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Bohemian

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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 Editor Gabe Meline, ext. 202

Staff Writers

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Calendar Editor Nicolas Grizzle, ext. 200

Interns Holly Abrahams, Jay Scherf, Catherine Zaw

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Contributors Michael Amsler, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Suzanne Daly, Stett Holbrook, James Knight, Jacquelynne OcaĂąa, Juliane Poirier, Bruce Robinson, Sara Sanger, Bruce Stengl, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow, Ken Weaver, Ryan White

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, California Newspaper Publishers Association. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at over 1,100 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40% recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers Š2011 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo of Ale Eckstrom by Michael Amsler. Cover design by Kara Brown.

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Teenagers in Kansas don’t get to hop in the Valiant and drive to the ocean. I try to remember that. Especially in the summertime.

This photo was submitted by Nik Catalina of Santa Rosa. Submit your photo to photos@bohemian.com.

‘They find them with their zippers down most of the time, believe it or not.’ COVER STORY P17

What Will Monsanto Think Up Next? T H E PAP E R P 8

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2012-2013 SEASON

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BOHEMIAN

Rhapsodies It Takes a Village School volunteers are making a difference BY GRETCHEN WERNER

I

t takes a village to raise a child.” While the origins of this proverb are still being debated, it does honor the influence that individuals outside the family have on a child’s development.

For over 14 years, volunteers have been quietly helping our dedicated public school teachers raise Sonoma County students. School volunteers, working one-to-one with students, have a significant impact on student success. Volunteer tutors help students increase their academic skills as well as promote more positive attitudes toward learning and school. School volunteers in the Volunteer Center of Sonoma County’s Literacy Connection work one-to-one with students to increase reading and math skills in grades K–12. Tutors in the United Way of the Wine Country’s Schools of Hope work one-to-one with students to increase literacy rates in grades K–3. Last year, 517 volunteers made a difference in the lives of 3,690 students. In fact, every school day there are volunteers somewhere at work in our public schools, helping our teachers improve the future outlook of our community. These volunteers actively support economic initiatives such as Upstream Investments, Healthy Sonoma 2020 and Cradle to Career. Volunteers are having a direct impact on student achievement as reported by teachers. However, Sonoma County’s need is great. Our village needs more volunteer school tutors. We have 5,564 first graders and 54 percent of them will not be proficient readers by the end of third grade. We have 5,767 ninth graders and 22 percent of them will not graduate from high school on time. To address this need, the Literacy Connection and Schools of Hope programs are expanding to new schools and increasing the number of grade levels served at participating schools. We need over 300 new volunteer tutors this school year. I encourage anyone who has a desire to help a child succeed to become a volunteer tutor. No experience is necessary. The Volunteer Center of Sonoma County, Literacy Connection recruits, trains, and matches volunteers with the needs of students and teachers in our community. For information, call 707.573.3399, ext. 121. Volunteer orientations begin in August with a special event on Aug. 23. Gretchen Werner is a Literacy Associate for the Volunteer Center of Sonoma County. We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

By the Book

The statement by Jose Guillén that “all references to 12 Step have been removed” is incorrect (“Step by Step,” July 11). The newly revised Participant’s Guide to Drug Court says, “regular attendance at group self-help meetings such as a 12 Step program or other alternative programs.” Alternatives are not listed anywhere in county literature and are not mentioned specifically in this document. Guillén “likens the choices in Sonoma County to a cafeteria menu, where defendants are encouraged to choose their mode of selfhelp,” but there are zero options listed anywhere in county literature.

BYRON KERR Santa Rosa

Not About God After reading your article about Mr. Kerr’s successful “crusade” to allow more secular options for those who have been convicted of either drug or alcohol related offenses, I was impressed, first, at how easy it seemed to be for this one fellow to have the courts capitulate to his threat that they were violating the First Amendment. And second, that the courts were not willing or able to find out that what Mr. Kerr was claiming is not entirely accurate. While it is true that Alcoholics Anonymous does come from and suggests that you find a way to accept the religion-based form of God, it is not a requirement. And, yes, they pray before and after the meeting. I was a member of AA for more than a year and left for the very reason complained about in this article. As someone who actually participated in and practiced the 12 Steps, I was turned off by the concept, because I could not stomach the constant references to the “great old white guy in the sky” idea of God. I was told constantly I didn’t have to believe in God but that I should find some sort of “higher power” for this 12 Step process to work. But the direct

references that appeared in the book and in the meetings themselves to the religious dogma were too much for me. That was AA. What I wasn’t aware of at the time was the sister program Narcotics Anonymous. In NA, references to any religious dogma are forbidden. While the book uses the word “God,” it is truly just a word used to describe a higher power. A higher power is something greater than yourself, plain and simple. The other advantage to the use of NA as a source for recovery is that they don’t discriminate between substances; a drug (alcohol) is a drug, as opiates or any other substance (more than 200 identified addictions) is a drug.

The 12 Step process is just that, a process, and one that has proven itself for many years as the most successful recovery tool there is today. It is worldwide for a reason. This one fellow who has taken it upon himself to discredit a process that has saved many lives and families, based on an uninformed belief that this process is a form of indoctrination into religion and, as such, is a violation of the First Amendment, is truly doing those in need of serious help a great disservice.

NAME WITHHELD BY REQUEST San Rafael

Stinkin’ Illuminati Jay Scherf writes, “The entrance to the Bohemian Grove has become a soapbox for 9-11 conspiracy theorists, protesters of fluoridated water and SmartMeters, and those claiming club members are Illuminati or practice satanic worship” (“Bogus Bohemia,” July 11.) Wait a doggone minute. I’m on that same soapbox right up to and maybe (someday) including the Illuminati bit. Ridicule is easy. Royalty once laughed at the idea of people electing their leaders. Ever since COINTELPRO and Iran-Contra, it’s been clear that something beyond mere greed and testosterone wants to run the world, in oblivious domination of millions of hard-working, honest people who just want to take care of their families.

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

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Yeah, we don’t need no stinkin’ Illuminati for sociopathic people in high places to wreck things. They are not the smartest guys in the room, just smart enough to avoid being stabbed in the back by their peers, lucky enough to be born into wealthy families, and mentally ill enough to see the rest of us as subhuman. We don’t need them to be secret Reptilians to explain their penchant for poisoning us all, stealing our resources and indebting future generations in order to get private jets and multiple houses. Remember, 15 percent of Americans have less wealth than six members of the Walton family. Laughing at SmartMeter and 9-11 activists is as narrow minded as the 1% wants you to be. Not that they’ll ever thank you.

LAUREN AYERS Sonoma

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.

Top Five 1

“Johnny Depp at Lagunitas” rumor continues to spread. Was he there?

2

Tavola Italian Kitchen countersues Francis Ford Coppola for dumb lawsuit

3

Coachella announces festival on a cruise ship; “indie” officially dead

4 RIP Marin author, father

and Pulitzer recipient Philip Fradkin, 1935–2012

5 Boy Scouts reaffirm

ban on gay members, cement dinosaur status

Carson Chase

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7

THE

Paper BLEECH Opponents of Proposition 37 claim labeling genetically engineered food will be costly, potentially driving jobs out of state.

Freak Foods

GMO labeling seems like a no-brainer, but initiative opposition does exist BY CATHERINE ZAW

O

ver the last several years, awareness of genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, has spread, as has the call for required labeling on food that’s been genetically modified. On the November ballot, California’s Proposition 37, if passed, would do just that.

Called the Right to Know Genetically Engineered Food Act, it’s already gathering widespread support. The Right to Know campaign in California reports that it took roughly 10 weeks to obtain close to 1 million signatures in its petition to place the requirement of labeling for GMO foods. “In Sonoma County, we had 200 volunteers to help us collect signatures,” says Karen Hudson, one of the Sonoma County co-

coordinators for Right to Know. “We’re a completely grassroots volunteer movement. People are really passionate about this. In Sonoma County, we collected about 35,000 signatures when we were just expecting 10,000.” According to a national poll conducted by Just Label It, 92 percent of Americans want the FDA to label genetically engineered food. Another study by IBOPE (formerly Zogby

Bruce Stengl

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8

International) reports support at 87 percent. But what might seem like a simple issue—who of us doesn’t want to know what’s in our food?—has opposition in the form of a group calling itself Stop the Costly Food Labeling Proposition, which says the labeling proposal is extreme and would put “California farmers and food companies at a competitive disadvantage,” because these labels would not be required outside of California. The opposition also criticizes Proposition 37 for having “arbitrary exemptions” to its labeling requirements. Under the proposition, foods for immediate consumption—restaurant foods and alcoholic beverages—and meat from animals fed GE products do not have to be labeled as genetically engineered. Additionally, the site states that labeling would “increase food costs paid by California consumers.” These types of arguments might sound familiar in Sonoma County. In 2004, Sonoma County voted down Measure M, a 10year moratorium on growing genetically engineered crops in the county. Although Measure M was considerably stricter than the current debate on GMO labeling, Dave Henson, cofounder of the GE Free Sonoma movement, reports that the public had seemed overwhelmingly supportive. So why didn’t the measure pass at the ballot box? Henson believes this was mostly due to lobbying efforts against the measure from biotech and big agricultural industries, adding that over a half million dollars was spent lobbying against the measure. This year, Henson predicts, “[the opposition] will say the labeling will drive up prices, scare jobs out of California and create other concerns related to our tough economic times. It’ll be the biotech companies for sure, and they’ll be hiding behind [people who] will look like citizens. But the folks in Right to Know have been doing a great job getting the word out about what the initiative really does.” “In this day and age, two issues are helping people decide what to eat,” explains Paul Wallace, manager of Baker Creek Heirloom

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‘I LOVE EVERYBODY’ Ashok Kumar has a loyal customer base that follows him quite literally around the world.

Kumar’s Castle Avatar’s Punjabi Burrito lives up to its grandiose reputation BY JESSICA DUR TAYLOR

A

week after opening his first restaurant, Ashok Kumar could not sleep. It was November 1989, and trying to run a nonsmoking establishment, even in a forward-thinking place like Sausalito, was proving very difficult indeed. “Twenty people would come in,” Kumar says, “and when

we had no ashtrays to give them, 10 would leave.” So even though they had no money, 20-year-old Kumar and his brother-in-law, Avatar, borrowed another thousand dollars from the bank, printed up invitations and hosted a free feast, replete with beer and wine. “It was the day before Thanksgiving, and we wanted to give something to the community,” Kumar tells me on a recent morning, as we sip coffee at the third of his five Avatar’s

Punjabi Burrito restaurants, in Petaluma. That first year they served 46 people. Last year, the day-beforeThanksgiving meal, a running tradition in Sausalito now for 23 years, drew 1,147 diners, from as far away as Sacramento, and was broadcast live by Channel 2. Even Bonnie Raitt—whom Kumar calls one of his best customers—has helped wash dishes. The sleepless nights are over. The Sausalito restaurant, now a favorite of folks like Robin

Williams and Talking Heads’ Jerry Harrison, soon spawned another iteration in Mill Valley. Though Avatar passed away 12 years ago, Kumar’s sister Kala is still head chef, and together with his wife, Saru, they continue to run a family business. Two years ago, Bruce Osterlye, owner of the beloved Aram’s Cafe on Petaluma’s well-trafficked Kentucky Street, approached Kumar with an offer to sell. Kumar did not hesitate. He wrote a check within the week and kept the same chefs, who are still cooking for him today. Two more restaurants, in Larkspur and Fairfax, have opened in the past few months. How did this oncefledgling eatery become so popular that an average of 150 people dine at each location every day? The answer lies in the food itself, which Kumar describes as IndianMexican, Indian-Jamaican and Indian-Cajun fusion. Instead of the heavy, rich food that many Americans associate with Indian cooking, Avatar’s food is light, cooked only in olive oil, never butter. “In 23 years, no one has ever sent a dish back,” Kumar tells me with a flourish of his hand. And while he is given to grandiosity (“You cannot find this food anywhere on the planet!”), I am inclined to believe him. With dishes like pumpkin enchiladas ($12), Jamaican jerk venison ($18) and curried lamb burritos ($8), the “purveyor of ethnic confusions” has created a dining experience not likely to be replicated, or forgotten. It’s not every day that you find the flavors of homemade yogurt, tamarind, pickled carrots, salsa and fruit chutney complementing each other on one plate. Unlike many restaurants that frown upon special requests, Avatar’s invites customers to be specific and exacting in their needs. “Please challenge me,” Kumar says, “and we will create anything you need—gluten-free, vegan, low carb, low sodium, whatever you want.” He even blends food for a regular customer who is on a liquid diet. The Petaluma menu is rife with choices—burritos, enchiladas and rice plates come with choice of

Avatar’s Punjabi Burrito, 131 Kentucky St., Petaluma. 707.765.9775.

13

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chicken, ground turkey, tofu, lamb, rock shrimp, crab, salmon, sea bass or ahi. Drinks include sweet and salty lassis, chai, homemade lemonade and ginger beer. When it comes to dessert, however, there is only one option, Avatar’s Dream, which is described with a directive: “Close your eyes and picture the sweetest concoction of dessert flavors from around the world coming full circle on one plate of bliss.” While it’s unlikely that you just pictured a wedge of almond gelato on a chocolate graham cracker crust topped with pistachio marzipan and drizzled with mango and rose petal syrup, it’s also unlikely that this sublime dessert would disappoint anyone. Beneath sparkling eyes, Kumar weaves a rags-to-riches tale full of karmic give and take. There are those who helped him—his parents, who, though poor and raising nine children, were committed to education, which led him to UC Berkeley in 1987; the 70 employees of Autodesk who, in 1989, took a chance on the new restaurant next door and became some of its most loyal customers. And then there are those he loves to help. Kumar, still the sole server in Sausalito, invites his customers to leave their résumés with him, which he then periodically gives to dining CEOs looking to hire new employees. He hosts an annual pancake breakfast fundraiser for the Sausalito public schools that last year brought in $16,000. And when he announced five years ago that he was closing his restaurant for a couple of weeks while he traveled to his nephew’s wedding, his customers were despondent. “Come to India with me!” Kumar told them, and though he was mostly joking, 72 of them took him up on it. Not many people can honestly say, “I love everybody,” but after spending an hour with Kumar, the sentiment is entirely believable. “The second time I see you, I remember you,” Kumar smiles, “and by the third time, we are friends.”

