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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15-21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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JJANUARY ANUARY EVENT EVENTSS

Thursday, January 16, 7pm

TONY WOLFF Lightening Up: The Yoga of Self-Acceptance

Tuesday, January 21, 7pm

SEBASTOPOL

nb OUT THERE FOR HOURS

Morris Turner volunteers at the rebuilding of the Andy Lopez memorial on Moorland Ave. in Santa Rosa.

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‘It’s like if Shakespeare returned, became a Trekkie, listened to rock music and wrote a play set in outer space.’ STAG E P20 Paleo Projections T H E PAP E R P 8

VICKI ROBIN

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies To the DA

An open letter to Jill Ravitch BY KEVIN O’CONNOR

‘A

prosecutor should not permit his or her professional judgment or obligations to be affected by his or her own political, financial, business, property or personal interests.” So reads section 3-1.3 (f) of The American Bar Association Standards Relating to the Administration of Criminal Justice. As I try to picture you and your staff discussing whether to press charges against Deputy Gelhaus, I can in fact barely see any of your faces. Everything is blocked out by an enormous elephant in the room. Nor can I imagine what you might be saying, as that elephant’s loud call drowns out any other conversation. That elephant demands nothing be done to jeopardize support for Sonoma County law enforcement during election season. The elephant’s wail becomes particularly piercing as it reminds all of you that you and Sheriff Freitas are campaigning together. All I can hear from the humans in the room is muffled mumbling, much like the adult voices of a Snoopy cartoon—people trying to make noises that sound responsible and authoritative, in control. But you’re not in control, the elephant is. And he’s not going anywhere between now and June. I imagine that with the bulky pachyderm in the room, it’s hard to get over to your bookshelf to read some of the guiding ethical standards for your profession, so I’ll read to you from one of them: “A prosecutor should avoid a conflict of interest with respect to his or her official duties.” (ABA Standards Relating to the Administration of Criminal Justice, section 3-1.3 (a)). You have said that you’ve contacted the attorney general regarding recusal, and that it is not required. But this does not change the fact that it is at your discretion to recuse your office. I understand that you cannot recuse your office from every case involving charges against a law-enforcement officer during an election year. But this situation is different. If your office does not recuse itself, and does not prosecute Deputy Gelhaus, these events will mark the time when people will have lost faith in the ability of your office to put the needs of the larger community over the short-term desires of law enforcement. And it will widen and deepen the rift and the fear that exist between the law enforcement community and the larger community of which it is a part. Kevin O’Connor lives in Graton and is a social worker currently studying for the bar exam. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Pension Woes

New Sonoma, a volunteer organization of financial experts and citizens concerned about the finances and governance of Sonoma County, has just completed an extensive study of the county’s pension crisis. The full text of the study is at www.newsonoma.org. In addition to describing how the county has incurred over a billion dollars in unfunded pension and retiree healthcare liabilities, and how the county ignored requirements to notify citizens of the cost of the benefit increase and failed to follow the board of supervisors’ resolution requiring that employees pay for the increase, the report also provides a first-of-its-kind comparison of Sonoma County’s pension system with neighboring counties. The following is a partial summary of the study’s findings: • Sonoma County is approaching balance sheet insolvency, which means its liabilities will exceed its net assets when the new accounting standards, which will require the county to list pension liabilities on its balance sheet, kick in and unfunded retiree medical liabilities are included. • The key driver of the pension problem was the retroactive increases which took effect in 2003 and 2006 for safety and 2004 for general employees. The increases have led to higher pensions, accelerated retirement rates and reduced the average retirement age by five years. • The retroactive increases combined with a new definition of pensionable compensation increased pensions by 66 percent for general employees and 69 percent for safety employees the year after the increases were enacted. • Even though the board of supervisors’ resolutions authorizing the new formula required general employees to pay the entire past and future cost of the increase and safety employees to pay

the past cost, the resolutions were never enforced by the retirement association. In fact, in the 2008 contract negotiations, the county picked up all but 1 percent of the general employees contributions to the increase and all but 1 percent of the safety employees contributions.

• The county’s pension costs have climbed from $24 million in 2001 to $122 million in 2012. Even with these increased costs, the system has $1.3 billion in unfunded pension, retiree healthcare and pension obligation bond liabilities. • When comparing Sonoma County’s pension costs with Tulare, Mendocino, Alameda, San Mateo, Marin and Contra Costa counties, we found that their average pension costs were 16 percent of the general fund, while Sonoma County’s were more than double, at 36 percent. No other county or city we know of has pension costs as high as ours or as a percentage of the general fund. • When adding payroll costs, the total climbs to 120 percent of the general fund. The average for the other counties is 60 percent. • The county currently has a funding ratio of 60 percent for pension and retiree healthcare benefits when pension bond debt is added in. That means there is only 60 cents available for every dollar for benefits already earned. This percentage uses a 7.5 percent return on investments. If a more conservative 5.5 percent return is used, the funded ratio drops to 50 percent. • Sonoma County employees receive on average $110,000 per year in salary and pension benefits, plus health insurance for life after 10 years of service. This is double the average salary and retirement benefits of Sonoma County residents. We hope this report will be a call to action on the part of all stakeholders, and that they will work together to solve this deepening crisis.

KEN CHURCHILL Director of New Sonoma, Santa Rosa

Rants By Tom Tomorrow

Santa Rosa

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Like It or Leave It? Sodom meets Gomorrah through a dating service in Sonoma County. Love at first sight. Distilleries and pot dispensaries open tasting rooms. Five-star restaurants open e-cig/wifi sections to compete with fast food restaurants. Apple orchards replaced by vineyards surrounded by organic pot farms. Schools required to stay 50 feet away from taco trucks, with slot machines and ice-cream trucks selling pot-laced brownies. CHP and XYZ towing set up mobile units in casino parking lot. Smart Train adds casino stop. Eat, drink and make merry with the ladies of the night. When debauchery becomes the cornerstone of our tax base, let the good times roll. Stay drunk and stoned. Hopefully, there won’t be a water shortage. Stay tuned for the end game.

NEIL E. DAVIS

Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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2 Florida continues reign as weird-crime mecca with movie-texting shooting

3 Magnolia trees. Magnolia trees? Magnolia trees! Indeed, magnolia trees.

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5 SSU’s ‘Art from the

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Shop supply charges in the amount of 6% of labor charges will be added to invoices greater than $35. These charges will not exceed $25 and represent costs and profits. Shop supply charges not applicable in CA or NY. Non-mandated disposal or recycling charges, if any are disclosed above, may also represent costs and profits. Specific product offerings and tread designs may vary. Prices, warranties, car service, credit plans and other offers available at Firestone Complete Auto Care;see affiliated for their competitive offers and warranties. See retailer for details restrictions and copy of each limited warranty.

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means means consuming consuming no no sugared sugared or alcoholic alcoholic beverages, beverages,, dairy, dairy y, beans, beans, grains flour. Perhaps grains or wheat wheat flo urr. P erhaps the the toughest toughest adaptation adaptation to modern modern living living is is that that processed processsed ffoods oods are are to be avoided avoided as as much mucch as as possible, possible, because they push because th ey p ush the th he extremes extremes of what our what o ur bodies can can handle. handle. To To consume consume the the amount amoun nt of sugar sugar in 34 ounces ounces of soda, soda, ffor o eexample, or xample, a caveman caveman would would have have had had ) 10 to eat eat eight-and-a-half eight-and-a-half

Task T a as sk Force Force o The deat death th of 13-year-old 13 -year--old Andy LLopez opez at the hands handds of Sonoma County Deputy Sheriff S Gelhaus Erick Ge lhaus has rresulted esuulted in the fformation orm mation of the Community and Local Locaal Law Enforcement Enforcement Force, TTask aaskk For F ce, a 21-member 21 b panell charged char ged with considering an independent independent civilian rreview eview board board for for law enf eenforcement—something orcement—something the U.S. Civil Rights Commission recommended recommended for for Sonoma County in i 2000. The task force force comprises cross comprise es a cr oss section of Sonoma County County, healthy y, with a heal thy mix of ethnicity, e ethnicity y, gender and social class class represented, represented, from from former supervisor former Sonoma S County super visor nonprofit Eric KKoenigshofer oenigshofer and nonpr ofit directors dir ectorss like Amber TTwitchell witchell Voices of V oices YYouth outh Center to Santa Junior Rosa Jun nior College student body president presidennt Omar Paz Paz Jr. Jr. Other members memberrs include those from from law enforcement enf orcem ment and government. The panel paneel had its first meeting Monday night in Santa Rosa, primarilyy to discuss pr procedural ocedural steps,, but bu ut members were were eager to move past the boilerplate and into the discussion of making current changes to the cur rent system. The four four main maiin topics (and deadlines for boardd for recommendation recom mmendation to the boar supervisors) of super visors) outlined ffor or the task force’s consideration force c ’s consider ation include: civilian rreview eview of officer-involved fatalities (March fatalitiess (Mar ch 14);; options for for community commun nity policing (April 30); coroner’s elected vs. v appointed cor oner ’s (June providing office (Ju une 31);; and pr oviding additional additional community ffeedback eedback on related (Dec. related topics t (Dec 31). 31) “We “We do not not have, in our back pocket, what our ou ur recommendations recommendations might be,”” saidd Jennifer Jennifer Murray, Murray, deputy county administrator, a administr ator, stressing stressing the openness opennness of the process. process. With a nod too both past and future, future, task force force c member Francisco Francisco Vásquez Vásquezz suggested a provision provision that the recommendations recommendations made by this group g oup be revisited gr revisited five or 10 years y s later, later, to ensure ensure accountability accountaability for for a community seeking answers and change. A full list list of task force force members is available available on Bohemian.com. —Nicolas —Nicola as Grizzle

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feet of raw sugar cane, a physical impossibility. And we still don’t know the long-term effects of today’s ubiquitous trans fats, as they only became popular about a hundred years ago. Paleo is a high-protein, low-carb diet, consisting of 35 to 45 percent nonstarchy fruits and vegetables and up to 35 percent protein from meat and seafood. One of the main arguments against the diet is its recommendation of a higher fat intake, calling for more unsaturated fats like omega-3. Though champions of the diet claim myriad health improvements, detractors insist it’s just another fad. “I don’t really encourage people to eliminate food groups,” says Melanie Larson, a registered dietician and manager of the nutrition department at Kaiser Permanente in Santa Rosa, “but this does have its place.” Larson occasionally recommends a diet similar to paleo for some of her patients, but likes to include whole grains like rolled oats or quinoa. Paleo might have some good ideas, such as reducing processed food intake, but it’s not a one-size-fitsall solution, she says. “It depends on the individual and what their medical needs are.” Rebekah Saunders has a similar approach. She’s been “about 90 percent paleo” for nearly two years, cooking paleo-friendly recipes for friends who want to sample the diet. “There are a lot of ways to still make old favorites,” says the Rohnert Park resident, “but you have to be willing to adjust to dishes being tasty but just a little bit different.” Substitutions she enjoys include spaghetti squash in lieu of pasta, almond flour instead of wheat or rice flour for baking, and coconut milk in place of dairy. Though she feels good physically, there are some drawbacks to the lifestyle. “It can be hard to completely control your diet when you go out to a restaurant or eat over at a friend’s house,” says Saunders. Stir-fry is a go-to dish for her at home, in part

because she likes veggies more than meat, and the combinations are endless—just leave out the rice. “People say the paleo diet is just meat, meat, meat, but it’s really about vegetables, too,” says Saunders. “I eat a lot of salads.”

