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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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‘Every parent should educate herself and know the difference between Gryffindor and Slytherin.’ PARE NTING P21 What Do I Do with This Kid All Day? PARENTING P17

What I Like to Eat, By A Baby DI N ING P 11

Shielding Your Children from Kenny G MUS IC P 2 9

Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p9 Dining p11 Wineries p14

Swirl p15 Cover Feature p17 Culture Crush p26 Stage p27

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5 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 14–20, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

nb BEWARE THE BIFF

If your kid is looking for the best skatepark around, look no further than St. Helena.

I drive drive mostly mostly back k roads roads o far fa ar from from the lights in the part part of the night nig ght just ahead of the dawn. da aw wn. It is a world world between betwee en wor lds, maybe the upper or maybe m the lower worlds, world. You but me,, the inter intersection wor ld. Y ou o could argue arrg gue about about which which is which, which, b ut ffor o or me rssection of a three a.m. sanctuary. where back rroad o oad and thr ree e a. m. is a sa anctuarry. A vvector e ector w herre no God d rules rules and a man can move move ffreely. re eely. Just Just like lik ke this morning, morning, far fa ar from frro om the visual stench sttench of eastbay rrefineries ef efineries i gas station sta ation t lasers, lasers,, I saw sa aw the new new comet low in the northeastern nor n theastern sky, sk ky, and gas pure alone.. It had stolen the sky starss tha that centuries only pur re and alone e sk ky ffrom rom o lesser star at ffor o or ce enturies had onl y drive through and later too carelessly carelessly occupied the spot. spott. I dri ve on thr ro ough this scene an nd la ater t past ffour our o ba by skunks skunk ks w ho ar e ffollowing o ollow a parentt iinto t ttraffic. f c P ast a the dee er-lik ke str re eet ffolk olk o baby who are Past deer-like street caught for f a moment in my headlights, past dark houses and b blinding linding semi's. T hrro ou all of this stuff I am driving, and although I am tired of driving, iving, I keep ke eep my my Through ey yes e on the road. The tank is on empty, but I never stop to refill. Maybe aybe ybe I'll pull eyes o ve and rest, if I can just get over this hill. I'm sick and tired of driving. g When, When, over af fte t you roll past the detritus of some poor son-of -bitch's bad judg-ment in the after ffast a as lane, in the dark, alone with the man, and bleeding to death in red and b lue blue moonbeams, d ht don't you have to wonder if the repo-man from the movie was right w hen he said th w when that 'the more you drive, the stupider you become'? So how is it now th e'rre all o or that we're out here together, dedicated road warriors, driving, jockeying for th hole-shot and no one is certain where to or where from. Grinding down the the whole-shot, shar p edg e of our I.Q.'s like the disintegrated retreads we dodge g in the lanes. anes. sharp edge Until I hear different, difffe h nd on I'll meet you in the number one lane when I have to, and the narrow narro ow back k roads when I can. Out here, far from the lights..."I ." have come ome to this edg e tonight for a reason". She thought as she stepped overr the scupper per and edge onto the brick kk ne wall. Twelve stories up and there would be no n mistak ke a bout knee mistake about it As if in a dr it. re ea her center of gravity moved out and over err the edg e of the dream, edge b uilding. T he ligh d together to ogether with the building. The lights of the taxis and busses below swirled rreflections ef eflections l in the wet pavement and the figures of New w Y e ears Ev ve rrevelers eve elerrs Years Eve par ty-bound ffor or o ch e, the e onl y sound she party-bound champagne. Above this noisy street scene, only could hear was was the th satiny rush of air by her ears as she slipped ed past pa ast the 11th floor windows. She se mell of the air and seemed to be falling slower as she took in the sm smell the beauty of the th lights. A peculiar lightness came over her and nd all of the weight tha at had pressed prresse e d to t floating. floa l atting. Dying that on her seemed lifted from her. Falling turned became living. living. Some-thing resembling regret came to her now ow w as she almost ho ove ered by by the lonely old guy's window in 7D. She had never actually ually met him and hovered now wished sh m and ffaced ms a aced the she had. Slowly, she stretched out her long pale arms wor ld below for a moment, and then turned towards the stars. Slowly, Slowly, she rrose ose world up pwarrd. d Lightness Lig i upward. turned to stillness as she lofted back past the clothes hung out a att apt 9A, and then to optimism as she passed the flowered boxes outside of 11C. H er ar ms still outstretched, she looked back down at the New Years Ev ve scene and Her arms Eve laughed out loud. Her hair played in silly curls around her face and d jo oy str reamed e joy streamed down he wall a roofs her cheeks. Her toes gently touched back onto the knee wall att the roofs edg e. Eyes Ey ye closed and smiling, she wrapped herself in her err own ar ms and edge. arms squeez ed until she felt herself returning at last. Down from om th he rroof oof now and squeezed the ffalling a alling a wak ke, she turned turned over ove er in n her bed and smiled. She knew knew this t would be the awake, last time me she would have ha avvve a e this dr ream e fa fa alling Falling alling. g again again n now w, this time dream of falling. now, as sleep, she s the pictur ed the faces face es of every eve verry y person perso on n she had ever ev eve verr known known and vowed d asleep, pictured to o dream drre eam m a new new dream drre eam of life liffe e fo ffor o a lif or fe e in the ne ew y earr.. It ha ad be een another long g life new year. had been day d y.. H e leaned l k too fa ffar ar in th e chair r, daring De estin e ny y to tak ke eh him m ov o ver back ve kw warrd d. day. He back the chair, Destiny take over backward. S he didn n and he smiled having n't, ha avving g cheated chea atted her one e last time. time. He He didn't d know it, but but She didn't, know itt would dn't be his last oppor tunitty to do so bef fo orre e the sun re rreturned etu urrne ed from frro om the other othe er wouldn't opportunity before si ide of the t world world to char him all a over ove ver again. again. He He stood up p an nd d went w to the book k side and cl loset at at the opposite end of th he ro rroom. oom. He ope en ned the stai nlesss steel door and d closet the opened stainless e ntered d the access code. code. Once Once in nside he closed th he door behind h behind him h and made hiss entered inside the w ay to the the rear re rear compartment. compartment. He He lifted lifftted his hand nd chest c high, to fe ffeel ee el way hand,, palm out an and ffor or the Bio-I. or Bio B io-II.D. D. pad pad tha att would a a allow him allow him, and onl on nly him him, to e enter nt nterr the inner cham Bio-I.D. that only cham-be er w here the article article t atten at nttiion tonight lay on a luminous b lue pad. Sta anding ber where of his attention blue Standing in n front fro fr ront of the article arrticle a person person iss quickly quickly taken tak ke en by by the sense off mass it conveys co onvve o ey ys despite espite its modest mode est siz e It is insi e. ide of a rrectangular ide e ectangular bo ox of a boutt 14 inches a bout acr crrro os oss o size. inside box about across and nd 8 inchess deep p. T he box h b bo oxx is i made ma ade d off a metallic material ma matterial i l but but a closer cllloser look l k rreveals eve ev vea eals deep. The e of an a almost fl fleshy y metaliz ed fi ffilm ilm w with a ffine iine por re e--lik ke e te exxture to o it. it to be made fleshy metalized pore-like texture He has ne ve ve er ope ened it and mos st other ho k no ow of its e o xiste ence hope tha att he h He never opened most otherss w who know existence that neve er will. ill Itt iis said i tto contain id t i th h LLaw, he aw, or something thiing g lik ke the LLaw. aw. w. At At fir st thought, thoug ght never the like first kn nowing the actual te exxt xt o of th he LLa h aw would seem aw m to ma ake ak e the mea aning of lif fe e her re knowing text the Law make meaning life here n Earth Earth clearer clearre er and possibly po osssibly even eve ven purposeful. purposeful. However, Howe eve verr,, after a long argu-ment, argu-men nt, on ome off the th world's world ld's greatest ld's grea gr ea atttest te estt thinkers tthi k think ke e errs concluded conclu l ded d d ye y ears ago ear ago that tha th ha att given give gi ve en human h huma some years na atture, knowledge knowledge of the true true nature natur na t re of the Law, Law, no matter ma attter what wha hat it was, was, would nature, quickly rrender ender life liffe as we ha ave k nown it, meaningless. Onl y cha aos and suf fffering quickly have known Only chaos suffering e esult. N ow w, af ftter decadess of ste w-arrd dship of the LLaw, aw, he e had determined determined could rresult. Now, after stew-ardship se of action and tonight and no man or petty tyr ra ant would wou uld k eep e him ffrom ro om his cour course tyrant keep ro ondesvous with destiny. destiny. He e closed his eyes ey yes e and removed re emove ed the t lid, setting it his rondesvous aside. H e opened his eyes ey ye es and squinted s at the glare glarre from from the article. arrticle. He reached re eached aside. He at adled it in n his palms, and lif fted t it out of th he bo ox. x Holding it in with both hands, cr cradled lifted the box. ushed it up an nd down a gainst his shir e it up a bit bef for ore in one hand, he br brushed and against shirtt to shine before raising it to his fface. a ace. Opening his his mouth slightly slightly and wetting hiss lips, he placed it raising ent ro ont teeth and, with w a wet crunching crunching sound, bitt a noisy tang between his ffront tangent thrro ough the article article and chewed. chewed d. Sensing a ffamiliar a amiliar fflavor lla avor v spr re eading acr oss his through spreading across tha at; t Yes, Ye es, sometimes an apple is just an apple. apple. tongue he decided that;

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 14– 20, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

6

BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Save Yourself

The mother of a meth addict speaks out BY KARLA V. GARRISON

P

reventing, stopping or explaining chemical dependency is often the focus of stories about addiction. Seldom does anyone consider the parents who suffer. Some teens grow up and out of chemical dependency. Some grow into chronic, crippled adults. Parents deserve permission to save themselves, but everywhere they turn, parents are blamed, shamed and held responsible and then further subjected to derision when they can’t control or fix their child. Some purport that if parents just love their kids enough they can bring them back from the brink. But this is misleading and ineffective. My message doesn’t do this unintentional disservice; rather, it promises parents they can recover even if their children don’t. When I discovered my son was using drugs, our world imploded. In spite of our best efforts, our son smashed every value laid before him. He was a star athlete and scholar, a kind and loving magnet who drew people to him with an electric smile as big as his warm heart. A sweet little boy who left love notes on my pillow and hugged me hard and long. But meth captured him, and the monster invaded our son and rendered him morbidly useless. As he disappeared into addiction, it took us with him. Paralyzed with grief, we became ineffective bystanders. For nine years, fear dangled like a spider, but it also pried open my mind. I learned I couldn’t fix him, but I could fix me. Taking back my life was a slow and arduous process, but now I can fast-forward relief. Addicts feel bad enough about themselves; heaping guilt and shame erects barriers and hostile withdrawal. Once I truly understood that my son was physically and mentally ill, I could act rather than react. And I could love him but also love myself, knowing I was powerless over something bigger than both of us. For parents newly initiated to this fraternity—or for those convinced their lives are over—please remember you can recover even if your children don’t. Maybe the very colleague you speak to and perhaps have known for years is the mother who’s never let you in on the secret that crowds her heart and cries her to sleep. Karla V. Garrison is a clinical therapist with a master’s degree in psychology and counseling. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Marin Housing

This is a positively bizarre take on the issues facing Marinwood (“Angry Grousing About Housing,” Aug. 7). Portraying Susan Adams as a “victim” of angry constituents is insulting to the community and ultimately to Supervisor Adams herself. Journalists used to be reliable in keeping politicians accountable. This story reads more like an apology. Fair-minded people will be able to see the truth through the fog created by the politicians about Plan Bay Area. It will radically alter our landscape and economy if built to plan. Unfortunately, we can no longer have the help of local media to help us. The “Gay Eskimo” post was making fun of racist xenophobia. It was pretty obvious and even had “satire” labeled in the post and discussion. It has received a disproportionate amount of attention, and some people even stupidly claim that it is evidence of racism. It shows the intellectual dishonesty of the phony outraged people who want to promote the idea that people for good planning are racist NIMBYS.

STEPHEN NESTEL Marinwood

Excellent article. It’s not hard to see “what the hell is going on”—there’s an ugly streak of racism and classism in Marinwood. Sixty percent of the people who work in Marin work outside the county and commute from Sonoma, Contra Costa, Alameda and Solano counties. Most of these commuters are lower income, and nonwhite. Most would greatly prefer to live close to where they work. The crazy thing about this latest outburst is that ABAG has now drastically cut the housing needs allocations (RHNA) for Marin jurisdictions, even though very little affordable housing has been built there to meet current and prior RHNA housing needs allocations. ABAG is dominated by

Marin, Napa and other wealthy jurisdictions, all of which have their numbers slashed for the next (2014–2022) planning period. But even a small RHNA allocation is not acceptable with these NIMBYs.

DAVID GRABILL Santa Rosa

As a moderate-income resident of Marin County, I am personally suffering from this refusal to build more housing. I wish people would stop making up scary stories about how poor people will be imported into the county, and realize that by fighting every housing proposal, many of us who are here now will be forced to leave. My rent has jumped $500 in two years because there just aren’t enough rental units. I have lived my whole life in Marin County, and have a good job here, but paying the increasingly high cost of housing here means I can’t ever get ahead.

CARLA Via online

Cramming all development into highrise housing next to noisy, polluting freeways is not a healthy option, affordable housing or not. Not only is it a step backwards in progress, but it is no solution to greenhouse gas emissions nor an equitable solution to affordable housing that could otherwise be accommodated by a smarter option: infill housing all over the Bay, not just in congested PDAs.