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Dining Our selective list of North Bay restaurants is subject to menu, pricing and schedule changes. Call first for confirmation. Restaurants in these listings appear on a rotating basis. For expanded listings, visit www.bohemian.com. COST: $ = Under $12; $$ = $13-$20; $$$ = $21-$26; $$$$ = Over $27

Rating indicates the low to average cost of a full dinner for one person, exclusive of desserts, beverages and tip.

S O N OM A CO U N T Y Arrigoni’s Delicatessen & Cafe Deli. $. A perennial favorite with the downtown lunch crowd. Breakfast and lunch, Mon-Sat. 701 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.1297.

Cafe La Haye CaliforniaFrench. $$-$$$. The very best Sonoma ingredients are married with nouvelle French cooking styles at this comfortable bistro. Dinner, Tues-Sat. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.935.5994.

Gaia’s Garden Vegetarian. $. International buffet with simple, homestyle food for just a few bucks, including curry and dahl, enchiladas, eggplant parmesan and homemade bread. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Hikuni Sushi Bar & Hibachi Japanese. $$$. Terrific teppanyaki plus a full sushi bar, tonkatsu, udon and bento. Lunch and dinner daily. 4100 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.539.9188.

Larry Vito’s BBQ Smokehouse Barbecue. $-$$. Southern-style and slow-cooked from a chef who’s worked with Wolfgang Puck and Alice Waters. Zing! 6811 Laguna Park Way, Sebastopol. 707.575.3277.

Nonni’s Ristorante Italiano Italian. $$. Hearty family recipes served with neighborly hospitality. Familyowned. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 420 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.0222.

Risibisi Italian. $$-$$$. An oasis of urbanity that will transport you to New York, Paris even. The menu keeps freshly seasonal and changes weekly. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 154 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.766.7600.

Rosso Pizzeria & Wine Bar Pizza. $-$$. Friendly, plentiful staff at outstanding and creative pizzeria. Excellent and affordable wine list. Creekside Center, 53 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.544.3221.

Sizzling Tandoor Indian. $-$$. A Sonoma County legend for almost 20 years, and for good reason. Of the more than 100 menu choices, all are worthwhile. Lunch, Mon-Sat; dinner daily. 409 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.5999.

flavor. Zagat-rated with much of the produce from its own gardens. Dinner, Wed-Sun; brunch, Sun. 3535 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4814.

premier spot on Sausalito’s spirited waterfront. Breakfast and lunch daily. 660 Bridgeway, Ste 3, Sausalito. 415.289.1195.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Brewpub. $$.

MA R I N CO U N T Y

Pub grub gets a pub-cuisine facelift. Lunch, Sat-Sun; dinner daily. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Avatar’s Indian-plus. $.

Joe’s Taco Lounge & Salsaria Mexican. $. Mostly

Fantastic East-meets-West fusion of Indian, Mexican, Italian and American, with dishes customized to your palate. Lunch and dinner, MonSat. 2656 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.8083.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Italian. $$. Hearty and flavorful food in authentic neighborhood-style Italian restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.927.2316.

Buckeye Roadhouse

Syrah California-French. $$$. Sophisticated cuisine in restaurant or indoor courtyard. Seasonally changing menu and inventive desserts. Lunch, MonFri; dinner daily. 205 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4002.

American. $$-$$$. A Marin County institution. Delightful food, friendly and seamless service, and a convivial atmosphere. Try one of the many exotic cocktails. Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sun. 15 Shoreline Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.331.2600.

Tres Hombres Mexican.

Casa Mañana Mexican.

$-$$. Excellent food in Petaluma’s Theater District, and a fun place to hang before or after a flick.Lunch and dinner daily; brunch, Sat-Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.773.4500.

$. Big burritos a stone’s throw from the perfect picnic spot: Perri Park. The horchata is divine. Lunch and dinner daily. 85 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.454.2384.

Drake’s Beach Cafe

authentic Mexican menu with American standbys. Lunch and dinner daily; takeout, too. 382 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.8164.

Marin Brewing Co Pub food. $-$$. Excellent soups, salads, pub grub and awardwinning pork-beer sausage. Lunch and dinner daily. 1809 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.4677. Mountain Home Inn American. $$-$$$$. Great summer sandwiches with a view atop Mt Tamalpais. Breakfast, Sat-Sun; lunch and dinner, Wed-Sun. 810 Panoramic Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.9000.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

The Underwood’s classy bistro menu and impressive bar belie its rural setting. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 9113 Graton Rd, Graton. 707.823.7023.

Californian. $$-$$$. More dinner party than restaurant, and the food is fresh and amazing. A meal to remember. Lunch, Thurs-Sun; dinner, Fri-Sat. 1 Drake’s Beach Rd, Pt Reyes National Seashore. 415.669.1297.

Vineyards Inn Spanish.

Easy Street Cafe

$$. Authentic foods from Spain, fresh fish off the fire broiler, extensive tapas, as well as paellas and more. Emphasis on organic. Open for lunch and dinner, Wed-Mon. 8445 Sonoma Hwy. (Highway 12), at Adobe Canyon Road, Kenwood. 707.833.4500.

American. $. Take a gander at the extensive list of Easy Street specials and get a spot by the window to watch Red Hill shoppers wander by. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 882 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.1984.

Yao-Kiku Japanese. $$-$$$. Fresh sushi with ingredients flown in from Japan steals the show in this popular neighborhood restaurant. Lunch and dinner daily. 2700 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8180.

Locally sourced northern Italian dishes with a Californiacuisine touch. The house red is a custom blend from owner Paul Fradelizio. Lunch and dinner daily. 35 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1618.

Zazu Cal-Euro. $$$. Perfectly

Il Piccolo Caffe Italian.

Angèle Restaurant & Bar French. $$$. Thoroughly

executed dishes that sing with

$$. Big, ample portions at this

French, but not aggressively

Underwood Bar & Bistro European bistro. $$.

Fradelizio’s Italian. $$.

Sushi Ran Japanese. $$$$. This beautiful restaurant attracts locals and tourists with its fresh catches. A wide selection of nigiri, depending on what’s fresh. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner, Mon-Sun. 107 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.332.3620.

Yet Wah Chinese. $$. Can’t go wrong here. Special Dungeness crab dishes for dinner; dim sum for lunch. Lunch and dinner daily. 1238 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.460.9883.

N A PA CO U N T Y

so. Lunch and dinner daily. 540 Main St, Napa. 707.252.8115.

BarBersQ Barbecue/ California. $-$$. An upscale ’cue joint with a high-end chef and high-end ingredients. Gorgeous chipotle-braised short ribs and pulled pork. Lunch and dinner daily. 3900-D Bel Aire Plaza, Napa. 707.224.6600.

Bistro Jeanty French. $$$. Rich, homey cuisine. A perfect choice when you can’t get a chance to do your Laundry. Lunch and dinner daily. 6510 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.0103. Bounty Hunter Wine country casual. $$. Wine shop and bistro with maverick moxie for the wine cowboy. Premium bottles for sale, also. Lunch and dinner, Tues-Sun; open late, Thurs-Sat. 975 First St, Napa. 707.255.0622.

Brannan’s Grill California cuisine. $$-$$$. Creative cuisine in handsome Craftsman setting. Lunch and dinner daily. 1347 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.2233.

Brassica Mediterranean. $$-$$$. Cindy Pawlcyn’s newsest venture features creative tapas, Middle Eastinspired dishes and extensive by-the-glass wine list. Lunch and dinner daily. 641 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.0700. Buster’s Barbecue Barbecue. $. A very busy roadside destination–for a reason. It’s the hot sauce, available in two heats: regular and hot. And the hot, as the sign says, means “hot!” Lunch and dinner daily. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5606.

Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen Eclectic. $$-$$$. As comfortable as it sounds, with a rich and varied melting pot of a menu. Lunch and dinner daily. 1327 Railroad Ave, St Helena. 707.963.1200.

Cole’s Chop House American steakhouse. $$$$$. Handsome, upscale 1950s-era steakhouse serving chophouse classics like dryaged porterhouse steak and Black Angus filet mignon. Wash down the red meat with a “nostalgia” cocktail. Dinner daily. 1122 Main St, Napa. 707.224.6328.

Compadres Rio Grille Western/Mexican. $-$$. Contemporary food and

outdoor dining with a Mexican flavor. Located on the river and serving authentic cocktails. Nightly specials and an abiding love of the San Francisco Giants. 505 Lincoln Ave, Napa. Lunch and dinner daily. 707.253.1111.

Fazerrati’s Pizza. $-$$. Great pie, cool brews, the game’s always on. Great place for post-Little League. Lunch and dinner daily. 1517 W Imola Ave, Napa. 707.255.1188.

Fumé Bistro & Bar California cuisine. $$$. California bistro fare that nearly always hits the mark. Lunch and dinner daily. 4050 Byway E, Napa. 707.257.1999.

Miguel’s MexicanCalifornian. $$. Ultracasual setting and laid-back service belies the delicious kitchen magic within; chilaquiles are legendary. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1437 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.6868.

Pizza Azzurro Italian. $. Run by a former Tra Vigne and Lark Creek Inn alum, the pizza is simple and thin, and ranks as some of the best in the North Bay. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 1260 Main St (at Clinton), Napa. 707.255.5552.

Robata Grill & Sushi Japanese. $$. Mmm. With thick slices of fresh sashimi, Robata knows how to do it. The rolls are big winners. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; dinner only, Sun. 591 Redwood Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.381.8400.

Salito’s Crab House Seafood . $$$. Waterfront setting with extensive marine menu plus steak and other American staples. Lunch and dinner daily. 1200 Bridgeway Ave, Sausalito. 415.331.3226.

Ubuntu Vegetarian. $$$$. Some of the most remarkable specimens of high-end vegetables and fruits available on a restaurant plate. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. 1140 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5656. Zuzu Spanish tapas. $$. Graze your way through a selection of tasty tapas in a lively rustic chic setting with a popular wine bar. Bite-sized Spanish and Latin American specialties include sizzling prawns, Spanish tortilla, and Brazilian style steamed mussels. Lunch, Mon-Fri; dinner daily. 829 Main St, Napa. 707.224.8555.

Wineries

15

SONOMA COUNTY

MARIN COUNTY

Dutcher Crossing Winery Barnlike room offers

Bacchus & Venus A trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001.

fireplace to warm the mitts on winter days; owner Debra Mathy leads monthly bike rides in better weather. Try the Maple Vineyard Zinfandel; ask the well-informed staff about the Penny Farthing bicycle. 8533 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Open daily 11am– 5pm. Tasting fee $5–$10. 866.431.2711.

Göpfrich Winery Accomplished dentist Ray Göpfrich found a new career in gladly helping to stain your teeth purple. Dry Creek Valley Cab, and sweet treats: Riesling, Silvaner and Huxelrebe from friends in Germany. 7462 West Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. By appointment, Saturdays. 707.433.1645.

John Tyler Wines For decades, the Bacigalupis have been selling prized grapes to the likes of Chateau Montelena and Williams Selyem. Now, the third-generation wine growers offer the pick of the vineyard in their own tasting room, brandnew in 2011. Graceful Pinot and sublime Zin. 4353 Westside Road, Healdsburg. Open dail,y 10:30am–5pm. Tastings $10. 707.473.0115.

Meeker Vineyard You might expect Meeker to be more slicked-out, what with its big-time Hollywood origins (co-owner Charlie Meeker is a former movie executive). But that’s clearly not the case. 21035 Geyserville Ave., Geyserville. Open Monday–Saturday, 10:30am– 6pm; Sunday, noon–5pm. 707.431.2148.

Skewis Wines Since 1979, veteran winemaker Hank Skewis labored out of the limelight. Now, he’s got his own shack to showcase his etherial, bright style of Pinot Noir. 57 Front St., Healdsburg. Saturday–Sunday, 11am– 4:30pm. $5. 707.431.2160.

Pey-Marin Vineyards A Marin wine adventure where cow country meets conifer forest, at the historic, hospitable Olema Inn. Discover razor-lean “Shell Mound” Marin County Riesling, opaquely purple, yet eminently food-friendly “Punchdown” Syrah, and more. 10000 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Olema. Open daily from noon to 4pm. $12 fee. 415.663.9559.

Ross Valley Winery In existence since 1987, the Ross Valley Winery produces Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc and Zin port wines. 343 San Anselmo Ave., San Anselmo. Open Tuesday– Sunday, 1–7pm. 415.457.5157. Tam Cellars Spacious wine bar quietly distributes the soul-salve of the ages and, like its soul mate the coffee shop, passes the laptop test. Cheese plates, wine flights and comfortable seating arrangements make a nice place to convene with the companion or flat screen of one’s choice. Wine shop features international, eclectic selection at fair prices. 1803 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. Open Monday–Wednesday, 4–9pm; Thursday–Saturday, 4–10pm. 415.461.9463.

NAPA COUNTY Beaulieu Vineyard History in a glassful of dust– Rutherford dust. Somethingfor-everyone smorgasbord of solid varietal wines, plus library selections of flagship Georges de Latour Cab back to 1970. 1960 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm.

Tastings $15–$20; Reserve Room, $35. 707.967.5233.

Far Niente (WC) Far Niente was founded in 1885 by John Benson, a ’49er of the California Gold Rush and uncle of the famous American impressionist painter Winslow Homer. The estate boasts beautiful gardens as well as the first modern-built wine caves in North America. 1350 Acacia Drive, Napa. By appointment. 707.944.2861. Peju Province Vineyards Talented staff, terrific food pairings and fantastic Cab. 8466 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Open daily, 10am–6pm. 707.963.3600.

Stony Hill Vineyard In the 1940s, advisers from UC Davis told them, “Under no circumstances plant Chardonnay.” So they planted Chardonnay. Intimate tastings in the flagstone-studded, Eisenhower-era McCrea living room; Chardonnay and White Riesling are legends. 3331 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. By appointment, Monday through Friday, weekends when available. $25. 707.963.2636.

Trefethen Winery Some critics claim Trefethen’s heyday was in the ’60s, but the winery proves them wrong with dependable, delicious wines. Trefethen is one of the oldest wineries in Napa. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily, 11:30am–4:30pm. 707.255.7700.

