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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Third-class postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

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Cover photo of Richard Diebenkorn at his Berkeley studio in 1958 by Fred Lyon. Cover design by Kara Brown.

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If you weren’t able to revel in the joyful craziness of SF Pride, make sure to check out our full photo gallery at bohemian.com.

Three cheers (hell, 12,000 cheers) for the end of DOMA and Proposition 8. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘To me, the best abstract painter of the time wasn’t in New York at all. His name was Richard Diebenkorn.’ COVER STORY P17 Asbestos, Death and Affordable Housing T H E PAP E R P 8

Kendall-Jackson’s Newest: Partake DI N IN G P 12

42nd Street Meets Arnold Drive STAGE P 2 1 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Media p11 Dining p12 Restaurants p13

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies Love at Last

Historical context of same-sex marriage ruling BY LEILANI CLARK

A

ll the images of people getting married at the Sonoma County Clerk’s Office on July 1—a few short days after the Supreme Court’s historic ruling in favor of gay marriage—are a joy to behold. Ecstatic couples, many with decades of relationship behind them, smile through tears, kissing and holding up the rings that make it official. The excitement brings to mind my own wedding day in 2008, when my husband and I said “I do” on a bluff in Salt Point overlooking the Pacific Ocean, surrounded by our family and friends. It stands as one of the best days of my life. At the time, because ours is a heterosexual marriage, we had no trouble heading down to the clerk’s office to get our marriage certificate. I still remember the rush of excitement as we signed the official documents, making our marriage “legit.” A mere 50 years ago, my marriage would not have been recognized as legal in 17 states, solely because I loved someone of a different race; our five-month old daughter would have had parents that could not marry because certain people—I’m looking at you, Harry Truman—deemed marriage between races to be wrong. Seems ridiculous, right? But it wasn’t until 1967 that the U.S. Supreme Court deemed anti-miscegenation laws unconstitutional, making interracial marriage legal across the entire country. Now, people don’t even bat an eye, at least in the Bay Area, at mixed-race couples. But it wasn’t always that way. The argument against gay marriage goes along the lines of “Marriage is between a man and a woman,” but in the not-toodistant past it was “Marriage is between a white man and a white woman” or “Marriage is between a black man and black woman,” and on and on. Fortunately, last week, we saw a moment of sanity and grace in American history with the dismantling of DOMA. I look forward to a time, 50 years from now, when we look back and say, “Remember when same-sex marriage was illegal? How crazy was that?”

In Support of Libraries

I use the libraries in Sonoma County and contribute to Friends of the Library in Rohnert Park. I was very disappointed when the libraries closed on Mondays system-wide, affecting school children and people looking for work using the computers. I am in agreement that the libraries should return to the Monday availability—if not every Monday, then perhaps in some areas the first and third Mondays of the month, and in other areas the second and fourth Mondays of the month. Thank you for running the piece, and hopefully the community and the county supervisors will work with the joint powers to restore at least some of the availability of the libraries.

MARTA HAYDEN Santa Rosa

If library is a place where one maybe reads some magazines and gets to take home free books and recordings, then I agree with the county officials, we have more important things to worry about. If library is a people’s meeting place, a classroom for small children, a spot to have short afternoon nap or the most convenient public restroom in town, then perhaps we should rethink the hours.

GUNAR BECKMANS Via online Editor’s note: Six days after our cover story on library closures and mismanagement, Sonoma County Library director Sandra Cooper announced her retirement.

Leilani Clark is a staff writer at this paper. Open Mic is a weekly op/ed feature in the Bohemian. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

Wages and Tips In the letter titled “Tip Away” from a Ms. Scruggs in the June 19 issue, she refers to “wine stewards,” which is

a term normally associated with sommeliers in restaurants. Having worked in the industry in various Michelin-starred restaurants, I can assure you that any fine dining establishment that can have a sommelier does not pay him or her $12 an hour, as Ms. Scruggs claims. They are usually in management and in charge of wine purchasing, inventory, pricing, wine list production and updates, etc., and make a considerable salary—in addition to bonuses and in many cases being in the tip pool that gets divided between waiters, bussers, bartenders and food runners.

If she is referring to tasting room associates and “wine educators” (as they are sometimes called), that is completely different, and in most cases they earn between $15 and $20 as a base salary plus commissions on wine sales. To compare this salary range to that of a typical Denny’s worker (a company often cited for employing illegal workers at below minimum wage) is misleading and disingenuous, to say the least. If you want to leave an additional gratuity for a sommelier (wine steward) or a tasting room associate that is fine, but it is not the norm, nor is it required.

JOSEPH MARTIN Healdsburg

It Can’t Be That Much Work I deplore the social psychology of those who are fortunate enough to belong to the Hundred Thousand Dollar Club who feel that they have to automatically defend anyone else in that pay bracket. Is it because they are not sure of their own worthiness? More to the point: Why does the Marin IJ feel that the Marin supervisors deserve a wage hike? Is it the $35 million they lost on the computer fiasco? Their slavish bowing to ABAG and the MTC? Their tremendous giveaways to the consultant class? The error of basing one’s pay on the

Rants

other guy’s pay is what got us on the merry-go-round of astronomical CEO compensation. Public service should be its own reward. Consider all the really talented people in Marin who would be glad to take on the supervisors’ responsibilities. After all, with two or three full-time aides, it can’t be that much work. The problem with running for the job is the political support purchased by incumbent supervisors with all the slushfund cash they spread around. How can you beat that kind of campaign funding? Let’s look at the Marin County median wage before going overboard with supervisor pay hikes. Next you will want to be buying each of them a new house.

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Antonin Scalia fake Twitter accounts popping up Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

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THIS MODERN WORLD

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Love Prevails Nadav Soroker

Bill Rousseau hadn’t married a gay couple since 2008. But in his office at the county clerk last week, sure enough, his phone started ringing again. Nadav Soroker

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 3 – 9, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Following last Wednesday’s Supreme Court decision effectively overturning Proposition 8, the gates have been reopened for Rousseau to issue licenses for and to conduct legal same-sex marriages in California. It’s something the Sonoma County clerk-recorderassessor had been eagerly awaiting, and he’s not alone. On Monday, the hallway of the clerk’s office teemed with couples in line when the doors opened at 8am. Not long after, Katie and Amy Evans-Reber became the first couple married—by Rousseau himself. Throughout the day, more couples wed, like Wanda and Susie Johnston of Lake County, above. Rousseau remembers being an officiant in 2008, describing it as a celebratory time. “As the officiant, I felt very honored to be able to perform some of those services. There were couples that had been together 20, 30 years, finally getting married,” he says.

FAIR HOUSING Caroline Peattie says including affordable housing with lead paint and asbestos fuels negative perceptions.

Housing Alert A new real estate disclosure in Marin

A

new disclosure form given to Marin homebuyers is the latest fault line in a Richter-topping controversy over regional zoning laws and affordable housing.

The Marin Association of Realtors’ form informs potential homebuyers of usual disclosures such as pesticide-spraying, potential fire hazards and wastewater regulations. But on page 13, in a new clause adopted

in May, it also addresses nearby housing developments. Fair-housing advocates worry that adding affordable housing to a list of mostly negative disclosures, including the presence of lead paint and any prior death on the property, could have NIMBY implications. “From time to time, the county, city and towns of Marin identify areas of Marin for possible developments,” it reads. “Real estate brokers and their agents are not responsible for investigating or identifying properties which

BY RACHEL DOVEY may be rezoned or affected by future developments.” It’s hardly inflammatory language, but the environment into which it slips is very much heated. The document was updated around the same time the Marin Association of Realtors announced its opposition to One Bay Area, an ambitious, controversial effort by regional planning hub the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) to encourage smart growth. As the Bohemian has previously reported, One Bay Area ) 10

For the next couple of weeks, Rousseau predicts a nearconstant stream of happy spouses-to-be. “We’ve got a couple wedding rooms, and we’re going to get some more as this thing develops,” he says. “We’ve got a couple of nice arbors at the clerk’s office that we can do for outdoor ceremonies as well. And we’re going to look for more depending on the demand.” Same-sex couples can start the marriage process by filling out a marriage license application online through the county office’s website, where fees for licenses and ceremonies are also provided. Those rushing to the clerk’s office should remember that both parties must be present to receive a license, and for ceremonies, a witness is needed, Rousseau adds. And, yes, there may be a wait.—Anna Hecht

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was motivated by SB 375, California’s statewide senate bill that discourages commuting and sets emission reduction goals through infill and city-centered growth. According to studies funded by foundations in Napa and Marin, the idyllic, open-spaceworshipping North Bay is in dire need of such a push: 60 percent of Marin workers and 30 percent Napa workers commute in daily from Sonoma, Solano, Alameda and other places where the cost of housing isn’t nearly as high. But the plan—which would zone for 2,292 new units, including lowincome housing, between 2014 and 2022—has been lividly debated in Marin. Some groups, like Citizen Marin, voice fears about high-rises and big-development interests that could radically alter the parks and oak-lined hiking trails residents now enjoy. Other groups have voiced dissent in more radical ways; Corte Madera voted to withdraw from ABAG altogether in 2012, and earlier this year another citizen group began collecting signatures to recall county supervisor Susan Adams. Though it is the wealthiest county in California, Marin has been notoriously reluctant to zone for low-income housing in the past, spurring at least one lawsuit. Novato’s 2011 attempt to update its housing element was an almost frenzied affair, in which townspeople—most of them, like Marin’s 80 percent majority, white—packed the meeting hall, many lambasting the gangbanging, drug-using, sex-offending others that would supposedly come with their rent-controlled homes. Speakers pushed to segregate these perceived projects across the freeway, away from homeowners and their children— one going so far as to suggest that housing for “them” should be kept safely “in the desert somewhere.” The five councilwomen eventually zoned at a lower number than they were supposed to in an effort to “push back” against ABAG, and even zoned land with existing businesses on it, one of which said publicly that

it did not intend to sell. It’s in this charged political climate—which has divided defenders of green open-space from advocates for green growth and sparked protests with signs reading “End Apartheid in Marin”— that a simple clause like the one released by the Marin Association of Realtors becomes a big deal. “This is very much an issue that we are concerned with,” says Caroline Peattie, executive director of Fair Housing of Marin.