ALAN C. SCOTCH Via online

There seems to be an underlying assumption that we in the Bay Area must “plan for future growth,” as it states in your article. It would also have us believe that the heavy commute traffic on Marin freeways is due to a lack of low-income housing in the county. I dispute both of these assumptions. Let’s look at the first assumption. For tens of thousands of years, homo sapiens were small in number and

Rants By Tom Tomorrow

LEARN TO THINK LIKE A

LAWYER Empire College School of Law is opening enrollment for its new Master of Legal Studies program with classes beginning Fall 2013. The program will give North Bay students the opportunity to pursue diverse career opportunities through the acquisition of a foundational understanding of the legal system, or as background for the Juris Doctor degree (i.e. dual enrollment).

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competed with other humanoid species and with large mammals many times our size. From this experience, it was ingrained in us that more homo sapiens was beneficial. And that belief stood us in good stead. Humans won this multi-millennium competition, and we have populated the entire planet. In fact, we are so numerous—7 billion and counting—that human activity is now endangering the health of the planet. All this is to say that we need to change our assumption that population growth is both beneficial and inevitable. I believe that Marin’s efforts to limit growth, or curb it entirely, and to maintain open space is a wise policy and should be a model for the rest of the Bay Area. Visit Orange County and you’ll see what happens when unbridled growth is allowed.

DANIEL BACON San Rafael

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1

Noreen Evans won’t seek a second term. Let the speculation begin!

2

Willie Nelson tells the Easy Leaves: “Let’s play together again sometime”

3

“San Francisco Chronicle” ready to drop online paywall for readers on SFGate

4

AOL’s Tim Armstrong fires Patch.com director in live conference call

5 Effort to save the

Ruth Asawa fountain in Courthouse Square underway

Santa Rosa

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THIS MODERN WORLD

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NEW WING Expansion will allow the California Parenting Institute to see an estimated additional 250 children

and families per year.

Growing Out California Parenting Institute expands to new building, adds services for families BY GABE MELINE

M

aria” was a 28 year-old new mom overcome with depression. Her threemonth old son was healthy, her partner supportive. But she spent days crying, thinking about the previous child that she lost when she was 25 weeks pregnant— thinking about how

overwhelming it all was, this new little human being with so many needs, and no owner’s manual. Maria moved back in with her family for help. Eventually, through the USDA’s Women, Infants, and Children program, she was referred to a place that would provide therapy, advice and direction—a place that would help her negotiate time off with her employer so she could bond with

her son and that would give her hope of moving back in with her partner and starting her family on a positive note again. Maria’s hope came from the California Parenting Institute, where the perinatal mood disorder program is just one of many resources available to parents who’ve known the all-too-common frustration of hitting a wall. Founded in 1978, the nonprofit offers parenting groups, ) 10 therapy, group classes,

Whether talking about flying missions in a B17 bomber in World War II, or leading two-week hiking expeditions through the Sierra Nevada, 89year-old Phil Arnot captivates an audience. The trailer of his life goes something like this: enlist in the Air Force at age 18, become a co-pilot on a B17, fly over 20 missions before switching planes to photograph Western Europe for Air Force maps, come back home and earn a teaching credential at Cal Berkeley, teach for 28 years, lead high school students on backpacking trips in the Sierras for 17 years, then lead adult backpacking trips in Alaska and the Sierras before retiring to day hikes and gym trips from his West Marin home. Arnot has also published a book of wilderness photography, full of stunning locations rarely viewed by human eyes. “It’s been a lot of fun putting [the book] together, and it reminded me how lucky I’ve been,” says Arnot. “I was just born at the right time, right place and had wonderful parents.” Arnot’s talk was brought about by Joe Noriel, former president of the Petaluma Museum. Noriel’s term ended, but his love of history hasn’t, so he started the History Connection to promote events just like this. “It’s educational, a lot of stuff kids aren’t learning in schools,” he says. “That generation, what they went through for our freedom— I don’t think you can tell those stories enough.” Arnot gives a talk after being honored with a proclamation by Petaluma mayor David Glass on Saturday, Aug. 17, at Valley Orchards Retirement Community. 2100 E. Washington St., Petaluma. 2pm. Free. 707.776.7534. —Nicolas Grizzle

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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supervised visitation, in-home visits, off-site classes, autism programs, a call center, the New Directions school and various trauma treatment programs. Their mission is simple: to end child abuse and strengthen the health of children, parents and families. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We get funding to see kids who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have health insurance, so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like the last-ditch safety net for kids,â&#x20AC;? says executive director Robin Bowen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids who have been abused, kids who come from high-conďŹ&#x201A;ict divorce, kids who have witnessed community violence, kids who have been in some traumatizing accidents, or maybe just even witnessed horrible things in their communityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;those kids can come here without insurance.â&#x20AC;? Except thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a waiting list for the programs at CPIâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Bowen estimates about 80 kids total. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why last week, Bowen walked through the warehouse into which CPI will be expanding, explaining how the new Parent Education Center will increase services, whittle down the waiting list and better serve families in Sonoma County. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really hard when you have kids who have traumaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;maybe theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re being bullied at schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; and you have to go, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Well, we have a waiting list,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Bowen says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And a lot of these families donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a lot of resources to go elsewhere, so theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re stuck waiting.â&#x20AC;? Adding an extra 4,600 square feet for group rooms, playrooms and supervised visits will surely help. Construction is slated to be completed in September and is estimated to serve an additional 250 children and families each year. (Last year, more than 3,000 families received services from CPI.) The expansion is being funded by a $350,000 donation from First 5 Sonoma County, and by nearly $100,000 from Connie Codding and Jean Schulz. While a bank loan is covering the additional bills, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re short about a half million,â&#x20AC;? says Bowen, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for right now.â&#x20AC;? In 2007, the G.K. Hardt Foundation gave $500,000 to CPI to improve its existing center on

Standish Avenue in southwest Santa Rosa. Bowen estimates that CPI has doubled in size since then. Expansion into the warehouse across the parking lot will also allow CPI to concentrate mentalhealth services into one building. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think people are getting more comfortable with looking for mental health help,â&#x20AC;? says Toni Sprouse, who serves on the CPIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board of directors, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and becoming more aware that there are issues, and you need to seek help.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;A lot of these families donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have resources to go elsewhere, so theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re stuck waiting.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; An estimated 51 percent of children seen at CPI are affected by domestic violence. Some parents are referred to CPI from family court on child-abuse issues, mandated to complete a 52-week program. Some are returning veterans with PTSD. Some have drug or alcohol issues. All of them have a chance for a better start at CPI. At the same time, says Tiffani Montgomery, CPIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s marketing director, â&#x20AC;&#x153;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here for everybody. For any type of family. Anyone can call us.â&#x20AC;? Indeed, classes are inexpensive and accessibleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;$10 to $50, depending on durationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and are bilingual. They range from infant massage and yoga classes to raising a child with an ex-partner and handling anger. Along with parenting tips, the classes provide a reminder that parents arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alone in the struggles they face, says Bowen, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s served as executive director at CPI for over 30 years, and who has three grown children of her own. Her ultimate advice for parents echoes that of many: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enjoy your kids. Really, really enjoy your kids. Because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re little for only so long.â&#x20AC;?

HIGHCHAIR HIGHNESS And, like, so this is me, right? And it’s, like, dinnertime, hello? Like, feed me already, God.

Gaagggh Uuuh Muuff Guhh What I like to eat

I

t’s, like, totally funny that you would wanna know all about what I eat, like, today of all days. Because if this were two weeks ago, I would have said, “Uh, duh, boob?” Like, what else would I eat, I’m a freakin’ baby! I mean, I don’t

BY A BABY actually eat the boob—what do I look like, a cannibal? I don’t even have teeth! No, I was on a pure liquid diet. Not like some skinny rich lady Gwyneth Paltrow $5 billion (yeah, I’m only six months old and I know math . . . whatevs) liquiddetox-cleanse grodiness. No, this stuff my mom was giving me was,

like, full of totally rad nutrients, and it was, like, totally free. Yum. But then, like, this morning? My mom starts cramming this orange goop up in my face. She tells me, all nice, that it’s called sweet potato. So, yeah, I tried to eat some, but then I was, like, gag me with a spoon! No, literally, I tried to gag myself with the spoon, but before I could jam that thing down

there, my mom grabbed it out of my hand, and I’m, like, “Mom, I can totally feed myself, I’m six months old now.” But it came out sounding more like “Ba ga ga ga ba ga ba ma ma.” My mom totally didn’t get it. Then she gives me this other mushy gunk, and she says they’re called apples, and that was a little better and I wanted more, but when I went to put more in my mouth, I put it in my eye instead, but, like, whatevs. And then, like, I’m just sitting there, and my mom crams this, like, mesh sock in my hand, and it’s all loaded up with these cold, purple circular things, and my mom says, “These are blueberries, baby.” And I put that sock in my mouth and suck on it, and YUM. Oh. My. God. Sooooo good. I could eat these all day. And then Grandma comes over and she brings these, like, Gerber mashed up peas and carrots, and my mom is totally, like, “Um? Are these organic? Because if they’re not organic I don’t think they’re healthy for the baby.” And I’m all, whatever, mom, is that pile of black dog hair on the floor organic, because I just totally crammed it in my mouth when you weren’t looking. And then she says, “And these plastic containers? I don’t think they’re BPA-free. We should only feed the baby out of glass jars,” and I’m, like, what about the floor? Who needs a plate when you’ve got, like, a totally delicious, dirtseasoned floor to eat off? Like I just did when my blueberry sock fell down. Just pick it up, let the dust flavor it up all nice, and then pop! Back in the mouth. Mom says next week we’re gonna try something new. Like organic puréed broccoli or something. Can we at least put some cheese on that? Uh, like, barf me out—no, like, literally, I’m projectile-vomiting right now, can someone get me, like, cleaned up? I have a hot date with a teething ring after this.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 14–20, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Jacques Law

Dining

11

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 14– 20, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12

Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N O MA CO U N T Y

and lunch, Mon-Sat. 630 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3785.

Belly Californian. $$. When

sushi, exotic seasoned seaweed salad, robata grill specialties and premium sakes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2446 Patio Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8282.

he’s not serving up crispy pork belly or healthy quinoa salads, owner/chef Gray Rollin tours with rock bands like Linkin Park as a personal chef. Lunch and dinner daily. 523 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787

Borolo’s Original Pizza Pizza $. Classic, California and European pizza combos beyond the ordinary. Borolo’s uses organic mozzarella, locally sourced produce and milled flour. Salads are made to order, with homemade dressings, and the pizza is baked in a stone oven. Takeout and delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Mission Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.539.3937.

Cucina Paradiso Northern Italian. $-$$. Delicious innovative fare. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 114 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.782.1130.

The Girl & the Fig Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

Gohan Japanese. $$-$$$. Superb Japanese favorites with modern twists like greentea cheesecake and wakame snow-crab caviar salad in a martini glass. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 1367 McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.789.9296.

JoJo Sushi Japanese. $-$$. Hip downtown eatery features fresh sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, and innovative specials. Lunch and dinner daily. 645 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8588.

Mac’s Delicatessen Diner. $. Large selection of Jewish-style sandwiches; excellent cole slaw. Breakfast

Osake Sushi Bar & Grill Japanese. $$$. Gourmet

Real Döner Turkish. $-$$. Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555. Russian River Brewing Co Eclectic. $. Decent pizza and excellent brews. Two words: beer bites! Lunch and dinner daily. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2337.

Saddles Steakhouse. $$$$$$$. A steakhouse in the best American tradition, with top-quality grass-fed beef. Pies are made from fruit trees on restaurant property. Dinner daily. 29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.938.2929.

Shiso Asian $$ Extensive

favorite for authentic Thai recipes with pad Thai, curries, exotic appetizers and entrées. Lunch and dinner daily. 2478 W Third St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.9296. 6961 Sebastopol Ave (across from West America Bank), Sebastopol. 707.829.8889.

MARIN CO U N T Y Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$.

modern Asian menu with emphasis on sushi–sashimi, nigiri and specialty rolls–made from local ingredients. Ask for the omakase. Dinner daily. 19161 Hwy 12, Sonoma. 707.933.9331.

Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Stark’s Steakhouse

Mountain Home Inn

Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour, Mon-Sat, 3 to 6. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Sushi Tozai Japanese. $$.

American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/

Spare, clean ambiance and some of the freshest sushi you’ll ever eat. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 7531 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9886.

contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Thai Pot Thai. $$. A local

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic,

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY

and lunch, Mon-Sat. 630 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3785.

Belly Californian. $$. When

sushi, exotic seasoned seaweed salad, robata grill specialties and premium sakes. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 2446 Patio Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.542.8282.

he’s not serving up crispy pork belly or healthy quinoa salads, owner/chef Gray Rollin tours with rock bands like Linkin Park as a personal chef. Lunch and dinner daily. 523 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787

Borolo’s Original Pizza Pizza $. Classic, California and European pizza combos beyond the ordinary. Borolo’s uses organic mozzarella, locally sourced produce and milled flour. Salads are made to order, with homemade dressings, and the pizza is baked in a stone oven. Takeout and delivery. Lunch and dinner daily. 500 Mission Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.539.3937.

Cucina Paradiso Northern Italian. $-$$. Delicious innovative fare. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 114 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.782.1130.