Truchard Vineyards (WC) No matter how attentive you are to the directions, no matter how much you study the quaint, hand-drawn map found online, no matter how vigilantly you watch the street addresses numerically climb along Old Sonoma Road, you will inevitably miss Truchard Vineyards. What follows is a three-point turn on a blind, two-lane road, with a single thought in your head: “This wine had better be worth the insurance deductible.” But with Cabernet this good, it is. 3234 Old Sonoma Road, Napa. By appointment. 707.253.7153.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

2010 Pinot Noir A difficult year is tasting better BY JAMES KNIGHT

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aving heard of and personally witnessed horror stories of the 2010 vintage, I’ve been curious as to how the wines turned out. Now the reds are trickling in. The year started cool and rainy; for weeks, the summer saw nothing but gray skies. Many growers took the nominally wise precaution of stripping leaves from their vines, exposing the fruit to, surprise, a three-day, triple-digit heat wave. All the bistros in wine country could not have sold enough small plate salads garnished with local, roasted grapes. But wine and memories mellow with time. “After 2011, 2010 seems like a distant memory and a walk in the park,” says VML winemaker Virginia Marie Lambrix. The Bohemian blind-tasted eight regionally appellated Pinot Noirs from $20 to $40, scored from 1 to 5 stars. VML 2010 Russian River Valley Pinot Noir ($30) The “coolest” tasting of the lot, fruit-wise, fringed with cayenne and warm spices. Cranberry, cherry jelly and a sliver of dried apricot make this a summer salad of a Pinot, with a fresh finish. ++++ La Crema 2010 RRV Pinot Noir ($40) As purple as a summer crepuscule, as rich as a cream-filled chocolate, this wine overwhelms a slightly inky aroma with vanilla, cherry cola, broadly appealing black cherry flavors and a big, smooth finish. ++++ Martin Ray 2010 RRV Pinot Noir ($30) High marks for balance and complexity; dusty, dried red fruit aromas and herbal berry tea flavors. Might be a good pairing with light but meaty fare, like steak salad. ++++ Rodney Strong 2010 RRV Estate Pinot Noir ($20) Smoky oak and sandalwood over ripe flavors of cherry, Dr. Pepper, chocolate. A classic of the region, lacking a little on the finish. +++ Balletto 2010 RRV Estate Pinot Noir ($20) Opinions diverged: I tasted intense, boysenberry juice over cool aromas of fruity potpourri and cardamom spice, wrapped up with a sour plum finish that begs for another sip. Different, possibly delicious. +++ Lutea 2010 Carneros Pinot Noir ($35) Needs some time before the dusty, medicinal aromas make way for more appealing chocolate-mint. Restrained, astringent, with cherry fruit. +++ Cline 2010 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($18) Cline insists on tagging this “Cool Climate Pinot Noir,” more of a selling point for their Syrah. The overall favorite of one taster; all found it agreeably fruity. +++ La Follette 2010 North Coast Pinot Noir ($19.99) Some of the fruit hails from sunnier Mendocino County. The lightest of the lineup, its bright, tutti-frutti raspberry flavor was noted by all; some liked it, others were not jazzed. +++

Michael Amsler

fabric of Sausalito for decades.

The Anchor-Outs In Sausalito’s shadow, a community adrift

L

ate last January, Phil McGovern’s cell phone rang around 4am, that most ominous of hours. It was the U.S. Coast Guard on the other end, calling to inform McGovern that the anchored boat he called home was spouting flames, its hull inching lower into the dark depths of Richardson’s Bay with each passing minute. The fire, fueled by a deck full of hoarded clutter, quickly consumed the vessel, and with it, McGovern’s beloved onboard library. As an unemployed carpenter, McGovern had spent the past year rebuilding the boat, whose charred remains

would soon come to rest on the shallow bay’s muddy floor. The fire’s cause remains a mystery. Tales of near-disaster and worse abound in a long-established but controversial floating community in the usually calm waters of southern Marin’s Richardson Bay. Some 50 people live yearround aboard a motley collection of vessels in varying states of disrepair within view of the affluent hillside homes and mansions of Sausalito and Tiburon, but police say up to 130 call the bay home in warmer months. While “anchor-outs,” as they’re locally known, have lived on the small bay for as long as anyone can remember, there’s a fresh focus on the group now as Sausalito’s newest police chief has simultaneously stepped

BY RYAN WHITE

up marine patrols and health initiatives. While police say they’re just doing their best to ensure public safety along the waterfront, ask most anchorouts and they’ll attribute the heightened scrutiny to the run-up to the highly anticipated 2013 America’s Cup Finals, which will take place in the main waters of San Francisco Bay and likely bring a flurry of visitors and media attention to nearby bayside communities such as Sausalito. At a glance, the Richardson Bay anchorage presents a postcard maritime scene. Indeed, the vistas are so prized that a Belvedere couple recently made national headlines after buying a $4.2 million house next door so they could tear it down to better their view. But for those who call

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 1 8-24, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

LIFE ON THE WATER At 76, Ale Eckstrom is the grand elder of a maligned boating community that’s been woven into the

the bay’s waters home, it’s often a life less than idyllic, one full of daily challenges and perils. Beyond harrowing winter storms and the practical difficulties of daily life afloat, chronic unemployment, substance abuse, mental health problems and poverty afflict many of the bay’s residents. While some vessels are kept seaworthy, others are little more than floating barges, precariously piled with debris. Fires and sunken vessels are common, and during periods of high winds and stormy seas, boats routinely drag their anchors, colliding with neighboring vessels or crashing into the Tiburon shoreline. At the U.S. Army Corps work yard along the Sausalito waterfront, a steady influx of maimed and sunken vessels add to a mountainous pile of flotsam plucked from the bay. And yet the bay’s protected waters have long served as a refuge for people who might otherwise be homeless. “This anchorage is a safety valve for people who’ve lost their homes, who’re divorced, foreclosure, whatever,” says Peter Romanowsky, 62, who moved onto an anchored vessel after a difficult divorce nearly three decades ago. Romanowsky is widely known for his annual bids for local political office (he self-identifies as Republican) and for playing the guitar before tourists arriving off the ferry, his sunglasses-wearing dog under one arm. But these days he says he’s looking for a home off the water, citing a growing number of friends lost in recent years to drowning and other causes. “People come out there to get a fresh start, or to die,” he says. “A lot of people are just dead.” Chief among the daily hazards anchor-outs face is getting to shore and back from their vessels, which are sprinkled along more than a mile of Sausalito waterfront. Many of the anchorouts come ashore in skiffs for almost daily free lunches at local churches and to hang out at Dunphy Park, where they play bocce ball and socialize. A few commute to jobs onshore. ) 18 Those who live here

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 1 8-24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

readily attest to the beauty and freedom of life on the bay’s open waters. It’s a community that’s historically been known for attitudes of self-reliance and nonconformism. “I tell you, these are resourceful people,” says Southern Marin fire captain Matt Bouchard, whose department will typically respond to several emergency calls a week on the bay. “When the rest of us guys are used to our hot water and fluorescent lighting, and the whole world comes to an end, those guys are going to make it. They know how to survive with nothing.” Suzi Olson, who varnishes and paints boats for a living, is notable both for being regularly employed and for being a woman in the mostly male anchorage. She’s lived on a succession of boats on the bay for more than two decades. Last August, however, she finally opted for a slip at Clipper Yacht Harbor that, for a hefty monthly fee, allows her to live aboard her boat. Fear of falling into cold bay waters prompted her to leave the open waters for the ease and security of the harbor. “One night I almost ended up in the water,” Olson recounts. While exact counts are hard to come by, Olson can remember a number of anchor-out drownings over the years. “They don’t fight. They’re drunk, they’re taking a leak, they fall in the water, hit their head, whatever,” she says. “They find them with their zippers down most of the time, believe it or not.” According to Sausalito police chief Jennifer Tejada, a “significant percentage” of anchor-out residents struggle with alcoholism. “Some of them don’t make it back to their boat,” she says. “Some of them do, and then they fall over, and they drown,” she says. “The first week I was here, we had a drowning of one of them who had fallen over drunk. You can’t last very long in those frigid waters.” There are other concerns as well. Sewage stemming from vessels anchored in the bay has long been a topic of debate in Sausalito. While the Richardson Bay Regional Agency has offered free holding

Michael Amsler

18 Anchor-Outs ( 17

want help. “Nobody’s trying to get these people off the water,” he says. “Nobody wants to disrupt their way of life. We just want them to know that if you want to come off the water, if you need help, if you need benefits, let us know.”

B

TO THE RACES Police focus on the anchor-outs is causing anxiety among boat dwellers over the America’s Cup finals, held in the Bay next year.

tanks and contracted with the company M.T. Head to offer free waste-removal services for anchorouts, participation is low. Rick Mortimer, owner of M.T. Head, says only 15 of an estimated 50 boats were using the monthly service. The others, he believes, are “just dumping it out there in the bay.” For two days last November, the Sausalito Police Department teamed up with Marin County’s Department of Aging and Adult Services and several nursing students in a public health outreach effort. Contacted on land and water, anchor-outs were offered flu and tetanus shots, eye exams, fire extinguishers and blankets, first aid supplies, brown bag lunches and information on basic services such as county healthcare, veterans benefits and dental care. “As you get older, you can only deal with the elements so much,” says Sean Stephens, veterans service officer for the county of Marin, who spearheaded the outreach events. “You have to come to the realization that ‘I need healthcare,’ ‘I need a warm bed,’ warm clothes, stuff like that.” Stephens says so far he’s identified about 10 veterans living on the water. “Believe it or not, there are some people who don’t

realize they’re veterans,” he says. One initially wary anchor-out discovered he was eligible for VA health benefits and transitional housing. “He was about in tears,” Stephens recalls. While Stephens and his colleagues consider the outreach events a success, they’re well aware of the community’s deeprooted suspicion of outsiders offering assistance. At the first on-the-water outreach on Nov. 1, some anchor-outs fled when word got out that county officials would be coming by with police to visit their boats, Stephens says. Indeed, Sausalito’s anchor-outs tend to be particularly wary if not outright resentful of local law enforcement. Tales abound in the community of unwarranted police searches, harassment, punitive fines or abuse. A common refrain among the anchor-outs interviewed for this article is that the outreach events are little more than political cover for a law enforcement crackdown. “I can’t tell you how many people thought that it was, myself included, an ulterior motive to get onto the people’s boats,” Olson says. Stephens and his county colleagues say they’re just trying to offer assistance to those that

ut with the 2013 America’s Cup looming on the horizon, many anchor-outs are convinced local authorities want to “clean up” Richardson Bay before the Cup arrives. “There’s always been pressure to get rid of the anchor-outs or thin them out,” says Romanowsky. “It comes in waves. Every 10 years or so, there’s a new movement.” Jennifer Tejada, responsible for increasing law enforcement on the water since she was named police chief last year, flatly denies any such allegation. “I have no intention of cleaning it up for America’s Cup,” she says. “My intention is to protect and serve this community.” The chief says she’s well aware the anchor-out community is a politically sensitive topic in a town with a strong maritime identity. “The anchor-outs are historically the sacred symbol of bohemian Sausalito,” she says. “Unless you really go out there and you meet and greet the anchor-outs, or you look at the statistics, or you’re in this business, you don’t see beyond that.” She insists the police’s renewed focus on the bay is not about driving out the anchor-outs but about reducing the waterfront’s comparatively high crime rate. Sgt. Bill Fraass, who leads the department’s marine patrol unit, says 27 anchor-outs were arrested during the first six months of 2011 (the most recent period for which numbers are available), largely for crimes such as public drunkenness, methamphetamine use and possession of stolen property. In addition, Fraass says about 45 people who live on the water or frequent the waterfront area have criminal histories and are still active in crime. “There’s a pretty big percentage that are part of this revolving door of this quality of life crime trend, and so we want to address those,” he says.

Michael Amsler

FEELING TIPSY Peter Romanowsky

plays guitar with his dog at the ferry dock.

attends the weekly free lunch held at Sausalito Presbyterian Church, where he offers residents help obtaining IDs, bus tickets, clean showers, county medical services, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and other services. “It’s a population that has learned how to survive with basic necessities and basic skills,” McDowell says. “And that causes a lot of conditions. That causes depression, poverty, hunger, lack of showers . . . no funds.” McDowell, who says he struggled with drug addiction himself and spent time in prison earlier in life, voices wonder that the town doesn’t do more for its maritime residents, such as provide public showers. “I know how it feels to be thrown away, to feel uncared for, to feel like your life has no purpose, to feel like nobody cares,” he says. “When all the time you live on survival skills —that’s how these people live— they just want to survive another day. It’s a lonely place.” Those hoping the anchorouts will eventually go away are kidding themselves, he says. “These people been here 30, 40, 50 years. Where are they going? They’re not going nowhere. So if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em—work with them.” McGovern, a Mill Valley native who was left temporarily homeless when his boat burned last January, says he has twice been turned down for SSI benefits. Blind in one eye from a firewoodchopping accident and diagnosed with emphysema three years ago, he struggles to navigate the medical system. “I can’t believe the paperwork and tonnage of hoops I have to go through to see the doctor,” he says. “I need an advocate is what I need.” Lack of accessible public showers in Sausalito is a particularly sore point for anchor-outs like McGovern and Romanowsky, who say they usually go without. Others depend on the kindness of friends or have managed to gain access to private harbor facilities. “I’m stuck out here, and they’ve closed every shower,” McGovern says. “It makes a person like me become real angry.”

Romanowsky says he’ll easily go a year without a hot shower. “This town is so stingy that they won’t provide any public showers,” he says. “I have a big long bread knife. I just scrape my skin with a bread knife. I call it a knife bath.”

