic Brendon Burns put it, ‘Mick’s got the advantage because all of us talk about our day jobs and he had the coolest day job of anyone.’” Two years ago, Foley moved away from a traditional standup style and made it more of a “storytelling” approach. What he’s doing now isn’t much different than what Beyond the Mat did. Foley enjoyed being part of the documentary, though not everyone did—in particular World Wrestling Entertainment CEO Vince McMahon. “He thought it took away people’s ability to enjoy the magic of what we did onscreen,” Foley says. “I always felt like the world behind the scenes was every bit as fascinating, if not more so than what people saw on TV. “I always thought of the WWE the way Dorothy thought of Oz. Some of it was horrible. But most of it was wonderful. It’s a very surreal place.” Mick Foley performs Aug. 9 at 8m at the Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St., Petaluma. $25. 707.762.3565.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Arts Ideas

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 6-1 2, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26 Honor able Honorable

Stage

88/8 / 8 – 88/14 /14

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AM Most ost W Wanted anted Man M an R (10:45-1:30-5:15)-8:00 (10 : 45-1: 30-5 :15 ) -8 : 00 JJoin oin uuss oonn SSunday unday 88/10 /10 @ 11pm pm & WWednesday ednesday 8/13 8 /13 @ @6:30pm 6 : 30pm for f or special special ppresentations r esen t at ions of o f Monty Mon t y PPython y t hon Live! L ive !

TRUE CONFESSION David Templeton gives 14 performances of ‘Wretch Like Me’ at the Fringe Fest.

Summerfield Su mmer field 5 551 51 S Summerfield ummer field Road R oad S Santa an t a R Rosa osa 707.522.0719 707. 522 .0719

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t’s a pig f**k!” That’s how comedian Will Durst described the Edinburgh Fringe Festival back in July when he appeared at Wretch Aid, a fundraiser to help send my one-man show, Wretch Like Me, to the world’s largest theater festival. Durst has appeared here a couple of times.

‘I

I say “here” because I’m writing this column from an outdoor bar at Surgeon’s Hall, in Edinburgh, Scotland, where a band of Sonoma County folks has teamed up to present my show—we’ll present it a total of 14 times. We’ve done the show three times and will certainly need a break now and then because, as Will pointed out, it’s a pig f**k over here in Edinburgh.

Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The city population doubles in size during August, when tens of thousands of theatergoers arrive to catch over a thousand different shows. The competition for audience members is fierce and frenzied—you cannot walk a block without having at least a dozen postcards pressed into your hand. Reviewers work overtime to see as many shows as possible, and their reviews are instantly copied by the hundreds at Fringe Central—the massive space where performers at the festival can rest, use WiFi, grab a snack and use the printers. Pertinent quotes are then cut out and stapled to postcards, which are rushed back out to the sidewalk to be handed out to passersby. Here in Edinburgh, reviews and word-of-mouth are the currency that builds attendance. Still, while some shows draw hundreds of people, others are thrilled to get 10. Acclaimed English storyteller Tim Ralphs dropped in to watch a morning performance of Wretch Like Me. He’s in Edinburgh with a one-man storytelling show, all about the devil, Beelzebub Rebranded. Ralphs stopped me later in the day at Fringe Central. “Oh man, I wanted to get up onstage and dance right along with you at the end!” he told me. “I’m still abuzz from how good your show is!” Team Wretch, which includes Wretch’s Santa Rosa–based director Sheri Lee Miller and stage manager Robin DeLuca, plans to see Ralphs’ devil but we first have to push through the crowds to catch Sonoma resident Reed Martin in his Fringe show, The Complete History of Comedy (Abridged). It’s funny to travel 5,000 miles, and still bump into people from back home. For the record, though, I have yet to see any pigs. Follow David Templeton’s Edinburgh adventure on his blog, www.wretchlikemeblog.com, and on, twitter@_wretchlikeme.

PRESTO! Emma Stone and Colin Firth try to keep Woody Allen’s latest film from being unwatchable.

Wooden Woody

‘Magic in the Moonlight’ not so magic BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

S

entimental attachment to Woody Allen’s movies and disgust with trial-by-Twitter make me want to consider Allen’s new film, Magic in the Moonlight, outside all the controversy over sexual misconduct now surrounding the director. But unfortunately Moonlight is all about a middle-aged man trying to expose a young girl as a liar.

The main character in this stuffy, creaky comedy is a misanthropic British stage magician named Stanley Crawford (Colin Firth). One day an old friend (Simon McBurney) informs Stanley about a female spiritualist preying on a rich family in the Riviera. When the magician arrives to expose the fraud, the spiritualist, Sophie (Emma Stone), turns out to be a large-eyed slip of a girl from Kalamazoo. Moreover, she seems to be legitimate. The soundtrack flogs a few moldy familiar tunes. Some of them come from Sophie’s boorishly persistent beau, Brice (Hamish Linklater)—very rich, but addicted to bad ukulele playing. It’s surprising how Allen refuses to construct a love triangle sturdy enough not to blow over in the first strong breeze. Stone has the frame for those Jazz Age sheaths, and she makes you wonder if she couldn’t have done a better job as Daisy Buchanan than Carey Mulligan recently did in The Great Gatsby. Firth and Stone keep this minor comedy from unwatchability. Still, Allen has rarely seemed so distracted. Sophie’s ability to talk to the next world immediately challenges Stanley’s disbelief in God. No matter the ultimate outcome of Stanley’s crisis, Magic in the Moonlight is the first Allen movie that gives us a big, old-fashioned prayer scene. It’s hard not to be dismayed by Stanley’s agnostic angst with lines like “I believe that the dignity of man is not enough!” In the context of a bum romance, with no quotable jokes, the open religiousness in this movie makes it seem all the more certain that this film won’t have a prayer. ‘Magic in the Moonlight’ is playing in wide release across the North Bay.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Film

27

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 6-1 2, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

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Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic, Alicia Baker, Bruce Gassman, Jet Black Pearl, Polkacide, Tara Linda, Motor Dude Zydeco, The Great Morgani, The Mad Maggies, Sourdough Slim, Paul Betken, The Steve Balich Sr. Polka Band AND SO MUCH MORE!

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MUSICAL MUSE Music is magic in a modern world, says songwriter Jesse DeNatale.

