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Summertime Good Times

magazine

priceless: please take one July | August 2011

CHICO California

green at heart

Monterey

California Operated by SkyWest Airlines

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contents

July | August 2011

Monterey, CA Inspiration for the Ages

12 | ArtWatch

Page 8 | Halfway between San Francisco and L.A. the Monterey Peninsula offers a glimpse of the Golden State’s unadulterated beauty. Diverse scenery has attracted artists for more than a century. Today, a bounty of recreation makes it a haven for every sojourner.

22 | America’s Best Places: Jackson, WY

25 | America’s Best Places: Eau Claire, WI

Boise, ID High-Desert Hot Spot Page 14 | Idaho’s vibrant capital city appeals to urbane, outdoorsy types especially those with an entrepreneurial bent. This high-desert mecca combines plenty of culture and high-country recreation with an economy powered by a can-do spirit and dedicated workforce.

Fort Wayne, IN

26 | America’s Best Places: Crescent City, CA

29 | Business Advantages

36 | Summertime Good Times!

38 | It’s Our Journey

Page 18 | Indiana’s second largest city is one happening town. Home to more than a dozen museums and attractions including a nationally acclaimed zoo, it also boasts a jam-packed calendar of events. There’s always a reason to celebrate in this river city.

40 | Crossword

41 | America’s Best Events

42 | Behind the Scenes

Durango, CO

43 | I’m A Fan Contest

Oasis of Optimism Page 20 | Much of “Main Street America” may still suffer effects of the Great Recession. Not so in Durango, Colorado. The historic Main Street is all a bustle thanks to a burgeoning art community, extraordinary Rocky Mountain location and access to abundant recreation.

44 | Route Map

45 | About Our Aircraft

46 | Airport Maps

On the Cover

48 | Last Word

South of Bixby by Jeff Daniel Smith captures a favorite vista south of the Monterey Peninsula. To see more of the artist’s work visit Galerie Plein Aire in Carmel, California or galeriepleinaire.com.

operated by SkyWest Airlines

Bridge: Visit Fort Wayne

Celebrating the Good Life

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ramblings and recommends

Summer Travel Simplified

Go!

P U B L I C AT I O N S

Dear Passenger: As the summer travel season heats up, it’s time for my annual plea to relax and enjoy your journey. You know in the great, grand scheme of human history, we belong to a very privileged class. The ability to cross a continent in a matter of hours never ceases to amaze me when I consider the 19th-century settlers who walked from Missouri to Oregon, or the sailors who navigated the hazards of Cape Horn to get from New York City to San Francisco. How hard is it for us? We get to nap, or read or make a new friend. We are fortunate indeed. I know. It isn’t always easy to keep that perspective when confronted with the occasional travel blips. However, I challenge you to focus on the benefits of air travel—the ease, the convenience and the opportunity you have to help someone else—especially families traveling with small children. Remember, you were a kid once too. Lend a hand if you can. That said, might I also turn your attention to the fact that American industry is forever seeking ways to improve your travel experience? New products abound. Here are a few of our SkyWest Magazine summer favorites:

Psi Bands: I know acupressure bands have been around awhile, but they are so helpful for folks (like me) who suffer from serious motion sickness; I thought they deserved another shout-out. I can get seasick on a cruise liner, and I hate feeling drowsy. Psi Bands put pressure on the inside of the wrist and somehow improve internal balance. Besides benefiting queasy seafarers, they also work to alleviate nausea caused by pregnancy and chemotherapy. When traveling, I don’t leave home without them.

Supersmile Professional Whitening Gum: The Supersmile line of tooth whitening products caters to travelers with carry-on sizes of everything from toothpaste to Quikee no-brush, no-rinse whitener drops to little packets of powdered mouthwash, (just add to water and swish in the lavatory). The gum is my favorite. Developed by a cosmetic dentist—like all of Supersmile—it seems to live up to its claims to both whiten teeth and freshen breath. That’s nice after an airborne nap. And it’s sweetened by XYLITOL, billed as a natural cavity inhibitor.

Oh, and just a couple more recommends. Remember to wear your sunscreen! And, smile! Life is an adventure. Enjoy where it takes you.

I N C O R P O R A T E D president Kelly D. Coles editor in chief Colleen Birch Maile colleen@gopubinc.com art director Janie W. Budell janie@gopubinc.com copy editor Bethany Maile proof readers Anna Bierman Tatro Becky Macdonald | Quincy Budell Staff Writers: Amanda Bjerke | Lou Jurassic

Contributors: Wes Horrocks | Hilary Sandeen

director sales and marketing Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com advertising managers MT, OR, UT, WA, WY and Canada: Wendy Rivers l 406-586-0439 wndyrivers@theglobal.net CO, NV, Northern and Central CA: Susan Vernier Garcia l 970-927-9599 susan@gopubinc.com

ArchPort Sandals: This is one of those innovations that makes you want to slap your forehead and say “why didn’t I think of that?” These durable, comfortable shoes have storage space in the soles. Ideal for river rafters, backcountry wanderers and hostel dwellers, they come with a mini-flashlight and utility tool and can easily accommodate a set of car keys and credit cards. Remember to leave the multi-purpose knife at home before going through airport security.

Happy Skies, Colleen

CJ

Colleen Birch Maile Editor in Chief

For reprints of articles in this issue of SkyWest Magazine, please call 208-333-9990. Visit us on our website at www.skywestmagazine.com.

Jackson Hole, WY: Keith Sauls l 208-690-9590 tablaraza@silverstar.com for all other locations call: Teena J. Wright l 208-333-9990 teena@gopubinc.com SkyWest Magazine corporate office 208-333-9990 l fax: 208-333-9991 205 N. 10th St., Suite B100, Boise, ID 83702 email: info@skywestmagazine.com www.skywestmagazine.com SkyWest Airlines 444 S. River Rd., St. George, UT 84790 435-634-3000 l email: info@skywest.com SkyWest Airlines Stock Symbol: SKYW SkyWest Magazine (ISSN 1527-4152) is published bimonthly by Go! Publications, Inc. for United Express operated by SkyWest Airlines. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to SkyWest Magazine are not necessarily those of the editor, publisher or of SkyWest Airlines. Acceptance of advertisements does not imply official endorsement of the products or services concerned. While every care has been taken to ensure accuracy of content, no responsibility can be taken for any errors and/or omissions. No part of this SkyWest Magazine may be reproduced without the express permission of the publisher. © 2011 Go! Publications Inc. All rights reserved.

Copies available for $6 each. This magazine assumes no responsibility for the safekeeping or return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, artwork or other material. This magazine does not reply to queries without SASE.

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Welcome Aboard

Combining Comfort, Convenience and Safety Dear Passenger: I don’t think there has ever been a better time to fly. Just take a look around; whether you’re sitting next to a window where you can take in the view, or you have an aisle seat where you can stretch your legs, you are sitting in one of the world’s most advanced aircraft. And each plane in SkyWest Airlines’ fleet is equipped with the latest technology that helps ensure you make it to your destination safely. They’re also built with a number of features that help reduce fuel consumption while keeping noise at a minimum. And, of course, each of SkyWest’s 300 aircraft is also designed with you in mind; they lead their class when it comes to storage space and room in the cabin. Besides the benefit of traveling in a modern, state-of-the-art, comfortable aircraft, air travel is also becoming more convenient in part because technology makes your experience easy from booking to boarding. Even with all of the added features and benefits that are part of modern air travel, we know that for each of our passengers to enjoy an exceptional experience, we need to provide quality service. And at SkyWest Airlines, that’s something we are dedicated to doing on every single one of our 1,700 daily flights. If you’re reading this magazine aboard one of our planes, you’ve already heard from our outstanding pilots and flight attendants who are committed to your comfort and safety. You’re likely to see one of our customer service agents taking a little extra time to carefully ensure your bag makes it into the cargo area of the plane. And you should also know that our maintenance professionals who keep our fleet (including this aircraft) operating at the highest level have attained the highest training and operating standards in the industry. And it’s that commitment, from our people at every level, that has helped SkyWest Airlines succeed for 39 years. Thank you for flying United Express operated by SkyWest. Wherever you’re headed today, enjoy your flight. Welcome aboard.

Sincerely,

Russell “Chip” Childs President and COO SkyWest Airlines

WAITING FOR A FLIGHT? SEE THE SIGHTS. Take a FREE shuttle and a tour of historic Temple Square—in less than two hours. Pickups at Terminal 1 (door 1), Terminal 2 (door 13).

When you come to Utah, be sure to visit

TEMPLE SQUARE in the heart of Salt Lake City Tours are available in more than 30 languages

Many venues to choose from, and all are free

Listen

© Busath.com

Your tour group can:

to the glorious music of the famed Mormon Tabernacle Choir, rehearsing and performing in the Tabernacle on Temple Square.

They also perform in the 21,000-seat Conference Center. See visittemplesquare.com for details.

Discover

your roots in the FamilySearch Center, where helpful volunteers can assist in retrieving family history information from the world’s largest repository of genealogical records.

Meander

through two upscale visitors’ centers that include the Christus statue by Danish sculptor Thorvaldsen. Visit the interactive map of ancient Jerusalem (kids love it!) and much more.

