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Drakes Bay Denouement p8 Bodega Bay Boats p21 Staging 'Fences' p22

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2014 Metrosa Inc.

Cover illustration by Michael Houghton. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Ghost River Trickster Remembering Mike Ruppert BY CAROLINE CASEY

L

et us honor the life of Mike Ruppert. His last radio show’s theme was “If we can feel what we are doing to the earth, we wouldn’t do it.” After that show on April 13, Mike took his life in Calistoga, diving into the lunar eclipse, symbolically apt, as he was a deep-delving detective of all that is corrupt.

I hosted Mike on The Visionary Activist Show on KPFA, and afterward we were colleagues at the Harmony Festival, where he was dismayed and delighted to find himself teetering on the brink of happiness. Mike had been a strident dingbat, but he had just released the movie Collapse, which won acclaim from unlikely admirers. His playful, cannabis-smoking self was fleetingly available to be teased forth. One could see the faux-macho, selfmythologizing, L.A. cop and unhappy child, part of him melting, revealing glimpses of the “innocent dignity of his child heart.” Just a flicker, but it was still pulsing. “Better a trickster than a martyr” is a theme I proffered to him backstage and onstage: how do we not drown in the poison into which we delve to illumine the obscene? The martyr takes on the corruption of an unconscious family or culture, succumbing to the lonely futility of it all. The trickster takes on the unconscious, but then invites in what can metabolize the poison. Absence of collaborative magic is evidence of the still-colonized mind. He was up for this conversation, but distracted. Lest we strengthen what we oppose, embody what we decry, be possessed by the myriad sneaky guises of the colonized heart, let us honor Mike by withdrawing our complicity with the hyper-yang death frenzy destroying so much life, so that our manners and our language are in accord with our dedication. Let us release our addiction to having an enemy. Let us dedicate to being in collaborative cahoots with nature’s against-all-odds ingenuity. Let us treat all beings with respect. We welcome Mike’s scouting reports from the Underworld Ghost River, and can almost see him wink back at us, relieved of roiling, with a dark compassionate trickster gleam in his eye. Caroline W. Casey hosts-weaves context for ‘The Visionary Activist Show’ on KPFA Thursdays at 2pm, and is the creator of Coyote Network News. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

The Golden Twirls

Please, over-thehill gang appears at Christy’s in Santa Rosa (“Some Like It Hot,” April 16). The county thrives on young blood, hello?

BRAD PIPAL Via online

presented this in a court of law he would have been laughed out of the courtroom by both judge and jury. This story is akin to a prosecutor arguing, “Well the defendant has done the crime once, so clearly he’s done it before!”

Thankfully, our legal system has protections built in for this. In journalism, that duty rests with a skilled editor. Sadly, in this case at least, it doesn’t appear the Bohemian has one.

PETER JENSEN Via online

The New Boyhemians

Lock ’Em Up

Thanks for introducing your new lineup! But you only introduced five men. Is that four women in the photo, too? Would love to hear their names and roles in the Bohemian as well!

KAREN DIONNE Via email

Editor’s note: All the names are listed online at www.bohemian.com.

So if a guy rapes me, Steve Martinot wants to put me in a room to talk to him, instead of putting him in jail (“Imagine No Prisons,” March 5). Wow, that’s brilliant. That’s how I want to spend my days, if that ever happens to me. I definitely want to spend my recovery days looking at the guy who raped me and knowing he’s still walking free, and probably choosing his next victim.

SUE HIRSCH Via online

Text Mess This is woefully inept reporting (“The Telltale Text,” March 19). It appears as if the Bohemian has done nothing more than file a series of public records requests and use that as the basis for skewering a competing news organization. I can’t say whether the assertions in this story are true—that the Press Democrat’s ownership is influencing coverage of a favored politician—they very well may be. But journalism—good journalism— owes an obligation to prove that. Here, the author has clearly fallen short. He takes one example, the Bosco-Carrillo text after the Lopez tragedy, and uses that to make a leap of logic backward to suggest that a similar thing may have happened after Carrillo’s arrest. No other hard evidence is provided, just circumstantial “proof” that may not prove anything. Had the author

Mr. Pickle vs. Hitler First off, I support freedom of speech. And to be honest, I support Obama. I am, however, not offended when I see someone exercising their right and protesting that Obama should be impeached. But the people who compare him to Hitler are taking that freedom too far. Regularly a table is set on the sidewalk outside Montgomery Village with a picture of Obama wearing a Hitler mustache. Hitler murdered over 11 million people. I politely call Montgomery Village every time and tell them I find the picture tasteless. They assure me they understand, but that since they are sitting on the sidewalk,

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

Top Five there’s nothing that can be done. I have a five-year-old daughter, and when Mr. Pickle’s first opened, we loved looking for the dancing pickle. Then suddenly, the pickle was gone. I understand Mr. Pickle’s is not now a business in Montgomery Village. I imagine they felt that the pickle was directing traffic away from their shops. Yet the Hitler-mustache-wearing-antiObama campaign can stay? I still want to know, and I hope the Bohemian will ask why is it not OK for the pickle to dance on the sidewalk, but it is OK that our president is being compared to the worst tyrant in history.

TESS KOFOID Via email

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

1 Head of the week, from

Marin IJ: “Faulty wiring sparks blaze in Larkspur marijuana shed.” You Guys!

2

Spotted in Bolinas: Laurie Anderson. Cool.

3

Another day, another meth-and-gun bust in Napa County, says the V-Register

4

PD says local Jon Reiter saved by a Sherpa during that Mt. Everest avalanche

5 Iggy Pop turned 67 last

week and remains a streetwalkin’ cheetah with a heart full of napalm

If you called a StubHub customer service line from a cell or cordless phone between January 27, 2011 and February 1, 2012 while you were in California and spoke to a StubHub customerservice agent, you could get money from a class action settlement. A proposed settlement has been reached in a class action lawsuit claiming that StubHub, Inc. violated California law by recording and monitoring telephone calls made to its customerservice lines without informing callers that the call may be recorded or monitored. StubHub has denied the claims, but agreed to settle the lawsuit to avoid the costs and uncertainty of litigation. Who’s Included? The settlement includes everyone that called a StubHub customer-service line from a cellular or cordless telephone—while they were located within the State of California—and spoke to a StubHub customer-service agent any time between (1) January 27, 2011 and March 7, 2011, and (2) March 8, 2011 and February 1, 2012 (“Class Members”). What Does the Settlement Provide? If the settlement receives final approval, Class Members who submit a valid Claim Form will receive between $20 and $400 payment based on the date they called a StubHub customer-service line and the total number of valid claims submitted. How Do You Get Benefits? You must submit a valid Claim Form by June 13, 2014. Claim Forms may be printed from www.StubHubSettlement.com or obtained by calling 1-866893-8380 or by writing to StubHub Claims Administrator, PO Box 43249, Providence, RI 02940-3249. Your Other Options. If you do nothing you will be bound by the Court’s decisions and you will not get a settlement payment. If you do not want to be legally bound by the settlement and keep your right to sue StubHub for any claim resolved by this lawsuit, you must exclude yourself from it. The deadline to exclude yourself is June 13, 2014. If you exclude yourself, you cannot get a payment from the settlement. If you stay in the settlement, you may object to it by June 13, 2014. More information is in the class notice and Settlement Agreement and Release available at www.StubHubSettlement.com. The Court’s Fairness Hearing. The San Francisco Superior Court will hold a hearing in this case at 9:30 a.m. on July 22, 2014 in Department 302 to consider whether to grant final approval to the settlement, including a request for attorneys’ fees up to 30% of the total settlement amount and costs. You may appear at the hearing, but you do not have to. You may also hire your own attorney, at your own expense, to appear or speak for you at the hearing. The time and date of the final approval hearing is subject to change. The final hearing date will be available at www.StubHubSettlement.com. Want More Information? Call 1-866-893-8380, go to www.StubHubSettlement.com or write to StubHub Claims Administrator, PO Box 43249, Providence, RI 02940-3249.

7 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Rants

Legal Notice

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

8

Paper THE

Quote of the Year Sonoma County Superior Court Judge Gary Medvigy heard police tapes from Sonoma County Supervisor Efren Carrillo’s July 13 early-morning arrest in court last week. As reported by the Press Democrat, Carrillo told officers, “In retrospect, I should have had my pants on.” Ya think?

SHELL SHOCKED The future of Drakes Bay Oyster Company is in the hands of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Shuck Stops Here Can fences be mended in the Drakes Bay oyster debate? BY TOM GOGOLA

O

ne day soon, the fight over the fate of Drakes Bay Oyster Company will end.

And then what? The family-run aquaculture farm, located within the Point Reyes National Seashore, has been operating in legal limbo since 2012, when then–U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar

closed the door on a push, led by U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein, to extend the popular farm’s lease for an additional decade beyond a disputed federal order to cease operations by 2012. Salazar’s move prompted a set of legal challenges by the Lunny family, who owns the oyster business but not the land or Drakes Estero, which is owned by We the People. “We didn’t have a guarantee,”

says Kevin Lunny, who purchased the business in 2005. “We don’t have a right to renewal. It is OK to hope that it is renewed. That is not a crime.” But the legal avenues to keep Drakes operational are running out. Two years after Salazar’s ruling, and numerous court dates later, “we’re toward the end, there’s no question,” says Lunny. Much of the court battle ) 10 has hinged on the farm’s

Carrillo is lucky that the only charge being brought against him is the misdemeanor “peeking,” which carries a six-month maximum jail sentence. As he recalled the event to officers, Carrillo knew the woman, a neighbor, and thought she’d be interested in a little conversation and bubbly refreshment—“a couple of Plinys”—at 2:30am. After all, he’d run into her at the downtown Santa Rosa nightclub Space XXV (a dress-code kind of club), and she had her kitchen light on when Carrillo’s girlfriend dropped him off at the end of the evening. And what better way to converse in the middle of the night than wearing only underwear and socks, because that’s how real pals hang. When he knocked on the door and identified himself as “Efren, your neighbor,” Carrillo told police he heard a man’s voice inside. Carrillo then left, he says, and doesn’t remember if he went to a bedroom window. (Police reported seeing a torn screen and the woman’s second 911 call came when she heard rustling blinds outside her bedroom window). After his arrest, Carrillo checked himself into a rehab facility for a month, saying he has a problem with alcohol. He returned to the board of supervisors in August. He told officers that night, “It was a bad read. A misperception on my part.” The trial kicked off Tuesday morning after jury selection was completed. —Nicolas Grizzle

