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JULY 2012

V OL.1 9 NO.6

✱ VAMPIRES, FAIRIES AND THE APOCALYPSE: A GUIDE TO TEEN READS ✱ CANOEING THE WINOOSKI WITH KIDS

Day-cations VERMONT

PART 5:

SANTA’S VILLAGE AND THE BILLINGS FARM & MUSEUM

✱ HOW TO WRITE AND DRAW A GRAPHIC NOVEL

Get some summer before it’s gone

Short & Sweet

Count the cones sprinkled in this issue to win tickets to Ausable Chasm! Chasm

Contest!

VERMONT’S AWARD-WINNING INTERNATIONAL YOUTH CIRCUS - 2012 BIG TOP TOUR

Circus-palooza Sunday, July 22 Come one, come all to a circus spectacular! Circus artists, carnival games, and activities! Bring your family to the Big Top for a circus extravaganza.

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C I R C U S - P A L O O Z A I S A F A M I LY D A Y SPONSORED BY:

GR

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o nt!

JULY 1 & AUG 18 & 19

GREENSBORO The Circus Barn

JULY 5 - 7

ESSEX

Champlain Valley Expo

July 12 & 13

MANCHESTER Ce

Dorr Farm

JULY 18 & 19

BRATTLEBORO VT Agric. Bus. Ed. Center

A Blast from the Past & Fun from the Future

Vermont residents $10 admission; children $5

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AUGUST 15 & 16

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MONTPELIER

Montpelier High School

6/20/12 11:24 AM

OPEN YEAR ROUND!

More to Explore May-October, Open Daily November-April, reservations suggested

kidsvt.com

Only 4 miles from the Port Kent Ferry Dock! Discount tickets available at the Burlington Ferry Dock!

July 2012

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6/20/12 11:04 AM

VOL.19 N O . 6

JULY 2012 A Vermont Nanny & Elder Care Agency

DEPARTMENTS From the Kids VT Staff ............................................5 See and Say ......................................................................7 Birthday Club..................................................................40 Use Your Words: Essay ..........................................43

• Safe, loving, and professional in-home caregivers • Professional screening and strict recruitment process

Day-cations VERMONT

EAT. LEARN. PLAY The Kids Beat ..................................................................8 Ask Dr. First: Sunscreen ........................................10 Fit Families: Winooski River Canoeing ...11 The Librarian Likes ....................................................11 Seeing STARS.................................................................12 The Because Project .................................................13 Out to Eat: A&W Drive-In ...................................15 Go Ask Dad: Last Night Out ................................16 The Art of … Graphic Novels ..............................17

• Full-time, part-time, temp, event, and sitter services

Part 5: .............18 18 Santa’s Village and the Billings Farm & Museum

Attention busy moms! Not enough time in the day? Ask us about our Household Managers and save 20% off a placement.

CALENDAR

www.babiestoboomersvt.com 802-540-0433

Daily Listings ..................................................................26 Classes ..................................................................................27 Story Times ......................................................................30 Playgroups ........................................................................32

‘1984 With Cute Boys’ ...................22 A grown-up’s guide to the YA world of sexy vampires and rebels with a cause

HANDS-ON Build a Terrarium .......................................................39 Puzzle Page ......................................................................40 Coloring Contest .........................................................41

FREE

ON THE COVER

6/6/12 2:39 PM

Small Boat Festival July 21-22

Kids Duct Tape Regatta Sun. July 22!

V O L. 1 9 NO . 6

✱ CHRISTMAS IN JULY AT SANTA’S VILLAGE ✱ VAMPIRES, FAIRIES AND THE APOCALYPSE: A GUIDE TO TEEN READS

Day-cations VERMONT

For this month’s cover, Tom McNeill photographed kids enjoying handmade ice cream at the Billings Farm & Museum.

JULY 2012

k8v-BabiestoBoomers0712.indd 1

✱ CANOEING THE WINOOSKI WITH KIDS

PART 5:

SANTA’S VILLAGE AND THE BILLINGS FARM & MUSEUM

✱ HOW TO WRITE AND DRAW A GRAPHIC NOVEL

Get some summer before it’s gone

Short & Sweet

Count the cones sprinkled in this issue to win tickets to Ausable Chasm! Chasm

Contest!

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS Copy Editors

Copublisher Copublisher/Executive Editor Creative Director Managing Editor Director of Marketing & Events Account Executive Intern

Colby Roberts Cathy Resmer Don Eggert Kate Laddison Corey Grenier Kaitlin Montgomery Sachi Leith

colby@kidsvt.com cathy@kidsvt.com don@kidsvt.com kate@kidsvt.com corey@kidsvt.com kaitlin@kidsvt.com sachi@kidsvt.com

ext. 77 ext. 74 ext. 71 ext. 73 ext. 76 ext. 72

© 2012 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

Did you get your School Family Pass?

Details: www.lcmm.org

Photographers: Andy Duback, Matthew Thorsen, Tom McNeill Illustrator: Rev. Diane Sullivan Cover image: Tom McNeill

(802) 475-2022

www.lcmm.org

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Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Contributing Writers: Margot Harrison, Kirk Kardashian, Cindy Morgan, Ken Picard, Kristi Roche, Helen Rock, Sarah Tuff

New! Daily Specials So much to do every day!

KIDS VT

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 400+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont.

Circulation Manager Deputy Web Editor Office Manager

JULY 2012

Editorial in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy.

Production Manager Lead Designer Designers

KIDSVT.COM

P.O. Box 1184 Burlington, VT 05402 802-985-5482 kidsvt.com

Proofreaders

Paula Routly Megan James Janice Obuchowski Kate O’Neill Don Eggert Brooke Bousquet Celia Hazard Rev. Diane Sullivan Steve Hadeka Tyler Machado Cheryl Brownell

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6/21/12 12:06 PM

2012

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Summer Camps July 9th–13th • July 16th–20th August 6th–10th • August 13th–17th

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5/21/12 1:41 PM

Explore More

We  measure kids’  feet!

Kevin, Kate and Oliver Laddison on the Island Runner ferry to Burton Island.

Williston

In mid-June, my family and I spent a few days at Burton Island State Park, wandering the grassy trails, skipping stones on the lake, listening to birds and bees. As part of our participation in the Vermont State Parks’ Venture Vermont Outdoor Challenge, we kept track of the many plants and animals we encountered. Our list grew to include garter and milk snakes, cedar waxwings, American toads, great blue herons, pike, perch, sunfish and bullpout. My son, Oliver, checked his map of the island as we walked, and trailed his toy boat alongside our canoe when we paddled. It was pretty close to my idea of heaven — especially since I had great coffee every day; a new insulated French press made that possible, even without electricity. The trip proved you don’t need to go far to explore: Burton Island is less than 10 as-the-crow-fly miles from our house, but we felt a world away. That’s the goal of our summer “Day-cations” series, which continues this month with a trip to the Billings Farm & Museum in Woodstock with its rolling green farmland and homemade ice cream. Willing to venture just a little farther? Santa’s Village in Jefferson, N.H., is a great theme park for little kids. Our aim is to encourage and assist in your adventures, whether they’re to cities, towns, farms or amusement parks. Kids VT covers indoor exploration, too. Literary editor Margot Harrison offers a young-adult book roundup in this issue that should be required reading for every parent. Check out the calendar for ideas, and when you’re on the road, use our new mobile-friendly website to make finding fun super quick and easy. Life is short, and summer in Vermont doesn’t last long. So get out and enjoy it, even if you don’t get farther than your own backyard.

This month’s Kids VT contributors include:

 

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Kristi Roche (“Crafting With Kids”) is a fish culture technician at the Ed Weed Fish Culture Station in Grand Isle. She recently helped organize the hatchery’s Children’s Fishing Festival, which drew a record 695 participants. Kristi lives in North Hero with her husband and their 8-month-old daughter.

too! )

July 2012

Sachi Leith (“Kids Beat” and “Use Your Words”) grew up in Burlington and is studying history at New York University in Abu Dhabi. She’s home for the summer, working as an intern at Kids VT.

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Kirk Kardashian (“Vermont Day-cations: Billings Farm & Museum”) is a senior writer at the Tuck School of Business in Hanover, N.H. This fall, the University Press of New England will publish his first book, Milk Money: Cash, Cows and the Death of the American Dairy Farm. He lives in Woodstock with his wife and two children.

> ( adults  

c

KaTe laddison, managing ediTor kate@kidsvt.com

Sara LaBarre, New Balance Williston Manager & Certified Pedorthist

summer is all abouT exploraTion. At the end of a long, action-filled day, who isn’t tempted to follow the sun as it drops below the western horizon?

New Balance Williston | Maple Tree Place next to Mexicali

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History  Trek  &   Day-cations  for  Kids! Discover what Vermont’s history is all about. Vermont State-Owned Historic Sites bring history to life through day camps, kids’ workshops, reenactments, hands on exhibits and special events for all ages.  Battle of Hubbardton Revolutionary War Encampment July 7-8, Hubbardton Battlefield  Drawing & Watercolor Workshop for Kids July 9-13, Justin Morrill Homestead  American Revolution Day Camp July 25-27, Mount Independence

rd Y TRE K Sco reca

150 points and ou have earned y Vermont Histor t your prize – a wned Historic Vermont State-O all of next year!

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Kids VT

July 2012

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Readers Respond Surviving Without Screen Time First off, I usually love your magazine but am writing to say how disappointed I was with the suggestions in the June “Go Ask Dad” on how to keep kids occupied while driving. Three of the four parents mentioned bringing media devices (iPad, DVD and iPhone) to keep the kids busy. Lame! Yes, the kids might not bug you as much, but what happens when the battery dies or the game crashes? And how is letting your kids plug in for multiple hours affecting their brain development? Research shows the more screen time kids have, the greater the increase in depression, ADD and behavior problems, and the less capable they are of thinking outside the box. I used to think my kids were not capable of making a six-hour drive without a movie. But the most amazing thing happened. We stopped packing the DVD player and canceled our TV (even PBS!), and it was crazy: They were happier, didn’t complain as much and got along much better. I would never have thought it possible, but my kids don’t ask to watch TV anymore. The majority of Vermont families live here to enjoy the outdoors and outdoor activities. Please list suggestions more in line with the Vermont lifestyle and do some thinking outside the box! MEGAN RUDY Quechee

SEE AND SAY

COLORING CONTEST

Some of last month’s colorists caught the Father’s Day reference in our June image: Sea horse “dads” carry as many as 2000 babies at a time, in their pouches. From their titles, callouts and costumes, we could tell kids recognized their pops. Thanks for sharing your inspirational artwork.

These winners get $25 from TD Bank.

HONORABLE MENTIONS SENSATIONAL SWASHBUCKLERS “The Real Pirates of the Caribbean” Eddie Fallis, 6, Hubbardton RAD RAINBOWS, FUNKY FISH “Rainbow Rays” Raegan Decker, 7, Fairfax

Here are some of Megan’s ideas for media-free road trips: • Check out new books at the library or listen to a book on tape. • Play car bingo — make your own game with landmarks along the way. • Draw with window markers. • Give kids a notebook, scissors, a pen, tape and a stapler, and let them have at it. “They’ll be happy for hours!” she says.

Contest!

Count the ice cream cones to win a prize.

“Sea Horses Swimming Under Colors”

STUPENDOUS STRIPED SEAFLOOR “Rockin’ Sea Horse” Winn Gillen, 8, Duxbury FANTASTIC FLORALS “Flower Fun” Lily Curtis, 9, Georgia FUNNIEST FISH “Under the Sea” Tracy Cosgrove, 10, North Ferrisburgh CREATIVE COSTUMING “Costume Party” Isabelle Collum, 10, Fairfax BEST SHIPWRECK, GREATEST GOOGLY EYES “Under the Sea … Horse!” Alyssa Boivin, 7, Georgia

5 to 8

Mae Moriarty, 8 LINCOLN

“Horsing Around in the Tropics”

BEST DEATH PUFFER FISH (EVER!) “Sea Wars” Bryan Ford, 10, South Burlington FIRST-EVER ADULT ENTRY “Planet of the Sea Horses” Mochi Kai Mu, 47, Worcester MOST INVITING AQUAMARINE “Sea Horse Shallow” Joe Reed, 5, Essex

TOP TITLES

“Do Sea Horses Have a Mother, Too?” Lola Kozic, 4, Vergennes “Water Sea Horse Adopts Sun Sea Horse” Tosh Swan, 5, Hinesburg “Adventures of Perpl and Pingk” Addy Kate Budliger, 7, Middlesex “Sea Horses Lost in the Deep, Dark Ocean” Alice Mae Peabody, 5, Vergennes

Kailea Silvers, 10 MIDDLESEX

“The Designer Maniac Sea Horses”

Find this month’s coloring contest on page 41. The deadline is July 15.

9 to 12

KIDS VT

Raegan Decker of Fairfax, Nichole Thibault of South Burlington, and Sara Maguire of Swanton correctly counted 15 pairs of boot prints tracked through the pages of the June issue. They’re beach bound after winning Vermont State Parks passes.

UNDERHILL

JULY 2012

Last month’s winners:

CUTEST CRUSTACEAN “The Fin-Head Duo” Max Fontana, 7, South Burlington

Jazmine Quinn, 2

4 and under

KIDSVT.COM

Count the cones sprinkled throughout the July issue, and you could win tickets to Ausable Chasm. Tell us how many you counted at kidsvt.com, or write to us at Kids VT, PO Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402. We’ll collect the correct responses and choose two winners, who will each receive admission for four. Enter by 5 p.m. on July 18 to win.

AWESOME ADDITIONS “Rainbow Sea Horses” Madelyn Ford, 7, South Burlington

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Parents who want to care for their kids and the planet take note: Burlingtonbased Seventh Generation recently introduced some new, environmentally friendly and infant-safe BABY CARE PRODUCTS. In addition to their longstanding line of chlorine-free diapers and wipes, the company now offers diaper cream, shampoo and body wash, lotion, and bubble bath. There’s also an SPF 30 mineral sunscreen without parabens, gluten or PABA — just in time for those sunny, midsummer days. None of the products contain phthalates — used in many products for children — that have been linked to 12:10 PMendocrine disruption and other health issues. Find out what the products do contain on the Seventh Gen website: Each product has an FAQ page that lists all of the ingredients. The sunscreen’s page, for instance, notes that a pediatrician should be consulted before any baby younger than 6 months gets slathered in it. — K.L.

BABY CARE: Baby Sunscreen, $13.99; Diaper Cream, $8.99; Baby Shampoo & Wash, gel $7.99; Baby Shampoo & Wash, foam, $7.99; Bubble Bath, $7.99; Baby Lotion, $7.99. Info, seventhgeneration.com.

BUSINESS

Phoenix Rising

Seminary Art Center

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KIDS VT

JULY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Still bummed about losing the downtown Burlington Borders? Don’t be; locally owned PHOENIX BOOKS k16-OrangeCountyPCC0512.indd 1 4/24/12 2:41 PM recently opened a few blocks away and is up to the challenge of satisfying the Queen City’s literary appetite. The bookseller, which has another branch in Essex, Join us for a summer filled with exciting art programs taught by offers a spacious shop with local artists and educators. some seating — and an entire bottom floor devoted to children’s literature. The kids section is Weekly sessions available for grades K-8. stocked with a range of options, from board books to young-adult Clay, impermanent art, making novels. Expectant mothers and fathers can find shelves full of musical instruments, mural paintings, books on parenting. Want your new title in e-book form? They sell paper mache, folk art, and much more. those, too. Events and workshops at both the Essex and Burlington locations give customers the chance to interact with local authors. seminaryartcenter.com • 253-8790 You won’t get that from Amazon. — S.L. Waterbury, Vermont k16t-seminaryartcenter042512.indd 1

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PHOENIX BOOKS: 191 Bank Street, Burlington, 448-3350, phoenixbooks.biz.

EAT. LEARN. PLAY. BOOKS

Star-Spangled Sleuthing Plattsburgh, N.Y. author Kate Messner’s new book, CAPTURE THE FLAG, is an action-packed detective story about the theft of the original star-spangled banner from the Smithsonian Museum of American History, in Washington, D.C. Three 12-year-olds from Vermont — Anna, José and Henry — meet in a snowed-in D.C. airport, brought together by mysterious pieces of silver jewelry and an ancient family history. The three begin a race against the clock to solve the crime before the skies clear and they, and the culprit, are able to fly back to BTV. As one of Messner’s characters smartly observes: “This whole thing is like that National Treasure movie or something.” The story is exciting and tackles some deeper issues, such as grief (Henry’s mom died three years before) and racism (the first to be blamed for the theft are members of a multi-racial international orchestra). It’s slightly predictable, but still a good read for any budding Sherlock. And a sequel is already on the way; this is the first book in Messner’s new Silver Jaguar Society trilogy. — S.L.

It’s a handful! Try kidsvt.com for fun at your fingertips.

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6/22/12 10:04 AM

CAPTURE THE FLAG: by Kate Messner, 240 pages, Scholastic, $16.99 hardcover. Listed for ages 8 and up.

TECHNOLOGY

Ranger Rover There are 52 state parks in Vermont, and each one is different. Some are great for fishing, some for camping, some have pools with water slides — lookin’ at you, Button Bay. Need help keeping track of them all? Download the new OH, RANGER! VT STATE PARKS app to your iPod, iPhone or iPad. This handy new tool uses your GPS-enabled device to determine which parks are nearby, and lists the amenities available at each site. Need directions? Oh, Ranger! will help you find your way there. Its friendly and intuitive interface simplifies a spontaneous search for a day hike or picnic spot. And the app is part of a national Oh, Ranger! network that you can use on road trips all over the country. Best of all, it’s free. — C.R. OH, RANGER! VT STATE PARKS: Available in the App Store, free.

FITNESS

Get a Move On

JULY 2012 KIDS VT

MOVE YOU FITNESS STUDIO: 71 Center Road, Essex, 734-0821, moveyouvt.com.

KIDSVT.COM

Ready to drag your post-pregnancy body to the gym — but at the crucial moment, the baby needs you? Consider popping the kid into a car seat and heading to MOVE YOU FITNESS STUDIO in Essex, where you can sweat together as a family in classes such as Mommy & Me Movin.’ Class times range from 5:15 a.m. to early evening, so you’re likely to find something that fits your schedule. The fees are family friendly, too; most classes have a drop-in rate as low $5 per class. The studio also sells six- or 12-class punch cards, so you don’t have to commit to a yearlong membership to participate. Still stuck on the couch? Take part in a free playgroup during which kids and moms can play, chat, snack, and stretch with mats and balls. Or leave the little ones at home and enjoy a Mom’s Night Out party that includes an hour of line dancing or Zumba followed by adult snacks and drinks. — K.L.

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Need a break for the night?

Q ASK DR. FIRST

Shedding light on some myths and facts about sunscreen b y ken Pi c a r d

Got questions for Dr. First?

Call one of our babysitters! Mention this ad for 10% off!

Send them to ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDS VT: Is there such a thing as a healthy tan? LEWIS FIRST: No, there really isn’t. Whether you tan naturally from the sun or use artificial tanning methods such as cosmetic skin pigmenters or tanning We are Vermont’s oldest & most experienced childcare placement agency. Our providers beds, you are still putting your skin at have undergone an intensive screening process. risk from the dangers of the ultraviolet rays that cause skin to turn darker. While 802-872-1VNC (1862) the artificial tanning pigments are not www.vermontnannyconnection.com felt to be damaging to the skin, it may make people less apt to take precautions in the sun, thinking their artificial tan is protective like sunscreen when it really isn’t. You need vitamin D for healthy bone growth — and the sun’s rays help produce k8v-VtNanny0712.indd 1 6/6/12 3:16 PMit in the body. But that goal is better achieved through a diet containing ample vitamin D since the risks of too much sun outweigh the benefits of getting vitamin D that way.

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KIDS VT

july 2012 KIDSVT.coM

KVT: Are kids with darker complexions still at risk of sunburns? LF: Yes. Getting tan is simply a function of how many cells in your skin produce a pigment called melanin that absorbs the sun’s rays. But it doesn’t mean the sun’s rays are not going to do further damage, causing the cosmetic as well as malignant dangers that can occur from sun exposure. One bad burn in an infant, toddler or child will more than double that child’s chances of getting skin cancer as an adult. But any sunscreen product that’s safe is going to reduce that original risk by 80 percent.