For information on these and many other fascinating venues on Temple Square, go to visittemplesquare.com, lds.org/placestovisit, or call 1-800-537-9703. © IRI. PD50021647

Monterey Peninsula

8 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

senses, while presenting visitors with a world of dramatically different vacation options. Let’s begin with the laid-back possibilities of Carmel-by-the-Sea, a place that remains an artistic vision of fantasy cottages, chaletstyle lodges, and inns bedecked with ample gingerbread. Restaurants, boutiques and highend retailers cram into a friendly-square-mile oozing Old World ambience. Artworks of every medium and genre, including plein-air seascapes, are presented in a host of galleries. Some double as the artists’ studios. It’s easy to lose an afternoon watching them at work. Among the most fascinating is sculptor Steven Whyte. The British transplant creates large-scale monuments at his Wellington’s Gallery on Dolores Street between 5th and 6th. It’s relatively easy to find. However, many enterprises cluster Euro-style around off-street courtyards. To make the most of your time, pick up the Official Visitor Guide at the Chamber of Commerce, 5th and San Carlos Streets (there are no street numbers in downtown Carmel). The

Wellingtons: stevenwhytesculptor.com

E

ver wish you could experience the California of yesteryear—without sacrificing 21st-century creature comforts? Time travel of that sort is possible midway between San Francisco and L.A. on the Monterey Peninsula. It’s a place of heart-grabbing beauty—a stretch of earth, sea and sky that inspires the most reticent of souls to wax poetic. Creative types thrive here. At the close of the 19th-century, plein-air artists from Europe and America’s East Coast traveled to California to discover fresh subject matter. In Monterey they found a dramatic convergence of waterfront and mountain vista. The scenery enticed many visiting artists to linger. Painters established artists’ colonies that evolved into Carmel-by-theSea and Pacific Grove. Authors flourished here as well. Robert Lewis Stevenson first visited Pacific Grove in the 1870s. More than a half-century later John Steinbeck found his muse in Monterey’s rugged seaport and the farm fields stretching inland. Iconic photographers Ansel Adams and Edward Weston both lived and died here. Today, the peninsula still exerts a magnetic hold on the

by Colleen Birch Maile

Hofsas House: Courtesy of Hofsas House

Inspiration for the Ages

Despite Carmel village’s pedestrianfriendly nature, you will want a car to access Pebble Beach and the rest of the peninsula. That’s just one reason I favor the Hofsas House, a historic, family-owned lodge with plenty of off-street parking and ties to Carmel’s artistic past. Noted 20th-century artist Maxine Albro, who San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo Mission is still home to a Catholic parish worked with Diego Rivera, painted the welcome mural a half-century ago. Her work also graces the lobby and one of the guest rooms. All rooms are updated with modern niceties including wet bars. The hotel boasts a pool and fireplaces in most rooms—a concession to Carmel’s cool evenings. The village and beach are just blocks away. The lovely stroll winds through Carmel’s charming residential neighborhood. Carmel’s mile-long public waterfront benefits from sugary sand, phenomenal views and a kennel club vibe. Dog lovers find nirvana in this canine-friendly community. A beach excursion might be dubbed “pets-on-parade.” Many eateries and hotels Sculptor Steven Whyte and gallery namesake Lord Wellington also welcome four-legged friends adding to Carmel’s family appeal. For a canine-free beach concise handbook makes it easy to uncover hidden experience, head to the astonishingly beautiful treasures. History buffs will want to take in the Point Lobos Natural Preserve on the way to Big Sur San Carlos Mission, 3080 Rio Road. The original just south of town. This is one of the few places to 18th-century structure built by Father Serra was see the hauntingly beautiful Monterey cypress. It’s destroyed by fire. The present church dates to also a favorite scuba diving spot and a wonderful the mid-1800s and is worth a look. place to enjoy a picnic. Strict design ordiCarmel’s evening entertainment leans toward nances safeguard Carmel’s concerts, theater, piano bars and fine dining. character. A patchwork There are dozens of restaurants of cobblestone lines the ranging from the innovative thoroughfares. (Highnouvelle cuisine at Mundaka to heels are prohibited by hearty wood-fired fare at the Rio law; so too, excessive Grill to mainstays such as the noise and bright lights.) Hog’s Breath Inn (once owned Those looking for peace by Clint Eastwood). This is not and quiet will do well the place for raucous clubbing. to make Carmel the launch Hofsas House, best bet for Carmel lodging Monterey, on the other hand, point for a Monterey Pencontinues to exude elements of insula experience. This is the high-brow center of the community John Steinbeck the area, home to the exceptional Sunset Center for crafted in Cannery Row. The Monterey’s monument to the Performing Arts, and gateway for a tour of book, a tale of fishermen and John Steinbeck swanky Pebble Beach. There’s a fee to access the factory workers, had such an impact on Monterey 17-mile drive that takes visitors by homes of the rich that once the sardines were fished out, city father’s and richer and the posh golf course. The peek into appropriated the name Cannery Row for the former the uber-good life and sweeping ocean views Ocean Avenue. When they invited the great man of makes it worthwhile. skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 United express |

9

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exhibition Japanese History: In Salinas Chinatown now – July 20

exhibition The Wonder of Learning – The Hundred Languages of Children now – november 15

5/10/11 1

31st annuaL steinbeck FestiVaL Friends and Foes august 4 – 7, 2011

one Main street, salinas | (831) 775-4721 | www.steinbeck.org

California State University, Monterey Bay

A leader in undergraduate research

CSUMB.EDU 10 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

National Steinbeck Center Publication: SkyWest Magazine — 1/6 page color ad Osborne Design 2011 kim@kographics.com

Jellyfish at Monterey Bay Aquarium

letters back to town for the dedication ceremony, Steinbeck commented “They fish for tourists now, and that’s a species they are not likely to wipe out.” Point Pinos lighthouse His words proved true. Visitors flock to the seaside village. The modern Cannery Row is an amalgam of history and kitsch. Remnants of Steinbeck’s day punctuate strips of tourist-friendly eateries, bars and tasting rooms. Local wineries are well represented. While plaques and monuments commemorate the author’s legacy, most visitors are more interested in the ample good times. The world-famous Monterey Bay Aquarium remains the focal point. Here, learning about the seldom-seen watery world is effortlessly educational and utterly addictive. Special exhibits explore flamingos, magellanic penguins, turtles, jellyfish and seahorses. (Yes, the males really do give birth.) All the oceanic wonders aside, one of the best things about the aquarium is its location in the old Hovden Cannery, built in 1916 when Steinbeck was just a teen. There’s a wonderful irony in a structure built to process seafood now dedicated to the preservation of ocean life. The aquarium’s mission spreads beyond its walls. The surrounding area is a marine life sanctuary and a fine place to watch sea lions frolic. North of Monterey, Pacific Grove retains its quaint Victorian quality. Home to California’s longest continually operating lighthouse at Point

Point Lobos Natural Preserve

Pinos, it’s worth a day of any visitor’s time. The lighthouse is open for tours Thursdays through Mondays and reveals a fascinating segment of California history. Afterward check into the Fandango restaurant (223 17th Street) for some of the area’s best cuisine. This eatery, operated by the former head of Pebble Beach Golf Course’s Club XIX, presents an exquisite European-influenced menu. Seafood is a specialty. The lamb is to die for. From Carmel’s white sand beach to Monterey’s harbor to Pacific Grove’s Victorian homes, the peninsula encapsulates California at its best. Getting there is easy with United Express service by SkyWest directly to Monterey from San Francisco, Los Angeles and Denver. n

AN EVENT TO REMEMBER The Steinbeck Festival in Salinas pays tribute to the Monterey Peninsula’s most renowned literary luminary. The annual event, held August 4 through 7 this year, is a celebration of books, talks, tours, food, films and visual and performing arts. All the activities are filtered through the lens of Steinbeck’s work and themes, but you don’t have to be a bibliophile to enjoy.

skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 United express |

11

ArtWatch

| Salinas, Ca

Natividad Medical Center

Benefits from Art with a Very Big Heart South of Bixby by Carmel, California artist Jeff Daniel Smith graces the cover of this magazine. The representation of the rugged Big Sur coastline is indicative of the work of members of the Monterey Bay Plein Air Painters Association who work outdoors from direct observation of their landscape. Their organization strives to capture the peninsula’s gorgeous topography—seascapes, mountain views and sprawling fields—amid the fleeting qualities of atmosphere and light. The group’s dedication continues the art world’s longstanding celebration of this beautiful part of the Golden State. They also band together with other area artists to bring beauty to what was once one of the area’s dreariest institutions—Natividad Medical Center. The Salinas facility is a “safety net hospital,” caring primarily for under- and un-insured people to the

Early Spring by Father Arthur Poulin

tune of more than $90 million worth of charitable services every year. Five years ago the facility reported a $25 million shortfall. Today, it is not only solvent; it’s beautiful with an ambience that rivals an art gallery’s. Linda Ford, president and CEO of the Natividad Medical Foundation, orchestrated a “win-win” program that’s created installations in atriums and transformed corridors into exhibition space. “We painted the walls red oxide to look like a gallery,” she said. “Many of our patrons are non-English

Where will your master’s degree take you? Where do you want to be two years from today? Halfway to a Ph.D., or halfway around the world? Making it to the weekend or making a difference? Located on California’s spectacular Central Coast, the Monterey Institute’s intimate campus and 11 degree programs attract students from more than 60 countries every year. From the halls of the United Nations to the boardrooms of Hong Kong, from the Brazilian rainforest to the villages of sub-Saharan Africa, Monterey Institute graduates are teaching and translating, building coalitions and building companies – connecting the world, and making a difference.

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Be the Solution 12 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

www.miis.edu

ArtWatch

Flores Sagradas – “Sacred Flowers” by Emilia Garcia Panoramic photograph Spring Lettuce on River Road by Kirk Kennedy

speakers, some are indigenous people who don’t speak Spanish either. The art helps them find their way through the hospital.” Evocative photos of newborns by Monterey’s Scott Campbell mark the OB-GYN area; a panorama of Salinas farm fields by Kirk Kennedy hangs on the corridors leading to the cafeteria. More than 80 local artists, including 30 members of the Plein Air Painters Association, display their works. Some are permanent pieces in a growing collection. Other art is available for purchase with 20% or more of the sale price going to the hospital. “The funds help support our chaplains. It’s all part of creating an environment that is welcoming and creates healing,” Ford said. n

Photograph from The First Breath collection by photographer Scott Campbell

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13

14 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

BODO: Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce

Just sixteen miles from downtown, Bogus Basin, a four-season resort with a base elevation of 6,000 feet, offers a convenient high-country fix. Skiers and snowboarders flock there in winter. The rest of the year, Bogus lures hikers and mountain bikers with pine-scented air and phenomenal views. Rapid rivers and higher peaks offer more world-class fun a scenic drive away from the city. Sun Valley and its summer symphony are just two hours to the east. Horseshoe Bend, home to Cascade Raft and Kayak whitewater fun is a mere hour north along the Payette River Scenic Byway. Every Boisean benefits from ridges, and rivers close to town. Mountain bike trails crisscross the foothills. Twenty-five miles of paved-riparian Greenbelt energizes the valley. Here, downtown workers fly-fish over the noon-hour or enjoy riverside picnics. In spring, summer and fall, rafters parade down the stream; kayakers play in eddies and a chain of waterfront parks are crowded with revelers and athletes of every persuasion from disc-golfers to serious softballers. There are more than 800 acres of open space along this urban pathway. Eleven parking lots provide access. Shoreline Park (13th and River streets) and Julia Davis Park (off Capitol Boulevard) offer the most convenient ingress if you’re staying downtown. Between those two vantage points, the $1.5-million Anne Frank Memorial pays homage to the indomitable human spirit and is a must-see. Funded by donations from school children and local philanthropists, it serves as an exceptional spot for contemplation. From the memorial take the Greenbelt tunnel east beneath Capitol Boulevard. You’ll be on the Boise State University campus and can catch a glimpse of the football stadium’s legendary blue turf. A Greenbelt

Rafters: Cascade Raft & Kayak

by Amanda Bjerke

Boise State Stadium: Boise State University

ure, it’s a long way to the next metropolis. That’s OK with Boiseans. Idaho’s capital city drives a powerful economic engine, serving a metro area with a population of around 500,000. Beyond its borders, wide-open spaces abound with things to see and do. Boise’s location breeds a cultural self-sufficiency perfect for urbane outdoorsy types—especially those with an entrepreneurial bent. Corporate success stories weave through Boise history. This is the place Joe Albertson created a grocery store chain, Jack Simplot developed the first frozen French fry and twin brothers Ward and Del Parkinson founded Micron Technology—the valley’s largest private employer. Start-ups and business incubators abound. Boise State University, known nationally for blue stadium turf and Cinderella-football teams, provides locals with lots of opportunity for training and education. State and local workforce development funds, and local community assistance with infrastructure, all make Boise a magnet for new companies. So does an unparalleled lifestyle. Mountain snow irrigates the lush Boise River valley. Beyond the intricate canal system, stark, sage-covered foothills morph into the Rockies northeast of town. A desert sprawls southwest until it meets the Owyhee Mountains. All those peaks catch most storms before they dump on Boise. So the weather’s as mild as the recreation is accessible. In summer, this is one of those places where “the sky is not cloudy all day.” In fact it’s a pristine vibrant blue and extraordinarily sunny. Boise inhabits a peculiar place in the Mountain Time Zone. The Pacific Zone lies both to its north and south. In summer, the sun typically sets well after nine. So there’s more time to enjoy Boise’s unnivaled recreation.