T

hough some anchorouts are just struggling to survive, others have managed to settle into a comfortable existence on the water. No one has been living at anchor here longer than Ale Eckstrom, a 76-year-old musician and poet who, after logging more than five continuous decades afloat on Richardson’s Bay, can rightfully be called grandfather of the anchor-outs. With his spry, compact figure and lyric-laden speech, Eckstrom looks a bit like a seafaring leprechaun, the likeness accented by his knee-high socks and breeches, brown vest, Celtic brooch, scraggly orange beard, ruddy visage and tweed cap. A Colorado native, Eckstrom first walked into Sausalito in 1957 after serving in the Navy. He made a living as a concertina player in coffeehouses and cabarets along the coast, and his entertainer’s impulse is still audible in the limericks and sea shanties that pepper his conversation. Most days he can be found aboard his 63-foot World War II– era aviation rescue boat Yesterday (after the Beatles’ song), with its onboard workshop, claw-foot tub and eclectically decorated den of found objects, books, and large windows giving out on an evershifting panorama of water, shoreline and mountains. He reluctantly comes ashore every few days for supplies (“I like fresh milk,” he says) in his motorized scow, but he’s happiest at home on the water. Most days, he says, are spent “dancing around and playing with boats” and keeping company with his two feline shipmates, Siammy and Calicoco. Even for a seasoned and sober seaman, threat of disaster is a constant companion. “There are times out here when if you make a misstep, it may very well be the last step you ever make,” he

says. During a fierce storm one night last February, Eckstrom nearly lost his boat when the wind and waves severed both chains anchoring the vessel to the bay floor, suddenly setting him adrift. He was able to set his spare anchor before his vessel crashed upon the Tiburon shoreline downwind.

‘I scrape my skin with a bread knife. I call it a knife bath.’ But for Eckstrom, life at anchor is infinitely preferable to what he views as the landlubber’s indentured plight of rents or mortgages. “The real estate mentality just refuses to think of anyone having an alternative to leasing and renting property,” he says. “If all you own is a boat, no matter how nice it is or expensive it might be, you’re shit in most people’s eyes.” Mere mention of landlords makes him visibly shudder. “I’d live in a tree before I’d pay a landlord,” he says. It’s a common sentiment among anchor-outs. Jan Zaslav, a public health nurse for Marin County who has worked with anchor-outs, says, “What’s interesting is you go out there in the boat and you see all these mansions—Belvedere, Tiburon and Sausalito—and their point is, ‘The people living in the mansions are the slaves. We’re the free ones.’ ” Or as Eckstrom, donning his poet’s cap, puts it, “I rise and fall on every tide that flows, turn to face every wind that blows.” This article was produced as a project for the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, a program of USC’s Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 1 8-24, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

But ask most on the water and they’ll say the anchor-outs have suffered a long history of persecution and harassment that predates even the houseboat wars of the 1970s and ’80s. In the late 1980s, anchor-outs successfully fought the Bay Conservation and Development Commission’s efforts to curtail long-term mooring in Richardson Bay. (In a move especially offensive to the anchor-outs, the agency had begun classifying many of the anchored vessels as “bay fill.”) Diane Linn, executive director of the Ritter Center, a nonprofit that works with homeless throughout Marin, isn’t surprised the anchor-outs tend to have a strained relationship with local police. “Either by their own choices or by their own existence in a culture of poverty, the relationship with police officers tends to be traumatic for the most part,” Linn says. “When you’re poor, you really have those experiences. People should not be too surprised when there’s not an openness or willingness.” Dominique McDowell is among a handful of social workers trying to overcome the residents’ wariness. As a case manager for the Ritter Center, McDowell

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JULY 1 8-24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

CULTURE

Crush S A N TA R O S A

To the Roots

Come back to the roots of Sonoma County’s Wine Country at the annual Rootstock Festival this weekend, featuring fine wine, craft brew tastings and gourmet street food, as well as a “Best Bites Competition.” Taking the music stage is Jim Bianco, Holly Conlan, Jesse Thomas and Javier Dunn. Vintners’ Square is already home to outstanding wineries, and with the opening of Heritage Public House, craft brew makes a splash appearance. Yet another grand gastronomical glugfest galore goes off on Saturday, July 21, at Vintners’ Square. 1301 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa. $45, a portion of proceeds benefit the SRJC Shone Farm Foundation. 2pm-6pm. 707.495.0831.

P O I N T R E Y E S S TAT I O N

Further West Three stages featuring a diverse lineup—including Les Nubians, Orgone, Vinyl, MC Radioactive, Marshall Payne, and many more—vendors selling local and organic offerings, family-friendly activities and all proceeds donated to community nonprofits—how much better can it get? Voted the Best Music Festival in Marin County by Bohemian readers,

ARGENTINE After playing Reggae on the River this week, Alika headlines Hopmonk Tavern on July 23. See Concerts, p26.

The week’s events: a selective guide

the annual Far West Fest is a green, zero-waste event—so don’t forget to bring your own cup or water bottle for discounts at the beer booth, and ride your bike or take public transportation to get there and receive free cookies and beer! It’s “good times for the greater good” on Saturday, July 21, at Love Field. 11191 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Point Reyes Station. $24; ages 10-7, $15; under 10, free. 10:30am–7:30pm. 415.663.8068.

P E TA L U M A

River Rollin’ There is barely anything to not do at the Rivertown Revival. Who can turn down a festival complete with over 100 musicians, an art boat flotilla, boat drag races, aerial acts over the water, local food merchants and numerous theatrical performances? This very green party—a reported 98-percent waste diversion rate last year—is all-ages and for everyone old enough to breathe, “saving souls” for a bargain entrance fee that benefits Friends of the Petaluma River. And look no further, fiancés and fiancées, you can have a $5 wedding in the garden with thousands of your newest and oldest friends! Come to “the greatest slough on Earth” on Saturday, July 21, at the David Yearsley River Heritage Center. Copeland and D streets, Petaluma. $5. 11am-7pm. 707.548.2937.

CORTE MADERA

He Write Good Dave Eggers. Good writer guy. Writes in complete sentences. Author of some books. One’s a memoir. One’s a novel. Dude runs a tutoring center. Also a publisher! Seems nice. Gets good reviews, anyway. Likes telling jokes and literary characters that like jokes. Lives in the Bay. Does some graphic design; a bit ended up on album covers. Coming to Marin. To Corte Madera! Dave Eggers is gonna sign some books. His latest is “A Hologram for the King,” maybe he’ll sign it for you or something. Hang out with Dave Eggers, writer good writing guy, on Thursday, July 19, at Book Passage. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera. Free. 12:00pm. 415.927.0960.

—Catherine Zaw and Jay Scherf

Reppinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hard Roller derby, filthy puppets and more at Summer Repertory Theater BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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he muses are in retreat!â&#x20AC;? warns the great god Zeus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Creativity shall remain stymied for decades. The theater? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll just take some stinkeroo movie or some songwriterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s catalogue, throw it onstage and call it a show!â&#x20AC;?

Summer Repertory Theater runs through Aug. 11, with shows every day except Monday, at various theaters at SRJC. 1501 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa. For full schedule of shows, times and prices, see www.summerrep.com.

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TOYS & DOLLS s ARTS & CRAFTS s POST MODERN

There you have it. That pithy observation is one of the slyest and funniest lines in Summer Repertory Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current production of the delightfully silly musical Xanadu. Considering that Xanaduâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with a ďŹ&#x201A;uffy-hearted book by Douglas Carter Beaneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is adapted from one of the worst movies ever made, a ďŹ lm so bad it killed the rising ďŹ lm career of Olivia Newton-John, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bit of a shock that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such an enjoyable, glittery, ridiculous pleasure. The plot, a supercharged variation of the static original, involves the legendary muses, the daughters of Zeus, one of which comes to Earth to inspire a surfer-

dude artist, ends up falling in love with him and breaks the rules by starting to create art herself. Her art project, in this case, is a roller disco palace called Xanadu. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all pretty silly, but the music, including a few extra songs from Electric Light Orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest hits (and one or two Newton-John hits as well), is infectious and fun, on or off roller skates. The cast is strong and committed, showcasing some ďŹ ne singers, though there are one or two performers who struggle to sing but excel in dancing. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of what happens with SRT, where participants are pushed to learn new skills in a theatrical bootcamp environment. Xanadu is just one of ďŹ ve SRT shows running in repertory through August, along with Agatha Christieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mouse Trap, Neil Simonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sweet Charity, Sarah Ruhlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Passion Play and the multiple-award-winning musical Avenue Q. Inspired by the offbeat multicultural neighborhood of Sesame Street, the cleverly kitschy Avenue Qâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with a book by Jeff

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ROLLER DERBY â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Xanaduâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; adds frilly, frivolous fun to this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SRT roster.

21 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 1 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 24, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

Whitty and music by Jeff Marx and Robert Lopezâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;combines live actors and furry puppet characters reminiscent of Bert, Ernie and the Cookie Monster. Alternately coarse and cuddly, the show is a wildly funny examination of modern life. For all of its warm-and-fuzzy lookâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and you can take fuzzy as literally as you likeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Avenue Q pushes the envelope, challenging us to look hard, and to laugh hard, at the way we behave when different types of people are thrown together into neighborhoods and communities and forced to confront their own prejudices, preconceptions and assumptions. If that sounds heavy, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come off that way onstage. This is one funny show, brilliantly performed by a cast up to its challenges. Featuring songs like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Little Bit Racist,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;If You Were Gayâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Internet Is for Porn,â&#x20AC;? Avenue Q is fresh, frisky and fun, butâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;furry puppets asideâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;deďŹ nitely not for kids. Less approachable, but equally bold a choice, is Sarah Ruhlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s marathon-length Passion Play. Ruhl, whose fondness for experimental theater has deďŹ ned her career, premiered this philosophical triptych just two years ago. Essentially three hour-long one-acts, each segment takes place in a different era and different country, beginning in Elizabethan England, moving to Nazi-era Germany, then to South Dakota in the 1960s. In each portion, the people of the community are preparing a presentation of the Passion Play, an age-old theatrical recreation of the death of Jesus. Less about religion than about the power of theater and the way different people relate to iconic characters like Jesus, Pontius Pilate, the Queen of England and Adolf Hitler, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dense and baffling play, to say the least. But the large, versatile cast does what it can to bring spice and energy to the proceedings.

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JULY 1 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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he bracingly negative ďŹ lmmaker Todd Solondz, who appears at the Rafael Film Center on July 20, has made a string of controversial, often difficult to watch tragicomedies. His newest, Dark Horse, is his briefest yet, a sharp retort to frat-pack/ mumblecore celebrations of the adult big-baby experience.

Protagonist Abe (Jordan Gelber) is cocooned at his parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Long Island house. His room is stuffed with collectible action ďŹ gures from Toys â&#x20AC;&#x153;Râ&#x20AC;? Us. Abe nurses his grievances under the care of a sweet, dippy mother (Mia Farrow, perfect in the role) whom he regularly skins at their backgammon games. The hulking overgrown Abe sort of works for his father, a minor strip-mall developer (Christopher Walken, in a cheap acrylic toupee).

Ashen with disappointment, Walken often looks at his donothing son like someone peering into an open grave. At a wedding, Abe meets Miranda (Selma Blair, in one of her best roles). She is the luckless, humiliated Vi from Solondzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Storytelling, and is apparently another one of those women who changed her ďŹ rst name in hope of better fortune. Abe tries to press her for a ďŹ rst date, and Miranda is so helpless under the weight of a terrible depression that Abe feels he can propose marriage to her. She eventually accepts, of course. But here, Dark Horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deliberately unsteady narrative starts to disintegrate. Even before an incident knocks Abe into a dream world, solipsistic daydreams of his own coolness overwhelm him. Abe says things like, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do you know, if it werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t for my dad, I could be a singer? Now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m even too old for American Idol.â&#x20AC;? When weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the world of Abeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fantasies, Solondz is at his sharpest; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cleaning up after a decadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth of Seth Rogen and Mark Duplass comedies, which invited us to see the arresteddevelopment life as cute and boyish. If you want to be tough about it, this failure to grow up represents a rotten streak that runs through much of suburban American male behavior. Dark Horse furthers Solondzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s argument for a dreadful symbiotic link between bullies and the bullied, and it adds to his annals of torture-centric families. Like John Watersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; satires, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gone past the excruciation point and come out funnyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and, lately, strangely reasonable. Abeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s combination of stiff neck and missing spine suggests a fully worked view of human failings, the kind Solondz demonstrated in his 1995 breakthrough Welcome to the Dollhouse. And still, Solondzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diane Arbusâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;like eye seems to foresee the awfulness to come. The day I saw Dark Horse, the Penn State investigation was on the radio, and if anything sounds like it came straight from a Solondz script, well . . . Todd Solondz appears at a screening of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Dark Horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on Friday, July 20, at the Rafael Film Center.

Film capsules by Gary Brandt and Richard von Busack.