‘It has the effect of suggesting there’s something wrong with affordable housing.’ “A disclosure means something negative is involved. You disclose that there’s lead paint. When you disclose a potential affordable housing site, you’re saying it’s bad.” Peattie says Fair Housing of Marin is less worried with the new disclosure and more concerned with a prior legal form drafted by Bradley Real Estate, which specifically cites affordable housing and proposed zoning sites. Robert Bradley, CEO of Bradley Real Estate, believes the company had a legal responsibility to disclose what he calls a massive rezoning of the county. “A disclosure is anything that will have a material effect on the desirability of the property,” he says, adding that a large development in a neighborhood of single-family homes could do just that. He also voices concern about how a below-market-rate property could affect an area where schools and city resources are shared, but inhabitants aren’t paying property taxes. His wife, Melissa, echoes his statements, citing a slogan she’s

heard repeatedly in her 20-year real estate career: “When in doubt, disclose.” She says she’s surprised that the larger Marin Association of Realtors has not previously made zoning changes an issue of disclosure. “We count on our board for updates on how things are going and what new info we need to disclose,” she writes in an email. Edward Segal, CEO of the association, said there was no connection between the Bradley document and his association’s disclosure, which was voted on by a task force within the organization. He would not state who was on the task force. “It was just for the sake of being current with all the talk and public discussion and debate,” he says, denying that the association is somehow taking a political stance on the explosive issue. Michael Allen, a civil rights attorney working with Marin Fair Housing, says that no matter the intent of the disclosures, they could easily become a self-fulfilling prophecy. He explains it cyclically: perception that affordable housing will lower property values could make a neighborhood less desirable to buyers and that, in turn, could lower property values. “Each of them has the effect of suggesting there’s something wrong with affordable housing,” he says. “The effect in the real world is going to be negative on affordable housing and negative on integration in Marin.” Allen says he doesn’t see a precedent for this kind of notice in California real estate disclosure law. A perusal of the law reveals many examples—asbestos, flooding, radon gas—that are, in fact, negative. According to Bradley, his notice is an attempt to get information out into an atmosphere that has been politicized to the point where simple facts are lost. “It’s like there’s a Fox News and an MSNBC, but no CNN,” he says of the cataclysmic debate. In the meantime, most of the county’s workforce commutes in, clogged freeways spew emissions, and the state’s wealthiest county remains economically and racially segregated—with few places for its workers to live.

UNCLIP This week, Bush defended the NSA’s PRISM program, which he instated.

Spy vs. Spy

As long as the technology exists, you’re going to be watched BY JENNA LOCEFF

I

n the midst of the continuing conversation about Edward Snowden, the former CIA and NSA employee who leaked information about the government spying on U.S. citizens, the New York Police Department has been found using less than ethical practices with surveillance as well.

After 9-11, the NYPD, according to reports in many major papers, employed four CIA agents to track suspected terrorists. However, because one of these agents was on a leave of absence, he had, according to a story from The Atlantic, “no limitations.”

Following the news stories on data-mining and government spying has been interesting on many levels. Discovering just how closely the public is watched and realizing that many conspiracy theorists have been right after all seems to have blown our minds. But how surprised should we really be? There are complaints about private companies providing information to the government, but in an age of oversharing trackable information online, it’s no surprise the government is watching. Of course, there’s also that pesky Patriot Act. We put so much information out there, forgetting that our social profile impacts us in the real-world—and forgetting that once it’s out there, it’s out there for good. This is not a new concept, but the issues are getting more relevant as more interaction takes place online. The phrase “what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas” can be adapted to say “What happens on the internet stays on the internet—forever.” The California Senate believes this to be true, particularly for youth. In May, the senate unanimously passed an online privacy bill aiming to protect children from themselves. It included provisions for giving minors an “eraser button” with the ability to permanently delete “content or information” supplied to websites and apps. Sounds great. But who knows if this is even viable? While I believe Snowden did a huge service in revealing the NSA’s reach, that the government lied about these surveillance programs is more disturbing than their existence in the first place. If the technology is there, it’s unlikely the government will stop using it. People ask over and over, what can be done, why aren’t there protests? If you don’t want the government watching you, the best protest is to go offline, where they can’t see.

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HAND-PICKED Grapefruit, celery root, quinoa and marcona almonds highlight the harvest of Kendall-Jackson’s garden.

Partake of Plenty K-J’s culinary foray offers increasing returns in Healdsburg BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

‘G

uess what it is!,” enthuses my server, Jessica, whose raven hair matches the wine glass she’s just placed in front of me. The black glass conceals the tell-tale violet or honey-hued color of the liquid inside. Is it dry and prickly? Buttery and floral? No matter what I find inside this “mystery glass,” one thing is clear: I am not here to idly imbibe; I am here, as the very name suggests, to partake.

The latest creation of KendallJackson, Partake is defined as much by what it isn’t as what it is. Too gastronomically ambitious to be a tasting room, more winedriven than a mere restaurant, Partake—just off the plaza in Healdsburg—bills itself as an eatery-tasting lounge, a place where food and wine exist to complement the other. “We start with the wine,” executive chef Justin Wangler tells me, “and then create the dishes.” Like Wangler, who’s worked at Kendall-Jackson’s winery for nearly a decade, the mystery glass has its roots in the tasting room. There,

the “wine geeks” competed to see who could guess the unknown wine they enjoyed after their shifts. “We turned it into a contest,” Wangler says, “but it’s really about opening up and using your senses.” My mystery wine turned out to be Kendall-Jackson’s Avant Chardonnay, whose brightness paired perfectly with a tart and creamy salad of fresh mozzarella, preserved lemon, summer squash and Castelvetrano olives ($9). The white flights complement light, dainty offerings like the challah with Dry Creek peaches, crescenza and hazelnuts ($8). Already a house favorite, and not

to be missed, are the caramelized carrots with guajillo chile and coconut ($6), paired with a Vintner’s Reserve Muscat. Moving down the seasonal menu, the flavors get bolder and richer, the wines darker and heavier. The perfectly pillowy pork buns ($7) are made with Syrah grapeskin flour, and the tempura maitake mushrooms ($8) evoke all the earthy goodness of rained-soaked soil. Highlighting the harvest of Kendall Jackson’s eightacre garden, the menu offers a refreshing selection of veggies and fruits. A corn pudding with pickled mushrooms ($8) has all the rich decadence of bacon-laced mac and cheese, but without the meat or the gluten (or, ahem, the stale trendiness). Another unexpected treat? The unctuous Riesling and Chardonnay grapeseed oils, proud products of the “Whole Vine” philosophy, which easily push olives out of the limelight. Diners are advised to save room for dessert. “The nectar of the gods” is how one winemaker describes the lush Grand Reserve Late Harvest Chardonnay, a fitting antidote to pastry chef Buttercup’s heavenly bite-sized mignardises ($10). In the location formerly occupied by Shimo Modern Steak, Partake’s two main seating areas, both amply windowed, are understated and elegant. The creamy white walls are mostly bare, save for an ancient gnarled grapevine and a blown-up photo triptych of Alexander Valley. And in a playful nod to Rodin, local tattoo artist Adam Burns of Bad Billies has used a mobile chalkboard as a canvas to paint his version of The Thinker. Backed by the sun setting over rolling vineyards, the iconic man with the furrowed brow has one hand tucked beneath his chin, the other holding—what else?— the stem of a mysteriously dark wine glass. Partake, 241 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. 707.433.6000.

Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OMA CO U N TY Carneros Bistro & Wine Bar Californian. $$$$. As fancy as foie graschestnut froth parfait for dinner, as simple as huevos rancheros for breakfast, and all superb. Bre0akfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 1325 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.931.2042.

Sun. 4776 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa. 707.539.0260.

Simply Vietnam Vietnamese. $. Friendly Vietnamese for all ethnic tastes. Savory, satisfying and filling. Pho can be hit or miss, depending on the meat quality. Lunch and dinner daily. 966 N Dutton Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.566.8910.

Spoonbar Regional

Flavor California cuisine. $-$$. Fresh and organic white-tablecloth food at paper-napkin prices. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast, Wed-Sun. 96 Old Courthouse Square, Santa Rosa. 707.573.9695.

cuisine. $$. Locally sourced dishes include sea bass, smoked bacon pork terrine, flourless chocolate torte and a Moroccan chicken that takes three days to prepare. One of the region’s best spots for cocktails. Lunch, Thurs.Mon.; dinner nightly. 219 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. 707.433.7222.

Gohan Japanese. $$-$$$.

Thai Taste Restaurant

Superb Japanese favorites with modern twists like greentea cheesecake and wakame snow-crab caviar salad in a martini glass. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner only, Sat-Sun. 1367 McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.789.9296.

Thai. $-$$. Lovely ambiance and daily specials showcase authentic Thai flavors. A hidden gem in Santa Rosa’s Montecito neighborhood. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Fri; dinner, Sat. 170 Farmers Lane #8, Santa Rosa. 707.526.3888.

Johnny Garlic’s California. $$. At Johnny’s, garlic is God–all dishes are infused with the glorious stinking rose. Lunch and dinner daily. 8988 Brooks Rd, Windsor. 707.836.8300.

Mac’s Delicatessen Diner. $. Large selection of Jewish-style sandwiches; excellent cole slaw. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 630 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3785.

Parish Cafe Cafe. $$. Authentic po’ boy sandwiches elicit the sound of a big brass marching band with every bite. Breakfast favorites include shrimp and grits, but don’t forget the beignets. Breakfast and lunch, Wed-Sun. 60-A Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.431.8474 Roberto’s Restaurant Italian. $$. Reliable home-style Italian cooking. Dinner, Tues-

MARIN CO U N T Y Casa Mañana Mexican. $. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Finnegan’s Marin Pub fare. $$. Irish bar with the traditional stuff. Lunch and dinner daily. 877 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.899.1516.

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian. $$. Big, ample portions at this premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195. Left Bank French. $$-$$$.

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Dining

Splendid, authentic French cuisine. Lunch and dinner daily. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Pier 15 American. $$. Fun, tucked-away old-fashioned spot overlooking hidden harbor. Great place for breakfast at a bar, too. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, SatSun. 15 Harbor St, San Rafael. 415.256.9121. Sushiholic Japanese. $$$$. A nice addition to the local lineup, with a lengthy and wellcrafted repertoire including uncommon dishes like nabeyaki udon, zaru soba, yosenabe and sea bass teriyaki. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. Rowland Plaza, 112-C Vintage Way, Novato. 415.898.8500. Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y Ad Hoc American. $$-$$$. Thomas Keller’s quintessential neighborhood restaurant. Prix fixe dinner changes daily. Actually takes reservations. 6476 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2487.

MON M ON & WED W ED

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Cafe. $-$$. Alexis excels at baked goods and offers killer breakfasts and sensible soup’n’-salad lunches. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1517 Third St, Napa. 707.258.1827.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.4870.

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Cindy Pawlycyn’s Wood Grill & Wine Bar American. $$-$$$. Classic American fare that stays up on current mainstays like crispy pork belly, braised short ribs and crab roll but doesn’t skimp on the burger. Long wine list, kids menu, patio and more. Lunch and dinner, WedSun. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, ) upscale 1950s-era

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steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dry-aged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

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Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

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Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

French Laundry

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Definitive California Cuisine. $$$$. What else is there to say? Chef Thomas Keller’s institution is among the very best restuarants in the country. 6640 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.2380.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Gilwoods Cafe Diner.

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$-$$. Classic hometown diner, specializes in the homemade. Breakfast and lunch daily. 1320 Napa Town Center, Napa. 707.253.0409. 1313 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.1788.

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Red Rock Cafe & Backdoor BBQ American. $-$$. Cafe specializing in barbecue and classic diner fare. Messy, delicious. Lunch and dinner daily. 1010 Lincoln Ave, Napa. 707.252.9250.