Soul Power

Jesse DeNatale headlines benefit show in Point Reyes BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

meet singer and songwriter Jesse DeNatale at Wildwood Cafe in Graton for coffee. By the time our cups arrive, we’re already steeped in a discussion about the philosophical nature of music. “It’s magic in a modern world,” says DeNatale. The local musician, now living in Sebastopol, is pondering what he calls a compulsion to document and connect. For DeNatale, music is as essential as food and shelter, a malleable but intangible force he can’t live without. Born in San Francisco, DeNatale is a soulful folk artist who’s been widely praised for his natural crafting of deeply felt, personal stories in the tradition of troubadour artists like Bob

Dylan and Ramblin’ Jack Elliott. DeNatale’s two albums, 2003’s Shangri-La West and 2006’s Soul Parade, are adored by critics and fans alike. DeNatale doesn’t currently have plans for a follow-up record, though he continuously writes new material and prefers to engage with live audiences, even performing unannounced to allow unsuspecting crowds to discover his music without preconceived notions. “Sometimes, when you discover a new song, it feels like it discovered you,” says DeNatale. “And maybe sometimes it does.” A longtime North Bay local, DeNatale first lived in Point Reyes Station when he moved from San Francisco, a community he is still closely connected with. “You can fall in love with a place, but it’s the people that keep you there, it’s their joys and struggles you celebrate.” Case in point: This past January, the Porrata-Powell family learned that their youngest child, four-yearold Ezequiel, was diagnosed with a rare cancer, rhabdomyosarcoma, and would require chemotherapy. A month later, husband and father Roneil Powell passed away in his sleep. He was only 43. When news of this tragedy reached DeNatale, his immediate impulse was to help. Now, with the generous support of the community, DeNatale is performing a special benefit concert on Sunday, Aug. 10, at Toby’s Feed Barn in the heart of Point Reyes Station. For the show, DeNatale is playing with a full band and has recruited one of his favorite songwriters, Jonathan Richman, to open with drummer Tommy Larkins. Richman is best known for founding the protopunk band Modern Lovers, and his influence is widespread. Beyond the fundraising aspect of the show, DeNatale hopes the show will act as a display of support and solidarity for the Porrata-Powell family, and he guarantees that at the concert there will be at least one song that I will love. “And what’s better than finding that one song?” Jesse DeNatale and Jonathan Richman perform on Sunday, Aug. 10, at Toby’s Feed Barn, 11250 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes Station. 7pm. $20. 415.663.1223.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY The American Roots Music Festival Lazyman, Bootleg Honeys, Pine Needles and others perform in the scenic setting with beer gardens, food and family fun. Aug 9, 2pm. $12-$15. Festival Grounds, 16951 Bodega Hwy, Bodega.

labor of love, “Beyond the Sun.” Aug 8, 8pm. $75-$115. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

The legend leaves his heart at Weill Hall. Aug 8, 7:30pm. $25$65. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

First Wednesday of every month, Chamber Music. First Thursday of every month, Celtic Night. Second Wednesday of every month, Jazz Jam. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Mick Foley

Tony Bennett

Ives Park Aug 6, the Blue Moon Band. Aug 13, David Luning Band. Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol. Aug 7, 6pm, Jeffrey Halford & the Healers. 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.9999.

Lagunitas Tap Room Aug 6, Sour Mash Hug Band. Aug 7, Stax City. Aug 8, Firewheel. Aug 9, Lee Howard’s Musical Universe. Aug 10, Rusty String Express. Aug 13, Michael Bloch. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Aug 7, Susan Sutton Jazz Piano. Mon, Gypsy Cafe. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Brixx Pizzeria

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Aug 9, Ricky Alan Ray. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162.

Aug 8, Tommy Thomsen Band. Sun, Vanguard Jazz Ensemble. Wed, trivia night. Second Saturday of every month, Bluegrass Night. Second Tuesday of every month, open mic. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Ben Vereen

D’Argenzio Winery

The Broadway star performs classic song-and-dance hits as part of his “Steppin’ Out Live” series. Aug 9, 5pm. $42-$125. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Aug 7, Amaya and the Howling Tramps. 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.280.4658.

MARIN COUNTY Blame Sally Indie folk rockers play outdoors, with dinners by Sol Food. Aug 9, 7pm. $20-$25. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Jesse DeNatale Local singer-songwriter plays benefit show for PowellPorrata family, with Jonathan Richman and Tommy Larkins. Aug 10, 7pm. $20. Toby’s Feed Barn, 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1223.

Gyptian The Jamaican reggae star performs with a full band. Aug 8, 9pm. $25-$30. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

NAPA COUNTY

Aug 8, Southbay Dub AllStars. Cloverdale boulevard between First and Second street, Cloverdale.

Epicurean Connection Aug 7, 3 on a Match. Aug 8, Ian Franklin. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Flamingo Lounge Aug 8, Killer Queens. Aug 9, Fast Times. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Mystic Theatre Aug 7, Yellowman. Aug 13, the Original Wailers. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Red’s Apple Roadhouse Aug 8, Austin Miller. Aug 13, Pete Delaney and Sean England. 4550 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.861.9338.

Redwood Cafe

Aug 7, Katie Phillips. 6948 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.9500.

Aug 9, Choppin Broccoli. Aug 10, Irish jam session. Aug 13, Sound Kitchen. Thurs, Open Mic. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Green Music Center

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Forchetta / Bastoni

Aug 10, Amos Lee. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Aug 8, the Dustbowl Revival. Aug 9, Blue Rock Country Club. Aug 11, Monday Night Edutainment with DJ Jacques and DJ Guacamole. Tues, open mic night. Wed, Brainstorm EDM show. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Aug 8, Sean Carscadden. Aug 9, Jamie Clark. Aug 10, Gypsy Jazz Caravan. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Chris Isaak

Hotel Healdsburg

The singer-songwriter plays inspired music from his latest

Aug 9, Susan Sutton Trio with Piro Patton and Tom Hassett.

your

KRSH

The WWE champion and bestselling author appears with his one-man, spokenword stage show, “Tales from Wrestling Past.” Aug 9, 8pm. $25. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Cloverdale Plaza

29

Napa's premier intimate intimate concert conceert venue,e, resta restaurant, venu urant, tap wine bar b and private event space.

Aug 9, the Thugz. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Aug 9, JP Soden. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sally Tomatoes Wed, North Bay Blues Jam. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Society: Culture House Sun, Church on Sundays. Thurs, Casa Rasta. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

Sugarloaf Ridge State Park Aug 8, Gator

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 6-1 2, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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BUCK NICKELS & LOOSE CHANGE

Sat

Sun

Aug 17 Aug 24 Sun

Aug 31 Mon

Rancho Debut!

Sept 1

Aug 6, Tiana Malone Jennings. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Taft Street Winery Aug 10, 3pm, “A Little Street Music” with the Sorentinos. 2030 Barlow Lane, Sebastopol. 707.823.2049.

The Sonoma House at Patz & Hall

Red-Dirt Rock 8:00

Aug 8, Backyard Summer Series. 21200 Eighth St E, Sonoma. 707.265.7700.