‘I don’t really encourage people to eliminate food groups.’ And yet Dr. Loren Cordain, who literally wrote the book on going paleo (2002’s The Paleo Diet), might not have been completely accurate with his anthropological assesment. In a 2013 TEDx talk, anthropologist Dr. Christina Warinner debunks the idea that the “paleo diet” is what cavemen ate. First of all, she says, diets of the Paleolithic Era varied greatly based on geographic location, and traces of barley and legumes have been found in fossilized plaque of cavemen. Though Warinner doesn’t doubt the health benefits of eating fewer processed foods and refined sugars, she suggests the diet’s biophysical, evolutionary, back-to-our-roots philosophy is inaccurate. Even unprocessed everyday staples like broccoli, bananas, olive oil, apples, beef and chicken—just about everything grown commercially— either didn’t exist or were available in different forms before the agricultural revolution. Take, for example, the recipe for chocolate molten lava cake. Besides the fact that, to a caveman, molten lava was either unheard of or something to run away from, it’s unlikely there were readily available supplies of coconut palm sugar, blanched almond flour, pink Himalayan salt and cacao powder. Our ancestors would have probably loved the taste, but we’ll never know.

PRODUCE HUSTLE Vicki Robin started frequenting the farmers market, putting her anti-consumerist ethics into practice.

Radical Radius

Author Vicki Robin on eating local—really, really local BY LEILANI CLARK

I

magine that nearly everything you ate for a straight month had to be grown within a 10-mile radius of your home. What would you eat? How much would you have to give up? What might you discover about the strength and weaknesses of your regional food system that you might never have realized before?

In September 2010, Vicki Robin, bestselling co-author of Your Money or Your Life, took on this very challenge in her hometown of Langley, Wash., a semi-rural hamlet on the south end of Whidbey Island, 30 miles north of Seattle. “Doing this experiment was a huge eye-opener for me in terms of justice, politics, regulations, cooking and community,” Robin says on the phone from her home. A serial yo-yo dieter and dedicated practitioner of “bedtime mini-gorges,” Robin writes with

down-to-earth honesty and humor about her personal transformation through food awareness. Despite a long history of anti-consumerist activism, Robin says, she’d never been able to align her values with her own personal behavior. That is, not until a local farmer friend asked Robin to be a guinea pig in a simple-sounding but logistically challenging proposition: to test whether she could actually feed another human being for a full month entirely from produce grown on a half-acre farm. At the

time, the only thing Robin could buy at her local grocery store that fit into the 10-mile limit was a bottle of local honey. It wasn’t the first time Robin had dived into “sustainability as an extreme sport,” but nonetheless she began blogging about her 10-mile diet immediately. By the end of the month, she’d written 25,000 words—the ideas that came together to make up her new book Blessing the Hands That Feed Us: What Eating Closer to Home Can Teach Us About Food, Community and Our Place on Earth. Robin appears at Copperfield’s in Santa Rosa on Jan. 17 and Copperfield’s San Rafael on Jan. 18. Early on, Robin and her friend Trina, the farmer, realized that the abundant vegetables from the farm wouldn’t provide enough nutrients for a woman in her late 60s to survive on healthily. So they allowed for a few exceptions, the exotics that would keep Robin going. These included olive oil, lemons and limes, a few Indian spices, salt and caffeine (in the form of tea). The search began for meats and dairy sourced within a 10-mile radius, most of which Robin found without much trouble, and with the added bonus of developing new friendships. One friend makes her a fresh weekly tub of goat chèvre. Another neighbor with a dairy cow provides her with contraband raw milk. The eternally frugal Robin even buys a $25 local, organic whole chicken, leading to a fascinating breakdown of just why and how a chicken should cost so much, even if Foster Farms has factory-farmed chicken selling for $10 a pop at the local industrial food mart. “Food in our culture is unnaturally cheap,” explains Robin. “We pay the smallest percentage for food than almost any country in the world. In giving our power over to the industrial food system, we’ve lost a sense of food as a precious part of existence, she adds. “If you are a revolutionary, you need to cook and you need to teach other people to cook,” says Robin, readily acknowledging ) 12 how she chafed against

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domesticity for years and at the prospect of “spending my life in a blowsy kimono cooking eggs” for a husband and two children. In fact, when the publisher asked for recipes to be included in Blessing the Hands, she initially balked. “This isn’t about recipes,” Robin told the publisher. “This is about systems thinking and spiritual transformation.” These days, she’s seen the light. “Cooking takes back your power,” Robin says. “If you can grow and cook your own food, you are freer.” A prime place to begin, she says, is learning to cook with whole ingredients, following something she calls “OWL”: organic, whole and local. It’s a luxury not just for hippies and yuppies. “Learning to cook with whole foods can nourish your family, and on a budget,” she adds. In the book, Robin breaks down the cost of making a grass-fed burger at home with a side of fries made from organic, local potatoes, in comparison to driving to the local fast food joint for the same meal. The almost negligible difference in price is surprising. An abiding passion for foodshed transformation, food democracy and restoring the vitality and prosperity of regional food chains has become a driving force in Robin’s life—that and how eating and preparing food can bring people together, a process she called “relational eating.” All of this, in addition to becoming part of the Whidbey Island food web, has helped Robin to conquer a long time “bag lady fear,” she says. “This sense of belonging is not only nice for my heart and soul, but also, I don’t think I’m going to starve,” she says. “As I get older, people will take care of me. And I entered that social safety net through food.” Vicki Robin appears at Friday, Jan. 17, at Copperfield’s Santa Rosa (775 Village Court, Montgomery Village, Santa Rosa; 7pm; free) and Saturday, Jan. 18, at Copperfield’s San Rafael (850 Fourth St., San Rafael; 1pm; free).

in time for Valentine’s Day!

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15-21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y

Breakfast and lunch daily. 404 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.573.5955. Dierk’s Midtown Cafe, 1422 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

Abyssinia Ethiopian/ Eritrean. $. Authentic and filling, and a welcome culinary addition. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 913 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.6455.

Parish Cafe Cafe. $$. Authentic po’ boy sandwiches elicit the sound of a big brass marching band with every bite. Breakfast favorites include shrimp and grits, but don’t forget the beignets. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Sun. 60-A Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.431.8474

Arrigoni’s Delicatessen & Cafe Deli. $. A perennial favorite with the downtown lunch crowd. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 701 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1297.

Baci Cafe & Wine Bar Italian $$-$$$. Creative Italian and Mediterranean fare in casual setting, with thoughtful wine list featuring local and Italian wines. Lunch, ThursSat; dinner, Thurs-Mon. 336 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8111.

Barndiva California cuisine. $$-$$$. Delicious food with outdoor seating great for balmy summer nights. Lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 231 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.431.0100.

Carmen’s Burger Bar American. $. Excellent and innovative burgers with a Mexican flair. Beef comes fresh daily from Pacific Market next door. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Sat-Sun. 1612 Terrace (in Town and Country center), Santa Rosa. 707.579.3663. 90 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1575.

Diavola Italian/Pizza. $$. From the folks of Taverna Santi, with artisan wood-fired pizzas and elaborate antipasti served in a rustic-chic old brick former smokehouse. Lunch and dinner daily. 21021 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0111.

Dierk’s Parkside Cafe American. $. Classic, fresh diner food in a comfortable diner setting. Ought to be in a movie.

Pub Republic Pub fare. $-$$. Pub grub from Petaluma’s southernmost tip, featuring Brussels sprout tacos and a hearty selection of brews. Lunch and dinner daily; weekend brunch. 3120 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.782.9090. Real Döner Turkish. $-$$. Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555.

MARIN CO U N T Y Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Cafe Reyes Pizza. $$. At the end of the main drag in West Marin’s quintessential small town sits a wood-fired oven serving piping pizzas of perfection. Beer and oysters can be had as well. Lunch and dinner, Wed–Sun. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.9493.

the restaurant’s own organic garden. Lunch and dinner daily. 739 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.331.7400.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Hilltop 1892 American. $$-$$$$. Casual dining with panoramic Marin views and a California-cuisine take on such classic fare as steaks, fresh seafood and seasonal greens. Complete with custom cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; Sunday brunch. 850 Lamont Ave, Novato. 415.893.1892.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Left Bank French. $$-$$$. Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch and dinner daily. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic, seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525.

Pier 15 American. $$. Fun,

The William Tell House American & Italian. $$. Marin County’s oldest saloon. Casual and jovial atmosphere. Steaks, pasta, chicken and fish all served with soup or salad. Lunch and dinner daily. 26955 Hwy 1, Tomales. 707.878.2403

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Celadon Global comfort food. $$. Relaxed sophistication in intimate neighborhood bistro setting by the creek. Superior wine list. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 500 Main St, Ste G, Napa. 707.254.9690.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121.

Gillwoods Cafe Diner. $-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Pizzeria Picco Pizza. $-$$.

French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

The wood-fired oven keeps things cozy, and the organic ingredients and produce make it all tasty. Lunch and dinner, Sat-Sun; dinner only, Mon-Fri. 316 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.8900.

Poggio Italian. $$-$$$. Truly transportive food, gives authentic flavor of the Old World. The cheaper way to travel Europe. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 777 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7771.

Copita Tequileria y Comida Mexican. $$.

Robata Grill & Sushi

California-inspired preparation of traditional Mexican fare, including spit-roasted chicken, homemade tamales and “eight-hour” carnitas. Some ingredients are sourced from

Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

La Toque Restaurant

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare.