Hot Spot

Boise Downtown, Basque Dancers: Steve Bly

Boise . . . High-Desert S

outing connects you to the soul of the city. Whether you walk, jog or cycle, be prepared to encounter wildlife. Otters, deer, fox, heron, geese and osprey all reside here. Boise’s cultural district crowds the BSU perimeter and presents a buzz that belies the town’s size. Big-name acts bound for Portland or Seattle stop off and pack out the 12,000-seat Taco Bell Arena (1910 University) and clubs like the Knitting Factory (416 South 9th Street). The Best of Broadway series fills the tonier 2,000-seat Morrison Center for the Performing Arts (2201 Cesar Chavez Lane). The local ballet and philharmonic take to the stage there, too. Whether your taste runs to rock or Ravel, chances are you’ll find something to like on any given Boise weekend. Same goes for museum fanatics. In Julia Davis Park, a couple hundred yards from the river, the Idaho State Historical Museum (610 Julia Davis Drive) gives a good overview of the region’s history. Nearby, the Boise Art Museum (670 Julia

Davis Drive) packs a powerful artistic punch. Maybe that’s why it’s called BAM. Portland sculptor Mike Rathbun’s large-scale installation created especially for BAM is on display through October. Despite the valley’s 50-miles of east-west sprawl, Downtown Boise is still the place to be. On its south side, national retailers and restaurants—the Urban Outfitters, P.F. Chang’s gang—fill up renovated warehouses in the BoDo shopping district. To the west, the emerging Linen District makes hip use of mid-century structures. The Modern Hotel (1314 W. Grove) prides itself on its Mad Men vibe, while Donny Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine (1515 W. Grove) offers tribute to the opposite societal element. Both are good kitschy fun. But for a taste of authentic Boise tradition, visit the Basque Block. More than 15,000 Basques make Boise one of the nation’s largest repositories of Pyrenees culture. The preservation of Basque dance, music,

skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 United express |

15

From our travelers, we often hear

“I could live here.”

language, sport and food means an intriguing encounter with a little known people. Get an overview of the immigrant experience at the Basque Museum (611 Grove Street). See if they’re playing pala or dancing in the Fronton. Poke around the Basque Market (608 W. Grove) and then go eat. Leku Ona (117 S. 6th Street) serves up a mean Txipirioak Bere Tintan (Squid in ink) and the Mina (braised beef tongue) is to die for! Dinners range from $11.95 for the Albondigak (meatballs) to$23.95 for T-Bone steak. If you’re in town July 28 through August 1, be sure to attend the San Inazio Festival. You’ll feel like you’re in the Old Country without the jet lag! n

BRING IT TO

Come visit and discover the Boise lifestyle.

We’ll make you feel at home!

BOISE.

Bring your next meeting, conference or special event to Idaho’s premier convention facility. Boise Centre delivers the best location and service for groups of 10 to 1,000.

Like Boise-Airport Follow iflyboise

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16 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

208.336.8900 | BoiseCentre.com

Rafters: Cascade Raft and Kayak

Rafting on the Payette River

Fort Wayne, INdiana

Celebrating the Good Life!

F

ort Wayne, Indiana’s second largest city is one happening place. Downtown is a cultural mecca—home to more than a dozen museums and attractions, including the newly expanded Fort Wayne Museum of Art, the Science Central children’s museum and the impressive Foellinger Freimann Botanical Conservatory.

The botanical conservatory is a sanctuary for plants and an urban oasis for human visitors. It includes more than 25,000 square feet of indoor gardens presenting more than 500 species. This summer, the year-round attraction celebrates

18 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

Flower Power with a big, bold blooming tribute to 1967—the summer of love. As part of the celebration of all things groovy, the annual Botanical Roots concert series features Country Joe McDonald, a renowned Vietnam-era singer and author of the anti-war anthem I-Feel-Like-I’mFixin’-To-Die Rag. Country Joe’s August 12 appearance is just part of a fun-filled calendar of events. Local festivals celebrate everything from the exquisite Cord Duesenberg antique cars (September 2 through 6), to native son Johnny Appleseed (September 18 though 19), to pickles. Preserved cukes make up a major industry in nearby St. Joe. They are feted the weekend of August 12 through 14. For those with a broader palate, Fort Wayne’s A Taste of the Arts, August 27, invigorates four city blocks with downtown’s premier art and food festival. The same weekend Viva Fort Wayne pays homage to the local Hispanic community. All summer the Fort Wayne Zoo is a must-see attraction. It’s easy to understand why Parents Magazine named it one of the nation’s best zoos for kids. It strives to teach children about its more than 1,500 residents with informative exhibits, events and presentations, and it engages adults as well. No matter your age or interest, you’ll find ample amusement in Fort Wayne.

images: Courtesy Visit Fort Wayne

by Hilary Sandeen

DID YOU KNOW? * Fort Wayne’s location at the western edge of the Eastern Time Zone means citizens bound for Chicago actually disembark their planes approximately 10 minutes before they took off? * The bustling city at the confluence of the St. Joseph, St. Mary and Maumee rivers traces its founding to the 1794 establishment of a fort by the American Revolution hero “Mad” Anthony Wayne. * Fort Wayne is home to America’s largest public genealogy library. With more than 350,000 printed volumes and 513,000 items of microfilm and microfiche, the genealogy department of the Allen County Public Library is a world of information. The extensive holding includes African-American and Native-American records. There is also a direct link to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. Best of all, there is no charge! n

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Durango, Colorado by Amanda Bjerke

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road remains a prominent Durango attraction]. It’s a more desirable location. We are buying the building. It was built in the 1880s and we’re only the fourth owner. It’s been in the previous owner’s family since 1937. He was ten when they moved in and he’s 82 now. They wanted to make sure that it was cared for and that it would be resided in as a business by the new owner. We’re so happy to be able to do that.”

The former clothing store includes more than 6,000 square feet, doubling Sorrel Sky’s gallery space and allowing Wells to add new artists to the eclectic cadre she currently represents. Sorrel Sky is home to more than 60 artists working in a broad sampling of genres and disciplines. They include painters, sculptors, pottery artists, those who work in mixed media and jewelry artists such as Wells’ father, former U.S. Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell. “We have a nice blend of well-known and upand-coming artists. We try not to duplicate styles. Some galleries specialize in plein air or wildlife. We try to represent just one artist in each genre and really work hard to promote that individual. Our artists appreciate that, and I think our customers do, too,” she said. “We always have something interesting and new”.

Shanan Campbell: Julie Dunn

Shanan Campbell Wells; the new expanded Sorrel Sky Gallery

Gallery: courtesy of Sorrel Sky Gallery

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ain Street America may still suffer lingering effects of the Great Recession, but not so in Durango, Colorado. Here, the historic Main Street, with its boutiques, eateries and art galleries, is a bustle. Shanan Campbell Wells, owner of local-mainstay Sorrel Sky Gallery, moved to the pleasant mountain community when she was a child. After attaining a special combined degree in art and business from local Fort Lewis College, she did a stint at the Smithsonian in Washington D.C. then became an art scout for Franklin Mint. Her lifelong ambition—to own a gallery—was ever-present. Now, she lives her dream and recently explained that the local economy is rebounding nicely. “It feels like things are on the upswing here,” she said. “But then we are fortunate. Durango is in a bit of a cocoon. Our gallery’s business only went down about 20% during the worst of times. We did stay that way for two years, but now we are up 40% over last year.” Wells said her business is no anomaly. “Last year at this time there were many empty storefronts. This year everything is full. Flights coming in here are packed. It feels prosperous.” Durango’s quick rebound is easy to understand, Wells explained. “It really is heaven. Who wouldn’t want to live here? Durango has it all, the mountains, the river. It’s a vacationer’s mecca, but it’s also a real town, with a wonderful sense of community. We have an amazing health care facility and a good educational system. Fort Lewis College is a wonderful asset. There are all the top draws that make us want to reside here and then you add the ski resorts, fine dining. I mean we have great restaurants. All those things put Durango in a very positive light. There’s really no room for the town to grow, so it’s an enviable place to be. And, it’s not as expensive as Aspen or Telluride.” Her optimism transfers to action. This spring Sorrel Sky gallery moved into a new expansive location. “It’s a block farther south, closer to the train station [the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Rail-

DRO ★

Durango’s burgeoning art community is just one of the many reasons visitors return. The quaint Western town is an outdoor lover’s dream. Here are a few top picks for summer fun.

1 Take a Ride on the Railroad. The scenic trip aboard the Durango & Silverton, powered by a coal-fired steam locomotive, carries passengers through canyons, meadows and time. Come away with an authentic sense of 19th century Colorado.

get on board!

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Raft the Animas. Before the railroad carried miners and cowboys into the rugged Rockies, mountain men looked to the river for transport. A bevy of outfitters offer trips through the scenic river canyon.

3

Giddy-Up. Dude ranches and trail guides make it easy to saddle up and head for the high country. Every Western adventure should include at least one hour in the saddle. Stagecoach rides are also available.

4 Take a Hike or Ride a Bike. The Animas River Trail is a seven-mile stretch ideal for folks who prefer a stroll to a strenuous trek. Bikes, including cruisers, are available for rent. More rugged souls will want to explore the trails in the San Juan National Forest. The Animas Mountain Trail covers eight miles and leads to a scenic mesa top. Separate trails for hikers, mountain bikers and horseback riders make for stressless fun.