DON FORBES AND RECKLESS ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

8:30

KRONOS QUARTET WANDA JACKSON PLUS RED MEAT ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL PLUS

TODOS SANTOS

CHUCK PROPHET & THE MISSION EXPRESS PABLO CRUISE Gates at 3, Music at 4 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Tradewinds Aug 13, Ralph Woodson Unplugged. Mon, Blues Defenders Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Twin Oaks Tavern Aug 6, Biscuits and Gravy. Aug 8, the Hots. Aug 9, the Wrecking Bells. Aug 10, Blues and BBQ with the Blues Defenders. Aug 13, Country Jam with Kevin Russell. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Whiskey Tip Aug 8, Shotgun Hoedown. Aug 9, I-Triniti. Aug 10, Sunday Bumps. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Wells Fargo Center

DON’T FORGET…WE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

Nation. 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.5712.

Authentic Louisiana Zydeco 8:30

BBQs ON THE LAWN!

Aug 10

Music ( 29 The Sunflower Center

DIN N E R & A SHOW Western Dance Party!

Original Songs, Great Harmonies 8:00 Tue A True Hall of Famer Aug 12 BILLY JOE SHAVER 8:00

TTHE HE DAN DAN BAND BAND SSat. at. Sept Sept 26 26

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Aug 9, Steve Winwood. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Zodiacs Aug 6, Levi Lloyd and Ray Brock. Aug 7, Living Light. Aug 8, Mike Dillon Band. Aug 9, Chris Cain with Moonlight Rodeo. Aug 10, Sheldon Bermont & the Outcrowd. Aug 12, DJ Chalice & DJ Sizzlak. 256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Aug 9, Taylor Negron and Logan Heftel. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Rain Dance Jeffrey Halford makes good with new album San Francisco guitarist and songwriter Jeffrey Halford is a blazing blues and roots musician who, with his band the Healers, has crisscrossed the country with national acts and received rave reviews for his scorching, driving R&B. Halford’s latest album, Rainmaker, is a sharp and engaging record of down-home Americana and raucous rock and roll. From the buzzing slide guitars of the rambling “Lost Highway” to the searing organs of “Vinyl” and the surprisingly poignant acoustic ballad “Thunderbird Motel,” the whole record is a compelling, pulsing collection of rugged tunes. Halford channels the dustbowls of the American southwest, the humid plains of the Midwest and the colorful hills of his hometown San Francisco, especially on his foot-stomping ode to the City, “North Beach.” This week, Jeffrey Halford & the Healers make their way to Sonoma County, when KRSH hosts Halford and company on Aug. 7 as part of its Backyard Concert series. Eclectic Marin blues outfit the Tazmanian Devils open the free show. Halford also plays the Sonoma County Fair, Sunday, Aug. 10. Jeffrey Halford & the Healers play on Thursday, Aug. 7, at KRSH, 3565 Standish Ave., Santa Rosa. 6pm. Free. 707.588.9999. —Charlie Swanson

Fenix Aug 7, Back N Black. Aug 9, James Moseley Band. Aug 10, Kim Baker. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub Aug 11, DJ JIGZ. Aug 12, Mic City Peach Street. Sat, DJ Night.

Sun, Mexican Banda. Wed, Rock and R&B Jam. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Hopmonk Novato

Aug 7, Danny Click. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross.

Aug 8, Lonesome Locomotive. Aug 9, Freestyle Fellowship. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage

Marin Art & Garden Center

Marin Country Mart Aug 8, Joshua Smith’s Birthday

DJ Beset. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

19 Broadway Club

Sweetwater Music Hall

Aug 6, Mark Sexton Band. Aug 7, Fighting Smokey Joe. Aug 9, Melvin Seals and JGB Band. Aug 10, Buddy Owen Band. Aug 12, Jewels and Johnny Nation. Aug 13, Fenton Coolfoot & the Right Time. Mon, 9pm, open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Aug 6, Imperial Messenger Service. Aug 7, JIG. Aug 8-9, Todd Snider with Great American Taxi. Aug 12, Nicole Atkins. Aug 13, Beso Negro with Slim Jenkins. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant

Terrapin Crossroads

FARM at Carneros Inn

Aug 6, Noel Jewkes. Aug 7, Passion Habanera. Aug 8, Grant Levin Trio. Aug 9, Open Sky. Aug 10, Cole Tate. Aug 12, Con Quimba. Aug 13, Deborah Winters. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Aug 6, Terrapin Family Band. Aug 7, San Geronimo. Aug 8, Terrapin All-Stars with Alex Nelson. Aug 9, Go by Ocean. Aug 10, Terrapin All-Stars with Grahame Lesh. Aug 12, San Geronimo. Aug 13, Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

Aug 6, Whiskey & Honey Trio. Aug 7, Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bunchovus. Aug 13, Carlos Herrera Trio. 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 888.400.9000.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Town Center Corte Madera

Aug 6, Haute Flash Quartet. Aug 7, Wendy DeWitt with Kirk Harwood. Aug 12, James Moseley. Aug 13, Natalie John. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Aug 10, Soulshine Blues. 100 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

Osteria Divino

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Aug 6, the Weissmen. Aug 8, the Crux. Aug 9, Back N Black. Aug 10, Sexy Sunday: Women Rockers. Aug 12, Tommy Odetto and Tim Baker. Aug 13, Silver Dollar Soul Snap. Mon, acoustic open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards Aug 10, Sweet Burgundy. 2000 Main St, St Helena, 866.708.9463.

City Winery Napa Aug 7, New Monsoon. Aug 8, Inside Lands DJ party. Aug 9, Dan Hicks & the Hot Licks. Aug

10, San Francisco Opera Adler Fellows. Aug 13, Berlin. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Aug 7, Ralph Woodson. Aug 8, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Aug 9, Jinx Jones. Sun, DJ Aurelio. Wed, open mic. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Goose & Gander Aug 10, Groove Session. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug 6, Full Chizel. Aug 7, Syria T Berry. Aug 8, Foxes in the Henhouse. Aug 9, GuitarZilla. Aug 10, Darrell Edwards Heavy Weather Band. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uva Trattoria Aug 6, James & Ted. Aug 7, Jeff M. Aug 8, Tony Macaroni Trio. Aug 9, Jack Pollard and Dan Daniels. Aug 10, Tom Duarte. Aug 13, Bob Castell Blanch. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

1030 Main Street in downtown Napa M O R E I N FO AT

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin

NVOH.ORG

DeLone 8:00pm

707. 260.1600

:HG$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

Imperial Messenger Service 7KX$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

JIG with JUSTice and The Sparrows featuring Robert Steiner, Cerica Liam & Neel Foon )UL$XJ 6DW$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

Todd Snider

with Great

American Taxi

7XH$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

Nicole Atkins

SF OPERA ADLER FELLOWS

SPONSORED BY JILL THOMAS DOYLE AND DAVID NORWITT SUNDAY, AUGUST 10 AT 2PM

:HG$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

Beso Negro

with Slim Jenkins, Marty O'Reilly and Carny Bastards 7KXU$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