Redd California cuisine. $$$$$. Rich dishes balanced by subtle flavors and careful yet casual presentation. Brunch at Redd is exceptional. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 6480 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.2222. Siena California-Tuscan. $$$$. Sophisticated, terroirinformed cooking celebrates the local and seasonal, with electric combinations like sorrel-wrapped ahi tuna

SMALL BITES

West End Farmers Market Gloomy weather didn’t keep the crowds away from opening day of the new West End Farmers Market on Sunday, June 23; in fact, according to Allen Thomas, one of the event organizers, approximately 500 people came through to check out the goods from 30 vendors. Santa Rosa’s newest farmers market includes organic veggies and flowers from Bloomfield Farms and Tusque Farms, sustainably raised eggs from Wise Acre Farm, fresh organic strawberries from Yerena Farms in Watsonville, coffee from the Arlene Francis Center Cafe and grass-fed beef burgers prepared on the spot by Guerilla Food. “It was absolutely successful,” said Jessica Rasmussen of Criminal Baking Co., who had sold out of nearly everything by the end of the day, praising the market’s family environment and great turnout. “I hope we can keep this momentum going,” she added. Behind her, families lounged on the lawn aside the DeTurk Round Barn, talking, laughing and enjoying the energy of the commons on a Sunday morning—like a slice of Dolores Park brought to a little patch of Santa Rosa. And while some were skeptical that Santa Rosa has the population, or consumer base, to support four farmers markets—with successful versions already in place at the Wells Fargo Center, the Veterans Memorial Building and the Wednesday Night Market—the numbers show that there’s always room for more community in Sonoma County. The West End Farmers Market runs every Sunday through Oct. 27. Donahue Street between West Ninth and Boyce streets, Santa Rosa. 10am–2pm. 707.477.8422.—Leilani Clark

puttanesca. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa. 707.251.1900.

Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a

Marilyn Rubbatino

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popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Wineries

15

S O N OM A CO U N T Y De Loach Vineyards In the 1970s, Cecil De Loach established this pioneering producer of Russian River Zinfandel and Pinot Noir par excellence.1791 Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open daily, 10am–4:30pm. 707.526.9111.

J Vineyards & Winery Save the sit-down, threecourse food and wine pairing in the Bubble Room for a special occasion, like, “Hey, it’s Sunday.” Weekend program offers deceptively wee courses that change every six weeks to feature seasonal produce. Diverse and intense flavors, matched with sparkling wine, Pinot and Chardonnay, sure to amuse anyone’s bouche. 11447 Old Redwood Hwy., Healdsburg. Open daily 11am–5pm, regular tasting $20. Bubble Room, Friday–Sunday, 11am–3pm, $60. 888.594.6326.

Lambert Bridge Winery On gloomy afternoons, a string of lights and a curl of smoke from the stone chimney make this Dry Creek landmark all the more inviting. Chandelierilluminated redwood cellar is a warm setting to sample meticulously crafted Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Zin and claret. 4085 West Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open 10:30am–4:30pm. Tasting fee $10. 707.431.9600.

Martin Ray Focus is on mountain Cab. And continuing the old tradition, folks can pick up a gallon of hearty Round Barn Red for $13. 2191 Laguna Road, Santa Rosa. Summer hours, daily, 11am–5pm. 707.823.2404.

Robledo Family Winery Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot and “Los Braceros” red blend are highly recommended. 21901 Bonness Road, Sonoma. Open daily, Monday–Saturday, 10am–5pm; Sunday, 11am– 4pm. 707.939.6903.

Sheldon Wines Globetrotting harvest hoboes who caught wine fever like an express train and held on tight. New, industrial Urban Winery Village location; same Rhône-style and offbeat varietals from small, family-run vineyards. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. Friday–Monday noonish to sixish; fees $5–15. Food carts join Thirsty Thursdays, 4–8pm. 707.865.6755.

Thomas George Estates Pinot pioneer Davis Bynum hung up the hose clamp and sold his estate, but the good wine still flows in remodeled tasting room featuring a long bar and vineyard videos. Russian River Chard, Pinot and Zin; sweet berry flavors and long-lasting finishes. Caves completed for tours in 2010. 8075 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11am–5pm, daily. Tasting fee, $5. 707.431.8031.

Tin Barn Vineyards Yes, it is located in a tin barn, of sorts–in the midst of a remote industrial park, home to “Eighth Street wineries.” From allspice to Jolly Rancher, coriander, fresh raspberry, jelly Danish and horsetail to a simply enjoyable claret style quaff, it’s all flavor and no frills in this friendly warehouse winery. 21692 Eighth St. E., Ste. 340, Sonoma. Saturday– Sunday, 11am–4pm. Tasting fee, $6. 707.938.5430.

N A PA CO U N TY Beringer Vineyards (WC) This historic winery offers some seven daily tours for nominal fees, most of which end gratefully with a glass and a spin through the underground wine-aging tunnels. Open daily, 10am– 6pm (summer hours). 2000 Main St., Napa. 707.963.7115.

Casa Nuestra Winery Endearingly offbeat, with a dedicated staff and a collection

of goats and dogs roaming freely. 3451 Silverado Trail N., St. Helena. Open daily, 10am– 5pm. 707.963.5783.

Darioush Exotic locale, with giant columns and a Persian theme, Darioush is justly famous for its Bordeaux. 4240 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–5pm. 707.257.2345. Olabisi & Trahan Wineries In the fancy heart of downtown Napa, a low-budget “cellar” where wines are shelved, with clever economy, in stacks of wood pallets; vibes are laid-back and real. Carneros Chardonnay and fruity but firm and focused Cab and Merlot from Suisin Valley, Napa’s much less popular stepsister to the east. 974 Franklin St., Napa. Open daily, noon–5:30pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.257.7477.

Phifer Pavitt Wines Lots of cowgirl sass but just one wine: “Date Night” Cabernet Sauvignon. Hale bale seating. 4660 Silverado Trail, Calistoga. By appointment. 707.942.4787. Robert Sinskey Vineyards In the lofty, barnlike hall–as elegant as a theater, as solid as a ski lodge–visitors can take in the tank room action; at least, the gleaming stainless steel, framed by wood and stonework and brewpub-style chalkboard menus imbues the space with a sense of energetic immediacy. “Gluttonous Flight” pairs savory munchables prepared in the gourmet demonstration kitchen with biodynamically farmed Careros Pinot Noir and Bordeaux varietals. Not to worry: there’s no flight for ascetics offered, so go for it. 6320 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open 10am–4:30pm daily. 707.944.9090.

St. Supéry Expect to find the tasting room crowded with a harrassed staff, but St. Supéry features an interesting art gallery with changing exhibitions. 8440 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–5pm. 800.942.0809.

William Harrison Winery Your Fourth of July ‘American Owned’ Cabernet BY JAMES KNIGHT

E

xactly when, in the course of human events, does it become necessary to ask, “What wine pairs best with barbecue?” What I’m getting at, of course, is “With what wine shall we celebrate a merchant class tax revolt with Enlightenment gloss against a kind of tyrant acting with the assent of more than 50 percent of a restive bicameral legislative body ’cross the pond?”

Zinfandel comes to mind, not least because it’s fun to say. Norton is more on point, but for the name—no fireworks. Amidst all this, William Harrison rides to the rescue like some Paul Revere, advertising on his Silverado Trail sign, “American Owned.” Inside the tasting room, housed in an attractive Spanish colonial California-style stonework winery, I’m told that owner Bill Harrison once had second thoughts about his sign. The people revolted, though, so he put it back up. And the sign has a point: a good portion of the Napa Valley has been bought up by British, French, Spanish, Australian, and now Chinese and Chilean and Constellation overlords. One can hardly accuse them of a long train of abuses and usurpations—mostly they are hawking highend hooch for ready buyers—but the line at this bar is firm: “We’re just proud to be American-owned.” No shots have been fired in this revolt, unless you ask the stuffed bear and wild boars to the left of the bar, who look as if they would like to add something to the discussion. Harrison’s grandfather Antonio Perelli-Minetti immigrated from Italy in 1902 with little but a winemaking degree in hand, then grew a 20th century wine empire. In the 1980s, Harrison believed that mobile bottling lines were the future, and, after dozens of brush-offs, founded Estate Bottling. With a touch of antique furniture to the aroma, the 2011 Carneros Chardonnay ($32) jives with the sepia-toned vibe of the place, but the palate bursts with buttered, baked pears. A vertical tasting of Estate Cabernet Franc is the main event here. The 2008 Cabernet Franc ($45) is a warmer, more appealing version of the angular 2007—all pencil lead, pumice stone and plum. The 2008 Estate Cabernet Sauvignon ($50) tops them all with a floral interpretation of Cab aromas, and a juicy, tense palate. Yea, even this Napa patriot is in thrall to the king of grapes—but what nation’s wine drinkers anointed that tannic, tooth-staining tyrant to the throne? Avid tea importers who also ran Bordeaux for centuries . . . as . . . a . . . colony. William Harrison Vineyards and Winery, 1443 Silverado Trail, St. Helena. Daily, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.963.8310.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 – 9, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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ANNOUNCING THE 2013 NORTH BAY MUSIC AWARDS AND 24-HOUR BAND CONTEST! SATURDAY, JULY 13 AT THE ARLENE FRANCIS CENTER IN SANTA ROSA!

Live music will be provided by bands assembled totally at random just 24 hours before in the…

24-HOUR BAND CONTEST. Musicians and singers, here’s your chance to take part in a totally creative experiment. Here’s how it works: you sign up for the 24Hour Band Contest at www.bohemian.com. You tell us your name and what instrument you play. On Friday, we’ll meet and pick names at random, assembling bands made up of complete strangers. The bands will then have 24 hours to write two original songs and learn one cover song, and return to perform the next night at the NorBays! Are you in? Of course you’re in. Sign up at www.bohemian.com.

24-HOUR BAND PERFORMANCES! WINNERS ANNOUNCED! GOLD RECORDS AWARDED! BEER AND WINE! FUNK AND SOUL 45S! ART SHOW PRESENTED BY HEAVEN SENT LOSERS! GET YOUR PHOTO TAKEN! A GREY CAT IMPERSONATING MEL TORME! LIVE PAINTING BY JULIA DAVIS AND JARED POWELL! IT’S ALL HAPPENING AT THE 2013 NORBAYS! Saturday, July 13, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 8pm. $5. All Ages!

Final voting is now live for the 2013 NorBays! Vote for your favorites at www.bohemian.com. Voting ends Wednesday, July 10 at 5pm. Judges: Bill Bowker, Steve Jaxon and more! BLUES / R&B Blues Burners Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs Lester Chambers Soulshine Blues Band Volker Strifler

FOLK / ACOUSTIC Foxes in the Henhouse Jen Tucker Mr. December Sally Haggard Timothy O’Neil Band

HIP-HOP / ELECTRONIC Frances Wolfe The Sandchild Tiny Pyramids Smoov-E Spends Quality

COUNTRY / AMERICANA David Luning The Easy Leaves Frankie Boots & the County Line Kyle Martin Band Travelin’ Soul

INDIE Anthony Presti & Leah Van Dyke Grace in the Woods The New Trust Manzanita Falls Trebuchet

PUNK / METAL Boo Radley’s House Creative Adult Our Vinyl Vows M Section Shotgun Harlot

DJ DJ Beset DJ Konnex DJ Lazyboy DJs Jacques & Guac, WBLK DJ Paul Timbermann

JAZZ The Gypsy Trio The Mighty Groove Dave McNab Nate Lopez Peter Welker

ROCK Dylan Chambers & the Midnight Transit Highway Poets John Courage & the Great Plains Kingsborough Steve Pile Band WORLD / REGGAE Cosmos Percussion Orchestra Dan Martin & the Noma Rocksteady Band IrieFuse Midnight Sun Thrive

Most Americans tearily gathered around television sets and radios. But not Onstad and his friend. “We had bigger fish to fry,” Onstad remembers. “We had an appointment with Richard Diebenkorn!” That meeting Diebenkorn would be an appointment more urgent to Onstad than learning the details of President Kennedy’s assassination is but a small surprise to those who care about fine art. Diebenkorn is set for a mini-reniassance of sorts in the North Bay and beyond, as two new exhibits open and two locally published books see release in the immediate future. To those same people who care about fine art, this is no surprise at all, a deserving recognition of the man who, before his final years in Healdsburg, left a legacy that’s still being rediscovered.