The Girl & the Fig Bistro. $$$. Country food with a French passion. Great wine bar, great patio. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 110 W Spain St, Sonoma. 707.938.3634.

Gohan Japanese. $$-$$$. Superb Japanese favorites with modern twists like greentea cheesecake and wakame snow-crab caviar salad in a martini glass. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 1367 McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.789.9296.

JoJo Sushi Japanese. $-$$. Hip downtown eatery features fresh sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, and innovative specials. Lunch and dinner daily. 645 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.569.8588.

Mac’s Delicatessen Diner. $. Large selection of Jewish-style sandwiches; excellent cole slaw. Breakfast

Osake Sushi Bar & Grill Japanese. $$$. Gourmet

Real Döner Turkish. $-$$. Casual, cafe-style ordering from a friendly staff. Get the coffee and buibal yuvasi dessert. Lunch and dinner daily. 307 F St, Petaluma. 707.765.9555. Russian River Brewing Co Eclectic. $. Decent pizza and excellent brews. Two words: beer bites! Lunch and dinner daily. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2337.

Saddles Steakhouse. $$$$$$$. A steakhouse in the best American tradition, with top-quality grass-fed beef. Pies are made from fruit trees on restaurant property. Dinner daily. 29 E MacArthur St, Sonoma. 707.938.2929.

Shiso Asian $$ Extensive modern Asian menu with emphasis on sushi–sashimi, nigiri and specialty rolls–made from local ingredients. Ask for the omakase. Dinner daily. 19161 Hwy 12, Sonoma. 707.933.9331. Stark’s Steakhouse Steakhouse. $$$$. Could be the best steak you’ll ever have. “Other than steak” menu changes seasonally. Happy hour, Mon-Sat, 3 to 6. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat. 521 Adams St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.5100.

Sushi Tozai Japanese. $$. Spare, clean ambiance and some of the freshest sushi you’ll ever eat. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun. 7531 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.9886.

Thai Pot Thai. $$. A local

MA R I N CO U N T Y Boca South American. $$$$$$$. Enjoy flavorful and rich regional fare in the rustic décor of an Argentinean ranch. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 340 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. 415.833.0901.

Citrus & Spice Thai/ Californian. $$. Thai meets California, with fresh fruit accents, light herbs and spices, and a great mango-duck summer roll. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1444 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.455.0444.

Comforts Californian. $$. The Chinese chicken salad is beyond rapturous. Excellent celebrity sightings. Eat in or takeout. Breakfast and lunch daily. 335 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.454.9840. Drake’s Beach Cafe Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Mon. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$. Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch, Sat-Sun. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Nick’s Cove Seafood/ contemporary American. $$$$. Fresh from the bay oysters, upscale seafood, some steaks and a great burger. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 23240 State Route 1, Marshall. 415.663.1033.

Piatti Italian. $$-$$$.Rustic,

) 14

13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 14–20, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Dining

favorite for authentic Thai recipes with pad Thai, curries, exotic appetizers and entrées. Lunch and dinner daily. 2478 W Third St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.9296. 6961 Sebastopol Ave (across from West America Bank), Sebastopol. 707.829.8889.

14

Dining ( 13

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 14â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 20, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

seasonal, Italian food. Kidfriendly. Lunch and dinner daily. 625 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.380.2525.

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Salitoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Open for Lunch & Dinner 7 days a week

345 Healdsburg Ave. Downtown Healdsburg bearrepublic.com

The Courtyard Spa

JgXN\cZfd\ Jg\Z`Xcj $50

OďŹ&#x20AC; couples massage $20 OďŹ&#x20AC; any individual massage or treatment includes a Mediterranean foot bath

16702 Coast Hwy One, Bodega 888.404.2255 www.scvilla.com

N A PA CO U N T Y Carpe Diem Wine Bar Californian. $-$$. Right in the heart of downtown Napa, Carpe Diemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contemporary and innovative menu includes a variety of seasonal flatbreads, an ostrich burger, the famed short-rib sliders and much more. Over 45 wines by the glass, six draft beers and an impressive reserve wine list round out this warm, inviting space. Dinner daily. 1001 Second St., Napa. 707.224.0800.

Fazerratiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Kellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

SMALL BITES

Jar of Magic In Sonoma County, fermentationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the name and producing farmfresh products is the game. Since moving from its original location in 2012 from Freestone to Santa Rosa, the Farm to Fermentation Festival continues its run while supporting a notable cause by partnering with Ales for Autism. This nonprofit charity works to preserve the craft beer movement by offering events with educational aspects and, as a result, raising money for schools and programs in Sonoma County. By teaming up with local beverage crafters, the festival provides an adult ticket option this year for the Libation Lounge, hosted by the Russian River and HenHouse brewing companies. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all alcohol: festival-goers can learn about and take part in the fermentation process of kombucha, pickles, cheese, vinegar, yogurt, sauerkraut and more. Keynote speakers include fermentation advocate Emma Christensen, author and veggie queen Jill Nussinow, Nourished Kitchen blogger Jenny McGruther and food reviewer Jeff Cox. The Farm to Fermentation Festival arrives on Sunday, Aug. 18, at the Finley Community Center. 2060 W. College Ave., Santa Rosa. 11amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;5pm. $25â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$50. 707.543.3737. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Anna Hecht

FumĂŠ Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner.

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$-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

Gottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadside Tray Gourmet Diner. $. Formerly Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Automatic Refresher. Lunch and dinner daily. 933 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.3486. Also at Oxbow Public Market, 644 First St, Napa. 707.224,6900.

La Toque Restaurant French-inspired. $$$$. Set in a comfortable elegantly rustic dining room reminiscent of a French lodge, with a stone fireplace centerpiece, La Toque makes for memorable special-occasion dining. The elaborate wine pairing menus are luxuriously inspired. Dinner daily. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa. 707.257.5157.

Miguelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast,lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and

Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch and dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$-$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222.

15

VML Winery is proud to announce its 2013 Summer Concert Series

Up on Napa’s roof, a vinicultural quintet plays a different tune

The ticket price does include a drink ticket

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I’m sorry to report that such adventurous food pairings are not part of the everyday tasting experience at Cain, but then little is everyday here. Developed in the 1980s, the Cain vineyard occupies a big, terraced bowl on part of the former McCormick sheep ranch. Picture this: If you were standing atop Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, looking toward Napa, and Howell was standing atop his ridge, you could almost wave to each other. The vineyard may be spectacular, but it ain’t pretty. Grass and weeds brush the vines, and not just in the biodynamically farmed block (typical of Howell’s philosophy, biodynamics is an experiment at Cain, not a dictum). Drip irrigation tubes slipped into PVC pipes stuck in the ground like syringes feed each vine a little extra something to make it through the summer. Compared to some of the so-called de-vigorated mountain vineyards I’ve seen, Cain is the real deal. This unique land makes a bigger difference, ultimately, than the particular varieties of grapes that are grown here, says Howell, pouring a 2000 Cain Five, a nicely integrated, older Cab-based blend which shows no bricking and no stewed fruit. Although Howell had to petition the government to be allowed to list all of their flagship wine’s five varietals on the label, “that doesn’t tell you anything about the wine,” he says. Nor, he suggests a little more controversially, does that hint of brett that another guest picked up on mean that the wine is spoiling. In small amounts, Brettanomyces— the yeasty bugbear of today’s clean, mean, super-fruity wines—adds a little interest, says Howell, and he has no fear of it. Whether from outlier microorganisms or the aromatic weeds that grow around the vineyard, the 2008 Cain Five ($125) has sweet, alluring floral aromas opening to a hint of mint. For roasted freerange chicken? That’s the Cain way, and it works. Cain Vineyard & Winery, 3800 Langtry Road, St. Helena. Tour and tasting by appointment only, Monday–Friday, 10am and 11:30am; Saturday, 10am and noon. $35. 707.963.1616.

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air this Cabernet Sauvignon with [fill in the blank—as long as it’s steak]. Endlessly reiterated, Cab pairing suggestions like juicy steak, slab of beef—among braver thinkers, maybe, venisonwrapped beef—have worn out the carving knife, so it was refreshing to enjoy a 2004 Cain Five, a Cab blend, with sake-marinated poached cod in a light broth with Chinese mushrooms. The wine is an earthy, minty blend of five Bordeaux grapes; the occasion was a press trip hosted by Cain’s husband-and-wife team Christopher Howell, winemaker and general manager since 1991, and sales director Katie Lazar. The pairing was a hit.

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What Are We Gonna Do Today? In which children, like the trash, need to be taken out

W

hen you’re a parent of a small child, every free day is a gigantic looming blank slate that you’ve gotta fill. Wake up, drink coffee, have some cereal, dress the kid . . . then what? You’ve got this little human being that needs to be entertained, but you need not be bored out of your skull.

I can’t claim to be an expert at this, but I do hate sitting around

the house, and in the last four years I’ve managed to escape the lure of Hulu or Nickelodeon or whatever to discover plenty of things out in the real world to do with my child that don’t make me want to kill myself. Hence, based on my own experience and geography (I live in downtown Santa Rosa), here’s a rambling run-on list, that’s by no means complete, of how I have managed to fill the long, empty days with a small daughter. First rule: get around other people. The quickest way is a park. You don’t even have to talk

to other parents, just exchange knowing glances and shrugs while the kiddos run around. Once you get to know the area parks, you can target them by mood. If I’m feeling up for activities and socializing, I go to Howarth Park, where there’s a train, a carousel and pony rides. (Don’t forget the boats—small children are allowed, and it’s only $8 an hour for a rowboat.) Often it makes more sense to go to a small area park—mine is MLK Park, near the horse track—which is a good way to meet your neighbors, anyway. Peri Park in Fairfax is

BY GABE MELINE dangerously close to Three Twins Ice Cream, and the Superpark in Sebastopol has been a destination on more than a few bike rides. Bike rides? Yep, a child’s seat is around $130. Do it. I’m amazed at how docile and quiet my daughter is on a bike ride, and the Santa Rosa Creek Trail is nice and flat. (Take it from me: do not try riding up Gold Ridge Road with the extra weight!) Kids, like dogs, love the whirring wind and open scenery as you pedal the day away. Hiking with a kid can be arduous, but not ) 22 impossible. I’ve scaled

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 14– 20, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18 Creative Parenting Issue

poster girl and champion of the “alternative” parenting scene through her unapologetic writing about the realities of raising kids outside of the norm. The articles in Hip Mama included personal essays on raising children as an LGBT parent, about parenting children with special needs, about sexuality after parenthood and even tips on how to breastfeed with nipple piercings.

REBORN Ariel Gore is relaunching Hip Mama this year.

‘All of the things I was told would ruin her life never came to pass.’

You’re Not Alone Hip Mama and Rad Dad provide forums for unconventional parenting BY DANI BURLISON

A

s a new, young mother in the mid ’90s, I was shocked by how my “open-minded” North Bay community treated me. Strangers, mostly women, repeatedly pulled me aside at Santa Rosa Community Market, the Salvation Army thrift store and even the Health & Harmony Festival. “Oh, my,” they’d begin, “you’re so young! Were you able to finish high school?” And, my personal favorite, “Is the father involved?”

As my daughter finished preschool, I was pregnant again. I also had more tattoos, craziercolored hair and a different partner. My idea of quality family time included weekend protests at Headwaters Forest, Saturday afternoon prison-reform marches in San Francisco and Sunday mornings cooking with Food Not Bombs. Sure, I used cloth diapers, made almond milk and sent my oldest to a Waldorf school like other linen-clad granola moms in the area, but I was also a young pseudo-anarchist feminist with radical political views, and very few fellow parents that fit into the same misshapen box as me.

I felt completely alienated from my supposedly forward-thinking community. Luckily for myself—and my kids—I found Hip Mama magazine. “Back in the day, you had your baby, you had your cigarette, you had your little umbrella stroller and you did the best you could,” laughs Hip Mama founder Ariel Gore. “Class diversity or familystructure diversity was just barely visible then. That was one of the key reasons I started the zine.” Gore first launched Hip Mama as a senior project at Mills College in 1993. A young single mom, Gore became the

“When I started Hip Mama,” says Gore, “there was Anne Lamott’s book [Operating Instructions], there were feminists’ books, a couple of kind of punky underground zines, like China Martens’ Future Generation. But in terms of an easy forum for single moms or younger moms or urban moms or anybody who didn’t fit in, there were literally three or four places you could access images of nontraditional families, including Roseanne, which was kind of a traditional family but they were working-class, which was a big deal then.” Twenty years later, Gore is relaunching the print magazine this winter after a brief hiatus and temporary move to Santa Fe, where she cared for her dying mother while raising her second child, Maxito. The magazine, she says, will feature regular columns from Teen Mom NYC blogger Gloria Malone, Rad Dad zine founder Tomas Moniz and the magazine’s new political editor Victoria Law. Gore’s daughter Maia, who’s just weeks away from graduating college, is working on a new logo and other graphics. The new format will also include

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 14–20, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

ZINEOGRAPHY Tomas Moniz started a zine to talk about fathering from radical

perspectives.

more food writing, more art, and, as always, it’s sure to contain sharp wit and insight. Along with Hip Mama, Tomas Moniz of Rad Dad zine is relaunching his seven-year-old publication with a redesign as well. “I just started a zine for fathers to talk about fathering in meaningful, feminist, anarchist ways. I started the zine I longed to read,” says Moniz. “It started as a place for fathers, but now anyone can write for the zine, and, in fact, in Rad Dad #20, my favorite essay was by a queer man in a relationship with a person who didn’t want kids, so they chose to live communally with a family who has kids. It is so amazing. Everyone needs to hear those stories.” Moniz says that, like Hip Mama, the new Rad Dad will feature regular columns along

with reader submissions, and will include stories on pop culture, race, queer parenting and more. And between Hip Mama and Rad Dad, parents can rest assured that they are not alone with their weird-ass coparenting, radical, farmsteading, anarchist, sex-positive, homeschooling (or, God forbid, public schooling), attachmentparenting, activist approaches to child-rearing. “All of the things I was told would ruin her life, and that I was being selfish for not giving her up for adoption—they did not come to pass,” says Gore. “And kid number two, he’s 17 years younger than Maia, and I’m not that worried about him. I don’t care what y’all think of me. Part of it, I think, is getting older, I guess. But I could not care less.”