Israel Vibrations with IrieFuse )UL$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

The Unauthorized Rolling Stones 6DW$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

The 85's 6XQ$XJÂ&#x2021;SP

Eric Lindell & Co. www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

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SUNDAY SONGBOOK SERIES

CELEBRATING COMPOSERS GERSHWIN AND BERLIN SUNDAY, AUGUST 24 AT 5:30PM

GEORGE KOMSKY

SOLO RECITAL SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 AT 3PM

TICKETS: CITYWINERY.COM/NAPA

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Band. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

Rancho Nicasio Aug 8, Buck Nickels and Loose Change. Aug 10, 4pm, Kronos Quartet. Aug 12, Billy Joe Shaver. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219. Aug 7, Judy Hall with Dave Getz. Aug 8, the City with Paula Sorce. Aug 9, Somos El Son. Aug 10, Los Boleros. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady

GYPSY G YPSY JJAZZ AZZ | A ALT LT B BLUEGRASS LUEGR A SS | FFOLK O LK

DUSTBOWL D USTBOWL R REVIVAL EVIVAL $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Wild Cub Five-piece indie pop band mixes dreamy atmospheres and tight rhythms. Aug. 7 at Great American Music Hall.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

European beats maker and electronic music producer brings rich melodies to his sampled techno. Aug. 9 at Mezzanine.

First Thursday of every month, the North Bass DJ night. Second Friday of every month,

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN FRI F RI A AUG UG 8

Cursive frontman Tim Kasher leads the indie folk-rock outfit. Aug. 6 at the Chapel.

Morris Day & the Time

Spitfire Lounge

OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

The Good Life

Aug 7, Los Flamencos del Pueblo. Aug 9, Jonathan Laurence Green. Aug 12, Jonah Levine Collective. Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, open mic with Simon Costa. Second Wednesday of every month, Acoustic Guitar Showcase. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 2 30 P PETALUMA E TA L U M A A AVE VE | S

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Sausalito Seahorse

SAT S AT A AUG UG 9 SSanta a nta Rosa Rosa

CLASSIC C L ASSIC | ROCK ROCK | COVERS COVERS

BLUE B LUE ROCK ROCK COUNTRY COUNTRY CL CLUB UB ((ANALY ANALY R REUNION EUN IO N A AFTER FTER PARTY) PART Y) $$55 ALUMNI, ALUMNI, D DOOR/$10 OOR/$10 GA/DOORS GA/DOORS 88PM/21+ PM/21+

MON M ON AUG AUG 11 11

REGGAE R EG G AE | D DANCEHALL A N CEH A L L | H HIP IP HOP HOP

The legendary funkmaster, who broke out on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Purple Rain,â&#x20AC;? brings his addictive dance hits. Aug. 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s S.F.

Align Yourself with Health

Woods

Quality family chiropractic care for managing chronic and acute pain

Celebrated Brooklyn band utilizes psych-folk and ethereal vocals. Aug. 9 at Brick & Mortar Music Hall.

Gold Panda

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Sebastopol S e b a s to p o l

5528.3278 2 8 . 3 2 7 8 823.7492 8 2 3 .74 9 2

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

sports injuries â&#x20AC;˘ pediatrics auto accidents pregnancy/postpartum discomforts

MONDAY M ONDAY NI NIGHT GHT E EDUTAINMENT DUTAINMENT W WITH ITH

DJJ JACQUES D JACQUES & D DJJ GUACAMOLE GUACAMOLE

$$7/ 7/ LLADIES ADIES FREE FREE B4 B4 11/DOORS 11/DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM/21+

WED W ED A AUG UG 13 13

BASS B A SS | TRAP TR AP | EDM ED M

NASTYNASTY: N ASTYNASTY: A TAHOE TAHOE TESSIE'S TESSIE'S FINAL FINAL VOYAGE VOYAGE FUNDRAISER FUNDRAISER $$15/DOORS 15/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 15 15

IINDIE NDIE | R ROCK O CK

MANZANITA M ANZANITA FALLS FALLS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

SAT S AT A AUG UG 1 16 6 Jake Quihuis, DC 1819 Fourth St, Santa Rosa

707-523-9850 chiropracticcentersantarosa.com

2014 2 014 NORTH NOR TH BAY BAY M MUSIC USIC AWARDS AWARDS AND AN D 24-HOUR 24- HOUR BAND BAND CONTEST CONTES T

Daily drop-in clinic, no appointment needed

NOR N OR BAY BAY MUSIC MUSIC AWARDS AWARDS $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

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Killer Queens All-girl tribute to Queen AUG 9 > $10 adv / $12 door

Hella Good Top 40 dance hits AUG 15 > $12 adv / $15 door

Notorious 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rock band AUG 16 > $10 adv / $12 door

Aqua Nett 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hair metal band AUG 22 > $10 adv / $12 door

Rock Skool rock band AUG 23

TBA

TBD

AUG 29 > $12 adv / $15 door

The Cheeseballs dance band AUG 30

TBA TBD 2777 4th Street | Santa Rosa flamingoresort.inticketing.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

AUG 8 > $12 adv / $15 door

Wed, Aug 6 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE 12:40pm Youth and Family 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7-10pm SINGLES & PAIRS Square Dance Club Thur, Aug 7 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:15-10pm CIRCLES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Aug 8 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 7:30-10:30pm CALIFORNIA BALLROOM DANCE Foxtrot lesson Sat, Aug 9 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 10:30amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SCOTTISH CHALLENGE 12:30pm DANCE CLASS 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm CIRCLE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;N SQUARES Hoedown Sun,Aug 10 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am JAZZERCISE 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, Aug 11 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tue, Aug 12 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am JAZZERCISE with PATTI JOHNSON 5:45-6:45pm REGULAR JAZZERCISE 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

Off The Grid

With Multi-genre acoustic artist Tiana Malone Jennings Hawaiian, Folk, and Island-Style Music August 9, 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30pm $10

Mettaquizzical CafĂŠ

Musical Multi-Media Science & Philosophy Salon August 14, 7:30pm $10

Bethanyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Story

An empowering film of healing too dramatic to be ignored

3F14 by Mary Jarvis, 2014

August 8, 6pm Donation

5FOUI4U 4BOUB3PTBt5VFo4BUo 707tcalabigallery.com

That feeling you get when you find a great booth at your favorite summer festival, is the best way to describe a visit to Native Riders. From custom made leather clothing dripping in fringe to colorful feather accessories, the store feels like a rare journey back to a time when quality and originality matters. The experience continues with every new treasure you discover. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leather hides, turquoise and silver jewelry, Tandy products, craft findings, bohemian clothing, sage, sweetgrass, incense, Panama hats, hand-crafted knives, Mountain T-shirts, custom leather belts and Native American art.