© Richard Diebenkorn Foundation

A ‘INTERIOR WITH DOORWAY’

Oil on canvas 1962, on display at the de Young.

Gone West

Richard Diebenkorn’s work comes home with de Young and College of Marin shows, and two new locally published books BY GRETCHEN GILES

rguably the most important painter to come from California, Diebenkorn was raised in San Francisco and fated to attend Stanford, where his father fervently hoped he would put away what he termed his son’s “fine avocation” and instead study something real, like medicine or law. But having seen a van Gogh at the de Young Museum with his grandmother in 1936, Diebenkorn was one of those rare folks who knew early on what he wanted to do with his life, and that was to paint. After Stanford, he enrolled in the California School of Fine Art, now known as the San Francisco Art Institute. His first one-man show was held at San Francisco’s Legion of Honor in 1948 when he was just 26. Influenced by Willem de Kooning, as well as Matisse and Cezanne, Diebenkorn came of age just after WWII, when abstract expressionism held sway among young artists, mostly men well into their 20s who were just back from the corps, ready to attend college on the GI bill, and who brought with them the rage and loss of an unwanted early maturity amid gruesome war. Figures were exploded, backgrounds receded, rules were broken, everything changed. Diebenkorn was quickly swept up into the San Francisco ab-ex movement in league with Clyfford Still, David Park, ) 18

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 – 9, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

T

he North Coast painter Peter Onstad has a story he likes to tell. It was Nov. 22, 1963, and he and a friend were walking down a Berkeley street. A boy ran past them and shouted, “The president’s been shot!”

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 3 – 9, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Frank Lobdell, Hassel Smith, Horst Trave and others. His daughter Gretchen remembers that as a time when, if you saw a figure in a painting, you never mentioned it. Representation was forbidden; emotion was all. As always, the art community was divided, with New York painters claiming abstract expressionism as their own, and West Coast painters having to add the geographical descriptor “San Francisco” to the name. But in his 1997 American Visions PBS project, the great art critic Robert Hughes put the record straight. “To me, the best abstract painter of the time wasn’t in New York at all,” Hughes intoned. “His name was Richard Diebenkorn, and he lived in California. He painted some of the most intelligent responses to Matisse that any American had done.” By 1950, Diebenkorn moved his wife, Phyllis, and their family to New Mexico while he pursued a masters degree. By 1953, they were back in the Bay Area, settling into a comfortable house in the Berkeley hills, where they were to remain for the next 13 years. He moved again, in 1965, to Santa Monica, where he would produce his Ocean Park series of abstracts, the best-known suite of work in his oeuvre. Diebenkorn retired to Healdsburg’s Alexander Valley in 1988, and lived there until his death in 1993. Hugely celebrated, the Ocean Park series was honored in a massive 1997 exhibit emanating from the Whitney Museum that traveled to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others. A piece from that period, Ocean Park No. 117, sold at a Christie’s auction in 2009 for $6.5 million, just shy of the $6.7 million that marks his most expensive canvas. The work, both figurative and abstract, that Diebenkorn produced during his East Bay tenure is less well known. That oversight has been remedied with “Richard Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Years,” a lush, stunning new exhibit at the de Young Museum running through Sept. 29.

Nadav Soroker

18 Diebenkorn ( 17

SELECTORS For two new books, Bart Schneider and Chester Aaron found themselves in the unusual position of cutting from Diebenkorn’s vast unseen output.

“It was during this period that Diebenkorn really became Diebenkorn,” argues Timothy Anglin Burgard, the Ednah Root curator-in-charge of American art at the de Young. “His artistic integrity rendered him immune to external pressure to conform to either abstract or figurative styles, and set a liberating example that seems remarkably prescient given the inclusive nature of the contemporary art world.” Not to be outdone, the College of Marin art gallery is undergoing a summer facelift in order to host a 40-piece show of Diebenkorn’s works on paper this September in conjunction with two new books on the subject introduced by painter Chester Arnold, a longtime COM faculty member, and produced by novelist Bart Schneider through his Kelly’s Cove Press. The Bay Area could be said to be suffering from a delicious delirium of Diebenkorn fever.

S

eated at the outside table of a Sonoma cafe one early morning last month, Arnold and Schneider allowed a visitor to admire the two books they have produced. One, From the Model, concentrates on Diebenkorn’s figures; the other,

Abstractions on Paper, on his nonrepresentational pieces. Each is small enough to slip into a purse or read in bed, and cost just $20 apiece. Seeing that the de Young was preparing to mount a large exhibit, Schneider thought to produce an accompanying book centering on Diebenkorn’s 4,000 or so works on paper. He approached the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation about the project and, he says, “they kind of lit up. That great work is just sitting there in their databases.” Schneider asked Arnold to help him choose the images and write a short introduction to each book. Arnold asked the College of Marin to mount a show. Things started rolling. After Kentfield, it will travel the country. Arnold, a highly regarded painter just returned from a oneman exhibit at the Katzen Arts Center in Washington, D.C., remembers that he first saw Diebenkorn’s work in reproduction. It caused what he calls “a spark.” “That’s why I think that these books are so important,” Arnold says, sitting over a cappuccino. “You don’t need to see an original to get a spark. And that spark was something that really appealed to me. I was doing a lot of figure drawing at that time. Not that I

patterned myself after him, though I did go through a Diebenkorn period in the late ’70s, I have to say. “After the Ocean Park series came out, I started to rethink lots of composition and my use of diagonal. It was born from a tremendous admiration for someone who was a lot more refined than I thought I would ever be. It’s elegant, thoughtful, profound—transcendent.” Schneider adds, “I think it’s a combination of really richly imaginative work, but it has a coherence to it, you know. Somehow, we can approach it. And,” he shakes his head, “it’s so damn handsome.” The works on paper held by the Diebenkorn Foundation are all digitized and include pieces perhaps no one has before seen, stuff hidden in drawers, scraps from the studio floor. After choosing the work, Arnold wrote a grant to have the works framed and readied for shipping. But choosing the art was all the fun. “It was much easier than I had originally thought,” Arnold says. “Visually, [Schneider and I are] very much on the same page. We just sat together at the computer, and in a few hours, we had done the first cut. The difficult thing for me to get my head wrapped around was, ‘Here I am, sitting here, cutting Diebenkorn?’ “It’s an embarrassment of riches,” he laughs, “but someone had to do it. We tried to pick pieces that had some kind of unique spark to them or that were particularly good versions of all the different genres he was exploring from those early ink things to the collages with the cut-outs.” The College of Marin show will open just before the de Young show closes. “In some ways, for purposes of clarity and appreciation, to see a small show like that of really beautiful drawings is a really unique way of appreciating what he did,” Arnold says, “just as these books are, because they’re closer in size to the actual work, and will start to feel closer to the real feeling that’s coming off the work.” In his recent review of the de Young exhibit, San Francisco

Š Richard Diebenkorn Foundation

19

SUNDAY JULY 14 12â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 PM

RESERVATIONS AVAILABLE AT 1:00, 2:00 AND 3:00PM $20 PER PERSON / $16 WINE CLUB MEMBERS Put on your favorite French fashion and celebrate La Fête Nationale Française! Taste FODVVLF%RUGHDX[ļVW\OHZLQHVQLEEOHRQ)UHQFKļLQVSLUHGELWHVWDS\RXUIHHWWROLYH PXVLFE\+DXWH)ODVK4XDUWHWČDQGGRQœWPLVVWKH&DQ&DQ*LUOV Purchase vol de vin et bouchÊesĪIOLJKWDQGELWHčDQGUHFHLYHD&KDWHDX6W-HDQEHUHW

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;UNTITLED (YELLOW COLLAGE)â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cut-and-pasted paper, gouache and ink on

paper from 1966, on display at the de Youngâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Berkeley-centered exhibit.

Chronicle art critic Kenneth Baker derides the show as having â&#x20AC;&#x153;the opposite of its intended effect of boosting the artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stature,â&#x20AC;? arguing that by focusing on Diebenkornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay Area years, the museum gives yet another boost to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;cultural prejudiceâ&#x20AC;? in favor of New York and European artists. The group at the cafe table just sighs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do you call a mathematician from California a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;California mathematician?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Schneider quips. Arnold, who was raised in Germany but has long resided in California, has surely felt the sting of this â&#x20AC;&#x153;cultural prejudiceâ&#x20AC;? before. He takes the long view. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only New Yorkers who have to do that; they build a fortress around themselves,â&#x20AC;? he says calmly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I always characterize California

artists as being the weeds in the garden with deep tap roots, and the New York artists as being the orchids in the hothouse. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re expensive, they take a lot of high maintenance, and, after all the dust settles, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still here and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still grounded, pulling out the foxtails.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Diebenkorn: Works on Paperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opens at the College of Marin Art Gallery on Thursday, Sept. 19. t835 College Ave., Kentfield. 415.485.9480. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;From the Modelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Abstractions on Paperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; can be purchased directly from Kellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cove Press, www.kellycovepress.com. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runs through Sept. 29 at the de Young Museum, 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, San Francisco. $10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$22, separate from museum admission. 415.750.3600.

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20

The week’s events: a selective guide

S A N TA R O S A

Today’s News

It starts with low, pounding dru ms, like a march of natives to the pyre of sin; a low-frequency voice crackles through muted guitars on the sights and sounds of hope; then, after a slight pau se, all hell breaks loose. This is how a grea t punk album starts, friends. This week, Strike to Survive celebrate the release of their new full-length, Yesterday’s News, with a tour kick-off show; opening are the Vibrating Ant ennas, William Bonney, State Faults and the New Trust. The first 50 people get a free silkscreened poster on Friday, July 5, at the Arlene Francis Center. 99 Sixth St., Santa Ros a. 8pm. $8. 707.528.3009.

SA N R A FA E L

Fair Enough Opening the Marin County Fair is “Weird” Al Yankovic (July 3), paving the way for Disney Channel stars, reggae legends and mariachi bands to play on the fairgrounds ’ island stage. Independence Day brin gs the Kingston

Trio and Eddie Money (July 4), followed by Zendaya and Ozomatli (July 5), the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and the Wailers (July 6), Mariachi Sol de Mexico de José Hernandez and the Pointer Sisters (July 7). Concerts and nightly fireworks—and all ride s are free with admission! Celebrate sum mer July 3–7 at the Marin Fairgrounds, 10 Ave nue of the Flags, San Rafael. $14–$16. 415. 473.6800.

N A PA

Hiero Heat Get your notebooks ready: Del the Funky Homosapien is substitute teac her for the day. The East Bay MC cancele d his Napa show back in April, but he mak es up for it with a free show this week. Free tickets can be found at the Uptown Theatre box office, as are $25 tickets for “Funk in the Electronic Age,” a preconcert discussion on the state of music today and how Del crea tes and composes. Del recently reunited with Dan the Automator and Kid Koala for his Deltron 3030 project; expect songs like “Virus” and “Positive Contact” when he play s on Friday, July 5, at Uptown Theatre. 135 0 Third St., Napa. Free. 8pm. 707.259.0123.