5

Drop a Line. The Animas is a Gold Medal river, offering exceptional fly-fishing and a good chance to land a trophy trout. The waters can be fished all the way from downtown to the high country. Experienced outfitters and guides make it easy to find the best spots. n

Image of Southern Ute Tribal Member Randy Doyebi Jr. courtesy of Jeremy Wade Shockley/The Southern Ute Drum

2

Live Our Story. SO U T H E R N U T E

C U LT U R A L C E N T E R & M U S E U M ignacio, colorado

www.southernutemuseum.org

Jewelry by Ben Nighthorse

SAVE THE DATE August 18 – 21 | Annual RailFest

Durango has always been a railroad town. The historic Durango & Silverton Narrow Guage Railroad continues to be a top-draw attraction and makes Durango the perfect setting for this celebration. The four-day weekend includes special trains, events, and presentations of other vintage engines.

828 Main Avenue • Durango, CO 81301 • 866 878-3555 • www.sorrelsky.com

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America’sB est Places

Jackson, Wyoming

A WHOLE Lot of Wonderful by Colleen Birch Maile

B

efore I begin explaining all the reasons why Jackson is a great destination in any season, let’s get something straight. While both Jackson Hole and its biggest town are named for 19th century mountain man Davey Jackson, there is a difference between the two. The “Hole” is a deep valley between the magnificent Teton and Gros Ventre mountain ranges. The Snake River winds along its floor. Small towns— Moose, Wilson, Kelly and, yes, Jackson—fleck the scenery presenting a peculiar amalgam of cowboy culture and deep-pocket chic. I tell you this so you understand that the “Hole” is the whole valley. Jackson is the town, and a fun one at that, especially in its role as launch point for a Jackson “Hole” adventure. Summer has always been the time for this place to shine. Before the late 1800s nobody stayed here year ’round. Now autumn is for leaf-peepers, winter beckons skiers and spring is a good time to get a sweet peek at wild animals and their babies. But, summer still reigns as a slice of heaven. Tourists jam the town of Jackson, crowding art galleries, restaurants and saloons. Most are on their way to or from the national parks. The Jackson Hole Airport, Wyoming’s busiest, sits right in Grand Teton National Park. Yellowstone is about 70 miles north along the John D. Rockefeller Highway. First timers or those with a week or less to spend will want to devote most of their time to the parks and spend a night or two in Jackson partaking among the many fine restaurants and visiting 22 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

landmarks like the Million Dollar Cowboy Bar, the historic Wort Hotel and the town square bedecked with elk antlers. There, actors from the nearby playhouse perform in a phony nightly shoot-’em-up. Horseback rides and chuck wagon dinners are de rigueur. But there’s so much more to this place than the expected excursions. Whether your passions favor wilderness adventures or a day on a manicured golf course, the good times seem better when set against a stunning Jackson Hole backdrop. Every activity serves up a 360-degree photo op. Here are some lesser known but wholly wonderful Jackson Hole pastimes:

1

Water Adventures: Rivers remain nature’s thoroughfares and time on the Snake carries Jackson Hole visitors into the home turf of moose, marmot and beaver. Eagles, osprey and pelicans soar above the water. There are river options for everyone. Thrill seekers can ride rapids with names like Big Kahuna. More laid-back adventurers may prefer a gentle float through Grand Teton Park. There are many guided trips to choose from, including those using kayaks and canoes. Fly-fishing outfitters are also available. Anglers of all abilities can benefit from expert instruction and a peaceful, hasslefree time on the river.

2

Wildlife Art: Landscape painters have been attempting to immortalize this area’s beauty ever since the U.S. government sent artists to document Yellowstone’s wonders in the mid-1800s. The National Museum of Wildlife Art on the north side of town should be part of any Jackson Hole visit. Its vast and impressive holdings include rare works by Thomas Moran, Albert Bierstadt and other early artistic Jackson visitors. The building serves as repository for more than 5,000 pieces. It includes 14 galleries and presents a full slate of exhibitions. Constructed of natural, rough-hewn stone, the 51,000-square-foot facility blends seamlessly with its lovely surroundings and affords amazing views.

3

Special Flights: Most summer days, a canopy of flawless blue sky stretches across Jackson Hole. Scenic glider and hot air balloon flights take sightseers up, up and away. Thrill seekers can soar over the Tetons via hang glider at Cowboy Up Hang Gliding, headquartered in the Jackson Hole community of Wilson. The launch site hugs the Idaho border in the lush Caribou-Targhee National Forest. Options include short discovery flights that ascend up to 4,000 feet as well as a variety of lessons. For a more sedate bird’s eye view, ride Jackson Hole Mountain Resort’s Cable to the Sky. The tram ride covers 4,139 vertical feet in just nine minutes and offers a terrific view from the top of Rendezvous Mountain. n

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2010 Signature Events

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America’sB est Places

| Eau Claire, WI

Oh! Eau Claire

Bikers: Visit Eau Claire

T

his Wisconsin community in the midst of the Chippewa Valley holds many surprises for summer visitors. A beautiful place of deep woods and placid water, it lures outdoor enthusiasts with easy access to fishing, boating and scenic vistas. Bicyclists benefit from more than 70 miles of trails weaving through the area’s farmland, bluffs, prairies and riverbanks. Thirteen miles of broad paved paths wend through the town making it easy to combine a day of al fresco exercise with a comfortable night in this charming riverside city. The landscape shaped much of Eau Claire’s heritage. Learn about the community’s history at Carson Park. The beautiful 134-acre peninsula juts into Half Moon Lake and is home to both the Chippewa Valley Museum and the Paul Bunyan Camp—a faithful representation of a 19th-century logging operation.

No Midwest summer is complete without a ball game, and Eau Claire does not disappoint. Carson Park’s stadium serves up America’s favorite pastime almost daily. Both a local amateur team, the Cavaliers, and the NCAA’s summer Nortwoods League play here. Admission is inexpensive. The experience remains as friendly and hassle-free as all of Eau Claire. The really good news: all this familyfriendly fun is a mere hour from Chicago’s O’Hare—flying time that is. n AUGUST 27 – 28 FUN FESTIVAL

Festival in the Pines, in Carson Park, features the best in family fun—more than 200 arts and crafts exhibitors, food, games, rides for the kids, live music and a petting zoo.

661-395-3000 www.sjch.us

San Joaquin Community Hospital is the first and only hospital between Los Angeles and San Francisco with a Nationally Certified Stroke Center, Nationally Accredited Chest Pain Center and a fulltreatment Grossman Burn Center under one roof.

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America’sB est Places

| Crescent City, CA

From the Redwood Forests . . . . .

To A World of Adventure

by Lou Jurassic

F

or most of my life I heeded Ronald Reagan’s admonition that ”If you’ve seen one redwood, you’ve seen them all.” And, when it came to “seeing” one, I believed an image to be sufficient. From pictures I knew they were big. I knew they were rusty-red. I knew they grew in damp places. I figured I knew enough. That was before I visited California’s far north country. Now, I wonder, “What was Reagan thinking?” Did he ever make it to Crescent City? Did he venture deep into those shaded forests and beyond to inhale the ocean air and marvel at the otherworldliness of this wild place? He could not have. To visit Redwood National Park is to marvel at the power of creation. There’s more here than really tall trees. Consider these reasons to make the trip, then add the park’s gateway, Crescent City, to your own bucket list.

1 The Trees:

With due respect to our departed 40th president, not all Redwoods are created equal. There are three species—a puny Chinese version that stretches only 140 feet in height; the far more impressive Giant Sequoia found in the similarly named Central California park (it grows to 311 feet) and the granddaddy of them all—the Coast Redwood. Found only along the Pacific where massive rainfall fosters 370-foot trees—the tallest of all plant life. That’s what you’ll find in Redwood National Park and its companion preserves—Del Norte, Jedediah Smith and Prairie Creek state parks. Back in the 1850s when logging the old-growth trees commenced, the coastal giants covered more than two-million acres. Now just around 100,000 acres remain. More than onethird of those trees grow within the parks. Stop by the Crescent City Information Center, 111 Second Street, to prepare for an encounter with the forest. It’s open every day from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and 26 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

friendly staff and forest rangers will help you plot your excursion. You’ll learn that the road accessing the famous Tall Trees Grove requires a free visitors pass. Only 50 are issued each day so get there early if you’re serious about seeing some seriously huge trees. Be prepared to work for the privilege of getting up close with these monsters. It’s a 45-minute drive to the trailhead and a steep mile-long climb thereafter. There are plenty of easier drives and gentler hikes that make a visit to the Redwoods readily accessible for everyone.

2 The Canyon:

Fern Canyon in Prairie Canyon State Park south of Crescent City transports visitors beyond this place and time. Hikers pass through a chasm surrounded by walls that soar 50-to-80 feet. Walls covered with a dense riot of oversized vegetation serve up a prehistoric ambience that made this the perfect locale for both Jurassic Park (a movie near and dear to my heart) and the BBC’s Walking with the Dinosaurs.

3 The Plains:

The morning fog was a constant companion during my Redwood stay. It shrouds the large herd of Roosevelt elk meandering across the aptly named Elk Prairie about 30 miles south of Crescent City. I was astonished at the quantity of these impressive animals. However, they continued on page 28

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skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express |

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didn’t seem at all impressed by my presence and appeared to be quite accustomed to cameras. They are also frequently spotted at Elk Meadow and Gold Bluffs Beach further south along Highway 101.

4 The Beach:

Thirty-seven miles of rugged, wind scrubbed coast extends from Crescent City to the park’s southern border near Eureka, California. It offers a dramatic contrast to the lush forest. A drive along Highway 101 presents countless photo ops. Click away. A visit to the Redwoods is one you’ll want to long remember. n

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Good Stuff to Know There is no admission fee at Redwood National Park. Jedediah Smith Redwood, Del Norte Coast Redwood and Prairie Creek Redwood state parks require day use fees and there are fees to stay in all campgrounds. There are no hotels or inns in any of the parks, but Crescent City has a variety of lodging options. It is easily accessed via United Express service by SkyWest Airlines from San Francisco to Crescent City.

Business Advantages

Economic Help

for 2011 and Beyond

A

mericans are by nature a restless bunch. In this hodgepodge populace of mostly immigrant stock, the national DNA seems to carry an adventurous yen for greener pastures and bigger adventures—especially the entrepreneurial variety. Advances in transportation and technology make chasing dreams across time zones easier than ever. Geography no longer dictates economic potential. “Living where you like and working where you please” seems to be the mantra of a “can-do” kind of citizenry. In the most densely inhabited locales, freeways clog, cost of living soars, and increasing numbers of businesses are discovering fresh opportunities off the beaten path. On-the-move enterprises come in all shapes and sizes—from sole proprietor, loneeagle telecommuters and new start-ups to corporate headquarters and manufacturing facilities. A myriad of states and communities are more eager than ever to grab a piece of the action. Economic devel-

opment incentives ranging from site acquisition incentives to help with workforce training, lure new enterprise. Some states actively recruit new businesses; others wait for a call before rolling out the red carpet. In what some see as challenging times for American business and industry, economic development offices are the ultimate bastions of positive thinking. Eager to serve, long on ideas and optimism, they are a wealth of important information. Business decision-makers should do their homework when developing plans for a better bite at life’s apple. Check out the lifestyle and economic advantages posed by every state and city on your short list of new hometowns. In addition, ask about the local work ethic, job-training partnerships with local educational institutions and the availability of any special redevelopment or economic incentive zones. There’s never been a better time to make a fresh start. The following pages detail a few of the great options available.