SMALL BITES

Pairing of Aces Pigs are so cute that it’s difficult to justify eating them—if they weren’t the most delicious of all land animals, that is. On a recent tour of Devil’s Gulch Ranch in Nicasio, ranch owner Mark Pasternak showed some of the Berkshire pigs he raises as part of a preview for Charlie Palmer’s annual Pigs and Pinot event in March. The little ones, able to fit in the palm of one’s hand, nestled up against mama pigs weighing in at over 300 pounds. If Dry Creek Kitchen chef Dustin Valette hadn’t prepared a wonderful cassoulet with unsmoked bacon and a sous-vide porchetta finished in a piping hot pan to perfect the crispy skin, it might have been appropriate, at the very least, to show some ambivalence about eating what may have been that same adorable piglet’s older cousin. But not one of the diners made a mention of it, nor much of anything, for that matter, during the meal— the ultimate compliment to a chef. Wines paired by Courtney Humiston, including 2009 pinots from Dutton Goldfield and Sean Thackrey (both grown at Devil’s Gulch Ranch) balanced the richness of the pork with fruity, airy lightness. Tickets are on sale now for the public event, slated for March 21–22 at Hotel Healdsburg, but Pigs and Pinot sold out last year in four minutes, so call in every favor you have when tickets go on sale Thursday, Jan. 16, at 11am. Healdsburg Hotel, 25 Matheson St., Healdsburg. $125–$2,892. For tickets, see Pigsandpinot.com. —Nicolas Grizzle

Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like

sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

15

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Buena Vista “Our future is our past” is the motto at this historic, remodeled and reinvigorated winery, founded 1857. Watch for character actors, taste Buena Vista Vinicultural Society favorites Zinfandel, sparkling wine and cream sherry—and look out for the crocodile. 18000 Old Winery Road, Sonoma. Daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee $10, Saturday tour $20. 800.926.1266.

Deerfield Ranch Winery (WC) The finest wine caves this side of the highway. Twenty-thousand-square-foot underground lair is perfect for keeping wine and wine tasters cool on a summer’s day. Watch for giraffes. 10200 Sonoma Highway, Kenwood. Daily 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $10-$15. 707.833.2270.

Geyser Peak Winery In the 1990s, the facility was in thrall to Australian overlords the Penfolds, who brought in winemakers Daryl Groom and Mick Shroeter. When their Shiraz won top awards at the Sonoma County Harvest Fair, it was seen as a peak moment in an Aussie invasion. 22281 Chianti Road, Geyserville. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 800.255.9463

John Tyler Wines For decades, the Bacigalupis have been selling prized grapes to the likes of Chateau Montelena and Williams Selyem. Now, the third-generation wine growers offer the pick of the vineyard in their own tasting room, brandnew in 2011. Graceful Pinot and sublime Zin. 4353 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open dail,y 10:30am–5pm. Tastings $10. 707.473.0115.

Loxton Cellars At Loxton, the shingle of Aussie Chris Loxton, who forewent a career in physics to save space-time in a bottle, Syrah and Shiraz are king. 11466 Dunbar Road, Glen Ellen. By appointment. 707.935.7221.

Valdez Family Winery Toiling with care in the vineyard of Zin

Michel-Schlumberger Highly recommended, but by appointment only. The family has been making wine in France for 400 years. Wellknown for Chardonnay. 4155 Wine Creek Road, Healdsburg. 707.433.7427.

Occidental Road Cellars High-end clients like Schramsberg and RadioCoteau buy most of the Prathers’ grapes; just 5 percent are made into their own wine, and at a comparative “grower’s discount.” Chard, Pinot, and cool-climate Syrah at its very best. 2064 Gravenstein Hwy. N., Building 7, Sebastopol. By appointment, Saturday 1–4pm. 707.874.9470.

Talisman Wine Husbandand-wife industry veterans play out their passion for Pinot in unassuming warehouse space—now pouring earthy, spicy Pinot in rustic Glen Ellen. Brunch alert: steps away from Garden Court Cafe. 13651 Arnold Drive, Glen Ellen. Thursday–Monday, noon– 5pm and by appt. Tasting fee, $25. 707.721.1628.

Unti Vineyards Very friendly and casual with an emphasis on young Italianstyle wines. Yum. 4202 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment. 707.433.5590.

Valley of the Moon Winery This winery was once owned by Sen. George Hearst. Perhaps instead of the epochal utterance “Rosebud,” we could dub in “Rosé.” 777 Madrone Road, Glen Ellen. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.996.6941.

N A PA CO U N TY Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dust– Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm.

Tastings $15–$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Cuvaison Estate Wines (WC) Producing some 65 percent of its product as Chardonnay, Cuvaison has a 22,000-square-foot cave. 4550 Silverado Trail N., Napa. By appointment. 707.942.6266.

Madonna Estate Millennial contingent of multigenerational family winery, once known as Mount St. John, finds success running it oldschool: touristy, old-fashioned, and wildly popular. Refreshing Gewürztraminer for summer picnics. 5400 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. Daily 10am to 5pm; $5– $10. 707.255.8864.

Patz & Hall In a Napa business park, this highlyregarded brand’s tasting room may look corporate-slick, but the spotlight is on the dirt farmers who make it all happen. Pinot and Chardonnay. 851 Napa Valley Corporate Way, Ste. A, Napa. Wednesday– Sunday, 10am–4pm. Seated tastings 10:30am, 1pm and 3pm. Tasting fee, $20–$40. 707.265.7700.

Quixote There is a sense of dignity to the colorful little castle that grows out of the landscape beneath the Stag’s Leap palisades, commensurate with the architect’s humanistic aspirations. 6126 Silverado Trail, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2659.

Raymond Vineyards Burgundy scion Jean-Charles Boisset has put his stamp on staid Napa producer. See the Theater of Nature, depicting biodynamics; feel the Corridor of the Senses; luxuriate in the members-only Red Room, party in the gold-plated JCB Room; or just taste good Cab in the club-like Crystal Cellar. 849 Zinfandel Lane, St. Helena. Daily, 10am– 4pm. Fees vary. 707.963.3141.

BY JAMES KNIGHT

Z

infandel is a broadly appealing wine best known for its unpretentious origins and juicy drinkability. That was certainly evident when, in past years, the annual Zinfandel Advocates and Producers festival filled two piers at Fort Mason Center with a raucous crowd. Yet there are some Zins too rare to pour out for the unslakable thirst of a mob. What makes them stand out?

“It’s old vines,” says Ulises Valdez, who’s farmed a vineyard at Cloverdale’s St. Peter’s Catholic Church for over 20 years. If Zinfandel wine doesn’t necessarily age as well as the best Cabernet Sauvignon, the vine itself is a much more tenacious survivor: St. Peter’s is over 120 years old, preceding the church by decades. At first, Valdez helped winemaker Kent Rosenblum to put St. Peter’s on the A-list of California Zin. Now the one-time vineyard laborer makes his own wine from the little vineyard, as well as from some of the other 900-plus acres that he leases or owns. Reflecting on his first answer, Valdez allows that his careful cultivation is an important part of the story of St. Peter’s Zin: “I mean, it’s my baby!” In 2013, the Valdez tasting room moved from Cloverdale to take advantage of better foot traffic in Healdsburg. Behind the bar, Angelica and Elizabeth Valdez say that their father always encouraged them to follow their own passions, but that their hearts soon led them back to the family business. Meanwhile, their mother works in the adjacent office, and Ulises drops in to deliver lunch. Minutes after he departs, a man walks up to the bar and asks if Valdez is around. “Which one?” Elizabeth replies. “We’re all Valdez!” If the 2010 El Diablo Vineyard, Russian River Valley Chardonnay ($50) seems steep, consider that it’s brought to you by the same team that farms Chardonnay that’s available “by invitation only” for a much higher tariff to drooling wine collectors. Longtime client and collaborator Mark Aubert, in fact, was also consulting winemaker for a time. This is a big Chardonnay without a lot of oaky showboating, just gobs of flavorful extract: pineapple, mango and white apricot. Perfumed with vanilla and blueberry, the 2009 Quinn Vineyard Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel ($38) is dry and plush, a solid Zin. But the 2009 Botticelli Vineyard Rockpile Zinfandel ($41) hints at the exotic, with its sweet, sticky floral overtones, raspberry and boysenberry fruit. Indeed, this vineyard was established using cuttings from the old St. Peter’s vines. Alas, the St. Peter’s Zin is not open for tasting today—it’s just that precious. Valdez Family Winery, 113 Mill St., Healdsburg. Thursday– Sunday, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.433.3710. ZAP Zinfandel Festival, Jan. 22–25, San Francisco. Instead of a single grand tasting, this year themed events will be held at various locations in the Presidio. 530.274.4900. www.zinfandel.org.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Wineries

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

16

The No-Workout Workout

How to be healthier by integrating exercise into your every waking hour BY JOSEPH HOOPER

A

n integrative physician to hard-driving Manhattan professionals, Dr. Frank Lipman encounters a lot of stressed-out patients. Some of them are stressed from working 12-hour days. Others are stressed from working 12-hour days while trying to fit in time for the gym. Still others are stressed from working 12-hour days, going to the gym when they can and feeling guilty or anxious when they can’t. “I try to get my patients to see exercise not as exercise but as movement,” Lipman says. “To get them to move as much as possible in their everyday lives rather than feeling that they have to keep to a rigid exercise regime.”