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KVT: what sun protection factor do you recommend? LF: Parents should be using a sunscreen rated at SPF 15 to 30. That means if your skin would normally take 15 minutes to tan or burn, with a sun protection factor of 15, theoretically it would take 15 times that — or 225 minutes — to get to the same level of burn. We do know that SPF 15 protects the skin from about 94 percent of the ultraviolet radiation, especially UVB rays, which are the ones that cause sunburns; with an SPF of 30, 97 percent. Once you surpass an SPF of 30, the value may not be that dramatic for the price. 6/20/12 3:28 PM

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MoST pARenTS Know that sunscreen is as crucial for kids on a beach day as sun, sand and plastic shovels. But some still adhere to dated beliefs: The sun can cure acne; tanning booths prevent sunburns; and a solid base tan is healthy. All are untrue. This month, Dr. Lewis First, chief of pediatrics at Vermont Children’s Hospital at Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington, elaborates on the importance of protecting children’s skin from sunburns, which can lead to dryness, premature aging and, ultimately, skin cancer. The good doctor lays it on thick — and often.

One bad burn in an infant, toddler or child will more than double that child’s chances of getting skin cancer as an adult. KVT: when should kids apply sunscreen? LF: Kids need to apply it 15 to 30 minutes before going outside in the sun, and then reapply it every one-and-a-half to two hours — as well as when they come out of the water. Even with products billed as “waterproof,” there’s controversy over how waterproof they really are. KVT: How much should they use? LF: A common mistake is that parents don’t use enough . They should use at least an ounce of sunscreen or sunblock per application. KVT: Does it matter if the sunscreen is a cream, lotion or spray? LF: What really matters is the SPF number, the amount that’s used and the frequency with which it’s applied. Parents should know that some environmental groups are concerned about some of the chemicals used in these products. There are some simple products that parents can look for when picking a sunscreen or sunblock that certainly would reduce the risk of exposure to unnecessary chemicals. KVT: Such as? LF: Make sure your sunscreen is PABAfree. PABA has been shown to cause

skin irritation and rashes. It’s also been shown to produce free radicals, which are associated with cancers. Most sun products today are PABA-free. The other chemical to avoid is called benzophenone, more commonly known as oxybenzone. Basically, it has been associated in some laboratory studies to produce free radicals that can lead to cardiovascular disease and, possibly, cancer. KVT: what about products that combine sunscreen with insect repellent? LF: Insect repellents contain a chemical called DEET that, when used in excess, can cause significant neurological damage. Insect repellents should be applied no more than once every six hours. The problem is, when you reapply sunscreen every hour and a half, you can overdose on DEET, so I don’t recommend combination sunscreen and repellent products. KVT: what’s the best treatment for a sunburn? LF: Cool compresses, aloe vera lotion to reduce the redness and take the sting out and acetaminophen for the pain. But it’s easier to prevent a burn than to treat one. KVT: But sunscreen alone doesn’t prevent skin cancer, isn’t that right? LF: That’s correct. Between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when the sun’s rays are the strongest and thus most dangerous, keep children out of the sun. Parents also need to remember that you don’t need to be at the beach to get a sunburn. Kids can still get burned on a cool, cloudy day. Whether it’s sunny or cloudy, all kids should be wearing sunscreen or sunblock. And they really need to cover up. If parents can’t see their hand through the clothing fabric, it means there’s a sun protection factor of at least 10. Light colors tend to absorb less of the sun’s rays than dark colors. Kids should wear hats with brims, and even babies need UV-blocking sunglasses. The American Academy of Pediatrics also recommends using sunscreen on a baby’s hands and face. But most babies should not be out in the sun at all. K

EAT. LEARN. PLAY. ✱ FIT FAMILIES

✱ THE LIBRARIAN LIKES

B Y SARA H T UFF

MATTHEW THORSEN

Left to right: Dillon, Harper, Carlton and Sarah

PaddlePower

As we settle into the rhythm of paddling and finally quiet down, we notice a heron overhead.

“The Librarian Likes” features a different librarian and book each month. Got an idea for a future LL? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

11

“Fit Families” is a monthly feature that offers easy and affordable ways to stay active. Got an idea for a future FF? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

Why it’ll draw you in: McDonnell’s illustrations have a dreamy quality with muted colors that lend a vintage feel. The contrast of the ending photograph makes a concrete link to the real-life Jane. A short biography explains all of Goodall’s achievements and is sure to inspire curious kids. 

KIDS VT

At one point, the kids take our paddles, presumably to give us a rest. “This is like we’re Egyptians or something,” says Carlton. “Cleopatrastyle.” But after three strokes, Dillon bonks me on the head and complains that her arms are tired. The kids go back to trailing their hands in the water, and Carlton and I tell stories about our own canoe trips as kids in Canada and as a couple on the Lamoille before they were born. Dillon and Harper, meanwhile, make up stories about bears at campgrounds, fish, frogs and logs. It’s so idyllic, I don’t even realize I’m getting a workout. Later, my deltoids will ache from the unfamiliar movement. We don’t make it all the way to Lake Champlain’s beaches. After half an hour of canoeing, we decide to turn around before the pint-size paddlers melt down. Next time, we’ll stay out longer and pack something more fortifying than a couple of granola bars and a bottle of water. The Mighty Winoosk’ calls. 

JULY 2012

to the Winooski River Paddling Guide, it’s 3.5 miles from the Route 127 Bridge to the takeout at Lake Champlain — definitely doable in the good weather. The trickiest part is getting the kids in and out of the canoe: There’s a steep, muddy bank between the small parking lot off the Beltline and the river. Any grumpiness resulting from the awkward maneuverings is quickly forgotten when we push off and glide out onto the glassy river and start seeing dragonflies. I’ve read that this area of the Winooski Valley Park District is rich in wildlife — blue-winged teals, geese and American bitterns. At first, though, I’m skeptical, as all we see are a seagull and a few dead logs that we pretend are sharks and pig heads. But as we settle into the rhythm of paddling and finally quiet down, we notice a heron overhead. The lines of passing fishermen indicate there’s plenty of life beneath the surface of the water.

KIDSVT.COM

“AH, THE MIGHTY WINOOSK!” my husband, Carlton, says with false bravado as he noses our Toyota 4Runner — laden with kids, canoe, life jackets, paddles and rain gear — off the Burlington Beltline, Route 127, and onto an unmarked road near Plattsburgh Avenue. For experienced paddlers, it’s easy to poke fun at this stretch of the Winooski River: The oxbow-shaped end of the 90-mile waterway is relatively short, very tame and, with busy Lake Champlain on one end and city traffic on the other, not exactly wilderness canoeing. But for a family with young children, it’s perfect. After years of gathering dust, our 16-foot Old Town Camper is back on the water, now that our 5-year-old daughter, Dillon, and son, Harper, 3, are no longer the tippy toddlers they once were. So on a Sunday morning in June, with a blue-sky break in the rain, we decide to tackle the Onion River. According

WHAT YOU’LL NEED: A canoe, paddles and life jackets or PFDs for each member of the family. Find rentals at Canoe Imports, 370 Dorset Street, South Burlington, 651-8760, canoeimports.com.

Perry’s summary: A young Jane Goodall, accompanied by her toy chimpanzee, Jubilee, spends her days exploring the outdoors and recording her observations of plant and animal life. Jane dreams of Africa, inspired by Tarzan of the Apes. This childhood aspiration LIBRARIAN: Amanda seems like an Perry, Library impossible Director, Winooski one, but the Memorial Library last of the book’s picBOOK: Me ... Jane by tures shows Patrick McDonnell just how fully AGE RANGE: her dreams preschool to grade 5. are realized. There are several books for children about Jane Goodall, and Me … Jane will lead readers to seek them out.

✱ CHILDCARE

Seeing

The grade on children’s programs in Washington County VERMONT’S STEP AHEAD RECOGNITION SYSTEM (STARS) helps parents evaluate programs that care for their kids. Sponsored by the Child Development Division of the Vermont Department for Children and Families, STARS assigns star rankings to participating childcare, preschool and after-school programs. Programs must apply to receive a ranking. The STARS coordinators consider applicants’ qualifications and operating policies, then assign them one to five stars. A single star means a program is new or examining its practices and working to improve them; a five-star ranking signifies that an applicant is established and outstanding in all areas.

Parents who meet the state’s income eligibility guidelines may pay less for childcare if they enroll their children in programs with three, four or five stars. Each month, Kids VT publishes an excerpt of the list of STARS participants. Last month’s issue contained the list of STARS programs in Barre, Montpelier and Waterbury. This month, we’re publishing the listings from the rest of Washington County. Find more information about STARS, a complete list of rankings and other childcare resources at dcf.vermont.gov/ cdd/stars.

Kira Harris

five-star program from the featured geographical area.

Spring Hill School

63 Spring Hill Road, Waitsfield, 496-2139 ★★★★★ Type of program: Morning preschool and an extended-day afternoon program of early care and education. Spring Hill is a part-year program that offers a collaborative learning environment; it’s inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach to early education. It also offers a month of summer camp after school gets out. Year opened: 1984. The program has grown from serving nine families to serving 38 families. Age range of children: 3 to 5 years old Last field trip: Knoll Farm in Fayston. The kids caught frogs in the pond, held hands around the second-oldest tree in Vermont, visited with farm animals, enjoyed a picnic and

hiked into a meadow. Favorite rainy-day activity: Put on rain gear and go puddle jumping. Favorite song to sing with kids: “Robin Red Breast.” Results from a recent class poll show that the school’s favorite bird is the chickadee. Most recent staff-development activity: The staff completed a ropes course at ELITEAM. Says director Kira Harris, “It was such a fantastic experience! We discovered amazing things we could do together as a team.”

Early Education Program Berlin Elementary School, 372 Paine Turnpike North, 223-2796

Fayston Elementary School Preschool 782 German Flats Road, 496-3636

★★★★★

MORETOWN

Montpelier Montessori School 89 Karl Circle, #3, 223-3320

Moretown Elementary School Preschool Program 940 Route 100B, 496-3722

★★★

★★★★

CABOT Cabot School Preschool 25 Common Road, 563-2289

Precious Moments Nursery School 20 Route 100 South, 496-4516

★★★★★

★★

Washington Northeast District After School Program Cabot 25 Common Road, 426-3213, ext. 208

NORTHFIELD

★ EAST MONTPELIER

Boys and Girls Club of the White River Valley After School Program @ Northfield 10 Cross Street, 728-3332

Washington Central Supervisory Union Early Education 321 Lightning Ridge Road, 454-7777

★★★★★ WAITSFIELD The Learning Tree 177 York Drive, 496-3812

★★★ Spring Hill School 63 Spring Hill Road, 496-2139

★★★★★ The Waitsfield Children’s Center Founder’s Hall, 6307 Main Street, 496-3372

★★★★★ WARREN Warren KPAS 293 School Road, 496-2487

★★

★★★★

Northfield Early Education Program 10 Cross Street, 485-3143

Warren School Pre-K Class 293 School Road, 496-2487

★★★★★

★★★★

★★★★

Happy Hearts Child Care 1205 Towne Hill Road, 229-9489

PLAINFIELD

WORCESTER

Twinfield Union School — After School Program 106 Naismith Brook Road, 426-3213, ext. 208

Rumney Memorial Preschool Kindergarten @ Doty Elementary Doty Elementary School, 24 Calais Road, 223-5429

East Montpelier Elementary Preschool 665 Vincent Flats Road, 223-7936

★★★ Orchard Valley Waldorf School Child’s Garden 2290 Route 14N, 456-7400

★★★ Orchard Valley Waldorf After School Program 2290 Route 14N, 456-7400

★★★

★★ Twinfield Union Preschool 106 Nasmith Brook Road, 426-3213, ext. 270

★★★★★

★★★★★ Washington Central Early Education Program Doty Elementary School, 24 Calais Road, 223-5656

★★★★★

THEATER FOR KIDS

Pinkalicious

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown

Pinkalicious can’t stop eating pink cupcakes. Her pink indulgence lands her at the doctor’s office with Pinkititis, an affliction that turns her pink from head to toe. But when her hue goes too far, only Pinkalicious can figure out a way to get out of this predicament.

Charlie Brown, Lucy, Linus, Sally, Snoopy and the rest of the Peanuts gang come to life in this delightful musical by Clark Gesner based on the internationally acclaimed comic strip by Charles M. Schulz. A family favorite about friendship and what it means to be truly happy. Friday, July 20 at noon Saturday, July 21 at 10:00 a.m. Sunday, July 22 at 10:00 a.m. & noon

Friday, August 3 at noon Saturday, August 4 at 10:00 a.m. Sunday, August 5 at 10:00 a.m. & noon

Playhouse Junior $10 per ticket 802.654.2281 saintmichaelsplayhouse.org

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KIDS VT

JULY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

s

a l k i c n i iou P

FAYSTON

★★★

MATTHEW THORSEN

SHINING STAR Each month, Kids VT spotlights one

BERLIN

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EAT. LEARN. PLAY. VERMONT CHILDREN’S TRUST FOUNDATION PRESENTS THE

BECAUSE PROJECT I am a curious and avid reader

WITH SUPPORT FROM

The Vermont Children’s Trust Foundation supports statewide prevention programs for children and families to help give all kids a fair chance at success.

BECAUSE of Iris Keith, a great librarian.

The Because Project asks Vermonters to share their stories about people and experiences that have shaped their lives, especially during their formative years — stories that may inspire others to get involved. Because together we can all make a difference.

P

age Memorial Library is a small, gray stone building in downtown Aberdeen, N.C. It is a historic, romantic, slightly spooky space — very different from the air-conditioned ranch houses and strip malls that made up most of my childhood world. The building was one big, slightly U-shaped room, with the young adult section tucked into a nook by the entrance. (I can visualize exactly where The Chocolate War was shelved.) The circulation desk, where Iris Keith held court, was front and center. I think I was in the fourth grade when they extended the hours and we started visiting regularly. Iris was the real reason that the library was special; we always said that we were “going to see Iris” — not “going to the library.” She was a beautiful, wrinkled grandmother with a sparkle in her eyes. She had her own casual sassiness: think Annie Oakley as a senior citizen. She told great stories and had an independent streak. When I’d spend time with my grandfather after school, visiting Iris was our favorite activity. I’d read magazines and do homework while Papaw and Iris would trade stories and discuss the state of the world. I realized years later that they were polar opposites politically, but I never heard them argue. Iris was my own personal reference librarian and

AMY CUNNINGHAM,

academic cheerleader. I’ll never forget the night she stayed with me after closing as I tearfully finished the most daunting and scary assignment that my 12-yearold self had ever encountered — a five-page report on Ireland with a bibliography and note cards. She helped me reach the “I” volume of the Encyclopedia Brittanica — the big one, not that lightweight Junior series. She sat with me at the table and read to herself from the material I had spread out, “hmming” with interest as she discovered something new about the potato famine. I was already a voracious reader by then, tearing through Judy Blume books years before I understood all of the juicy parts. I suppose I was on my fifth reading of Harriet the Spy when I got my first library card. My teachers and family had already instilled in me a strong foundation of reading and learning, but Iris helped me see that this was a lifelong pursuit and joy. One thing that sticks with me is how excited she was by art and poems and ideas; I didn’t really know anybody quite like that. The word in the town was that she retired because the new computer cataloguing system would require her to start charging overdue fees. When I happily hand over a few dollars for my own often-overdue library books, I think of it as my tiny tribute to her. 

Submit your stories for the Because Project!

Email them to sara@vtchildrenstrust.org. Submissions should be 300 to 600 words long and respond to the prompt "I am/decided to/learned to _______ because of ______." Kids VT will feature one of these stories in each issue.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, EVERYBODY WINS! VERMONT

Investing in a shared future... We proudly support the events that bring our community together.

aD

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EaT. lEarn. Play. Q oUT To EAT B y cindy m o rgan Three-year-old Gracie Lambert of Rochester gets in the spirit of fast food at the A&W in Middlebury with her mom, Nicole.

A&W Drive-In 1557 route 7, middlebury, 388-2876

When I opened the window to order, the smell of fried food wafted in. As if intoxicated by it, my son started chanting, “This is going to be so good. This is going to be so good.” He ordered a chili-cheese dog, but no fries, because he wanted “to leave enough room for a root-beer float.” My daughter got a burger basket that oUr bill for TWo: $13.35 came with fAmily-friEndly fries, a side of AmEniTiEs: Kids meal, coleslaw and a which includes an entrée, medium mug of small fries and small root beer. drink. The drink comes in a I skipped the special cup with a straw. culinary trip down memory lane rather long waits for food; there are no worries than pay the gastric about offending other patrons with loud price for a meal heavy voices and poor table manners. with grease, sugar and But there is a downside to in-car full-fat dairy. dining, as I discovered soon after our “But a stomach food arrived. The inevitable dining ache would totally be worth it,” my daughter detritus of two 10-year-olds was now in the car — my husband’s, as it rationalized as she turns out — and I’m pretty sure the dipped her burger and fries into ranch dressing. smell will linger through summer. My daughter sloshed root beer out of the That’s easy to say if you’re not heavy open-topped glass mug almost suffering from acid reflux. instantly, and I spent the entire meal In some ways, the drive-in is a mopping up spills. If only I’d had the great concept for families with small kids. Parents don’t have to stress about foresight to take our lunch to one of

The smell of fried food wafted in. As if intoxicated by it, my son started chanting, “This is going to be so good. This is going to be so good.”

calEB kEnna

WE WErE driVing Across ThE coUnTry last summer when, somewhere in Wyoming, my kids spotted an A&W and begged that we stop. A restaurant that is also a brand of root beer was a must-see for a pair of 9-year-olds. Dreading yet another road-trip burger and fries, I kept driving, assuring them “we could go to A&W some other time.” Last weekend I was reminded of my promise, when the twins spotted the A&W on Route 7, south of Middlebury. They demanded I stop because I had promised I would take them to an A&W. “Some other time” had arrived. For me, it had been 30 years. But as I pulled up to the drive-in, I noted how little the place has changed. Though no longer on roller skates, the waitresses still come up to your car to take the order. The food still arrives on a tray that hooks onto the car door. The root beer and floats are still served in thick — but no longer frosty — glass mugs. Everything — except my metabolism — was just as I remembered it.

the dozen picnic tables on the south side of the restaurant. But the kids were overjoyed. Based on the happy sighs and exclamations coming from the backseat, the food was everything they had dreamed of since last summer in Wyoming. The only thing left behind was a pile of root-beer-and-catsup-sodden napkins and the little container of coleslaw. I ate the slaw while they talked about what they would get next time they came to A&W. Six years from now, they’ll be driving up in their own cars. K

“Out to Eat” is a monthly family-friendly restaurant review. Where should we eat next? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

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Q Go asK dad

Q:

When was your last night out with your partner? What did you do? michael hinchman,

Joe hennessy,

Children: daughters Michaela and Jillian, 16; sons Josh and Griffin, 12

Children: son, Lucas, 3; baby girl due in July

milTon, driVer, U.s. PosTal serVice

We just went out Tuesday night. That was probably the first time in a couple of weeks. It was a case Parties for all ages of the boys had their eighth grade graduation ceremony, and then they had a dance after. So we walked out of the school at five after 7, looked at each other and said, “Hmmm ... the boys are set until 10 o’clock; let’s go out to dinner.” We went to the Belted Cow. We love 21 Taft Corners Shopping Center that place. I had a lamb Williston • 288-9666 www.beadcrazyvt.com burger that they’re Class schedule online testing and thinking of Localy owned and operated putting on the menu. Sal had a hot chicken Instruction is Always Available sandwich that was out brendan Kinney of this world. k8v-beadscrazy0712.indd 1 6/13/12 4:26 PM The first thing Rocky Knoll Stables, Inc. we do is look at the kids’ schedule: Is there a softball game? Is there a lacrosse game? Does somebody have dance practice? With the kids getting older, if we have an opportunity to go out, but all of us are there, we don’t go so that we can hang out with the kids. If there’s nothing going on, then we can all be together.

larry edelson,

FairField, membershiP direcTor, GreaTer bUrlinGTon ymca

Child: son, Eli, 2

Our one and only non-kids evening was in January. We left our son, Eli, with some friends and went for dinner and a movie. We live in Fairfield and planned to catch a movie in St. Albans. There weren’t a lot of good movie choices, but we were so desperate, we ended up seeing the Sherlock Holmes movie, which was terrible. It was one of the few snowstorm nights, and driving through blizzard conditions, we asked ourselves, “Why are we doing this?” But it was all good. We saw a terrible movie, checked out a newish restaurant in St. Albans. I had fajitas, and I would be willing to bet my wife had chile rellenos, and I remember they had Switchback on special. It definitely felt a little strange at first, but we were able to relax and enjoy it.

www.rockyknollcamp.com

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June 18-22 July 16-20 & 23-27 August 6-10 & 20-24

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We went to Evolution Yoga for a monthly class that they offer for couples. It’s about positions the pregnant woman can be in to help them ease labor. Try this for fun; it’s called the goddess pose: You stand with your legs slightly wider than shoulder width apart and then squat down and hold your arms up like you’re being mugged, and you hold that. It doesn’t sound like a lot of pain, but it is a lot of pain. I think it was something to show participants that if you breathe correctly, then you can push through uncomfortable moments. I didn’t breathe correctly, because I hurt the whole way through. We don’t get to do much together often; I expect to have my life back when my kids go off to college.

we see our relationship as the foundation of our family and so it’s important to care for it and feed it.