NEW MOVIES The Dark Knight Rises (PG13; 164 min.) Set eight years after The Dark Knight, Christopher Nolan’s final installment in his Batman series finds the crusader battling Bane, the new threat to Gotham, while struggling to restore his name, sullied by crimes he didn’t commit. Anne Hathaway plays the ambiguously aligned Catwoman. (GB)

30 Beats (PG; 88 min.) Romcom ensemble piece follows an interconnected group of New Yorkers looking to get some action during a heat wave. (GB)

(Shakespeare in Love) directs an all-star cast playing British retirees in India in adaptation of Deborah Moggach’s novel These Foolish Things. (GB)

Brave (PG; 93 min.) In Pixar’s newest, a young princess in ancient Scotland must use her skills as an archer to reverse a curse put on her family. With the voices of Kelly Macdonald (Gosford Park), Emma Thompson and Billy Connolly. (GB) Hysteria (R; 100 min.) Maggie Gyllenhaal and Hugh Darcy star in romantic comedy set in Victorian England about the invention of the vibrator. (GB)

Ice Age: Continental Drift

of America’s ailing state of literature makes it to the big screen. Coproduced by Tim Burton. (GB)

(PG; 94 min.) Saber-toothed squirrel Scrat precipitates the breakup of Pangaea through a search for acorns in the fourth installment of animated fave. With the voices of Wanda Sykes, Ray Romano, Queen Latifah, Denis Leary and Peter Dinklage. (GB)

The Amazing Spider-Man

Katy Perry: Part of Me

(PG-13; 136 min.) Purposeless reboot from director Marc Webb ((500) Days of Summer) co-stars Andrew Garfield (The Social Network) as Peter Parker and Emma Stone as Gwen Stacy. Martin Sheen plays Uncle Ben! (GB)

(PG; 97 min.) Documentary of the popular singer follows her on- and offstage, and features interviews with handsome young people I’m too old to care about. Also in 3-D, for reasons unknown. (GB)

The Avengers (PG-13; 142 min.) Marvel Studios rounds up characters from recent hits for an ensemble superhero thriller directed by Joss Whedon. Stars Robert Downey Jr. (Iron Man), Chris Evans (Captain America), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Samuel L . Jackson and Scarlett Johansson. (GB)

Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted (PG; 85 min.) Still

ALSO PLAYING Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (R; 105 min.) Latest example

Bernie (R; 104 min.) Richard (Slacker, School of Rock) Linklater’s latest stars Jack Black as Texas mortician, choir leader and murderer Bernie Tiede. Based on a true story. Co-stars Shirley MacLaine and Matthew McConaughey. (GB) Beasts of the Southern Wild (PG-13; 91 min.) In a swampravaged town, a gumption-crazed little girl daydreams of melting glaciers and advancing monsters in apocalyptic fantasy from first-time director Benh Zeitlin. (RvB)

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (PG-13; 124 min.) John Madden

trying to get back to New York, the gang find themselves in a traveling circus show in Europe. With the voices of Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, Martin Short and Frances McDormand. (GB)

Magic Mike (R; 110 min.) Steven Soderbergh’s latest stars Channing Tatum as a veteran male stripper teaching the ropes to newcomer Alex Pettyfer. With Matthew McConaughey. (GB)

Medea’s Witness Protection (PG-13; 114 min.) One-

third installment of hit sci-fi comedy. Also stars Tommy Lee Jones. (GB)

Moonrise Kingdom (PG-13; 94 min.) In September 1965, gifted 12-year-olds Suzy and Sam head off to the wilderness of a fictional New England island, not knowing Hurrican Maybelline is heading for them. Directed by Wes Anderson (Rushmore, Fantastic Mr. Fox) with dollhouse aesthetics and New Yorker cartoon punch lines. (RvB)

MAGICAL FI L M OF T H E Y EAR “A BLAST OF

SHEER IMPROBABLE JOY.” A.O. SCOTT

People Like Us (PG-13; 95 min.) Drama stars Chris Pine and Elizabeth Banks as siblings who discover each other after the death of their wealthy father in the directorial debut from the co-creator of Fringe. (GB)

Prometheus (R; 124 min.) Ridley Scott directs this (sort of) sequel to the Alien franchise about the link between the aliens and humanity’s origins. Co-stars Charlize Theron, Guy Pearce and Noomi Rapace (Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). (GB)

Savages (R; 113 min.) Niceguy pot growers go toe-to-toe with a Mexican drug cartel who kidnapped their hippie girlfriend in crime thriller directed by Oliver Stone. (GB)

Take This Waltz (R; 116 min.) Actress Sarah Polley’s second film as director stars Michelle Williams as a happily married woman who must come to terms with her growing feelings for the neighbor. With Seth Rogen, Luke Kirby and Sarah Silverman. (GB) Ted (R; 106 min.) John Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) finds the teddy bear he wished for in childhood cramping his attempt to embrace adulthood in comedy from the creator of Family Guy. (GB) To Rome with Love (R;

man film industry Tyler Perry’s latest brings Medea’s New York family down South, where they go in hiding after Uncle George’s Ponzi scheme defrauds the mob. (GB)

102 min.) New romantic-comedy ensemble piece from Woody Allen continues his enchantment with Europe. With Penélope Cruz, the great Judy Davis, Alec Baldwin, Jesse Eisenberg and Greta Gerwig. (GB)

Men in Black 3 (PG-13; 106 min.) Agent J (Will Smith) travels back in time to 1969 to save a young Agent K (Josh Brolin)—and the planet—in

Your Sister’s Sister (R; 90 min. ) A man recovering from the death of his brother falls for his friend’s gay sister. (GB)

NORTH BAY MOVIE TIMES SonomaMovieTimes.com | MarinMovieTimes.com | NapaMovieTimes.com

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT SANTA ROSA Summerfield Cinemas (707) 522-0330 STARTS FRIDAY, JULY 20

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Film

D I S C OV E R T H E M O S T

Music

THE WINNERS DyaTribal were so

good, they decided to become a real band.

Success!

NorBay Awards and 24-Hour Band Contest BY GABE MELINE

W

here to start? The riotous, jubilant acceptance “speech” by Church Marching Band? The amazing Beat Machine contraption, invented by a 19-year-old who works at Walmart? The grand finale, with the overflow crowd playing dozens of percussion instruments along to what turned out to be the top-scoring band?

The fact is, there were nonstop incredible moments in the Bohemian’s packed-to-the-gills 2012 NorBay Awards and 24-Hour Band Contest last Saturday at the Arlene Francis Center. Radioactive’s freestyle about the kids in the front row; Jason the Argonaut rhyming through a bullhorn over a hardcore song; killer cover versions of “Ain’t No Sunshine,” “Look at Miss Ohio,” “We Got the Beat,” “Hallelujah”

David Korman

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

and “Walking in Your Footsteps.” Laughter, inspiration, joy. I got home at 1am, exhausted yet gratified at the incredible success of what was by all estimation a totally ludicrous idea. To wit: on Friday night, I met with 22 willing participants and literally pulled names out of a hat to randomly assemble them into five different bands. Most of the musicians were complete strangers to each other, and I tasked them with writing two original songs together and learning one cover song in just 24 hours. At 8pm the next night, they’d return to perform in front of a live crowd. I had no idea how it would turn out. (While rehearsals were underway, I received text after text from the band members: Do you have a megaphone we can use? Is it OK if we don’t have any lyrics? When will the beatboxer show up? We wrote a song that’s 18 minutes long, is that cool?) But in the end, every band rose to the challenge, and the huge crowd roared their approval, as did the judges. So I’m very pleased to announce the winning band: Deborah Frank on vocals, Andy Graham on Slaperoo and didgeridoo, Teed Rockwell on Touchstyle Veena, Andy Maroney on drums and Dan Ford on percussion. They called themselves DyaTribal, and you might want to get used to that name; as they accepted the award, they declared that they’ll keep playing together as a real band. Of course, we had our North Bay Music Awards to hand out too, and what a tremendous turnout we had in voting this year, with 1,637 total votes! Without further ado, the winners of the 2012 NorBays: Blues / R&B: Levi Lloyd Country / Americana: The Crux DJ: Zack Darling Folk / Acoustic: Church Marching Band Hip-Hop / Electronic: Radioactive Indie: Girls and Boys Jazz: Hot Club Beelzebub Punk / Metal: No Sir Rock: Baby Seal Club World / Reggae: Dgiin Thanks to all who came. Here’s to next year!

Ŵŷ

T AY A FRIDAM! 10

FRIDAY

SATU RDAY

th

th

SUNDAY

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G LE S I NA D YETS TICK

Music

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26

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Concerts

Thur, Jul 19 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm Circles Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Squares Square Dance Club

Sheryl Crow

SONOMA COUNTY

Best Music Venue / Best Place for Singles to Meet THUR )JULY 19 )9PM

BERNER, YUKMOUTH FRI )JULY 20 )9PM

ELEPHANT LISTENING PROJECT

Rootstock

Nine-time Grammy winner touring in support of â&#x20AC;&#x153;100 Miles from Memphis.â&#x20AC;? Jul 20, 8pm. $79-$125. Wells Fargo Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Holly Conlan, Jim Bianco and others to fill your ears, gourmet street food, several wineries and breweries to fill your belly. Jul 21, 2-6pm. $45-$65. Santa Rosa Vintner Square, 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa.

Al Molina Latin Jazz Sextet

Summer Nights on the Green

Sun, Jul 22 8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm VINTAGE DANCE with Gary Thomas 1:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3:30pm DJ Steve Luther COUNTRY WESTERN LESSONS & DANCING $10

Legendary Latin jazz icon with percussionist Louie Romero. Jul 21, 6pm. $35. SonomaCutrer Vineyards, 4401 Slusser Rd, Windsor. 707.528.1181.

Mon, Jul 23 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 4:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;5:30pm Jazzercise 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm NORTH WEST PACIFIC RAILROAD MEETING

Friday Night Live

Outdoor summer shows in Windsor include Garrett Wilkin & the Parrotheads on Jul 19. 6pm. Free. Windsor Town Green, Bell Road and McClelland Drive, Windsor.

Fri, Jul 20 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am Jazzercise North Bay Country Dance Society/Contra Dance

Sat, Jul 21 7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11pm

8:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:30am Jazzercise Dj Steve Luther hosts HOT FUN IN THE SUMMERTIME

Tues, Jul 24 8:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9:45am; 5:45â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6:45pm Jazzercise 7:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10pm AFRICAN AND WORLD MUSIC DANCE

Cloverdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer-long series features Tom Rigney and Flambeau on Jul 20. 7pm. Free. Cloverdale Plaza, Cloverdale Boulevard between First and Second streets, Cloverdale.

Santa Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Hall since 1922

KRSH Backyard Concerts

1400 W. College Avenue â&#x20AC;˘ Santa Rosa, CA 707.539.5507 â&#x20AC;˘ www.monroe-hall.com

Hang out in stationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s backyard and listen to an Americana showcase featuring Michael Oneill, Ian Moore and others. Jul 19, 6pm. Free. KRSH, 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.9999.

Live at Juilliard ALL DOOR TIMES 9PM

park feature McKenna Faith on Jul 22. 6pm. Free. Juilliard Park, 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa.

Evening shows in Santa Rosa

Tuesdays on the Plaza Summer concert series in Healdsburg plaza features Steve Pile Band on Jul 24. 6pm. Free. Downtown Plaza, Healdsburg Avenue and Matheson Street, Healdsburg.

MARIN COUNTY Far West Fest Bands include Les Nubians, Orgone, Vinyl, Spark & Whisper, Marshall Payne, Sol Doc with Mi Gaan, MC Radioactive and others. Jul 21, 11:30am-7:30pm. $24-$60. Love Field, Highway

TAP ROOM Listen to Live Local Music while you knock back a frosty beer & a sandwich in the Tap Room

SAT )JULY 28 )9PM

19BROADWAY.COM MUSIC HOTLINE 415.459.1091

TICKETS AVAILABLE WWW.19BROADWAY.COM

International superstars of opera, dance, music and acting including Joshua Bell, Angel Romero, HÊlène Grimaud and others. Through Jul 22. Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.226.8742.

Leo Kottke The guitarist singer-songwriter is as comfortable with pop and folk as he is with jazz and classical. Jul 25, 8pm. $25-$30. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

The Mavericks Raul Malo and the gang will do more than just bring you down in their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Born to Be Blueâ&#x20AC;? tour. Jul 20, 7pm. $30. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Charlie Musselwhite Harmonica master Charlie Musselwhite bleeds blues through his instrument. Jul 20, 8pm. $20-$25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Toots & the Maytals, Midnite, Lady Saw, Calypso Rose and many others headline this two-day fest. Kids zone and camping option available. J ul 21-22. $60-$110. Benbow Lake Recreation Area, 1600 US Highway 101, Garberville.

4TH THURSDAYS

HOT UPCOMING ACTS

Festival del Sole

Reggae on the River

HIP-HOP NIGHT

7/29 CATHY COTTONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ALLSTAR EVIL PLAN 8/10 DEVIN THE DUDE 8/18 ENGLISH BEAT 8/24 AVOCADO SUNDAE REUNION

Featuring Acoustomatics on Jul 19. Thursdays, 6:30pm. through Aug 30. Free. Pioneer Park, Cedar and Elm streets, Calistoga.

BEYOND

THUR )JULY 26 )9PM

STEPPIN UP SATURDAYS

Calistoga Summer Concert Series

Did you know heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recorded over 200 albums? I bet he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, either. Appearing with Pegi Young & the Survivors. Jul 18, 7pm. $95-$110. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

JOSE NETO

SAT )JULY 28 )9PM

NAPA COUNTY

Willie Nelson

& Beer Sanctuary

SAT )JULY 21 )9PM

NORRISMAN

1 and Levee Road, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.8068.

Come see us! Wedâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Fri, 2â&#x20AC;&#x201C;9 Sat & Sun, 11:30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;8

Clubs & Venues

Brewery Tours Daily at 3! 1280 N McDowell, Petaluma 707.769.4495

w w w.L AGU N ITAS.com

SONOMA COUNTY SUPER BUMPINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Cali Swag District, of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Teach Me How to Dougieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fame, plays the Phoenix on July 21.

Affronti Jul 22, One Cello, One Guitar

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Coffee Catz

7:00pm / No Cover

Fri

Flamingo Lounge

Sun

THE OFFSHOOTS July 20 Americana, Alt-Country, Blues, Newgrass 8:00pm / No Cover

Jul 20, B-4 Dawn. Jul 21, UB707. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club

New festival up-and-comers “We are doing this with a lot of blood, sweat and tears,” says Bask Festival organizer Sara Darling. The phrase may be the only band name connected with the inaugural festival with which many are familiar, but she isn’t talking about the ’60s rock group. The Bask Festival is a new event taking over Hilton Park Campground in Forestville this weekend, and “it’s kind of the anti– Outside Lands,” says Darling. “It’s been brought to my attention several times that there are no headliners,” but that isn’t the focus of the festival, she says. “It’s about being able to say down the road, ‘I saw them playing at this beautiful campground at the Russian River five years ago before they were big.’” Indeed, some of the groups at the Bask Festival seem primed to make it big, or at least bigger, in the near future. Deep Chatham (pictured), Nova Albion, Winter Teeth, the Mowglis, Black Flamingo, Albino!, Wooster, Beso Negro and 10 others play with burlesque, theater, fire dancing, trapeze, a traveling art gallery and, in a unique twist, a communal kitchen for campers. The Bask Festival runs Friday–Sunday, July 20–22, at Hilton Campground in Forestville. $50 single day; $150 three-day pass. www.baskmusic.com.—Nicolas Grizzle

Jul 21, the Spyralites. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

Aubergine Jul 19, Fenton Coolfoot & Right Time, Guy Fox Band.

Jul 20, Mamadou & Vanessa Sidibe, Karamo Susso. Jul 21, Impossible Bird, Jay Trainer Band, Mike d AllStars. Jul 22, String Rays. 755 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2722.

July 22 Fri

BBQ ON THE LAWN!