Lipman’s perspective is informed more by traditional Chinese medicine than the latest sports science, but as it turns out, his view supports new revelations in exercise science. In the past several years, research has shown that exercise isn’t just what happens when you sweat for at least a half-hour running, biking or doing strength or cardio training at the gym; exercise can also be any movement you do during the day, and it can be just as effective at improving health, controlling weight and, in some cases, maintaining or even boosting fitness. The idea of exercise as a sustained activity separate from the rest of your day dates back

to the 1970s, when the American College of Sports Medicine recommended continuous workouts of at least 20 minutes, based on research on elite athletes. “The implication was that if you didn’t reach a certain number of minutes, it wasn’t worth your while. But that’s not true,” says Glenn Gaesser, an exercise physiologist at Arizona State University. Gaesser recently conducted a study to see if short bouts of activity done throughout the day could deliver the same benefits as one continuous workout. He asked a group of people to walk briskly on a treadmill for 30 minutes or at the same pace for 10 minutes three times a day. He

found that participants’ bloodpressure levels were “significantly lower” on the 10-minute interval days. Previous studies have also shown that taking multiple short walks lowers blood sugar more effectively than sustained walking. Researchers think that being active more frequently throughout the day forces the body to shuttle sugar from food to working muscles instead of storing it as fat. Cumulative exercise contributes to weight loss in more significant ways, too. A recent Danish study found that when people didn’t work out as long at the gym, they had more energy to move throughout the

day, adding up to a bigger caloric burn. The science supports a concept called NEAT, shorthand for “non-exercise activity thermogenesis,” which is the number of calories we burn when we’re not eating, sleeping or doing sustained exercise. It includes every movement you make, from momentary activities like bending over to tie your shoes and gesturing during a conversation to conscious activities like walking a few more blocks and taking the stairs instead of the escalator. When you do enough of these movements, NEAT can cause you to burn up to 2,000 more calories per day. Consider an average day: drive to work, sit at a desk, sit

similar benefits by doing some pushups here, sit-ups there and a little body squatting at random. Mini strength workouts done throughout the day can add up to more work than most people can handle in a single session, says Dr. Tim Church, a preventivemedicine researcher at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, La. Better yet, they can be done at home, in a closed office or in an empty conference room. How can you tell if your “exercise” during the day is paying off? Monitor yourself. If, over time, you’re accomplishing the same work, the same number of flights of stairs and the same number of pushups with less effort, you’re getting fitter and stronger. If your weight drops or stays the same, you’re also getting a similar caloric effect to the gym. There are also significant benefits to reducing the time you spend sitting. An impressive body of research now shows that prolonged sitting increases the risk of cancer, heart disease and other chronic illnesses, no matter how much you exercise,

by slowing blood flow, heart rate and cell turnover. University of Southern California professor of medicine Dr. David Agus has compared the risk incurred by prolonged sitting to smoking a pack and a half a day, while one study found that sitting for eight hours daily increases the risk of premature death by 15 percent, even for those who work out. If science has loosened its grip on the five-days-a-week gym habit, it has also shown us that less time at the gym is more. Research on high-intensity training suggests that you can maximize exercise’s payoff by working out at a higher intensity for a shorter time. Martin Gibala, a professor at Ontario’s McMaster University, has published mind-blowing research which concluded that six to nine minutes a week of all-out pedaling on a stationary bike can produce the same fitness gains as five hour-long workouts conducted at a comfortable pace. As for weight loss, while short intervals don’t torch as many calories per week as five hourlong workouts, caloric burn during and after doing intervals is

significantly higher. The message is this: less is more. “There aren’t many studies that have proved a minimum effective dose for exercise. But there are many studies that disprove the need to be in the gym for hours per week, let alone per day,” says Tim Ferriss, author of The 4-Hour Body. As the evidence in favor of shorter workouts accumulates, so too does data suggesting that long workouts make less sense for those of us who aren’t elite athletes. Recent research has found that joggers who run fewer miles tend to outlive those who run more than 20 miles a week. “There is a law of diminishing returns,” Gaesser says. “My guess is that beyond 300 minutes a week of moderate to vigorous exercise, the additional health benefits become rather negligible.” So when you’re at the office or home with the kids, don’t stress about not being at the gym. Movement is movement, and it all counts. “I coach my kid’s baseball team, so I’m running around all over the place,” says Church. “I work hard at not making it a sedentary activity.”

Beyond Counting Sheep The basics on (finally) getting to sleep

BY SARAH MOSKO

O sleep! O gentle sleep! Nature’s soft nurse, how have I frightened thee, That thou no more will weigh my eyelids down And steep my senses in forgetfulness? —Shakespeare, ‘Henry IV, Part 2’

H

uman beings spend roughly one-third of their life sleeping. Studies show that a good night’s sleep (usually seven to nine hours) promotes a sense of well-being, and that sleeplessness leaves us feeling exhausted, irritable and easily overwhelmed by the day’s challenges. Not surprisingly, sleep consistently ranks in surveys as one of life’s most pleasurable activities. However, the percentage of both U.S. men and women in all age groups who are chronically sleep-deprived, averaging six hours of sleep or less, has risen significantly in recent decades, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among the causes are societal shifts, like longer work hours and shift work, greater emphasis

on getting ahead and increased technologies. But it’s a worrisome trend. Studies have shown that

insufficient or mistimed sleep can contribute to serious health problems, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, depression and cancer, as well as auto accidents. About 30 percent of the adult population suffers from insomnia—difficulty falling or staying asleep—and in a recent national survey, one in three adults reported difficulties related to sleep loss, such as trouble concentrating or remembering. Sleep disturbance can ) 18 also be a symptom of

17 NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

through lunch, sit in a meeting, drive home, watch TV. Through small changes, we can integrate intentional effort into this same schedule: walk instead of driving, or park farther away; use a standing desk or sit on a Swiss ball; take a walking lunch break; pace the office with your phone glued to your ear; do wall sits while watching TV. Mayo Clinic endocrinologist Dr. James Levine, who coined the term “NEAT,” thinks being proactive about intentional activity can add up, as shown by the Amish, who live without computers, cars, TVs and smartphones. According to statistics, an Amish man takes 18,500 steps a day, while the average American walks only 5,000. And research shows men need to walk only 3,500 more steps per day, less than two miles, to lose 8.5 pounds in a year without changing their diets. Yet the Amish, as healthy as they may be, don’t produce a lot of strong recreational runners or tennis players. To be these things, you need fitness, which requires pushing the body beyond its comfort zone. When you stress or overload your cardiovascular system, it adapts to meet the increased load: the heart pumps more blood and oxygen to muscles, where muscle cells increase in number. But can you accomplish all this simply by walking and standing up more frequently? Maybe. How much exercise a person needs to increase fitness will be particular to that person, dependent upon current activity and genetics. Yet some research shows that cumulative exercise can improve fitness. Researchers in an Irish study asked two groups of people to either walk vigorously 30 minutes a day or split up the workout into three 10-minute walks at the same pace, similar to Gaesser’s setup. After six weeks, scientists found that frequent short walks provided a bigger boost to VO2 max, which is our ability to process oxygen and is one of the classic measures of fitness. If you want to build strength without the gym, you can get

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

18 Beyond Counting Sheep ( 17

other medical conditions, like chronic pain, breathing disorders or psychiatric problems. But when such medical conditions are not the cause, sleep problems are commonly rooted in simple poor habits.

Get in Rhythm Sleep is a 24-hour (circadian) rhythm generated by the brain’s biological clock. Getting up every day at about the same hour keeps your internal clock set to local time and promotes getting sleepy at roughly the same time each night. Keeping this clock synchronized is simple: develop a relaxing pre-bedtime routine (like bathing and reading), and keep the bedroom quiet, dark, cool and reserved just for sleep (and sex). Performing work, playing videogames and other waking activities in bed are cues to stay alert, not to go to sleep. Be aware that not everyone needs eight hours of sleep; we need just enough to feel rested and to function well. Avoiding naps is helpful, but if you must, nap early in the day and keep it short, under 20 minutes. And because the brain’s clock is set by

environmental lighting, exposure to bright outdoor light early in the day helps the clock maintain a healthy alignment and eases troubles falling asleep at bedtime.

Watch What You Eat (and Drink) Avoiding substances known to disturb sleep is another basic tenet of good sleep hygiene. Caffeine has a longer action in the body than most people realize (the half-life, or time for the body to eliminate half the amount imbibed, is typically five to 10 hours), so it can contribute to trouble staying asleep as well as to bedtime insomnia. Limit caffeine to the first thing in the morning, and don’t overdo it. Other stimulants, like tobacco and chocolate, are also no-no’s in the evening. And while many people look to alcohol, a central nervous-system depressant, for help in falling asleep, once metabolized it promotes rebound sleeplessness later in the night. Maintaining a healthy diet and body weight is also a foundation of healthy sleep, as weight gain promotes

esophageal acid reflux, snoring, and stoppages of breathing called apneas, all of which cause awakenings. Avoiding meals near bedtime minimizes reflux, too, but if you need a late-night snack, stick with a combo of complex carbohydrates and protein, because that makes the sleep-promoting amino acid tryptophan more available to the brain. Regular aerobic exercise not only keeps body weight in check (and reduces anxiety and depression), but also promotes sounder, deeper sleep. Though experts previously thought that exercise close to bedtime was too stimulating, the latest findings from the National Sleep Foundation reveal that some people benefit from exercise timed just before retiring.

Clear the Mind Stressful life events can cause insomnia, too—and insomnia itself can be a stress. If people become overly fixated on their inability to sleep, it can lead to hours in bed trying to force sleep to come, which, in turn, causes anxiety and arousal. Over

time, this pattern can become ingrained, so that the insomnia persists long after the original stressor has passed. If you can’t sleep, relocate to another room to do something relaxing, like reading, until you feel sleepy, and take to heart that you’ll get back to sleeping better soon enough. Not including over-thecounter sleeping pills, Americans received prescriptions for over 60 million hypnotic medications in 2011, according to IMS Health, which tracks healthcare statistics. Side effects of these sleeping pills include next-day drowsiness, dependence and loss of efficacy over time. Unnecessary pharmaceuticals also harm the environment, because after being excreted from the body they go to water-treatment plants illdesigned to remove them. If a self-help approach doesn’t do the trick, a sleep expert can guide you through a nonpharmacological program called cognitive behavioral therapy that studies show is as effective as prescription hypnotics in treating chronic insomnia. With these measures, a third of one’s life can be spent enjoyably.

—Gabe Meline

‘JASON KELCH’ Bob Cornelis’ ‘Studio: 50 Sonoma County Artists’ is celebrated at the Sonoma County Museum from Jan 17–24. See Receptions, p25.

19 NORTH NO R TH BAY B A Y BOHEMIAN BO H E M I A N | JANUARY J ANU A R Y 15-21, 1 5 - 21 , 201 2014 4 | BOHEMIAN.COM BOH E MI AN . C O M

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The week’s events: a selective guide

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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ELECTRIC DREAMS This popculture mashup is giddy and wild.

Space Case The Bard meets Picard in wacky â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Forbidden Planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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ike the id of mad doctor Prospero, Bob Carltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s British stage musical Return to the Forbidden Planet has morphed and evolved since it ďŹ rst emerged in the mid-1980s. An inspired mashup of sci-ďŹ , Shakespeare and rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll, the play borrows the plot of the classic ďŹ&#x201A;ick Forbidden Planet (itself based on Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tempest), uses dialogue snatched from dozens of different Shakespeare plays, steals references from Star Trek and adds songs beamed in from the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;50s and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s.