Summer Camp For children ages 5-13 of all levels of riding experience

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Children: sons Liam, 12, and Henry, 6; daughter, Nora, 8 We celebrated our 14th anniversary, and we knew we didn’t have time to get away. So we had my sister-in-law come over and stay overnight with the kids. We went to the Inn at Essex, had an amazing meal at Amuse and then stayed the night. It was special, because we had a really romantic evening without “getting away.” We see our relationship as the foundation of our family, and so it’s important to care for it and feed it. One of the ways we do that is by going on dates. Sometimes that’s going to a show and dinner; sometimes that’s just going out for a creemee, but we try to make time for it. One of the easy things that we do is to open up our home to our family and friends. So we’re often hosting — it can be as formal as a full-on plated dinner; but sometimes it’s just take-out night. It’s a really easy way to create a social environment in your own home. Even though we don’t get away, we create a social experience that also helps us reconnect. K — IntervIews compIled by Kate laddIson

“Go Ask Dad” is a monthly feature in which we ask fathers to answer a question. Got a question or a pop you’d like to hear from? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

eAt. leARn. PlAy.

Q The aRT oF…

CouRteSy of oliveR koChAlkA

Graphic Novels

By h e len Ro Ck

BacK in The day, kids saved money to buy floppy comic books. Today, it’s graphic novels — a longer, more literary form of the genre. Like comics, graphic novels use a combination of dialogue and illustration to tell action-packed tales, sci-fi sagas or autobiographies. They might be funny, serious, sad or even poetic — which is why they’re so much fun to make. So what do you need, besides an active imagination, to create a graphic novel with your kids? “All you really need is paper, a pencil and an eraser,” says Vermont’s first-ever cartoonist laureate, James Kochalka, author of the all-ages graphic novel series Johnny Boo. To get started, it’s a good idea to provide young graphic novelists with a pre-drawn grid of panels, so they can spend more time creating stories and less time struggling to keep their panels straight. Simply fold a sheet of paper in half to create two pages. Then draw just one panel per page. Kids in third grade and up can draw and write in smaller panels. Fold three or four pieces of paper in half, then draw three rows of two panels on each page. Voilà! There’s a template for a six- to eight-page graphic novel. So what’s next? For cartoonists of any age, it’s important to talk through the whole story before you start drawing. Kochalka

recommends that parents “ask lots of questions, like, ‘What happens next?’” Then they can read through completed pages with their child, and if they come across a gap in the plot, ask for details about how one panel led to the next. The child’s answers become content for the page in between. Kochalka’s No. 1 tip for all budding graphic novelists and cartoonists: Always write the words first and then draw the word balloons. “The success rate and readability will go up 1000 percent!” he says.

All you really need is paper, a pencil and an eraser. James KochalKa But kids don’t have to go it alone. Vermont artist Peter Wallis has taught children age 8 and up to make graphic novels at Barre’s Studio Place Arts, using a curriculum he adapted from his own experience as a student at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction. His high-energy, multiage classes can get “a little hectic and crazy,” he says, because the kids take

the characters to the “zaniest, weirdest places in their imaginations!” As a warm-up, each class starts with a few drawing games. Then, Wallis introduces three characters for their collaborative graphic novel: “It’s always a boy, a girl and a dog,” he says. Wallis decides what the characters look like, so students can hit the ground running. Then, taking turns and building off one another’s stories, each kid creates one scenario starring those characters. Then comes the fun part: fleshing out the scenarios they’ve created, “focusing on the details,” says Wallis. “Students rough out [each individual segment and] ink it in.” When a page is complete, Wallis scans it into PhotoShop and teaches the kids digital techniques such as color overlays. In a daylong class, each student completes one or two pages. If they have time, the students create a print to use as the cover. Kochalka and Wallis agree that graphic novels can be amazing educational tools, especially for kids who aren’t inspired by more traditional teaching methods to read or write stories.

“Anytime I’ve gone into a classroom to teach,” says Kochalka, “the kids explode with creativity in the weeks afterward. Moving words around is fairly abstract, and anchoring words to pictures helps kids understand the story.” K

WhaT yoU need: Paper, a pencil, an eraser, a ruler and at least 20 minutes. Choose inspiring graphic novels and cartoons, which you can find at most libraries, and set aside time for discussion and listening.

WheRe To Go: you can find classes in graphic-novel making for kids at • Davis Studio in Burlington, davisstudiovt.com; • Studio Place Arts in Barre, studioplacearts.com; and • Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, cartoonstudies.org.

The Art of...” spotlights creative skills that enrich kids’ lives. Got a class or teacher to recommend? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

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Day- cations VERMONT

Road trips and tips B Y K AT E LA DDISON & KI R K KAR D A SHI AN

SANTA’S VILLAGE AND THE BILLINGS FARM & MUSEUM

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f you live in Vermont, you don’t have to travel far for familyfriendly summer fun. But, let’s face it, sometimes you want to. This summer, we’re asking our Kids VT contributors to visit some of our favorite destinations, both around the region and here at home. They’re writing about their adventures in our June, July and August issues. Looking for more day-trip ideas? Check out all of this summer’s —and last summer’s — suggestions at kidsvt.com.

COURTESY OF SANTA’S VILLAGE

FILE: PAT LEWIS

PART 5:

Santa’s Village:

positioned around the neatly manicured wooded paths and gardens. Each elf punches a different letter out of your card; collect them all to earn your diploma from Elf University. The game seemed silly to me, but Oliver loved it. Santa’s Village has kid excitement down to a science. He also enjoyed exploring an elf house, sitting in cupcake-shaped chairs, and climbing into an igloo and onto an enormous snowman.

Christmas all year long BY KAT E L AD D I SON

THE ONLY THING WEIRDER than visiting Santa Claus in the summertime? Going to his theme park — Santa’s Village in New Hampshire — when the mercury is hovering around 45 degrees. It was rainy, too, on the June Saturday we decided to cross state lines in search of the big guy. We’d planned the weekend trip before we heard the forecast and didn’t want to reschedule. So we trekked two and a half hours, from St. Albans to Jefferson, N.H., dressed for the cold and armed with umbrellas. We arrived to find the park hands out free ponchos — sweet! — and the weather had scared off all but the hardiest visitors. The sound of Christmas carols echoing around a nearly empty park made for a seriously surreal experience: We had the whole holiday-happy place to ourselves. The weather didn’t dampen my son Oliver’s spirits at all. He immediately grabbed the “Elphabet” card the park staff gave him and ran off in search of the 26 life-size elf statues

Santa’s Village has kid excitement down to a science. The park offers a good mix of low-tech attractions — the climbing structures, playgrounds, ball-toss games and a reindeer petting zoo — combined with typical twisty-turny fair rides. Happily for a mom prone to motion sickness, all of the rides are geared toward young kids, not adventurous teenagers. There are spinning “Drummer Boy” drums and fire trucks that circle around a “burning” building. I’d never been on a roller coaster but agreed to

kate laddison

Santa’s Village

kate laddison

accompany Oliver on the one here. I can’t say I enjoyed it, but I was happy to scream right alongside my shrieking son. The biggest bonus of the rain-soaked day: no lines. In fact, we rode some rides as many times as we wanted. Bumper cars: 40 minutes. Drivable antique cars: 12 circuits. Roller coaster: until mom said it was time to get off. The only rides that weren’t appealing were the ones involving cold sprays of water, but I imagine that on any summer day, the Yule Log Flume and Hot Shots Fire

Brigade would guarantee wicked wet fun. Did I mention there’s a kid-size water park, too? Called Ho Ho H20, of course. While the elves, gingerbread and carnival rides delighted Oliver, my husband and I were more impressed with family-friendly amenities such as free strollers, numerous well-located benches and clean, spacious bathrooms. Park staffers, aka Santa’s Helpers, were truly helpful in sluicing water off ride seats with their squeegees. Every time we exited a ride, they asked if we had enjoyed ourselves. We also loved how green and clean the park looked, with lupines and bachelor’s buttons in bloom and window boxes and hanging baskets everywhere, even in the covered gazebo smoking areas. We chatted with some folks we met while warming up in the gingerbread house. Their 8- and 10-year-old kids were enjoying their seventh visit, and it made me think we could happily celebrate Christmas twice each year for many years to come. We never did run into Santa — we stopped by his cabin, but he wasn’t around. Guess we’ll catch him in December.

528 Presidential Highway, Jefferson, N.H., 603-586-4445, santasvillage.com

Know before you go: • Santa’s Village is open daily from mid-June to early September. July hours are 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. The park is also open on some weekends from September through December. • Admission prices: ages 4 and older, $27; ages 62 and older, $25; under 3, free. • All rides, shows and activities in the park are included in the admission price.

Where to eat: • We were happy with our pie at Nick’s Pizza Emporium in Santa’s Village. It had a nice, chewy crust, and we added freshly chopped onions and peppers to our olives and pepperoni. It was impressively unlike typical, greasy theme-park pizza. • You could also visit the Burger Meister Food Court for — you guessed it —  burgers, as well as fries, soups, salads and sandwiches. • Don’t want to shell out dough for food in the park? Pack a picnic lunch and eat at one of several picnic tables scattered around the park, or on the grassy field near the Ferris wheel.

Where to stay: • On a recommendation from Kids VT copublisher Colby Roberts and family, we stayed at the Lantern Resort motel and campground. “Resort”

Also nearby: • Santa’s Village is about a 45-minute drive from North Conway, N.H., in the White Mountain National Forest. Take a trip on an old-fashioned train on the Conway Scenic Railroad: 603-3565251, conwayscenic.com. Or visit the MWV Children’s Museum: 603-3562992, mwvchildrensmuseum.org. • See friends from your favorite books come to life at Story Land theme park: Glen, N.H., 603-383-4186, storylandnh.com. • If you’re looking for a more outdoorsy adventure, try Clark’s Trading Post in Lincoln with trained bear shows, a Segway Safari and a climbing tower, among other things: Lincoln, N.H., 603745-8913, clarkstradingpost.com.

Tom Mcneill

Billings Farm & Museum:

might be a bit of an exaggeration, but we loved the fact that it was a two-minute drive from the park. Our room was equipped with a coffeepot, minifridge and microwave. The Lantern offers hayrides and campfires, which we skipped due to rain. But we did sign up for free stories from “Miss Sleepytime,” who visited our room at 7:30 p.m. to read to Oliver — a sweet touch. 850 Route 2, Jefferson, N.H., 603-586-7151, thelanternresort.com.

Animal magnetism

day-cations p. 20 »

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July 2012

A few years ago, I discovered something that in retrospect should have been obvious: Kids love farms. I learned this when we started taking our daughter, Agnes, 4, to daycare on a working dairy farm in Barnard. Now her brother, Brian, 2, joins her there every day. They come home a little muddy and smelling like silage, but it’s all fine — I mean, where else can children get up close and personal with real farm animals and marvel at their excrement? Answer: at Billings Farm & Museum in Woodstock, which happens to be about two miles from where we live. Even though Agnes and Brian spend their days on a dairy farm, they still jump at the

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Kids Explore the World on VPT

… and at VPT Family Days! We’ve got two great VPT Family Days remaining this summer.

July 8: Vermont Lake Monsters, Burlington September 15: Montshire Museum, Norwich

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July 2012

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Day-cations

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chance to go to Billings, so we take them there when the weather’s nice and we all need a few hours out of the house. Billings is technically a museum of Vermont agriculture circa 1890, but don’t let the farm’s slogan — “gateway to Vermont’s rural heritage” — scare you away. While the museum complex does house exhibits of antique farming implements, 19th-century cultural ephemera and an “authentically restored” Victorian farmhouse, the lure of the place, especially for kids, is the fully functional dairy farm, frozen in time. We arrived at noon on June 3, one of the three Ice Cream Sundays in National Dairy Month, when visitors get to make and sample maple and coffee ice cream. The museum has plenty of other special events throughout its season, including Junior Farm Vet for a Day, Time Travel Tuesdays and Hay Day. These are always fun, but you don’t need to visit during a special event. In my experience, kids are never bored by big animals. I held out the prospect of ice cream as a reward for good behavior, which sometimes helps keep the kids in line. This time, they probably didn’t need motivation: They immediately ran to the horse barn to gaze at Jim and Joe, the 2000-pound Belgian draft horses that pull wagons and plows on the pastures and fields. The white beasts were munching hay and bulging from their corrals. The kids were mesmerized. A few feet away, a museum worker was giving a lesson on what and how much cows and horses eat: a perfect sideshow for adults or kids old enough to appreciate the wonder of cows eating 70

Where else can children get up close and personal with real farm animals and marvel at their excrement? pounds of food and drinking a bathtub full of water per day. From there we walked into the calf nursery and then the dairy barn. In the latter, about 40 beautiful Jersey cows were lined up in their stalls eating hay and peeing and pooping at will. There were farmworkers around to keep an eye on things, but the barn is remarkably open. A word to the wise: Make sure your kids don’t go too close to the cows’ hindquarters; they might get splattered or kicked. We wandered back outside to the green, fenced-in pastures dotted with sheep. The sheep weren’t shy; they’re covered in lanolin-filled wool, and they let the kids bury their hands in it. For the kids, time just melted away. I brought them back to reality with a suggestion of ice cream, served from the dairy bar next to the pristinely kept farmhouse. After our snack, we were off to see the chickens and get a lesson in roosting from a museum docent — they’re all nice, patient with kids and more than willing to indulge silly questions. It’s the perfect mix of fun and education. We broke away from the hens and

followed one of the farm lanes out to Tom and Jerry, the other draft horses, standing in the pasture. Agnes and Brian climbed the split-rail fence to pet the horses’ brown hides and marvel at their placid immensity. The baaa-ing of lambs called us back to their corral, where another museum worker was standing with an adult sheep on a leash. He explained that Vermont’s agricultural history started with sheep farms, but the result — 80 percent of the state’s forests were cleared for grazing — was an environmental disaster. In part, that’s what prompted George Perkins Marsh to conserve the 550-acre

woodland on the slopes of Mount Tom, just across the street from Billings Farm. Frederick Billings and Laurance Rockefeller continued that stewardship, laying the foundation for both the museum and nearby Marsh-BillingsRockefeller National Historical Park. We’ve walked the carriage roads in that park many times, and almost went back again after seeing the sheep. But Brian needed a nap — and I was ready for a break — so we headed home, back to the 21st century. K

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Shelburne Farms

Billings Farm & museum

Route 12 and River Road, Woodstock, 457-2355, billingsfarm.org

• Children’s Farmyard • Walking Trails* • Cheesemaking • Farm Cart Lunch • Property Tours • Tea Tours • Welcome Center & Farm Store* * Open year round

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www.shelburnefarms.org • 1611 Harbor Road • Shelburne, VT • 985–8686

Kids VT

Special Events for the Whole Family: Community Concerts at the Farm, local food & entertainment, Weds. July 11- August 22 • Green Mountain Draft Horse Field Day, July 28, 11-2 • Bats in the Barn July 20, 7:30-9 pm, reservations 802-985-8686

also nearby: • Check out raptors and other birds of prey at VermonT insTiTuTe oF naTural science: 6565 Woodstock Road, Quechee, 359-5000, vinsweb.org. • For educational fun regardless of the weather, go to the monTshire museum oF science: 1 Montshire Road, Norwich, 649-2200, montshire.org.

Open through October 21

July 2012

• Most of the fun activities at Billings Farm are outside, so try to visit when the weather is nice. • Billings Farm is open daily May 1 through October 31, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; November through February on weekends, 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; Christmas and February vacation weeks, 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. • Admission prices: ages 16 to 61, $12; ages 62 and over, $11; ages 5 to 15, $6; ages 3 to 4, $3; under 3, free.

• Get great sandwiches for a picnic at Village BuTcher: 18 Elm Street, Woodstock, 457-2756. Or WoodsTocK Farmers’ marKeT: 979 West Woodstock Road, Woodstock, 457-3658, woodstockfarmersmarket.com. • For home-cooked dishes in a casual, sitdown environment, go to mounTain creamery: 33 Central Street, Woodstock, 457-1715, mountaincreameryvt.com.

KidsVT.com

Know before you go:

Where to eat:

Photo: Roz Graham, Orah Moore

TOM MCNEill

Bring the whole family!

BOOKS

‘1984 With Cute Boys’ A grown-up’s guide to the YA world of sexy vampires and rebels with a cause BY MAR G OT H AR R I SON

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een fiction has changed since we were young. Before Harry Potter came along, few adults who weren’t school librarians could name a single youngadult best seller. Many of us picked up Stephen King or Jane Austen when we hit adolescence, realized we could handle “grown-up” books just fine and never looked back. Today, the average adult can rattle off not just the names of YA megahits, but the names of their protagonists and their dueling love interests. Blame Hollywood all you want for the Team Edward versus Team Jacob business. But Harry Potter, Twilight and The Hunger Games have plenty of grown-up readers, too. There’s a lot more to YA lit than those familiar titles, though, and some parents find it daunting or disturbing. Venture into that section of the bookstore, and you’ll find yourself drowning in a sea of dark, glossy covers plastered with images of teen models who look like they just escaped from a pre-Raphaelite painting. Last year, in an influential piece in the Wall Street Journal, Meghan Cox Gurdon attacked the “Darkness Too Visible” of teen fiction, quoting a mother of three who lamented that she saw on the YA shelves “nothing, not a thing, that I could imagine giving my daughter. It was all vampires and suicide and self-mutilation, this dark, dark stuff.” Is YA really that bad? Gurdon’s handwringing about “expletives” aside, readers of YA can confirm that there is a lot of “darkness” and, yes, violence there. In the best books, though, that darkness becomes an occasion for authors to examine disturbing aspects of our culture. Teen novels about futuristic polygamy, totalitarian personality testing and compulsory plastic surgery (actual examples!) play on young people’s real-life anxieties and could start interesting conversations between teens and parents. For the perplexed, here’s a primer on popular YA subgenres, with examples we think stand above the crowd. (Note: By “young adult,” we mean books targeted at ages 12 to 18, or sometimes 14 to 18. Books for the 8-to-12-yearold set are called “middle grade” by the publishing industry; see sidebar.) For candid reviews by readers of all ages, your best source is goodreads.com, which will lead you to a multitude of YA bloggers. Find reviewers you trust and stick with them.

Dystopias and Future Shock

Thanks to the Hunger Games trilogy, the hottest trend in YA right now could be described as “1984 with cute boys.” Writers are falling all over themselves to create totalitarian future societies that give teen protagonists a chance to be rebels with a cause. Take last year’s best-selling Divergent, by Veronica Roth, in which teenagers in a post-collapse Chicago must align themselves with social factions based on dominant personality traits and goals. Sure, it sounds silly, but any teen who has felt pigeonholed will relate to the heroine, who rejects her family’s monkish “Abnegation” lifestyle for the tattoos and daredevil stunts of “Dauntless.”

Action packed (and, yes, violent), Divergent raises questions about the limits of selflessness and the nature of courage. A sequel is already out. Also thoughtful is Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies series, in which society has devised a high-tech solution to the problem of looks-based discrimination: Make everybody gorgeous. Will the heroine solve her problems by transforming from a gawky preteen into a vapid “Pretty”? Harebrained social schemes are fun to imagine. But what about a future that could actually happen? Paolo Bacigalupi, also an adult science-fiction writer, explores an America fractured by climate change and resource depletion in the award-winning Ship Breaker,

about a boy who risks his life to salvage copper from useless oil tankers.