Colorado Colorado has what your business needs to succeed and grow Colorado has what your business needs to succeed and grow. Our state offers low business costs, a highly skilled and educated workforce and our famous and exceptional quality of life. Colorado’s central geographic location and up-to-date infrastructure means goods and services are deliverable across the country and around the world. Colorado’s diverse economy and industrial base fosters collaboration between businesses and across industries. This diversity creates opportunities and enhances profitability. Our top-ranking, high tech workforce and world-class research institutions and laboratories have made Colorado a global technology capital. Find your dream in Colorado. Find out why Colorado has what your business needs. You’ll have access to capital and markets and you’ll build a dream team that will help your company build consistent quality and growth. National Rankings Colorado consistently ranks among the top states as a place to live and to succeed in business. But you don’t have to take our word for it: America’s Top States for Business 3rd (Source: CNBC); Best Economic Outlook 2nd (Source: ALEC-Laffer State Economic Index): Best States for Business 4th (Source: Forbes): Economic Competitiveness 6th (Source: Beacon Hill Institute); Entrepreneurial Activity 2nd (Source: ITF New Economy Index); Lowest Rate of Business Closings 3rd, (Source: CQ Press, SBA data). n 303-892-3840 | www.advancecolorado.com skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express |

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Business Advantages

Metro Little Rock, Arkansas Earning well-deserved accolades For two years in a row, the Little Rock region has been named America’s Fourth Strongest Economy by the Brookings Institution’s MetroMonitor. The Wall Street Journal calls it the nation’s Sixth Best Real Estate Market, while Forbes said it is America’s Seventh Best Place for Jobs.   Where miles equal minutes, one million people live within 50 minutes of Downtown Little Rock. So, twelve central Arkansas counties and their unique communities united to compete as one common, globally recognized brand— Little Rock. Six years and over $1.3 billion in new capital investment, $439 million in new annual payroll, and 11,300 jobs later, the results are indisputable and historically unprecedented.   According to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, “Little Rock has one of the lowest unemployment rates of any city in the United States. Little Rock’s regional approach to job creation has resulted in job growth even amidst a deep recession. . . Bringing together regional resources and assets is imperative for communities wanting to build more resilient economies after the recession.”   Companies such as Caterpillar, HP and LM WindPower have recently invested in the Little Rock region. If you want to find out why, or if you are interested in Little Rock yourself, just go to our website and check out what we have to offer your company.  We’ll see you soon. n 800-905-6577 | www.metrolittlerockalliance.com

Lincoln Breaks U.S. Trends Nebraska Capital grows through national downturn What does $2 billion look like? In Lincoln, Nebraska, it takes on many different shapes. At least that much new investment is planned in Nebraska’s capital city. Bucking national trends, Lincoln has either had the lowest or second-lowest unemployment rate in the nation since 2009. This success is led by private industry. Assurity Life Insurance Corp. and Farmer’s Mutual Insurance have begun construction of new headquarter facilities and Nelnet continues to expand its downtown Lincoln headquarters. Additional significant investments have been made to Kawasaki’s railcar facility, Cabela’s bank headquarters, Dell Services and Fiserv’s bank software division. That mirrors the commitment of Lincoln’s own citizens who recently resoundingly approved the construction of a $250-million, 16,000-seat arena. It will be the new home of the Nebraska Cornhusker basketball team as they enter the Big 10 Conference. The state-of-the-art entertainment venue will open in the fall of 2013. Finally, the most important investment for Lincoln’s future is being made by the University of NebraskaLincoln and private industry partners with the development of a new 249-acre research campus. Dubbed Innovation Campus, construction begins in the spring of 2012. For more information on the nation’s newest hotspot, contact the Lincoln Partnership for Economic Development. n 402-436-2350 | www.selectLincoln.org 30 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

kennewick | pasco | richland | west richland

recreation energy Direct flights from Seattle, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Denver, Salt Lake City, Phoenix-Mesa, Minneapolis, and Las Vegas #1 location for job growth

160 wineries within a one-hour drive

Lowest cost-of-living in Washington state

97.5% green energy production

10 premier golf courses

Located at the confluence of the Columbia, Snake, and Yakima Rivers

Leader in technology manufacturing, energy research and development

The Heart of Washington Wine CountryÂŽ Fastest growing metropolitan area in Washington state

100% of Washington State’s wind power produced within 100 miles

www.gototricities.com

Discover the possibilities. Cities of Kennewick, Richland & West Richland Photography by Focal Point Marketing & Multimedia, Kim Fetrow / Imageworks.

800.874.2489 | www.tridec.org

www.visittri-cities.com

Business Advantages

Monterey County Business Council WOW! I had no idea! These two comments are most commonly heard when discussing Monterey County’s economy. The natural elements, combined with a moderate climate and a diverse workforce have given rise to a modern metropolis where a little of everything is performed daily, with outstanding, world-renowned leaders in a variety of industries. Providing the world’s freshest vegetables and fruits has earned the “Salad Bowl of the World” designation for the Salinas Valley. Innovation and a competent, technical workforce have combined to bring ready-made salads to markets all over the world. The hospitality industry thrives on providing exemplary customer experiences, making the most of our long coast line, amazing outdoor opportunities for the environmental tourist and romantic getaways for the global traveler. The 23 institutions of higher education and research, all within a 45 minute drive, provide cutting-edge development in defense, marine science, clean tech, environmental and energy practices, with outstanding language translation and interpretation training. Entrepreneurs thrive in this environment and the six long-term industry clusters, agriculture, hospitality, higher education/research, creative/ technology, health wellness and green building and design are now joined by green innovation. A member of the Green Coast Alliance and Green Coast Innovation Zone, Monterey County is OPEN FOR BUSINESS! n 831-883-9443 | www.mcbusiness.org

MTEC SmartZone Business Accelerator New engineering insourcing model proves success with Fortune 500 companies Why have Fortune 500 companies, GE Aviation and Ford, relocated offices to Michigan’s remote Keweenaw Peninsula? Because they’ve discovered a new insourcing model that meets business objectives, saves money and increases service quality, by implementing the MTEC SmartZone Fortune 500 Formula. MTEC SmartZone is a technology business accelerator missioned to create jobs. They have four facilities in the cities of Houghton and Hancock where nationally ranked engineering college, Michigan Technological University is also located. Together GE and Ford employ over 100 Michigan Tech students in permanent and temporary positions. Companies also access inexpensive, high-tech office space and support from the MTEC SmartZone. Companies outsourcing repetitive engineering work overseas are familiar with the many challenges of meeting business objectives, increasing costs, loss of intellectual property and poor service quality. The Fortune 500 Formula is a solution to many of these challenges. It has proven to provide companies new capabilities, resources and talent that up to now have been untapped. As an added benefit, this program provides companies with a new recruitment tool. Fortune 500 Formula insourcing program provides benefits of outsourcing, without the disadvantages, while maintaining complete business control. n 906-487-7000 | www.mtecsz.com 32 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

MEDFORD, OREGON

... the smartest move!

Medford is the regional center for southern Oregon and northern California.

With year- round cultural and recreational activities.

City of Medford Economic Development 411 West 8th Street Medford, OR 97501 (541) 774-2000 (541) 618-1700 fax bill.hoke@cityofmedford.org

Medford is an Enterprise Zone with an E-Commerce Overlay. Located on Interstate 5 between Portland and San Francisco. Non-stop daily flights to eight cities.

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT...CUSTOMER SERVICE skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express |

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Business Advantages

Nevada Introducing you to the state of Nevada as a home for your future business opportunities Nevada’s corporate and general business advantages include one of the least burdensome tax structures with NO Corporate Income Tax or Personal Income Tax. In fact, Nevada law requires a super majority to increase taxes or fees and our citizen legislature only meets every two years. This offers companies the stability and predictability to safely plan their future operations. Nevada offers many programs to fuel your growth and increase your market share like tax incentives along with professional global trade and procurement assistance. Once you’re in Nevada, we go to great lengths to ensure your prosperity and success. One of the many advantages that make Nevada a popular state for business is the geographic location. Centrally located to the western states, and all major western cities, Nevada offers easy access to growing markets. The state of Nevada was ranked #4 in the Tax Foundation’s 2011 State Business Tax Climate Index and #3 as an Entrepreneur Friendly State by the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council. Nevada is one of only two states to have achieved such high rankings in both indices. If you are looking for a business-friendly environment, accessibility to an efficient and effective workforce, and a great quality of life for you, your family and your employees, then Nevada is the right state for you. n 800-336-1600 | www.DiversifyNevada.com 

Location is Ever ything! Own a piece of Idaho, in one of America’s favorite resort towns. Now is the right time to invest in McCall, Idaho. One of few parcels of land for sale that is walking distance to beautiful Payette Lake and all that McCall, Idaho has to offer. A spectacular offer $450,000 for 4.25 acres •

Surrounded by towering pine trees

Residential zoned for up to 5+ units per acre

Electricity, water, telephone, gas/propane available to site

McCall amenities include: - Five local golf courses - Brundage Ski Mountain - Numerous water activities - Only 2 hours from Boise, Idaho

Rick McGraw/Broker Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group Cell: 208-880-8889 rickmcgraw@qwest.net

Robert Lyons C-21 Whitewater Clark Cell: 208-866-3557 RobertLyons@highmountaincountry.com

Visit www.skywestmagazine.com/mccall for more information. 34 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

Business Advantages

Santa Maria, CA The Santa Maria Valley has great business potential and an exceptional quality of life Santa Maria is located on California’s Central Coast, midway between San Francisco and Los Angeles. With a near-perfect climate, central location, and close proximity to beaches, wineries and other attractions, the Santa Maria Valley has an exceptional quality of life. For a company looking to expand or relocate, Santa Maria is a very compelling option. A pro-business environment makes the City of Santa Maria stand out from most other California areas. This region is home to a diverse industrial and manufacturing base, with plenty of room to expand and grow. The Santa Maria Economic Development Commission, a department of the Santa Maria Valley Chamber of Commerce, works with the City of Santa Maria, local employers, and community leaders in education, business, and government to create an environment that welcomes new companies and creates greater opportunities for economic development. We will work with you every step of the way. Contact the Santa Maria Economic Development Commission today for additional information, and consider moving or expanding your company to Santa Maria, California! n 800-331-3779, ext 817 | www.santamariaedc.com

skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express |

35

Good Times!