R O H N E R T PA R K

Crazy Fourth

NEW NOISE Strike to Survive’s album cover lady is tripping us out. They play a tour kickoff Friday; see above.

Think you’ve seen every firew orks display this county has to offer? Thin k again. For the Santa Rosa Symphony’s Fourth of July concert, the Green Music Cen ter promises “the biggest fireworks in Son oma County!” The evening begins with bou nce houses, a rock wall and a craft tent for the kiddies, a Dixieland band and a wine and beer garden; when nighttime arrives, the sym phony performs songs from The Mus ic Man, My Fair Lady, Back to the Future and others. Then it’s up in the air, junior birdman, for all the crash-bang-pow your heart desires on Thursday, July 4, at the Gre en Music Center. 1801 East Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. $25–$85. 7:30–9:30pm. 866 .955.6040.

Candy Glass Productions

ANOTHER OP’NIN’ Broadway stars

light up the park’s open-air stage.

Under the Skies Fantastic new shows at Jack London Park BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘I

would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.” With this quote from Jack London, Transcendence Theater Company kicked off its second season of Broadway Under the Stars last week on a warm, breezy evening at Glen Ellen’s Jack London State Park. Recited by artistic director Amy Miller, those stirring words have become the traditional opening for TTC’s revues, held within the roofless ruins of London’s stonewalled winery. Titled Fly Me to the Moon, the company’s first two-weekend-long show of the season will be followed later in the summer by Fantastical Family Night (July 19–20), the variety revue Dancing Through Life (Aug. 9– 17) and the season-ending Gala

‘Broadway Under the Stars’ runs through Aug. 31 at Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. All shows 7:30pm. $29-$117. For full info, see www.broadwayjacklondon.com.

21

the month of

July

hiking, swimming, biking, paddling, camping, live music, fireworks, eco-adventures, campfires, fishing, picnicking, conservation projects, historical reenactment, safety programs, educational tours, Healdsburg Water Carnival & more!

Calpine, North Bay Corp, Heck Foundation, Foundatiion, Healds Healdsburg sburg Chamber of Commerce, Community Foundation

for calendar calendar of events events

sonomacountyparks.org sonom macountyparkks.org

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 – 9, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

Celebration (Aug. 30–31). All shows feature an assortment of singers and dancers culled from the world of professional theater. Fly Me to the Moon—the theme partly inspired by the surrounding Valley of the Moon—mixes 30 songs (some classics, many less familiar) with dance routines and the occasional literary quote. Last year, the company established this unique blend of first-rate entertainment served up with a dash of old-time revival energy, using the music of Broadway to illustrate the life-changing power of pursuing one’s dreams and the necessity of taking chances. It’s a powerful recipe. Starting with a rousing opening that combines snippets from The Sound of Music with “The New World,” from Jason Robert Brown’s Songs for a New World, the otherwise sensational opening was marred a bit by some microphone issues, which persisted occasionally throughout the show. Fortunately, nothing interfered with Stephan Stubbins (the company’s co-executive director) and his magnificent, deeply felt rendition of “As If We Never Said Goodbye” from Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Sunset Boulevard. It’s amazing how many surprises can be discovered in a well-known song when presented by a truly gifted performer. Other highlights, in a show full of them, include Morgan Karr’s giddy, energetic performance of “In These Skies” from Taylor and Oberacker’s aeronautical adventure Ace; the brilliant Carrie Manolakis’ miraculous turns with Scott Alan’s beautiful “Never Neverland” and Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah”; and Nili Bassman and Kurt Domoney’s impressively flirty “Shall We Dance” (from George and Ira Gershwin’s Crazy for You), reminding us how much fun it can be falling in love. Clearly, TTC remains committed to presenting shows that, like London’s “superb meteor,” light up the night, while setting fire to the hearts and imaginations of those lucky enough to witness it.

Film

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 3 – 9, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

ME, UH, TONTO Johnny Depp could accept any role. He accepted this one.

Masked Man(ure) What the hell’s going on in ‘The Lone Ranger’? BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I Tune into

“Swingin' with Sinatra”

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nteresting as a train wreck, Gore Verbinski’s Lone Ranger (produced by Jerry Bruckheimer) may still end up having its defenders, thanks to its flagrant apologies for itself, which make it a sort of zillion-dollar remake of Dead Man (and, since you’ll be taking the kids, no marijuana first to make the stupid-white-man castigation look profound).

The studio would love to have “Don’t take off the mask” become the tagline of summer 2013, but it’s odd how the movie unmasks its own fear of the audience and loathing of the myths it pollutes. The Lone Ranger’s framing device has a jaded, bored little entertainment consumer of 1933 hearing the unlikely story from Johnny Depp’s even more unlikely Tonto. But this movie wants to be so many hundreds of other movies (there’s a pocket watch borrowed from For a Few Dollars More turning up as a symbol of the white’s man’s greed), and it’s therefore in a shaky position to teach us “thou shalt not covet.” It wants to be Once Upon a Time in the West and Pirates of the Caribbean, and had a good chance of being The Mask of Zorro, but there’s little evidence of the love, care and spirit shown in that revamp. Sherman Alexie aside, the Lone Ranger is only remembered by wheezing old senior citizens—why disinter him just to (literally) drag him through the shit? Our silly, prissy hero (Armie Hammer) and his wiser Comanche tutor Tonto get caught in a three-way struggle between the scarfaced ogre Butch Cadvendish (William Fichtner) and a pack of scheming railroaders led by Tom Wilkinson. Ruth Wilson of Jane Eyre has the unenviable role of the Lone Ranger’s beard. Some relief is provided by Helena Bonham Carter as a henna-haired madam with an ivory leg (she seems to have snuck in from a Flashman novel), but the good joke about dangerous rabbits would be funnier in a movie that wasn’t completely about cannibalism. ‘The Lone Ranger’ is in wide release.

Ĺ´Ĺľ with Austin DeLone 7:30pm :HG-XO\ĂŁSP

Lady Rizo~

Fri July 5 FREE SHOW

Del the Funky Homosapien & Guests Sun July 7

Cabaret Superstar

J Boog plus <Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ÄŽĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;, Aaradhna & Hot Rain

)UL-XO\ĂŁSP

Jewelâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Greatest Hits Tour

Thur July 18 & Fri July 19

The Soul Jah Family Band with Lumanation 6DW-XO\ĂŁDP

Sat July 20

Mary Chapin Carpenter & Marc Cohn Sat July 27 Ladies Night In Napa~An Evening Of Comedy Presented By KGO 810 Featuring

Live Music Brunch FREE SHOW with

Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x;ĹśÄ&#x201A;WÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ć?Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x152;ĹŹÇ&#x2021;Í&#x2022;dÄ&#x201A;žžÇ&#x2021;WÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻĹ?Í&#x2022; Mary Lynn Rajskub, Loni Love

Dore Coller

Fri Aug 2

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:Ä&#x17E;ÄŤĆ&#x152;Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć? & The Abiders

Sister Sparrow

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Sat Aug 3

Kenny Loggins plus Blue Sky Riders SOLD OU

Fri Aug 9 T!

Anjelah Johnson Wed Aug 14

Dirty Cello

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0RQ-XO\ĂŁSP Locals Night featuring

A Midsummer's Night with The Monkees

The Emma Lee Project

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Wed Aug 21

Thur Aug 15 Sat Aug 17

Bayside Jazz with Dan Hicks

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Chris Isaak Fri Aug 30

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TM

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THE KEITH CROSSAN BAND Jul 12 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beatnik Jungleâ&#x20AC;? 8:30 Rancho Fri

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Dance Party Jul 13 LONE STAR RETROBATES Roadhouse/Western Swing 8:30 Sat â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bye-Bye Bonnie Bashâ&#x20AC;? Jul 20 BONNIE HAYES WITH MYSTERY DAN CE 8:30

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Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Friday Night Live Weekly music series in conjunction with farmers market. Jul 5, the Far West; Jul 12, Hot Buttered Rum; Jul 19, Lost Dog Found; Jul 26, SambaDĂĄ; Aug 2, Frobeck; Aug 9, Eddie Robertsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; West Coast Sounds; Aug 16, RonKatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Katdelic; Aug 23, Maxx Cabello Jr; Aug 30, Chuck Prophet & the Mission Express. Fridays, 5:30pm. through Aug 30. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Funky Fridays Live music in the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outdoor amphitheater. PRoceeds support Team Sugarloaf. Jul 5, the Cork Pullers; Jul 12, Jaydub & Dino; Jul 19, A Case of the Willys; Jul 26, Michael Bolivar; Aug 2, Jami Jamison Band; Aug 9, Streetwise with Blythe Klein; Aug 16, Twang Ditty; Aug 23, Tommy Thomsen; Aug 30, Backtrax. Fridays, 6:30pm. through Aug 30. $10. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

Jim Kweskin Jug Band 2 24 V 224 VINTAGE INTAG E W WAY AY 415 . 8 9 2 . 6 2 0 0 NOVATO N OVA ATO | 415.892.6200

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Fiftieth anniversary tour, featuring Maria and Geoff Muldaur. Jul 3, 8pm. $40-$45. Studio E, Address provided with tickets, Sebastopol.

Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Concerts Series Jul 4, California Dreaminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;; Jul 6, Sounds of Santana; Jul 13, Surfinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Safari; Jul 20, Unauthorized Rolling Stones; Jul 27, Pop Fiction; Aug 3, Sun Kings; Aug 10, Foreverland; Aug 24, Men N Black; Aug 25, Twang Ditty; Aug 31, Paperback Writer; Sep 1, Life in the Fast Lane; Sep 8, Summer of Love; Sep 14, the Purple Ones; Sep 21, Chicago Tribute Authority; Sep 28, Mustache Harbor; Oct 5, Pride & Joy; Oct 12, David Martinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House Party. Saturdays, 12pm. through Oct 12. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, Village Court, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Symphony Fourth of July celebration begins with Dixieland jazz pre=show and kids activities, followed by symphony concert

and fireworks. Jul 4, 4:30pm. $25-$85. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

TRADJASS First Sunday of every month. Last Day Saloon, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

MARIN COUNTY Andre Nickatina Rapper from San Francisco has gained much critical acclaim while remaining a local favorite. Jul 6, 9pm. $15. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Bayside Jazz with Dan Hicks Singer-songwriter vocalizes jazz standards in his uniquely hip style. Jul 10, 8pm. $12. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Kathryn Keats with Michael Manring Soulful songstress has a a message of courage, faith, and joy. Appearing with Windham Hill bassist. Jul 6, 8 and 10pm. $10. Fenix, 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

NAPA COUNTY Del the Funky Homosapien Rapper, actor and dancer is a walking rhyming dictionary. Bukue One, 4 two 7 and Ammbaataa open. Jul 5, 8pm. Free. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Richard Glazier A leading authority on the music of George Gershwin and the star of two award-winning PBS television specials brings his new concert program, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Movies, Great Music.â&#x20AC;? Jul 7, 4pm. $20. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Grand Night for Singers Vocalists from around Northern California and beyond take turns onstage. Piano accompaniment by host Richard Evans. First Saturday of every month, 7pm. $15. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Katchafire Island reggae from New

Zealand. J Boog, Hot Rain and Aaradhna open. Jul 7, 8pm. $28. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center Jul 5, Strike to Survive, the New Trust, State Faults, William Bonney, the Vibrating Antennas. Jul 5, 8pm, Strike to Survive. Screamo punk band releases its new record. The New Trust, State Faults, William Bonney and the Vibrating Antennas open. $8. Wed, Open Mic. Mon, Fire Spinning. First Thursday of every month, Jazz & Coffee. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Aubergine Jul 6, Beso Negro. Jul 7, the Leftovers. Wed, 7pm, open mic. Mon, artist and model Mondays. Tues, Bluesy Tuesday. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

Bergamot Alley Jul 7, Lonesome Holler. Sun, Live Music. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Cinnabar Theater Jul 7, Due Zighi Baci. 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Heritage Public House Jul 6, Gypsy Jazz Caravan. 1901 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jul 3, Brainstorm. Tues, 7:30pm, open mic night. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hopmonk Sonoma Jul 5, Muncie California. Jul 6, Dan Martin. Jul 7, Lauren Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connell. Wed, Open Mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg Jul 6, Jimmy Gallagher Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room Jul 3, Lipbone Redding. Jul 4, Eric Cornforth & the Hicktown Homeboys. Jul 5, Wilson-Hukill Blues Revue. Jul 7, Danny Montana. Jul 10, Rusty Evans. Jul 6, Royal Deuces. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Station Jul 4, Jess Petty. Jul 5, Frankye Kelly. Jul 6, Yancie Taylor. Jul 7,

Jul 5, the Pulsators. Jul 7, the Chosen Few. 397 Aviation Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.765.2515.