B

W

UTCH HACKS AND THE LASS ACKS Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm

G

P

NORTH BAY BLUES REVIEW July 27 Dance to these Blues! 8:30pm Sat

July 28

DANNY CLICK AND HELL YEAHS!

Sun

Hopmonk Tavern Jul 18, Sola Rosa. Jul 19, Kraddy. Jul 20, Tommy Castro & the Painkillers. Jul 21, MC Yogi. Jul 23, Alika & DJ Stepwise. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg Jul 20, Stephanie Ozer & Peter Barshay. Jul 21, Adam Shulman Trio with Eric Markowitz & Jimmy Gallagher. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jasper O’Farrell’s

July 29

Aug 4 Sun

Aug 5

WED W ED – JUL JUL 18 18

HOPMONK H PRESENTS D NKK PRESENTS

PO POST

NE

WORLD/ELECTRONIC/FUNK D / ELEC TRONIC / FUNK

SOLA S OLA ROSA ROSA

((LIVE LIVE FR FROM OM A AUCKLAND UCKLAND NZ) NZ )

+A AN NE EVENING VENING W WITH ITH

$$12 12 ADV/$15 ADV/$15 DOS/DOORS DOS/ DOORS 99PM/21+ PM /21+ THUR T HUR – JUL JUL 1 19 9 W WEEKLY EE EK KLY E EVENT VENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT & DOUBLE DOUBLE D PRESENT PRESENT

KRADDY K RADDY

+M MALARKEY ALARKEY & THE THE ORIGINALZ ORIGINALZ

BBQ ON THE LAWN! 2ND ANNUAL CAJUN FEST WITH

BEAUSOLEIL QUARTET AVEC MICHAEL DOUCET & TOM RIGNEY AND FLAMBEAU

Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm  Sat

BEST PL BEST PLACE ACE FFOR OR S INGLES TO M E ET SINGLES MEET B EST BAR BAR HONORABLE BEST HONOR ABLE BEST B EST BR BREWPUB EWPUB HONORABLE HONOR ABLE BEST B EST MUSIC MUSIC VENUE VENUE HONORABLE HONOR ABLE

BEATNIK/DUBSTEP/GLITCH B EATNIK / DUBSTEEP/ GLITCH

THE

Americana/Blues 8:30pm

PAUL THORN WEEKEND 

PAUL THORN BAND

$$44 JAMESON JAMESON & O ORGANIC RGANIC YERBE YERBE MATE MATE CO COCKTAILS CKTAILS $$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

FRI F RI – JUL JUL 20

HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R E SE NT S BLUES/CLASSIC/ROCK B LUES/ CL ASSIC / ROCK

TOMMY C TOMMY CASTRO ASTRO & THE THE P PAIN AIN K KILLERS ILLERS $$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

In the Rancho Room 8:30pm BBQ ON THE L AWN!

SAT S AT – JUL JUL 21 21

JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS

PAUL THORN BAND

Gates Open at 3:00pm, Music at 4:00pm

HIP H IP H HOP/BHANGRA/YOGA OP/ BHANGRA / YOGA

MC M CY YOGI OGI

$$12/DOORS 12/ DOORS 88:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+ MON M ON – JUL JUL 23 23 W WEEKLY EEKLY EVENT EVENT WBLK W BLK DANCEHALL DANCEHALL MASSIVE MASSIVE P PRESENTS R E SE NT S

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

REGGAE/DANCEHALL/HIP R EGGAE/ DANCEHALL / HIP HOP HOP

Jul 19, Midnight Raid. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

MONDAY M ONDAY N NIGHT IGHT EEDUTAINMENT DUT TAINMENT

DJJJ D J JACQUES ACQU Q ES&D &D DJJGU J GUACAMOLE ACAMOLE $3 $ 3 RED RED STRIPES STRIPES & $4 $4 JAMESON JAMESON ALL ALL NIGHT NIGHT $$5/LADIES 5/ LADIES FFREE REE B B44 111/DOORS 1/ DOORS 110PM/21+ 0PM /21+

Ayurvedic

Lagunitas Tap Room Jul 18, Blue Merle. Jul 20, Jimbo Trout. Jul 21, Dennis Johnson. Jul 25, Lauralee Brown. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Indian Head Massage

Last Day Saloon

• improves mobility in

Jul 19, the Boomers. Jul 20, Wonderbread 5. Jul 21, Daniel Castro Band. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2343.

neck and shoulders • relief from tension headaches, eyestrain, and sinusitis

Ledson Lounge

Margery Smith 707.544.9642

Jul 21, Dan Daniels & Nicky DePaola. Ledson Hotel, 480 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9779.

T TUES UES – JUL JUL 24 24

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT BILL B ILL DECARLI DECARLI PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT

FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES

THUR T HUR – JULY JULY 26 26

WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT JUKE JUK E JOINT JOINT PRESENTS PRESENTS AFRO/WORLD A FRO / WORLD //FUNK FUNK

FFIRE IRE FLY FLY W WITH ITH H HAMSA AMSA LLILA ILA

$$44 JAMESON JAMESON & O ORGANIC RGANIC YERBE YERBE MATE MATE COCKTAILS COCKTAILS $$16 16 A ADV/$20 DV/$20 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 99PM/21+ PM /21+

FRI F RI – JULY JULY 2 27 7

ON SITE MASSAGE AVAILABLE

DOUBLE D OUBLE D PRESENTS PRESENTS

BEATNIK B EATNIK /DUBSTEP/GLITCH / DUBSTEEP/ GLITCH

FREQ F REQ N NASTY ASTY

$$20/DOORS 20 / DOORS 9PM/21+ 9PM /21+ WEEKLY W EEKLY EVENT EVENT BILL B ILL DECARLI DECARLI PRESENTS PR E S E N T S

T TUES UES – JUL JUL 31 31

Main Street Station Jul 18, Gwen Avery. Jul 19, Pocket Canyon Ramblers. Jul 20, Bruce Halbohm & the Blue Jazz Trio. Jul 21, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphy’s Irish Pub with Rebecca Roudman. 235 Healdsburg Ave, Ste 105, Healdsburg. 707.431.1113.

DIN N E R & A SHOW

Jun 19 SINGER /SONGWRITER SERIES HOSTED BY LAURALEE BROWN

Jul 19, Dr. Loco’s Rockin’ Jalapeno Band. 16201 First Street, Guerneville.

27

Outdoor Dining 7 Days a Week

Thur

Downtown Guerneville Plaza

Basking in It

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Jul 19, Keeley Valentino. Jul 20, Vanessa Schillings Band. Jul 21, Perfect Crime. Jul 22, David Aguilar & Peter McCauley. Jul 24, Adam Traum & the Traumatics. 464 First St E, Sonoma. ) 707.935.0660.

28

Cover May Apply

Fri, Jul 20 X5:30pm XBRIAN FRANCIS 9pm XREDWOOD COMBO Vocal Jazz/R&B Sun, Jul 22 X4pm

OLD TIME MUSIC FIDDLE JAM

OPEN O PEN MIC MIC NIGHT NIGHT

FFREE/DOORS R EE / D O O R S 7 7PM/ALL PM /ALL AGES AGES

FRI F RI – A AUG UG 3

HOPMONK H OPMONK P PRESENTS R E SE NT S ROOTS/SOULFUL/ROCK RO OTS/ SOULFUL / RO R CK

BLAME B LAME S SALLY ALLLY

+ HANNAH HANNAH JERN JERN MILLER MILLER & FRIENDS FRIENDS

Tue, Jul 24 X6pm

$$12 12 A ADV/$15 DV/$15 D DOS/DOORS OS/ DOORS 77:30PM/21+ : 30PM /21+

WINE & DINE

HOPMONK H OPMONK PRESENTS PRESENTS

WITH LOCAL AUTHORS Check out July’s authors online & reserve a spot! Thur, Jul 26 X$350 for all beer on tap 6pm, Sign-ups at 5pm XOPEN MIC Sign up for our newsletter & like us on facebook to receive special offers! 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868 www.redwoodcafe.com

SAT SAT – AUG AUG 4

ROOTS/SOULFUL/ROCK RO OTS/ SOULFUL / R ROCK

FREE F REE PEOPLES PEOPLES

+C CONNER ONNER HILL HILL & A ACACIA CACIA $$13/DOORS 13/ DOORS 8PM/21+ 8PM /21+

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Mon, 6pm, open mic. Third Friday of every month, 7pm, West Coast Songwriters showcase. Sat, 2pm, Bluegrass jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

ROCKIN’ HEART PRODUCTIONS

FREE

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Sunday, July 29

&

Music ( 27

842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

Swoop Unit. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Occidental Center for the Arts

19 Broadway Club

Station House Cafe

Jul 18, Love Dimension. Jul 19, Berner. Jul 20, Elephant Listening Project. Jul 21, Jose Neto. Jul 22, Soulvent. Jul 25, Gail Munrow & the Rockin’ Blues Band. 19 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Jul 20, Dale Polissar Trio with Bart Hopkin. Jul 22, Three Guys Named Mo. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515.

NORTH BAY HOOTENANNY PRESENT

11am-6pm

Jul 22, Bell the Cat. Graton Road and Bohemian Highway, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Railroad Square, Santa Rosa

THISTRAIN.ORG

Phoenix Theater Jul 18, Strengthen What Remains, Set Free, Youthquake AD, Mirrors & Covenant (CA). Jul 21, Clyde Carson, New Boyz, Loverance, the Finatticz, Cali Swag. Jul 23, Becoming the Archetype, Wolves at the Gate, Crush the Adversary, Mirrors. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

River Theatre

FEATURING

RAMBLIN’ JACK ELLIOTT FRANCISCO HERRERA DAVID LUNING OLD JAWBONE THE EASY LEAVES SOLID AIR MISNER & SMITH AND MORE...

Jul 21, Stephanie Teel. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.3194.

TWO STAGES

GUTHRIE EXHIBIT

FAMILY AREA FOOD - BEER

BOOTHS - SOAPBOX

DRESS IN YOUR DUST BOWL BEST!

A benefit for Centro Laboral de Graton (Graton Day Labor Center)

Russian River Brewing Co Jul 22, Blue Diamond Fillups. 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.BEER.

Society: Culture House Wed, Gallery Wednesday. DJs and art curated by Jared Powell. Thurs, Casa Rasta. Jul 21, New Boyz. Sun, Rock ‘n’ Roll Sunday School. 528 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, No phone.

Old Western Saloon Jul 20, Moonlight Rodeo. Main Street, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Osher Marin JCC Jul 21, Oliver Mtukudzi & the Black Spirits. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Osteria Divino Jul 18, Lau Paiva. Jul 19, Homenagem Brasileira. Jul 20, Ken Cook Trio. Jul 21, Curtis Woodman Trio. Jul 22, Joan Getz Duo. Jul 24, Carlos Oliveira. Jul 25, Piro Patton Duo. 27 Caledonia St, Sausalito.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Jul 19, Rahman’s Songwriters in the Round. Jul 20, Beso Negro. Jul 21, Rusty Evans & the Ring of Fire. Jul 22, Slowpoke. Jul 24, the Jammists. Jul 25,

NAPA COUNTY Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Jul 20, Wall of Blues. Jul 21, Chris Cobb. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Jarvis Conservatory Jul 18, Mayumi Kanagawa. Jul 20, Sarina Zhang. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Napa Valley Opera House Jul 19, Jeff Applebaum with David Studebaker. Jul 20, Charlie Musselwhite. Jul 25, Leo Kottke. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Silo’s Jul 20, Rockin Down the Hiway. Jul 21, Pulsators. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre Jul 18, Willie Nelson. Jul 20, the Mavericks. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Spancky’s Jul 20, Rock on Broadway. Jul 21, Detroit Desciples. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Tradewinds

San Francisco’s City Guide

Jul 18, Herb in Movement. Jul 20, Brothers of Siren. Jul 21, Bern Man. Jul 22, Timothy O’Neil Band. Jul 25, the Hots. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Beachwood Sparks

Wells Fargo Center

Verbal Abuse

Jul 20, Sheryl Crow. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY 142 Throckmorton Theatre Jul 20, Todd Boston. Jul 21, Tim Hockenberry. Jul 22, Just My Type. Mon, Open Mic with Derek Smith. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Elk’s Lodge Jul 22, Groove Society. 1312 Mission Ave, San Rafael, 773.755.4700.

George’s Nightclub Jul 19, Deborah Winters. Jul 20, Pride & Joy. Jul 21, Gator Beat.

Perfect summertime music in the form of breezy, harmony-laden Sub Pop band. Jul 19 at the Independent.

Gilman hardcore blowout with Blank Expressions, Five Fingers of Death, more. Jul 20 at 924 Gilman.

Owl City At the top of the charts just a few years ago, Postal Servicejacking band now plays small clubs. Jul 21 at Slim’s.

Steve Kimock Guitar wizard strangles the fretboard with Bernie Worrell, Wally Ingram and Andy Hess. Jul 21 at the Fillmore.

Charo and Too Short They both play on the same night: Charo in the Club, Too Short in the Lounge. Collaboration, please! Jul 21 at Yoshi’s SF.

Find more San Francisco events by subscribing to the email newsletter at www.sfstation.com.

29

At 4pm. Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery, “Songs of the Earth: The Joy of Color,” featuring ironic landscapes by Jack Stuppin. 1785 Coast Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2911. At 5pm. Marin MOCA, “Horizons,” artist members exhibition runs concurrent with “Jeffrey Sully: Poetic Contours.” Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137. At 5pm. Gallery One, “Paint to the Music,” juried show open to all artists. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277. At 5pm. Towers Gallery, Frank Oravetz, photography and Melissa Cox, watercolors, celebrate the summer. Reception, Jul 21, 5pm. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

ARThouse Gallery

Bodega Bay Heritage Gallery

Calabi Gallery Through Aug 19, “Art Inspired by the Natural World” with work from Fran Hardy, Alexander Loemans and others. 144 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Through Aug 4, “Alchemy of Seasons” features Becoming Independent and community artists, including Genevieve and Raymond Barnhart and others. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sat, noon to 5 and by appointment. 707.578.9123.