Science Fiction

Dystopias may rule the YA best-seller lists, but traditional science fiction is gaining ground. Witness the recent success of Beth Revis’ Across the Universe, in which a teen follows her parents into cryogenic freeze for a 300year spaceship journey. When she’s rudely awakened ahead of schedule, she must adjust to a culture of crew members who have spent generations in space. Revis uses her claustrophobic setting to raise knotty questions about the uses and abuses of power. Set on a colonized

What about middle-grade fiction? “Middle-grade” lit, aimed at kids in third through seventh grades, has distinct differences from YA, and we don’t just mean a PG rating. Because teen girls read more than teen boys — for whatever reason — female protagonists dominate YA, and romantic main plots or subplots are virtually inescapable. In MG, the genders get closer to equal representation. Action adventure and goofy gross-out humor are heavily represented here. MG covers a vast territory, as we can see just from looking at some Vermont authors who write it. J&P Voelkel of Norwich (The Jaguar Stones trilogy) offer Indiana Jones-style adventure laced with silly jokes. Kate Messner of Plattsburgh (yes, Tom Messner’s wife) tends to produce female-oriented contemporaries. But her new book, Capture the Flag (see “Kids Beat” pages 8-9), is an action-oriented mystery in which three seventh graders solve the theft of a national treasure. Phoebe Stone of Middlebury applies literary prose to bittersweet middle-school romance in her latest, The Boy on Cinnamon Street. Dayna Lorentz of Burlington makes canines the heroes of rousing

adventures set against the backdrop of a national tragedy in her Dogs of the Drowned City series. Bonnie Shimko of Plattsburgh (who also writes YA) introduces kids to the civil rights era in her spirited historical novel The Private Thoughts of Amelia E. Rye Rye. Chris Tebbetts of Hinesburg rocketed to the top of the best-seller lists with Middle School, the Worst Years of My Life, a comic contemporary about a boy who breaks every rule in his school’s code of conduct, coauthored with literary whirlwind James Patterson. The sequel — Middle School: Get Me Out of Here! — was just released. On his website (christebbetts.com), Tebbetts offers a handy list of his favorite books for young readers, past and present. Among the more recent MG titles he likes are The Game of Sunken Places, by M.T. Anderson (also an excellent YA writer); When You Reach Me, an acclaimed Sci-Fi-tinged mystery by Rebecca Stead; and R.J. Palacio’s Wonder, about a boy born with a facial deformity. For more recommendations, check out Goodreads, ask a librarian or consult the folks at Shelburne’s Flying Pig Bookstore, who periodically host readings by popular MG authors.

books follow the gothic template that Jane Austen mocked centuries ago in Northanger Abbey: Girl meets brooding stranger; girl swoons, etc. And some of these novels’ brooding strangers seem less like good boyfriends than, well, superpowered stalkers. ((Twilight and Becca Fitzpatrick’s popular Hush, Hush series often come in for this criticism.) A refreshing change of pace is Kendare Blake’s Anna Dressed in Blood, in which a ghost hunter finds Blood himself falling for the specter he’s supposed to exorcise. It’s more “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” than Twilight, and be warned: There’s gore. I’ve also heard great things about Maggie Stiefvater’s Wolves of Mercy Falls series.

Urban Fantasy

Where in the world are you off to this summer? Send us a postcard from your summer travels by September 3 for a chance to win 4 passes to Jay Peak’s

PumPhouse WaterPark! All entries will re ceive a Ben & Jerry’s coupon!

ORTHODONTICS

In urban fantasy, magic is part of daily DRS. PETERSON, RYAN&&eaton EATON drs. Peterson, ryan life, and fairies, demigods, demons and the like mingle with humans. Braces for Children & Adults — champlainortho.net So these books are like paranormal Burlington office St. AlBAnS office WilliSon office novels with less heavy breathing and 247 Pearl Street 94 South Main Street 277 Blair Park Rd. more spell casting (not to be confused 862-6721 527-7100 878-5323 with YA steampunk, which has more robots and Victorian bustles). Melissa Marr’s Wicked Lovely k4t-ChamplainOrtho0712.indd 1 6/21/12 12:22 PM series and Cassandra Clare’s Mortal Instruments series both have legions of fans. My personal favorite, though, is the late English fantasy author Great stories need the right setting. Diana Wynne Jones, who was writing Camping in Vermont State Parks about shadow societies of magic users provide the perfect backdrop for long before J.K. Rowling came along. Braces for Children and Adults a lifetime of memories and fun. Try her Fire and Hemlock, The Time And, while we can’t guarantee of the Ghost and Archer’s Goon. Burlington Williston St. Albans the weather, we do offer risk-free 862-6721 878-5323 527-7100 campsite reservations. Contemporary www.champlainortho.net When people complain about sex, swearing and sensationalism in YA lit, they’re often talking about these books, set in present day and with no vampires or fairies in sight. But contemporary YA covers a vast range, from frothy, lighthearted chick-lit-type books to “problem” novels about cutting, date rape and suicide. Some are “literary” enough to cross the age divide. Take The Fault in Our Stars, from cult author John Green, a recent best seller about a teen with a terminal Make a date to get outdoors;; cancer diagnosis who falls in love if something comes up, with a teen in remission. It’s just call by 2:00 p.m. the day before your arrival and possibly the funniest, fiercest, switch your reservation to least sentimental book about another date this season mortality I’ve read, featuring without penalty. a few F-bombs and sex that occurs offscreen. The real FORESTS, PARKS & RECREATION question is, though, can VERMONT your teen weather hours of sobbing? 

S’more  Fun,  Risk-Free!

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AGENCY OF NATURAL RESOURCES

6/20/12 10:52 AM

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What  are  your  waiting  for?  Hurry  –  the  chocolate’s  melting.   Learn  more  at  www.vtstateparks.com www.vtstateparks.com

KIDS VT

Ever since the Twilight saga, tales of teenagers falling in love with supernatural critters have been huge. It’s not just vampires, either: Werewolves, ghosts, fallen angels and even mermen are getting in on the tormentedromance action. Many of these

JULY 2012

Paranormal and Horror

KIDSVT.COM

planet, Patrick Ness’ Chaos Walking trilogy broaches the same hot-button war and imperialism themes as the Hunger Games trilogy — in more artful prose. The first book, The Knife of Never Letting Go, introduces us to a boy who lives in a town where all the women have died and the men can’t stop eavesdropping on each other’s thoughts. From this nightmarish scenario, which Ness says was inspired by the internet, the trilogy evolves into a gripping coming-of-age saga with equally strong male and female protagonists.

The annual PBS KIDS GO! WRITERS CONTEST, sponsored by Vermont Public Television, invites children in grades K through 3 to create original stories and illustrations. VPT received nearly 200 entries in this year’s contest. A panel of judges, including Kids VT managing editor Kate Laddison, picked the winners. They’ll go on to compete at the national level. We’ll print ALL FOUR FIRST-PLACE STORIES in Kids VT, this month and next. Thanks to Gordon’s Window Decor and Small Dog Electronics for sponsoring these pages. And congratulations to these creative kids!

Second Grade Winner

Eddie The Possum With No Tail By Leo Powers

one. His and he had always longed for ddie was a possum with no tail . lked wa rch of one. Eddie walked and parents told him to go in sea or tail h a tailor inside. He asked if the Finally he came to a store wit don’t tailor said, “Sorry possum, we could make him a tail but the on. and on So Eddie walked make tails here, only clothes.” n he asked the rope maker, “Ca and He came to a rope maker the for use e of the leftover string you you make me a tail with som . did he so “I can do that for you.” And rope?” The rope maker said, w back to possumland to sho Eddie put the tail on and went tails and hanging in the trees by their everyone. All his friends were tried that, too!” He climbed up and he thought, “Finally, I can do hurt his head. hanging, but he fell down and ker and said, “You can have my ma e rop He went back to the ng enough to let me hang.” tail back because it wasn’t stro his mom’s house and they Then he went back home to ate a nice yummy supper. h his friends. Feeling After that, he went to play wit bed up his favorite tree happy but not satisfied, he clim and slept in a hole. rning, to his surprise When he woke up the next mo und. He had forgotten there were many gifts all aro around and saw his it was his birthday! He looked and friends. He gave mother, father, brothers, sisters . He said, “Love his mother and father a big hug .” matters more to me than a tail The end.

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E

O

The 2-D 3-D Mac hine

Third Grade Winner

By Genevieve M

umford

ne day after sc hool when Kar en was walking James, “what if home she said you could turn to her best frie a picture from “Maybe we coul nd, a book into real d make an inve life?” ntion to do that lots of old part !” s. Let’s go get answered Jam them.” So they es excitedly. “I They opened th have ran the rest of e door and tram the way to Jam pled through th way to the base es ’ ho use. e living room as ment. “Here, lo ok at this piece they made thei said James. “O r of projector an k” said Karen, d these 3-D glas “how about th some more pa ses,” is conveyor be rts, and got to lt?” So they ga work building thered When it was do the 2-D 3-D m ne Karen open achine. ed her backpack an book. “Ok, here d randomly pu it goes, but I’m lled out a not sure this is the book and pu go in g to work.” She t it on the conv opened eyor belt. “Wha anyway?” Jam t book did you es asked. pu t in there But before she could answer, th e book slid into the room shoo the machine. PO k and there was OF, a blast of bright standing before blue light. Ther them was the gi e ant Goliath! “Ah” they scre amed. Petrified with fear Karen “Quick, p-p-pr was unable to ess the r-r-reve move. rse button!” sh pressed the bu e stammered. tton and Golia Ja m es th shrank smal back into the bo ler and smaller ok. until he fit James’s mom ca me to the top of the stairs. “W on down there? hat’s going ” she yelled. “We were just testing our new invention,” they smiling at each said other. “Well, ke ep it down!” she answered. “Hmmm” said James turning to Karen, “wha should we try t next then?” “Well, I have a gem book in m y backpack” said Karen. “Why didn’t yo u say that in th e first place!” James said laug hing. “If this w or ks we’ll be rich!” “So, what are w e waiting for, le t’s the machine!” fire up

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SPONSORED BY

JULY 2012 KIDS VT

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JULY

Sponsored by: Like Fletcher Allen Health Care on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First!

CALENDAR

CALENDAR SPOTLIGHTS AND LISTINGS BY KATE LADDISON

KIDS VT

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Once a summer, the Shelburne Museum hosts an old-fashioned circus. Face painting, carnival games and clowning go on all day while aerialists, jugglers and contortionists converge for shows at 11:30 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Among the stars are former Cirque du Soleil performers Bill and Serenity Forchion of Wunderle’s Big Top Adventures in Brattleboro. What kids see as high-flying antics, mom and dad will recognize as a very flexible husbandand-wife partnership. CIRCUS-PALOOZA: Sunday, July 22, Shelburne Museum. Vermonter admission: $10 adult, $5 child. Info, 985-3346, shelburnemuseum.org.

COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM

JULY 2012 KIDSVT.COM

Step Right Up

JUNE CALENDAR Planning for 4th of July festivities? Find a list of events on the next page.

Nature & Science

Hoopster Gliders: Kids create a craft that flies. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200.

1 SUNDAY

Straw Rockets: Science lovers discover the power of air during this hands-on session. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200.

Arts

3 TUESDAY

Circus Smirkus: Talented troupers take audiences on a tantalizing trip through time as a circuspowered time machine explores endless eons of fractured fun throughout history. The Circus Barn, Greensboro, 1 & 6 p.m. $15-19; free for kids under 2. Info, 533-7443. Music on the Porch Summer Concerts: Music lovers listen to jazz, rock and blues. All ages. Green Mountain Coffee Visitor Center and Café, Waterbury, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 882-2700.

Nature & Science

Color Mixing: Mix it up! Starting with primary colors, painters experiment to see what new hues can be created. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200. Magnetic Moments: Budding scientists experiment with electric currents. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200. Sundays for Fledglings: Kids hike, create, carve, act, write and investigate the lives of birds, their habitats and their neighbors. Intended for kids in grades 1-4, but all welcome. Preregister. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 2-2:45 p.m. Free with admission. Info, 434-2167.

2 MONDAY

Baby & Maternity

Arts

Superheroes Musical Performance: Very Merry Theatre presents an original show on the library lawn. Kids bring blankets, chairs and a picnic lunch. All ages. Charlotte Public Library, noon. Free. Info, 425-3864.

Fairs & Festivals

Lawn Party: Young patriots celebrate independence Montpelier-style with face painting and an outdoor performance. All ages. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

Health & Fitness

Family Fun Day at the Pool: Families meet up for fun in the water. Open to all. Montpelier Public Pool, 1:30-4 p.m. Free. Info, 225-8699. Parent/Child Yoga: Families flex and stretch together in a class teaching basic at-home techniques. Ages 5 and up with a parent. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-0313. Tuesday Night Trail Running: Kids lace up for the largest weekly trail-running series in the country. This fun event is for all ages and abilities and includes a 5K race, a 2.5K Cadets race (ages 9-12) and a short Cubs race (ages 8 and under). Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Williston, 6 p.m. Free-$6. Info, 879-6001.

Baby Yoga: Mini yogis and their minders stretch and move to soothing music, building coordination, strength and balance. Ages 3-10 months. Preregister. Move You Fitness Studio, Essex, 10:45-11:30 a.m. $10. Info, 734-0821.

Library & Books

Montpelier Prenatal Yoga: Moms-in-the-making give their full attention to relaxation and strength building. Yoga Mountain Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, 778-0300.

Creative Tuesdays: Crafters use their imagination and recycled materials. All ages, but kids under 10 must be accompanied by an adult. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

Yoga After Baby: New moms focus on their core, pelvic floor and arm strength, bringing their infants along if they choose. The Shambala Center, Montpelier, 11 a.m.-noon. $10. Info, 778-0300.

Community

Breast-Feeding-Mom Support: New mothers get to know each other during this informative and informal session. Children welcome. Rutland Regional Medical Center, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 747-8665.

Food

Burger Night: See Spotlight, pg. 35. Kids in the Kitchen: Lemon Blueberry Muffins: Kids bake up sunny, summery muffins packed with fresh lemon zest and juicy blueberries. Preregister. Healthy Living Market and Café, South Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. $20 adult/child pair. Info, 863-2569.

Hot Mama Workout: Kids are welcome while moms squeeze in some fitness. City Hall Gymnasium, St. Albans, 9-10 a.m. $10, or free with preregistration. Info, 524-1500, ext. 266.

South Burlington Crafternoons: Creative kids drop in for a hands-on activity. South Burlington Community Library, 12:30-2 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Williston Summer Story Hour: Read-aloud time with family and friends. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

Nature & Science

Leafcutter Ants: Nature fans examine the secret life of these insect fungus farmers during a handson investigation. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200. Sound Science: Curious kids experiment with sounds and how they travel. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200. Tasty Tuesdays at Bromley Mountain: Adventure pass-holders get free ice cream while they explore the super air slide, space bikes, zip line, bumper boats and more. Bromley Mountain, Peru, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $15-32. Info, 824-5522.

Fairs & Festivals

March With the Library: Kids join up with library folks to walk the parade route in Colchester. Meet at Creek Farm Road shopping center. All ages. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 878-0313.

Health & Fitness

Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: Pedalers wend their way along the trails in a nonintimidating atmosphere. Kids 8 and under take a “Lil Lap” at 6:21 p.m., kids 9-12 take a half lap at 6:19 p.m. All ages. Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Williston, 6:15 p.m. $4-10; free for kids under 6. Info, 879-6001. Winooski on Foot: Walkers and runners meet weekly to march out a marathon over the course of nine weeks. Participants get info about the 2.9-mile walking routes each week via email and can choose from one of three possible times. All ages. O’Brien Community Center, Winooski, 8 a.m., noon & 6 p.m. $25. Info, 655-9622.

Nature & Science

Honeybees: Beekeeping keeps kids busy as they explore what the museum’s honeybee colony is buzzing about. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200. Pocket Kites: Kids make their own simple craft to take to the skies. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200.

5 THURSDAY

Arts

Circus Smirkus: See July 1, Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, noon & 6:30 p.m. $17.5020.50; free for kids under 2. Snow Farm Vineyard Concert Series: Families picnic at 5 p.m. and take in live music starting at 6:30. Food and drink available for purchase. Snow Farm Vineyard, South Hero, 5-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 372-9463. Sunsets: Once Upon a Time: Cinderella, Snow White, Mother Goose and Little Red Riding Hood. Families meet some favorite fairy-tale characters during an enchanting evening filled with activities

Breast-Feeding Support Group: Lactating moms bring their babies and share stories, advice and company. Preregister. Family Birthing Center, Northwest Medical Center, St. Albans, 10 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 524-7970. Middlebury La Leche League: Breast-feeding moms and kids gather for fun and conversation. Expectant mothers welcome, too. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 382-1589.

Community

Mom’s Matinee: Parents and their wee ones catch a flick with dimmed lights and baby-friendly volumes. Palace 9, South Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free-$7.25. Info, 864-5610.

Food

Kids in the Kitchen: Zoku Pops: Young cooks make layered pops using yogurt, fruit and juices. Preregister. Healthy Living Market and Café, South Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. $20 adult/child pair. Info, 863-2569.

Health & Fitness

Hot Mama Workout: See July 2.

Library & Books

‘Caps for Sale’: Book lovers enjoy an action-packed performance of this classic children’s story. Grades K-6. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 388-4095. Crafternoons: Imaginative kids channel their creativity into hands-on projects. Grades K-8. Sara Partridge Community Library, East Middlebury, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-7588. Essex Drop-In Story Time: Sensational stories thrill little readers. All ages. Essex Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. Food for Thought: Teen volunteers chow down on pizza and work on library projects. Grades 7-12. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Highgate Youth Advisory: Kids in grades 5 to 8 plan projects with the Crossroads after-school program. Highgate Public Library, 3-4:45 p.m. Free. Info, 868-3970. Lake Monsters Story Time: Young fans listen to stories during a grand slam of a story time. All ages. Essex Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. Library Movie Matinee: Kids see a film about three gray whales trapped under ice until an unlikely coalition rallies to help. Popcorn and drinks provided. Rated PG. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Midnight Snack in the Morning: See July 3. Ages 6 and up. 10:30 a.m. 5 THURSDAY, P. 28

Class

DANCIN’ WITH MY BABY: Jun. 26-Jul. 31, 10:30 a.m. studio open, 10:45-11:45 a.m. class, weekly on Tue. Jun. 29-Aug. 3, 11 a.m. studio open, 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., weekly on Fri. Age 6 weeks through 3 years. Cost: $10/drop-in, $50/6 classes, $80/12 classes. Location: Studio One at Middlebury Fitness. Info: Preregister by phone, 388-3381, or email zumbalindsey@gmail.com. Exciting new “Baby and Me” class! Get out and get fit! Bring your little one along while you dance, do targeted toning and stretch. We’ll listen to rock, reggae, pop, hip-hop, salsa, funk, disco, reggaeton ... you name it! All caregivers welcome. MidFit has A/C, locker rooms with showers and lots of fun “toys” to use in our workouts. List your class or camp here for only $15/month! Submit the listing by the 15th at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com.

27

Submit your August events by July 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Social Thinking: Kids with nonverbal learning disabilities, Asperger’s syndrome and high-functioning autism develop their social skills. Ages 6-17. Preregister. Maple Leaf Clinic, Wallingford, call for times. Info, 446-3577.

Baby & Maternity

KIDS VT

Parent/Child Sign Language Class: Family members learn to speak with their hands in a seven-week program. Ages birth to 5 and parents. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-0313.

Afternoons With Farmer Fred: Spend an afternoon with Plymouth’s own Fred DePaul. Farmer Fred, known for his engaging humor, will demonstrate historic farming activities such as sheep shearing and logging. He gives wagon rides in good weather. Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site, Plymouth, 1-5 p.m. $2-7.50; free for kids under 6. Info, 672-3773.

JULY 2012

Library & Books

Midnight Snack in the Morning: Late-night readers get a mid-morning snack and story. Ages 3-5. Preregister. Charlotte Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 425-3864.

Education

for princes and princesses of all ages. Shelburne Museum, 5-7:30 p.m. $10-20; free for members and kids under 5. Info, 985-3346.

KIDSVT.COM

Health & Fitness

Craftacular Tuesdays: Kids get caught up in lowtech projects. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 3:30-5 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

4 WEDNESDAY

JULY

CALENDAR 5 THURSDAY (CONTINUED)

Go Fourth

Independence Day commemorates the American Revolution and the adoption of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. It’s also a day to relax with family and friends, and there are plenty of ways to celebrate; Vermont towns organize parades, fairs, barbecues, fun runs, concerts and, of course, fireworks. Don’t miss the festivities in your hometown. • BRANDON: Saturday and Sunday, July 6 and 7. Festival, parade and fireworks. Various times and locations. Info, brandon.org. • BRISTOL: Tuesday and Wednesday, July 3 and 4. Celebrate with music, games, crafts and fireworks on Tuesday. Parade Wednesday. Various times and locations. Info, 4534877, bristol4th.com. • BURLINGTON: Tuesday, July 3. Live bands and funfilled activities — including stilt walkers, face painting, amusement-park rides and theater acts — set the scene for spectacular fireworks over Lake Champlain. 3-10 p.m., various downtown locations in Burlington. Info, 864-0123. Rock the Dock Celebration, Lake Champlain Community Sailing Center, 6:30 p.m. $25-65. Info, 864-2499. communitysailingcenter.org.