Nearly 30 years later, this outrageous intergalactic dance party of a show has been updated for the Siri generation, and lands on the stage of the Novato Theater

Company in a co-production by Curtain Theatre and Marin Onstage. Directed by Carl Jordan, the playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wackiness begins before the show starts, as the cast roam the theater distributing spaceage snacks (Tang anyone?). The marvelous set by Jordan and Gary Gonserâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the Enterprise-like bridge of the S.S. Starchaserâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;works as a kitschy assemblage of Christmas lights and lava lamps, sliding pod bay doors and an overhead screen onto which are projected a parade of images, jokes, cartoons and one very funny recurring puppet show. After blasting off to the 1963 Surfaris tune â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wipeout,â&#x20AC;? Capt. Tempest (Phillip Percy Williams) leads the crew of the Starchaser on a routine science mission. After escaping near death in a massive meteor show (during which the crew, of course, sing â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Balls of Fireâ&#x20AC;?), they land on a mysterious planet where the marooned scientist Dr. Prospero (Paul Abbott) and his beautiful daughter Miranda (Amanda Morando, also the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music director) have been stranded for years, accompanied only by the doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sexy, rollerskating robot Ariel (a magniďŹ cent Melissa Claire, also the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s costume designer). What follows is a giddy concoction packed with jokes that appeal to lit majors and nerd-persons of all ages. The large cast features a number of community theater veterans and newcomers, all working at furious fever pitch, singing and dancing up a happy, high-spirited storm (with choreography by Steve Beecroft, also the shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s treacherous chef Cookie). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all a bit loose and unfocused, yes, but if Shakespeare ever returned to earth, became a Trekkie, listened to a lot of great rock music, then decided to write a play set in outer spaceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Return to the Forbidden Planet would be that show. Rating (out of ďŹ ve): ++++ â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Return to the Forbidden Planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, Jan. 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Jan. 26, at the NTC Theater. 5420 Nave Drive, Novato. Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Saturday at 8pm; 3pm matinees on Sunday. $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$25. 415.226.9353.

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In August: Osage County, Meryl Streep’s Violet is afflicted with oral cancer: it scalds her mouth as payment for the acid she’s belched up on her family over the years. Her hair is patchy from chemo, but her tongue is in perfect working order, except when the pills (“my best friends!”) send her into a case of nigh-Pentecostal glossolalia. Violet’s husband (Sam Shepard), a sensitive academic drunk, has vanished, and she calls her angry family to her side, awaiting his return. It’s a barely adapted adaptation of a much-laureled, long-winded play with a reputation as a black comedy. But I didn’t get the humor, and I don’t see how anyone other than a cast of drag queens could hit it home. And August has a stunning cast: Julia Roberts as an angry daughter, Benedict Cumberbatch as a cowed nephew and Abigail Breslin as a blasé granddaughter. (Though filmed in Oklahoma, the film lacks any visual sense and may as well have been shot in Bakersfield.) Director John Wells, a TV vet smooth with transitions, does almost nothing with this theatrical source material except to watch Streep spellbound. But Streep is too forceful an actor to go for half measures. Such is her career: when she’s on, she’s brilliant, and when she’s bad, you need a gas mask. Streep has been in more difficult material, such as Ironweed, and that excellent Fred Schepisi film everybody mocks, A Cry in the Dark. She’s tried harder, but in August: Osage County, she’s never been worse. ‘August: Osage County’ is in select theaters now.

Dr. D r. D Downing ow nin g iiss iinternationally nte r nat iona l ly k now n for known for his h i s innovative i n novat i ve work work and a nd has h a s been be e n practicing pr ac t ic i ng in i n the t he Bay Bay Area A r ea ffor or over ove r 40 4 0 years. yea r s .

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A rare bad performance by Meryl Streep in ‘August: Osage County’ etaphors in film are rarely subtle. The lonely padre dying of stomach cancer in Diary of a Country Priest is an elegant symbol, a devout person corroding from the inside. On the other side of the ledger, legions of movie mothers have contracted breast cancer as punishment for not being nurturing enough.

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Film

21

Free IInitial Free n Consultation C onsu l

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

22

Music

A Sebastopol Community Cultural Center and Cumulus Presents Production Cloud Moss’ 60th birthday

Charity Benefit Concert Saturday, January 25

Concerts Clubs & SONOMA COUNTY Venues Bach to the Future Zivian-Tomkins duo with Joseph Maile and Pei-Ling Lin play program of JS Bach, Robert Schumann and Brahms. Presented by the Redwood Arts Council. Jan 18, 8pm. $30. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

All proceeds to benefit Redwood Empire Food Bank and Sebastopol Community Cultural Center

Featuring Dave Alvin (trio), Jimmy Lafave (band), Wavy Gravy, Special Guest Nina Gerber, Jim (Mr. Music) & The Corbettes, Teresa Tudury and Analy High School Vocal Ensemble (singing doo-wop) Concert begins at 7pm (6pm doors) includes late night dance set Pre-concert reception 4pm, Center Annex, includes food, entertainment & libations Ticket Prices: Victrola $100 • Gramophone $78 • Vintage $60 Juke Box $45 (reception only) • Vinyl $33.33

SONOMA WEST

Sponsored in part by:

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Kate Wolf Music Festival

Tickets and Info: cumuluspresents.com, seb.org or 707-823-1511

Winter Inventory Ftubuf!Kfxfmmfsz

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NEW YEAR NEW YOU! Jan 13 – Feb 7, 2014

Early registration discount still available! Fast results for busy women

707.217.3795

www.SebastopolBootCamp.com

J Boog Reggae meets island sound. Jan 22, 9pm. $30. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Ratt Hair metal at its finest. Shotgun Harlot opens. Jan 22, 8pm. $33. Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings Blues and rock. Carlos Reyes and Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs open. Jan 18, 8:30pm. $26. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

MARIN COUNTY

SONOMA COUNTY Andrews Hall Jan 18, Black & White Jazz. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma.

122 West Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.7960.

Flamingo Lounge Sun, 7pm, salsa with lessons. Tues, Swing Dancing with Lessons. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

French Garden Jan 17, New Skye. Jan 18, Quarter to Four. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gaia’s Garden

Aqus Cafe

Jan 15, Klezmer Creek. Jan 19, 5:30pm, Jazz Jam. Jan 22, 7pm, Celtic Jam. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Jan 17, Dictator Tots. Jan 18, Machiavelvets. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Guerneville Community Church

Arlene Francis Center Jan 17, Mat Callahan, Robert Ethington and Dale Henry Geist. Jan 18, Aenimus. Wed, Open Mic. Third Thursday of every month, Jazz & Coffee. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Dry Creek Kitchen Jan 20, Dick Conte & Steve Webber. Jan 21, Carlos Henrique Pereira & Randy Vincent. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Epicurean Connection Jan 16, the June Drops. Jan 17, the Orchid Killers. Jan 19, the Leftovers. Third Thursday of every month, words, strings and wild things open mic.

Jan 19, River Choir’s singalong Vivaldi’s Gloria. 14520 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville.

Heritage Public House Jan 18, Flyover States, Temptation. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jan 15, Dub Specialists. Jan 17, Pat Jordan Band. Jan 18, Sean Hayes, Trebuchet. Jan 20, Rocker T. Jan 22, Kicks n’ Licks. Mon, Monday Night Edutainment with Jacques & Guac. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Jan 17, Girls & Boys. Jan 18,

Ike Stubblefield Trio Hammond B3 master has player with almost every Motown legend. Eddie Roberts of the New Mastersounds joins him. Jan 18, 9pm. $22-$25. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

The Marin Project Superstar group plays compositions by Susan Gundunas, Vince Guaraldi, Booker T Jones and others. Concert and adjoining CD benefit Homeward Bound of Novato, a homeless services organization. Jan 18, 6pm. $100. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Marin Symphony “American Dream,” featuring works by Copland and Schwantner. Jan 19, 3pm and Jan 21, 7:30pm. $10-$70. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

BACK FROM THE CELLAR Believe it or not, Ratt play the Phoenix Theater on Jan. 22. See Concerts, above.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Murphy’s Irish Pub

23

Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660. Jan 18, Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings. Jan 22, J Boog, Los Rakas. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts Jan 18, Bach to the Future. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater

Gimme Shelter ‘The Marin Project’ album to help homeless Famous tunesmiths Vince Guaraldi, Roger Eno, W. A. Mozart, Erik Satie and Booker T. are indirectly helping homeless families in Marin County. Each has a composition on the new album The Marin Project, the profits of which go directly to Homeward Bound of Marin. Played and recorded by North Bay artists, the mostly instrumental album features extraordinary Bay Area talents like pianists Ed Goldfarb and Maryliz Smith, and vocalist Susan Gundunas. Homeward Bound, which operates 14 programs for the homeless and opens 450 beds per night to those in need, will receive 100 percent of the profits, both from the album and an upcoming concert at the Marin Center. Producer John Liviakis, who comes from the corporate finance world, selected some lesser-known works of great composers to refrain from recycling overplayed hits. Some pieces are so rarely played that published scores do not yet exist for them, so they were transcribed by hand for this project. The recording was done locally, too, by Rick Vargas at Bob Weir’s TRI Studios. Local, high-quality and for a good cause—what’s not to love? The Marin Project’s “Music with a Mission” concert is Saturday, Jan. 18, at the Marin Center’s Showcase Theater. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 6pm. $100. 415.473.6800.—Nicolas Grizzle

Jan 17, Peach Street, Obvi, MND, tha Realist House, Straight Forward Entertainment, Christopher Harrison. Jan 22, Ratt, Shotgun Harlot. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Ray’s Deli & Tavern

Jan 18, Stephanie Ozer Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

AUCTION & PARTY

Featuring to benefit the University Art Gallery at SSU original artwork SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 6–9 PM donated by 150 artists FREE PREVIEW EXHIBITION:

Redwood Cafe Jan 17, the 7th Sons. Jan 18, Foxes in the Henhouse. Jan 20, Neil Buckley Octet. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Riverside Bistro Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Jan 17, Maury Manseau & Cheri Buonaguidi. Jan 18, Greenhouse. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Society: Culture House Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Church on Sundays. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Jan 18, Joyful Noise. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Hotel Healdsburg

ART FROM THE HEART

Jan 18, Hundred. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Sonoma County Museum

Jamie Clark. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

30th Annual

Lagunitas Tap Room

Spancky’s

Jan 15, Rusty Evans. Jan 16, McCoy Tyler Band. Jan 17, Cascada. Jan 18, the Deadlies. Jan 19, the Royal Deuces. Jan 22, Adam Traum & the Mosey Boys. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Thurs, Dj Tazzy Taz. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Tradewinds Thurs, DJ Dave.