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Drakes ( 8 environmental impact on the Estero. The ďŹ ght over the oyster business has pitted sustainability advocates against save-thewilderness folks—people who otherwise would ďŹ nd themselves in basic agreement over ecoissues. But the conict has also been a lightning rod for right-wing activists and politicians to play out their ideological longings for a less intrusive federal government. Louisiana senator David Vitter, for example, took up the cudgel of support for Drakes Bay in 2013, offering legislation that would have green-lighted the XL Keystone Pipeline, and kept the oyster farm in business. Proponents of closing Drakes Bay see moves like Vitter’s as part of an effort to maximize private proďŹ ts at the expense of the public—and see the Drakes Bay case on a slope that is quite slippery. “This is really an effort by industry to open up public lands and waters for uses that would go against what taxpayers purchased years and years ago,â€? says Neal Desai, PaciďŹ c region associate director of the National Parks Conservation Association. Drakes’ fate is in the hands of the U.S. Supreme Court. A lastditch petition to the high court is all that stands in the way of Lunny being compelled to begin removing traces of his business from the land and water. One main thrust underpinning the Supreme Court petition is a recent 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that Lunny’s lawyers argue created contradictory interpretations of federal law, a “circuit split,â€? that only the Supreme Court can resolve. The high court ďŹ elds upwards of 10,000 petitions a year and generally accepts 1 percent or fewer of them for legal review, says Desai. “The truth is, we know that it is a long shot,â€? Lunny says. “But there are legal analysts who are looking at this; our case is meritorious.â€? The “circuit splitâ€? argument,

says Desai, indicates that Lunny’s legal team is “completely reaching for straws now.â€? Whatever the outcome, there’s been a lot of bad blood spilled in West Marin along the way toward a ďŹ nal resolution. “The more local you get, the more it becomes about relationships and not about the values that hold our social fabric together,â€? says Desai. The West Marin Environmental Action Committee, the lead local environmental organization pushing for the facility’s closure, has had its offices vandalized twice, says executive director Amy Trainer. Trainer is also the subject of a Facebook page devoted to getting her ďŹ red. (The page has 33 likes at last count, with comments like “Can the bitchâ€? from one Florida woman.) Lunny, meanwhile, has faced accusations that he’s in the tank with the Koch brothers, a charge that arose when he accepted legal help from an organization called Cause of Action, which PBS and others reported had ties to the right-wing oligarchy-enablers. More recently, the Koch-funded PaciďŹ c Legal Foundation has been providing pro bono legal work on Lunny’s behalf. Lunny also has high-toned sustainability advocate Alice Waters on his side, as well as numerous Bay Area restaurateurs and residents who have enjoyed Drakes’ oysters for decades. The farm has been in operation for about 80 years. However it ends, “the healing is going to take a lot of time,â€? says Trainer, an Inverness resident. She and Lunny at least agree on that. “I’m really interested in rebuilding relationships with the [National] Park Service,â€? says Lunny, who also owns a ranch near the oyster farm. “I had a great relationship with them over the years, and we want to rebuild that,â€? he says. Lunny is less certain he’ll be breaking bread with Trainer’s Environmental Action Committee any time soon, whether or not he prevails in court. “Ranchers won’t even talk to them. It’s going to take a while.â€?

킬킬 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

ųŴ

Book and Lyrics by Eric Idle Music by John Du Prez and Eric Idle

April 25, 26, 30, May 1, 2, 3 at 8PM April 26, 27, May 3 at 2PM plus Day Under the Oaks: May 4 at 3PM Burbank Auditorium, Santa Rosa Junior College 1501 Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa Campus TICKETS ONLINE www.santarosa.edu/theatrearts TICKETS $10-$18 BOX OFFICE 707.527.4343 Recommended for Age 10 and up. Some adult references, revealing costumes & brief strong language.

Monty Python’s Spamalot is presented through special arrangement with Theatrical Rights Worldwide. www.theatricalrights.com

17 years strong in Sonoma County

Peacepipe

622 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa

707.541.7016

8492 Gravenstein Hwy, Cotati

707.795.3420

thepeacepipesmokeshop.com

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call ďŹ rst for conďŹ rmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Carmen’s Burger Bar American. $. Excellent and innovative burgers with a Mexican flair. Beef comes fresh daily from Pacific Market next door. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 1612 Terrace (in Town and Country center), Santa Rosa. 707.579.3663. 90 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1575.

D’s Diner Diner. $. Classic diner serving a bevy of breakfast delights, as well as delights for other meals too. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily. 7260 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.8080.

Garden Court Cafe & Bakery American. $-$$. Traditional diner food treated with utter respect; the quality ingredients make for sublime eating. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Mon. 13647 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.1565.

Le Bistro French. $$. A tiny space, simple menu, excellent food–and a reasonable price. Dinner, Wed-Sun. 312 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.762.8292.

Old Chicago Pizza Pizza. $$. Extraordinary deep-dishstyle pizza with tasteful wine list in historic stretch of Petaluma. Delivery, too! 41 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.3897. Pick-up and delivery: 203 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.766.8600. Risibisi Italian. $$-$$$. An oasis of urbanity that will transport you to New York, Paris even. The menu keeps freshly seasonal and changes weekly. Lunch and dinner daily. 154 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.766.7600.

Simply Vietnam Vietnamese. $. Friendly Vietnamese for all ethnic tastes. Savory, satisfying and

filling. Pho can be hit or miss, depending on the meat quality. Lunch and dinner daily. 966 N Dutton Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.566.8910.

Sushi Tozai Japanese. $$. Spare, clean ambiance and some of the freshest sushi you’ll ever eat. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 7531 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9886. Volpi’s Restaurant Italian. $$-$$$$. Festive atmosphere teams with great traditional Italian dishes at one of county’s oldest eateries. Accordion in the speakeasy if you’re lucky. Dinner daily. 124 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.2371.

Willow Wood Market Cafe Mediterranean. $$. Homey, eclectic foods. Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; brunch, Sun. 9020 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.0233.

Wolf House Californian. $$. Stick with the simple, classics dishes, as they always shine. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 13740 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.996.4401.

MARIN CO U N T Y

Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Bay Thai Thai. $. Fresh Thai food with curries that combine the regions classic sweet and tart elements. Some of the best fried bananas to be found. Lunch and dinner, MonSat; dinner, Sun. (Cash only.) 809 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.458.8845.

Buckeye Roadhouse American. $$-$$$. A Marin

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Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

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Fish Seafood. $$-$$$. Incredibly fresh seafood in incredibly relaxed setting overlooking bay. Lunch and dinner daily. (Cash only.) 350 Harbor Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.FISH.

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$. The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 316 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900.

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Poggio Italian. $$-$$$. Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Avatar’s Indian-plus. $.

13

Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

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Dining

County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

14 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

BAY VIEW RESTAURANT & BAR – BODEGA BAY ESTA BLISH ED IN 1984

Traditional Italian and Local Seafood at Affordable Prices SERVING DINNER Wednesday–Sundays (Saturday Piano Bar) ~ Full Bar, Fireside Lounge, Outdoor Patio ~ Featuring Sonoma County Wines ~ Spectacular Sunset Views ~ Winemaker Dinner Series featured Monthly ~ Groups and Receptions Welcome

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Dining ( 13 dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487. BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

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Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Carpe Diem Wine Bar Californian. $-$$. Right in the heart of downtown Napa, Carpe Diem’s contemporary and innovative menu includes a variety of seasonal flatbreads, an ostrich burger, the famed short-rib sliders and much more. Over 45 wines by the glass, six draft beers and an impressive reserve wine list round out this warm, inviting space. Dinner daily. 1001 Second St., Napa. 707.224.0800.

Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Keller’s

SMALL BITES

Killer Tomatoes It’s one of the most popular plants to grow in a home garden, yet outside of the Roma, beefsteak and cherry varieties, the true diversity and delicious possibilities of the tomato aren’t well known. There are more than 150 tomato cultivars, from Amish paste to Zapote, and each one carries with it a unique color, shape and taste. For dedicated tomato-heads out there, the fruit offers endless delectability, whether it’s tossed in salad, sliced on bread or chomped like an apple. And every year, tomato fans flock to the annual Tomatomania, held for the sixth consecutive year at Cornerstone Gardens in Sonoma on April 26–27. Tomatomania began as a small, West Coast phenomenon in the early ’90s and has since grown into a national sensation, and recently even caught the attention of the New York Times, which dubbed it “the tomato freak’s Woodstock.” Now the event’s only Bay Area appearance brings with it everything from tips and tricks, tastings, and seedlings to prepare for the upcoming tomato season. Producer Scott Daigre and local propagator Brad Gates will show off their latest tomato creations, including the world’s first blue tomato and one named after author Michael Pollan. There will also be free workshops and expert advice to turn any garden novice into a tomato fanatic for life. —Charlie Swanson

institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gott’s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $-$$. Formerly Taylor’ Automatic Refresher. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Wineries

15

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Arrowood Winery Most of Arrowood’s wine is done in the Bordeaux style of France. 14347 Sonoma Hwy., Glen Ellen. Tasting room open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.935.2600.

Deerfield Ranch Winery (WC) The finest wine caves this side of the highway. Twenty-thousand-square-foot underground lair is perfect for keeping wine and wine tasters cool on a summer’s day. Watch for giraffes. 10200 Sonoma Highway, Kenwood. Daily 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $10-$15. 707.833.2270.

Hop Kiln Winery Both pleasant and rural, Hop Kiln has an extremely popular crisp white wine (Thousand Flowers) which sells out every year. The grounds are gorgeous, right on the Russian River. 6050 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 707.433.6491.

Kamen Estate Wines Key lines from screenwriter Robert Kamen’s features are available on T-shirts, packaged in film cans. Cabernet Sauvignon with intense red fruit flavor over inky tannins. Insert chase scene, destination: 111-B E. Napa St., Sonoma. Monday–Thursday, noon–6pm; Friday–Sunday, 11am–6pm. Tasting fees, $20 and $35. 707.938.7292.

Murphy-Goode Winery Value is a premium. Be sure to try the Brenda Block Cabernet and Fume Blanc. The new tasting room is a classy, low-key experience. 20 Matheson St., Healdsburg. Open daily, 10:30am–5:30pm. 800.499.7644.

Paul Mathew Vineyards Sunny, corner tasting room in downtown Graton offering a singular expression of Valdiguié, progressively deeper and more aromatic Pinot Noir, and cushioned benches to sink into should you become lost in

reverie as a result. 9060 Graton Road, Graton. Thursday– Sunday, 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.865.2505.

Red Car Wine Co. Lay some track to the “Gateway to Graton” and take your palate on a ride with Boxcar Syrah and Trolley Pinot from Sonoma Coast vineyards. Next stop: Côte-Rôtie on the way to Beaune. 8400 Graton Road, Sebastopol. Open daily, 10am-5pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.829.8500.

N A PA CO U N T Y Acacia Vineyard Acclaimed Pinot and Chardonnay; their biggest client is Costco, but the tasting room is a hole-in-the-wall in a drab beige facility. 2750 Las Amigas Road, Napa. Monday through Saturday, 10am–4pm; Sunday, noon–4pm. $15. 707.226.9991.