28

KIDS VT

JULY 2012 KIDSVT.COM

• COLCHESTER: Wednesday, July 4. Fun run, parade and fireworks. Various locations, 8:15 a.m. – dusk. Info, 2645640, colchestervt.gov. • EAST BURKE & LYNDONVILLE: Friday, July 6. Outdoor music, barbecue, chairlift rides and fireworks. Burke Mountain, 5-9:30 p.m. $10 parking. Info, 626-7300, skiburke.com. • FAIRFAX: Wednesday, July 4. Parade and family community day, complete with a “ducky race.” Parade

starts 1 p.m., ducky race at 4 p.m., $4. Various downtown locations. Info, fairfaxrecreation.com.

opens at 10 a.m. for swimming and picnicking; fireworks at dusk, Knight Point State Park. Info, 3728400, champlainislands. com.

• JEFFERSONVILLE: Wednesday, July 4. Fireworks and music by the 40th Army Band. Village Green, Smugglers’ Notch Resort, 8 p.m. Info, 338-3480, vtguard.com.

• RANDOLPH: Wednesday, July 4. Parade and street fest. Merchant’s Row, 10 a.m. Info, 728-9027, randolph-chamber.com.

• KILLINGTON: Wednesday, July 4. Parade, silent auction, field games, swimming, fireworks and an all-day barbecue. Johnson Recreation Center, 10 a.m. Info, 422-2185, discoverkillington.com.

• ROCHESTER: Wednesday, July 4. Patriots celebrate the nation’s birthday with a colorful community parade. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., various locations. Info, 767-3631, rochestervermont.org.

• MILTON: Wednesday, July 4. The Milton Community Band performs with a pyrotechnic display. Milton Outdoor Performance Center, Bombardier Recreation Park, 7 p.m. Info, 893-1398, miltonband.net.

• ROUSES POINT, N.Y.: Friday through Sunday, June 29 to July 1. Food booths, a village-wide garage sale, a car and motorcycle show, live tunes and fireworks. Various times and locations. Info, 518-297-5502, rousespointny.com.

• MONTPELIER: Tuesday, July 3. The day starts with a pancake breakfast, street festival, and a one-mile road race and city parade that ends with fireworks. Various downtown locations. 8 a.m. - midnight with parade at 6 p.m. and fireworks at 9:30 p.m. Info, 238-6888, montpelieralive.org. • NEWPORT: Wednesday, July 4. Fireworks rocket into the sky after live music, kids games and good eats. Gardner Memorial Park, 4 p.m. to midnight. Info, 334-6345. • NORTH HERO: Tuesday, July 3. Fireworks. Park

• RUTLAND: Wednesday, July 4. Rutland’s Summer Smash features a fair and demolition derby, followed by fireworks. Vermont State Fairgrounds. Derby at 6:30 p.m., fireworks at 9:45 p.m. Info, 773-2747, rutlandvermont.com. • SHELBURNE: Wednesday, July 4. A morning bazaar mixes white elephants with baked goods, books and toys. A live auction and a chicken barbecue with all the fixings follow. Shelburne United Methodist Church, 9 a.m. $6-12. Info, 985-3981.

• STOWE: Wednesday, July 4. A parade in Moscow, followed by face painting, music, clowns and food in the village. Various times and locations. Fireworks at Mayo Farm. Info, 2537321, gostowe.com. • WARREN: Wednesday, July 4. Thousands attend one of the state’s largest parades, which goes Constitutional with a “We the People” theme this year. Street entertainment, music by the Mad Mountain Scramblers and kids games follow. 10 a.m.-1 p.m., downtown Warren. • WATERBURY: Friday, June 29. The Waterbury Rotary Club starts the fun early with a “Not Quite Independence Day Celebration.” On Friday, local bands set up a stage in Rusty Parker Memorial Park. Saturday brings a village parade and evening fireworks. Info, 272-6515, revitalizingwaterbury.org. • WHITE RIVER JUNCTION: Wednesday, July 4. Take the train from White River to Wilder for fireworks, then ride the train back after the show. White River Junction Amtrak Station. Trains at 6 and 8 p.m. $6. Info, 295-5036. • WOODSTOCK: Wednesday, July 4. An “Old Vermont Fourth,” with historic debates, wagon rides, ice-cream making and an egg toss. Billings Farm & Museum, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-12. Info, 457-2355, billingsfarm.org.

Shelburne Magic Club: Illusionists practice card tricks and share their most successful sleights of hand. Grades 5-8. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124. Sign a Song of Dreams: Music lovers learn to sign a tune to perform at the summer reading program party. Ages 8 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Starlight Studio: Kids bring a feather, shell or bead to use in the creation of a dream catcher. Ages 8 and up. Preregister. South Burlington Community Library, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Superheroes Musical Performance: Very Merry Theatre performs a superhero musical and kids check in on their summer reading. Reading program at 11:30 a.m., performance begins at noon. Ages 5 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Williston Teen Club: Teens fight summer doldrums with movies, comics, games, snacks and book talk. Grade 6 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

Nature & Science

Fossils: Science enthusiasts handle preserved remains and use clues to guess their origins. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200. Kitchen Chemistry: Kids explore scientific reactions with household products. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200.

6 FRIDAY

Arts

Circus Smirkus: See July 5.

Community

First Friday Family Dance: Supper kicks off a wholesome evening of live music and dancing. All ages. Worcester Town Hall, 5:30-10 p.m. $5 person; $8-12 family. Info, 229-0173. Kids VT Night at Centennial Field: It’s time to play ball with Kids VT! Check out the Vermont Lake Monsters as they take on the Hudson Valley Renegades. Come early: the first 350 fans get cool Kids VT prizes. Centennial Field, Burlington, 7 p.m. $5-7. Info, 985-5482.

Education

Foodways Fridays: Children and adults learn how heirloom vegetables are used in historical recipes prepared in the Billings farmhouse kitchen. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock. $3-12; free for kids under 3 and for members. Info, 457-2355.

Fairs & Festivals

Stoweflake Hot Air Balloon Festival: Four flights of balloons take off during the weekend with sunrise and twilight shows as well as a kids corner with bounce houses, face painting and other familyfriendly fun. Stoweflake Mountain Resort & Spa, 6:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. $10; kids under 12 free.

Food

Burger Night: See Spotlight, pg. 35. Richmond Farmers Market: Seasonal shoppers find local food and kid-friendly fun, including arts and crafts, face painting, a market scavenger hunt and Hula-Hooping. Each third Friday features a youth booth. All ages. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3:30-7 p.m. Free.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: Basketball-loving high school students spend the afternoon dribbling, shooting and scoring. Preregister. St. Albans City Hall, 2:303:45 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1500, ext. 266.

See “First with Kids” videos at FletcherAllen.org/firstwithkids

Library & Books

a.m.-5 p.m. $10-12; free for members and kids under 2. Info, 649-2200.

After-School Movie: Film buffs put up their feet and watch a flick, popcorn in hand. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

What’s Bugging You and Your Garden?: A bug expert talks about flying, buzzing and crawling creatures that inhabit gardens. Ages 3 and older. Preregister. Gardener’s Supply, Williston, 10 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 658-2433.

Dream Big! Youth Media Lab: Make movies and explore technology during this drop-in collaboration between the library and Middlebury Community Television. For kids entering grade 4 or higher. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4097.

8 SUNDAY

Arts

Music on the Porch Summer Concerts: See July 1.

South Burlington Wilma Worm’s Book Club: Preschoolers join Wilma Worm and Rita Book, the South Burlington Bookmobile, for stories, songs and games in the gardens. Book Worms activities presented in collaboration with the National Gardening Association. Ages 3-6. Vermont Garden Park, South Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Fairs & Festivals

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: Music-loving families take in daily concerts all week long, including “brown bag” family-friendly jam sessions at noon each day. Festivities begin Sunday at 7 p.m. and evening performances fill the night air from 7 to 10 p.m. A street dance closes the festival Saturday, July 14, starting at 7 p.m. Middlebury Green. Free. Info, 462-3555.

Tanabata: Learn about this Asian celebration and hear the legend of the cowherd and weaver star who only meet across the galaxy on this day. All ages. Preregister. Charlotte Public Library, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 425-3864.

Stoweflake Hot Air Balloon Festival: See July 6. 6:30 p.m.

Young Adult Book Signing: Former Jericho resident and author J. Meyers reads from her debut book, Intangible. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Youth Media Lab: Movie mavens explore TV technology with Middlebury Community Television. Grades 4-6. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4095.

Nature & Science

Bats!: Kids learn about houses, migration, hibernation and other facts related to these nocturnal creatures. Bring a white cotton T-shirt to decorate. Ages 6 and up; children 8 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Bird Banding: Science in Action: Audubon staff demonstrate the banding process from mist nets to data sheets. View wild birds up close and learn about conservation. Bring a camera and wear mud boots. Rain date: July 13. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 7-11 a.m. Donations. Info, 434-3068. Discover the Moon: Children’s-book author Rebecca Rupp takes kids on a journey to the moon with stories, crafts and learning. Ages 7-11. Preregister. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. Microscopic Explorations: Kiddos use microscopes to realize there’s more to see than with the naked eye. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200. Mirror, Mirror: Little ones use looking glasses to investigate reflection and symmetry. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Free-$12. Info, 649-2200.

7 SATURDAY

Arts

Ben & Jerry’s Outdoor Movie Night: Film fan families take in an outdoor screening of a kid-friendly flick. Ben & Jerry’s Factory, Waterbury, Free. Info, 862-9620. Circus Smirkus: See July 5.

Baby & Maternity

Moth Madness

Don’t leave your little lepidopterist home at night. Not when there’s a MOTH PARTY at Audubon Vermont, offering up nature’s nocturnal entertainment. The time is right: July’s long days lend themselves to staying up late, and July 23 through 29 is National Moth Week. You’ll see a diversity of “butterflies of the night,” ranging from pin- to palm-size, and their patterns and colors are a lesson in the art of camouflage. Audubon staff set up lights and bait to attract the night flyers, and James Hedbor of the Vermont Entomological Society will be on hand with mounted specimens to help with identification. Wind up the night with a moonlight OWL PROWL. MOTH PARTY AND OWL PROWL: Saturday, July 28, Education Barn at the Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 8-9:30 p.m. Info, 434-3068, vt.audubon.org.

Library Night at the Lake Monsters: Fletcher Free Library summer readers team up to take in a game at the ballpark. Centennial Field, Burlington, 6:05 p.m. $7. Info, 865-7216.

Nature & Science

Hoopster Gliders: See July 2. Straw Rockets: See July 2. Sundays for Fledglings: See July 1.

9 MONDAY

Baby & Maternity Baby Yoga: See July 2.

Childbirth Education: Soon-to-be parents prepare for the birth and care of their baby in a six-week course. Attendees can also take a breast-feeding class August 20 from 7-9 p.m. Preregister. Franklin County Home Health Agency, St. Albans, 7-9 p.m. Call for prices. Info, 527-7531. Infant Care: Expectant parents prepare for taking care of Junior. Preregister. Timber Lane Pediatrics, South Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. $30 family. Info, 658-5959. Montpelier Prenatal Yoga: See July 2. Yoga After Baby: See July 2.

Home Health Agency staff. Fairfax Community Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-1941.

music and face painting. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 310-5172.

Prenatal Yoga: Moms-to-be explore meditations, postures and breath work tailored to their minds and bodies during pregnancy. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, 9-10:30 a.m. $10. Info, 778-0300.

Health & Fitness

Postnatal Yoga: Moms and their brand-new babies connect through movement and breathing exercises. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, 10:45-11:45 a.m. $10. Info, 778-0300.

Fairs & Festivals

Stoweflake Hot Air Balloon Festival: See July 6, 6:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. Windsor County Fair: The “Best Little Fair in Vermont” entertains crowds with a petting zoo, rides, live music and ag exhibits from beekeeping to cheesemaking. All ages. Barlow’s Field, Springfield, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Free-$10.

Food

Burlington Farmers Market: More than 90 stands overflow with seasonal produce, flowers, artisan wares and prepared foods. Fun for kids includes live

Library & Books

Russian Story Time: Children listen to stories, songs and find new friends. Russian and English speakers welcome. Presenters translate and teach Russian words. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

Nature & Science

Creatures of the Night: Fly-by-night animals offer their secrets during this program from Exordium. Haston Library, Franklin, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 285-6505. Super Science Day: Up, Up and Away: Little scientists spend the day experimenting with the physics of air, making kites, rockets and parachutes. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 10

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 8.

Food

Burger Night: See July 2.

Health & Fitness

Hot Mama Workout: See July 2. Itsy Bitsy Yoga: Families try out toddler-friendly poses with songs, stories and games. Ages birth to 4. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 388-4097.

Library & Books

Dream Catcher Workshop: Kids discover Native American dream catchers during an interactive presentation. Ages 5-13. Preregister. Moretown Memorial Library, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 496-9728. Parent/Child Sign Language Class: See July 2. Young Adult Movie Night: Students entering grade 5/higher gather for pizza and a movie. Highgate Public Library, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 868-3970. 9 MONDAY, P. 30

29

Submit your August events by July 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Member Guest Day at the Pool: Pool-pass-holders bring a friend for a free swim during general and family swim times. Montpelier Public Pool, 4:155:30 p.m. Free when visiting with a member. Info, 223-6829.

Fairs & Festivals

KIDS VT

Breast-Feeding Clinic: Parents-to-be who are considering nursing get information and support from

Library & Books

JULY 2012

Birth and Beyond: New parents learn skills for infant care. First Steps Childbirth Center of Franklin County Home Health Agency, St. Albans, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call for price. Info, 527-7531.

Windsor County Fair: See July 7, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

KIDSVT.COM

Saturday Drama Club: Thespians help Very Merry Theatre produce a show in just three hours. All ages. Preregister. Very Merry Theatre, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $15 (or pay what you can). Info, 863-6607.

JULY CALENDAR

9 MONDAY (CONTINUED)

Zombie Attack: Kids dress as zombies and get makeup to complete their undead ensemble. Other fun includes making a voodoo lucky charm and zombie felties, playing zombie tag and competing in a zombie apocalypse survival kit creation contest. Ages 10 and up. Preregister. Charlotte Public Library, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 425-3864.

Nature & Science

Bead Animals: Budding beaders craft creative creatures with Kayla Smith. Grades 4-6. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 388-4095.

Education

Leafcutter Ants: See July 3. Owls of Vermont: Presenters from the Southern Vermont Natural History Museum present a program with live birds and interactive demos. All ages. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 878-0313. Sound Science: See July 3.

10 TUESDAY

Arts

The Art of the Waltz: Playing Accompaniment: String, guitar and piano players learn waltz music in a simple course on ornamentation. All ages. Artis Tree Gallery, Woodstock, 6-8 p.m. $20 session. Info, 457-3500.

New Beginnings Support Group: Parents gather to celebrate the joys, accomplishments and challenges they face as parents of young children who have an autism spectrum diagnosis. Vermont Family Network, Williston, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 863-0423. Time Travel Tuesdays: Kids of all ages experience 19th-century chores and pastimes in the farmhouse. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. $3-12; kids 2 and under free. Info, 457-2355.

Fairs & Festivals

Ben & Jerry’s Outdoor Movie Night: Film fan families take in an outdoor screening of a kid-friendly flick. Ben & Jerry’s, Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, Free. Info, 862-9620.

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 8.

Food

Kids in the Kitchen: Cheese and Crackers: Learning Center staff teach kids to whip up their own cheese

Story Times MONDAY Bristol Toddler Story Time: Lawrence Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 453-2366. Burlington Dream Big Story Time: Fletcher Free Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Marshfield Story Time: Jaquith Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. Milton Infant Story Time: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Richmond Pajama Time: Richmond Free Library, 6:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. St. Albans Story Time: St. Albans Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 524-1507.

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Stowe Story Times for 2-3-Year-Olds: Stowe Free Library, 10 a.m. Free.

spread for cracker snacks from scratch. Preregister. Healthy Living Market and Café, South Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. $20 adult/child pair. Info, 863-2569.

Health & Fitness

Williston Summer Story Hour: See July 3.

Tuesday Night Trail Running: See July 3.

Nature & Science

Library & Books

Board Game Night: Beat back summer boredom with chess, checkers and other boxed fun. All ages. Warren Public Library, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 496-3993. Bubbles and Books: Bubble buffs compete in a contest for outstanding orbs. Discover how to make a bubble snake or create a bubble wand from a paper plate. All ages. Farrell Park, South Burlington, 6:307 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Creative Tuesdays: See July 3. Fun at the Library: Ellie Tetrick takes toddlers and preschoolers on an imaginative journey using bubbles, music and movement. Preregister. Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3970. Game On!: Kids learn new diversions or play old faves. All ages. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

Colchester Drop-In Story Time: Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-0313.

Woodstock Toddler Story Time: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 457-2295.

East Barre Kids Story Hour: East Barre Branch Library, 9:30 & 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 476-5118.

WEDNESDAY

East Middlebury Preschool Story Hour: Sara Partridge Community Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 388-7588.

Essex Preschool Story Time: See Tuesday. Middlebury Story Time: Ilsley Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, Free.

Essex Preschool Story Time: Brownell Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Middlebury Baby and Toddler Story Hour: Ilsley Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 388-4097.

Essex Toddler Story Time: Brownell Library, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Middlebury Story Hour: Ilsley Public Library, Free. Info, 388-4095.

Georgia Pajama Story Time: Georgia Public Library, third Tuesday of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 524-4643.

Realms of Reading Crafts: East Barre Branch Library, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 476-5118.

Montpelier Story Time: See Tuesday.

Richford Story Hour: Arvin A. Library, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 848-3313.

Williston Story Time at Buttered Noodles: Buttered Noodles, Williston, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 764-1810.

Hinesburg Preschool Story Time: Carpenter-Carse Library, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 482-2878.

Woodstock Baby Story Time: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 457-2295.

Hinesburg Toddler Story Time: Carpenter-Carse Library, first Tuesday of every month, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 482-2878.

Swanton Story Hour: Swanton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 868-7656.

Montpelier Story Time: KelloggHubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

Waterbury Baby Lap Time: Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036.

Barre Children’s Story Hour: Aldrich Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 476-7550. Burlington Science and Stories: ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, 11 a.m. Museum admission. Info, 324-6386.

Honeybees: See July 4.

Pocket Kites: See July 4. Tasty Tuesdays at Bromley Mountain: See July 3.

11 WEDNESDAY

Arts

Music at the Mall: Shoppers sing along with musical duo Robert and Gigi at Center Court. University Mall, South Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 863-1066.

Baby & Maternity

Breast-Feeding Preparation: Moms-to-be learn the basics of feeding baby the natural way. Preregister. Timber Lane Pediatrics, South Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. $30 family. Info, 658-5959.

Early literacy skills get special attention during these free read-aloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign language instruction. Contact the story time organizer or visit kidsvt.com for details.

Waterbury Toddlers-’n’-Twos: Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036.

Alburgh Story Hour: Alburgh Community Education Center, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 796-6077.

South Burlington Crafternoons: See July 3.

Parent/Child Yoga: See July 3.

Grand Isle PJ Story Time: Grand Isle Free Library, first Tuesday of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 527-5426.

TUESDAY

Nature After Dark Story Time: Children discover what is making all of those noises in the yard at night. Ages 3-5. Preregister. Charlotte Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 425-3864.

Richmond Story Time: Richmond Free Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. South Burlington Tiny Tot Time: South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Williston Story Time at Buttered Noodles: See Monday.

Shelburne Story Time with Webby: Shelburne Museum, 10:30-11 a.m. Free$20. Info, 985-3346. South Burlington Story Time: Barnes & Noble, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 864-8001.

Warren Story Hour: Warren Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 496-3913.

Williamstown Story Time: Ainsworth Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 433-5887. Williston Story Time at Buttered Noodles: See Monday.

Colchester Preschool Story Time: Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-0313. Franklin Story Time: Haston Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 285-6505. Milton Story Time: Milton Public Library, first Thursday of every month. Free. Info, 893-4644. Montgomery Story Hour: Montgomery Town Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, montgomery.librarian@ gmail.com. Shelburne Story Time With Mary Catherine Jones: Pierson Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-5124. South Burlington Baby Story Time: South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. St. Albans Story Time: See Monday. Vergennes Story Time: Bixby Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 877-2211. Westford Story Time: Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-5639. Williston Story Time at Buttered Noodles: See Monday. FRIDAY Enosburg Story Hour: Enosburg Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 933-2328. Georgia Preschool Story Time: Georgia Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 524-4643.

THURSDAY

Huntington Story Time: Huntington Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 434-4583.

Bristol Preschool Story Time: Lawrence Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 453-2366.

Lincoln Children’s Story Time: Lincoln Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 453-2665.