) 24

Weds, Thurs, & Fri, January 15, 16 & 17 $

25 suggested donation • For more information, call 707.664.2295

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Mystic Theatre

Music ( 23

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

24

Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Monday ~ Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG-DQĂŁSP

MARIN COUNTY

Guitar Legend Albert Lee with The Bootleg Honeys

Fenix

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Sonoma Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Original Roadhouse Tavern

Stu Allen & Mars Hotel

Great Food & Live Music

with Asher Fulero

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Ike Stubblefield Trio with Eddie Roberts of New Mastersounds 6XQ-DQĂŁSP

Bonnie Hayes Band

Thur Jan 16

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

118'4Â&#x2DC;LhENUGN2/Â&#x2DC;FEx

Karaoke Party with Razor Karaoke

Jan 17, Bradford. Wed, Salsa & Bachata. Thurs and Fri, DJ Rick Vegaz. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Fri Jan 17

Hopmonk Novato

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Cole Walker and His

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Sat Jan 18

Rhythm

Trivia Cafe

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Jason Crosby & Friends

Richie Blue

featuring Lebo,

Jay Lane, & Robin Sylvester

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Open Mic Night with Carl Green

The Overcommitments )UL-DQĂŁSP

Tim Flannery

Plus on Fri & Sat Nights:

6XQ-DQĂŁSP

Rasta Dwight's BBQ!

Peter Walsh and Friends

5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley

707.795.5118 twinoakstavernpenngrove.com

CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

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DIN N E R & A SHOW Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Party Time! Jan 17 THE ED EARLEY BAND Funky Grooves 8:00 / No Cover Sat Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Birthday Bash 18 Jan DOUG ADAMZ & BRAVO! Mr Americana 8:00 Sun Austinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Legendary Jan 19 GREEZY WHEELS 4:00 / No Cover Fri

Fri

Jan 24

BUCK NICKELS AND

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New Country Music 8:00 Put on Your Dancinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Boots 25 Jan LONE STAR RETROBATES Roadhouse/Western Swing 8:00 Sat

Sun

Jan 26

Kanbar Center for the Performing Arts

Marin Center Showcase Theatre Jan 18, the Marin Project. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Marin Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium Jan 19 and 21, Marin Symphony. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

Jan 16, MND, Nick Lopez Band. Jan 17, Rock Candy. Jan 18, Zoo Station, Stung. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Jan 17, David Broza. Osher Marin JCC, 200 No San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Sun Jan 19

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Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

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A Harmonious Excursion 4:00 / No Cover Fri Chinese New Year Dance! Jan 31 TOM FINCH GROUP Year of the Horse 8:00 / No Cover â&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľâ&#x2122;Ľ Celebrate Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day with Fri THE BAGUETTE QUARTETTE Feb 14 7:00pm Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

acoustic open mic. Tues, John Varn & Tom Odetto. Third Thursday of every month, Burnsyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sugar Shack. Third Sunday of every month, La Mandanga. Third Wednesday of every month, Elvis Johnson Soul Review. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Jan 17, Ed Earley Band. Jan 18, Doug Adamz & Bravo. Jan 19, Greezy Wheels. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Wed, Tango with Marcello & Seth. Sun, salsa class. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Monday of every month, Blue Monday with Paul Knight. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

Studio 55 Marin Jan 18, the T Sisters. 1455 E Francisco Blvd, San Rafael. 415.453.3161.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jan 15, Albert Lee. Jan 17, Stu Allen & Mars Hotel. Jan 18, Ike Stubblefield Trio. Jan 19, Bonnie Hayes Band. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY

Sleeping Lady Jan 16, Danny Uzilevsky. Jan 17, Junk Parlor. Jan 18, Jazzitude. Jan 19, Dave Getz Straight Up Jazz. Jan 21, Drake High Jazz Band. Jan 22, King & Ace. Sat, Uke Jam. Sun, 2pm, Irish music. Mon, 8pm, open mic with Simon Costa. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Smileyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wed, Larryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s karaoke. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Station House Cafe Jan 19, Paul Knight. Third

Downtown Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brewery & Restaurant Wed, Jumpstart. Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Jarvis Conservatory Jan 18, Napa Valley Youth Symphony Chamber Music. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jan 16, Syria T Berry. Jan 18, Fleetwood Mask. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

19 Broadway Club Jan 15, Alphabet Soup. Jan 16, Knightress M1. Jan 17, Playground People. Jan 18, Honeydust. Jan 19, the Continentals. Jan 22, Matt Heulitt. Mon, 9pm, open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar Fri, 9pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sun, 3pm, Mal Sharpeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dixieland. Tues, 8:30pm, open mic with Damir. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino Jan 15, Jonathan Poretz. Jan 16, Lilan Kane. Jan 17, Eric Markowitz. Jan 18, Rob Reich. Jan 21, Stuart Rabinowitsh. Jan 22, Noel Jewkes. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jan 15, M-Tet. Jan 16, Deborah Winters. Jan 19, Donna Dacutti. Jan 21, Swing Fever. Jan 22, Bob Gordon & the UFOs. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Jan 17, Swoop Unit. Jan 18, Thrust. Jan 22, Dr Mojo. Mon,

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

Gusttavo Lima Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve probably never heard of a country music star from Brazil. Now you have! Jan 15 at the Regency Ballroom.

Mary Stallings Impeccable style emanates from this jazz vocalist, with Kenny Barron and Eric Reed. Jan 16-17 at SFJAZZ Center.

Colin Meloy Oft-bearded frontman of the Decemberists sings beardy anthems for these beardy times. Jan 17 at the Fillmore.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Standâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: A Tribute A three-night, all-star celebration of the famous Sly & the Family Stone album. Jan 17-19 at the Independent.

Pinback From the streets of San Diego, Rob Crow and Zach Smith peddle perfect thinking-personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pop. Jan 19 at Bimboâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

25

Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Fulton Art Depot

RECEPTIONS Jan 17

Sundays, 1pm. through Jan 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Month of Sundays,â&#x20AC;? former chicken slaughterhouse now an art depot. 1200 River Rd, Fulton.

Napa Valley Museum, Jan 17-Mar 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thinking Outside the Bottle,â&#x20AC;? exploration of the artistic passions of the people behind the wine. 5:30pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Graton Gallery

Sonoma County Museum, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Studio: 50 Sonoma County Artists,â&#x20AC;? pop-up exhibit of portraits of Sonoma County visual artists. 6pm. Panel Discussion, Jan 23, 7pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Through Feb 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sculpture Trail,â&#x20AC;? outdoor exhibit with sculptures along Cloverdale Boulevard and Geyserville Avenue changing every nine months. 215 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Jan 18

Jan 15-Mar 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once Upon a Wetland,â&#x20AC;? art by Ane Carl Rovetta. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Sonoma State University Art Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art from the Heart,â&#x20AC;? 30th annual benefit art auction. 6pm. Preview, Jan 15-17, 11am. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2295. Marin MOCA, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Re/Vision,â&#x20AC;? work by members that has undergone revisions. 5pm. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

Jan 19 Gallery Route One, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Catalyst,â&#x20AC;? Juried show. 3pm. Closing salon, Feb 9, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

SONOMA COUNTY Charles M Schulz Museum Through Feb 3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Play Things: Toys in Peanuts,â&#x20AC;? a nostalgic journey through popular toys in the Peanuts comic strip. Through Mar 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;School Projects,â&#x20AC;? follow the Peanuts gang as they struggle through a typical school year with original comic strips. Through Apr 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starry, Starry Night,â&#x20AC;? feautring Peanuts characters under the night sky. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa.

Through Feb 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invitational Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? fine art by North California painters, printmakers and sculptors. Reception, Jan 18. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

History Center

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center

Redwood Cafe Through Mar 11, Sandra Jill Anfang presents acrylic paintings and collage. Reception, Jan 29, 6pm. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Jan 15-Feb 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vessels,â&#x20AC;? juried exhibition. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery Jan 15-Mar 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Fashion Statement,â&#x20AC;? wearable art. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

707.829.7300 70 7. 829 . 7 3 0 0 SEBASTOPOL E B AS T OP OL 230 PETALUMA AVE 2 30 P E TA L U M A A VE | S

Through Mar 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Site & Sense,â&#x20AC;? the Architecture of Aidlin Darling Design. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown Jan 15-Feb 28, Paintings by Jeremy Morgan. Closing reception, Feb 14, 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Mar 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artisans,â&#x20AC;? emerging and internationally known artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

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Gallery Route One Jan 17-Feb 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Catalyst,â&#x20AC;? Juried show. Closing salon, Feb 9, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

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Through Jan 24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transmissions,â&#x20AC;? work by 30 artists from around the country. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Jan 18-Feb 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Re/Vision,â&#x20AC;? work by members that has undergone revisions. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Through Feb 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Passages,â&#x20AC;? nonjuried exhibit by MSA members. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

Jan 17-24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Studio,â&#x20AC;? pop-up exhibit of portraits of Sonoma County visual artists. Panel Discussion, Jan 23, 7pm. Through Jun 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Precious Cargo,â&#x20AC;? exhibition of California Indian cradle baskets. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hanlon Center for the Arts

Sonoma Mountain Village Event Center

San Geronimo Valley Community Center

Through Jan 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cardboard Currency,â&#x20AC;? found-art pieces by Nick Mancillas. 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park.

Jan 15-30, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Senior Lunch Group Show.â&#x20AC;? 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888. )

Saturday, Jan 18

Wed, Jan 15 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:45pm 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family SINGLE & PAIRS Square Dance Club

Thur, Jan 16 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm CIRCLES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Jan 17 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:30pm North Bay Country Dance Society / Contra Dance Sat, Jan 18 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm DJ Steve Luther hosts GATOR NATION formerly known as Gator Beat Sun, Jan 19 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm Steve Luther DJ COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS AND DANCING Mon, Jan 20 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pmJazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Jan 21 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

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We are happy to announce the new location of our galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;456 10th St., Santa Rosa, CA. Please check our website or call for our opening date and new hours of operation.

LLoverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; overâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Playthings Playthings â&#x20AC;˘ SSensual ensual Lingerie Lingerie â&#x20AC;˘ GGift ift CCertificates ertificates â&#x20AC;˘ JJewelry ewelry

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Through Jan 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Member Show,â&#x20AC;? featuring sculpture, paintings, photography and more. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

26

Gator Nation

Music by Paul Kuhn

Galleries

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

26

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BRRRRâ&#x20AC;Ś B RRRRâ&#x20AC;Ś

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iitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cold cold outside outside

Jan 18-Apr 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inherent Vice: This Is Not a Bruce Conner Exhibition,â&#x20AC;? Will Brown works with Bruce Conner collaborators to make a fluctuating exhibition related to the artist. Through Feb 2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beatnik Meteors,â&#x20AC;? collaborative sculptures by regional artists. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Ready R eady for for winter? winte n r? Large L a rge sselection elect ion of of raincoats, r a i n c o at s , p ponchos, onc hos, dog dog houses, houses, heated h at e d he dog d og beds bed s and a nd heating heat ing p pads ad s

Napa Valley Museum Jan 17-Mar 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thinking Outside the Bottle,â&#x20AC;? exploration of the artistic passions of the people behind the wine. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Animal Nutrition and Supply Locally Owned and Operated for 45 Years

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Below the Belt Brandon Revels hosts this evening of standup comedy featuring local talent. Third Fri of every month, 9pm. $10. Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

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Presented by Active 20-30 Club 656. Third Thurs of every month, 8:30pm. Free. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Caitlin Gill Winner of the 2011 National Poetry Slam has been a veteran of SF Sketchfest since 2007. Dash Kwiatkowski and Dan Mires open. Jan 18, 7 and 9:30pm. $15. Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Comedy Open Mic Third Sun of every month, 8pm. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

How to Be an Earthling Comic monologue by Wes â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scoopâ&#x20AC;? Nisker. Jan 18, 8pm. $20-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Incredibly Handsome Comedians

1217 Washington St Downtown Calistoga www.yoelrey.com

Comedy Night

Best in Napa

Tim Lee, Monty Franklin and Andrew Norelli. Jan 19, 7:30pm. $20-$25. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Jamie Kilstein Comedian described as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a combination of George Carlin and Bill Hicks.â&#x20AC;? Jan 16, 8pm. $16-$21. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Colin Quinn Saturday Night Live alum gives his take on current events. Jan 16, 8pm. $37. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-and-comers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Golden Dragon Acrobats: Cirque Ziva

Winery, 343 San Anselmo Ave. 415.457.5157. Third Thurs of every month, 5:30-8pm.

Wedding Expo Peruse and purchase wedding goodies. Jan 18, 12pm. $12-$15. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Field Trips Afternoon Community Service Participate in center restoration projects. Third Wed of every month. Richardson Bay Audubon Center, 376 Greenwood Beach Rd, Tiburon. 415.388.2524.

Bird Walk Jan 18, 10am. Spring Lake Park, 391 Violetti Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

Acrobatics, traditional dance, spectacular costumes, circus acts, music and innovative theatre. Jan 17, 8pm. $20$45. Marin Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Family Nature Walk

Green Drinks

Nature Walk

Mingle with other sustainability-minded individuals at this networking soiree. Third Thurs of every month. $5. Share Exchange, 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.583.7667.

Led by Petaluma Wetlands Alliance. Rain cancels. Thurs, Jan 16, 8:30am and Sat, Jan 18, 8:30am. Schollenberger Park, Lakewood Highway 116 and South McDowell Boulevard, Petaluma. 707.769.0429. Jan 20, 7pm. Lake Sonoma Visitor Center, Rockpile Road (off Dry Creek Road), Healdsburg.

Pacific Coast Air Museum Third weekend of every month from 10 to 4, folks are invited to play pilot in a featured aircraft. Third Sat of every month and Third Sun of every month. $5. Pacific Coast Air Museum, 2330 Airport Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.575.7900.

Resource Clinic Get info on housing, transit, food stamps and Medi-Cal. Wed, 11am-1pm. Free. Petaluma Health Center, 1301 Southpoint Blvd, Petaluma. 707.559.7500.

Riverfront Thursday Nights Wine, dine, shop and play as shops stay open late. Every third Thurs, from 6 to 9. Third Thurs of every month. Free. Riverfront District, Downtown, Napa. 707.251.3726.

Naturalists lead family hikes into the park. Third Sat of every month. through May 17. Free. Environmental Discovery Center, Spring Lake, Violetti Road, Santa Rosa. 707.539.2865.

Film Vintage Film Series Jan 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Color Purpleâ&#x20AC;?; Feb 17, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Camelotâ&#x20AC;?; Mar 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Rain Manâ&#x20AC;?; Apr 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Maltese Falconâ&#x20AC;?; May 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;After the Thin Manâ&#x20AC;?; Jun 16, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Odd Couple.â&#x20AC;? Mon, Jan 20, 7pm. $8. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Food & Drink

San Anselmo Art Walk

Civic Center Farmers Market

Third Thurs monthly, 5 to 8; includes changing shows at venues including Ross Valley

Sun at 10am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat Local 101â&#x20AC;? provides walking tour with information, cooking advice

27

CRITIC’S CHOICE

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15–21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Year-round. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Corte Madera Farmers Market Year-round. Wed, noon-5pm. Town Center, Tamalpais Drive, Corte Madera. 415.382.7846.

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Dustin Saylor

Forestville Farmers Market

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Year-round. Tues, 3-7pm. Russian River Vineyards, 5700 Hwy 116, Forestville. 707.887.3344.

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Dysphunctional Species

French Garden Farm Market Enjoy produce from restaurant’s farm, along with freshly baked breads and pastries from their kitchen. Every Sun, 10 to 2. Free. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Gender Bender ‘Victor/Victoria’ at Sixth Street

K_li›AXe)*›ACOUSTIC POP

Harvest Market

Continuing her run of roles made famous by musical theater legends, local legend-in-the-making Taylor Bartolucci-DeGuilio follows now in the footsteps of Julie Andrews, playing a woman who impersonates a man who impersonates a woman, in Blake Edwards’ 1995 stage musical Victor/Victoria, based on the 1982 hit movie. The show recently opened on the G.K. Hardt Stage at Sixth Street Playhouse.

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Selling local and seasonal fruit, flowers, vegetables and eggs. Sat, 9am-1pm. Harvest Market, 19996 Seventh St E, Sonoma. 707.996.0712.

Indian Valley Farmers Market Organic farm and garden produce stand where you bring your own bag. Wed, 10am-3pm. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.454.4554.

Olive Curing Workshop Olive expert Don Landis describes his process of curing olives without using lye. Jan 19, 11am. $20. BR Cohn Winery, 15140 Sonoma Hwy (Highway 12), Glen Ellen. 707.938.4064.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 8:30am-1pm and Wed, 8:30am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Renaissance Tea Third Sun monthly at 3, treat the belly with specialty teas, sandwiches, scones and sweets. RSVP; ages 12 and up. Third Sun of every month, 3pm. $35. Cedar Gables Inn, 486 Coombs St, Napa. 707.224.7969.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.522.8629.

Sebastopol Farmers Market Local produce,

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As Victoria, a penniless English soprano who winds up homeless and hungry in 1933 Paris, Bartolucci-DeGuilio is charming and convincing, but the show is no solo act; under the unflashy direction of Michael Ross, the entire cast shines. As Toddy, the aging gay cabaret singer who befriends Victoria and engineers her transformation into Count Victor, Poland’s most acclaimed female impersonator, Tim Setzer puts his own stamp on a role originally created by Robert Preston. Abbey Lee, however, as Norma Cassidy— the hilarious moll to gangster King Marchan (Anthony Guzman)—steals the show. Though the ending misses the mark—blame Blake Edwards—this production is light and fluffy, and the performances will leave a lingering impression. Victor/Victoria runs Thursday–Sunday, Jan. 10–Feb. 2 at Sixth Street Playhouse. 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Thursday–Saturday at 8pm’ 2pm matinees Saturday–Sunday. $15–$35. 707.523.4185.—David Templeton

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Sunday Supper with Syndi Seid Social etiquette and protocol expert educates on proper dinner manners. Prix fixe meal by Fabrice Marcon. Jan 19, 5:30pm. $30-$45. Left Bank Restaurant, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Totally Truckin’ Thursdays Four food trucks park in the O’Reilly parking lot, provide you with local goodness and donate 10 percent of sales to a monthly selected nonprofit. Thurs. O’Reilly & Associates, 1005 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.7190.

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Hang-out spot for Santa Rosa teens ages 12 to 20 offers art studio and class, open gym, tech lounge, cafe, recording studio and film club. Hours for high schoolers: Mon-Thurs, 3 to 9; Fri, 3 to 11; Sat and school holidays, noon to 11. For middle school kids: Mon-Fri, 3 to 7; Sat and school holidays, noon to 7. Film club meets Tues at 4. Ongoing. Membership, $5$10 per year. Chops Teen Club, 509 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.284.2467.

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Every Saturday, 9:30 to 11:30, toddlers and their parents are invited to a drop-in, free-form art studio to create with paint, ceramics, collage, construction, found objects and feathers.

Sat. $15. Nimbus Arts, St Helena Marketplace, Ste 1-B, 3111 St Helena Hwy, St Helena. 707.965.5278.

Preschool Storytime

cultural arts manager for the city of Oakland. Jan 15, 6pm. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

A lap-sit program for infants, one day to 17 months old, accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Fri, 10:45am. free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Public Discussion

Toddler Storytime

Robert Irvine

High-energy storytime for toddlers 18 months to three years old. Fri, 10am. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Star of TV’s “Restaurant Impossible.” Jan 17, 8pm. $40$100. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Lectures CityZen Evening of sitting meditation, tea and dharma talk. All are welcome. Mon, 7pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Design + Conversation Architect Stanley Abercrombie and SVMA executive director Kate Eilertsen talk with Joshua Aidlin and David Darling about their design process. Jan 18, 2pm. $15. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Ecovillages: Lessons for Sustainable Community Slideshow and experiential activity. Jan 19, 2pm. Free. Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 15290 Coleman Valley Rd, Occidental. 707.874.1557.

Icons of Modern Architecture Art historian Ann Wiklund talks about iconic buildings. Tues, 2pm. through Jan 21. $50. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

John Edward Psychic medium. Jan 16, 7pm. $54-$94. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Meditation Group for Mothers Mindful meditation and sharing experiences for benefit of mothers and their children. Wed, 8:30am. $10. Shambhala Meditation Center, 255 West Napa St, Ste G, Sonoma.

Public Art & Downtown Revitalization: The Oakland Story Lecture by Steven Huss,

Institute for the Fulfillment of Human Society invites all for public chat on current issues. Third Tues of every month, 7pm. $5. Subud Hall, 234 Hutchins Ave, Sebastopol. 707.793.2188.