Beringer Vineyards (WC) This historic winery offers some seven daily tours for nominal fees, most of which end gratefully with a glass and a spin through the underground wine-aging tunnels. Open daily, 10am–6pm (summer hours). 2000 Main St., Napa. 707.963.7115.

Chateau Boswell Winery (WC) This small, boutique winery is open by appointment only, selling most its wine directly via post to club members. 3468 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.963.5472.

Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345. Hall Winery (WC) Craig and Kathryn Hall specialize in “beefy” wines favored by Robert Parker. Intensely modern art and all things Austrian. 401 St. Helena Hwy. S., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5:30pm. 866.667.HALL..

Peju Province Vineyards Talented staff, terrific food pairings and fantastic Cab. 8466 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–6pm. 707.963.3600.

Silver Oak Silver Oak truly is a venerable cult wine, confounding to outsiders who don’t feel the magic. Folks love the Silver Oak; the Silver Oak is good. 915 Oakville Cross Road, Oakville. Monday– Saturday, 9am–5pm; Sunday, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $20. 707.942.7022

Swanson Vineyards Not lotus-eating, per se, but caviar, Grana Padano, artisan chocolate bonbons–same idea. Whimsically elegant Salon or informal, candystriped Sip Shoppe. Known for Merlot. 1271 Manley Lane, Rutherford. Sip Shoppe Thursday–Sunday 11am–5pm; call or ring gate. Fee $15–$20. Salon by appointment, $60. 707.754.4018.

Trahan Winery In the fancy heart of downtown Napa, a low-budget “cellar” where wines are shelved, with clever economy, in stacks of wood pallets; vibes are laid-back and real. Carneros Chardonnay and fruity but firm and focused Cab and Merlot from Suisin Valley, Napa’s much less popular stepsister to the east. 974 Franklin St., Napa. Open daily, noon–5:30pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.257.7477. V. Sattui Though a regular stop on the tourist circuit, it remains charming in the Italian style. With no distribution except via the Net, wines can only be purchased onsite. 1111 White Lane, St. Helena. Open daily, 9am–6pm. 707.963.7774.

Velo Vino Napa Valley Cycling-themed bungalow is filled with enough gear to outfit a peloton, plus wine and espresso, too. Tastings include spiced nuts and dried cherries, but sample-sized Clif and Luna Bars are readily available for your impromptu energy bar and wine pairings. 709 Main St., St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 6pm. $10–$25. 707.968.0625.

Magic Flute Live by the sword, drink by the sword at Sigh Sonoma BY JAMES KNIGHT

N

apoleon’s light cavalry, in the early 1800s, were constantly on the move and had no time to sit around in wine lounges and gently twist the cork off a bottle of Champagne, eliciting the proper “sigh.” Whether celebrating victory or commiserating in defeat, they employed a fast, effective, if dicey-looking method of opening those very necessary bottles of Champagne: sabering.

Two hundred years after the French emperor’s armies were defeated by a plucky coalition of oligarchs, Sigh Sonoma owner Jayme Powers steps into a winetasting-room-choked alley off the Plaza with bottle and saber in hand. Key points in sabering, she says, are a dull saber, a cold bottle and a strike on the seam. Slice, crack, pow! Neat trick. No reason to fear shards of glass in a pour of crisp and toasty Veuve Fourny and Fils Blanc de Blancs ($62; glass, $16; taste, $6), says Powers—the physics of bottle pressure took care of that. A job at Schramsberg Vineyards spurred the Sonoma native’s interest in sparkling wine and Champagne. “A lot of people don’t know that Champagne is a region,” says Powers, who offers a bit of education with flights. By popular demand, she started a small wine club. Instead of carrying the big names, she looks for Champagnes from smaller labels and growers that cannot be found in other stores. The spot’s popular with winemakers; largebowled stemware is kept in reserve for serious aroma sniffers. Indeed, while the Iron Horse Wedding Cuvée ($38) is as elegant and austere as usual, with ghostly traces of grapefruit and strawberry under a veil of scoury mousse, the star sippers are Champagnes. A whiff of the Michel Forget Ludes Brut Rosé ($64) conjures a vision of strawberry shortcake, which vanishes just as fast on the firm, dry finish. Nine years on the lees has aged the 2002 LeLarge Pugeot ($72) like pungent cheese rind, while the palate is still fresh with fermenting white grapes and rich with toasted almond flavor. Tuesday evenings during the Valley of the Moon Certified Farmers’ Market on the Plaza, two bottles of cold bubbly “to go” cost just $29—darn near charity. During the week, locals have discovered this is a quiet place to have a business meeting; weekends bring in bachelorettes, honeymooning couples and wine country daytrippers. For the odd guy out who simply can’t abide sipping fizzy wine from a flute, an hour spent lounging on cushioned benches and goldtasseled pillows needn’t be his Waterloo. Sigh Sonoma’s “42” license allows them to serve Miller High Life, the “Champagne of Beers.” Sigh Sonoma, 29 East Napa St., Sonoma. Summer hours: noon– 7pm; noon–8pm, Friday–Saturday, noon–8pm; Sunday, noon–6pm. 707.996.2444.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

The Gopher Hunters When the going gets tough, pest-plagued gardeners call in the experts BY NICOLAS GRIZZLE

O

ur enemy has dug an elaborate tunnel system to evade capture. They know discovery means certain death in this ruthless battle. Excavation mounds are hidden just enough to cause damage if stumbled upon, and many have suffered the consequences—it’s time for revenge. The humid late morning air is warm and silent, save for our own movements and the whirr of tiny propellers from toy planes overhead. But we’re not here to play with toys. We’re on a seek-and-destroy mission. Our target: gophers.

The underground rodents are a menace to anyone who has ever owned a lawn, played at a park or tended a garden. And with warmer weather and gardening season upon us, the gopher hordes are on the move. “They have nothing else to do but make babies and eat your plants,” says Sonoma County master gardener Jim Lang, who gives seminars on trapping the tiny terrors. “It’ll never end. You can’t get rid of them.” But there are ways to keep them in check. A Place to Play park in Santa Rosa is littered with gopher holes—little landmines ready to blow out someone’s ACL during a soccer game. It’s Gregg Crawford’s job to combat the garden guerrillas before the

green grass in the 83-acre park succumbs to brown mounds of dirt. On this day, the 66-year-old retired sheet-metal worker and combat veteran arrived with his future son-in-law about half an hour before dawn to set dozens of traps in hopes of making a Place to Play a safer place to play. “These are badass,” he says, demonstrating a cinch trap, the only kind he uses. When asked why, he looks me dead in the eye and says, “Because I catch a lot of gophers.” Crawford does catch a lot of gophers. At a Place to Play, he averages 25 to 40 in an eighthour day, once bagging 85 in one session, and he has hundreds of satisfied customers at private residences and vineyards to attest

to his skills. As his weathered hands set a trap in front of me, he says it’s the trapper, not the trap, that makes the difference. “I set it for a hair trigger, just so he breathes on that son of a bitch, all he has to do is touch it and it goes off.” True to form, he moves his thumb a millimeter in one direction and the trap snaps faster than I can blink, causing me to jump. He then shows off his own modification: a sharpened end of the closing cinch. “If he tries to

go around it, this sharp end goes around and impales him.” Before I’ve even seen him catch one gopher, I get the sense that this guy really loves what he does. Crawford started trapping underground pests 14 years ago. “I had [a mole] in my yard. And you know what? I couldn’t catch that son of a bitch,” he says. He went to one of Lang’s seminars and decided to try his hand at catching the pest. “I’d just retired, and I bought a couple of traps, caught the mole and I said, ‘This

17 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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most common variety in these parts is Botta’s pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae). It is known as such for the exterior pockets on either side of its mouth, which it uses to carry food and nesting material to its den. When digging tunnels with its sharp claws and incisors, it somersaults inside a tunnel barely big enough for its body, and pushes dirt and rocks out excavation holes, making sure to plug them to keep predators and moisture out. Gophers aren’t all bad— ) 18

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is kinda fun.’ I bought more traps and caught seven in a friend’s garden, and I was hooked, like fishing. “Go out hunting and fishing every day, and get paid for it?” he asks rhetorically. “A grown man driving around on an ATV and getting paid should not be having this much fun.”

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Gophers ( 17 those mounds can provide fresh seedbed and increase the variety of plants at a given site, and the tunnels give refuge and shelter to other animals. Their droppings in the tunnels fertilize the soil. And some animals find them delicious. “These are at the bottom of the food chain,” says Crawford. “Everyone wants a gopher.” But if a snake, raccoon or other creature looking for a meal does get in, the gopher has an effective defense strategy. They’re normally skittish creatures and quite quick on the retreat, and that’s usually good enough. But if confronted, a gopher will clamp down with an astonishing 18,000 pounds of pressure per square inch using yellowed front teeth that can grow to almost an inch long. By comparison, the average dog bites with about 320 psi. Crawford says he has been bitten once, and quickly changes the subject when asked for more details. A single gopher can make several mounds in one day, and create a 50-foot-long tunnel with lateral mounds in about a week. They work on four-hour shifts, digging for four and sleeping for four. “It’s a tremendous amount of dirt they move in a year,” says Crawford. Unlike moles, which dig one continuous linear path just below the surface, a gopher’s tunnel is only visible from the surface by tracing its mounds. Though Crawford has an iPhone, and even texts pictures of his successful missions to clients upon request, he’s decidedly old-school in his techniques. His metal traps are purely mechanical. When first studying his enemy, he took a first-hand approach. “I got two windowpanes, spaced them about four feet apart,” says Crawford, “put in some nice Forestville soil, caught a live [gopher], threw him in there and I’d watch him dig. Every day, he’d dig a different tunnel. I’d come home, and there’d be more tunnels. It was just like a giant

ant farm, you know, like when you were a kid? That son of a bitch, he dug and dug and dug. I fed him carrots and celery, stuff like that. He ate everything. “I had a screen and a brick over the top. One day, I fed him and didn’t put the brick back. I come home from work, and he had dug a new tunnel, but he made like a ramp going up to the top, got out of my cage, jumped off the table and got into my backyard. “I let him live. I have a heart, you know.”