Montpelier Story Time: See Tuesday. Stowe Baby and Toddler Story Time: Stowe Free Library, July 6, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 253-6145. Waterbury Preschool Story Time: Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. Williston Story Time at Buttered Noodles: See Monday. SATURDAY Barre Story Time: Next Chapter Bookstore, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 476-3114. South Burlington Saturday Story Time: Barnes & Noble, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 864-8001. South Burlington Second-Saturday Stories: South Burlington Community Library, second Saturday of every month, 10:15 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 652-7080. Woodstock Story Time: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 457-2295. 

See “First with Kids” videos at FletcherAllen.org/firstwithkids

EXPLORE Bellwether!

Burlington La Leche League: Moms bring their questions, babies and older kids, too, to this breastfeeding support group. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-8228.

‘Star Wars’ Party: Families gather for fun dressed as George Lucas-inspired characters. Sip Yoda soda and test the Force with themed challenges. All ages. South Burlington Community Library, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Community

Nature & Science

Georgia Family Game Night: Candyland, checkers and Monopoly bring gamers to the library. Visitors are welcome to carry in other favorites, too. Georgia Public Library, Fairfax, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 524-4643.

Education

Social Thinking: Kids with nonverbal learning disabilities, Asperger’s syndrome and high-functioning autism develop their social skills. Call for times. Ages 6-17. Preregister. Maple Leaf Clinic, Wallingford, Info, 446-3577.

Fairs & Festivals

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 8.

Food

Cookie Decorating: Budding bakers doll up treats with sprinkles, frosting, sugar and nuts. Panadero Bakery, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 863-8278.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See July 6. Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: Pedalers wend their way along the trails in a nonintimidating atmosphere for all ages and abilities. Kids 8 and under take a “Lil Lap” at 6:21 p.m., kids 9-12 take a half lap at 6:19 p.m. All ages. Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Williston, 6:15 p.m. $4-10; free for kids under 6. Info, (802) 879-6001. Winooski on Foot: Walkers and runners meet weekly to march out a marthon over the course of nine weeks. Participants get info about the 2.9-mile walking routes each week via email, gather and go at one of three possible times each Wednesday. Details available at kickoff event June 6. All ages. O’Brien Community Center, Winooski, 8 a.m. 12 & 6 p.m. $25. Info, 655-9622.

Library & Books

Book Discussion: Critical readers voice their thoughts on Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award titles, including A Dog’s Way Home. Ages 8-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-0313. Booktivity: Midnight Snack: Early graders work together to create the ultimate snack. Ages 5-8. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 878-0313. A Dream and a Journey: Former Olympic hopeful Dave Keenan shares his training experiences. All ages. Essex Free Library, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. In the Lab With Doctor Galaxy: Science geeks check out the library lab and mix up a batch of solar slime. Ages 8 and up. Preregister. South Burlington Community Library, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Exordium Adventure: Young explorers find out about creatures of the night. Meet in the park; rain location in the library. Grades K-6. Preregister. Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3970.

Limited spaces in our K/1 Classroom. Must be age 5 by Oct. 1

PRESCHOOL • KINDERGARTEN ELEMENTARY • AFTER SCHOOL SUMMER CAMPS

1186 S. Brownell Rd. • Williston • (802) 863-4839 • BellwetherSchool.org k8h-bellweatherschool0612.indd 1

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Fossils: See July 5. Kitchen Chemistry: See July 5. VINS Program: Tots talk turtles with Vermont Institute of Natural Science staff. Ages 4 and up. Preregister. Stowe Free Library, 11-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 253-6145. Wagon-Ride Wednesdays: Horse-drawn wagon rides are fun for the whole family. Admission to Wagon-Ride Wednesdays includes all farm and museum programs and activities. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, $3-12; free for members and kids under 3. Info, 457-2355.

12 THURSDAY

Arts

Assisting Your Child With Music: Musician Paul Ruscak teaches caregivers to share a love of tunes with kids. Participants brush up on instrument care and tuning. Adults. ArtisTree Gallery, Woodstock, 6:30-7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 457-3500.

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Bristol Movies in the Park: Film fans view a classic movie on a theater-size screen for a drive-in experience without the car. All ages. Bristol Town Green, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 453-5885. Circus Smirkus: See July 1. Dorr Farm, Manchester, 2 & 7 p.m. $16.50-20; Free for kids under 2. Groovin’ on the Green: Shoppers bring blanketsand chairs for an open-air concert as well as face painting, temporary tattoos and clowning around. Maple Tree Place, Williston, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 646-5263. Snow Farm Vineyard Concert Series: See July 5.

Community

Mom’s Matinee: See July 5.

Fairs & Festivals

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 8. Summervale: Families enjoy an open-air dinner with children’s activities including crafts and educational programs. Intervale Community Farm, Burlington, 5:30 p.m. Free admission; food and drink available for sale. Info, 660-0440.

Food Kids Cooking Class: Summer Strudels and Salads: Kids wrap up a variety of summer veggies mixed with cheese into crispy, edible pockets to accompany fresh salads. Ages 8 and up accompanied by an adult. Preregister. Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 861-9757. Richmond Farmers Market: See July 6.

Health & Fitness

Hot Mama Workout: See July 2.

KIDS VT

Preschool Music With Raphael: Little ones move and groove to guitar tunes. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-0313.

ECHO Family-Scientist Lab: Parents and kids get a closer look at how the muscular/skeletal system acts as a frame for the body. Participants hear a lecture then dissect a chicken wing. Intended for ages 10 and up, but all welcome with an adult. Preregister. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. $6-22.50; free for kids under 2. Info, 877-324-6386, ext. 100.

JULY 2012

Night Journeys Through American History: Learn about Paul Revere and Sybil Ledington’s rides with a hands-on marshmallow-horse activity. Preregister. Joslin Memorial Library, Waitsfield, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 496-3993.

Learn more about our school and our holistic approach.

KIDSVT.COM

LEGO Afternoons: Youngsters create freely from big buckets of building blocks. Parents are encouraged to send a snack; popcorn provided. Ages 6 and up. Lincoln Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 453-2665.

Come for a tour • Give us a call Check out our NEW website

12 THURSDAY, P. 32

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Submit your August events by July 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

12 THURSDAY (CONTINUED)

Library & Books

Dream Catchers: Kurt Valenta of Exordium teaches kids about these dream devices and what they are supposed to do during sleep. Participants then get to make their own. Preregister. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Essex Drop-In Story Time: See July 5. Highgate Youth Advisory: See July 5. Nature After Dark Story Time: See July 10. Ages 6 and up. Sign a Song of Dreams: See July 5. Starlight Studio: Kids create a comet using the tennis ball they bring to the program. Ages 8 and up. Preregister. South Burlington Community Library, 1-2 p.m. Info, 652-7080. Storyteller Presentation: Mike Caduto presents “Touching the Sky Dome: Stories of the Sun, Moon and Stars.” Franklin Town Hall, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 285-6506. Teen Club: Young adults gather for movies, snacks, games and book discussions. Grade 6-12. Dorothy

Alling Memorial Library, Williston, Free. Info, 878-4918.

Fairs & Festivals

Telling Tales With Gigi & Michelle: Storytellers enchant little listeners with humor, music, dance and circus arts. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

Food

TV Production: Aspiring videographers learn to use equipment and create a short project, interviewing a librarian for the segment. Ages 8-9. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 878-0313.

Barre Open Gym: Sunrise Gymnastics, 10 a.m.-noon. $10 child. Info, 223-0517. Burlington Crawlers, Waddlers and Toddlers: St. Joseph School, 11 p.m. Free. Info, 999-5100. Essex Open Gym: Regal Gymnastics Academy, 11 a.m.-noon. $8; free for children under 18 months. Info, 655-3300. Isle La Motte Playgroup: Isle La Motte School, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Jeffersonville Hometown Playgroup: Cambridge Elementary School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 885-5229. Montgomery Playgroup: Montgomery Town Library, second Monday of every month, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Morristown Hometown Playgroup: Morristown Graded Building, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Music With Raphael: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

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JULY 2012 KIDSVT.COM

Williston Music With Raphael: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Winooski Fathers and Children Together: Winooski Family Center, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 655-1422. Winooski Playtime: O’Brien Community Center, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 310-1861.

Youth Media Lab: See July 6.

Burlington Farmers Market: See July 7.

Nature & Science

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See July 6.

Library & Books

Mirror, Mirror: See July 6.

Big Insane Games: Families join in high-energy games, races and silliness on the library’s lawn. All ages. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library 898 Main Street, Colchester, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 878-0313.

Microscopic Explorations: See July 6. Night Creatures: Kids learn about bats, moths, insects and other fly-by-night creatures. Joslin Memorial Library, Waitsfield, 10-11 a.m. & 9-10 p.m. Free. Info, 496-4205.

After-School Movie: See July 6.

South Burlington Wilma Worm’s Book Club: See July 6. Teen Movie Evenings: Teens take in a movie at the library. Preregister. Stowe Free Library, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 253-6145.

13 FRIDAY

Arts

Color Mixing: See July 1.

Magnetic Moments: See July 1. Project Micro: Kids experience the microscopic world: Is it a dream or is it real? Ages 6 and up. Preregister. Charlotte Public Library, 2-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 425-3864.

14 SATURDAY

Arts

Ben & Jerry’s Outdoor Movie Night: See July 7. Saturday Drama Club: See July 7.

Baby & Maternity Prenatal Yoga: See July 7.

Circus Smirkus: See July 12, 2 & 7 p.m.

Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal get-togethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and friends. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music themes. Contact the playgroup organizer or visit kidsvt.com for site-specific details.

Burlington Fathers and Children Together: VNA Family Room, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420.

Essex Welcome Baby Playgroup: Essex Junction Teen Center, 10 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 872-9580.

Burlington Music With Robert: Fletcher Free Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

Fairfield Playgroup: Bent Northrup Memorial Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426.

Essex Open Gym: See Monday.

Hinesburg Playgroup for Dads: Annette’s Preschool, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420.

Hardwick Playgroup: Hardwick Elementary School, 8:15-10:15 a.m. Free. Info, 652-5138. Johnson Baby Chat: Church of the Nazarene, fourth Tuesday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-3470. Middlebury Playgroup: Middlebury Baptist Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171.

Morrisville Open Gym: River Arts, 1011:30 a.m. $5 child, $3 additional child. Info, 888-1261. Shelburne Sing-Along: Lemon Peel Café and Creperie, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 985-9511. Stowe Preschool Music Time: Stowe Free Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free.

Milton Playgroup: New Life Fellowship Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 893-1457.

South Royalton Playgroup: United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 685-2264.

Montpelier LEGO Club: Kellogg-Hubbard Library, third Tuesday of every month, 3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

Vergennes Playgroup: Congregational Church of Vergennes, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171.

Montpelier Tulsi Morning Playgroup: Tulsi Tea Room, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 223-0043.

Williston Baby-Time Playgroup: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-3659.

South Hero Playgroup: South Hero Congregational Church, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426.

Winooski Open Gym With Princess: Regal Gymnastics Academy, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m. $12 child. Info, 655-3300.

St. Albans Playgroup: St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426.

THURSDAY

Worcester Playgroup: Doty Memorial School, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 229-0173.

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Bristol Playgroup: Bristol Baptist Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171.

Barre Open Gym: See Monday.

Burlington Family Play: VNA Family Room, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420.

Burger Night: See Spotlight, pg. 35.

Nature & Science

Playgroups MONDAY

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 8.

Tie-Dye Party: Kids bring their own whites to make shirts swirl like galaxies, socks explode like supernovas and underwear burst with brightness. All ages. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

Enosburg Playgroup: American Legion-Enosburg, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 933-6435. Essex Open Gym: See Monday.

Johnson Hometown Playgroup: United Church of Johnson, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Milton Playgroup: See Tuesday. Montgomery Infant Playgroup: Montgomery Town Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Morrisville Baby Chat: First Congregational Church of Morrisville, first Thursday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-3470. Music With Raphael: See Monday, 11:30 a.m. Richmond Welcome Baby Group: Richmond Free Library, second Thursday of every month, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4415. Williston Music With Raphael: See Monday, 10:30 a.m. Winooski Playgroup: O’Brien Community Center, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 655-1422.

Burlington EvoMamas Playgroup: Evolution Physical Therapy and Yoga, second Thursday of every month, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-9642.

FRIDAY

Burlington Family Play: See Tuesday.

Essex Open Gym: See Monday.

Essex Movin’ Moms: Move You Fitness Studio, first Thursday of every month, 10:30-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 734-0821.

Ferrisburgh Open Gym: Ferrisburgh Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171.

Essex Open Gym: See Monday.

Essex Center Playgroup: Memorial Hall, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6751.

Hometown Playgroup Stowe: Stowe Community Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229.

Montgomery Tumble Time: Montgomery Elementary School, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Morrisville Open Gym: See Wednesday. St. Albans MOPS: Church of the Rock, first Friday of every month, 8:45-11 a.m. Free. Info, 891-1230. Williston Playgroup: Allen Brook School, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 8767147; jakruwet@yahoo.com. SATURDAY Morrisville Weekend Baby Chat: Lamoille Family Center, second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-3470. South Burlington Tots and Tykes Open Gym: Chamberlin Elementary School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 8464108. 

See “First with Kids” videos at FletcherAllen.org/firstwithkids

Postnatal Yoga: See July 7 Welcome Baby Ice Cream Social: Babies born in the past 12 months get a community birthday party with games, music and prizes. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, noon. Free. Info, 878-0313.

Fairs & Festivals

Middlebury Festival-on-the-Green: See July 8. One-Man Circus: Daniel Forlano treats audiences with perfectly timed tomfoolery. Bromley Mountain, Peru, 11:30 a.m. & 2 p.m. Free with park admission: $15-39. Info, 824-5522.

Bring your favorite Star Wars paraphernalia for all to enjoy or dress up as your favorite character. Charlotte Public Library, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 425-3864. Tie-Dye Party: Kids bring shirts, socks or other materials to hand-dye their own creations. Grade five and older. Highgate Public Library, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 868-3970.

Nature & Science Honeybees: See July 4.

Pocket Kites: See July 4.

Food

17 TUESDAY

Nature & Science

Ben & Jerry’s Outdoor Movie Night: See July 10.

Burlington Farmers Market: See July 7.

Bird-Monitoring Walk: Birders bring binoculars for a walk on museum property. Best for adults and older kids with some experience. Preregister. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 7:30-9 a.m. Donations. Info, 434-2167. Bird-Monitoring Walk: See July 7. Hoopster Gliders: See July 2. Let’s Go Owling: Steve Amos shares information about one of the night’s most celebrated creatures. Ages 5 and up. Ainsworth Public Library, Williamstown, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 433-5887. Straw Rockets: See July 2.

15 SUNDAY

Arts Master Class With Violinist Rachel Barton Pine: Violinists of all ages and abilities attend and observe an advanced session. Preregister by Wednesday, June 20. Elley-Long Music Center, Colchester, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, kathy@vermontviolins.com. Music on the Porch Summer Concerts: See July 1.

Food

National Ice Cream Day: Farm-goers celebrate this cool American dessert by sampling four fun flavors. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-12: free for members and kids under 3. Info, 457-2355.

Nature & Science

Leafcutter Ants: See July 3. Sound Science: See July 3. Sundays for Fledglings: See July 1.

16 MONDAY

Baby & Maternity Baby Yoga: See July 2.

Childbirth Education: See July 9. Montpelier Prenatal Yoga: See July 2. Yoga After Baby: See July 2.

‘Anne of Green Gables’: Very Merry Theatre presents a children’s classic on the library lawn (weather permitting.) All ages. Children age 8 and under must be an accompanied by an adult. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

Education

Time Travel Tuesdays: See July 10.

Food Kids in the Kitchen: Chocolate S’Mores Tartlets: Pastry-chefs-in-training learn to make chocolate and marshmallow tartlets in a camp-fire-meetsculinary-school session. Recommended for kids age 6 and up, but all welcome. Preregister. Healthy Living Market and Café, South Burlington, 3:304:30 p.m. $20 adult/child pair. Info, 863-2569.

Health & Fitness

Parent/Child Yoga: See July 3. Tae Kwon Do: Kid kickers try out this martial arts discipline. Grades 4-6. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 388-4095. Tuesday Night Trail Running: See July 3.

Library & Books

Book Group: Kid critics discuss the Dorothy Canfield Fisher honoree The Running Dream by Wendelin Van Draanen. Essex Free Library, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. Creative Tuesdays: See July 3. Jiggity Jog Around the Campfire: Happy campers gather for stories, songs and crafts around the library campfires. Ages 2-7. South Burlington Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. South Burlington Crafternoons: See July 3. Take a Trip to the Moon Story Time: Tots travel with the help of books, pictures, videos and crafts. Ages 3-5. Charlotte Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 425-3864. Williston Summer Story Hour: See July 3.

Nature & Science Fossils: See July 5.

Kitchen Chemistry: See July 5.

Library & Books

Tasty Tuesdays at Bromley Mountain: See July 3.

Health & Fitness

JULY 2012

Hot Mama Workout: See July 2.

Nature at Night: Glow in the Dark: Curious kids check out creatures that come awake at night and hike the fields and forests of the Nature Center in search of bioluminscent life. All ages. Preregister. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 8-10 p.m. $3-10. Info, 229-6206.

Burger Night: See Spotlight, pg. 35.

KIDSVT.COM

Food

Arts

Parent/Child Sign Language Class: See July 2.

KIDS VT

‘Star Wars’ Event: Jedi fans of all ages join Aaron Masi of Essex Junction, a master of all things Star Wars, for models, games, art and discussion.

18 WEDNESDAY, P. 34

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July

Vermont’s Premier Gymnastics Facility Now open at our new 22,000 sq. ft. facility at 2 Corporate Dr. in Essex!

Calendar

17 TuEsdAY, (Continued)

19 THURSDAY

18 WEDNESDAY

Arts

Arts

circus smirkus: See July 1. Vermont Agricultural Business Education Center, Brattleboro, 2 & 7 p.m. $15-22; free for kids under 2. Nighttime crafts: Little night owls craft up some evening-themed fun during the day. Georgia Public Library, 1697 Ethan Allen Highway, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 524-4643.

Education

Night Journeys Through American History: History lovers hear Kate Shelley and the Midnight Express while creating ode poetry and night etchings. Warren Public Library, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 496-3993. social Thinking: See July 11.

Food

www.regalgym.com • 655-3300

cookie decorating: See July 11.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See July 6. Wednesday Night mountain Biking: See July 4.

• Home to USAG state championship Women’s and Men’s competitive teams. • Toddler, school age, high school and adult recreational gymnastics • Summer Day camp • Cheer/Tumbling • USAG safety/CPR certified coaches • Highly trained Senior Coaching Staff • Parkour and Free-Running instruction

Winooski on Foot: See July 4.

Library & Books

‘Anne of Green Gables’: Very Merry Theatre stages an original musical adaption of the children’s classic. Summer reading program participants check in at 11:30 a.m., show starts at noon. Ages 5 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 863-7216. Booktivity: creatures of the Night: Kiddie night owls create a collage of nocturnal animals and stars. All ages. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 878-0313. dream Big magic show: Magician Tom Joyce wows families with comedy and sleights of hand. All ages. South Burlington Community Library, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

New Features:

Preschool music With Raphael: See July 11.

Nature & Science

Come check us out, you MUST SEE to believe! To view our summer dance schedule and get more info, visit:

regalgym.com

Franklin/Grand isle Families Together: Neighbors gather to discuss housing and independent living. Pizza provided. Preregister. Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Swanton, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 868-6450. mom’s matinee: See July 5.

Fairs & Festivals summervale: See July 12.

Health & Fitness

Hot mama Workout: See July 2.

Library & Books

Bookmaking: Kids create books from mostly recycled materials, crafting tomes that can be used as journals or to house artwork or poetry. Morning session for elementary school students; evening session for middle and high schoolers. Joslin Memorial Library, Waitsfield, 10-11 a.m. & 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-4205. cardboard Box Parade: Craft a costume from a corrugated container and join other square friends for a parade. Meet at the Unitarian Universalist Church at the top of Church Street. Ages 2-12. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Essex drop-in story Time: See July 5. Highgate Youth Advisory: See July 5. shelburne magic club: See July 5, 6-8 p.m. sign a song of dreams: See July 5. starlight studio: Bring an empty plastic jar with a lid to make a firefly trap. Ages 8 and up. Preregister. South Burlington Community Library, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Take a Trip to the moon story Time: See July 17.

Nature & Science

PJ story Time: Little lit lovers don their bedtime best for a nighttime story during the day. Grades Pre K-12. Preregister. Highgate Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3970.

Monday-Thursday, 9am-1pm, $120/week

Community

Teen club: See July 12.

musical Evening: Young entertainers get toes tapping with fiddle tunes, jazz favorites and classical pieces. Ages 5 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

July 23-July 26 & August 13-August 16

snow Farm Vineyard concert series: See July 5.