Y

ou know what they say about all work and no play? Do yourself a favor. Take a break. Plan an adventure. Whether you mosey through a museum or raft a rapid river, hit up a festival or take a tour of new territory, you’ll find refreshment away from the doldrums of daily life. Here are a few smart suggestions, all accessed via United Express service by SkyWest Airlines.

Idaho

Cascade Raft

Since 1985, Cascade Raft and Kayak has been providing a comfortable level of whitewater rafting fun on the Payette River in Idaho for adventure seekers of all ages and budgets. It brings together families and friends one splash at a time. Choose from a mellow half-day float or a full day packed with raging Class IV whitewater thrills. The spectacular scenery, professional staff and beautiful setting promise to create a cherished memory for all, only one hour from Boise. 800-292-7238  |  www.cascaderaft.com

Oktoberfest/Chippewa Falls

Wisconsin

Join us for the 9th Annual Oktoberfest, September 16th – 18th at the Northern Wisconsin State Fairgrounds in Chippewa Falls. Event kick-off begins Friday at High Noon, so follow the Golden Keg from the Jacob Leinenkugel Brewery to the Main Tent for tapping and stay all weekend for non-stop entertainment on four different stages. You’ll experience family-friendly festive fun, scrumptious German and American foods and plenty of music. 866-723-0340  |  www.chippewachamber.org/oktoberfest.asp

36 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

Colorado

Gunnison-Crested Butte

September Splendor in the Rockies is synonymous with Gunnison-Crested Butte, Colorado! Five weekends of colorful events and nature’s palette of red, yellow and gold are a feast for the eyes! See the largest aspen tree grove in the U.S., travel two historic and scenic byways and have a wilderness experience in your passenger car. Discover life at a slower pace in our 1880s Western and Victorian Rocky Mountain Towns. Call our information specialists or visit our website for budget-friendly offers. 800-323-2453 | GunnisonCrestedButte.com/packages

Southern Ute Cultural Center

Colorado

Walk into the Welcome Gallery at the new Southern Ute Cultural Center & Museum in Ignacio, Colorado, and connect with generations of Native Americans through dynamic, multi-sensory exhibitry that combine a collection of more than 1,500 artifacts with texts, photographs, high-quality flat-screen DVD presentations and hundreds of recorded oral histories. This 52,000-square-foot facility celebrates the living history of Colorado’s longest continuous residents and remains a place the Southern Ute Indian Tribe will always call home. 970-563-9583 | www.southernutemuseum.org

Sycamore Springs Resort

California

Girlfriend Getaways at Sycamore Mineral Springs Resort The perfect all-inclusive package for a fun and relaxing getaway with your girlfriends. Accommodations include a two-night stay in our beautiful three-bedroom guest house, dining credit, spa gift bags, champagne, chocolate truffles, mind body classes and local wine tasting passes. Surrounded by beaches and vineyards, we are located in the beautiful town of San Luis Obispo, recently voted the “Happiest Place in the Nation.”  Packages starting at $1,450 all-inclusive for up to 6 people a great value with less than $250 per person for the entire getaway. 800-234-5931 | www.sycamoresprings.com  

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208-333-9990 ext. 102

www.gopubinc.com skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express |

37

It’s Our Journey, too Journey, too

SkyWest Employees Continually Providing

Exceptional Service

M

illions of people fly aboard SkyWest Airlines every month. They head to and from both regional airports and the world’s largest terminals. And since its first flights took to the sky nearly 40 years ago, SkyWest has put its “Safety First” motto to work. The airline recognizes it takes much more than a motto to build a solid safety record—it requires tireless effort from more than 11,000 dedicated aviation professionals each day. Spending hours both inside and outside of each plane, SkyWest’s highly-trained group of maintenance professionals know each of the 300 aircraft in the fleet better than nearly anyone else. Their jobs require extensive skill and dedicated work to ensure every plane is safe and reliable wherever they happen to be. Recently, the expertise of Chris Olson and Jerry Winterton, Salt Lake City, Utahbased mechanics who specialize in engine repairs, was needed in three different states in just three days’ time. In each case, they spent hours, working into the early morning, on each aircraft to ensure the repairs were done properly and thoroughly before departing for the next job. Ian Weight, a maintenance supervisor who works with Chris and Jerry in Salt Lake City said, “It’s nice to work with people who will voluntarily go above and beyond and are always ready to get the job done.” Chris’ and Jerry’s actions demonstrate a commitment to safety undeterred by time constraints or geographic challenge, an attitude found often at SkyWest. For example, in Reno, Nevada SkyWest customer service agents Ellice Wissenback and Renato Austria were helping passengers embark to their various destinations and preparing aircraft for the next flight when they noticed someone who seemed out of place in a secure area of the airport. To help maintain the highest level of safety they acted immediately, confronting the suspicious person and asked to see identification. They later learned the individual was a TSA Inspector performing a security test at the airport. Krys T. Bart, President and CEO of the Reno-Tahoe Airport said, “[Their] actions were exactly what the situation called for and illustrated an understanding of the key role [they] play in the security of this airport.” The responsible actions of Ellice and Renato are a clear demonstration of their commitment

38 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

by Wes Horrocks Corporate Communications Coordinator

to the security and safety of each passenger traveling through the airport. Safety is first and foremost both on the ground and cruising the skies at 500 mph, as a Colorado Springs-based crew recently demonstrated. On a flight from San Francisco to Colorado Springs, Colorado the wind picked up and a thunderstorm moved into place directly over the airport. Like all SkyWest pilots, both the captain and first officer

Upper left: Jerry Winterton and Chris Olson, Salt Lake City, Utah-based mechanics. Above: Ellice Wissenback at the Reno airport terminal. Left to right: Reno customer service agents Jason Boyce, Renato Austria, Sandy Rodarte.

were well trained for the adverse weather. They made an assessment of the conditions and quickly utilized their proficiency to avoid the storm and the turbulence it was generating. The pilots expertly and calmly devised their plan and within minutes crew and customers were safely on the ground in nearby Pueblo, Colorado. After completing the landing, they checked on the passengers and purchased food to ensure everyone was comfortable. These employees demonstrate a customer commitment and willingness to go aboveand-beyond at an airline where more than 11,000 professionals work together to ensure every passenger has the best possible travel experience. At SkyWest Airlines, safety first is all in a day’s work. n

Business Class

New Location

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Arvada

Olde Town Arvada 5660 Olde Wadsworth Arvada, CO 303.940.9877

The Largest Italian Restaurant in Colorado! Dinner Shows Coming Soon!

OVER 20 DIFFERENT PASTA SAUCES SERVING CHICKEN, STEAK, VEAL & FISH DAILY SPECIALS

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6701 Tower Rd., Denver, CO Near DIA • 303.574.1956

SkyWest Travel SUN VALLEY, IDAHO

VACATION HOME available as nightly/weekly rental. 3 BR, 2 BA, sleeps 6-9. Ideal location on a quiet street in Ketchum. Walking distance to everything. 4 blocks from center of town and a one minute drive to River Run Ski Lodge and the new gondola! Hot tub, pool table, ping pong, drum set and more. $250/nt or $1,500/wk. Holiday rentals available. 208-861-5232 www.skywestmagazine.com/ketchumhome

VACATION RENTALS

ZION NATIONAL PARK

Best western zion park inn will provide the comfort and amenities while you enjoy the majestic beauty of Zion National Park. Restaurant, gift shop, convenience and liquor store, hot tub HSIA, Brian Head skiing one hour away. Ask for “SkyWest Package.” 800-934-7275

www.zionparkinn.com

SOUTHERN UTAH

BOISE, IDAHO

The Boise Valley, winner of numerous “quality of life” and “best places to do business” awards, welcomes new businesses and offers their employees affordable living. Find out what we can offer your business today. Contact the Boise Metro Chamber or Boise Valley Economic Partnership (BVEP) today at 208-472-5200. www.boisechamber.org www.bvep.org

P ark C ount y , W Y T ravel

WILD.

Planning your next vacation? Every journey begins with a destination; make The Perfect Rentals your first stop. Over 12,000 Beach and City Vacation Rentals to suit all budgets, join our “Travelers Rewards Program” for money off rental rates. www.theperfectrentals.com

Golfing, Hiking, RV’ing, National Parks and Much More! Kane County, UT averages over 320 days of sunshine each year. That’s 320 days of sunshine and outdoor adventure waiting for you! www.thegrandcanyons.com

A NIMALS.

Wild Animals. Meet both in Cody, Wyoming. Awaken spirit of .adventure. Takeof adventure. in the majesty MEET BOTHyour IN CODY, WYOMING Awaken your spirit Take in majesty of Cody/Yellowstone. Getknow to know American hero at theat of the Cody/Yellowstone. Get to ananAmerican hero Buffalo Bill Historical Center. Fish, mountain bike or hike. Plan your thevisit Buffalo Bill Historical Center. Fish, mountain bike or at yellowstonecountry.org hike.8 Plan your visit. 8 1-800-393-2639 Fly into Cody via SkyWest Airlines. Fly into Cody via Delta & United Airlines. 800-393-2639 www.yellowstonecountry.org skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express |

39

crossword

Solution on page 44

Songs of Summer! It’s summertime when the living is easier, the days brighter, the nights cooler and the fun simpler to find. No wonder the sunny season makes us want to sing out loud. You’re probably humming a summer tune right now. Good. It’ll help you solve this puzzle. Answers to all clues in bold are the titles of summer songs.