‘They have nothing else to do but make babies and eat your plants.’ Ongoing Battle Crawford says the best place to set a trap is in a fresh hole on the main tunnel path. He points out one 20 feet away from us that would be perfect. “See, this dirt clod right here is starting to bleach out from the sun. He probably dug this about 30 minutes ago.” A trap goes in, with a hair trigger. To our right, a trap has sprung, but no gopher—the hole has been backfilled. “How the hell did he get by my trigger, and pumped the hole full of dirt?” Crawford asks. He nonchalantly blames Skylar Delzell, his 30-year-old future son-in-law, whom he’s training to take over the family business. Delzell quickly informs me that his first day on the job was four days prior, a fact I wouldn’t have known based on Crawford’s tough-love teaching style. To our left, a gopher pops its head out of another hole. “Skylar, this guy’s teasing me right here, he’s poking his head out,”

Gopher Whisperer Sheila Bradford catches gophers, too. In the relatively small world of underground-pest eradication, she and Crawford have crossed paths; in fact, Crawford helped get her started with her own business. Both agree that education is key. “We need more people to do it themselves and stop the spread,” she says. “It’s getting worse and worse.” Bradford began catching gophers as an employee with the San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department, where she was so good at her job that a local TV news crew did a story on her. She keeps track of her success, not with marks on a helmet—with more than 2,000 catches so far, she would need a huge headpiece—but by mental tally. “It started out as me being competitive with one of my coworkers,” she says. “They’d never heard of people not only keeping track, but having those kind of numbers.” Now that she’s out on her own, competition drives her. She references Caddyshack with a chuckle. “It’s like the gopher beat him,” she says of Bill Murray’s golf-course groundskeeper character. “It’s a way to get comic relief from a job that can be pretty gross sometimes—to think of it like a game, like the gopher is an opponent.” Bradford has a different approach than Crawford—she sets traps inside the tunnels rather than at the excavation holes. Her clients have referred to her as “the Gopher Whisperer,” but she shrugs it off. “It’s like the Caldecott tunnel,” she says of a gopher’s main thoroughfare. “They’re going to be going through it.” Both decry the use of poisons, for a poisoned gopher can be deadly to a pet or bird of prey, if left unattended. Traps are the way to go. Like Crawford, Braford is good at her job. And like the combat veteran, she doesn’t mind the gruesome aspect of it. “I don’t have a moral issue with killing them,” she says. “I got over that years ago.”

19

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Crawford yells across the field. Then he gets intensely quiet. “Don’t move,” he tells me. “You see him?” I nod. We wait. The little turf terrorist is watching us, determining our threat level. Crawford moves toward the hole and the critter disappears. A trap goes in, with a hair trigger. Ten minutes later we hear the tell-tale snap, and head over to find a one-legged wounded veteran of the gopher wars caught in a trap, flopping around like a fish on the deck of a boat. Crawford ends the gopher’s suffering with a quick rap to the head. “This job is not for the squeamish,” Crawford says. Despite his ongoing efforts, Crawford says he hasn’t seen a drop in his average catch. “Most of my business is repeat business,” he says. “A gopher, when he gets into your perennials, he’ll eat every last one of them. And they gnaw on woody plants: grapes, apples, figs, pears. I don’t know what they see in it, but they’ll gnaw on the woody parts. They love roses.” Crawford believes west Sonoma County is particularly favored by the underground pests. “About 60 to 70 percent of my business is in Sebastopol and West County,” he says. Lang, the master gardener, says gophers aren’t particular to any part of the North Bay. “I live in Petaluma, and they’re like ants here,” he says. They also love vineyards. “I’ve got a friend with 25 acres of grapes. He traps about 300 a year, every year.” Crawford and Lang agree that trapping and education are the best ways to stall the gopher invasion. Sharing information with neighbors and keeping an eye out for fresh holes helps keep them at bay. Lang says he’s heard of folks trying to poison them with everything from Aqua Velva aftershave to chewing gum, with some even stooping to lower depths. “I heard some people put Ex-Lax down the hole, thinking they’ll poop themselves to death,” he says with a laugh. For the record, none of those “poisons” actually kill gophers.

Crush C h CULTURE

NORTH NOR TH BAY B A Y BOHEMIAN BOH H E MI AN | APRIL AP R I L 23-29, 23 - 29 , 20 2014 0 1 4 | BO BOHEMIAN.COM H E M I AN . C O M

20 0

THE WEEK’S WEEK’ W S EVENTS: E VENT S: A SELECTIVE SELE C TIVE GUIDE E GLEN ELLEN

The Woman Woman o Behind the Wolf Wolf o

Everyone has h heard heard of Jack London, London, whose home hom me is a state park in Glen Ellen.. But fewer fe know about abou ut his wife, wife, Charmian Kittredge Kittredge London, Lond don, who lived a full and spirited life life herself. h Charmian was w ahead of her times—she packed packed a pistol, sailed the South Seas,, boxed boxee and wrote novels.. Now w is the chance to learn more more about her adventures, adventures,, as a series of docent-led docentt tours at Jack LLondon ondon Park Park a this summer explore explore the cottage and a museum on the grounds grounds and shed shee light on the woman who helped London Lonndon become the literary literary icon he is. The T Life Life and Times Times of Charmian Kittredge Kittre London Tour runs throughout the summer, summeer, beginning April 24, 24,, at the Jack London Lonndon State State Park, Park,, 2400 2400 London London Ranch Road, Glenn Ellen. 11am. $50. 707 7..938.52216 707.938.5216

S A N TA R O S A

Feather F e eath her Fest Fe est We see th We them em flying high over the fields, per perched ched on telephone lines or nestled aatop tree branches, but the impr esssive bir ds of pr arely seen up cclose and personal, until impressive birds prey ey that call Sonomaa County home ar aree rrarely now B pens its doors this weekend ffor or its second annual Festival now.. The Bir Birdd Rescue Center in Santa Rosa oopens of Feather rs, allowing ffor or close encounters with with the ar ray of owls, ffalcons alcons and ha a Feathers, array hawks that reside at the rrehabilitation ehabilitat h bilit tion ti t andd education d ti center t . This Thi ffamily-oriented amily-oriented il i t d afternoon ft will ill include i l d a silent auction and center. rraffle, affle, and kid-friendly activities, all benefitin ofit center dedicated too rescuing and releasing benefitingg the nonpr nonprofit our orpha ned and injur ed feathered feathered friends. The T Festival of Feathers takes plac c Saturday, April 26, at orphaned injured place the Bir R Center S Rosa. 11am–4pm. Fr ee. 707 7..55 Birdd Rescue Center,, 3430 Chanate Road, Santa Free. 707.523.2473.

BOLINAS

The Story’s in the Supper Su upper The Eat Myy Heart Out Supper Club was born five fivve years ago in New York York City, Cityy, when Eugene Euu AshtonGonzalez first fi met chef Luke Luke Davin.. Ashton-Gonzalez Ashton-Gonzzalez pr oduced live storytelling showss similar produced to the Moth Moth and This American Life Liffe, and he and Davin dreamed dreamed of a dinner that actedd as an com mplement to stories shared shared live onstage. onstagee. e The event immediately took off, offf, andd edible complement Ashtoon-Gonzalez was touring the country y. This T week,, the Eat My Heart Out Supper Suppp soon Ashton-Gonzalez country. debutts in the North Bay, Bayy, pairing stories by Glen G David Gold,, Richard Richard Dillman,, Maria Maria Club debuts an nd others with a five-course dinner prepared prepared by chefs Eve Love Love and David Cook. C Muldaur and KWMR, west Marin’s Marin’s community radio, radioo,, Eat My Heart Out Supper Club takess Benefiting KWMR, Saturrdayy, April 26,, at the Peace Peace Barn,, 70 Olema Ollema Bolinas Road,, Bolinas.. 7pm. place Saturday, 4115.6 663.8068. $200.. 415.663.8068.

SA N R A FA E L

They y Played the Hits s While supe superstars erstars like Elvis and the Righteous Br Brothers otthers wer weree taking all the cr credit, edit,, the uns unsung u session mu usicians who played the actual music rremained e emained in the liner notes,, rrarely arely gettin n the notice musicians getting they deser v . Now a gr ved. oup of W est Coast musici ians dubbed the W recking Cr ew get the e turn in the deserved. group West musicians Wrecking Crew their spotlight inn Denny Tedesco’s Tedesco e ’s documentary ffocusing ocusinng on the players behind the hits,, includ d the filmmaker’s including late ffather, atherr, guitarist TTommy oommy TTedesco. eedesco.. Rarely Rarely screened screenned since its pr emiere in 2008, ‘The W r premiere Wrecking Crew’ returns to the big scr een with additional interviews interviews ffor esented by TTedesco edes e s on Sunday, April 27, at the or a special one-time showing pr screen presented Smith Raf ael Film Center, Centerr, 1118 Fourth SSt., t.,, San Raf a . 7pm.. $12–$15.. 4415.454.1222. ael. 115.454.1222. Rafael Rafael.

—Charlie Swanson —

Emo Philips delivers his one-of-a-kind standup at the Throckmorton Theatre in Mill Valley April 25.

VESSEL VENTURE Ken Swindt (second from right) and his team, the Wasabi Rockets, prepare for competition.

Sink or Sail

The annual Wooden Boat Challenge returns to Bodega Bay BY CHARLIE SWANSON

F

rom Noah’s Ark to the Viking longship, the art of the wooden boat brings with it a history and craft that can transport you to any place and time in the world. It’s a love affair that continues in woodshops today across the state, and for Bodega Bay residents Ken and Starr Swindt, it’s a hobby 30 years in the making.

The Swindts are avid boaters who logged more than 5,000 miles on water last year alone. They cruise the North Bay when they’re not setting course for the Caribbean or Chesapeake Bay. Yet for the Swindts, riding in the boat is only half the fun; Ken is also a master builder of wooden boats, from canoes to kayaks to 50-foot vessels. A retired firefighter, Ken built his first wooden boat 25 years ago and it’s still around today. Swindt revels in the idea of being

able to travel freely, “like people have been doing for thousands of years.” But the hook for him was the puzzle: “How do we make this piece of wood do that, make that shape, look nice, carry some folks around and actually work? That’s the challenge.” For the past six years, the Swindts have organized and hosted Bodega Bay’s Wooden Boat Challenge. Taking place April 26, as part of the annual Bodega Bay Fisherman’s Festival, the competition encourages

craftspeople of every level to take part in an afternoon of team work that turns planks of plywood into seaworthy and sometimes impressive small boats. The Swindts first heard of the wooden boat challenge when it started eight years ago, and each credits the other with first getting involved in it. Now Starr is the chairperson, overseeing aspects like recruitment and wood donations, and Ken continues to compete and coordinate the teams and the event. For an activity that normally takes 50 to 70 hours of work, the challenge’s time constraint of three hours is one of the most daunting and exciting aspects of the competition. “It’s just like, ‘What?’ You have to build something that looks like a boat, acts like a boat, and the time constraints are ridiculous,” he says. This year, the event introduces a youth division, as students from the Spaulding Wooden Boat Center in Sausalito face off in their own race. The event will also feature running commentary from local comedian and star of the upcoming film The Mendoza Line, Juan Carlos Arena. Awards are given for craftsmanship and speed (there’s even a Titanic award for best sink), and the teams always attempt to put new spins on traditional designs. “These old Merchant Marines built a potato chip boat that was oval and almost flat,” Starr says. “They entered the day before the race. It was only a team of two guys, and they blew everybody out of the water.” The Wooden Boat Challenge takes place April 26 during the 41st annual Bodega Bay Fisherman’s Festival running April 26–27 at Westside Park, Bodega Bay. 10am–5pm. $10–$12 (kids under 12 are free). www.bbfishfest.org.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Arts Ideas

21

Stage

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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ALL TOO HUMAN Carl Lumbly plays Troy Maxson, a great character of the modern American stage.