Science Buzz Cafe Jan 16, “Income & Wage Inequality” with Steven S Cuellar, PhD; Jan 23, “The Archaeomythology of Marya Gimbutas” with Joan Marler; Feb 6, “Marine Bioacoustics” with Michael Stock; Feb 13, “Wild Polar Bears of Manitoba” with Forrest Blau; Feb 20, “The Role of Mutation in Evolution” with Philip Harriman, PhD; Mar 6, “Entrepreneurs, Money & Crowd Funding” with Rob Eyer, PhD; Mar 20, “Geological History of Planet Earth” with Richard Ely. Third Thurs of every month, 7pm. through Mar 20. $5. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Sim Van der Ryn Award-winning architect is the author of “Design for an Empathetic World.” Jan 22, 5:30pm. $20. The Sunflower Center, 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Tea & Talk Slow down and get to know one another with Melody Myrick. Third Sun of every month. Donation. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Thomas Moore Author of “Care of the Soul” talks about religion and personal spirituality. Jan 17, 7pm. $20-$50. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Understanding California’s Native Flora Lecture by Dan Gluesenkamp of the California Native Plant Society. Jan 21, 7:30pm. Luther Burbank Art and Garden Center, 2050 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa.

What Do Birds Do for Us? Presented by UC Berkeley

post-doctoral fellow Julie Jedlika. Jan 22, 8:30am. First United Methodist Church, 1551 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa.

29

Book Passage Jan 16, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Writing Is My Drinkâ&#x20AC;? with Theo Pauline Nestor. Jan 17, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mercy Snowâ&#x20AC;? with Tiffany Baker. Jan 18, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Astor Place Vintageâ&#x20AC;? with Stephanie Lehmann. Jan 18, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hypothetical Girlâ&#x20AC;? with Elizabeth Cohen. Jan 19, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Unknown World: Notes on the Meaning of the Earthâ&#x20AC;? with Jacob Needleman. Jan 19, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of Empathyâ&#x20AC;? with Karla McLaren. Jan 19, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frommer EasyGuidesâ&#x20AC;? with Arthur & Pauline Frommer. Jan 20, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sharkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paintbrush: Biomimicry and How Nature Is Inspiring Innovationâ&#x20AC;? with Jay Harman. Jan 21, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Poison Patriarch: How the Betrayals of Joseph P Kennedy Caused the Assassination of JFKâ&#x20AC;? with Mark Shaw. Jan 22, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Trip to Echo Spring: On Writers and Drinkingâ&#x20AC;? with Olivia Laing. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Coffee Catz Third Sunday of every month, 12:30pm, poetry open mic. $5. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.6600.

Santa Rosa Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jan 16, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Independent Studyâ&#x20AC;? with Joelle Charbonneau. Jan 17, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blessing the Hands That Feed Usâ&#x20AC;? with Vicki Robin. Jan 22, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wind Is Not a Riverâ&#x20AC;? with Brian Payton. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jan 21, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Days of Anna Madrigalâ&#x20AC;? with Amistead Maupin. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jan 16, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lightening Up: The Yoga of Self-Acceptanceâ&#x20AC;? with Tony Wolff. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Falkirk Cultural Center Third Thursday of every month, Marin Poetry Center hosts open reading and workshops, Dec 20, potluck. Bring a dish and poem (25 words or less) to share. Free. www.marinpoetrycenter.org. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael.

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Third Wednesday of every month, 6:30pm, poetry reading series. $5 donation. 205 Second St, Sausalito 415.331.3344.

Third Wednesday of every month, 2pm, Sitting Room book club. 707.823.3477. 170 E Cotati Ave, Cotati.

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Healdsburg Senior Center Third Sunday of every month, Third Sunday Salon, Join Healdsburg Literary Guild third Sun monthly, 2 to 4, to honor and discuss craft of writing with featured author. Free. 707.433.7119. 133 Matheson St, Healdsburg.

Point Reyes Books Third Tuesday of every month, 7pm, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book group. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1542.

Robert Louis Stevenson Museum Jan 22, 4pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Under the Wide and Starry Skyâ&#x20AC;? with Nancy Horan, dinner with author at private residence. Inquire with museum for details. $150. 1490 Library Lane, St. Helena 707-963-3757.

San Rafael Copperfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books Jan 16, 7pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Religion of Oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Own: A Guide to Creating a Personal Spirituality in a Secular Worldâ&#x20AC;? with Thomas Moore. Jan 18, 1pm, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blessing the Hands That Feed Usâ&#x20AC;? with Vicki Robin. 850 4th Street, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Theater Return to Forbidden Planet Shakespeare meets â&#x20AC;&#x153;Star Trekâ&#x20AC;? in zany sci-fi sendup. $15-$35. Novato Theater Company, NTC Theater, 5420 Nave Drive, Novato. 415.226.9353.

Victor/Victoria We know weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in Paris, but is this person a he or a she? What confusion, what fun. Thurs-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Feb 2. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of January 15

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Whose enemy are you? Are you anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adversary or obstructionist or least favorite person? Answer honestly, please. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in denial. Next question: Do you derive anything useful from playing this oppositional role? If your answer is yes, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ ne. I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try to talk you out of it. Continue to reap the beneďŹ ts of being someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obstacle. But if, on the other hand, you get little value out of this negative relationship, now would be a good time to change it. You have more power than usual to free yourself from being an antagonist. TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20) You Tauruses are customarily more grounded than the rest of us. But this week, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m wondering if you will be tempted to escape the laws of gravity and rebel against the call of duty. I suspect that your dreams, at least, will feature uninhibited forays into the wild blue yonder. While youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sleeping you may ďŹ&#x201A;oat weightlessly in an interplanetary spaceship, become an eagle and soar over forests, wear a futuristic jet pack on your back and zip through the sky, sail across the Serengeti Plains in a hot-air balloon or have a picnic on a cloud with a feast of cotton candy and sponge cake and mint tea. Would you consider bringing this kind of fun into your waking life?

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) Is there a part of your life thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too small, and you want to make it bigger? Is there a situation thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overly intense and dramatic, and you wish you could feel more light-hearted about it, less oppressed? Are you on a quest that has become claustrophobic, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d love to ďŹ nd a way to make it more spacious and relaxed? If you answered yes to any of those questions, Gemini, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good news. Very soon now you will have a close encounter with the magic you need to open what has been closed and expand what has been narrow. Be alert for it. Be crafty as you gather it in and harness it for your use. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

In her poem â&#x20AC;&#x153;Catch a Body,â&#x20AC;? Ilse Bendorf says she dislikes the advice â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ever tell anybody anything.â&#x20AC;? On the other hand, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tell everyone everythingâ&#x20AC;? isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the right approach, either, she says. Judging from your astrological omens, Cancerian, I surmise that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re wavering between those two extremes. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re tempted to think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to do one or the other. Should you cultivate the power that comes from being silent, and keep people guessing about your true feelings? Or should you seek greater intimacy but risk giving away your power by confessing all your inner thoughts? I suggest you take a middle path. Tell the vivid truth, but carefully and incrementally.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) If a substance has been burned, it canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be burned again. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no ďŹ&#x201A;ammable stuff left to feed a ďŹ re. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simple physics. Now as for the question of whether a person can be burned more than onceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re speaking metaphorically hereâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the answer is, unfortunately, yes. Some folks donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t learn from their mistakes and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough emotional intelligence to avoid the bullies and manipulators who burn them again in the future. But Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m conďŹ dent that you arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t one of these types, Leo, or that at least you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in the coming days. You may have been burned before, but you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be burned this time.

time to ďŹ x that problem. Start now! How? Open your mind to the possibility that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know yourself as well as you someday will. Take vocational tests. Ask smart people you trust to tell you what they think about your special aptitudes and unique qualities. And one more thing: be wildly honest with yourself about what excites you.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

In his book Schottenfreude: German Words for the Human Condition, Ben Schott dreams up new compound German words for use in English. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one that would serve you well in the coming week: Fingerspitzentanz, meaning â&#x20AC;&#x153;ďŹ ngertips-dance.â&#x20AC;? Schott says it refers to â&#x20AC;&#x153;tiny triumphs of nimble-ďŹ ngered dexterity.â&#x20AC;? His examples: fastening a bracelet, tightening a miniscule screw, unknotting, removing a recalcitrant sticker in one unbroken peel, rolling a joint, identifying an object by touch alone, slipping something off a high shelf. Both literally and metaphorically speaking, Scorpio, you now have an abundance of this capacity. Everything about you is more agile and deft and limber than usual. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a master of Fingerspitzentanz.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) The four elements that compose cocaine are the same as those that make up TNT, caffeine and nylon: hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. The combinations and proportions of elements are different in each substance, of course. But the point, for our purposes, is that the same raw materials lead to different results. I foresee a similar drama unfolding in your own life, Sagittarius. How you assemble the ingredients you currently have at your disposal could produce either a rough and ragged high, a volatile risk, a pleasant stimulation or a useful resource. Which will it be?

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Metaphorically speaking, you have recently come into possession of some new seeds. They are robust. They are hardy. They have the potential to grow into big, strong blooms. So when should you plant them, metaphorically speaking? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to suggest that you wait a while longer. It wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be bad for them if you sowed them right now, but I think their longterm vitality will be even greater if you postpone the planting for at least a week. Two weeks might be better. Trust your intuition. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) The Flemish artist Jan van Eyck (1385â&#x20AC;&#x201C;1441) was renowned for his innovative mastery of oil painting. He signed many of his works not just with his name but also with his motto: Als ick kan. Its idiomatic translation is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The best I can do.â&#x20AC;? What he meant was that he had pushed his talent and craft to the limit, and then stopped and relaxed, content that he had given all he could. I invite you to have a similar attitude as you wrap up the projects youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re currently involved in, Aquarius. Summon all your passion and intelligence as you create the most excellent outcome possible, but also know when to quit. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try too hard; just try hard.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;People who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year,â&#x20AC;? said author Peter Drucker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People who do take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year.â&#x20AC;? In general I agree with that assessment. But I think it needs to be altered for your situation in the coming months. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the adjusted version of the formula: Virgos who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take risks in 2014 will make an average of 3.1 big mistakes. Virgos who do take risks in 2014 will make, at most, a half a big mistake.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an excellent time to rise up and revolt against conventional wisdom. I urge you to immunize yourself against trendy groupthink as you outwit and outmaneuver the status quo. Have fun and activate your playful spirit to the max as you create workarounds to the way things have always been done. At the same time, Pisces, stay acutely attuned to your compassion and common sense. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a quarrelsome intransigent. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be rebellious just to please your ego. If you follow these guidelines, you will be able to pull off a graceful insurrection that both soothes and stimulates your soul.

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know what the greatest tragedy is in the whole world?â&#x20AC;? asks novelist Terry Pratchett. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all the people who never ďŹ nd out what it is they really want to do or what it is theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really good at. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all the people who never get to know what it is that they can really be.â&#x20AC;? If that description applies to you even a little, Libraâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still not completely sure what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re good at and what you want to doâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the coming months will be prime

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žų NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JANUARY 15-21, 2014 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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