Murphy’s Irish Pub Jul 6, Andrew Freeman. Wed, trivia night. Second Tuesday of every month, open mic. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Redwood Cafe Jul 5, Junk Parlor. Jul 6, the Bruthas. Thurs, Open Mic. First Friday of every month, Dginn. First Sunday of every month, Organix Guitar. Second Tuesday of every month, 9pm, Barnburners Poetry Slam. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

River Theatre Thurs, Thugz. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

Mystic Theatre

Riverside Bistro

Jul 5, Midnite, DJ Jacques, Pure Roots. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Fri, Jazz on the River with the Peter Welker Sextet. 54 E Washington St, Petaluma. 707.773.3200.

Olive & Vine Cafe Sun, Sunday Supper Club with Live Music. 14301 Arnold St, Glen Ellen. 707.996.9150.

Phoenix Theater Jul 5, Secret Cat, Rags, the Angus Scrimm, Rainbow Noir, Floral, NorthWestClue, Dj Scissorfeid. Jul 6, Sanctuary Lost, Boo Radley’s House, Waxwyng, Viral, Sepulchre. Jul 7, Bio Crisis, Ignit, Shadow of Progress, Refuge, Shit Show. Wed, 6pm, Jazz jam. Sun, 5pm, rock and blues jam. Mon, 7pm, young people’s AA. Tues, 7pm, Acoustic Americana jam.

The Rocks Bar & Lounge Fri and Sat, Top 40 DJs hosted by DJ Stevie B. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.782.0592.

Russian River Brewing Co Jul 7, Afro-Funk Experience. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Jul 6, JP Soden. Sun, Evening Jazz with Gary Johnson. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Society: Culture House Jul 3, Ricky Alan Ray. Jul 10, Kellythesinger. Wed, North Bay Blues Revue. Thurs, Casa Rasta. First Friday of every month, Neon with DJ Paul Timbermann & guests. Sun, Church on Sundays. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Studio E Jul 3 and , Jul 5, Jim Kweskin Jug Band. Address provided with tickets, Sebastopol.

Sunflower Center Jul 5, Gordon Rowland. Tues, Sunflower Music Series. 1435 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.792.5300.

Ron Carter Simply one of the greatest and most-recorded jazz bassists alive. Jul 3-4 at Yoshi’s Oakland.

RX Bandits “Metaphoric rock outfit” which features the most handsome man in Bennett Valley, Steve Choi. Jul 5 at Regency Ballroom.

Burger Boogaloo

Smiley’s

Jul 6, the Fondettes, Dolly’s Tap Dancers, Smart Fellers. 2727 Sulphur Springs Ave, St Helena. 707.251.8715.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Jul 5, Afrofunk Experience. Jul 6, Andre Nickatina. Jul 9, Kingsborough. Jul 10, Jeff Moon. Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Jul 5, Kevin Russel Band. Jul 6, Kathryn Keats with Michael Manring. Jul 7, Russo Alberts Trio. Wed, Blues Night. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Hopmonk Novato Jul 5, AgapeSoul. Jul 6, Pete Stringfellow. Jul 7, the Itals, Trinity. Wed, Open Mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club

A cello, a Wurlitzer, and perfectly matched harmonies from this classically inspired duo. Jul 7 at Bottom of the Hill.

Future Bible Heroes

Panama Hotel Restaurant

You Are Plural

Side project from members of Magnetic Fields, but heads up: Stephin Merritt is not playing. Jul 9 at the Independent.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

Sausalito Seahorse

White Barn

Jul 3, the Whiskey Sisters, Knight Drive, Makaela. First Sunday of every month, 19 Broadway Good Time Band. Mon, 9pm, open mic. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Redd Kross, Oblivians, Zeros, Mikal Cronin, Ty Seagall’s Fuzz and more. Jul 6-7 at Mosswood Park, Oakland.

Jul 4, Zydeco Flames. Jul 5, Mostly Joni. Jul 6, Pellejo Seco. Jul 7, Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band. Town Square, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Thurs, DJ Dave. Mon, Donny Maderos’ Pro Jam. Tues, Jeremy’s Open Mic. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Tradewinds

Jul 3, Eldon Brown Band. Jul 9, James Moseley Quartet. Jul 10, Audrey Moira Shimkas. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Jul 4, Fighting Smokey. Jul 5, Droptones. Jul 6, Soul Discipilz. Jul 10, Sticky’s

25

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Rancho Nicasio

Jul 5, Stephanie Teel Band. Jul 6, Ricardo Lemvo & Makina Loca. Jul 7, Orquestra la Modern Tradicion. Wed, Tango with Marcello & Seth. Sun, salsa class. Tues, Jazz with Noel Jewkes and friends. First Wednesday of every month, Tangonero. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito.

Fenix

San Francisco’s City Guide

Backyard. Jul 3, the Pickups. First Sunday of every month, Blues Jam. Mon, acoustic open mic. Tues, John Varn & Tom Odetto. First Thursday of every month, Biambu’s Groove Room. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Jul 3, Beso Negro. Jul 4, Beso Negro, High Tide Blues Collective. Jul 5, Charlie Docherty Band. Jul 6, This Old Earthquake. Wed, Larry’s karaoke. Sun, open mic. Mon, reggae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jul 3, Lady Rizo. Jul 5, Soul Jah Family Band, Lumanation. Jul 6, Sister Sparrow & the Dirty Birds. Jul 7, Dirty Cello. Jul 8, the Emma Lee Project. Jul 10, Bayside Jazz with Dan Hicks. Every other Wednesday, Wednesday Night Live. Mon, Open Mic. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Jul 5, Charles Wheel Band. Jul 6, Audio Farmers. Wed, Jumpstart. Sun, DJ Night. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Hydro Grill Jul 4, Maxx Cabello Jr & the Breakdown. Sun, 7pm, Swing Seven. Fri, Sat, blues. 1403 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.9777.

Lincoln Theater Jul 5, Dirty Cello. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Archers of Sugarloaf State park hosts weekly concert series Taking in a concert in the great outdoors—around here, it doesn’t get much better. Except, that is, when it’s combined with supporting a state park. Bill Myers calls it Funky Fridays, and it’s happening each week at Sugarloaf State Park. “Not many people even know there’s an amphitheater in the park,” says Myers, who also hosts monthly hikes in the park as a volunteer docent. This Friday, the Cork Pullers (above) take the stage at the 200plus-seat amphitheater, playing favorites from Doris Day to the Dead. Other bands in the series include A Case of the Willys, the Jami Jamison Band, Twang Ditty and more, continuing each week through Aug. 30. So far, the effort has raised about $1,000 per show to help keep the park open. It’s one of many fundraisers planned for the summer, including a Fourth of July hike to the top of Bald Mountain, with 360-degree views of almost 20 simultaneous fireworks displays. Funky Friday concerts run every Friday through Aug. 30 at Sugarloaf Ridge State Park. 2605 Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 6:30pm. Adults $10; kids 18 and under, free. Fourth of July hike is $50. 707.833.6288. —Nicolas Grizzle

Napa Valley Opera House

Silo’s

Uptown Theatre

Jul 7, Richard Glazier. Second Tuesday of every month, Cafe Theatre Comedy Series. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Jul 4, the BlackRock Project. Jul 6, CR Vibes. Wed, 7pm, jam session. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Jul 5, Del the Funky Homosapien, Bukue One, 4 two 7 & Ammbaataa. Jul 7, Katchafire, J Boog. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 – 9, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Mavericks

201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Peter Griffith

Eddie Neon. Jul 7, Slowpoke. Jul 9, Maple Profant. Jul 10, Willie Perez and Ken Ward. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Galleries RECEPTIONS Jul 5 At 6pm. Arts Guild of Sonoma, Carol Larsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s textile art. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115.

SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma Jul 3-30, Carol Larson, new to the gallery, shows her textile art. Reception, Jul 5, 6pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. WedThurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Backstreet Gallery Through Jul 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Color Fuse,â&#x20AC;? fused glass and abstract paintings by Kate E Black and Suzanne Edminster. Reception, Jul 13, 6pm. 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa.

Calabi Gallery Through Jul 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Intimate Enigmas,â&#x20AC;? abstract stone sculptures by Easton. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art of the Line,â&#x20AC;? describing Schulzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s process, from the tools he used to the research he undertook. Through Oct 14, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barking Up the Family Tree,â&#x20AC;? featuring comic strips with Snoopyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s siblings. Through Oct 27, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mid-Century Modern,â&#x20AC;? works of prominent post-war-era decorative, textile and furniture designers. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

At the Veterans Building 282 South High St. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707.829.4797 www.sebarts.org

Dutton-Goldfield Winery "Husband of the Earth" by Easton, 2012

Open Wed thru Sun, 11 to 5pm 144 Petaluma Blvd North, Petaluma

707tcalabigallery.com

Through Jul 19, Bert Kaplanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings on display. 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol. Daily, 10amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:30pm 707.827.3600.

Finley Community Center Through Aug 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shared Vision,â&#x20AC;? paintings by Kathy Cia White and Gary Albright. Through Aug 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Small Works

in Watercolor,â&#x20AC;? works by the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Friday Afternoon Classâ&#x20AC;? of senior artists. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 7; Sat, 9 to 1 707.543.3737.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven Through Aug 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hodge Podge,â&#x20AC;? mixed-media exhibit by artists from Becoming Independent and the Barracks Studio. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Jul 13, â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Gallery,â&#x20AC;? oil paintings by Jennifer Jaeger and watercolors by Lucy Arnold. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Aug 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Summer of 2013,â&#x20AC;? featuring pieces by Harley, Bill Shelley, Brian Wilson and Hugh Livingston. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

History Center Through Feb 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sculpture Trail,â&#x20AC;? outdoor exhibit with sculptures along Cloverdale Boulevard and Geyserville Avenue changing every nine months. 215 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale.