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Building ‘Fences’

515 Ross St, Brickyard Center, Santa Rosa (707) 542-5588 802 4th St, San Rafael • 415-457-7600

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Wed, Apr 23 10:15am– 12:40pm 7–10pm

8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLE & PAIRS Square Dance Club

Thur, Apr 24 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15–10pm CIRCLES N’ SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Apr 25 7–11pm

8:40–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther TOP 40 DANCE HITS of the 80s and 90s

Sat, Apr 26 10:30am– 12:30pm 5–9pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise SCOTTISH CHALLENGE Dance Class SCOTTISH DANCE FUNDRAISER

The Dream Farmers

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Sun, Apr 27 8:30–9:30am Jazzercise 5–9:30pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, Apr 28 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–10pm NORTHWEST PACIFIC RAILROAD HISTORICAL SOCIETY Tues, Apr 29 8:45–9:45am; 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD Music and Dance

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922

1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

The Cliffs by Seymour Tubis, Circa 1952

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MTC brings August Wilson’s masterpiece to life BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

t’s a basic truth about theater: the best plays are those that are both speciďŹ c and universal, revealing vivid details about individuals or cultures or historical moments, while giving a glimpse of the common thread that connects us to the characters whose lives are unfolding onstage. The late August Wilson was among the best practitioners of this art. His “Century Cycle,â€? 10 plays spanning a hundred years, one for each decade, is rooted in the larger African-American experience. The plays are ďŹ lled with fury and frustration, humor and hope, and recount the heartbreak and resilient spirit of a

segment of American society. At the same time, the plays are about fathers and daughters, sisters and brothers, husbands and wives, friends and foes. They explore getting ahead in the world, ďŹ nding something to believe in, making and losing money, ďŹ nding and losing love, discovering and losing a sense of one’s value and purpose. As such, August Wilson’s plays are about everyone. His Pulitzer-winning Fences, set in the 1950s, captures that sense of universality in a vibrant, emotionally driven production at the Marin Theatre Company. Directed with graceful attention to the connective tissue that binds a family together, Fences tells the story of Troy Maxson. A proud, deeply angry former Negro Leagues baseball player, Troy is at odds with his teenage son, Cory (Eddie Ray Jackson), who’s been offered a shot at a college football scholarship. Troy is one of the great characters of the modern American stage: petty, meanspirited and unapologetically unlikable one moment, then gentle, generous and loving the next. Played with combustible complexity by Carl Lumbly, Troy is an achingly believable character, whose strengths and aws are all frustratingly raw and real. As his wife, Rose, Margo Hall gives one of the great performances of the year. As aware of Troy’s aws as anyone, Rose also sees what’s good and beautiful about him, perhaps even more so than he does. Her gradual evolution from helpmate to standalone powerhouse, a progression that unfolds right alongside Troy’s staunch, bitter obstinacy, is absolutely amazing to watch. Some fences, we are told, are built to keep people out, while others are built to keep people in. In Wilson’s shimmering masterpiece, he creates a fence that somehow contains all of us at once. Rating (out of 5): +++++ ‘Fences’ runs Tuesday–Sunday through May 11 at Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Times vary. $20–$58. 415.388.5208

Film

23 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

SELF PORTRAIT Amateur photographer Vivian Maier chronicled everyday life, but guarded her own identity.

Camera Eye

New doc turns the lens on enigmatic photographer BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he aloof meets Maloof in Finding Vivian Maier, John Maloof’s account of the detective work he did to learn more about the woman whose photographs he discovered in a locker.

Vivian Maier never exhibited her photos or home movies, shot from World War II to the 1970s. Some of the immense volume of her work is a harder-edged version of the photojournalism that made Life magazine sometimes indelible, sometimes trite; other pieces are compassionate, invaluable images of people on the margins, taken by a brave photographer. Her best work is as good as the photography of Weegee or Gordon Parks. Born in New York, Maier considered herself French (her mother was from Alsace). She dressed functionally, mannishly. In self portraits, she’s sometimes as horsey as Nancy “Miss Hathaway” Culp, and sometimes as handsome as actress Rachel Griffiths. Maier was a mystery, and the mosaic-like fragments people remember make up this investigation. During years of work as a domestic and a nanny, Maier hid behind identities. “I’m sort of a spy,” she once said to an employer. She changed her name and her range, from the Hamptons to Chicago, and even worked as Phil Donahue’s servant, though the TV personality has little recollection of her. Ultimately, if Finding Vivian Maier is the work of a promoter, it’s also the work of an ardent fan. Maloof is eager to prove that his hands are clean—his research demonstrates Maier did at one time want to promote some of her photographs, which clears him of implications of grave-robbing and privacy-disturbing. Rather than echoing accusations at the person who found, restored and brought forth Maier’s haunting work, ask why, in our cultural-integrity vacuum, crowds are so fascinated by stories of monk-like, suffering artists. ‘Finding Vivian Maier’ opens Friday, April 25, at Summerfield Cinemas. 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.522.0719.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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HIGH ROLLER Zoe Muth’s new album ranges far, wide and deep.

Little Bit Country Zoe Muth’s new album is also a little bit rock and roll

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BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been three years since singer and songwriter Zoe Muth and her band the Lost High Rollers released their last record. And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been 16 months since the Seattle native left her hometown for the rolling hills of Austin. The move across so much country to an unfamiliar land, which Muth made with drummer Greg Nies, informs her new album, World of Strangers, available May 27 on Signature Sounds.

After the move, Muth reassembled the Lost High Rollers with some of Austinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most

talented musicians, including producer and bassist George Reiff, Brad Rice (Keith Urban, Son Volt), Martie Maguire (Dixie Chicks) and Bruce Robison. They set up in the studio with Grammy-winner Steven Christensen behind the glass, and Muth allowed for a more free-ďŹ&#x201A;owing, experimental approach to the recording. The result is an album chock-full of new ideas, grounded in Muthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature country-folk style. World of Strangers opens with the sparse and forlorn â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Did You Come Back Here For?â&#x20AC;? with Muthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resonant vocals laid prominently over acoustic and slide guitars. The opener sets a somber tone for the next nine tracks of Americana that explore hard times and hard living, a storytelling narrative Muth naturally gravitates toward with heartrending honesty. Muth has a penchant for country ballads and an uncanny ability to channel the likes of Emmylou Harris when she takes the mic. No longer conďŹ ning herself to any one niche, Muth makes the most of her new surroundings and ensemble with poignant, soulful moments and surprises throughout the album. Tracks like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mama Needs a Margarita,â&#x20AC;? with its lackadaisical laments, call to mind the southof-the-border-blues of Jimmy Buffett, while â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make Me Change My Mindâ&#x20AC;? is as close to rock and roll as anything sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s put together, though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still steeped in classic country melodies. And â&#x20AC;&#x153;Waltz of the Wayward Windâ&#x20AC;? is just that, a waltz, albeit one slow to build and cathartic in its culminationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a description that neatly describes World of Strangers. Zoe Muth & the Lost High Rollers play a pre-release show for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;World of Strangersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; April 24 at the Occidental Center for the Arts. 7:30pm. $25 advance; $27 day of show. 3850 Doris Murphy Court, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Concerts

Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Graham Nash

SONOMA COUNTY Charlie Schlangen & Susan Witt-Butler Charlie Schlangen, baritone extraordinaire, and super soprano Susan Witt-Butler present a concert in the wine caves. Apr 24, 6pm. $50. Deerfield Ranch Winery, 10200 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.833.2270.

MARIN COUNTY

Two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee is legendary for his harmonies and passion. Apr 29-30, 8pm. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY

Casual

A’Roma Roasters

Oakland rapper from Hieroglyphics crew has become a fan favorite with his intense rhymes. Apr 26. $15. 19 Broadway Club, 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Apr 25, Disclaimer. Apr 26, Jacob Green. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Michael Franti & Friends All-star benefit featuring members of RatDog, ALO and others. Apr 30, 8pm. $150. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Los Lonely Boys Sibling trio’s music draws equally from rock, blues, Tex-Mex and Tejano. Apr 23, 8pm. $60-$70. Uptown

Aqus Cafe Apr 23, St George’s Day Sing-Along. Apr 25, Dictator Tots. Apr 26, Spyglass. Fourth Sunday of every month, Gypsy Caravan. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Bergamot Alley Apr 25, the Gypsy Trio. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Burgers & Vine Apr 25, Midnight Sun Massive. 400 First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.7110.

Carole L Ellis Auditorium Apr 27, Trio Navarro. 680

Center for Spiritual Living Apr 26, the One Heart Choir. Apr 30, Kirtan Concert with Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda. 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4543.

D’Argenzio Winery Apr 24, Redwood Duo. 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.280.4658.

Dhyana Center Lofts Apr 25, Tina Mali and Hans Christian. 186 N Main St, Sebastopol. 800.796.6863.

Epicurean Connection Apr 24, Hannah Jern-Miller. |Apr 27, 5 Cent Coffee. 122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Flamingo Lounge Apr 25, Elsa Denton Band. Apr 26, Reflex 80s Band. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Apr 25, Un Deux Trois. Apr 26, Smilin Iguanas. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Green Music Center Apr 23, Instrumental Repertory Recital. Apr 24, SSU Jazz Orchestra & Latin Band. Apr 25, SSU & UC Berkeley Wind Ensembles Concert. Apr 26, SSU Symphonic Chorus & Chamber Singers. Apr 27, Hilary Hahn. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Apr 23, Dimond Saints. Apr 25, Emily Bonn )

EASTERN SPICE Husband and wife David Tiller and Enion Pelta-Tiller lead folk-jazz troupe Taarka in a performance April 24 at Lagunitas in Petaluma. See Clubs & Venues, p26.

26

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

25

Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 415.392.5225.

26 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW

DETROIT DISCIPLES Ranchut!o Apr 25 Soulful Rock 8:00 / No Cover Deb Fri

Sat

Apr 26

TENDER MERCIES

DAN AND JIM FROM COUNTING CROWS

FEATURING

Americana/Roots Rock 8:30 From Kauai Apr 27 MATT BOLTON Sun

Singer/Multi-Instrumentalist 5:00 / No Cover

Music ( 25 & the Vivants. Apr 26, Beso Negro. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Apr 25, Sean Carscadden. Apr 26, Jamie Clark. Apr 27, Gypsy Jazz Caravan. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

“Rock ’n Roll Dance Party” May 3 JOHNNY ALLAIR AND PETE LIND 8:30

Apr 26, Marcus Shelby Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

BEAR’S BELLY May 4 Original Americana

Jackson Theater

Sat

Sun

5:00 / No Cover

Rancho Debut!