LEGo Afternoons: See July 11.

EcHo Family-scientist Lab: Parents and kids digest information about the process by which food is turned into useful materials for the body. Participants hear a short lecture then try their hands at digesting a sandwich using kitchen science. Intended for ages 10 and up but all welcome with an adult. Preregister. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. $6-22.50; free for kids under 2. Info, 877-324-6386, ext. 100. microscopic Explorations: See July 6.

Kids VT

July 2012 KidsVT.com

CHEER CAMPS

Groovin’ on the Green: See July 12.

in the Lab With doctor Galaxy: See July 11. marko the magician: Cards, coins, ropes and other props help Marko make magic happen right before kids’ eyes. St. Albans Free Library, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507.

• Adult classes, Including Gymnastics and Dance • A full-functioning Deli • Playtime Village • A Fairy Tale Stone Castle featuring birthday party rooms • Parkour Free Running Center • Adult Fitness Space • Dance Studio • Zumba, Yoga, and more!!!

circus smirkus: See July 18.

mirror, mirror: See July 6. Wagon-Ride Wednesdays: See July 11.

color mixing: See July 1.

down by the River: Boatbuilders get together for a visit to the Huntington River. Ages 3-5. Preregister. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 10-11 a.m. $8-10. Info, 434-3068. mad science: Fire and ice: Aspiring scientists have fun with friends. Grades K-6. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 388-4095. magnetic moments: See July 1. star Light, star Bright, star Night: Stars steal the show as experienced astronomers share their telescopes and knowledge. Bring blankets, flashlights, and binoculars or telescopes. In case of poor weather, an indoor program features deep-space photos. Preregister. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site, 8-10 p.m. Free. Info, 672-3773.

20 FRIDAY

Arts

Pinkalicious: See Spotlight, pg. 38. summer Encore Theater: Students from Rutland High School perform Sleeping Beauty for a young audience. All ages. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 878-0313.

Food

Burger Night: See Spotlight, pg. 35. Richmond Farmers market: See July 6.

34

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See “First with Kids” videos at FletcherAllen.org/firstwithkids

JULY

CALENDAR

Prenatal Yoga: See July 7.

Fairs & Festivals

Small Boat Festival: Families find floating fun as boaters row or paddle across the lake and back on Saturday. Kids compete in Sunday’s duct tape regatta, building a cardboard craft for launch at 3 p.m. Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, Vergennes, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free-$10. Info, 475-2022.

Food

Burlington Farmers Market: See July 7.

Library & Books

Music With Raphael: Tots tap toes, dance and sing along with Robert and his guitar. Ages birth to 5 with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

Working Dairy Farm Farm Life Exhibits 1890 Farmhouse Programs & Activities z

May – October Daily November– February Weekends

802-457-2355

www.billingsfarm.org

Nature & Science COURTESY OF BROOKE BOUSQUET

Deadly Predators on Wings: Kids get the scoop on owls in all their night-hunting glory. Franklin Town Hall, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 285-6505. Super Science Day: Nature Up Close and Personal: Explorers check out the museum’s forests, fields and riverbanks, then take an indoors look at resident frogs, turtles, fish, bees and ants. Hike to Bird’s Eye View, and use bug nets for insect hunting. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $10-12; Free for members and kids under 2. Info, 649-2200.

Where’s the Beef?

Looking for a family dinner spot where the kids can “free range” it? Check out BURGER NIGHT at Bread & Butter Farm in Shelburne. Pack up your blankets or grab a seat at a table to enjoy locally sourced burgers, hot dogs, sausage, salads and homemade cookies. Kids can roam the field while you listen to live music or pick up a loaf of fresh bread from the farm store. New this year: On Mondays, kids make flags and march in a parade.

22 SUNDAY

Arts

Circuspalooza: See Spotlight, pg. 26. Music on the Porch Summer Concerts: See July 1. Pinkalicious: See Spotlight, pg. 38.

Baby & Maternity

Woodstock, Vermont

Real Science.

Newborn 101: Moms- and dads-to-be get the skin-8v-BillingsFarm0611.indd ny on tiny babies and how to enjoy the first three months of parenthood. The class covers tips on setting routines, breast-feeding basics, newborn care, and how to handle prolonged crying. Preregister. Franklin County Home Health Agency, St. Albans, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $30 couple. Info, 527-7531.

1

5/11/11 1:38 PM

REAL FUN!

Fairs & Festivals

Small Boat Festival: See July 22.

Nature & Science BURGER NIGHT: Mondays and Fridays, Bread & Butter Farm, Shelburne, 4:30-7:30 p.m. Free admission, food and drink available for purchase. Info, 985-9200, breadandbutterfarm.com.

Honeybees: See July 4.

Pocket Kites: See July 4. Sundays for Fledglings: See July 1.

23 MONDAY

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See July 6.

Library & Books

After-School Movie: See July 6.

Puppetrees: Preschoolers watch a puppet show with make-believe fun and stories. Preregister. Stowe Free Library, 11-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 253-6145. South Burlington Wilma Worm’s Book Club: See July 6. Youth Media Lab: See July 6.

Hoopster Gliders: See July 2. Straw Rockets: See July 2.

21 SATURDAY

Arts

Ben & Jerry’s Outdoor Movie Night: See July 7. Pinkalicious: See Spotlight, pg. 38. Saturday Drama Club: See July 7. Showcase Spec-tap-ular: Sixty tap dancers ages 9-22 take the stage in a percussive celebration featuring excerpts from the show ‘Tap Kids.’ All ages. Main Street Landing, Burlington, 2 & 8 p.m. $25. Info, 914-374-0066.

Baby & Maternity

Childbirth Education: See July 9. Childbirth Education Refresher Class: Parents join attendees of the six-week course to brush up on newborn care. Preregister. First Steps Childbirth Center of Franklin County Home Health Agency, St. Albans, 7-9 p.m. Call for price. Info, 527-7531. Montpelier Prenatal Yoga: See July 2. Yoga After Baby: See July 2.

Community

Northeast Kingdom Families Together: Families with teens or adults with developmental disabilities gather for support, information, advocacy and sharing. Hebard State Office Building, Newport, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 373-5382.

Food

Burger Night: See Spotlight, pg. 35.

23 MONDAY, P. 37

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35

Postnatal Yoga: See July 7.

Rated “Top Ten Science and Technology Museum” in the country. (Trekaroo.com)

Baby Yoga: See July 2.

KIDS VT Kids

Youth Night: Teens and tweens hang out and enjoy movies, snacks and projects. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6-9 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

Bats in the Barn: Celebrate nature’s bug zappers, learning about the benefits of bats. All ages with an adult. Preregister. Shelburne Farms, 7:30-9 p.m. $10-12. Info, 985-8686.

Montshire Museum!

Baby & Maternity

kidsvt.com KIDSVT.COMAugust JULY 2012 2011

Keepers of the Night: Author and storyteller Michael Caduto performs stories, songs and chants that transport listeners to dark places where bats flutter, animals cavort and a creature chases a hunter through moonlit shadows. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

Nature & Science

6/20/12 3:31 PM

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Session I

6/18-6/22

Cruise Ship

Session II Session III

6/25-6/29 7/2-7/6

Treasure Island Myth Busters *closed 7/4

Session IV

7/9-7/13

Talent Week

Session V Session VI

7/16-7/20 7/23-7/27

Party in the USA Olympics

Session VII

7/30-8/3

Game Shows

Session VIII Session IX

8/6-8/10 8/13-8/17

Survivor Time Traveler

Session X

8/20-8/24

Wacky Week *Williston & Essex only

Essex    X  s Williston    s 3 "URLINGTON (802) 658-0080 or (802) 658-0002

EDGEVT.COM

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36

Kids VT

July 2012

kidsvt.com

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6/20/12 10:34 AM

See “First with Kids” videos at FletcherAllen.org/firstwithkids

23 MONDAY (CONTINUED)

25 WEDNESDAY

Health & Fitness

Arts

Parent/Child Sign Language Class: See July 2.

Art in the Alley: Families stroll through downtown Waterbury to enjoy outdoor exhibits, live music and children’s activities such as hands-on gardening. All ages. Various locations, Waterbury, 5-8 p.m. Info, 244-1912.

Nature & Science

Education

Hot Mama Workout: See July 2.

Library & Books Fossils: See July 5.

Kitchen Chemistry: See July 5. Star Gazing & Campfire Stories: Junior astronomers learn about the night sky with staff from the Vermont Astronomical Society. Preregister. All ages. Children 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

24 TUESDAY

Arts

Night Journeys Through American History: History buffs learn about famous astronauts and the mystery of outer space with a hands-on activity building a model spacecraft. Warren Public Library, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 496-3993. Social Thinking: See July 11.

Food

Cookie Decorating: See July 11.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See July 6.

Ben & Jerry’s Outdoor Movie Night: See July 10.

Wednesday Night Mountain Biking: See July 4.

The Art of the Waltz: Playing Accompaniment: See July 10.

Winooski on Foot: See July 4.

Art Safari: Tots dive into stories and art activities related to the museum’s collections. Ages 3-5 with adult. Preregister. Shelburne Museum, $5-7.50 child. Info, 985-3346. Fabulous Fibers: Crafters turn fibers into works of art by learning techniques of felting, weaving and tying. Preregister. Purple Crayon Productions, Woodstock, 9 a.m.-noon. $15-30 child. Info, 457-3500. Preschool Tea Party: Kids dress up to lift a cup, enjoying treats, friends and fun. Ages 2-6. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, noon. Free. Info, 878-0313.

Education

Pediatric CPR: Responsible caretakers get lifesaving information and skills. Preregister. Essex Fire Department, 6-8:45 p.m. $25. Info, 658-5959. Time Travel Tuesdays: See July 10.

Health & Fitness

Parent/Child Yoga: See July 3. Tuesday Night Trail Running: See July 3.

Library & Books

African Drumming: Drummers join Chimie Bangoura for rhythmic percussion. Grades 4-6. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 388-4095. Book Discussion: Bibliophiles discuss the Vermont Reads book Bull Run. Best for young adults. Haston Library, Franklin, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 285-6506. Creative Tuesdays: See July 3. Game Night: Friends and families get together for friendly competition. All ages. Joslin Memorial Library, Waitsfield, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 496-4205. Night Shivers Story Time: Young readers hear spooky nighttime stories. Ages 3-5. Charlotte Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 425-3864.

Russian Story Time: See July 7. South Burlington Crafternoons: See July 3.

Celestial Jewelry: Kids create jewelry and a box in which to keep it safe. Ages 5-10. Preregister. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 879-7576. Exordium Adventure: Curious kids learn about silent, predatory owls. Meet in the park; rain location in the library. Grades preK-6. Preregister. Highgate Public Library, 4 p.m. Info, 868-3970. Jon Gailmor Concert: This popular children’s entertainer gets families moving and grooving. All ages. Georgia Public Library, 1697 Ethan Allen Highway, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 524-4643. The Glow Games: Competitive kids and caregivers vie for top honors in a set of family games played in the dark. All ages. South Burlington Community Library, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

k4t-Earl's0712.indd 1

6/21/12 10:58 AM

In the Lab With Doctor Galaxy: See July 11. LEGO Afternoons: See July 11. Preschool Music With Raphael: See July 11.

Nature & Science

ECHO Family-Scientist Lab: Parents and kids learn about the nervous system and the brain. Participants hear a short lecture, then dissect a sheep’s brain. Intended for ages 10 and up, but all welcome with an adult. Preregister. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. $6-22.50; free for kids under 2. Info, 877-324-6386, ext. 100.

UVM PARENT & PEERS PR S OJECT

Honeybees: See July 4. Pocket Kites: See July 4. Wagon-Ride Wednesdays: See July 11.

26 THURSDAY

Arts

Groovin’ on the Green: See July 12. Snow Farm Vineyard Concert Series: See July 5.

Community

Kids ages 8-‐10 and parents are invited to participate in the Parents and Peers Project at the University of Vermont.

Mom’s Matinee: See July 5.

Fairs & Festivals Summervale: See July 12.

Nature & Science

Leafcutter Ants: See July 3. Sound Science: See July 3. 26 THURSDAY, P. 38

37

Submit your August events by July 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Families receive $40 and kids receive a prize! For more info ’ contact us at 802-‐656-‐4409 or famlab@uvm.edu.

KIDS VT

Tasty Tuesdays at Bromley Mountain: See July 3.

JULY 2012

Families will come to the Family Development Lab for a 2.5-‐hour visit that includes games, discussions of kids’ recent experiences with peers and questionnaires. ’

Williston Summer Story Hour: See July 3.

KIDSVT.COM

Olympic Architects: Budding builders construct their own observation towers for the Olympic Games. Ages 7 and up. Preregister. Essex Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313.

Library & Books

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Think Pink

26 THURSDAY (CONTINUED)

Food

Hot Mama Workout: See July 2.

Library & Books

Bubbles and Books: See July 10. South Burlington Community Library, 6:30-7 p.m. Dark Stories: Storytellers gather for a writing workshop and see what kinds of scary tales they can create. Joslin Memorial Library, Waitsfield, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-4205. Essex Drop-In Story Time: See July 5.

COURTESY OF SAINT MICHAEL’S PLAYHOUSE

Kids in the Kitchen: Greensicles at National Gardening: Kids tour the gardens, learning how veggies grow through hands-on planting and harvesting. Then the bounty comes inside and children create green popsicles. Preregister. Healthy Living Market and Café, South Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. $20 adult/child pair. Info, 863-2569.

Health & Fitness

JULY CALENDAR

Playhouse Junior picked the perfect protagonist to demonstrate the perils of overindulgence in the musical PINKALICIOUS. The 50-minute show stars a young girl who can’t stop eating pink cupcakes and winds up with “pinkitis” — a head-to-toe color condition. Based on the children’s book of the same name by Elizabeth and Victoria Kann, the story offers a good message: A girl cannot live on sugar alone. Local actors play Pinkalicious Pinkerton and her family, friends and Doctor Wink. Next month, look for You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown. PINKALICIOUS: Friday, July 20, at noon; Saturday, July 21, at 10 a.m.; Sunday, July 22, at 10 a.m. and noon; Saint Michael’s Playhouse, Colchester. $10 general seating. Info, 654-2281, academics.smcvt.edu/playhouse.

Highgate Youth Advisory: See July 5. Mime With Robert Rivest: Library-goers watch a fun-filled program that brings this mime’s childhood dreams to life. One moment he’s a superhero, then an explorer, a dragon slayer, a stuntman, a firefighter. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Night Shivers Story Time: See July 24. Sign a Song of Dreams: See July 5. Starlight Studio: Crafty kids make a solar print using a cool-shaped flower or leaf they bring with them. Ages 8 and up. Preregister. South Burlington Community Library, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Summer Reading Celebration Cookout: Families have fun celebrating summer reading and trying out a 25-foot climbing wall. Highgate Municipal Park, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 868-3970. Teen Club: See July 12. Tie-Dye: Aspiring artists color pillowcases in rainbow hues. Intended for elementary school students. Joslin Memorial Library, Waitsfield, 10-11 a.m. Info, 496-4205.

Nature & Science

Teen Movie Evenings: See July 13. Youth Media Lab: See July 6.

Nature & Science

Microscopic Explorations: See July 6. Mirror, Mirror: See July 6.

28 SATURDAY

Arts

Children’s Author at Joslin Memorial Library: Erin Moulton, author of middle-grade novel Flutter, speaks at the library about her work. Joslin Memorial Library, Waitsfield, 2 p.m. Info, 496-4205.

Nature & Science

Bird-Monitoring Walk: Bird lovers bring their own binoculars to look for avian excitement. Best for older children. Preregister. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 7:30-9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-2167. Family Field Day: Student curators head out for family-friendly fun in the fields, exploring the meadows, forests and wetlands. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, 10 a.m.-noon. $5. Info, 748-2372. Magnetic Moments: See July 1.

Dream Catchers: Discover Native American dream catchers and what they are supposed to do during sleep. Franklin Town Hall, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 285-6505. Saturday Drama Club: See July 7.

Wood-Carving Demo: Bird lovers check out carvings in progress and guess which feathered friends will be added next to the museum collection. All ages. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 1-2 p.m. $6. Info, 434-2167.

Jake the Snake: Meet Jake, a nine-foot, red-tailed boa constrictor. Grades K-6. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 388-4095.

Baby & Maternity

29 SUNDAY

Kitchen Chemistry: See July 5.

Fairs & Festivals

Nature at Night: Mesmerizing Moths: Night owls examine the amazing diversity of moths, checking bait stations to look for colorful under-wing creatures. All ages. Preregister. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 8-10 p.m. $3-10. Info, 229-6206.

27 FRIDAY

Fairs & Festivals JULY 2012 KIDSVT.COM

South Burlington Wilma Worm’s Book Club: See July 6.

Bikes in the Library: Pedalers get into gear by bringing bikes to the library for maintenance tips from a visiting expert. All ages. Essex Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313.

Moth Party and Owl Prowl: See Spotlight, pg. 29.

Herbal Workshop: Lavender takes center stage as library patrons learn how to grow and use scented sprays. Best suited for kids ages 10 and up. Moretown Memorial Library, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 496-9728.

KIDS VT

Game Day: Kids let the (board and Kinect) games begin as the real Summer Olympics officially get started. Essex Free Library, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 879-0313.

Library & Books

Ben & Jerry’s Outdoor Movie Night: See July 7.

Fossils: See July 5.

38

Fairy Door Workshop: Participants find out how fairies get back and forth between the worlds, and learn to decorate homes and yards with doors they can access. All ages. Preregister. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

Lamoille County Field Days: Kick off the summer fair season with kids fun, including pedal pulls, clowns, magic shows, games, rides and prizes. Lamoille County Field Days Fair Grounds, Johnson, 8:30 a.m.10 p.m. $10. Info, windsorcofairvt.weebly.com.

Food

Burger Night: See Spotlight, pg. 35. Richmond Farmers Market: See July 6.

Health & Fitness

Afternoon Hoops: See July 6.

Library & Books

After-School Movie: See July 6

Postnatal Yoga: See July 7.

Green Mountain Draft Horse Field Day: Horse lovers watch demonstrations of draft animals plowing, haying and logging, using modern and antique equipment. Mini horses show how helpful they can be around the farm, too. Wagon rides lead to some remote areas of the farm. Shelburne Farms, 11 a.m.2 p.m. $5-8; free for kids under 3. Info, 985-8686. Hay Day: Haying is hard, as all the cutting, raking and tedding today demonstrate. Families find fun in penny-in-the-haystack, making scarecrow puppets, wagon rides and other activities. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-12; free for members and kids under 3. Info, 457-2355.

Arts

Music on the Porch Summer Concerts: See July 1.

Baby & Maternity

Newborn 101: New parents learn what to expect in a baby’s first three months of life. First Steps Childbirth Center of Franklin County Home Health Agency, St. Albans, fourth Sunday of every month, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Call for price. Info, 527-7531.

Fairs & Festivals

Lamoille County Field Days: See July 27, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.

Lamoille County Field Days: See July 27.

Nature & Science

Food

Straw Rockets: See July 2.

Hoopster Gliders: See July 2.

Food

Burger Night: See Spotlight, pg. 35. Kids in the Kitchen: Perfect Potato Salad: Culinarily inspired children learn to make this wellloved summer salad staple from scratch. Preregister. Healthy Living Market and Café, South Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. $20 adult/child pair. Info, 863-2569.

Health & Fitness

Hot Mama Workout: See July 2.

Library & Books

CANstruction at the Library: Summer readers celebrate a month of literacy programs and compete by building can structures appropriate for space travel. All cans will be donated to the Charlotte Food Shelf. All ages. Charlotte Public Library, 3 p.m. Info, 425-3864. Parent/Child Sign Language Class: See July 2.

Nature & Science

Leafcutter Ants: See July 3. Sound Science: See July 3.

31 TUESDAY

Arts

Ben & Jerry’s Outdoor Movie Night: See July 10. Pottery: Children try this hands-on art form. Grades 4-6. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 388-4095.

Education

Time Travel Tuesdays: See July 10.

Health & Fitness

Parent/Child Yoga: See July 3. Tuesday Night Trail Running: See July 3.

Library & Books

Creative Tuesdays: See July 3. Night Out With Rita Book: Rita Book leads lit lovers on an evening adventure in the park, walking, reading and then crafting. All ages. Wheeler Nature Park, South Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. South Burlington Crafternoons: See July 3.

Burlington Farmers Market: See July 7.

Sundays for Fledglings: See July 1.

Health & Fitness

Sweet Dreams Story Time: Kids kick back, relax and follow their dreams during an evening story session. All ages. Essex Free Library, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 879-0313.