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 14– 20, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20 Creative Parenting Issue

Which One Should I Buy?

One can of Gerber pears: $1.74

One pear, split with you: 30 cents

One two-piece Carter’s outfit: $9

One canvas grocery bag with holes cut out for limbs: 99 cents

One bag of ABC blocks: $18.79

Three large rocks: free

you’re like many of us, you too often find yourself at the neighborhood Big Box, thinking resentful thoughts about the elitism of homespun yarn and feeling sad and guilty underneath.

One Evenflo entertainment center: $119.99

One drawer full of mixing bowls you already own: free

One Sophie the Giraffe teething ring: $15.99

One stick: free

But what if doing it yourself for baby not only saved money, but was possible without massive amounts of time? What if we could break down, mathematically, how going Prairie Parent would give you an easier, thriftier life? Mamas and papas of the eco-hipster-poor, we present you with a price comparison chart to guide you through a different— and more egalitarian—kind of DIY.

One trip to the San Francisco Zoo (including parking and gas): $30

One bike ride to Santa Rosa creek to visit the skunks: free

One small time-out chair, for when she hits the cat: $12.99

Letting her continue to hit the cat and learn a valuable lesson: four band-aids, 10 cents each

One package of Pampers: $10.99

Hanging out outside: free

Eight handy price comparisons for the new DIY parent BY RACHEL DOVEY

D

espite the appeal of home-mashed beet porridge and stitchedby-hand hemp diapers, baby DIY can seem like an impossible dream if you lack two things: time and money. Perhaps if you have a partner working in tech and the ability to stay home and are still not, somehow, passed out in a pool of locally sourced ice cream by the end of your toddler-chasing day, you can be the kind of parent who carves alphabet blocks from reclaimed redwood. But if

Totals: $219.49 vs. $1.69

21

9. If your child is psyched about driving and gets a driver’s license (unlike mine, who is afraid of being on the road while other teens are driving and takes the bus everywhere), you, my friend, have a personal designated driver for rides home from happy hour!

Mom! I Need a Ride! Ten tidbits everyone should know about living with teenagers BY DANI BURLISON 1. It’s a fact of nature: sweet cooing, smiling and cuddly babies eventually grow up into awkward, moody, hormonal, smelly, doorslamming, screaming teenagers. Don’t take it personally. 2. You will never have enough milk (cow, soy, goat, hemp, rice, whatever) or cereal in the house to satisfy the hunger of a growing teen. Buy a goat or cow and a grain mill. 3. Some teens never grow out of their obsessions with Harry Potter. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Every parent should educate herself and know the difference between Gryffindor and Slytherin.

4. If your teenager is female, you will spend a few hundred dollars a year on menstrual products, PMS tea, rom-com rentals, chocolate, gynecological visits and stain removers. You’ll also be able to prove the theory of women’s cycles syncing up. For roughly one week each month, your home will transform into a modern-day Red Tent situation, sans actual tent and bloody stacks of hay.

annual goddessy ceremonies your daughters attend at the Women’s Herbal Symposium, at some point they will attempt to pluck their own eyebrows and shave their legs without your permission. It’s not pretty.

5. Thumbs really can be sprained by too much texting. You’ll learn this when you get your kid a new cell phone “for safety reasons” in eighth grade.

7. Morning carpool is a perfect time to interject your politics into conversations about celebrities. For example, when a Chris Brown song comes on the local radio station, this is an opportunity to discuss boycotting, sexism and violence against women—and to make sure the teen boys around know you mean business.

6. No matter how many unshaven radical feminist friends you have, and no matter how many

8. As teens get older, you don’t have to wait until they’re sound asleep to watch all the steamy

10. At some point in the mid– high school years, no matter how difficult or exhausting you become from driving back and forth across town, calling to make sure no creepers abducted your child on public transportation, helping with geometry homework and college job applications, buying cereal and milk, addressing health issues, counseling the kid after a blowup with a friend and all of the other various and unpredictable challenges that come with being a teenager, you will panic. You will sit alone at your kitchen table while your kids are out at parties or movies, and you’ll think, Oh mother of pearl, how did this happen so fast? These people are almost adults and will be leaving me soon. You’ll think of how desperately you want to shrink them, to encase them in cute little boxes in order to hold on to every precious, gut-aching, nostalgic memory forever. Then you realize putting your kids in boxes is creepy and illegal, so you let them go out into the world, you learn to trust that you are a great parent, that you did everything you could to love them and guide them into the people they are. And then you’ll pour yourself a glass of wine, sit back and learn to enjoy the last few years together while you still have them.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 14–20, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

R-rated movies you rented. R-Rated Movie Night can and should become a Friday-night family tradition. The only catch: sex scenes are often used as an opportunity for your teen to badger you with questions about your own sex life. (Also, watching Girls with your teen is a great opportunity to show them just exactly what bad sex looks like.)

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22

the just-opened Taylor Mountain with my daughter, which was not a great idea; the trail gets steep and is mostly in the open sun. Annadel is a better bet, and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal to swim in Lake Ilsanjo or not so, uh, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell you to, OK? In Marin, the Tennessee Valley Trail is the best for kids, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s short and wide. Nightlife? Why not? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve brought my daughter to more than a few all-ages shows on special â&#x20AC;&#x153;stay up past your bedtimeâ&#x20AC;? nights, where sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen everyone from Stevie Wonder to Ceremony to Skrillex. (Those ubiquitous kiddie headphones are cheap.) Outdoor concerts are especially great for kids, and I go to the ones in Juilliard Park and the Cloverdale Plaza, though they happen everywhere. Movies in the Park are a ďŹ ne bet, in Windsor, San Anselmo or elsewhere, and movie theaters, of course, have a good deal on matinees. I also love buying VHS tapes for a dollar at thrift stores, like Fattyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Threads, and renting movies from my local video rental spot Video Droid. Libraries have an incredible selection of DVDs, of course, along with CDs and books, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re free to rentâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;hurrah! Childrensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reading programs abound at just about any branchâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; my local branch has been doing â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Read to a Dogâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; days, weirdly. Not to instill early-onset consumerism in your child, but window shopping can be a hell of a good time with your kid. I once spent over an hour putting illďŹ tting clothes on my daughter in the dressing rooms at Macyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and taking funny photos. She loved it. Of course, when you have a kid, you will get garbage bags full of hand-me-downs, but if you must buy clothes, Goodwill and other thrift stores have an inventory thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way more entertaining to kids than a department store in the mall. Getting familiar with your local independent boutique is key, tooâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;mine are We Three and Cupcakeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have much more personality than the big-box behemoth with the red circle logo. ) 25

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Get in Where You Fit In Finding the right kind of mommy group—or starting your own BY LEILANI CLARK

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nless they’ve been prescribed a heavy dose of Zoloft, most parents can attest to the “fetal-position” moment of new parenthood. It might happen after the first poopup-the-back diaper blowout, or the first glance at the heinous masses of grime and laundry in the house, or after the baby wakes

screaming for the seventh time in one night, baring her gums and demanding food like the little milk vampire that she is. Mark my words, it will happen; you will find yourself in the shower, or on the hallway floor, curled up and begging in desperation for one more hour of sleep, or even just a minute of freedom to cut your scraggly toenails.

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24 Fit In ( 23

FIND MY PLACE Jessica Mills pioneered Maximum RocknRoll’s first punk

parenting column..

This is where “mommy groups” groups enter the picture, because what helps us through the most challenging moments more than community? On the surface, mom groups—or parent groups—look like the perfect antidote to the confusion and exhaustion that comes with having an infant. But in reality, finding the right group can be complicated. Sarah Hamner, a 35-year-old teacher and mother of two young children, experienced this when she tried to break the ice with a group at an outdoor cafe in Petaluma. Hamner came across the moms as she stopped for her morning coffee, chatting as their kids ran around a play area. After recognizing the mother of one of her daughter’s schoolmates, Hamner, who had a fivemonth-old and a child entering kindergarten at the time, decided to introduce herself and maybe

meet some new friends. “When I greeted them and tried to make conversation, they just looked at me and gave me a weak smile and went back to their own conversation,” recalls Hamner. After several attempts, when at one point someone turned away from her without responding, she gave up. “I was, like, I’m out of here, this is the worst,” she recalls. “I just had the experience of being snubbed by other mothers of young children.” She called a friend to tell her had happened and to “affirm that I wasn’t a total loser.” I have other friends—intelligent, mature people—describe similar encounters with organized “mommy” groups—how they were reduced to feeling like the reject in the junior high lunchroom; how they felt judged, out of place and generally unwelcome. So what is it

about these groups that can bring out the worst pack mentality in parents? Or is it just about trying and trying again until you find the right community? After the birth of her first child seven years ago, Romney Garbo, who lives in Windsor and works in global procurement at Agilent Technologies, found a warm welcome at Kaiser Santa Rosa’s Mommy and Me group. At first, the weekly gathering, which is facilitated by an RN and offers a chance for new moms to ask questions about sleep, food and behavior in a “crowdsourcing” kind of setting, was an opportunity to get out of the house, says Garbo. Eventually, it became a safe space. “It was a very welcoming place,” she says. “I’ve never felt judgment or fear around topics that I want to discuss. That is so important, because there’s so much selfdoubt and fear involved in taking care of a new baby.” She’s maintained friendships from the original group and hasn’t found the need to search out any other parenting groups, other than open play dates and kindergym programs. Still, the thought of joining a pre-established group can be daunting—especially if you’ve always felt like an outsider on the block or have social anxiety. At the last mommy group I attended, I was more drawn to the two moms talking about where to find the best Moonlight Brewing Company beer than the rest of the discussions, which centered on Giants-themed birthday cakes, solid foods and children’s toys. But when it came down to it, like Sarah Hamner, I regressed to my nerdy middle-school self, skulking in the background and feeling like a weirdo, since nobody was making the effort to talk to me. But the power of community cannot be underestimated, so it’s important to try and try again to find that tribe, says Jessica Mills, author of My Mother Wears Combat Boots: A Parenting Guide for the Rest of Us. “Taking care

of a kid’s physical and emotional needs requires a lot more energy than what one or two people can possibly give,” she adds. In one chapter of her hybrid memoir/handbook, Mills, former saxophonist in Less Than Jake, Citizen Fish and former Maximum RocknRoll columnist, writes about moving when her daughter was a baby from a well-established community in Gainesville, Fla., to isolation in Miami. She searched high and low for like-minded souls. “I would go to playgrounds and try to meet people and give them my number and expect them to call me,” says Mills, whose children are now 13 and seven, with a laugh. “I’d wonder why they wouldn’t call, but nobody knew this crazy lady!” Mills started attending La Leche League meetings, where she found a community that could at least help her on her breastfeeding journey. Even that had its limits. “If you are breastfeeding and go to a La Leche League meeting, you can’t expect to have more in common with these folks except breastfeeding,” she says. “Sometimes that’s not enough commonality to build community.” Mills recommends starting your own group with people who share common values and ideology. “I think you have a better chance of having some long-term community there, rather than sticking with a group that’s already established but doesn’t feel like a perfect fit,” she explains. And Hamner agrees. She says she’s talked with friends about the whole mommy-group thing: what makes one experience successful and another awful? “The hand-selected mommy groups, where you have a couple of friends with young children, and then they know someone and you all get together—they already have something to go on,” Hamner says. “That seems like the recipe for success for these groups, while just showing for a park meet-up tends to be more uncomfortable.”

Activities ( 22

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Rohnert Park, CA. © 2013 Graton Resort & Casino

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Likewise, hit up your locally owned toy store—mine is the terrific Toy Works—where staff can field your questions and find the right gift. I made an annual tradition of going to whichever Mexican Circus came to town, though none seems to be coming this year. But the Schulz Museum in Santa Rosa is an excellent day trip, and totally interesting for adults as well. (Time your trip right and across the street at the Redwood Empire Ice Arena, kids can learn to skate with chairs on Sunday and Wednesday mornings.) The Bay Area Discovery Museum in Sausalito offers educational and fun activities for all ages, and Scientopia in Napa also sparks the imagination. Ever drag your kid to a baseball game? The Giants have the more kid-friendly stadium, with a kids’ baseball diamond, slides and a model cable car, but the A’s have a play area and batting cages, too—plus tickets get as low as $12. We always take BART there. While it’s still sunny, familiarize yourself with your local community pool. I like Ridgeway in Santa Rosa, but Finley, Mill Valley and Terra Linda are fine options, and they’re inexpensive. That can eat up a few hours right there, as can going to a childrens play at the likes of the Wells Fargo Center, the Marin Theater Co., the Marin Center or at community centers. Train Town and Safari West are standbys for a reason—they’re excellent places to while away the hours. And if you want to do adult things in Napa while bringing the kids, Sterling Vineyards has a tram ride and juice boxes at the tasting room. If you’re feeling fancy, the Napa Valley Wine Train offers a Family Date Night where kids are free (one per adult), and they’ll watch your kids in a separate car while you dine. Finally, show me a kid who doesn’t like a jumpy house and I’ll eat my hat. Pay-one-price jumpy house places include PlayLand in Sausalito and Pump It Up in Santa Rosa. Bring a book and relax for an hour or two . . . until it’s cocktail time.