Showtimes: Sun 12pm/Thur 8pm/Fri & Sat 9pm

>=i`/&/Â&#x203A;Shotgun Hodown >JXk/&0Â&#x203A;I-Triniti, Big Yard Band,

Chris Makonnen & The Visionaries >Jle/&('Â&#x203A;Sunday Bumps >=i`/&(,Â&#x203A;Mystic Roots, IrieFuse,

Dewey & The Peoples >JXk/&(-Â&#x203A;Paulies Garage

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

The list could go on and on but suffice to say, this is definitely the most enjoyable place to shop for yourself or buy that unique gift for that special person. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re enviro-conscious too! Between the nostalgic tunes playing and the friendly faces, it just doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get better than Native Riders. They making going local so easy. Enjoy!

2836 Hwy 116 S Sebstopol â&#x20AC;˘ 707.829.8544 Tueâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6, Sat 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 Sun 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Arts Events Galleries RECEPTIONS Aug 6 Redwood Cafe, “August Exhibit,” paintings by Christine Kierstead and Carole Barlas, with photos by Rita Salluzzi and sculptures by Rick Butler. 6pm. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Aug 8 Fulton X Gallery, “Human/Nature,” artist Michael Francis Ramos explores our relationship to nature in this solo show. 5pm. 1200 River Rd, Fulton.

Aug 9 Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, “Realism, Really?” showcases contemporary realist art from a diverse group of artists. 3pm. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA. MINE Art Gallery, “Exciting New Works,” late summer exhibition features Mark Jaeger, Ayumi Weissbuch, Ken Belluci and Jean Capron. 6pm. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center Through Aug 24, “Chopped & Screwed,” artist Mary Roll displays her body-centric paintings and drawings. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Sep 1, “August Exhibit,” displaying the artwork of KC Winston and Lyn Swan. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. WedThurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Backstreet Gallery Through Aug 31, “New Works in Glass and Paintings,” a solo show by Kate Black. Reception, Aug 16 at 5pm. 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa.

Calabi Gallery

Graton Gallery

Through Aug 30, “Summer Selection Exhibition,” showing new works from gallery artists and an inventory of vintage pieces. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Through Sep 21, “Teachers and Influences,” featuring paintings by Sandra Rubin alongside works by artists who have influenced and inspired her. Reception, Aug 9 at 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Aug 11, “Heartbreak in Peanuts,” over 70 comic strips focusing on lost love. Aug 13Dec 7, “Punchlines in Peanuts,” 70 original strips look at the art of joke-telling that kept “Peanuts” readers laughing for decades. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Christie Marks Fine Art Gallery Through Aug 11, “Alejandro Salazar-Selected Works, 20112014,” expresses the artists unique and abstract figures. 322 Healdsburg Ave, Second Floor, Healdsburg. ThursSun, 1pm to 5:30pm and by appointment. 707.695.1011.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery Through Sep 14, “David Meirik Exhibit,” the artist revels in juxtaposition in his mixed materials artwork. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10am to 4:30pm. 707.827.3600.

Eggen & Lance Chapel

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Sep 7, “Cry, Love Life” exhibits artist Jenny Honnert Abell’s playful collage work. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Sep 14, “Clay & Glass,” exhibits the works of artists Bill Abright,Terry Ow-Wing and many others. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

New Leaf Gallery Through Aug 31, “Sculpture Within Reach,” fun, accessible fine art sculptures. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Aug 31, “Colors of Summer,” juried art exhibit featuring local artists. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.542.7143.

Through Aug 29, “Petal to the Metal: Scrapture,” exhibits recycled metal art by local artist Ron Petty. 1540 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3747.

Petaluma Arts Center

Finley Community Center

The Prince Gallery

Through Sep 12, “Art Quilts,” presented by Santa Rosa Quilt Guild. Reception, Aug 7 at 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Through Sep 14, “(n) Collage,” new works in mixed-media collage art. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600. Through Aug 10, “Creative Studio Pop Up,” local artists and craftsmen share a pop up show. 122 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.889.0371.

RiskPress Gallery

Through Aug 30, “Sonoma Scapes,” collects several artists works in a multi-media show. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Through Aug 31, “Stumbling Toward Ecstasy!” showing the book art of artist and poet Mark Wangberg. Reception, Aug 2 at 5pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Gallery 300

Riverfront Art Gallery

Through Aug 14, “Ceiling to Floor,” work by Jennifer Hirshfield, Alejandro Salazar and C.K. Itamura. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Through Sep 7, “Showin’ on the River,” exhibits more than 40 artists work in a juried show. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART. )

Gallery One

36

Petaluma Arts Association 57th Annual

Walnut Park at D Street & Petaluma Blvd South Saturday Sept 6 & Sunday Sept 7, 2014 ~ 10am to 5pm

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 6-1 2, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Aug 31, “Play It Again, Sam” exhibits collage and recycled art. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Library Through Aug 29, “Books & Boxes,” a library art show. Reception, Aug 6 at 6pm. 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. Mon-Tues, 1 to 5 and 6 to 9; Wed-Sat, 1 to 5. 707.823.7691.

Sonoma County Museum

Through Aug 24, “Motion/ Emotion,” juried show features 150 artists working in a variety of media. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4, 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Gallery Through Aug 9, “Trends and Impressions,” includes a wide range of media in the juried member show. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11am to 4pm; Sat-Sun, noon to 4pm. 415.454.9561.

Through Aug 17, “Siberia: In the Eyes of Russian Photographers,” spans a century of images from rural and urban Siberia. Through Aug 24, “From Hogarth to Hundertwasser,” features a rich collection of fine art prints dating from the 15th century to the present. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Steele Lane Community Center

Through Sep 28, “West Marin Views,” the photos of Art Rogers. 1 Bear Valley Rd, Pt Reyes Station. 415.464.5125.

Through Aug 21, “Works of Nature,” melds nature photography and hand-stitched canvas work by Danielle Joy Reynolds. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Thumbprint Cellars Through Sep 11, “New Works by Molly Perez,” displaying expressive images from the Sonoma County artist. 102 Matheson St, Headlsburg. 11 to 6, daily 707.433.2393.

Unity Church of Santa Rosa Through Aug 17, “Risha Arts,” prints and paintings that revolve around themes of transformation and healing. 4857 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.542.7729.