30 MONDAY

Williston Summer Story Hour: See July 3.

Baby & Maternity

Nature & Science

Childbirth Education: See July 9.

Pocket Kites: See July 4.

Montpelier Prenatal Yoga: See July 2.

Tasty Tuesdays at Bromley Mountain: See July 3. 

Prenatal Yoga: See July 7.

Baby Yoga: See July 2.

Yoga After Baby: See July 2.

Honeybees: See July 4.

HANDS-ON

O C S N A E L R O

Since 1867

Road • Barton, VT • ww k o o r B g n i r a 278 Ro NG AGRICULTURE & FAMILY ENT

GI “BRINBurlington,  VT Grand  Isle,  VT Plattsburgh,  NY Port  Kent,  NY COME

Charlotte,  VT EBRATE 1 CEL Essex,  NY

www.orleansco

www.ferries.com  or    802.864.9804   JUNE 15-17for  schedule   JUNEinformation 24

2012 Pony 4-H Horse EVENTS O U C N S T YPulling Clinic FAI LEAN

k8h-LCFerries0712.indd 1

Since 1867

Building a Terrarium

gardens that kids can keep in the house. They require little care, and they’re easy and inexpensive to build — especially in the spring and summer months, when it’s possible to collect most of the materials outdoors. The best part? These miniature gardens will flourish all year long, even in winter.

— KRISTI ROCHE

materials

instructions

• a clear plastic or glass container with a large opening (a two-liter soda bottle or an old fishbowl works well)

1. Cut the top of a soda bottle off (about ⅓ of the way down). If using a glass container, skip to the next step.

• scissors (if using a soda bottle) • a few handfuls of small round stones or pebbles (gathered from outside) • nutrient-rich soil or compost

AUGUST 17

Run-N-Gun Gymkhana

• plastic wrap

4. Carefully break apart the roots of your plants and transplant them into the terrarium, making sure all the roots are covered with soil. 5. Spray the terrarium with water. Cover the opening of the container with plastic wrap and secure with a rubber band.

SEPTEMBER 7-9

AUGUST 15-19 • 145TH Independence Day Celebration

• Farm Stock Tractor Pull • Horse Pull • Lumberjack Round-up • Chicken Bar-B-Q • Gymkhana (games on horseback) • Carnival Games & More • All Day Fun for the Whole Family • Grand Parade Arrives at the Fairgrounds around 3pm

AUGUST 5

Circuit Pony 4H Dairy Grand Restoration One PriCe Horse adMissiOn Pulling PaY Clinic Show

includes aLL dreamland

8-9 SEPTEMBER 30 PAY ONE PRICE auGust 15-19, 2012SEPTEMBER amusement rides &THEME: shows Free THIS YEARS

Vermont Trapper’s Association Rendezvous

Pony Pulling Weekend

Vermont Horse Show Association Event

AUGUST 15-19 •ADMISSION 145TH ORLEANS FAIR wed-thu $10,COUNTY Fri & sun $12, satNEW$15 FO INCLUDES ALLFARMERS 12 PAY ONE PRICE THIS YEARS THEME: “OCF HELPING FEED THE WORLD” “Little FarmR 20 Hands” ADMISSION S • GREAT AMERICAN FRONTIER SHOW A DREAMLAND T U INCLUDES FreeALL R shO D w A Y • EUDORAFarm FARMS PETTING ZOO interactive Farmyard DREAMLAND new: “Little hands” saturd NIGayHnig AMUSEMENT • MASTERS OF THE CHAINSAW AMUSEMENT T! ht the best for kids to learn the farm to plate connection! MIDWAY w/paRIDES • ALplace THE ARTIST id ad mission

MIDWAY RIDES

“Little Far project tha m Hands” is ou r important will teach childrnewest en the ce of agricu

how it aff lture and FREE Midway rides & games for all ages • The Best Food Vendors on the Circuit • Tractor Pulls • Horse, Pony & Oxen Pulling • 4-H Exhibits • Cattle, Sheep, Llama, Poultry & Rabbit Competition ect lives in a s their daily & Displays • Dairy Center & NEW milking parlor • Arts,Crafts & Produce Competition • Antique Exhibits • Maple Sugar House • 4x4 Truck Pull • Burn-out Competition • Beer Tent w/ DJ and interactivfun and e way. live Bands • Industrial Lane • Youth, Gymkhana & Open Horse ShowsTractor Pulls • Horse, Pony & Oxen Pulling • 4-H Exhibits • Cattle, Sheep, Llama, • Harness Racing w/ FREE giveaways in the grandstand • Great American Frontier Show w/ trick riding, vaudeville shows & hands on American Heritage events • Cow Town-hands on experience with cow & goat milking, butter, cheese & soap production • Eudora Farms Exotic Poultry & Rabbit Competition& Displays • Dairy Center & NEW milking parlor Petting Zoo w/ camel & pony rides • Masters of the Chainsaw Carving Shows • Al the Artist FREE caricatures • Mechanical Bull for everyone to try • Demolition Derby • Coin & Pig Scrambles • Children’s Little Farm Hands Barnyard interactiveArt, Crafts & Produce Competition • Antique Exhibits • Maple Sugar House exhibit • Live Local Bands Entertaining Thurs-Sat • Expanded Floral Hall Exhibits • Children’s Day on Wednesday-Free Raffle of 4 bicycles • Reduced Admission Senior Citizen & Military Honor Day on Friday • Friendly Vendors Selling anything you can imagine & some things you can’t • Camper Hookups by the day or week

7. Water your terrarium every 7 to 10 days or when the soil starts to look dry. Condensation will form in your terrarium and water droplets will trickle down to the soil, reducing the need to water as often.

• GRE • EUD • MAS • AL T

FREE Midway rides & games for all ages • The Best Food Vendors on the Circuit • Tractor Pulls • Horse, Pony & Oxen

July 4 Celebration live Bands • Industrial Lane • Youth, Gymkhana & Open Horse Shows • Harness Racing w/ FREE July 15: Pony Pulling vaudeville showsIndustrial Lane • Youth, Gymkhana & Open Horse Shows • Harness Racing & hands on American Heritage events • Cow Town-hands on experience wit w/ FREE giveaways in the grandstand • Great American Frontier Show w/ trick July 26-27: 4-h dairyPetting Clinic Zoo w/ camel & pony rides • Masters of the Chainsaw Carving Shows • Al the Artist riding, vaudeville shows & hands on American Heritage events • Cow Town-hands august 5: Grand Circuit Pig Scrambles •cow & goat milking, butter, cheese & soap production • Eudora Farms Exotic Children’s Little Farm Hands Barnyard interactive exhibit • Live Local Bands restoration horse show Petting Zoo w/camel & pony rides • Masters of the Chainsaw Carving Shows • Reduced Admission Senior Citizen & Military Honor Day on Friday • Friendly Vendors Selling Al the Artist FREE caricatures • Mechanical Bull for everyone to try • sept 7-9: vt trappers rendevous Demolition Derby • Coin & Pig Scrambles • National Guard Lane • Live Local • sept 8-9: Pony pulling weekend Bands Entertaining Thurs-Sat • Expanded Floral Hall Exhibits • Children’s Day • sept 30: vhsa horseshow • • • •

DEMOY DERB

on Wednesday-Free Raffle of 4 bicycles • Reduced Admission Senior Citizen & Military Honor Day on Friday • Camper Hookups by the day or week

Jamie Two Coats Jamie Two Coats Toyshop Toyshop

k6h-orleans0712.indd 1

6/21/12 3:46 PM

Located of Shelburne Located ininthethe of Shelburne Village Village Monday-Saturday 10-6 10-6 Monday-Saturday Sunday 11-5 Sunday 11-5 802-985-3221 802-985-3221

all playmobil 20% off!!

all playmobil 20% off!!

k6h-JamieTwoCoats0712.indd 1

39

Say you saw it in

6/21/12 3:47 PM

KIDS VT

Share your fun craft ideas with us!

“OCF

M&O Displays DE2012 events • Dairy Center & NEW milking parlor • Arts,Crafts & Produce Competition • Antique Exhibits • Maple DERBY 4x4 Truck Pull • Burn-out Competition • Beer Tent w/DJ and live Bands

6. Place your terrarium out of direct sunlight, preferably near a north-facing window. Direct sunlight will “cook” the plants and eventually cause them to die.

• large rubber band

Send them to ideas@kidsvt.com.

Pony Pulling

JULY 2012

• spray bottle with water

3. Put soil or compost on top of the stones (about 3 to 4 inches deep).

SATURDAY NIGHT!

moreJUNE info: orleanscountryfair.net 24 JULY 4 JULY 15 JULY 26-27

JUNE 15-17

4-H Horse Clinic

R

KIDSVT.COM

• slow-growing, small plants (4 inches tall or less) collected outdoors or from a local florist. If collecting plants from outside, look for small ferns, tree saplings or small pieces of rotten wood with moss. Be careful not to pick plants that are poisonous or endangered; when in doubt, let them be. Small houseplants with different colors and shapes also work well.

2. Put small round stones or pebbles in the bottom of your container (about 1 to 2 inches deep).

OR

A BLUE • Farm RIBBON Stock Tract FAIR • Lumberjack Roundarton, VT • www.orleansc ng Brook Road • B FAMILY ENTERTAINMENountyfair.net • 802-525-355 • Gymkhana (gam i r a o R 8 T TOGETHER SI 27 GRICULTURE & NCE 186 •5 Carnival Games & M GING A17 AUGUST SEPTEMBER 7-9 7”the Whole Family • G “BRIN 4 1 5 E T Y A E R B R E W L 5 E 4 I Y 1 T C E E H A T E A Run-N-Gun Gymkhana Vermont Trapper’s Association Rendezvous U S R M the Fairground S B W O E ! I L C T E H US! COME C www.orleanscountyfair.net

2012 EVENTS

TERRARIA are small, simple and self-sustaining

JUL Independence D

6/20/12 11:31 AM

HANDS-ON

ANSWERS P. 43

PUZZLE PAGE

Birthday Club Sponsored by

Every month, birthday kids win prizes, and their picture appears in Kids VT to make their birthdays extra special!

Congratulations to these July Birthday Club winners:

GRAND PRIZE WINNER OLIVIA lives in Shelburne and

turns 13 in July. She loves to bake and plays softball and piano. Olivia wins a $75 gift certificate from Bounce Around VT.

Join the Club!

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club. Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

Winners get gift certificates toward the rental of a bounce house from Bounce Around VT.

Abigail, Cooper and Corry win $50 gift certificates from Bounce Around VT.

and turns 5 in July. She loves to sing Disney songs while dancing around the house.

Puzzles4Kids

40

KIDS VT

JULY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Riddle Search — Golf

BAND BRIDE CAKE CATERING FLOWERS FOOD GIFTS GOWN GROOM GUESTS

IN-LAWS MENU PHOTOS RECEPTION RINGS TRAVEL TUXEDO USHERS VOWS

Call today 527-5725 www.bouncearoundvt.com on. Please present coupon when making reservati Not valid with other offers.

off

Back yard Parties!

BY HELENA HOVANEC

Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: Where do rabbits go after their wedding?

25

$

ABIGAIL lives in Colchester

COOPER lives in Barre and turns 9 in July. He is an animal lover who also enjoys playing soccer and hockey.

Choose from Bounce Castles, Houses, Ballerina and more! Great for all parties! Super and Safe Outdoor Fun! Free Delivery* Now Renting 25 ft. Waterslide Snowcone and popcorn machine rentals available! By the hour or by the day uncearou w.bo ndvt.com ww

NCE AROUND VT U O B CORRY lives in Barre and Riddle Answer:

___ ___

___ ___ ___ ___ ___

___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___.

turns 10 in July. She likes karate, math and helping others.

r Become ouend fri Facebook ial offers ec and get spscounts! and di

Call today

527-5725 *Delivery charge may apply outside of Chittenden or Franklin County. Safety and cleanliness are a priority. We vacuum and sanitize each inflatable daily. All children are required to wear clean socks.

COLORING CONTEST! Send us your work of art by July 15 for an opportunity to win $25, sponsored by TD Bank.

Be sure to include the info at right in your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 4 and younger, (2) ages 5-8, and (3) ages 9-12. The best artwork will be featured on kidsvt.com, and winners will be named in the August issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, PO Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________ Artist _____________________________________ Age _______________________________________ Town _____________________________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2012 KIDS VT

41

THE Y COMES TO YOU! BACKYARD SWIM PROGRAM A certified lifeguard/ instructor brings swim lessons and water safety tips to your home or neighborhood pool. • Private and semi private lessons • Teach your child(ren) the importance of water safety • Have fun and learn life-long skills • Convenient schedule For more information, call Jaimie Held at 862-8993 x156 for details. k4t-GBYMCA0512.indd 1

4/19/12 11:00 AM

Champlain Valley Head Start

Serving Chittenden, Addison, Franklin and Grand Isle Counties

.

Early Head Start and Head Start are national programs that provide services to families with children ages 0 -5. Services include: education, health, nutrition, mental health, and social services that help families and children to grow and to do well in school and in life. Early Head Start and Head Start help parents to take the lead role in their child’s learning and development, to be their child’s first teacher, and to build positive family relationships. CVHS provides services for children with special needs, including those with severe disabilities, and helps families to access public community transportation services, such as bus vouchers and SSTA or PCC vans. Early Head Start serves pregnant women and families with children from birth to 3 years of age. Head Start serves families with Champlain Valley Head Start children 3 to 5 years of age. Services are free for all eligible families, though some childcare fees may apply in childcare offers a range of services to meet centers in which Head Start services are provided. the needs of different families.

Champlain Valley Head Start 431 Pine Street, Burlington, VT 05401 1-800-854-9648

Clip and mail this form to:

Child's Name: ___________________________________________ (Last)

(First)

LIMITED SPACES APPLY NOW!!

Birth Date: ___/___/___

Circle one:

Children attend a classroom in a local childcare centerfive full days each week, year-round.

Boy Girl

Parent/Guardian's Name: _____________________________________________ (Last)

If applicable, for pregnant women:

(First)

Applicant's Name: ________________________________________ Expected Due Date: ___/___/___ (Last)

(First)

Address: ___________________________________________ Mailing Address: __________________________________________ (Street)

(Town)

(Zip)

(if different)

(Street or PO Box)

(Town)

(Zip)

How many members in your household? __________

What is your approximate yearly income? ________________ Are you the foster parent of the child?

Yes

Are you currently living in a shelter, sharing the housing of others, or living in a motel, car or campground?

No Yes No

Circle any of these benefits you or a houshold family member receive: Reach Up (RUFA) / SSI / Childcare Subsidy st

_________________________________________ (Signature)

_______________ (Date)

Where did you get this form: ____________________________

nd

rd

Please rank your 1 , 2 , and 3 choice of options for your child: Full day, full year classroom: Center-based classroom: Combination classroom: Home-based:

Part-day / School-year Classrooms (Head Start only): Children attend a preschool classroom four or five times each week (mornings or afternoons) from September through June. Part-day / combination Classrooms (Head Start only): Children attend a preschool classroom three times each week (mornings or afternoons) from September through June, and receive one home visit per month with a Head Start Teacher. Home-based Program (EHS & HS): Children and families receive one home visit per week with a Home Visitor and take part in playgroup activities twice per month. The Early Head Start program runs year round. The Head Start program runs September through May.

42

KIDS VT

JULY 2012

KIDSVT.COM

Telephone #: _____________________ Cell #: __________________________ Message #: ________________________ Primary language(s) spoken: __________________

Full-day / Full-year Classrooms (EHS & HS):

K2h-champlainvalleyheadstart0312.indd 1

2/23/12 9:56 AM

USE YOUR WORDS

LOOK CLOSER… IT’S TIME TO DISCOVER SOMETHING NEW!

Adventures in Babysitting A seasoned sitter meets her match BY SA C H I LE I T H

AFTER GRADUATING FROM high school last summer, I considered myself a babysitting expert. I’d taken care of kids who ranged in age from infancy to tweenhood. I knew how to change a diaper, could wrangle the squirmiest of toddlers into a pair of clothes and had developed a relatively solid bank of voices to use for story time. Babysitting, to me, was one of the best jobs to have; basically, I was getting paid to play. It doesn’t get much better than that. So I was beyond excited when Mr. and Mrs. X asked me to care for their two boys while they went to a wedding in Boston. I’d never been alone with two kids for an entire weekend before, but I was confident that I was up to the challenge. I arrived at 7:30 Friday evening with a smile on my face. Hayden, an energetic 3-year-old, greeted me with a high-velocity hug when I walked in the door. His brother, mellow but strongwilled Max, 1, was already asleep in the crib next to his parents’ bed. We were off to a good start. But the situation deteriorated quickly. It was a summer night, so it was still light out, which meant that getting Hayden to sleep was nearly impossible. Bedtime was a process of small trade-offs. “No, you can’t sleep with the truck that makes noise; yes, you can sleep with the matchbox car. No, we can’t keep the lights on; yes, I’ll stay with you. No, it’s too late for a snack; yes, you can go to the bathroom.” Eventually, the balance tipped toward no: “No, you can’t run around the room; no, you can’t keep flipping the light switch; no, you can’t go to the bathroom, you just went to the bathroom; no, we need to be quiet because your brother is sleeping. No, no, no.” At some point, he transitioned from nestling happily against my chest to jumping around the room screaming. I uncertainly took on the role of stern parent stand-in and told him that if he didn’t calm down and go to sleep, I would have to close the door and leave him alone. This was a common practice for his parents; they’d installed a cuff on his doorknob so that he couldn’t open it at bedtime. Normally, I’d just smile, stay put and wait for his parents to deal with him, but they wouldn’t be back until Sunday. I knew I’d have to follow through. He screamed again, so I shut the door.

“NOOOOOOO!” he shrieked. I curled up in the middle of the hallway and rested my forehead on the cool wood floor. I can’t handle this, I thought. Mr. and Mrs. X won’t be back for another — I looked at my watch, calculating — 40 hours. I took a deep breath, wrapped my arms around my head and closed my eyes. Thump. I looked up, thinking I might be hearing things. Thump. The nightmarish sound came from Mr. and Mrs. X’s bedroom, where Max was sleeping. I apprehensively opened the door, and there was Max, staring at me from the floor with an empty bottle of milk in his hand, ready to hit the door again. Oh my god, oh my god, oh my god, I was mentally hyperventilating. Max had never climbed out of his crib before. Its mesh walls were nearly as tall as he was. I hadn’t seen him since Mrs. X put him to bed almost three hours before, but I was sure this was somehow my fault. Meanwhile, Hayden was still screaming. I broke down and called the Xs, who were still en route to Boston. “Max escaped!” I reported to Mr. X. He calmly explained that Max had probably MacGuyver’d his way out of his crib by climbing onto their bed, and told me to move the crib away from it. Duh! By this point, Max was playing quietly on the floor; I’d caved and let his brother out, too. Before hanging up, the Xs said good night to Hayden and assured me that I’d be fine. After that, Max went down easily. Hayden snuggled in with me that night, and the next. The rest of the weekend went smoothly, but my confidence was shaken. Parenting is hard. I spent a weekend completely focused on two other people, one of whom couldn’t talk. I barely slept, held an adult conversation or properly fed myself for days. I didn’t even manage to find time for a shower. How do people do this, I thought, every single day? When I left, Hayden gave me a big hug and a kiss. Max waved good bye. At home, I gave my mom a long, tired hug and tried to tell her how much I appreciate what she’s done for me. I also told her that, as much as I love babysitting, I’m not ready to have my own kids ... yet. 

ATTENTION CLASS INSTRUCTORS! List your class in Kids VT for only $15/month! Submit the listing by the 15th at kidsvt.com or classes@kidsvt.com

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FUNNY BUSINESS 4/26/12 ENTERTAINMENT featuring

3:40 PM

New Kids Game Show & Visual Dunk Tank Magic • Juggling • Balloon Sculpturing • Costumed Deliveries

NEW!

Kids Inflatable Obstacle Course

“NOOOOOOO!” he shrieked.

879-0997 • www.joeyfunbiz.com

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2/18/11 5:14 PM

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS (see p. 40) JUmbLES Try, Hour, long, seed RIDDLE ANSWER: What can run but not walk? YoUR NoSE

KIDSVT.COM JULY 2012

43

RIDDLE SEARCH ANSWER: on their bunnymoon.

KIDS VT

“Use Your Words” is a monthly essay in which writers reflect on parenting and childhood. Got a story to share? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

Disney Bouncers • Sponge Bob • Finding Nemo Parties • Schools • Fairs • Company Promos & Events

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6/20/12 10:42 AM


Kids VT for July 2012