1

2

3

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5

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7

10

15

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40 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

9

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46

ACROSS 1 Lovin’ Spoonful’s Summer in the _____ 5 Spread out 10 Glass ornament 14 Potpourri 15 Isolated 16 Largest continent 17 Central Oregon vacation spot 18 Bird homes 19 Gentlewoman 20 Worthless piece of cloth 21 Self important Brit, his ____ 22 Eddie Cochran’s Summertime _____ 23 Cheap synthetic fabric 25 Poi ingredient 27 Climbing vine 28 Having a yolk 32 White poplar tree 35 Monetary unit of Lesotho 36 Fuss 37 Talk irrationally 38 Glaze 39 Small secluded valley 40 To sustain a living with difficulty, (with “out”) 41 Threefold 42 Flip-flop 43 Faith Hill’s _________ and Summertime 45 Bleat of a sheep 46 Early astronaut’s drink 47 10,000 square meters 51 Boredom 54 Swift 55 Large 56 Ridge of rock

8

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54 58

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57 Corn 59 Become dim 60 Feudal peasant laborer 61 Shoelace tip 62 Employs 63 Whirlpool 64 Ringing instruments 65 Resting place DOWN 1 Venomous snake 2 Pelvic artery terminating at the aorta 3 Shade 4 10th letter of the Hebrew alphabet 5 Soundness of judgment 6 Military academy frosh 7 Negative pitching stat 8 Industrious insect 9 Affirmative reply 10 Round of voting 1 1 Jacob’s twin 1 2 Helper 1 3 Nat King Cole’s Those Lazy, Hazy, Crazy ____ of Summer 2 1 Main part of a church structure 22 Soft cheese 24 Roofing material in Spain and Santa Barbara 25 Rigid

59

26 Performs 28 Spaghetti Western director Sergio 29 Nimbus 30 Yemen’s winter capital 31 The Beach Boys’ All Summer _____ 32 Greek god of war 33 Capital of Azerbaijan 34 Level 35 Toss 38 Broad smile 39 Steps descending to a river 41 Cuisine featuring Tom Yum Goong and Pa See Ew 42 Diplomacy 44 Poorly ventilated 45 Assails 47 Tree bearing filberts 48 Humiliate 49 Travels on 50 Discharge from the body 51 Scottish Gaelic 52 Requirement 53 Dweeb 54 Satiate 57 Irish fairy queen 58 Period of human life 59 Sly and the Family Stone’s Hot ___ in the Summertime

America’sB est Events

July/August MODESTO, CA | ONGOING – AUGUST A&W Summer Nights Festival, turns back the clock every Friday and Saturday through the summer. Elvis impersonators, Hula Hoop contests, classic cars and plenty of root beer floats served by carhops in the town that inspired American Graffiti.

ASHEVILLE, NC | AUGUST 12 – 14 The Asheville Food and

RAPID CITY, SD | ONGOING – OCTOBER 11 Legends in Light, an

its 23rd year, lays claim to status as the Midwest’s largest outdoor blues festival. More than 30 nationally recognized acts play on two outdoor stages in Canal Park adjacent to Lake Superior. After dark, fans head to local nightclubs. More than a dozen showcase the blues.

inspiring multimedia presentation set against the Crazy Horse Memorial just 30 miles from United Express service by SkyWest to Rapid City and a mere eight miles from Mount Rushmore, begins each evening at sunset.

MADISON, WI | JULY 9 – 10 Art in The Square, held along Dr. Martin Luther King Boulevard and on the Monona Terrace Center Esplanade, showcases more than 100 Wisconsin-based exhibitors and includes a Kids’ Craft Corner, public art project, food and entertainment. BEND, OR | JULY 9 – 16 Sagebrush Classic, a week of fun-filled

Wine Festival, held at the Western North Carolina Agricultural Grounds Expo Center, features regional wineries, chefs and food producers hosting a series of tastings and foodie events.

DULUTH, MN | AUGUST 12 – 14 Bayfront Blues Festival, now in

CARLSBAD, CA | AUGUST 14 Art in the Village presents the work of more than 200 of the area’s finest arts and craft vendors in the lovely Carlsbad Village just two blocks from Carlsbad State Beach. Highlights include fine art, sculpture, ceramics and handmade jewelry, furniture and crafts and live jazz entertainment.

fundraisers includes a scavenger-style foot race through downtown and an outdoor feast featuring acclaimed chefs from around the globe.

Jackson Hole, wy | July 2 – August 20 Grand Teton Music Festival 50th Anniversary Season

GUNNISON, CO | JULY 14 – 16 Annual Cattleman’s Day Rodeo, a summer high-country highlight since 1900, this authentic grandaddy of Colorado rodeo serves up a carnival, horse races, events such as cow pie bingo, a county fair, parade and plenty of high-flying traditional events.

For 50 years, the top orchestral musicians in the country have gathered at the gateway to Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks to make music together each summer. Join the Golden Anniversary celebration this summer with two months of concerts featuring the Festival Orchestra, Music Director Donald Runnicles, Sarah Chang, Yefim Bronfman, Doc Severinsen and more.

SANTA BARBARA, CA | JULY 16 The French Festival, held Bastille Day Weekend in Oak Park is the largest celebration of all things French in the Western U.S. Dozens of chefs serve up everything from crepes to quiche to Cajun. Non-stop entertainment mimics Edith Piaf, Maurice Chevalier and others. Even poodles are on parade.

307-733-1128 www.gtmf.org

MOORHEAD, MN | JULY 16 – 17 The Midwest Viking Festival, at the Clay County Historical and Cultural Society in the Hjemkomst Center, offers demonstrations, performers, merchants and other educational Vikingesque activities. Just across the Red River from United Express service to Fargo, by SkyWest Airlines.

ASPEN, CO | Friday, August 5, 6 p.m.

Aspen Art Museum ArtCrush Prominent artists, collectors, curators, gallery owners, celebrities, and philanthropists from around the world gather yearly for The AAM’s annual summer benefit. ArtCrush features a remarkable wine tasting, seated dinner, and live auction conducted by Tobias Meyer, Sotheby’s Worldwide Head of Contemporary Art and Principal Auctioneer (pictured).

CASPER, WY | JULY 22 – 24 Annual Casper Balloon Roundup, held at Casper College’s Murane Playing Field, transforms the sky into a magical display of color when dozens of hot air balloons float up, up and away. Food vendors, demo rides and pilot presentations add to the fun. PADUCAH, KY | JULY 28 – 30 The Paducah Summer Festival salutes the area’s rivers with a celebration of Western Kentucky’s good life. Wholesome entertainment included are free nightly concerts, Kidz Day in the Park, lawnmower races, hot air balloons and various competitions. ROCK SPRINGS, WY | JULY 28 – AUGUST 7 The Sweetwater County Fair, western Wyoming’s regional fair, offers all the expected midway and 4-H fun plus events ranging from horse competitions to BMX and stock car races. MIDLAND, TX | AUGUST 4 – 6 Rock the Desert presents Spirit in

Photo: Clint Spaulding/Patrick McMullan

970-925-8050 www.aspenartmuseum.org

LITTLE ROCK, AR | AUGUST 16 The Clinton Presidential Center honors its namesake’s birthday by waiving admission fees. Enjoy this repository of 1990’s milestones and full-scale replicas of both the Oval Office and Cabinet Room as they appeared during his two terms. The facility is the largest of its kind and includes the most artifacts as well.

SAGINAW, MI | AUGUST 9 – 13 The Summer Music Festival in

DAVENPORT, IA | AUGUST 12 – 20 River Rockin’ Ribfest, in downtown Davenport just across the Mississippi River from United Express service to Moline, Illinois operated by SkyWest, attracts barbecue fans from across the nation to a tasty combination of mouthwatering ribs and great live music.

nearby Frankenmuth’s Heritage Park heralds the region’s European legacy with a celebration of Polish-, German- and Slovenian-style music. Dancing,food and drink add to the festivities.

WAUSAU, WI | AUGUST 19 – 20 Big Bull Falls Blues Fest held at beautiful Fern Island Park creates an intimate environment for blues fans to enjoy national and local acts and ample refreshment.

the Sky one of the nation’s largest Christian rock festivals. This year’s lineup includes more than a dozen top acts including Stellar Kart, Switchfoot and Shonlock. The Shoe Drive for Orphans turns the good time into an act of charity.

skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express |

41

behind the scenes

Aircraft Safety Comes First at SkyWest Airlines

“Safety First” is more than just a mission statement at SkyWest Airlines; it’s a way of life. From the moment your reservation is made until you claim your baggage, your safety is our primary concern. The well-being of passengers and crews is always our top priority. SkyWest’s impeccable safety record spans more than 36 years. It is rooted in the highest caliber of trained professionals and supported by a proven fleet of aircraft. The People: Each day, thousands of SkyWest employees are responsible for the safety of hundreds of thousands of passengers. SkyWest’s experienced mechanics, pilots, flight attendants and ground personnel have the know-how and ability to keep their passengers safe. In the Flight Deck: You also have the comfort of knowing you’re flying with some of the most experienced and thoroughly trained pilots the airline industry has to offer. It takes years of training and experience to become a commercial airline pilot, and most come to SkyWest with several thousand hours of flying experience. However, as part of our team, their training has just begun. Before he or she ever flies a passenger flight, each pilot spends another 30 days in initial training; this is reinforced with recurrent training for weeks at a time every year. All the extra effort is geared toward ensuring the highest level of safety for all onboard our aircraft. To ensure that SkyWest remains an industry leader, a comprehensive, results-based training system has been implemented for crew members: the Advanced Qualification Programs (AQP). In addition to classroom instruction, this program trains our pilots for real-life situations by simulating a variety of scenarios that are tailored toward airline/industry trends. These training sessions are specifically designed for SkyWest pilots, giving them the opportunity to train for situations they encounter on a daily basis. AQP offers pilots more effective training with practical information and individualized support to consistently produce the industry’s best and safest aviators. In the Cabin: At SkyWest, a flight attendant’s first responsibility is your safety. Like pilots, SkyWest’s in-flight team participates in AQP. This program allows them to undergo comprehensive and results-driven training before they take to the skies. By the end of 42 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

training, SkyWest flight attendants are well-versed in emergency procedures, evacuation protocol and passenger service. Flight attendants also continue their training throughout the year and are required to be recertified in First Aid and CPR annually. On the Ramp: SkyWest’s safety practices are evident in our ground operations as well. SkyWest’s customer service personnel initially attend two weeks of training emphasizing ground safety practices. They learn both in the classroom and on the job. These agents become specialists in aircraft weight and balance. They are also extensively trained to operate the various ground equipment and safely park the aircraft once it arrives at the gate. In colder climates, they also learn how to properly de-ice an aircraft allowing for a safe take-off and flight. Under the Wing: For every hour one of SkyWest’s aircraft spends in flight, one of our mechanics spends two hours servicing that aircraft. SkyWest maintains a strict maintenance schedule. Undoubtedly, an experienced SkyWest mechanic has recently inspected or serviced the aircraft carrying you. All mechanics come to SkyWest with extensive training, including three years of Airframe and Power (A&P) training and certification. Additionally, SkyWest mechanics undergo three weeks of mandatory training every two years to keep their skills sharp and make sure they’re on the cutting edge of the most current safety practices. Each day, all SkyWest aircraft are given attention by a mechanic. Every third day, each plane receives standard service. On the fifth day, a more thorough service and inspection is conducted. Extensive maintenance is scheduled every 54 days with a major inspection every 540 days. Flight Control: This department consists of aircraft dispatchers, system controllers and customer service coordinators located in the Operational Control Center at SkyWest’s headquarters in St. George, Utah. All play an integral role in the airline’s operations. SkyWest dispatch personnel undergo six weeks of intensive training courses, learning in-depth aircraft systems, meteorology and flight planning to become certified by the Federal Aviation Administration. Upon arrival at SkyWest, their training continues with three

weeks of classes followed by an average of eight weeks of on-the-job training, culminating with a two-day competency check. Dispatchers are responsible for preparing the flight release, including fuel planning, route selection, Federal Aviation Regulation compliance and weather analysis. They also monitor flights to ensure safety. The system controllers coordinate the flow of SkyWest flights and ensure optimum coverage of and adherence to flight schedules, economics and utilization of the operation. The customer service coordinators assist the controllers, working closely with the stations to maintain a customer service advocacy, always keeping the passenger in mind. These highly trained individuals work with the rest of the SkyWest team to provide incomparable service, exceptional quality and a safe flying experience.