MARIN COUNTY Falkirk Cultural Center Through Aug 15, “Reflections,” presenting ceramic pieces that reflect thoughts and expression. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Aug 31, “Group Show,” new paintings by gallery artists. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Sep 14, “The Box Show,” annual exhibit features 150 artists creations from a plain wood box. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Through Aug 21, “Bay Area Women Artists,” mixed-media artwork with emphasis on exploration and abstraction. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Red Barn Gallery

Seager Gray Gallery Through Aug 28, “A Sense of Place,” abstract landscape exhibit features Jeffrey Beauchamp in the gallery’s last exhibit at the current location. Reception, Aug 8 at 6pm. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

NAPA COUNTY Dennis Rae Fine Art Through Sep 7, “Sensations,” mixed-media works by Edward Barrett, Francesco Cafiso, Lars Johnson and others. 1359 Main St, St Helena. Daily, 10am-6pm. 707.963.3350.

di Rosa Through Sep 28, “Ones and Zeros,” group exhibition explores the digital age and the impact of new media on present-day culture. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm. 707.226.5991.

Napa Valley Museum Through Sep 14, “Wayne Thiebaud: Works on Paper,” exhibiting nearly 50 years of Thiebaud’s work and reflecting his passion for art education. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Adult Content Hosted by Helen Pachynski. Second Fri of every month, 9pm. $4. Gaia’s Garden, 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.544.2491.

Comedy Night Queenie T T headlines a night of laughs. Every other Thurs, 7pm. Bui Bistro, 976 Pearl St, Napa, 707.225.5417.

Michael Pritchard The standup “Ambassador of Joy” appears. Aug 8, 8pm. $20-$30. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Stand Up Comedy Aug 8. $10. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati, 707.795.7868. Sun, Aug 10, 7pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.528.3009.

Tuesday Night Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Events Draper’s & Damon’s Fall Fashion Show See smart and fashionable apparel for the mature woman and for every occasion. Aug 7, 1pm. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol, 707.829.2440.

Gravenstein Apple Fair The apple of Sebastopol’s eye offers live music on two stages, arts and crafts vendors, local food, wine, cider and beer, contests, children’s corner and much more. Aug 9-10. $10-$15. Ragle Ranch Park, 500 Ragle Rd, Sebastopol.

Meditation Group for Mothers Mindful meditation and sharing experiences for benefit of mothers and their children. Wed, 8:30am. $10. Shambhala Meditation Center, 255 West Napa St, Ste G, Sonoma.

The MetaQuizzical Cafe A spirited and musical multimedia science & philosophy salon. Aug 9, 7:30pm. The Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma, 707.792.5300.

Sonoma County Fair This year’s “Peace, Love & Fair” includes carnival rides, farm yard attractions, horse racing and concerts from country star Billy Currington, Lifehouse, Coco Jones and others. Through Aug 10. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.545.4200.

Sonoma County Wine Library Gala 25 wineries, silent auctions, music by Heard These Cats and more. Aug 10, 2pm. $40-$45. DeTurk Round Barn, Decker and Prince streets, Santa Rosa.

Field Trips Animal Relations An interactive evening, dinner and walk with author Laurel Braitman and others. Aug 10, 4:30pm. $20-$25. Headlands Center for the Arts, 944 Fort Barry, Sausalito, 415.331.2787.

Docent Training Open House Audubon Canyon Ranch gives potential docents a look before their 22 week training program. Aug 6, 10am. Martin Griffin Preserve, 4900 Shoreline Hwy 1, Stinson Beach, 415.868.9244.

Free Days at the Park Free parking and tours with special focus on familyfriendly, educational activities. Aug 11. Free. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen, 707.938.5216.

Marin Moonshiners Hike Monthly three-mile hike to experience sunset, moonrise, picnic and spectacular views. Second Tues monthly at 7:30. $15. Pelican Inn, 10 Pacific Way, Muir Beach, RSVP. 415.331.0100.

Nature Night Summer Campout Led by Bohemia docents. Registration is required. Through Aug 10. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

Tour d’Organics Ride local and eat local in this all-day cycling and culinary adventure. Aug 10. $45-$100. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol, 707.823.1511.

Film 37 Days Political thriller that explores

the outbreak of WWI screens to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the war. Aug 13, 1pm. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol, 707.525.4840.

Bethany’s Story Documentary screens with producer Janet McKee in person for Q&A. Aug 12, 7:30pm. $10. Open Secret, 923 C St, San Rafael, 415.457.4191.

Dinner and a Movie “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2” plays with a kids cooking class and culinary delights. Aug 7, 7pm. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa.

Impossible Light Napa Valley Film Fest preview series concludes with this illuminating documentary on the Bay Bridge art installation. Aug 10, 3pm. $20. Hess Collection Winery, 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa, 707.255.1144.

The Red Shoes The 1948 classic art film plays. Aug 9, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa, 707.255.5445.

Royal Cousins BBC documentary about European powers embroiled in conflict commemorates the 100th anniversary of WWI. Aug 11, 1pm. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol, 707.525.4840.

San Francisco Jewish Film Festival Several films screen throughout the weekend. Aug 8-10. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Food & Drink Ballroom & Dining Room One-hour dance lessons followed by a special threecourse menu created by chef Aaron Wright. Second Mon of every month. $40. Lark Creek Inn, 234 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur.

Cheese Making Class Focusing on Creme de Ricotta and summer berries. Aug 10, 1pm. Sonoma Valley Inn, 550 Second St W, Sonoma.

Chef Gator Prix Fixe Dinner Aug 12, 7pm. Fenix, 919 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.813.5600.

Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, “Eat Local 101” provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Year-round. Thurs, 8am and Sun, 8am. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael, 800.897.3276.

Corte Madera Farmers Market Year-round. Wed-noon. Town Center, Tamalpais Drive, Corte Madera, 415.382.7846.

Food Truck Party Good food and live music come together on the lawn. Aug 9, 11am. $25-$40. Napa Cellars Winery, 7481 St Helena Hwy, Oakville, 707.944.2565.

Forestville Farmers Market Year-round. Tues, 3pm. Russian River Vineyards, 5700 Hwy 116, Forestville, 707.887.3344.

Indian Valley Farmers Market Organic farm and garden produce stand where you bring your own bag. Wed, 10am. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato, 415.454.4554.

Lamborn Vineyards Family Dinner Aug 8, 6pm. $80. City Winery Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.226.7372.

Napa Farmers Market at Oxbow Market Tues-Sat through Oct 28. Napa Farmers Market, 500 First St, Napa.

Oyster Shucking & Tasting with Saltwater Oyster Company Aug 7, 5pm. $50-$65. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg, 707.431.7433.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 8:30am and Wed, 8:30am. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Farmers Market First Wed of every month. Oakmont Farmers Market, Oakmont Drive and White Oak Drive, Santa Rosa, 707.538.7023.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am and Wed, 9am. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.522.8629.

Sebastopol Farmers Market

Summer Party Sat, Aug 9, 10am. $15. DuttonGoldfield Winery, 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol, 707.827.3600.

Vin Rose et Cuisine Provencale A taste of Provence wine and food. Aug 13-16. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.927.3331.

Windsor Certified Farmers Market Sun, 10am and Thurs, 5pm. Old Downtown Windsor, Market St, Windsor.