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Crush CULTURE

C O TAT I

N A PA

Volpi’s Home

Opera House’s 10th

Where’s the only place in Sonoma County that rolls out the red carpet to the accordion every year? Cotati, of course! The 22nd Annual Accordion Festival makes its appearance this weekend, exciting the hearts of diehard accordion lovers and players. The featured performer is Renzo Ruggieri, Italy’s jazz accordion legend. This sunglass-wearin’ accordionist founded an acclaimed organization of music schools, has collaborated with and arranged music for dozens of artists, and tickles a mean squeezebox. The two-day fest includes many other performers (don’t miss Polkacide), dance parties and a play-along to “Lady of Spain.” Led by honorary director John Volpi, who frequently plays his accordion in the back bar at Volpi’s in Petaluma, the festival fun runs Saturday, Aug. 17, to Sunday, Aug. 18, at La Plaza Park. 60 West Cotati Ave., Cotati. $15–$23. 9:30am. 707.664.0444.

It’s been a decade since the remodel of the Napa Valley Opera House, and that means it’s time to paaaarrrrttaaayyyy! Rita Moreno, Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony winner, was the first artist to perform upstairs at the Opera House after the renovation was completed in 2003, and is now back to join in this 10th anniversary benefit concert on Saturday, Aug. 17 ($50–$100. 7pm). The fun spills into Friday, too, as master conguero Poncho Sanchez fuses jazz, soul and a variety of Latin American and South American influences for a perfect blend of styles in the heart of wine country, in one of our favorite theaters. See Sanchez perform at the Napa Valley Opera House on Friday, Aug. 16 ($35–$40. 8pm). 1030 Main St., Napa. 707.226.7372.

THE WEEK’S EVENTS: A SELECTIVE GUIDE

S A N TA R O S A

No Flat Tires It has a bike swap, a cargo race, BMX tricks, a track-stand contest, a marching band and a tractor pull. Seriously, is this not just a crazy bike festival all ’roided up? All kidding aside: the Sonoma County Bicycle Expo jams every fun thing to possibly do with a bike into a one-day event, starting with the bike swap, where riders and collectors gather to buy, sell, trade and discuss bikes and accessories from every era. Also at the expo is the track-stand contest, where a judge will record how long competitors can go on their fixed or freewheel bikes without putting a foot down. Other attractions include the crowd– pleasing flatland BMX stunts, performances by the Hubbub Club and a race of silly, practical and creative cargo bikes. All of this and more on Sunday, Aug. 18. Fifth Street between B Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. Free. 10am–4pm. 707.545.0153.

N O VAT O

Naked & New Step one: produce an EP with two naked people staring out over the San Francisco landscape. Step two: write a band bio that describes this cover picture, and throw in some strange ramblings/possible song lyrics to make it seem as if you’re in a cult and looking for followers. Step three: eh, let’s just see how that last part plays out. Such is the quirky vibe of San Francisco–based Nova Albion, and who knows whether or not one can judge this book by its cover. The indie band plays a record-release show this Friday and, since the group trucks in the same amount of mystery as a unicorn, there’s no telling what exactly the performance will have in store. Test the waters and “join them” on Friday, Aug. 16, at Hopmonk Tavern. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. $10. 9pm. 415.892.6200.

—Anna Hecht

IN THE KEY OF LIFE ‘Glee’ star Chris Colfer appears at Book Passage on Aug. 16 and Copperfield’s Books in Petalumta on Aug. 17. See Readings, p36.

ALCHEMY Ian McKellen and Patrick

Stewart in the theater event of the year.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Pinter-est All-star cast in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;No Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Landâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY DAVID TEMPLETON

A

bsurdist playwright Harold Pinter enjoyed putting his characters into situations where at least one of them has no idea whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on. That same sense of uncertainty and confusion is often experienced by Pinterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s audiences, who, like the character of Spooner in 1975â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Land, must give up whatever expectations they had upon entering the room and simply ďŹ nd a way to go with the ďŹ&#x201A;ow and enjoy the mystery of it all.

Pinter, who died in 2008, would no doubt enjoy the added dimension of absurdity in the new production of No Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Land, running through Aug. 31 at Berkeley Repertory Theatre before moving to New York City for a run

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;No Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Landâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday through August 31 at Berkeley Repertory Theatre. 2015 Addison St., Berkeley. Times vary. Sold-out. 510.647.2949.

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FZW4Sj3dWS e4[YYWef Technology conference + Music Festival 70+ Acts | 12+ Venues | 4 days | 1 wristband

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conference Topics Include: Gi\cf_Â&#x;Mi]c[fÂ&#x;;oag_hn_^L_[fcns Q_[l[\f_=igjon_lmÂ&#x;Nl[hmg_^c[Â&#x;;C;jjm Mb[lcha?]ihigsÂ&#x;>cmlojncih Mi]c[fNl[hmjiln[ncihÂ&#x; Gil_ Speakers Include: Li\_lnM]i\f_Â&#x;D_``Mnc\_fÂ&#x;Hif[h<ombh_ff =blcm;h^_lmihÂ&#x;Mn_p_Eclm]bÂ&#x;[h^g[hsinb_lm San Jose McEnery Convention Center

Tickets Now on Sale @ c2sv.com/tickets

SEPT 26-29, 2013

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Stage

on Broadway. The production features a quartet of ďŹ ne actors known across the globe for their appearances on television and in blockbuster movies: Ian McKellen (The Lord of the Rings, X-Men), Patrick Stewart (Star Trek: The Next Generation, X-Men), Billy Crudup (The Watchmen) and Shuler Hensley (Van Helsing). Though accomplished stage actors all, the enormous celebrity of the No Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Land cast will certainly attract unsuspecting ticket buyers unfamiliar with Pinter, sure to be baffled by the playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plotless nonspeciďŹ cs and forced to ďŹ nd satisfaction where they can. They will ďŹ nd it, of course, in the brilliantly sly, comically rich performances of the actors, especially Stewart and McKellen. But if they also surrender themselves to the jam-thick joys of Pinterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ&#x201A;avorful language and the thrills of the playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where-arewe-going elusiveness, ďŹ rst-timers might also ďŹ nd themselves having a great time with the play itself. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;actionâ&#x20AC;? takes place in a large room at the opulent English manor of the wealthy alcoholic Hirst (Stewart), where a somewhat shabby stranger named Spooner (McKellen) has been invited for a late-night drinkâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a few too many drinks, it turns out. As Hirst sits in a stupor, Spooner spins a self-aggrandizing tale that stretches credibility but demonstrates his elastic gift for eccentric oratory. Eventually, Briggs (Hensley) and Foster (Crudup)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Hirstâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thuggish aidesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;enter the picture, immediately wary of Spooner, whom they suspect of . . . itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never clear what. Spoonerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to improvise explanations soon comes in handy, as Hirst, once sobered up, proves to be equally deft at spinning outrageous talesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;though in his case, he actually appears to believe his own delusions. Staged with humor and stylized dread by Sean Mathias, No Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Land is pure Pinter Land, maddeningly short on answers, but packed with entertaining, pleasantly intangible questions. Rating (out of 5): +++++

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 14-20, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Ŵź

1030 Main Street in downtown Napa Tickets & Information

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NVOH.ORG

707.226.7372

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From I Do to I Still Do

PONCHO SANCHEZ Fri, Aug 16, 8 PM

Gritty soul music, infectious rhythms from Latin & South America

RITA MOREANO

Sat, Aug 17, 7 PM

A 10TH Anniversary NVOH Benefit Performance

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HISTORY OF THE AMERICA’S CUP Thu, Aug 22, 6 PM

FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF Fri, Aug 23, 7 PM

TOMMY CASTRO Sat, Aug 24, 8 PM

BABY! Behold, Christians who even dismiss the music of Amy Grant.

Parental Advisory My favorite Christian music book BY GABE MELINE

I

f you must know, my four-year-old’s favorite song is “Beez in the Trap” by Nicki Minaj, which is full of the sexes and the swears and the filthy rapping. I personally do not mind. So, naturally, I love to mock the hell out of Chart Watch, a pop music guidebook for parents published in 1998 by extremist Christian group Focus on the Family, found at a thrift store long ago and pulled out for a good several tipsy guffaws while hosting friends and remembering the Tipper Gore era.

Chart Watch is a 350-page paperback guide to over 400 popular albums from the 1990s, examined through an ultraconservative lens and rated

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 14–20, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

entirely on how strictly the music’s content aligns with Focus on the Family’s anti-abortion, anti– premarital sex, creationist, alcoholfree, homophobic beliefs. Meant to assist Christian parents in monitoring their teens’ musical choices, it is an absolute motherlode of unintentional hilarity, especially when you imagine the religious authors listening to songs like King Missile’s “Detachable Penis” and ingesting lyric after lyric of, as copiously quoted in the book, “F---,” “S---” and “B-----s.” It’s no surprise the book takes the most umbrage at rap albums. On Snoop Dogg’s Doggystyle: “This Dogg has fleas, but no one seems to care . . . avoid this trash at all costs.” On Silkk the Shocker’s Charge It 2 Da Game: “Obscenitystrewn trash from start to finish. Drugs. Misogyny. Murder. Sexual perversion.” On Mase’s Harlem World: “There’s nothing artistic about obnoxious bragging, anonymous sex, murderous gunplay, or being able to rhyme things with the f-word.” But it’s not just rappers; Chart Watch even takes aim at conservative bastions of white America like Garth Brooks (“lyrically inconsistent . . . skip the disc”), Celine Dion (“references to sex outside of marriage”) and Shania Twain (“sexual ethics lack clarity”). Incredibly, the book’s authors express disappointment even in Christian artists Amy Grant (“longing for intimacy”) and Jars of Clay (“teens expecting edifying answers . . . will need to seek elsewhere”). You might think reason would be found turning to the entry for Kenny G. Alas, you underestimate the absurdity of Focus on the Family. “‘Two lovers . . . will be together in the morning,’ without explaining whether or not they’re married,” it condemns. Seriously. Kenny G. Chart Watch is out of print, but with a ’90s revival in full swing, it’s a perfect gag gift. Beck, Sublime, Aqua, Spice Girls, Aaliyah, Butthole Surfers—they’re all in here. You can find copies online for about three bucks, and the best part is that it’s a remaindered title, so no money goes to Focus on the Family. Because F--- those B-----s.

88/16 /16 – 88/22 / 22

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5 51 S 551 Summerfield ummer field Road Road Santa S an t a R Rosa osa 707.522.0719 707. 522 .0719

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A NON-PROFIT EVENT BENEFITTING LOCAL YOUTH GROUPS

Music

$%

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Alkaholiks

28 Acts 4 stages

A Non-Stop, Multicultural Extravaganza at La Plaza Park ~ Cotati

L

KIDS 15 AND UNDER

FREE

Brandi Carlile

 #) L#*  

Old-school hip-hop show also featuring Cali Agents and Casual. Aug 18, 9:30pm. $12$20. Society: Culture House, 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.



9:30 AM TO 8:00 PM - BOTH DAYS

Young songwriter blends rock, folk, bluegrass and soul. Aug 18, 8pm. $39-$49. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Cotati Accordion Fest

Viva Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Italia! World-Class Italian Accordionists Renzo Ruggieri, Frank Petrilli, Vincenzo Abbracciante Cory Pesaturo, Gail Campanella and a host of multi-cultural acts:

Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic MotorDude Zydeco, Jazz Great Those Darn Accordions, Andre Thierry Renzo Ruggeri & Zydeco Magic The Wild Catahoulas, The Mad Maggies, Polkacide, The Golden State Accordion Club Band, The Steve Balich Sr. Polka Band, The Hot Frittatas, Simka, The Internationals, Chuck Berger, Jim Gilman, Sweet Moments of Confusion, Jet Black Pearl, Tango No. 9, Youkali, Future Accordion Stars, Bella Ciao, Cajun / Zydeco Duckmandu, Les Amis Zydeco, Dance Parties La Familia PĂŠna-Govea, 12:00 to 5:00 pm The Great Morgani and Friar Tuckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pub 5:05 to 6:30 in the park Sat. SO MUCH MORE!

(707) 664-0444

Musical acts include Renzo Ruggieri, Andre Thierry & Zydeco Magic, Those Darn Accordions, the Mad Maggies, Motor Dude Zydeco and many others. Aug 17-18, 9:30am8:30pm. $15-$25. La Plaza Park, Old Redwood Highway, Cotati.

Dave Koz & friends Saxophonist appears with Mindi Abair, Gerald Albright and Richard Elliot. Aug 17, 5pm. $60-$90. Rodney Strong Vineyards, 11455 Old Redwood Hwy, Healdsburg. 707.431.1533.

Friday Night Live Aug 16, RonKatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Katdelic. 5:30pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Gypsy Soul, Saffell Aug 15. $15-$20. Aubergine, 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Jazz It Up Concert Series Aug 17, Chris Amberger & His Hot Dogs. Free. Seasons of the Vineyard, 113 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2222.