Peter Lowellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Through Jul 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Day with Goats & Divine Deliciousness,â&#x20AC;? photos by Ananda Fierro. 7385 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily 707.829.1077.

Quercia Gallery Through Jul 29, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Natures,â&#x20AC;? paintings, drawings and prints inspired by nature by Sandra Rubin and Alan Johnson. Reception, Jul 7, 3pm. 25193 Hwy 116, Duncans Mills. 707.865.0243.

RiskPress Gallery Jul 5-28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Words Fall Away,â&#x20AC;? paintings, drawings and monotypes by Claude Smith. Reception, Jul 13, 5pm. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Jul 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Faces of El Capitan,â&#x20AC;? fine art paintings by Jeffery T Williams. Through Jul 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Into the Deep,â&#x20AC;? underwater photography by Jeff Lemelin. Jul 10-Sep 8, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Juried Fine Art Show,â&#x20AC;? works from North Bay residents. Reception, Jul 13, 5pm. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Santa Rosa City Council Chambers

Through Aug 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Horse Play,â&#x20AC;? paintings and mixed media by John Denning. 23570 #D Arnold Dr, Sonoma.

Through Jul 10, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pinhole Photography,â&#x20AC;? works by Ira Meinhofer. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 9 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

John Denning Studio

Through Sep 26, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inspired by Nature,â&#x20AC;? quilted fiber arts by the Pointless Sisters. Reception, Jul 14, 3pm. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Through Jul 20, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Up, Up & Away,â&#x20AC;? expressing aspects of flight. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Local Color Gallery

Through Aug 18, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Margins to Mainstream,â&#x20AC;? seven contemporary artists with disabilities. Through Aug 18, Rodger Warnecke, Oakland artist, displays paintings after a 25-year hiatus from art. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Jul 10-Aug 11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Horizons,â&#x20AC;? paintings and drawings by Pamela Wallace and Linda Gamble. Reception, Jul 13, 2pm. 1580 Eastshore Rd, Bodega Bay. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.875.2744.

New Leaf Gallery Through Jul 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breaking Up Is Hard to Do,â&#x20AC;? new sculpture by Gordon Halloran. Through Jul 7, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ice Break,â&#x20AC;? new sculpture by Gordon Halloran. Cornerstone Place, 23588 Hwy 121, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.933.1300.

Sonoma County Museum

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Akin,â&#x20AC;? pieces by photographer Nicole Katano and painter Marc Katano. Through Aug 25, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stand by

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di Rosa Through Dec 31, Largest collection of contemporary Bay Area art. Tours daily. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

ECHO Gallery Through Jul 6, “The Great Wall of Doof,” installation by Tim Sharman. Through Jul 6, “Touch of Nature,” juried exhibition exploring the wild and wonderful ways of nature in all media. 1348 A Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.812.2201.

Gordon Huether Gallery OUR NATURES Work by Sandra Rubin is included at

Quercia Gallery’s new exhibit. See Galleries, adjacent.

Through Jul 31, “Norcal Modern,” new paintings by Grace Slick. 1465 First St, Napa. 707.255.5954.

Grand Hand Gallery Me,” photographs by Nicole Katano of the Sonoma Valley Mentoring Alliance. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center Through Aug 15, “Fantasy in Oils,” paintings by Marcia Chastain. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Towers Gallery Jul 5-Oct 6, “Hidden Treasures,” variety of styles from local artists. Reception, Jul 20, 5pm. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Through Jul 31, “Devil Moon,” paintings by Robert Gumpertz. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Bolinas Museum Through Aug 25, “Birds of the Sierra Nevada,” paintings by Keith Hansen. Through Aug 25, “Celebrating 30 years,” featuring historical pieces from the museum’s past. Through Aug 25, “Constructed Surfaces,” color photographs by Andy Rappaport. Through Aug 25, “Consuelo Kanaga,” pieces by the American photographer from the collection of Susie Tompkins Buell. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

Falkirk Cultural Center Through Aug 17, “Splendid Objects,” new works by 19

contemporary artists. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Gallery Bergelli Through Jul 10, “Ten Years of Water,” paintings by Pegan Brooke. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.945.9454.

Gallery Route One Through Jul 21, “GRO Artist Member Exhibition.” Salon, Jul 21, 4pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 27, “Breaking Barriers,” featuring work by Bay Area artists with disabilities. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin MOCA Through Jul 14, “Summer National Juried Exhibition,” featuring 45 pieces selected from hundreds of entries. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists Jul 7-Aug 3, “Fresh Art,” paintings by local artists. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. MonThurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jul 30, “Viewpoints II,” group show of photographs by O’Hanlon Center members and artists. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Through Jul 31, “American Juke Box,” photography by Christopher Felver. Through Jul 31, “Fruit Juice,” work incorporating or inspired by all things fruit. 1136 Main St, Napa. No phone.

Napa Valley Museum Through Jul 28, “Miles Davis,” sketches and oil paintings by jazz pioneer Miles Davis. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Tues-Sun, 10am to 4pm. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Tuesday Evening Comedy Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers. Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Events Biggest Little Parade Parade down Main Street followed by barbecue and music by Charlie Baker. Jul 7, 11am. Free. Penngrove Community Park, 11000 Main St, Penngrove.

Music Events Gordon Rowland J UL 6ƒ8:30pm-12:30amƒ$10ƒBenefit Concert

Roots Rocking Reggae Concert J oy of Learning, Inner Riddim

feauring Sky-I, Chris Levy & the Visionaries & Herb In Movement J UL 11ƒ5pmƒ$10ƒcommunity mixer & talk

Toby Hemenway ~ Permaculture, J UL 13ƒ8pmƒ$12-14ƒMaster Percussionist & Team & Belly Dance Concert

Souhail Kaspar & Ziva Emtiyaz J UL 28ƒ8pmƒ$20ƒEcstatic Kirtan & Classical Indian Dance

Rasa Lila Jai Uttal & Nubia Teixeira PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT W W W.LYDIASORGANICS.COM /.$%08&--#-7%t1&5"-6."t$"

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Open House

Wed, Jul 3 10:15am– 12:45pm 7–10pm

Drop-in

Boxing

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8:45–9:45am; 5:45-6:45pm Jazzercise SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE Youth and Family Singles & Pairs Square Dance Club

Thur, Jul 4 Happy Fourth of July

Sessions

Now Open! Meet the Trainers Tour the Gym

Marin County Fair Short but sweet, this year’s entertainment includes: Jul 3, “Weird” Al Yankovic; Jul 4, the Kingston Trio; Jul 4, Eddie Money; Jul 5, Zendaya; Jul 5, Ozomatli; Jul 6, ) Nitty Gritty Dirt

Lydia’s Organics

J UL 5ƒ8pmƒ$12ƒJazz & flamenco guitarist

350 E St Ste 102 ground floor

707.5 40.0 185 Santa Rosa

Fri, Jul 5 7:15–11pm

8:45–9:45am Jazzercise Steve Luther hosts a WEST COAST SWING PARTY

Sat, Jul 6

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise

Sun, Jul 7 5–9:25pm

8:30–9:30am Jazzercise DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING

Mon, Jul 8 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 5:45–6:45pm Jazzercise 7–9:25pm SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING Tues, Jul 9 8:45–9:45am Jazzercise 7:30pm–9pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC & DANCE

Santa Rosa’s Social Hall since 1922 1400 W. College Avenue • Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 • www.monroe-hall.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 – 9, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Sandra Rubin Quercia

NAPA COUNTY

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9, 20 1 3 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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707.226.7372 707.226.73 372

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Band; Jul 6, the Wailers; Jul 7, Mariachi Sol de Mexico de JosĂŠ Hernandez; Jul 7, the Pointer Sisters. Jul 3-7. Prices vary. Marin Fairgrounds, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael.

Preschool Storytime A lap-sit program for infants, one day to 17 months old, accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Fri, 10:45am. free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma, 707.763.9801.

Puppet Show

Thursday, July 18, 8 PM Experience the impressive and innovative sound of this showcase! TO PURCHASE TICKETS OR FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT NVOH.ORG

OK LIKE US ON FACEBO S! FOR SPECIAL OFFER www.facebook.com/napavalleyoperahouse www .facebook.com/napavalleyoperahouse

Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

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Master storyteller Rebecah Freeling brings her handmade friends to tell stories for preschoolers. Every other Sat, 11am. Free. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Python Ronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reptile Kingdom Kids get the chance to get up close and personal with unusual members of the animal kingdom. Jul 3, 11am. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma, 707.763.9801.

Quilt & Flower Show

Yo el Rey Roasting and Arthouse

Savory Lunch Menu Aromatic Loose Teas

Tudor Rose English Tea Room Traditional English Tea Room with a Slice of Silliness Reservations Recommended Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sunday, 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6

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Hundreds of hand-made quilts and beautiful flowers. Jul 7, 10am. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

Red, White & Boom Kids activities throughout the day and music by Wonderbread 5, Pat Jordan Band and Court â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Disaster, with fireworks after dark. Jul 4, 4pm. $5-$10. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.545.4200.

Story Time for Wee Ones Stories and interactive multicultural folktales (some with Spanish) for children age 4 to 7 led by Cynthia Conway. Wed, 11am. through Jul 31. Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500.

ECHO GALLERY

Yo Y oe ell R Rey ey A Arthouse r t h o us e P Presents r es e n t s

Israel Israel Valencia V alencia

Naturale Naturaleza a eza Elegante E legante Opening O pening Sat S at JJuly ul y 6 8pm 8p m also a lso ssee ee o our ur o other ther llocation o c a t io n a att 1 1348 348 LLincoln in c o l n A Ave ve

Field Trips Bald Mountain Hike Bill & Daveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hikes presents a hike to view 18 different fireworks from one location. Jul 4, 7pm. $50. Sugarloaf

Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood.

Marin Moonshiners Hike Monthly three-mile hike to experience sunset, moonrise, picnic and spectacular views. Pack your own picnic. Second Tues monthly at 7:30. $15. Pelican Inn, 10 Pacific Way, Muir Beach, RSVP. 415.331.0100.

Film Film Night Jul 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Return of the Jedi.â&#x20AC;? 8pm. Free. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

Food & Drink Civic Center Farmers Market Sun at 10am, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eat Local 101â&#x20AC;? provides walking tour with information, cooking advice and ideas inspired by locally grown foods. Thurs, 8am-1pm and Sun, 8am-1pm. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 800.897.3276.

Corte Madera Farmers Market Wed, noon-5pm. Town Center, Tamalpais Drive, Corte Madera. 415.382.7846.

Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg. Wed-Sat, 9amnoon. Healdsburg Farmers Market, North and Vine streets, Healdsburg, 707.431.1956.

Ice Cream Social Celebrate the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 30 years with ice cream and music by Charlie Docherty. Jul 5, 2pm. Free. Bolinas Museum, 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

Redwood Empire Farmers Market Sat, 8:30am-1pm and Wed, 8:30am-noon. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market Sat, 9am-1pm and Wed, 9am1pm. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.522.8629.

Sonoma Valley Certified Farmers Market Fri, 9am to 12:30pm. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma, 707.538.7023.

Tam Valley Farmers Market Local artisan food, flowers and crafts. Tues, 3pm. Shoreline Shopping Center, 219 Shoreline Highway, Mill Valley.