Wines & Sunsets in Paradise Fine wines and spectacular sunsets, with live music and gourmet food trucks, every week on the veranda. Wed, 5:30pm. through Oct 22. $8. Paradise Ridge Winery, 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa, 707.528.9463.

Lectures Art Rising Workshop Local artists Gayle Madison and Lorrie Ragozzino lead. Thurs, 4pm. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma, 707.762.3565.

CityZen Evening of sitting meditation, tea and dharma talk. All are welcome. Mon, 7pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.568.5381.

From Published to Prized Award-winning author Katy Pye shares her publishing process. Aug 10, 3pm. $5$8. Flamingo Resort Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.8530.

Marin Green Drinks Eco-friendly series includes informative lectures and networking. Tues, Aug 12, 5:30pm. Free. Lotus Cuisine of India, 704 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.456.5808.

Soulstone

to Form,” a night of rhythm and poetry. $25. 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1075.

The Traveling Gardener

Aug 7, 6pm, “Golden Boy” with Tara Sullivan. Aug 10, 3pm, “I Am Coyote” with Jay Schoenberger. Aug 12, 6pm, Sustainable Earth, Sustainable Lives writing workshop. 964 Pearl St, Napa.

Exploring the world, one garden at a time, with Yvonne Horne. Aug 9, 11am. Free. Windsor Library, 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor, 707.838.1020.

Vatsu Bette Timm leads this weekend long workshop about the art and science of creating a good space. Aug 8-10. $100-$125. Yoga Community, 577 Fifth St W, Sonoma, 707.935.8600.

Readings Aqus Cafe Mondays, 9:30am, Storytelling with Phaedra. 189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060.

Book Passage Aug 7, 12pm, “Lucky Us” with Amy Bloom, part of the Literary Lunch series. $55. Aug 8, 6:30pm, an evening of young adult literature with Anne Aguire. Aug 9, 7pm, “Lost, Kidnapped, Eaten Alive!” with Laurie McAndish King. Aug 10, 4pm, “The Nonviolence Handbook” with Michael Nagler. Aug 11, 7pm, “The Nixon Defense” with John Dean. Aug 12, 7pm, “Dear Daughter” with Elizabeth Little. Aug 13, 7pm, “Painted Horses” with Malcolm Brooks. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Aug 6, 7pm, “Queen of Hearts” with Rhys Bowen. Aug 11, 7pm, “No Safe House” with Linwood Barclay. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Aug 12, 7pm, “Painted Horses” with Malcolm Brooks. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books Aug 7, 7pm, “The Forest Feast” with Erin Gleeson. 104 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.433.9270.

A new monologue by Margery Kreitman. Aug 9, 7pm. $12-$15. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.4331.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Science Buzz Cafe

Dance Palace

“Cultural Impact of the World

Aug 9, 7:30pm, “From Formless

Aug 7, 7pm, “Meister Eckhart” with Matthew Fox. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Napa Bookmine

The Odd Couple SRJC’s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents Neil Simon’s seminal comedy about mismatched roommates Oscar and Felix. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.

Old Money

Aug 7, 7pm, Sight and Insight, local women writers series. $10. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley 415.388.4331.

The Ross Valley Player presents the clever comedy by Wendy Wasserstein. Through Aug 17. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555.

Readers’ Books

On the Verge

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Aug 7, 7pm, “Profiles: Poems and Stories” with Armando Garcia-Davila. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

Theater Alice: The Rebellion of Wonderland Narrow Way Stage Company presents the new original play. Aug 7-24. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

As You Like It Marin Shakespeare Company kicks off its 25th Silver Season with the classic comedy from the Bard. Through Aug 10. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Cabaret North Bay Stage Company brings the classic musical to life. Through Aug 10. $36. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

A Chorus Line SRJC’s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the beloved Broadway musical. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.

La Cage aux Folles SRJC’s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the acclaimed comedy musical classic. Through Aug 9. $18$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

The Curtain Call Theatre presents this play of language, that follows three Victorian era lady adventurers as they spin through time travel. Aug 9-30. $15-$20. Hall for Performing Arts, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio, 707.524.8739.

Phoenix The romantic comedy written by Scott Organ and directed by Beulah Vega plays Through Aug 24. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

Present Laughter SRJC’s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the witty 1939 comedy about a comedy actor facing a bizarre series of events. Through Aug 9. $18-$25. Newman Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.

Romeo & Juliet Vacant Lot Productions presents the premiere event at the former California Packing Company’s Plant No. 5, with an outdoor space within the remaining walls of the old Cannery. Through Aug 23. Shakespeare in the Cannery, 3 West Third St, Santa Rosa. Presented by the Marin Shakespeare Company. Through Sep 28. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

The Taming of the Shrew

9 to 5: The Musical

Sonoma Shakespeare’s annual under the stars production is presented by Avalon Players. Aug 7-24. $20-$25. Buena Vista Winery, 18000 Old Winery Rd, Sonoma, 800.926.1266.

SRJC’s 2014 Summer Repertory Theater Festival presents the musical based off the 1980’s movie. Through Aug 9. $18$25. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an

War Revisited Two films look at the beginnings of WWI

It was “the war to end all wars,” and it began 100 years ago this month. In honor of the anniversary of the First World War, the Rialto Cinemas in Sebastopol offers a chance to learn from the Great War through two films that explore its origins. On Aug. 11, Rialto screens the BBC-produced 2014 documentary Royal Cousins at War. The film delves into the relationships between Europe’s greatest powers—Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany and King George V of Britain—and the divisions and rivalries that led to the emergence of the alliance system and Germany’s growing isolation. This dramatic retelling concludes with the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand, largely considered the catalyst for the global conflict. Next, the Rialto screens the political thriller 37 Days on Aug. 13. Also produced by the BBC, this film picks up where Royal Cousins leaves off with a behind-closed-doors account of the days between the Ferdinand’s assassination on June 28 and the declaration of war between Britain and Germany on Aug. 4, 1914. This ticking-clock thriller features an international cast, led by Ian McDiarmid (Star Wars) and Nicholas Farrell (Chariots of Fire), and is loaded with intense drama and intrigue. Royal Cousins at War screens Monday, Aug. 11, and 37 Days screens Wednesday, Aug. 13, at Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. Both films show at 1pm. Free. 707.525.4840.—Charlie Swanson

item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa

Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

37 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Local produce, meat and artisan goods. Sun, 10am. Sebastopol Plaza, McKinley St, Sebastopol.