Gallery One Through Sep 2, “Paint to the Music,” juried show open to all artists. Reception, Jul 21, 5pm. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Gallery 300 Through Jul 28, “Pointillism,” the work of Mary Jarvis. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Open Sat, 12 to 5, and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Graton Gallery Through Aug 11, “Dog Treats” work by Mylette Welch, including guest artists Susie Peterson, Richard Moore, Linda Schroeter and Gen Zorich. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSun, 10:30 to 6. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Jul 28, “Landau, Miller and Vogel” features the work of Frank J Miller, James Vogel and Natasha Landau. Through Sep 8, “Second Nature,” paintings and collages of Jenny Honnert Abell, reflects on the abundance of the natural world. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Longboard Vineyards Jul 21, 5-8pm, Cuban Lyrical Expressionist Alian Rives shows work for one night only. 5 Fitch Street, Healdsburg. 707.433.3473.

Quicksilver Mine Company Through Aug 12, “Collectanea”

Through Jul 31, “She Eats Cheetos with Chopsticks,” the work of painter Naomi Murakami. 7345 Healdsburg Ave, Sebastopol. No phone.

Riverfront Art Gallery Through Sep 9, “Showin’ on the River,” juried fine art featuring 25 artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Gallery Through Aug 12, “Spontaneous Journeys” features Teri Sloat’s landscapes and folk art. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma County Museum Through Aug 12, “Santa Rosa’s Chinatown,” exhibition explores how Chinese communities developed in Sonoma County, with special attention to Santa Rosa’s Chinatown. Through Sep 9, “Trees” featuring the large-scale oil paintings of Chester Arnold. Through Sep 9, “Sonoma Oaks: Points of View” featuring Hugh Livingston’s multimedia installations on the patterns and sounds of California oak habitats. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Through Sep 13, “Cross Pollination,” the art of painter Lawrence Ferlinghetti. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Towers Gallery Through Sep 30, Frank Oravetz, photography and Melissa Cox, watercolors, celebrate the summer. Reception, Jul 21, 5pm. 240 N Cloverdale Blvd, Ste 2, Cloverdale. 707.894.4331.

MARIN COUNTY Gallery Bergelli Through Aug 22, “Duende: Junkyard Melodies,” paintings by Tim Weldon. Artist demo Aug 4, 4pm. 483 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. ) 415.945.9454.

30

www.raventheater.org

a tribute to Etta James

LYDIA PENSE & COLD BLOOD plus RAY CHARLES PROJECT plus

Deszon Claiborne Dave Mathews

Clifford Coulter DeWayne Pate

Saturday, August 3 8 PM Doors open 7PM. $30 general seating; ages 21+ only TICKETS: (online) raventheater.org; (cash/check) Copperfield’s in Healdsburg or Last Record Store in Santa Rosa www.raventheater.org

Tony Lindsay Glenn Walters

433-6335

Through Sep 3, “Songs of the Earth: The Joy of Color,” featuring ironic landscapes by Jack Stuppin. Reception, Jul 21, 4pm. 1785 Coast Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. Wed-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.875.2911.

Gallery of Sea & Heaven

RiskPress Gallery

www.raventheater.org

Through Jul 31, Etching tools and India ink create intricate scratchboard works. Free. 13758 Arnold Dr, Glen Ellen. 707.935.3513.

Through Jul 31, Christopher Scott’s original paintings and giclee prints on display, presented by Zipper. Through Sep 30, “Heads Up,” the human head interpreted by seven sculptors in different mediums. 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. Daily 10 to 4 707.933.3010.

433-6335

SONOMA COUNTY

Cornerstone Sonoma

features the accumulations, agglomerations and assortments of many local artists. 6671 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 6. 707.887.0799.

433-6335

Jul 21

Through Jul 31, “Ooohhh & Aaahhh,” paintings by Heather P McConnell. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

www.raventheater.org

OPENINGS

Coffee Catz

433-6335

Galleries

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 1 8 – 24, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Events

A E

30

( 29

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | JULY 1 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 24, 20 1 2 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Gallery Route One Through Aug 5, Group show of member artists, with Mimi Abers, Candace Loheed and others. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation Through Sep 28, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond Landscapeâ&#x20AC;? features artwork focused on sustaining nature and taking care of the planet. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

Marin History Museum Through Sep 1, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Golden Gate Bridge, an Icon That Changed the World,â&#x20AC;? historical exhibit. Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. Tues-Fri, plus second and third Sat monthly, 11 to 4. 415.454.8538.

Marin MOCA Jul 21-Aug 19, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Horizons,â&#x20AC;? an artist members exhibition runs concurrent with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jeffrey Sully: Poetic Contours.â&#x20AC;? Reception, Jul 21, 5pm. Novato Arts Center, Hamilton Field, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 415.506.0137.

Marin Society of Artists

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Seager Gray Gallery Through Jul 31, The first of this two-part series brings together works in clay, glass, stone, porcelain, wood and more. 23 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat; 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 7; Sun, 12 to 5. 415.384.8288.

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Through Aug 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Open Fine Arts Showâ&#x20AC;? is a juried exhibit for local artists. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. Mon-Thurs, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.454.9561.

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Through Aug 4, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Williams, Waitsâ&#x20AC;? features the work of Franklin Williams and Kellesimone Waits, who share a playful obsession for acquiring and incorporating discarded relics. 20 Greenfield Ave, San Anselmo. 415.457.8847.

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di Rosa Through Sep 23, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Entering the Wildâ&#x20AC;? featuring the work of Trish Carney, Adriane Colburn and others. Panel discussion, Aug 1. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10am to 6pm 707.226.5991.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;UNAVOIDABE DUSTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Work by Jeffrey Sully opens

at Marin MOCA. See Openings, p29.

Napa Valley Museum Through Aug 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Modernâ&#x20AC;? features the abstract expressionist paintings of Ira Yeager. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Mon, 10 to 5. 707.944.0500.

Robert Mondavi Winery Through Sep 6, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land, Sea and the People Within,â&#x20AC;? oil paintings by Dorallen Davis. free. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.968.2203.

Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Santa Rosa Comedy Nights Comedy Open Mic hosted by MC Ricky Del Rosario. Third Thurs of every month. Free. Heritage Public House, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.540.0395.

Tuesday Evening Comedy

Through Jul 31, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stories on Canvas,â&#x20AC;? still life, animals and portraits by Vernon Valine. 1314 McKinstry St, Napa.

Mark Pitta hosts ongoing evenings with established comics and up-andcomers Tues at 8. $15-$20. 142 Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Comedy

Events

Below the Belt

BASK Music Festival

Brandon Revels hosts this evening of standup comedy featuring local talent. Third Fri of every month, 9pm. $10. Jasper Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Farrellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Music, art and food in inaugural rustic camping festival. Bands include: Deep Chatham, Steve Pile Band, Wooster, Chris Rovetti and many others. Jul 20-22. $50-$150. Hilton Park Campground, 10750 River Rd, Forestville.

Westin Verasa Hotel

Bright Yellow Circle Will Franken presents oneman show with characters ranging from Sherlock Holmes on the hunt for his own body to director Roman Polanski going door to door to inform his neighbors that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a registered sex offender. Jul 19, 8pm. $18-$21. 142

Coffee with the Mayor Santa Rosa Mayor Ernesto Olivares invites all comers for some one-on-one coffee talk. Jul 20, 9am. Free. SoCo Coffee, 1015 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.433.1660.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Valley Campus, 1088 College Ave, St Helena.

Featuring music from a Salute to Nick Gravenites (Jul 18), Country All Stars (Jul 25), Michael Boliver Band (Aug 1) and the Fabulous Luv Rustlers (Aug 8). Wed, 5pm. Free. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Rhyme-A-Palooza!

To Mimic S.F. Mime Troupe brings message from 1% Despite what their name might imply, the Tony award–winning San Francisco Mime Troupe is anything but silent. Their use of the word “mime,” rather than indicating only gestures and expressions, means “to mimic.” And mimic they do, satirizing the absurdities of contemporary life through attention-grabbing singing, dialogue and showmanship. The San Francisco Mime Troupe is a worker-owned company led by an elected collective. Every summer, they perform weekly in Bay Area parks before touring the rest of the state, nation and world, seeking to present socially relevant theater before the broadest possible audience. The troupe’s 53rd season show is For the Greater Good, or The Last Election, based on the classic 19th-century melodrama The Poor of New York. Featuring a live band, The Last Election debates “true” American values, flipping the Occupy movement and telling a story from the point of the view of the misunderstood 1% “Godzillionaires.” See it in two free performances on Thursday, July 19, at the Mill Valley Community Center (180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley; 7pm), and also on Sunday, July 22, in Walnut Park (Petaluma Boulevard South at D Street, Petaluma; 4pm).—Catherine Zaw

Mystery Writers Conference

Napa Valley Writers Conference

Speakers include: Don Winslow; Cara Black; Tarquin Hall; and Karin Slaughter. Jul 19-22. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Readings and lecture series. Times and locations may vary, see napawritersconference.org for details. Jul 22-26. $10-$25. Napa Valley College, Upper

Poetry event for kids with poets Kathleen Winter, Bill Vartnaw and others. Jul 22, 1pm. Free. Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books, 2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

A River Runs Through It: Our Napa River Themed activity allows students to make their own terrarium biosphere complete with rocks and plant specimens. Jul 24, 1pm. $7. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Rivertown Revival Music (John Courage, The Crux, David Luning, Baby Seal Club and others), art (build your own art boat and race it), $5 weddings and $5 beers (coincidence?), and much, much more. Jul 21, 11am-7pm. $5. Steamer Landing Park, Copeland Street, Petaluma.

Rumi’s Caravan Middle Eastern feast prepared by Ceres Community Project, followed by readings of Rumi, Hafiz, Blake, Oliver and others set to music. Jul 19, 6pm. $60. Osmosis Day Spa, 209 Bohemian Hwy, Freestone. 707.823.8231.

Film Fixing the Future Documentary focused on building local jobs, income and sustainability. Jul 18, 7pm. $7. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

The Help Outdoor movie in the park. Jul 21, 8pm. Donation. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

Todd Solondz The director of “Welcome to the Dollhouse” and other films will be in attendance for a screening ) of new film “Dark

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Peacetown Summer Concert Series

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Horse,” starring Mia Farrow and Christopher Walken. Jul 22, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

( 31

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Steve Prefontaine Film Festival “Without Limits” and “Fire on the Track” shown outdoors to honor the long-distance 1970s track star. Jul 20, 8pm. Donation. Creek Park, Hub Intersection, Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, San Anselmo.

Food & Drinks Catalan Festival Spanish food, wine and entertainment with classical guitar, flamenco and grape stomping. Jul 21, 11am-4pm and Jul 22, 1pm. $45-$55. Gloria Ferrer Champagne Cellars, 23555 Hwy 121, Sonoma. 707.996.7256.

Chili Cook Off Taste 10 different chili recipes and quaff several wines. Jul 21, noon-3pm. $25. Bourassa Vineyards, 190 Camino Orugo, Napa. 800.499.2366.

Gourmet Hike Chow down and swirl some wine under the natural canopy of the Redwoods. Proceeds benefit Stewards of the Coast. Jul 21, 1-5pm. $35. Armstrong Woods State Reserve, Armstrong Woods Road, Guerneville.

Bathing in It Poetry, food and more with Rumi’s Caravan Water isn’t the only thing you’ll be soaking up—this week, Rumi’s Caravan stops at Osmosis to immerse attendees in a soft lit evening in the bamboo-lined zen garden, filling the sweet night of poetry with musical accompaniment. Words from the works of Jellaludin Rumi, Hafiz, William Blake, Mary Oliver and others follows a fresh and healthy vegan Middle Eastern meal provided by Ceres Community Project. After circling the koi pond of the Kyoto-inspired landscape, don’t forget to dip into the cedar enzyme footbaths, a relaxing heat treatment from Japan. Nourish the body, mind, and soul on Thursday, July 19, at Osmosis Day Spa Sanctuary. 209 Bohemian Hwy., Sebastopol. $60, proceeds benefit Ceres Community Project. 6pm-9pm. 707.823.8231.—Catherine Zaw

The Herbal Kitchen Kami McBride shows how to turn a garden into a spice rack, medicine chest and pantry full of herbal foods and condiments. Jul 21, 10am. Free. Toby’s Feed Barn, 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1223.

Midsummer Garden Tea Traditional tea service, and a loveliest hat contest, in this charming reminder of bygone days. Sun, Jul 22, 1-3pm. $50. Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, Santa Rosa Avenue at Sonoma Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.524.5445.

Pinot Family Reunion Taste top pinots from many wineries followed by a familystyle dinner from Tom Schmidt.

Jul 22, 1pm. $50-$60. John Ash & Co, Vintners Inn, 4350 Barnes Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.7687.

Lectures Armed Conflict & Forced Displacement Nat J. Colletta, Advisor to World Bank, United Nations, Asia Foundation discusses efforts to obtain “durable solutions” moving from a humanitarian to a development approach. Jul 20. $23-$28. La Gare Restaurant, 208 Wilson St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4355.

Climate History of the Earth Science Buzz Cafe series features Richard Ely, selfdescribed “geology dude.” Jul 19, 7pm. $4. French Garden, 8050 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2030.

Daniel Conner Colorado cartoonist behind comics and art for Abdo Publishing, the Buffalo Bill Museum, Antarctic Press, Mile High Comics and others. Jul 21, 1pm. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. ) 707.579.4452.

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34 Arts Events

( 32

Ira Yeager: Up Close & Personal

Napa Copperfield’s Books

Ask the California abstract expressionist and painter questions or just listen. Jul 19, 7pm. $5-$10. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Jul 19, 6pm, “The Napa Valley Historical Ecologial Atlas” with Robin Grossinger. 3900-A Bel Aire Plaza, Highway 29 and Trancas Street, Napa. 707.252.8002.

Jerry Mander

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Activist and author addresses the privatization of democracy, policy of endless growth on a finite planet, amorality in the corporate structure and other topics. Jul 23, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.579.ARTS.

Secrets of Getting Published Literary agent Amy Rennert demystifies the publishing process for fiction and nonfiction writers. Jul 19, 7pm. $15. Petaluma Community Center, 320 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma.