Wednesday Night Market

Courtyard Cocktail Party

Food, vendors, produce, live music and activities. Wed, 5pm. through Aug 21. Free. Downtown Santa Rosa, Fourth and B streets, Santa Rosa.

Honoring Ewan Mcdonald and his efforts to restore the museum. Jul 3, 5:30pm. $25. Bolinas Museum, 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.0330.

Lectures

Fairfax Community Farmers Market Offering artisanal foods and locally grown and raised agricultural products. Wed, 4pm, through Sep 24. Free. Bolinas Park, 124 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax.

Forestville Farmers Market Tues, 3-7pm. Russian River Vineyards, 5700 Hwy 116, Forestville, 707.887.3344.

Fourth of July Picnic Three course menu with top notch cocktails available. Jul 4, 3pm. $38. Spoonbar, 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Healdsburg Farmers Market Wed, 4-7pm. Downtown

Art Uncorked Recreate masterpieces in this fun painting class. First Thurs of every month, 6:30pm. $45. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Ask a Historian Research Advisory Council tackles tough questions posed by moderator, first Sun monthly at 2:30. First Sun of every month. Free. Napa County Historical Society, Goodman Library, 1219 First St, Napa. www.napahistory.org.

Basic Jewelry Design Learn to construct beautiful earrings with Denise Ward. Jul 6, 12pm. $35. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St at

East Washington, Petaluma, 707.762.5600.

WEILL W EILL HALL HALL Sonoma

29

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State Universit University ty

presents pr esen ts the

Learn the basics and details of beekeeping. First Sat of every month. Free. Whole Foods Market, 790 De Long Ave, Novato. 415.878.0455.

Bounty Mutineers Dr Robert Kirk discusses the Pitcairn Island and the Bounty Mutineers of 1790. Jul 6, 2pm. Free. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma, 707.763.9801.

Readings Book Passage Jul 3, 1:30pm, Bay Area Writing Project Author’s Chair Celebration. Jul 9, 7pm, “My Animal, My Self: A Breakthrough Way to Understand How You and Your Animal Reflect Each Other” with Marta Williams. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

PINK I MART ARTINI AR RTINI T GOOD MORNIN’! It’s closing weekend for ‘Singin’ in

gmc.sonoma.edu mc.sonoma.edu

the Rain’ at Sixth Street Playhouse. See Theater, below.

866.955.6040

Hopmonk Sebastopol Jul 9, 6pm, “The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls” with Anton DiSclafani. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol 707.829.7300.

Point Reyes Books Jul 9, 7pm, Marin Poetry Center’s Summer Traveling Show. Second Monday of every month, 7pm, Knit Lit group. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1542.

Redwood Cafe Second Tuesday of every month, 8:30pm, Slamazon Poetry Slam, all-women’s open mic with competitive poetry and a headlining poet. $5-$10. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jul 10, 7pm, Redwood Writers Fiction Panel. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Santa Rosa High School Jul 6, 6:30pm, “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” with Neil Gaiman. Sold out. 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Theater Broadway Under the Stars Professional stage actors from

Sunday unday, y, July u 14

GREEN G R EE N MUSIC M USI C CENTER C E NT TER MasterCard, Priceless and the MasterCard Brand Mark ar aree registered registered trademarks of MasterCard MasteerCard International Incorporated. ©2013 MasterCard.

New York and Los Angeles perform pieces from Broadway favorites. Jun 28-30, Jul 5-6, “Fly Me to the Moon”; Jul 1920, “Fantastical Family Night”; Aug 9-10, 15-17, “Dancing Through Life”; Aug 30-31, “Gala Celebration.” Fri-Sat, 5pm. through Jul 6. $29-$117. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen, 707.938.5216.

Evita The story of Eva Peron, wife of the Argentine dictator Juan Peron. Directed by John DeGaetano. Fri-Sat, 8pm and Sun, 2pm. through Jul 14. $25-$30. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg, 707.433.3145.

Kitchen Kut-Ups Senior variety show with the theme of “Travelin’ Show.” Sat, Jul 6, 1pm and Tues, Jul 9, 1pm. $16. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park, 707.588.3400.

Mark & Dre Comedy Show The carnival of chaos is fun for the whole family. Jul 10, 11am. Free. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville, 707.869.9004.

Scapino Saucy, slapstick comedy about

a devious valet who helps two pairs of lovers overcome parental opposition. Thurs-Sun, 7:30pm. through Jul 13. $15$30. Redwood Amphitheatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross.

Singin’ in the Rain This 1920s-set romantic comedy is full of classic songs. Times vary. Thurs-Sun through Jul 7. $15-$35. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

The Spanish Tragedy Marin Shakespeare Company opens summer season with the play credited as the inspiration for “Hamlet.” Sun, 4pm and Fri-Sun, 8pm. through Aug 11. $20-$38. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

4pm

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 3 – 9, 20 1 3 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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Astrology

BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of July 3

ARIES (March 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;April 19)

In his book The Fisher King and the Handless Maiden, Robert Johnson says many of us are as much in debt with our psychic energy as we are with our ďŹ nancial life. We work too hard. We rarely refresh ourselves with silence and slowness and peace. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get enough sleep or good food or exposure to nature. And so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re routinely using up more of our reserves than we are able to replenish. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re chronically running a deďŹ cit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is genius to store energy,â&#x20AC;? says Johnson. He recommends creating a plan to save it up so that you always have more than enough to draw on when an unexpected opportunity arrives. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to make this a habit, Aries.

TAURUS (April 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;May 20)

In the course of your long life, I estimate you will come up with approximately 60,000 really good ideas. Some of these are small, like those that help you decide how to spend your weekend. Some are big ones, like those that reveal the best place for you to live. As your destiny unfolds, you go through phases when you have fewer good ideas than average, and other phases when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re overďŹ&#x201A;owing with them. The period youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in right now is one of the latter. You are a fountain of bright notions, intuitive insights and fresh perspectives. Take advantage of the abundance, Taurus. Solve as many riddles and dilemmas as you can.

GEMINI (May 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;June 20) No one knows the scientiďŹ c reasons why long-distance runners sometimes get a â&#x20AC;&#x153;second wind.â&#x20AC;? Nonetheless, such a thing exists. It allows athletes to resume their peak efforts after seemingly having reached a point of exhaustion. According to my reading of the astrological omens, a metaphorical version of this happy event will occur for you sometime soon, Gemini. You made a good beginning but have been ďŹ&#x201A;agging a bit of late. Any minute now, though, I expect you will get your second wind. CANCER (June 21â&#x20AC;&#x201C;July 22) Thomas Gray was a renowned 18th-century English poet best remembered for his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard.â&#x20AC;? It was a short poemâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;only 986 words, which is less than the length of this horoscope column. On the other hand, it took him seven years to write it, or an average of 12 words per month. I suspect that you are embarking on a labor of love that will evolve at a gradual pace, too, Cancerian. It might not occupy you for seven years, but it will probably take longer than you imagine. And yet, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly how long it should take. This is a character-building, life-deďŹ ning project that canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t and shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be rushed.

LEO (July 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;August 22) The 18th-century German philosopher Georg Christoph Lichtenberg accepted the possibility that some humans have the power of clairvoyance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;second sightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; possessed by the Highlanders in Scotland is actually a foreknowledge of future events,â&#x20AC;? he wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe they possess this gift because they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wear trousers. That is also why in all countries women are more prone to utter prophecies.â&#x20AC;? I bring this to your attention, Leo, because I believe that in the coming weeks youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re likely to catch accurate glimpses of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to comeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not wearing pants. VIRGO (August 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;September 22)

Were you nurtured well by caring adults in the ďŹ rst year of your life? If so, I bet you now have the capacity to ďŹ x whateverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ailing your tribe or posse. You could offer some inspiration that will renew everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motivation to work together. You might improve the group communication as you strengthen the foundation that supports you all. And what about if you were not given an abundance of tender love as a young child? I think you will still have the power to raise your crewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mood, but you may end up kicking a few butts along the way.

LIBRA (September 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;October 22)

Summing up his experiment in living at Walden Pond, naturalist Henry David Thoreau said this: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I learned that if one advances conďŹ dently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will

pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws will be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings.â&#x20AC;? Given the astrological factors that will be impacting your life in the next 12 months, Libra, you might consider adopting this philosophy as your own.

SCORPIO (October 23â&#x20AC;&#x201C;November 21) Thirteen thousand years ago, lions and mammoths and camels roamed parts of North America. But along with many other large beasts, they ultimately became extinct. Possible explanations for their demise include climate change and overhunting by humans. In recent years a group of biologists has proposed a plan to repopulate the Western part of the continent with similar species. They call their idea â&#x20AC;&#x153;re-wilding.â&#x20AC;? In the coming months, Scorpio, I suggest you consider a re-wilding program of your own. Cosmic forces will be on your side if you reinvigorate your connection to the raw, primal aspects of both your own nature and the great outdoors.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;December 21) Who was Russiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest poet? Many critics say it was Alexander Pushkin, who lived in the 19th century. His abundant creativity was undoubtedly related to his unruly libido. By the time he was 31 years old, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d had 112 lovers. But then he met his ultimate muse, the lovely and intelligent Natalya Goncharova, to whom he remained faithful. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without you,â&#x20AC;? he wrote to her, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would have been unhappy all my life.â&#x20AC;? I half-expect something comparable to happen for you in the next 10 months, Sagittarius. You may either ďŹ nd an unparalleled ally or else ďŹ nally ripen your relationship with an unparalleled ally youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve known for a while. One way or another, I bet you will commit yourself deeper and stronger.

CAPRICORN (December 22â&#x20AC;&#x201C;January 19) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grease Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a time when you need to make sure everything is as well-oiled as possible. Does your car need a quart of Castrol? Is it time to bring more extra virgin olive oil into your kitchen? Do you have any K-Y Jelly in your nightstand, just in case? Are there creaky doors or stuck screws or squeaky wheels that could use some WD-40? Be liberal with the lubrication, Capricornâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;both literally and metaphorically. You need smooth procedures and natural transitions. AQUARIUS (January 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;February 18) Two years into the War of 1812, British soldiers invaded Washington, D.C. They set ďŹ re to the White House and other government buildings. The ďŹ&#x201A;ames raged out of control, spreading in all directions. The entire city was in danger of burning. In the nick of time, a ďŹ erce storm hit, producing a tornado and heavy rains. Most of the ďŹ res were extinguished. Battered by the weather, the British army retreated. Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital was saved. I predict that you, Aquarius, will soon be the beneďŹ ciary of a somewhat less dramatic example of this series of events. Give thanks for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;lucky storm.â&#x20AC;?

PISCES (February 19â&#x20AC;&#x201C;March 20)

Like the legendary Most Interesting Man in the World who shills for Dos Equis beer, you will never step in gum on the sidewalk or lose a sock in the coming weeks. Your cereal will never get soggy; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll sit there, staying crispy, just for you. The pheromones you secrete will affect people miles away. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have the power to pop open a pinata with the blink of your eye. If you take a Rorschach test, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ace it. Ghosts will sit around campďŹ res telling stories about you. Cafes and restaurants may name sandwiches after you. If you so choose, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to live vicariously through yourself. You will give your guardian angel a sense of security.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

žų NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN | JULY 3-9, 2013 | BOHEMIAN.COM

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