Wide Web” with Zur Ofur, PhD. Aug 7, 7pm. $5. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol, 707.824.2030.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 20 14 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of August 6

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just be smart and articulate, Aries. Dare to be wildly wise and prone to unruly observations. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t merely be kind and well-behaved. Explore the mysteries of healing through benevolent mischief. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t buy into the alltoo-serious trances. Break up the monotony with your unpredictable play and funny curiosity. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t simply go along with the stories everyone seems to believe in as if they were the Truth and the Way. Question every assumption; rebel against every foregone conclusion; propose amusing plot twists that send the narratives off on interesting tangents. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

Breve orazione penetra is an old Italian idiom. Its literal translation is â&#x20AC;&#x153;short prayers pierceâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;concise prayers penetrate.â&#x20AC;? You can extrapolate from that to come up with the meaning that â&#x20AC;&#x153;God listens best to brief prayers.â&#x20AC;? In the coming week, I invite you to apply this idea whenever you ask for anything, whether you are seeking the favors of the Divine Wow or the help of human beings. Know exactly what you want, and express it with nononsense succinctness.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) Every February, you go through a phase when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easier to see the big picture of your life. If you take advantage of this invitation, your experience is like being on a mountaintop and gazing into the vastness. Every August, on the other hand, you are more likely to see the details you have been missing. Transformations that have been too small and subtle to notice may become visible to you. If you capitalize on this opportunity, the experience is like peering through a microscope. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a third variation, Gemini: Around the full moons of both February and August, you may be able to alternately peer into the microscope and simulate the view from a mountaintop. I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about to happen. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22) You wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sip dirty water from a golden chalice. Am I right? Nor would you swig delicious poison from a ďŹ ne crystal wine glass or 10-year-old vinegar from a queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goblet. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure you will agree that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d much rather drink a magical elixir from a paper cup, or a rejuvenating tonic from a chipped coffee mug, or tasty medicine out of a kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; plastic soup bowl you bought at the thrift store. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you dare lie to yourself about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best for you.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Every 12 years, the planet Jupiter spends about a year cruising through the sign of Leo. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there with you now, and will be with you through early August, 2015. What can you expect? EXPANSION! Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great, right? Yes and no. You might love to have some parts of your life expand; others, not so much. So I suggest you write down your intentions. Say something like this: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want Jupiter to help me expand my faith in myself, my power to do what I love and my ability to draw on the resources and allies I need. Meanwhile, I will prune my desires for things I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really need and cut back on my involvement with things that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t inspire me. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want those to expand.â&#x20AC;? VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) TV comedian Stephen Colbert confesses that his safeword is â&#x20AC;&#x153;pumpkin patch.â&#x20AC;? Does that mean he participates in actual BDSM rituals? Is it the codeword he utters when he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want the intensity to rise any further, when he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want his next boundary crossed? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know. Perhaps heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simply joking or speaking metaphorically. Whether or not you engage in literal BDSM, Virgo, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an aspect of your life right now that has metaphorical resemblances to it. And I suggest that you do the equivalent of using your safeword very soon. Nothing more can be gained from remaining embroiled in your predicament. Even if the ordeal has been interesting or educational up until now, it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be for much longer. Escape your bondage. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re planning to hurl a thunderbolt, make sure you are all warmed up and at full strength before you actually unleash it. It would be sad if you ďŹ&#x201A;ung a half-assed thunderbolt that looked like a few ďŹ reďŹ&#x201A;ies and sounded like a cooing dove. And please donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t interpret my wise-guy tone here as a sign that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just kidding around. No, Libra. This is serious stuff. Life is offering

you opportunities to make a major impression, and I want you to be as big and forceful and wild as you need to be. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tamp down your energy out of fear of hurting peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feelings. Access your inner sky god or sky goddess, and have too much fun expressing your raw power.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

In your dreams, you may travel to Stockholm, Sweden, to accept the Nobel Prize or to Hollywood to pick up your Oscar. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a decent chance that in your sleepytime adventures you will ďŹ nally score with the hot babe who rejected you back in high school, or return to the scene of your biggest mistake and do things right this time. I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised if in one dream you ďŹ nd yourself riding in a gold chariot during a parade held in your honor. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m afraid, however, that you will have to settle for less hoopla and glamour in your waking life. You will merely be doing a fantastic job at tasks you usually perform competently. You will be well-appreciated, well-treated and well-rewarded. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not so bad, right?

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Lake Superior State University issues a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unicorn Questing Privilegeâ&#x20AC;? to those people who are interested in hunting for unicorns. Are you one of them? I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised if you felt an urge like that in the coming weeks. Unusual yearnings will be welling up in you. Exotic fantasies may replace your habitual daydreams. Certain possibilities you have considered to be unthinkable or unattainable may begin to seem feasible. Questions you have been too timid to ask could become crucial for you to entertain. (You can get your Unicorn Questing License here: http://tinyurl. com/unicornlicense.) CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Your ethical code may soon be tested. What will you do if you see a chance to get away with a minor sin or petty crime that no one will ever ďŹ nd out about? What if you are tempted to lie or cheat or deceive in ways that advance your good intentions and only hurt other people a little bit or not at all? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not here to tell you what to do, but rather to suggest that you be honest with yourself about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really at stake. Even if you escape punishment for a lapse, you might nevertheless inďŹ&#x201A;ict a wound on your integrity that would taint your relationship with your own creativity. Contemplate the pleasures of purity and righteousness, and use them to enhance your power. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The thorn arms the roses,â&#x20AC;? says an old Latin motto. The astrological omens suggest youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be wise to muse on that advice in the coming weeks. How should you interpret it? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll leave you to draw your own conclusions, of course, but here are a few hints. It may be that beauty needs protection, or at least buffering. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t simply depend on your sincerity and good intentions, but also need to infuse some ferocity into your efforts. In order for soft, fragile, lovely things to do what they do best, they may require the assistance of tough, strong, hearty allies.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

If you go to an American doctor to be treated for an ailment, odds are that he or she will interrupt you no more than 14 seconds into your description of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wrong. But you must not tolerate this kind of disrespect in the coming days, Piscesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not from doctors, not from anyone. You simply must request or, if necessary, demand the receptivity you deserve. If and when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s given, I urge you to speak your truth in its entirety. Express what has been hidden and suppressed. And this is very important: Take responsibility for your own role in any problems you discuss.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žŝ NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 6-1 2, 2014 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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Devoted to Apples!

Located on an east-facing slope in the Sebastopol hills youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find Devoto Orchards. A cider maker that

approach ciders from a winemaking perspective and only ferment ciders when apples are at the peak of their season and fresh off the tree from the months of August-November. Two generations ago, back when apples were king, Devoto Orchards planted 6,500 apple trees in Sebastopol, California. Times have changed and most of Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s orchards have been replaced with vineyards, taking with them the centuries-old Gravenstein. But Devoto Orchards held their ground and tend to 50+ heirloom apple varieties on 26 organic acres. Gravenstein apples are just about peak of their ripeness this time in august, and at Devoto Orchards, they pick them, press them, and pour themselves into every drop. They are proud to offer this food-friendly, semi-dry cider from their family farm to you.

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