TOM FINCH GROUP May 9 Funky Dance Grooves 8:00 Fri

Sat

May 10

EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE & JUNK PARLOR This is not Americana! 8:00 Join us for

Mother’s Day Brunch Buffet

 SUNDAY, MAY 11  Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Apr 27, Santa Rosa Symphony’s Preparatory and Repertory Spring Concert. Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 707.284.3200.

NOTHING TO FEAR Oakland rapper Casual features tracks from debut ‘Fear Itself’ for the album’s 20th anniversary on April 26 at 19 Broadway. See Concerts, p25.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Apr 26, Brandon Butler & Probably Cause. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Apr 23, the Rivereens. Apr 24, Taarka. Apr 25, Cascada. Apr 26, the Pine Needles. Apr 27, Vintage Grass. Apr 30, Nate Lopez. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Apr 24, the No Buenos. Apr 25, Timothy O’Neil Band. Apr 27, Tony Gibson. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Shows: 21+

Mystic Theatre Apr 27, the Fixx. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Newman Auditorium Sonoma County’s Original Roadhouse Tavern

Great Food & Live Music Thur Apr 24˜L2/hEF#/

Karaoke Party

with DJ Hewy Dawg Fri Apr 25˜LhEE2/

Yo Pizza Face! Sat Apr 26˜LhEE2/

Manzanita Moon Sun Apr 27˜IhL2/

Blues and BBQ

with the Blues Defenders Tue Apr 29˜LhEE2/

“Levi's Workshop” with Levi Lloyd & Friends Wed Apr 30˜LUGNhENUGN2/

Dixie Giants

Mon May 5˜IhL2/

Cinco de Mayo Party! Live music & free taco bar! Plus on Fri & Sat Nights:

Rasta Dwight's BBQ! 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove

707.795.5118 twinoakstavernpenngrove.com

Apr 25, Afiara String Quartet. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Apr 25, Under the Radar. Apr 26, Larry K Potts. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sally Tomatoes Apr 25, Hoodwink. Wed, North Bay Blues Jam. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Sebastopol Community Center Apr 26, Greg Brown. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Sprenger’s Tap Room Apr 29, Norbay Pyrate Punx. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Apr 24, Zoe Muth & the Lost High Rollers. Apr 26, Phil Lawrence Band with the Windshield Cowboys. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Stout Brothers

Phoenix Theater

Apr 26, the Dream Farmers. Apr 27, Lauren Ashley Brown with Michael Zeligs. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Apr 25, Pennywise. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe Apr 23, José Arnulfo. Apr 26, the Mighty Groove. Apr 30, William Griffith. Thurs, Open Mic. Fourth Friday of every month, Reggae at the Redwood. Fourth Saturday of every month, KRSH Evening. Fourth Sunday of every month, Old Time Music. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Apr 23, Closet Bakers. Apr 24, Dustin Saylor. Apr 30, Steve Pile. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

The Sunflower Center

Toad in the Hole Pub Apr 27, the Gypsy Trio. Fourth Sunday of every month, Ian Scherrer. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Tradewinds Apr 25, Flash Back Friday with DJ Dave. Apr 26, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Band. Thurs, DJ Dave. Mon, Blues Defenders Pro

Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Twin Oaks Tavern Apr 25, Yo Pizza Face! Apr 26, Manzanita Moon. Every other Sunday, Blues and BBQ with the Blues Defenders. Every other Tuesday, Levi’s Workshop with Levi Lloyd. Every other Wednesday, Dixie Giants. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Vino di Amore Apr 25, Blue Jazz Combo. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Whiskey Tip Apr 25, the Blues Defenders. Apr 26, the Allways Elvis Band. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Wells Fargo Center Apr 27, Symphony Pops: Classical Mystery Tour. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

White Barn Apr 27, Joe Galambos. 2727 Sulphur Springs Ave, St Helena. 707.251.8715.

Zodiacs Apr 23, Matt Silva and Nick Otis. Apr 24, the Spyralites. Apr 25, Materialized. Apr 26, New Monsoon. Apr 30, D’Bunchovus. 256 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma. 707.773.7751.

MARIN COUNTY Angelico Hall Apr 28, DU Chamber and Jazz Ensemble. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael.

Fenix

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub Sat, DJ Night. Apr 25, Part Rumor. Apr 28, Clear Conscience. Apr 29, Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Tip the Tweester. Wed, Rock and R&B Jam. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Hopmonk Novato Apr 24, Jim Kweskin. Apr 25, Frobeck. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club Apr 23, Voodoo Switch. Apr 24, Peach Street. Apr 25, Mustache Harbor. Mon, 9pm, open mic. Tues, Bluesday Piano Night. Last Tuesday of every month, Radioactive with Guests. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osteria Divino Apr 23, Jonathan Poretz. Apr 24, Passion Habanera. Apr 25, Ken Cook Trio. Apr 26, Denise Perrier. Apr 27, Noel Jewkes. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

music. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Apr 24, Pacific High. Apr 25, the Restless Sons. Apr 26, Saffell. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Station House Cafe Apr 27, the doRiAN Mode. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Studio 55 Marin Apr 23, Scott Nygaard and Sharon Gilchrist. Apr 26, Dulcie Taylor, Steve Key and John Roy Zat. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Apr 23, JD McPherson. Apr 25, Super Diamond. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Apr 23, Tea Leaf Trio. Apr 25, Scott Law Bluegrass Dimension. Apr 29, Supernova Spacetwang. Apr 24 and , Apr 30, Terrapin Family Band. Fri, 4:20 Happy Hour with live

Apr 23, Dale Pollosar and Bart Hopkin. Apr 24, Paul Vornhagen. Apr 27, the Gaters with Maggie Catfish. Apr 29, James Moseley. Apr 30, C-JAM. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Mon, acoustic open mic. Tues, John Varn and Tom Odetto. Fourth Thursday of every month, Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jam Sammich. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Apr 25, Detroit Disciples. Apr 26, Tender Mercies. Apr 27, Matthew Bolton. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Apr 24, Donna Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Acuti. Apr 25, Doc Kraft and company. Apr 26, Olive and the Dirty Martinis. Sun, live salsa music. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. Wed, Tango with Marcello and Seth. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Sleeping Lady Apr 23, Windshield Cowboys. Apr 24, Samurai Wolf. Apr 25-26, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs! Apr 27, Namely Us. Apr 30, Folk Yeah!Sat, Ukulele Jam Session. Sun, 2pm, Irish

music. Sun, Midnight North. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael.

27

Unity in Marin Apr 24, Snatam Kaur in Concert. 600 Palm Dr, Hamilton, Novato.

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin

DeLone 7:30pm

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NAPA COUNTY

JD McPherson

with David Jacobs-Strain

Billcoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Billiards

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Apr 24, Dyonesus. 1234 Third St, Napa. 707.226.7506.

Super Diamond

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant

Michael Franti & Friends

Apr 24, Jeff Fetters. Apr 25, Highwater Blues. Apr 26, Walter Hand and the Blue Hand Band. Sun, DJ Night. Wed, Jumpstart. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

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All Star Benefit featuring

Members of RatDog, ALO & More 6DW0D\Â&#x2021;SP

Pride & Joy 6XQ0D\Â&#x2021;SP

Davey Pattison's GAMMA+

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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Uptown Theatre

with Josh McIntosh &

Apr 23, Bob Castell Blanch. Apr 24, the Gentlemen of Jazz. Apr 25, Tony Macaroni Trio. Apr 26, Jack Pollard and Dan Daniels. Apr 30, Trio SoleĂĄ. 1040 Clinton St, Napa. 707.255.6646.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

California New band featuring Jawbreaker drummer and Green Day collaborator. April 24 at Rickshaw Stop.

Les Nubians Brother-sister duo from Chad, Africa by way of Paris makes acclaimed R&B afrobeat soul. April 24 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SF.

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The Fall Risk

Rattlesnakes in the Garden )UL0D\Â&#x2021;SP

The Headhunters

featuring Mike Clark, Bill Summers, Donald Harrison, Chris Severin & Stephen Gordon with J Boogie

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley

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OPEN O P E N MIC M I C NIGHT NIGHT

EVERY T EVERY TUES UES A AT T7 7PM PM W WITH ITH E EVAN VAN WED W ED APR A PR 2 23 3

Showtimes: Sunâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thur 8pm / Fri & Sat 9pm =i`+&),Â&#x203A;$*Â&#x203A;BLUES

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The Blues Defenders

DUBSTEP D UBS TEP | WEST WES T COAST COA S T | GLITCH G L I TC H

DIMOND DI MOND SAINTS SAINTS

$$10 10 ADV/$15 ADV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 10PM/21+ 10PM /21+

FRII A FR APR PR 25 25

AMERICAN A M ER I C AN R ROOTS O OTS MUSIC M USI C

EMILLY E MILLY BONN BONN AND A ND T THE HE VIVANTS VIVANTS $$8/DOORS 8 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

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Canadian chamber-pop ensemble has perfected intimate compositions. April 28 at Great American Music Hall.

DJJ JJACQUES D ACQUES & DJ DJ GUACAMOLE GUACAMOLE

Jason Isbell

FRI F RI M MAY AY 2 & SAT SAT M MAY AY 3

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

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Three Silver Mt. Zion Memorial Orchestra

Holly Williams joins reflective songwriter for two nights. April 29-30 at the Fillmore.

Mon. M on. May May 26 26

CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

The Soft White Sixties SXSW darlings mix soul and pop for working-class grittiness and edgy modern indie rock. April 25 at Slimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Wed. W ed. M May ay 21 21 & TThur hur M May ay 2 22 2

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Boris Garcia

Apr 24, Syria T Berry. Apr 25, Forejour. Apr 26, They Went Ghost. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833. Apr 26, Gavin DeGraw. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

THE ATRE, NAPA SSat. at . M May ay 3

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Apr 24, Lady Bianca. Apr 25, James Moseley. Apr 26, Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. Apr 27, Daria. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

28

Arts Events

with Chris Dewees and Rick Starr. 105 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.6166.

Galleries

Gallery Bergelli

SONOMA COUNTY ArtStart Art House Through Apr 26, “ArtStart Apprentice Alumni Exhibit” 716 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2345.

Calabi Gallery Through Apr 26, “Inaugural Group Exhibition,” celebrates Calabi Gallery’s reopening after relocating from Petaluma to Santa Rosa. 456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Apr 27, “Starry, Starry Night,” featuring Peanuts characters under the night sky. Through Jul 6, “From the Pen to the Comic Pages,” exhibits the evolution of the comic strip. Through Aug 11, “Heartbreak in Peanuts,” over 70 comic strips focusing on lost love. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Corrick’s Through May 1, “Sonoma County Art Trails April Exhibit,” features woodworker Michael Palace and painter Nicole Ours. 637 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.2424.