Patti LaBelle Soul diva is in the Grammy Hall of Fame. Aug 16, 8pm. $79$119. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Eric McFadden Guitar virtuoso has toured with the president of funk, George Clinton. Aug 17, 9pm. $15. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jonathan Richman Songwriter plays a three-set evening. Aug 16, 8pm. $13. Hopmonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

RockNapa Blood, Sweat & Tears headlines Friday, supported by Xceptional Woodstock Group, Natisha Lyne, Robert Foley Band and Eve Selis Band. Aug 15-16, 4:30pm. $39-$325. Charles Krug, 2800 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.3993.

MARIN COUNTY

Funky Fridays

Maria Muldaur with the Campbell Brothers

Aug 16, Twang Ditty. 6:30pm. $10. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

Legendary blues singer teams up with sacred steel gospel group. Aug 16, 8pm. $28-$50. 142 Throckmorton Theatre,

142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Zulu Spear Popular Bay Area world music band from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s is back. Singer Gideon Bendile performed on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Circle of Lifeâ&#x20AC;? from the movie â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lion King.â&#x20AC;? Aug 18, 4pm. $20. Rancho Nicasio, Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

NAPA COUNTY Los Lonely Boys Acoustic show, rescheduled from March 8. Tickets from canceled show honored. Sarah Gwen opens. Aug 14, 8pm. $45$55. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Rita Moreno Most recognized as Anita in â&#x20AC;&#x153;West Side Story,â&#x20AC;? she is one of the few artists to EGOT (winning Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony awards). Aug 17, 7pm. $50. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Poncho Sanchez Latin conguero Poncho Sanchez stirs up a fiery stew of jazz and soul with infectious melodies and rhythms. Aug 16, 8pm. $35. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Aug 16, Junkyard. Aug 17, Dead Cat Hat. Aug 18, Jazz Linez. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

www.cotatifest.com

$15 ONE-DAY IN ADVANCE, $17 AT GATE OR $25 TWO-DAYS PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE ONLINE OR AT: CALL 888-559-2576 Ä?Ć&#x2039;((Ć&#x2039;$.!!Ć&#x2039;(%2!.Ä&#x161;/Ć&#x2039;.'!0Ć&#x2039; +0%+*/ Ä?Ć&#x2039;$!Ć&#x2039; /0Ć&#x2039;!+. Ć&#x2039;0+.!Ć&#x2039;%*Ć&#x2039;*0Ć&#x2039;+/Ć&#x2039;Ä?Ć&#x2039;!+,(!Ä&#x161;/Ć&#x2039;1/%Ć&#x2039;%*Ć&#x2039;!/0+,+( Volker Financial  6 6   & Insurance Services

BOTTOMS UP The Alkaholiks play Society: Culture House on Aug. 18. See above.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

31

Aug 17, KYMA, Sub Liquid, Smash & Grab. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Belly

2 24 V 224 VINTAGE INTAG E W WAY AY NOVATO N OVA ATO | 415.892.6200 415 . 8 9 2 . 6 2 0 0

WEDNESDAYS WE DNESDAYS / VA VARIETY RIE T Y | GENERAL GENER AL

Aug 17, Choppin’ Broccoli. 523 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.5787.

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT N I G HT

WITH W ITH D DENNIS ENNIS HA HANEDA NEDA FFREE/DOORS REE/ DOORS 7:30PM/ALL 7: 30PM /ALL AGES AGES

Cinnabar Theater

FRI F RI A AUG UG 1 16 6 / IINDIE NDIE | P POP OP | R ROCK O CK

Aug 14, Men of Worth. 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

NOVA N OVA ALB ALBION ION ((ALBUM ALBU M R RELEASE E LE A S E E EVENT) VE NT)

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Dhyana Center Lofts Aug 20, Jaya Lakshmi. 186 N Main St, Sebastopol. 800.796.6863.

SAT S AT A AUG UG 17 17 / IINDIE NDIE | R ROCK OCK | BLUES BLUES

BLUESHIFT BL UESHIFT

$$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

FRI F RI A AUG UG 23 23 / COUNTRY COUNTRY | R ROCK O CK BUCK B UCK NICKLES NICKLES AND AND LO LOOSE OSE CHANGE C HANGE A AND ND T THIRD HIRD RAIL RAIL

Coming Around Again

Heritage Public House

Zulu Spear reunite with original members and new songs

Aug 14, DJ Shotnez, Dub Gabriel, Dr Israel. Aug 16, Jonathan Richman. Aug 17, Eric McFadden. Aug 19, DJ Jacques & Guac. Aug 21, the OriginalZ. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

FRI F RI A AUG UG 30 30 / BBLUES LUES | R A AND ND B | R ROCK O CK

Hotel Healdsburg

WWW.HOPMONK.COM W WW.HOPMONK.COM

Zulu Spear, forerunners of the 1980s world music explosion, are back after a long hiatus. The band’s African rhythms combined with Western pop instrumentation like saxophone and chorused-out electric guitar—though not as mainstream as it once was (Paul Simon’s Graceland was probably the genre’s height in this country)— is still great, feel-good dance music. This is not just an homage to Africa or world music. It’s the real thing. Singer Gideon Bendile is also known as the iconic voice in the beginning of The Lion King, and at a show last year at Guerneville’s River Theater, three dancers donned African garb and had coordinated moves. It’s not just a couple members taking the name on the road, either. Six original members (dancers, singers and players) have been playing a handful of Bay Area gigs since last year, spurred by the inclusion of unreleased Zulu Spear tracks on a Bendile solo album in 2009. Here’s hoping for some new tunes from the entire group. Zulu Spear play with opener Freddy Clarke at Rancho Nicasio on Sunday, Aug. 18. Town Square, Nicasio. 4pm. $20. 415.662.2219.—Nicolas Grizzle

Aug 17, Eric & Erica. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol

Aug 17, Chris Amberger Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Aug 14, Nikos Eliot, Heather Marie Van Cleave, Andrew

Maurer. Aug 17, Z-man, Al Lover, Luke Sick & Brycon, Mr Element, Cramske.

SAT S AT A AUG UG 24 / GYPSY GYPSY SWING SWIN G

BESO BE SO N NEGRO EGRO $$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

COMMANDER C OMMANDER CODY CODY (EXCLUSIVE BAY (EXCLUSIVE BAY AREA AREA SHOW) S H OW ) $$25/DOORS 25/ DOORS 7:30PM/21+ 7: 30PM /21+

SAT S AT A AUG UG 31 31 / JAM JAM | B BLUES LUES | R ROCK O CK

FREESTONE F REESTONE PEACHES PEACHES (A T (A TRIBUTE RIBUTE TO TO DUANE DUANE ALLMAN) A L L M A N) $$10/DOORS 10 / DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

Book your Book yo u r n next e x t eevent vent with with us, us, up up to to 150 1 50 p people, eople, kim@hopmonk.com kim@hopmonk .com

Lagunitas Tap Room Aug 14, Gypsy Trio. Aug 15, Sara Petite. Aug 16, JimBo Trout. Aug 17, Americano Social Club. Aug 18, the Parmesans. Aug 21, Misner & Smith. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Aug 14, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Aug 16, Bruce Halbohm. Aug 18, Jess Petty. Aug 15 and , Aug 18, Susan Sutton. Aug 19, Gypsy Cafe. Aug 20, Maple Profant. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501. Aug 16, Lucky Ned Pepper. Aug 17, Wonderbread 5. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Aug 15, Elaine Dempsey. Aug 16, Timothy O’Neill Band. Aug 17, Perfect Crime. Aug 18, David Aguilar & Peter McCauley. Wed, trivia night. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660. Aug 16, Reckless Kelly, Mikey & the Motorcars, Wade Brown. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121. )

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 14â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 20, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

32 Monday ~ Open Mic Night Wed, Aug 14 10:15amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:45pm 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

Thur, Aug 15 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm CIRCLES Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SQUARES Square Dance Club Fri, Aug 16 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10:30pm North Bay Country Dance Society/ Contra Dance Sat, Aug 17 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise Sun, Aug 18 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING Mon, Aug 19 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am;5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Aug 20 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pmâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG$XJĂŁSP

Steep Ravine

with Feed

Me Jack

7KXU$XJĂŁSP with Bobby Jo Valentine )UL$XJĂŁSP

Luce

Wonder Bread 5 6DW$XJĂŁDP

Live Music Brunch

Occidental Center for the Arts

Sleeping Lady

Aug 16, Nova Albion. Aug 17, BlueShift. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Phoenix Theater

Osteria Divino

Aug 16, Sol Horizon, Kingsborough, DJ Broken Record, Inner Riddim, Midnight 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Aug 14, Jonathan Poretz. Aug 16, Grant Levin Trio. Aug 17, Ken Cook Trio. Aug 18, Marcelo Puig & Seth Asarnow. Aug 20, Michael Fecskes. Aug 21, Piro Patton & Ken Cook. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Aug 15, Steve Wolf & Teja Bell. Aug 16, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Aug 17, Sean Hannan: A Life of Song. Aug 20, the Honeybelles. Aug 21, Angeline Sarisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Gypsy Jazz Trio. 23 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.485.1182.

Quincyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

6DW$XJĂŁSP

Society: Culture House

Jeff Pehrson of Furthur CD Release Party

with Josh

McIntosh Three

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Live Music Sunday Brunch FREE SHOW with Matt Eakle Band 6XQ$XJĂŁSP MS Fundraiser & Concert featuring

The Ring & Ellie Condello

Aug 17, James Moseley Band. Aug 18, Mazacote. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Hopmonk Novato

The Fall Risk featuring

FREE SHOW with

Aug 16, Super Huey. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Aug 17, the Zins. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Aug 16, Waxwyng. Aug 17, Oranguhtango. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

The Heartache Sisters

Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nightclub

Aug 14, Sonny Lowe. Aug 18, Alkaholiks, Kali Agents, Casual. Aug 21, the Wilson-Hukill Blues Review. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Sun, Church on Sundays. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Sprengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tap Room

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

0RQ$XJĂŁSP Emily Elbert CD Release Party with Rushad Eggleston & special guest Sam Barry

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave Mill Valley

The Sunflower Center

CafĂŠ 415.388.1700 | Box Office 415.388.3850

Aug 14, Ashley Raines & the New West Revue. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Aug 16, Terry Savastano. Aug 17, the Hax. 446 B St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8277.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Aug 14, Dale Polissar Trio. Aug 15, Deborah Winters. Aug 20, Swing Fever. Aug 21, Harley White Sr. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Sweetwater Music Hall Aug 14, Steep Ravine. Aug 15, Luce. Aug 16, Wonder Bread 5. Aug 17, the Fall Risk. Aug 18, the Ring, Ellie Condello. Aug 19, Emily Elbert. Aug 21, Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers. Mon, Open Mic. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Periâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Silver Dollar Aug 14, Dr Mojo. Aug 16, Droptones. Aug 17, Chrome Johnson. Aug 18, La Mandanga. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio Aug 16, Dore Coller & Bermuda Grass. Aug 17, Annie Sampson. Aug 18, Zulu Spear. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse Aug 15, Gerald Beckett Quartet. Aug 16, Billy Love Express.

NAPA COUNTY Lincoln Theater Aug 16, Larry Vuckovich. Aug 20, Orchestra Institute Napa Valley. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Siloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug 16, the Dean-o-holics. Aug 17, Cosmos Percussion Orchestra. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Tradewinds

TAP ROOM

& Beer Sanctuary Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGETâ&#x20AC;ŚWE SERVE FOOD, TOO!

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Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

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7

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Aug 14, the Antiquaters. Aug 16, Steve Sutherby Band. Aug 21, Cougar & the Cubs. Mon, Donny Maderosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Open Mic. Thurs, DJ Dave. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Windsor Library Aug 17, Old Redwood Highway. 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. 707.838.1020.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Aug 16, Maria Muldaur with the Campbell Brothers. Aug 19, Fath Chamber Players. Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Palace Aug 15, 7:15pm, Calming Energy Drum Circle. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

San Franciscoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Guide

The Cookers Hard bop supergroup features Billy Harper, Eddie Henderson, Billy Hart and others. Aug 14-15 at Yoshiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oakland.

Best Coast If Nirvana had learned to surf and featured a female lead singer, this would be it. Aug 15 at the Fillmore.

James Murphy The meticulous music guru and former leader of LCD Soundsystem spins a DJ set. Aug 15 at Public Works.

Polyphonic Spree Blips, beeps and songs that are deep and free. Aug 18 at Amoeba Records SF.

QueensrĂżche Progressive metal at its most excellent. Aug 19 at the Independent.

Fenix Aug 15, Soul Power. Aug 16, Miles Schon. Aug 17, Gypsy Soul. Aug 18, Craig Corona. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Galleries RECEPTIONS Aug 15 6pm lecture. Hammerfriar Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Regenesis,â&#x20AC;? art, science and technology projects by Robert Michael Smith. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Aug 17-Oct 12, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art Delicious,â&#x20AC;? work by artists from Becoming Independent and Studios on A. Reception, Aug 17, 5pm. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery 300 Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pieces,â&#x20AC;? art by Cat Kaufman and Mary Vaughan. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Aug 17

Hammerfriar Gallery

5pm. Gallery of Sea & Heaven, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art Delicious,â&#x20AC;? work by artists from Becoming Independent and Studios on A. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.9123.