Readings Book Passage Jul 18, 12pm, Literary Luncheon with Chris Cleave. $55. Jul 18, 7pm, “Run to Failure: BP and the Making of the Deepwater Horizon Disaster” with Abrahm Lustgarten. Jul 19, 12pm, “A Hologram for the King” with Dave Eggers. Jul 19, 4:30pm, “The Hunter” with John Lescroart. Jul 19, 7:30pm, “The Case of the Deadly Butter Chicken: A Vish Puri Mystery” with Tarquin Hall. Jul 20, 7:30pm, “The Kings of Cool: A Prequel to Savages” with Don Winslow. Jul 21, 6:30pm, “Criminal” with Karin Slaughter. Jul 23, 7pm, “Etiquette for an Apocalypse” with Anne Mendel. Jul 24, 7pm, “The Cottage at Glass Beach” with Heather Barbieri. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jul 21, 6pm, “Food Lover’s Guide to Sonoma” with Jean Saylor Doppenberg. 2316 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jul 24, 7pm, “The Land of Stories” with Chris Colfer. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Jul 20, 7pm, “The Creativity Cure” with Carrie and Alton Barron. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.2618.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Jul 19, 7pm, “Spiritual Practice: A Contemplative Guide to Growing Older and Wiser” with Lewis Richmond. 11445 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1349.

Point Reyes Presbyterian Church Jul 19, 7pm, “Aging as a Spiritual Practice: A Contemplative Guide to Growing Older and Wiser” with Lewis Richmond. 11445 Shoreline Highway, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1349.

Theater Dream the Impossible Dream

Dominican University, San Rafael.

For the Greater Good, or The Last Election Pity the poor 1% in this mockumimery by the San Francisco Mime Troupe. Jul 19, 6:30pm. Free. Mill Valley Community Center, 180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley. Jul 22, 3:30pm. Free. Walnut Park, Petaluma Boulevard South and D Street, Petaluma.

The Lion in Winter Made famous by Peter O’Toole and Katherine Hepburn in the 1968 film, this play keeps audiences on the edge of their seats. Dates and times vary. Through Jul 22. $20 to $25. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

The Mikado Gilbert and Sullivan’s comic opera directed by Molly Noble with an all-Marin cast. Fri, Jul 20, 8pm, Sat, Jul 21, 8pm and Sun, Jul 22, 4pm. $10-$24. McInnis Park, Smith Ranch Road, San Rafael.

Peaseblossom A farce based on Shakespeare’s most beloved comedy, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Part of Sebastopol Shakespeare Festival. Dates and times vary. Through Jul 28. Free-$20. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Picnic in the park while Broadway performers belt tunes from your favorite musicals. Fri-Sun, 5pm. through Jul 22. $25-$35. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Sister Cities

Greater Tuna

Summer Repertory Theater

The show focuses on small town Southern life. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 12. $17-$25. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Gutenberg! The Musical Authors of a musical about Johannes Gutenberg (printing press inventor) pitch their show to producers. Times vary. FriSun through Jul 22. $20. Sixth Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

King John Marin Shakespeare Company’s rendition under the stars is sure to strike a romantic chord. Dates and times vary. Through Aug 12. $20 to $55. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre,

Dark comedy written by Colette Freedman, directed by Jacquelyn Wells. Dates and times vary. Fri-Sun through Aug 19. $15. Pegasus Theater Company, Rio Nido Lodge, Canyon Two Rd, Rio Nido.

‘Xanadu,’ ‘Avenue Q,’ ‘Passion Play,’ ‘The Mousetrap’ and ‘Sweet Charity,’ playing in repertory at various dates and times. Through Aug 11. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Full schedule at www. summerrep.com.

Astrology

FREE WILL BY ROB BREZSNY

For the week of July 18

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Acro-Yoga is a relatively new physical discipline. According to a description I read on a flyer in Santa Cruz, it “blends the spiritual wisdom of yoga, the loving kindness of massage, and the dynamic power of acrobatics.” I’d love to see you work on creating a comparable hybrid in the coming months, Aries—some practice or system or approach that would allow you to weave together your various specialties into a synergetic whole. Start brainstorming about that impossible dream now, and soon it won’t seem so impossible.

realities about poverty, crime and classism. Yet one critic described him as a “genial and loving humorist” who showed that “even in dealing with the darkest scenes and the most degraded characters, genius could still be clean and mirth could be innocent.” I’m thinking that Dickens might be an inspirational role model for you in the coming weeks, Libra. It will be prime time for you to expose difficult truths and agitate for justice and speak up in behalf of those less fortunate than you. You’ll get best results by maintaining your equanimity and good cheer.

TAURUS (April 20–May 20) Unless you grow your own or buy the heirloom variety at farmers markets, you probably eat a lot of tasteless tomatoes. Blame it on industrial-scale farming and supermarket chains. They’ve bred tomatoes to be homogenous and bland—easy to ship and pretty to look at. But there’s a sign of hope: a team of scientists at the University of Florida is researching what makes tomatoes taste delicious, and is working to bring those types back into mainstream availability. I think the task you have ahead of you in the coming weeks is metaphorically similar, Taurus. You should see what you can to do restore lost flavor, color and soulfulness. Opt for earthy idiosyncrasies over fake and boring perfection.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) It’ll be a humming, murmuring, whispering kind of week—a time when the clues you need will most likely arrive via ripplings and rustlings and whirrings. Here’s the complication: Some of the people around you may be more attracted to clangs and bangs and jangles. They may imagine that the only information worth paying attention to is the stuff that’s loudest and strongest. But I hope you won’t be seduced by their attitudes. I trust you’ll resist the appeals of the showy noise. Be a subtlety specialist who loves nuance and undertones. Listen mysteriously. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

Most change is slow and incremental. The shifts happen so gradually that they are barely noticeable while you’re living in the midst of them from day to day. Then there are those rare times when the way everything fits together mutates pretty quickly. Relationships that have been evolving in slow motion begin to speed up. Longstanding fixations melt away. Mystifying questions get clear answers. I think you’re at one of these junctures now, Cancerian. It’s not likely you’ll be too surprised by anything that happens, though. That’s because you’ve been tracking the energetic build-up for a while, and it will feel right and natural when the rapid ripening kicks in.

LEO (July 23–August 22) Lately you’ve been spending time in both the off-kilter parts of paradise and the enchanting areas of limbo. On one notable occasion, you even managed to be in both places simultaneously. How’d you do that? The results have been colorful but often paradoxical. What you don’t want and what you do want have gotten a bit mixed up. You have had to paw your way out of a dead-end confusion but have also been granted a sublime breakthrough. You explored a tunnel to nowhere but also visited a thrilling vista that provided you with some medicinal excitement. What will you do for an encore? Hopefully, nothing that complicated. I suggest you spend the next few days chilling out and taking inventory of all that’s changed. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) The painter

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Philip Guston loved to express himself creatively. He said it helped him to get rid of his certainty, to divest himself of what he knew. By washing away the backlog of old ideas and familiar perspectives, he freed himself to see the world as brand new. In light of your current astrological omens, Virgo, Guston’s approach sounds like a good strategy for you to borrow. The next couple of weeks will be an excellent time to explore the pleasures of unlearning and deprogramming. You will thrive by discarding stale preconceptions, loosening the past’s hold on you, and clearing out room in your brain for fresh imaginings.

LIBRA (Sept 23–October 22) Nineteenth-century author Charles Dickens wrote extensively about harsh social conditions. He specialized in depicting ugly

For many years, ambergris was used as a prime ingredient in perfumes. And where does ambergris come from? It’s basically whale vomit. Sperm whales produce it in their gastrointestinal tracts to protect them from the sharp beaks of giant squid they’ve eaten, then spew it out of their mouths. With that as your model, Scorpio, I challenge you to convert an inelegant aspect of your life into a fine asset, even a beautiful blessing. I don’t expect you to accomplish this task overnight. But I do hope you will finish by May of 2013.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) “Interruption” will be a word of power for you in the coming days. No, really—I’m not being ironic, sarcastic or satirical. It is possible that the interruptions will initially seem inconvenient or undesirable, but I bet you will eventually feel grateful for their intervention. They will knock you out of grooves you need to be knocked out of. They will compel you to pay attention to clues you’ve been neglecting. Don’t think of them as random acts of cosmic whimsy, but rather as divine strokes of luck that are meant to redirect your energy to where it should be. CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) You don’t have to stand in a provocative pose to be sexy. You don’t have to lick your lips or radiate a smoldering gaze or wear clothes that dramatically reveal your body’s most appealing qualities. You already know all that stuff, of course; in light of this week’s assignment, I just wanted to remind you. And what is that assignment? To be profoundly attractive and alluring without being obvious about it. With that as your strategy, you’ll draw to you the exact blessings and benefits you need. So do you have any brilliant notions about how to proceed? Here’s one idea: be utterly at peace with who you really are. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) I brazenly predict, my dear Aquarius, that in the next 10 months you will fall in love with love more deeply than you have in over a decade. You will figure out a way to exorcise the demons that have haunted your relationship with romance, and you will enjoy some highly entertaining amorous interludes. The mysteries of intimacy will reveal new secrets to you, and you will have good reasons to redefine the meaning of “fun.” Is there any way these prophecies of mine could possibly fail to materialize? Yes, but only if you take yourself too seriously and insist on remaining attached to the old days and old ways. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

Be alert for fake magic, and make yourself immune to its seductive appeal. Do not, under any circumstances, allow yourself to get snookered by sexy delusions, enticing hoaxes or clever mirages. There will in fact be some real magic materializing in your vicinity, and if you hope to recognize it you must not be distracted by the counterfeit stuff. This is a demanding assignment, Pisces. You will have to be both skeptical and curious, both tough-minded and innocently receptive. Fortunately, the astrological omens suggest you now have an enhanced capacity to live on that edge.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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2370 Market Street, PMB 502 San Francisco, CA 94114 -orFax: 415.373.4466 -orEmail: ggch2012@gmail.com Please read and fill out the form carefully. If you have any questions, please contact us via email at ggch2012@gmail.com or telephone 415.518.5716. IF YOU DO NOT REQUEST A COPY OF YOUR PATIENT RECORDS ON OR BEFORE AUGUST 31, 2013, GGCH will request that the United States Department of Health and Human Services and the California Department of Health and Human Services take possession of your medical

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A Finer Touch

Call 707.527.1200 x215 today!

Great Massage

Swedish massage, body electric experience. Petaluma. Jack CMT. 707.347.9497. 415.235.2590. Outcall.

sales@bohemian.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JULY 1 8-24, 20 1 2 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Above Expectation

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGR AM

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxycontin and Vicodin using Methadone.

We’re here to help you help yourself.

• Subutex/Suboxone available • Confidentiality assured

1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B • Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 • www.srtp.net

Horti-Tech LLC, Specializing in Master Light Control, Ballast and Fluorescent Repair

PSYCHIC PALM AND CARD READER Madame Lisa. Truly gifted adviser for all problems. 827 Santa Rosa Ave. One visit convinces you. Appt. 707.542.9898

Josh Guttig, email — jgutt7@yahoo.com or call 707.364.1540

BECOME A YOGA TEACHER in 6 extended weekends at Ananda Seva ashram in Santa Rosa, Oct–March. Visit: www.anandaseva.org/yoga/yoga-teacher-training or call Gayatri 707.239.3650

SUBUTEX/SUBOXONE available for Safe Oxycontin, Vicodin, Other Opiate Withdrawal! Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

NATURAL HOME DESIGN’S NEW LOCATION! We have moved next to Costco in R.P: 5833 Redwood Dr. Rohnert Park,CA 94928 707.585.2343 naturalhomeproducts.com

BraveHeart Women Sonoma County Chapter Meeting Way Beyond Networking! Be. Create. Collaborate!

• MediCal accepted

PEACE IN MEDICINE IS NOW OPEN IN SANTA ROSA 1061 North Dutton Ave @ West College Ave. Santa Rosa CA 95401 — Great Prices! Visit our online menu at www.PeaceinMedicine.org

Wifi, video conferencing, meeting & event space. At the Share Exchange. 531 5th St, Santa Rosa shareexchange.coop

Promote Your Business – Create More Visibility in your Community – Contact Lynn Kwitt @ 707.280.5449 or email: healthfairsampler1@gmail.com

Free Firewood Fruitless Mulberry. 707.569.9808

Napa Meditation class: Universal Love and Compassion.

We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxycontin and Vicodin using Methadone. • Subutex/Suboxone available • Providing Treatment since 1984 • Confidentiality assured • MediCal accepted

Mondays from 7:00 to 8:30pm at Jessel's Studio Gallery. We will explore Buddhism and the spiritual path, and what it means in our lives. The classes are $10 drop in; no commitment is needed, and they are open to both beginning and more experienced meditators. For information, call Mike Smith at 415.717.4943 or www.meditationinnorcal.org Jessel Gallery is at 1019 Atlas Peak Road, Napa. 707.257.2350 www.jesselgallery.com

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM

Local Leader, Laurie Allen 707.318.9865

1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B • Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 • www.srtp.net

SKIRT CHASER VINTAGE — BUY, SELL, TRADE 707.546.4021 208 Davis Street, RR Square, SR

Move In Specials

COMPASSIONATE HEALTH OPTIONS Providing Compassionate Care and Medical Cannabis Evaluations Since 2004

•Led by Dr. Hanya Barth •Real Care—Real Doctors •24/7 Safe Verification •Totally Confidential

We’ll Match Any Local Price

SANTA ROSA CO-WORK SPACE

HEALTH FAIR SAMPLER Wellness Practitioners Wanted

we’re here to help you help yourself.

Saturday July 21st, 11:00, Dhyana Center, Sebastopol

• Providing Treatment since 1984

Quality ID Cards

5 X 10… Smart Comedy, it’s like NPR… on Acid! EVERYTHING SONOMA COUNTY PLUS ✦ POLITICS ✦ LIVE MUSIC ✦ COMEDY ✦ POP CULTURE ✦ WORLD FAMOUS GUESTS

1.707.568.0420

3 TO 6, WEEKDAY AFTERNOONS ON 1350 AM KSRO

Downtown Santa Rosa: 741 5th St @ E St

/JAXONDRIVE

www.GREEN215.com

Steve Jaxon with Phil Donahue

starting as low as $ 30 per month

10 X 10…

starting as low as $ 75 per month

We sell boxes, packaging and other moving supplies

3205 Dutton Ave | 1435 Sebastopol Ave Santa Rosa | Locally Owned & Operated

707-546-0000 707-578-3299


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