Dutton-Goldfield Winery Through May 13, “Jim Freed,” exhibit of the artist. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10am to 4:30pm. 707.827.3600.

Finley Community Center Through May 15, “Fresh Reflections,” exhibits works by the Art Heaven group, with special guest Michele Hoting. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery One Through Apr 27, “Mixed Media Invitational,” exhibits by Tracy Bigelow Grisman, Gerald Huth, Joycenew Kelly and Judith Klausenstock. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Susan Ball and Rik Olson, with guest artists Phil Wright, Mayr McLean and Rhen Benson displaying “Pierce Ranch Reflections.” 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through May 4, Gordon Onslow Ford, John Anderson and Robert Percy exhibit their abstract work. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Museum Through May 4, “Sonoma County and the Civil War,” artifacts from the 1860s. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. TuesSun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jun 29, “Surfaces” exhibits three sculptors, Michael Hannon, Kari Minnick and Pam Morris. Conerstone Palace, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Apr 27, “Pointless Sisters Quilt Show” 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Arts Center Through Apr 27, “Art Shapes the World,” featuring student artists work, juried by local professional artists. 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Redwood Cafe Through Apr 30, “April Exhibit,” displaying work of Lillianna Raynor, Rachael Trujillo, Adrian Ruhle and Danielle Demuro. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through May 4, “Showin’ on the River,” with photography from the Bay Area and beyond. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Russian River Art Gallery Through Apr 30, “Tim Dixons” shows all month. 16357 Main St, Guerneville. Daily, 10 to 6. 707.869.9099.

Graton Gallery

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through May 11, “Out of Our Minds,” featuring works by

Through May 3, “Ready or Not (Here We Come)” shows

emerging teen artists. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Apr 26, “From the Shadows, Out” features painter Jeff Watts and photographer Mike Shoys. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Seishin Studio & Gallery Apr 26-Jun 22, “Hitsohii (Similar),” features two artists–Shoji Uemura and Ken Matsumoto–working under similar influences of East and West. 360 A St, Santa Rosa.

SoCo Coffee Through Apr 30, “Kenneth Pelletier Exhibit,” the artist’s oil paintings are on display for the month of April. 1015 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.433.1660.

Sonoma County Museum Through May 4, “Camellia Has Fallen,” the first US exhibit featuring contemporary Korean artists’ reflections on the Jeju uprising. Through Jun 1, “Precious Cargo,” exhibition of California Indian cradle baskets. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Apr 27, “Discovered,” four emerging artists are awarded $2,000 each and put on exhibit. Through Apr 27, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Apr 24, “Portrait Project” combines photo and art for portraits by 50 local artists. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

University Art Gallery Through May 10, “BFA Exhibition,” with works by Lindsey Vargas, Patrick Cass, Justin Ringlein and others. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Through May 15, “Group Show,” featuring works buy Marco Farias, Santiago Garcia, Jeff Faust and others. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through May 4, “The Vickisa Experience,” features mixed media and found objects from different artists. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through May 16, “California Dreamin’,” includes art and sculpture by Bay Area foreignborn artists. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through May 24, “Altered Book/Book Arts Show,” displays literal inspired works from over 100 artists. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4, 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Gallery Through Apr 26, “Open Craft and Sculpture–Traditional to Cutting Edge,” presents a broad spectrum of three-dimensional media. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11am to 4pm; Sat-Sun, noon to 4pm. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Apr 24, “Watercolor: Outside the Lines,” showcasing art that explores the edges of watercolors as a medium. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Apr 30, “Mouse and Mot,” displays the works of two modern-day legends. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Seager Gray Gallery Through Apr 30, “Engrams,” featuring the work of Claudia Marseille. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

(shown), Kari Minnick and Pam Morris exhibits at New Leaf Gallery. See Galleries, adjacent page.

in Focus: Richard Shaw,” features work of the sculptor from the gallery’s collection. Through Apr 27, “Lost and Found: Elisheva Biernoff and Floris Schönfeld,” exhibits the overlooked and the unfamiliar with fascinating range. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Napa Valley Arts in April Through Apr 30, “Napa Valley Arts in April 2014,” a month-long celebration of art and wine with exhibitions and festivities throughout the region. For a full lineup, visit www.visitnapavalley. com/artsinapril. various locations, Napa.

Comedy Emo Philips Described by Jay Leno as “the best joke writer in America,” Emo Philips carries a sharp wit and unforgettable delivery. Apr 25, 8pm. $20-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

building competition, food and wine-tasting and more fun for all ages. Apr 26-27, 10am. $10$12. Westside Regional Park, 2400 Westshore Rd, Bodega Bay.

Butter & Egg Days Parade & Festival Petaluma tradition continues with food, arts and family fun. Apr 26. Downtown Petaluma, Fourth and Kentucky streets, Petaluma.

Day on the Green Eath Day event offers live music, art, fun festival activities and lessons in sustainability. Apr 26, 11am. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Village Court, Santa Rosa.

Earth Day Festival With appearances by North County Supervisor Mike McGuire, speakers from Project Censored, the Peace & Justice Center of Sonoma County and more. With live music and over 30 vendors highlighting various causes. Apr 26, 11am. Healdsburg Plaza, Healdsburg Plaza, Healdsburg.

Free Speech Annual Awards Dinner

Events

Presented by the Social Justice Center of Marin Apr 27, 5:30pm. $35-$50. West End Cafe, 1131 Fourth St, San Rafael.

di Rosa

Bodega Bay Fisherman’s Festival

Great Chefs & Wineries Gala

Through Apr 27, “Collection

Live music, artisan crafts, boat-

Presented by Lifehouse Agency,

Vino di Amore Through Apr 30, “Undersea Impressions: Prints and Pixels,” an artistic glimpse into the fascinating oceanic realm

‘WARRIOR’ Work by sculptors Michael Hannon

NAPA COUNTY

International Marconi Day Organized by the Cornish Amateur Radio Club, this onthe-air event celebrates the birthday of radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi. Apr 26, 10am. Free. Marconi Conference Center, 18500 Hwy 1, Marshall, 415.663.9020.

Love Fish! Earth Day celebration includes screening of “Red Gold” documentary and a local sustainable dinner Apr 27, 6pm. $60. Kenwood Restaurant & Bar, 9900 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood, 707.935.3456.

North Bay Stage Company Grand Gala An evening of food, entertainment and fun to introduce the new resident theater company to the Center. Apr 24, 8pm. $26. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

Spring Tea & Fashion Show This fundraiser features aromatic teas Dragonfly Tea Company, and spring fashion from J. Jill. Apr 26, 1pm. $30. History Center, 215 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Wine Tasting Concert Local wines are paired here with the voice of mezzosoprano Betany Coffland and the Spanish and Classical Guitar of Aaron Larget-Caplan. Apr 25, 7:30pm. $40-$45. Petaluma Historical Museum & Library, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma, 707.778.4398.

Field Trips The Life & Times of Charmian London Tour

Gold Ridge Farm, 7777 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol.

Eat My Heart Out Supper Club

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Film

The West marin debut of this storytelling supper event. Benefiting KWMR community radio. Apr 26, 7pm. $200. Peace Barn, 70 Olema Bolinas Rd, Bolinas.

Apr 24, 6pm, “Stress Relief for Men” with Jed Diamond. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Filmmaker Smamntha Grant presents her documentary about “NY Times” plagiarist reporter Jayson Blair. Apr 23, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Tasting Room on the Green Grand Opening

Apr 29, 10am, “It’s an Orange Aardvark” with Michael Hall. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Capriccio

Healing Foods Basics

Opera film directed by Marco Arturo Marelli. Apr 26, 7pm. $20. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa, 707.255.5445.

Connect the dots between your health, food, stress, toxins and relaxation and being part of a community. Apr 24, 6pm. $15. Ceres Community Project, 7351 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.8295.

A Fragile Trust

Chasing Ice Time-lapse cameras present this undeniable look at climate change. With the filmmaker in person, Q&A follows. Apr 25, 7pm. The Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma, 707.792.5300.

Crime After Crime Presented by the Center for Domestic Peace, the acclaimed documentary is screened with director Yoav Potash in conversation. Apr 29, 7pm. Free. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael, 415.444.8000.

The Galapagos Affair: Satan Came to Eden Filmmakers Dayna Goldfine and Dan Geller appear in person to present this true-crime tale of paradise found and lost. Apr 25, 4 and 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol, 707.525.4840.

The Wrecking Crew The long-awaited documentary about the studio muscicians behind the biggest hits of the ‘60s and ‘70s screens with director Denny Tedesco in person. Apr 27, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Meet ’n’ Meat in Valley Ford

Food & Drink

Open House

Chef Louis Maldonado goes whole hog in this dinner presented by Slow Food Sonoma County. Apr 27, 5pm. Shone Farm, 7450 Steve Olson Lane, Forestville.

Ark of Taste Dinner

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Apr 23, 7pm, “Backyard Roots” with Lori Eanes. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Mill Valley Community Center Apr 29, 6pm, “The How of Happiness” with Sonja Lyubomivsky. 180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley.

MINE Art Gallery

A beef-tasting event and dinner by chef Brandon Guenther. Apr 27, 4:30pm. Rocker Oysterfeller’s, 14415 Hwy 1, Valley Ford, 707.876.1983.

Apr 27, 3pm, Poetry and Prose Reading Series, In honor of Holocaust Remembrance Day, Author Ruth Weiss and poet Sandra Cross read. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

Passport to Dry Creek Valley

Napa Bookmine

Fifty-plus wineries offer an exclusive pairing of exquisite wine, gourmet food and great entertainment. Apr 26-27, 11am. $70-$120. Dry Creek Valley, various locations, Healdsburg, 707.433.3031.

The Zen of Zin Meet winemaker Carol Shelton and feast on a five course dinner. Benefiting the Arts Center. Apr 25, 6pm. $75. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at East Washington, Petaluma, 707.762.5600.

Tomatomania Tomato lover’s mecca. Apr 26-28, 10am. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma, 707.933.3010.

Readings Book Passage

Learn more about the wife of Jack London and her experiences in a docent-led tour. Apr 24. $50. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen, 707.938.5216. Luther Burbank’s experimental farm is still operating, and this weekend opens its doors with free tours and fresh apple fritters. Apr 26-27, 10am. Free.