Aug 15-24, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Regenesis,â&#x20AC;? art, science and technology projects by Robert Michael Smith. Lecture, Aug 15, 6pm. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

6pm. MINE Art Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unframed Freedom,â&#x20AC;? works by Bob Stang and Sunila Bajracharya. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

John Denning Studio

6pm, Grand Hand Gallery, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Presence,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Michele de la Menardiere and sculptures by John Petrey. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Selection,â&#x20AC;? new selection of works by gallery artists as well as vintage art. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art of the Line,â&#x20AC;? describing Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. Through Oct 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barking Up the Family Tree,â&#x20AC;? featuring comic strips with Snoopyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s siblings. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Gallery One Through Aug 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scapes, Scapes & Scapes,â&#x20AC;? handcolored photos by Laura Culver and oil scapes by Robin Burgert. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Through Aug 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Horse Play,â&#x20AC;? paintings and mixed media by John Denning. 23570 #D Arnold Dr, Sonoma.

Occidental Center for the Arts Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Light and Shadow,â&#x20AC;? original art. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Historical Museum & Library Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Changing Courses,â&#x20AC;? the history and future of the Petaluma river. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

RiskPress Gallery Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Reverse Image,â&#x20AC;? printmakers show their process. Closing reception, Aug 25, 4pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Sep 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Juried Fine Art Show,â&#x20AC;? works from North Bay residents. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Sep 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monoprints,â&#x20AC;? pieces by Harry Frank. Through Sep 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not Just Landscapes,â&#x20AC;? scenery in any style, from cityscapes to nature views. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

(FU/PUJDFE  .BOZ*UFNT  4BMF3BDL

Sonoma County Museum

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

DIN N E R & A SHOW

DORE COLLER & BERMUDA GRASS Aug 16 Americana, Bluegrass, Reggae lease Fri

Through Aug 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Margins to Mainstream,â&#x20AC;? seven contemporary artists with disabilities. Through Aug 18, Rodger Warnecke, Oakland artist, displays paintings after a 25-year hiatus from art. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

CD Rerty! Pa

8:00 / No Cover

Sat

Aug 17

ANNIE SAMPSON BAND

US PLU

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Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Soulful Blues 8:30 Fri

Aug 23 -PWFS¤T1MBZUIJOHTÂ&#x2026;4FOTVBM-JOHFSJFÂ&#x2026;(JGU$FSUJGJDBUFTÂ&#x2026;+FXFMSZ

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

PHIL BERKOWITZ

Rancho

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Classic Blues 8:00 / No Cover Western Dance Party! Aug 24 BUCK NICKELS Sat

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AND

Original Songs, Great Harmonies 8:30

Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Akin,â&#x20AC;? pieces by photographer Nicole Katano and painter Marc Katano. Artist talk, Aug 15, 5:30pm. Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stand by Me,â&#x20AC;? photographs by Nicole Katano of the Sonoma Valley Mentoring Alliance. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

1960s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Girl Groupâ&#x20AC;? Singing Sensations! Aug 31 THE COVERLETTES 8:30 Sat

 Sun

BBQs On The Lawn! 

Gates Open at 3:00, Music at 4:00

Aug 18 Sun

ZULU SPEAR PLUS FREDDY CLARKE

AND HAITIAN ARTIST

T-ROSEMOND

Aug 25 Beatle Q with THE S UN KIN GS Sun

Sep 1

THE SONS OF CHAMPLIN

FROBECK T MAD HANNANS FEATURING H E 2 Sep JERRY HANNAN & FRIENDS

Steele Lane Community Center

PLUS

Mon

Through Aug 15, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fantasy in Oils,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Marcia Chastain. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Upstairs Art Gallery Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exuberant Watercolors,â&#x20AC;? Patricia Barnettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s watercolor paintings. 306 Center Ave (above Levin & Co bookstore), Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 10 to 6; Fri-Sat, 10 to 9. 707.431.4214.

Wed Aug 14

Los Lonely Boys Thur Aug 15

MARIN COUNTY

A Midsummer's Night with The Monkees

Sat Aug 17

Art Works Downtown Through Sep 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back to School?!â&#x20AC;? Digital Abstracts by Suzanne Bean. Through Aug 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Transitions,â&#x20AC;? photographybased imagery from 32 Bay Area artists. Through Sep 9, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mary Macey Butler,â&#x20AC;?photographs. Through Sep 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hollywood Holograms,â&#x20AC;? contemporary, postmodern multimedia paintings by Deanna Pedroli. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

:Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;:Ä&#x17E;ÄŤtÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŹÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; ^Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ä?Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ĹŻ'ĆľÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;Í&#x2014;ĹŠÄ&#x201A;ĹśĹ?Ĺ˝tÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŹÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;   

Wed Aug 21

Chris Isaak

"Barranca #11" by Robert McChesney, 1977

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

Fri Aug 30

Lisa Marie Presley Special Guest: The Deadlies

707tcalabigallery.com

Sun Sept 1

Psychedelic Furs Special Guest: The Burning of Rome

Fri Sept 6

The Zombies plus E Tu Bruce Wed Sept 11

:Ĺ˝Ĺ&#x161;Ĺś,Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ĆŠ and the Combo Special Guest: Drew Holcomb

Fri Sept 13

tÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;^Ç&#x2021;ĹŹÄ&#x17E;Ć?

Bolinas Museum Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Birds of the Sierra Nevada,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Keith Hansen. Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celebrating 30 years,â&#x20AC;? featuring historical pieces from the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past. Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Constructed Surfaces,â&#x20AC;? color photographs by Andy Rappaport. Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Consuelo Kanaga,â&#x20AC;? pieces by the American photographer from )

34

Sun Sept 15

George Thorogood and the Destroyers Special Guest: The Iron Heart

Fri Sept 20

Michael Grimm -Grimmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fairytale Tour ^Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć?ŽŜĎątĹ?ŜŜÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĹľÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ä?Ä&#x201A;Í&#x203A;Ć?'Ĺ˝Ć&#x161;dÄ&#x201A;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;

Dr. John At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

Sat Sept 21 Special Guest: Jenny Kerr

Fri Sept 27 Billy Cobhamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spectrum 40â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;? featuring Dean Brown, Gary Husband & Ric Fierabracci

Planning an event? Contact us for rental info

1350 Third St, Napa | 707.259.0123 www.uptowntheatrenapa.com

33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 14â&#x20AC;&#x201C;20, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Arts Events

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 14– 20, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

34

‘CLOSED SYSTEM’ Work by Bob Stang joins others in ‘Unframed Freedom’ at the MINE Gallery in Fairfax. See Receptions, p33.

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( 33

the collection of Susie Tompkins Buell. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Through Aug 31, “Trends and Impressions, Your Vision–Your Way,” juried member show. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

Elsewhere Gallery

MINE Art Gallery

Through Aug 31, “WabiSabi,” a taste of Japanese culture through craft with Kai Grover. 1828 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Daily, 11 to 6. 415.526.2855.

Aug 17-Sep 29, “Unframed Freedom,” works by Bob Stang and Sunila Bajracharya. Reception, Aug 17, 6pm. 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax.

Falkirk Cultural Center

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Through Aug 17, “Splendid Objects,” new works by 19 contemporary artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Route One Through Sep 8, “Box Show,” 150 artists choose from three boxes and create a work of art. Closing party and live auction, Sep 8, 3pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin MOCA

NINKASIBREWINGCOM BREWEDINEUGENEOREGON 

Marin Society of Artists

Through Aug 25, “Out of Order,” a MarinMOCA member exhibition. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Through Aug 26, “Bay Area Women Artists,” mixed-media artwork with emphasis on exploration and abstraction. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Osher Marin JCC Through Sep 2, “Nurture,” photos and stories midlife mothers with their families, written and created by Cyma Shapiro with photos by Shana Sureck and Tracy Cianflone. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

select gallery artists in various mediums. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

Toby’s Feed Barn Through Aug 28, “Exhibition 3D,” portraits and large scale nature photographs by Art Rogers and John Kaufman. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Mon-Sat, 9 to 5; Sun, 9:30 to 4. 415.663.1223.

Two Bird Cafe Through Sep 10, “Ripped,” new works by Marcus Uzilevsky. Valley Inn, 625 San Geronimo Dr, San Geronimo. Wed-Sun, 8am to 3pm, 5:30 to 9pm. 415.488.0528.

NAPA COUNTY Blackbird of Calistoga Through Aug 31, “Vegetable Portraits,” photography by Lynn Karlin. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga.

di Rosa Artist panel discussion, Aug 14, 7pm, $10. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

Seager Gray Gallery

ECHO Gallery

Through Aug 31, “Summer Salon,” group exhibition of

Through Aug 31, “Sum Sum Summer,” art by John Casey,

Grand Hand Gallery Through Sep 29, “Presence,” paintings by Michele de la Menardiere and sculptures by John Petrey. Reception, Aug 17, 6pm. 1136 Main St, Napa.

Comedy Below the Belt Brandon Revels hosts this evening of standup comedy featuring local talent. Third Fri of every month, 9pm. $10. Jasper O’Farrell’s, 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Comedy Night Presented by Active 20-30 Club 656. Third Thurs of every month, 8:30pm. Free. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Dance

201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Peace Fair Music, arts & crafts, games, poetry and food. Aug 17, 1pm. Free. Unity Church of Santa Rosa, 4857 Old Redwood Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.542.7729.

Poetry Walk

Sonoma County Bicycle Expo

Elemental

Celebration of everything bicycle, including vendors, food, exhibits, a bike ride, racing, bike building, raffles and more. Aug 18, 10am. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fifth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

Wags, Whiskers & Wine Dinner, music and fun with animals in thius benefit for the Sonoma County Humane Society. Aug 16, 5:30pm. $175. Trentadue Winery, 19170 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.433.3104.

Presented by Axis Dance and dancers with and without disabilities. Aug 16, 7:30pm. $25-$32. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa 707.568.5381.

See the smoke-blowing wonders made before 1972 as part of the farmers market. Aug 20, 3pm. Free. Russian River Vineyards, 5700 Hwy 116, Forestville. 707.887.3344.

Speakers and workshops teach how to ferment, and a libation lounge showcases a potential final product. Aug 18, 11am. $25-$50. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Heritage Day Demonstrations, vendors, food and entertainment celebrating Chinese-American culture. Aug 17, 11:30am. Free. China Camp State Park, N San Pedro Road, San Rafael. 415.456.0766.

Field Trips Bike the Watershed Ride with Gallinas Watershed Council to China Camp. Aug 17, 10am. Free. Adrian Rosal Park, Adrian Way, Santa Venetia.

Run for the Seals Fun run through the Marin Headlands for all ages ends with a party at the center. Aug 17, 7am. $35-$45. The Marine Mammal Center, 2000 Bunker Road, Sausalito. 415.289.7341.

Museum at the Mansion Cocktail reception with interior designer and historical consultant from the mansion’s renovation. Aug 17, 5pm. $100$120. McDonald Mansion, 1015 McDonald Ave, Santa Rosa.

Passion for Pain: Live Pro Wrestling Live music by Venat and Rubber Duckee. Aug 17, 5:30pm. $10. Phoenix Theater,

Burning Man Reckless, provocative and moving story of a father and son’s journey back to happiness. Aug 17, 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Wine Star Classic Car Show

Farm to Fermentation Festival

Documentary film reveals that dyslexia is a neurological issue, not a character flaw. Aug 20, 7pm. $6-$10. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Poet Michael Sheffield leads a hike and poetry workshop. Aug 17, 9:30am. $5. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

Inspire!

Events

The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia

Film Arlene Francis: That Certain Something Documentary on the life and legacy of Arlene Francis. Live music by Bordeaux Blues. Aug 15, 8pm. $10. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Three individuals are united by their deep connection with nature. Q&A with Director Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee after the film. Aug 16, 7pm. $10. Fairfax Women’s Center, 46 Park Rd, Fairfax.

Film Night Aug 16, “Singletrack High”; A ug 17, “The Avengers.” Fri-Sat, 8pm. through Aug 17. Free. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

Hava Nagila Documentary about the traditional Jewish song and its cross-cultural connections. Aug 14-15, 4:30 and 6:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan Documentary about the visual effects pioneer who worked on “Jason & the Argonauts,” and other films. Introduction by Oscar-winning friends Dennis Muren (Aug 18) and Craig Barron (Aug 25). Sun, 7pm. through Aug 25. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

A Steinway Soiree Showing of short silent film “How to Build a Steinway in 8 Minutes” and full-length documentary “Pianomania.” Aug 16, 7:30pm. $10. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Food & Drink Cigar Dinner Four-course meal paired with whiskey, started and finished with a fine cigar. Aug 16, 6pm. $85. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260. )

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Grape to Glass A BBQ dinner paired with wine celebrating the Russian River Valley. Aug 17, 4pm. $85. Richard’s Grove and Saralee’s Vineyard, 3575 Slusser Rd, Windsor.

August 17

Harvest of the Heart Ceres Community Garden serves a family-style dinner. Aug 17, 5pm. $150. O’Reilly & Associates, 1005 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. 707.827.7190.

Bill Champlin with Special Friends 2 time Grammy Award Winner Tickets $50

Jewish Food Fest Jewish comfort food, music all day, kid’s activities and a Jewish fortune teller. Aug 18, 10am. $5. Congregation Shomrei Torah, 2600 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.5519.