Enjoy complimentary tastings and meet the winemakers. Apr 26, 11am. Free. Tasting Room on the Green, 9050 Windsor Rd, Windsor.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Apr 23, 7pm, “Under Magnolia” with Frances Mayes. Apr 26, 4pm, “Morning in Serra Mattu” with Arif Gamal. Apr 27, 4pm, “The Light on the Coast” with Dave Mitchell. Apr 28, 7pm, “Etched on Me” with Jenn Crowell. Apr 29, 7pm, “50 Children” with Steven Pressman. Apr 30, 7pm, Book Passage Poetry Night. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Apr 27, 3pm, Write On, Mamas!. 964 Pearl St, Napa.

Pt Reyes Presbyterian Church Apr 25, 6:30pm, “Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land” with Gary Nabhan, supper and conversation with Nabhan and John Wick, Marin Carbon Project. 11445 Shoreline Hwy, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1349.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books Apr 24, 6pm, “The Steady Running of the Hour “ with Justin Go. Apr 26, 1pm, “Found” with Salina Yoon. Apr 26, 7pm, Poetry Month Reading with Cynthia Sims. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Apr 26, 7pm, Word Temple Poetry Series, Featured poets include Todd Melicker, Leonore Wilson and David Rosenthal. Free. 282 S High St, Sebastopol 707.829.4797.

Theater BABA AlterTheater Ensemble presents a new comedy from celebrated physical performer Denmo Ibrahim. Freedom and family collide when an Egyptian immigrant’s search for the American dream leads his daughter on a quest for home. Through Apr 27. $25. West End Studio Theatre, 1554 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.2787.

The Comedy of Errors Shakespeare’s play is directed by Dario Tangleson. Apr 25-27. Ives Hall room 119, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels Con men make a living by swindling rich women. Based on 1988 film starring Steve Martin and Michael Caine. Presented by Lucky Penny Productions and 6th St Playhouse. Fri-Sun through May 4. $25-$35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.226.7372.

Feelin’ Fracked A play (about Earth Day). FriSat through May 10. Coffee Catz, 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.6600.

Fences A former Negro League homerun king is now a garbage collector trying to come to terms with his disappointment. Through May 11. $37-$53. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

Five Women Wearing the Same Dress Five reluctant bridesmaids and a male usher hide out in a bedroom during an elaborate Southern wedding. Fri-Sat, 8pm. through May 10. $10. Studio Theatre, College of Marin, 835 College Ave, Kentfield.

Little Shop of Horrors

Apr 26, 2pm, “Waxing Moon” with H.S. Kim. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa 707.579.1500.

The cult classic musical about a skid-row florist and his hungry plant is newly imagined by Narrow Way Stage Company. Through May 4. $30. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

The Spinster Sisters Restaurant

A Moon for the Misbegotten

Apr 24, 6pm, “Under Magnolia” with Frances Mayes, as part of the Dining with Authors series. 401 South A St, Santa Rosa.

Eugene O’Neill’s classic love story is presented by Marin OnStage. Through May 4. $10$18. The Little Theater at St.

Sonoma County Museum

Vincent’s, 1 St Vincent Dr, San Rafael.

Mother Jones in Heaven MSW is pleased to share the California premiere of Si Kahn’s musical tribute. Apr 25-May 11. $25. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Noises Off The hilarious theatrical farce is presented by the Raven Players. Apr 25-May 11. $20$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg, 707.433.6335.

Ross Alternative Works Festival Ross Valley Players present their seasonal festival featuring the world premiere of “Giovanni Is Here” by Mercedes Cohen, as well as other works. Through Apr 27. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555.

The Scion Written by and starring Brian Copeland, this new play showcases the performers evocative wit in a new telling of a well-known true crime story. Apr 27, 7:30pm. $20-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Spamalot Monty Python’s musical is presented by the SRJC Theater Arts and directed by esteemed instructor Reed Martin. Apr 25-May 4. $10-$18. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Wit A staged reading from the Sonoma Readers Theater. Apr 29-30, 7pm. $14. Andrews Hall, Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

The Year of Magical Thinking Starring Grace Kingsley, and directed by artistic director, Craig A. Miller, this one-woman tour de force promises to touch the heart. Through Apr 27. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

29 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

the gala features honorary chairman Huey Lewis and celebrates 60 years of support services. Apr 26, 5:30pm. $325. Fireman’s Fund Insurance Co, 777 San Marin Dr, Novato.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of April 23

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) If for some inexplicable reason you are not simmering with new ideas about how you could drum up more money, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to tell youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;except that maybe your mother lied to you about exactly when you were born. The astrological omens are virtually unequivocal: if you are a true Aries, you are now being invited, teased and even tugged to increase your cash ďŹ&#x201A;ow and bolster your ďŹ nancial know-how. If you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ferret out at least one opportunity to get richer quicker, you might really be a Pisces or Taurus. And my name is Jay Z. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) You remind me of a garden plot that has recently been plowed and rained on. Now the sun is out. The air is warm. Your dirt is wet and fertile. The feeling is a bit unsettled because the stuff that was below ground got churned up to the top. Instead of a ďŹ&#x201A;at surface, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got furrows. But the overall mood is expectant. Blithe magic is in the air. Soon it will be time to grow new life. Oh, but just one thing is missing: the seeds have yet to be sewn. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to happen very soon. Right?

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an excerpt from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celestial Music,â&#x20AC;? a poem by Louise Gluck: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m like the child who buries / her head in the pillow / so as not to see, the child who tells herself / that light causes sadness.â&#x20AC;? One of your main assignments in the coming weeks, Gemini, is not to be like that child. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true that gazing at what the light reveals may shatter an illusion or two, but the illumination you will be blessed with will ultimately be more valuable than gold. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

Would you like to forge new alliances and expand your web of connections and get more of the support you need to fulďŹ ll your dreams? You are entering the Season of Networking, so now would indeed be an excellent time to gather clues on how best to accomplish all that good stuff. To get you started in your quest, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advice from Dale Carnegie: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.â&#x20AC;?

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) Does Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt run faster than any person alive? As far as we know, yes. He holds three world records and has won six Olympic gold medals. Even when heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bit off his game, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best. At the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics, he set the all-time mark for the 100-meter raceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;9.69 secondsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;despite the fact that one of his shoelaces was untied and he slowed down to celebrate before reaching the ďŹ nish line. Like you, Bolt is a Leo. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m making him both your role model and your antiâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; role model for the foreseeable future. You have the power to achieve something approaching his levels of excellence in your own ďŹ eldâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially if you doublecheck to make sure your shoelace is never untied and especially if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t celebrate victory before itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s won. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) In his unpublished book The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, John Koenig coins new words that convey experiences our language has not previously accounted for. One that may apply to you sometime soon is â&#x20AC;&#x153;trumspringa,â&#x20AC;? which he deďŹ nes as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the temptation to step off your career track and become a shepherd in the mountains, following your ďŹ&#x201A;ock between pastures with a sheepdog and a riďŹ&#x201A;e, watching storms at dusk from the doorway of a small cabin.â&#x20AC;? To be overtaken by trumspringa doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily mean you will literally run away and be a shepherd. In fact, giving yourself the luxury of considering such wild possibilities may be a healing release that allows you to be at peace with the life you are actually living. LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The supreme pleasure we can know, Freud said, and the model for all pleasure, orgasmic pleasure, comes when an excess tension built up, conďŹ ned, compacted, is abruptly released.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an observation by philosopher Alphonso Lingis. I bring it to your attention, Libra, because I expect that you will soon be able to harvest a psychospiritual version of that supreme pleasure. You have been gathering and storing up raw materials for

soul-making, and now the time has come to express them with a creative splash. Are you ready to purge your emotional backlog? Are you brave enough to go in search of cathartic epiphanies? What has been dark will yield light.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21) The potential turning points that might possibly erupt in the coming days will not become actual turning points unless you work hard to activate them. They will be subtle and brief, so you will have to be very alert to notice them at all, and you will have to move quickly before they fade away. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another complication: These incipient turning points probably wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t resemble any turning points youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen before. They may come in the form of a lucky accident, a blessed mistake, a happy breakdown, a strange healing, a wicked gift or a perfect weakness.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) If you happen to be an athlete, the coming week will not be a good time to headbutt a referee or take performance-enhancing drugs. If you hate to drive your car anywhere but in the fast lane, you will be wise to try the slower lanes for a while. If you are habitually inclined to skip steps, take shortcuts and look for loopholes, I advise you to instead try being thorough, methodical and by-the-book. Catch my drift? In this phase of your astrological cycle, you will have a better chance at producing successful results if you are more prudent than usual. What?! A careful, discreet, strategic, judicious Sagittarius? Sure! Why not?

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) My interpretation of this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s astrological data might sound eccentric, even weird. But you know what? Sometimes life is (or at least should be) downright unpredictable. After much meditation, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve concluded that the most important message you can send to the universe is to ďŹ&#x201A;y a pair of underpants from the top of a ďŹ&#x201A;agpole. You heard me. Take down the ďŹ&#x201A;ag thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up there, and run the skivvies right up to the top. Whose underpants should you use? Those belonging to someone you adore, of course. And what is the deeper meaning behind this apparently irrational act? What exactly is life asking from you? Just this: stop making so much sense all the timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially when it comes to cultivating your love and expressing your passion. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) You need to take some time out to explore the deeper mysteries of snuggling, cuddling and nuzzling. In my opinion, that is your sacred duty. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your raison dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;etre, your ne plus ultra, your sine qua non. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to nurture your somatic wisdom with what we in the consciousness industry refer to as yummy warm fuzzy wonder love. At the very least, you should engage in some prolonged hugging with a creature you feel close to. Tender physical touch isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just a luxury; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a necessity.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20) Your body contains about four octillion atoms. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four with 27 zeroes after it. Believe it or not, 200 billion of that total were once inside the body of Martin Luther King Jr. For that matter, an average of 200 billion atoms of everyone who has ever lived and died is part of you. I am not making this up. (See the mathematical analysis here: http://tinyurl.com/AtomsFromEveryone.) As far as your immediate future is concerned, Pisces, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m particularly interested in that legacy from King. If any of his skills as a great communicator are alive within you, you will be smart to call on them. Now is a time for you to express high-minded truths in ways that heal schisms, bridge gaps and promote unity. Just proceed on the assumption that it is your job to express the truth with extra clarity, candor and grace.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žų NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | APRIL 23-29, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Taste of

a m o n o S

County Saturday, April 26 2OLYHUÄ&#x201E;V0DUNHW&RWDWL&DÄ&#x2039;SPWRSP Taste of Sonoma County is a showcase of our local vendors in Sonoma County. Vendors will have samples and will be able to answer your questions about their products. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a farmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market of all your favorite Sonoma County brands! Local wineries and brewers will also be attending. A Beer & Wine Garden area with â&#x20AC;&#x153;tasting ticketsâ&#x20AC;? are available to purchase for use at the wineries and breweries of your choice. Live local bands from Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Real Music CDs volumes 1-3 will perform thoughout the day. Face painting, livestock, hula hoops and craft activities available for the kids!.


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