Information and Tickets: shop.sonomacutrer.com 707.237.3489 $PODFSUTTUBSUBUQNt5FSSBDFPQFOTBUQN

Sip, Savor & Celebrate Food, wine and an “instant wine cellar” raffle in this fundraiser for the Healdsburg Museum. Aug 18, 2pm. $45. Sbragia Family Vineyards, 9990 Dry Creek Rd., Geyserville. 707.473.2992.

Soba Noodle Workshop Learn how to make Japanese noodles from scratch. Aug 17, 3pm. $85. SHED, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

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Animal Tracking & Bird Language Jim Sullivan leads a workshop involving plenty of field work. Aug 17, 9am. $35. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

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Historian Ann Wiklund traces the introduction of abstract painting to the American audience. Tues, Aug 20, 2pm. $55. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

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Author of “Wired Style” focuses on prose in writing. Presented by Writer’s Forum of Petaluma. Aug 15, 7pm. $15. Petaluma Community Center, 320 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma.

DiDi Jewelry Project Laurel Gunnarson talks about her project to teach women in India to make jewelery. Aug 16, 5pm. Free. Kindred, 605 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1459.

Fun with Dick & Bob Variety music and talk show hosted by Dick Bright and Bob Sarlatte. Aug 15, 8pm. $20-$35. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Aug 16, 6:30pm, YA Pizza Party with Stacey Jay and Corina Vacco. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Life & Death at 20,000 Feet

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

B17 bomber pilot and wilderness author Phil Arnot shares his life story. Aug 17, 2pm. Free. Valley Orchards Retirement Community, 2100 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.778.6030.

Aug 17, noon, “The Land of Stories: The Enchantress Returns” with Chris Colfer. Aug 18, 4pm, “Smarty Marty’s Got Game” with Amy Guitierrez. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Rabbi Lynn Gottlieb

Corte Madera Library

Presentation titled “Stories of Nonviolent Civilian Resistance, Solidarity and Hope in Palestine and Israel.” Aug 18, 3pm. $10. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Aug 15, 7pm, Marin Poetry Center’s Summer Traveling Show. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera 707.924.6444.

Science Buzz Cafe Aug 20, “Cellular Science & the Imagination” with Sondra Barrett, PhD. 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Town Hall Meeting Supervisor Mike McGuire listens to constituents’ concerns. Aug 19, 6:30pm. Free. Windsor Council Chambers, 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Bldg 400, Windsor.

Walking Tour of Prince Memorial Greenway Local historian Bill Montgomery discusses the history of the Greenway Project. Aug 14, 7pm. $10. Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, Santa Rosa Avenue at Sonoma Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.524.5445.

Readings Book Passage Aug 14, 1pm, “The Light Between Oceans” with ML Stedman. Aug 14, 7pm, “Heirs and Graces” with Rhys Bowen. Aug 15, 7pm, “Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson” with Jeff Guinn. Aug 16, 6:30pm, “The Land of Stories: The Enchantress Returns” with Chris Colfer. Aug 17, 1pm, “The Five Levels of Attachment: Toltec Wisdom for the Modern World” with Don Miguel Ruiz Jr. $50. Aug 17, 4pm, “True North” with Tom North. Aug 17, 7pm, “Wandering in Paris” with Linda Watanabe McFerrin and Joanna Biggar. Aug 19, 7pm, “Stay, Illusion!: The Hamlet Doctrine” with Simon Critchley. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Dance Palace Aug 20, 7pm, “Raising Dough: Financing Socially Responsible Businesses” with Elizabeth Ü. Fifth and B streets, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1075.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Thurs, Aug 15, 7pm, Women Writers Series. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley 415.388.4331.

Point Reyes Books Aug 15, 7pm, “Mother Daughter Me” with Katie Hafner. Third Tuesday of every month, 7pm, women’s book group. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1542.

Theater All’s Well That Ends Well Marin Shakespeare Company presents the Bard’s romantic comedy. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sun through Sep 28. $20-$38. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

Blithe Spirit A medium summons a man’s first wife who does her best to disrupt his current marriage in this Noel Coward comedy. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Aug 25. $18. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Broadway Under the Stars Professional stage actors from New York and Los Angeles perform pieces from Broadway favorites. Aug 15-17, “Dancing Through Life”; Aug 30-31, “Gala Celebration.” Thurs-Sat, 5pm. through Aug 17. $29-$117. Jack

CRITICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOICE

The Dining Room Six performers delineate the dying lifestyle of wealthy WASPdom and the now neglected room which was once a vital center of family life. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 3pm. through Aug 31. $12-$15. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

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The Dixie Swim Club

Cell by Cell

Creator of human tissue sculpture shows work Robert Michael Smith is the ďŹ rst artist to create a sculpture with living human tissue, and in a lecture this weekend in Healdsburg, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell you all about it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing now is just beyond,â&#x20AC;? says Hammerfriar Gallery owner Jill Plamann. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s absolute science ďŹ ction, its incredible.â&#x20AC;? In his art, Smith uses the same technology used to regrow human tissue for organ transplants, creating his own artistic molds with a 3D printer in which the tissue grows. (Smith was an early adopter of 3D printing about 15 years ago.) His sculptures are mostly made with machines from his own CAD designs, including Paradise Bird Burlesque. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I recognized early on that it was a favorite,â&#x20AC;? he says. A six-foot version of the piece carved from stone sits in the National Art Museum in China. A smaller, plastic version is on display at Hammerfriar, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let the size fool youâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still a stunning visual display. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Regenesisâ&#x20AC;? by Robert Michael Smith is on display Aug. 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;24 at Hammerfriar Gallery, with a lecture by Smith Saturday, Aug. 15 at 6pm. 132 Mill St., Healdsburg. 707.473.9600. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Nicolas Grizzle

London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

The Cat in the Hat The story of a mischievous cat and his bottomless headpiece presented by Bay Area Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Theatre. Sat-Sun,

10:30am and 12:30pm. through Aug 18. $15-$20. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

A Comedy of Errors Marin Shakespeare Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presentation of the Bardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classic with a Texas twist. Fri-

Sassy comedy about friendships between women that last a lifetime. Presented by Ross Valley Players. Thurs, 7:30pm, Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Aug 18. $22-$26. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Rent (School Edition) Story about falling in love under the shadow of HIV and AIDS adapted for a younger audience. Fri-Sat, 7:30pm and Sat-Sun, 2pm. through Aug 18. $10-$15. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

The Soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tale Igor Stravinskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s post-WWI story of a young soldier, his violin and his deal with the devil in a fully staged production of the Faustian legend. Aug 15, 7:30pm. $55. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

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The Tempest Prospero, the rightful Duke of Milan, plots to restore his daughter Miranda to her rightful place using illusion and skillful manipulation in this Shakespeare play. Thurs-Sun, 7pm. through Aug 25. $7-$20. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

The Waiting Period Brian Copelandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one-man show takes a comical look at his personal struggle with depression. Aug 15, 8pm. $35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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General Notices North Bay Herpetological Society's REPTILE EXPO Variety of vendors and exhibitors offering hundreds of snakes, lizards, geckos, turtles, tortoises, tarantulas, scorpions, supplies, jewelry, and more. Not for the squeamish. Aug. 24, 10 to 5. Petaluma Community Center, 320 North McDowell Blvd.,

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William Turner was a 19th-century English landscape painter born under the sign of Taurus. His aim was not to capture scenes in realistic detail but rather to convey the emotional impact they made on him. He testiďŹ ed that on one occasion he had himself tied to the mast of a ship during a snowstorm so that he could experience its full effects ďŹ rsthand. The result was Snow Stormâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;SteamBoat off a Harborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mouth, a painting composed mostly of tempestuous swirls. What would be the equivalent for you, Taurus? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to think of a way you could be perfectly safe as you treated yourself to an up-close encounter with elemental energies.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) Some years back, the Greek government launched a huge anti-smoking campaign. In response, cigarette sales spiked dramatically. When my daughter was six years old, I initiated a crusade to ban Barbie dolls from our home forever. Soon she was ripping out pictures of the accursed anti-feminist icon from toy catalogues and leaving them on my desk. With these events in mind, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m feeling cautious about trying to talk you into formulating a ďŹ ve-year master plan. Maybe instead I should encourage you to think small and obsess on transitory wishes. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22)

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BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of August 14

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19) Normally, International CAPS LOCK DAY happens only once a year, on June 28. But in alignment with your current astrological omens, you have been granted the right to observe the next seven days as your own personal International CAPS LOCK DAYS. That means you will probably be forgiven and tolerated if you use OVERHEATED ORATORY and leap to THUNDEROUS CONCLUSIONS and engage in MELODRAMATIC GESTURES. You may even be thankedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;although itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to note that the gratitude you receive may only come later, AFTER THE DUST HAS SETTLED.

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Astrology

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wings are a constraint that makes it possible to ďŹ&#x201A;y,â&#x20AC;? the Canadian poet Robert Bringhurst reminds us. That will be a good principle for you to keep in mind during your own adventures during the coming weeks. I suspect that any liberation you are able to achieve will come as the result of intense discipline. To the degree that you cultivate the very ďŹ nest limitations, you will earn the right and the power to transcend inhibitions that have been holding you down.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) â&#x20AC;&#x153;The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on ďŹ ghting the old, but on building the new.â&#x20AC;? When I came across that quote while surďŹ ng the web, I felt that it jibed perfectly with the astrological omens that are currently in play for you. Every website I consulted agreed that the speaker of this wisdom was Socrates, but I thought the language sounded too contemporary to have been uttered by a Greek philosopher who died 2,400 years ago. After a bit of research, I found the real source: a character named Socrates in Way of the Peaceful Warrior, a New Age self-help book by Dan Millman. I hope this doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t dilute the impact of the quote for you, Leo. For now, it is crucial that you not get bogged down in quarreling and brawling. You need to devote all your energy to creating the future. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22)

Do you know that you are a host for more than 10,000 different species of microorganisms? Many of them are bacteria that perform functions essential to your health. So the stunning fact of the matter is that a large number of life forms share your body and constantly help you in ways about which you have no conscious awareness. Might there be other examples of you collecting beneďŹ ts from unknown sources? Well, do you know who is responsible for providing you with the water and electricity you use? Who sewed your clothes and made your medicine? Who built the roads and buildings you use? This is an excellent time to take inventory of all the assistance, much of it anonymous, that you are so fortunate to receive.

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22) More often than not, your ďŹ ne mind does a competent job of deďŹ ning the problems that need solving. It comes up with concise questions that lead you in the right

direction to ďŹ nd useful clues. It gathers evidence crisply and it makes smart adjustments as the situation evolves. But after studying the astrological factors currently at work, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a little concerned that your usually ďŹ ne mind might temporarily be prone to suffering from the dreaded malady known as paralysis through overanalysis. To steer yourself away from that possibility, keep checking in with your body and your feelings to see what alternate truths they may have to tell you.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21)

By the standards of people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know you well, the triumph you achieve in the coming days might seem modest. But I think it will actually be pretty dramatic. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my only concern: thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a slight danger you will get grandiose or even a bit arrogant in the aftermath of your victory. You could also get peeved at those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see it for the major achievement it is. Now that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve given you this warning, though, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping you will avoid that fate. Instead you will celebrate your win with humble grace, feeling gratitude for all the help you got long the way.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) â&#x20AC;&#x153;All my life, my heart has yearned for a thing I cannot name.â&#x20AC;? So said French writer AndrĂŠ Breton. I suspect that many of us feel the same way, which is kind of depressing. But the good news for you, Sagittarius, is that there will be times in the coming months when you will get as close to naming that mysterious thing as you have ever gotten. On more than a few occasions, you may be able to get a clear glimpse of its true nature. Now and then you might even be fully united with it. One of those moments could come soon.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) The Paris Review did a story on novelist William Gass. The interviewer asked him why he wrote his books. That was â&#x20AC;&#x153;a very dumb question,â&#x20AC;? he sneered. Nevertheless, he answered it, saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I write because I hate. A lot. Hard.â&#x20AC;? In other words, his primary motivations for expressing himself creatively were loathing, malice and hostility. I beg you not to use him as your role model, Capricorn. Not now. Not ever. But especially now. It is essential to your long-term health and wealth that you not be driven by hate in the coming weeks. Just the opposite, in fact; the more you are driven by love and generosity, the better chance you will have of launching a lucky streak that will last quite a while. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18)

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Until we have seen someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s darkness, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really know who they are,â&#x20AC;? said author Marianne Williamson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Until we have forgiven someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s darkness, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really know what love is.â&#x20AC;? Your assignment, Aquarius, is to seek out the deepest possible understanding of these truths. To do that, you will have to identify the unripe, shadowy qualities of the people who are most important to you. And then you will have to ďŹ nd it in your smart heart to love them for their unripe, shadowy qualities almost as much as you do for their shiny, beautiful qualities.

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Aldous Huxley was the renowned 20th-century intellectual who wrote the book Brave New World, a dystopian vision of the future. Later in his life he came to regret one thing: how â&#x20AC;&#x153;preposterously seriousâ&#x20AC;? he had been when he was younger. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are quicksands all about you, sucking at your feet,â&#x20AC;? he ruminated, â&#x20AC;&#x153;trying to suck you down into fear and self-pity and despair. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why you must walk so lightly. Lightly, my darling . . . Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re feeling deeply.â&#x20AC;? I would love for you to put this counsel at the top of your priority list for the next 10 months, darling Pisces. Maybe even write it out on a piece of paper and tape it to your bathroom mirror.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žŝ NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 14-20, 201 3 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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