The Safety Department: More than ever, the airline industry is committed to operating at the highest possible standard. SkyWest has a department wholly dedicated to the operational safety of the airline. The safety department coordinates with all the departments involved with ground and flight operations and acts as a compliance liaison between the airline and the Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration. The safety department conducts internal safety audits and evaluations of all operational departments. Additionally, SkyWest operational departments each voluntarily participate in the Aviation Safety Action Program (ASAP), a reporting program for pilots, flight attendants and dispatchers dedicated to continuously improving safety. n

ie mov

Calling All SkyWest Fans Every issue of SkyWest Magazine brings letters bearing praise for our publication. From time to time, you write to offer corrections or suggestions about ways we can improve. That’s great, too. To encourage this ongoing communication, we’ve teamed up with Hollywood to reward some of our terrific “correspondents” with a FREE COPY of a recently released DVD. This issue we are offering a perfect traveling companion for families with children. The Scrambled States of America and More Stories by Laurie Keller entertains and amuses as it teaches U.S. geography and other valuable lessons. It’s part of the Scholastic Storybook Treasures series and an animated delight. Learn more about the author and illustrator behind the stories. Laurie Keller, the

Muskegon, Michigan-based creator is the subject of this issue’s Last Word column, page 48. To win a free copy of one DVD, just be among the first five people to write and tell us what you like best about this publication. Sorry, no email. You have to use a stamp! Send your letter or postcard to: Send your letter or postcard to: I’m a Fan SkyWest Magazine 205 North 10th Street, Suite B100 Boise, Idaho 83702

skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express |

43

Route Map

Edmonton

Saskatoon Calgary Winnipeg Regina

Vancouver Kalispell

Victoria

Minot

Spokane

Seattle/Tacoma Pasco/Richland/ Kennewick

Great Falls Missoula

Bismarck

Helena Billings

Portland Cody

Redmond/Bend

Gillette

Idaho Falls Jackson Hole

Boise

North Bend Medford

Rapid City

Casper

Klamath Falls

Crescent City Eureka/Arcata

Rock Springs Hayden/Steamboat Springs

Redding

Salt Lake City

Chico Reno

Oakland San Francisco Modesto San Jose Fresno Monterey

Eagle County

Grand Junction

Sacramento

Quebec

Duluth

Bozeman

Eugene

Houghton/Hancock

Fargo

Montrose

Aspen

Indianapolis

Denver

Kansas City

Colorado Springs

Wichita

Tulsa

Bakersfield Inyokern

Springfield

Northwest Arkansas

New York

Pittsburgh Washington, DC

Norfolk Knoxville

Albuquerque

Huntsville

Little Rock

Atlanta Birmingham

Dallas

El Paso

Raleigh/Durham

Asheville Charlotte

Oklahoma City

Burbank Ontario Los Angeles Palm Springs Phoenix Orange County Imperial/El Centro Carlsbad Yuma Tucson San Diego

White Plains

Lexington Paducah Nashville

Las Vegas

San Luis Obispo Santa Maria Santa Barbara

Springfield St. Louis

Columbus Dayton Cincinnati

Syracuse

Gunnison Durango

St. George

Minneapolis/St. Paul Green Bay Traverse City Eau Claire Wausau Appleton Toronto Sioux Falls Muskegon Saginaw London Grand Rapids Madison Milwaukee Lansing Detroit Cedar Rapids Des Moines Moline Chicago Cleveland South Bend Omaha Lincoln Peoria Fort Wayne Akron

Midland

Austin San Antonio

United - Regional Jet

Houston

United - Turbo Prop Seasonal Time Zones

Pacific

Mountain

Central

Eastern

Atlantic

8:00

9:00

10:00

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NOON

EFFECTIVE June 2011 (may not reflect recent service updates)

Rubes®

By Leigh Rubin

SKYWEST AIRLINES ROUTE MAP EFFECTIVE JUNE 2011 (updated monthly, may not reflect recent service updates. )

C O B R A A R E S E R S E

I L E A C B A K U N E E D

T I N G E E V E N N E R D

Y O D

S A N N I T A T I V Y L E E G T R S H I T A N U I F M F A Y B

P L E B E S L I N G A G E

L A Y O N E S T S S B T A R L E C I E N T E O S S N E T E B A H E C F A S T I Z E L E T L L S

Solution to Crossword on page 40. For more of Leigh’s humor check out his brand new Best of Rubes® collection, The Wild and Twisted World of Rubes, available at your favorite neighborhood or online bookstore, and be sure to visit www.rubescartoons.com.

44 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

B A L L O T

E S A U

A I D E

D A Y S

H A G L H O A T A B F A U S N E

A D E N

L O N G

R I D E S

E G E S T

about your aircraft

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SkyWest has been safely flying the EMB 120, commonly CRJ700 referred to as the “workhorse” of the regional airline industry, since 1986. Don’t be fooled by the propellers you see; the same technology that powers jet aircraft actually powers the EMB 120 as well. Like jet engines, the EMB 120 is powered by a gas turbine design, allowing for the superior reliability and power that jet engines enjoy. The EMB 120 is also economically sound, allowing it to serve communities that may not support jet service. Additionally, the EMB 120 possesses state-of-the-art technology allowing for maximum passenger safety. Each SkyWest EMB 120 is equipped with a Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS). GPWS is a warning system designed to alert pilots when the aircraft is not in landing configuration or is getting too close to the ground. GPWS detects terrain ahead of and below the aircraft and warns pilots when there’s an obstruction ahead. Each EMB 120 also has an onboard Global Positioning System (GPS), which uses satellites to calculate an aircraft’s position on the earth’s surface. Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems (TCAS) are also included for your safety. A more advanced radar system, TCAS in the flight deck is similar in theory to the equipment used in air traffic control towers to detect the position of all aircraft in the area.

Emergency Exits

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While SkyWest’s employees are truly what set the airline apart, the equipment used also plays a significant role in passenger safety. SkyWest’s fleet of 280 regional aircraft is CRJ200 one of the industry’s newest. The average age of an aircraft is under seven years. The fleet consists of three different airCRJ200 craft types: the 30-passenger Embraer 120 Brasilia (EMB 120), the Bombardier Canadair Regional Jet 200 LR (CRJ200), and the CRJ200’s sister aircraft, the Canadair Regional Jet 700 ER (CRJ700).

CRJ AIRCRAFT SkyWest has operated the 50-passenger CRJ200 since 1994. And in 2004, SkyWest welcomed the CRJ200’s sister aircraft, the nearly identical 66-passenger CRJ700, with a two-class cabin and United’s explusSM service. The CRJ200 and CRJ700 offer a balance of the best economics in their class and outstanding performance with the Collins Pro Line 4 Avionics Systems. This onboard technology allows pilots to better observe the flying environment. Both regional jets have the ability to monitor performance of aircraft systems as well as track nearby aircraft and terrain clearances. The aircraft are also equipped with a weather Galley Lavatory radar system which helps pilots see potentially treacherous CRJ200long before it is encountered. weather Passengers can rest easy knowing that the technology on1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 1 12 13 board SkyWest’s aircraftMain provides for a safer, smoother flying Entrance experience for both passenger and pilot. That’s safety first! n Emergency Exits

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UNITED FIRST

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EMBUNITED 120ECONOMY PLUS

UNITED ECONOMY

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skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express | Emergency Exits

Lavatory

45

United Red Carpet Club United First International Lounge

Airport Maps

United Arrivals Suite International Arrivals Suite

Denver (DEN) Concourse C US Airways

Inter-Terminal Shuttle Bus Stop

United Arrivals Suite

United Easy Check-in

International Arrivals Suite

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25

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TERMINAL 2 Air Canada Air New Zealand

TERMINAL 1 US Airways 12

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4B TERMINAL WEST

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A E

Parking

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United Gate Areas United Express (SkyWest Airlines)

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TERMINAL 5 TERMINAL 2 Air Canada Air New Zealand

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San Francisco (SFO)

Chicago/O’Hare (ORD) F14

Concourse F US Airways

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TERMINAL FIVE International Arrivals

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Shuttle runs between Gates C9 and E3.

Concourse M

Shuttle runs between Gates C9 and E3.

46 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

Concourse A Asiana

Concourse B Continental US Air ways

Š 2011 United Air Lines, Inc. All rights reserved.

Expand your horizons. We have. Over 370 destinations throughout the world.

Includes destinations served by United Air Lines, Inc., Continental Airlines, Inc., United Express, Continental Express and Continental Connection.

Last Word

| Muskegon, Mi

Enjoys the Best of All Worlds

L

Q. The Scrambled States of America books are lauded as a great way to help children learn geography. How did you get the notion to turn 50 states into 50 characters? A. When I worked as an illustrator at Hallmark I spent a lot of time at a children’s bookstore in Kansas City. I began collecting children’s books. I always loved to write and draw and one night while I was falling asleep, these little states with arms and legs and faces popped into my brain. I asked friends if they’d ever seen a book like that. No one had. So that was my inspiration. I’d write every night after work until the first book was done. Then I started calling publishers. I didn’t know you weren’t supposed to do that. Four agreed to meet with me. I went to New York, fell in love with the city and made plans to move. Q. And the rest is history? A. Well, yes. While I was packing to move I got a call from Henry Holt offering to publish the first book, The Scrambled States of America. The Scrambled States of America Talent Show followed that. Now, I’m working on a third where the states go to summer camp. Q. You work in a home studio in Michigan now? A. Yes. After four years in New York, I wanted to be closer to family. I realized that I could work anywhere and Michigan has a lot to offer. Q. What are some of the advantages of living where you do? A. Well, it’s absolutely beautiful and has so much to offer geographically. We’re surrounded by the Great Lakes and then there are so many inland lakes

48 | skyWest Magazine July/August 2011 united express

as well. I live near the Muskegon Winter Sports Complex where there’s an ice rink, a luge, and miles and miles of trails for crosscountry skiing in winter. In summer there’s hiking and bicycling and they just opened a summer luge, as well. I was a little worried about leaving New York because there’s so much culture. But we have culture here too, and you can be inspired wherever you live. Here I am more inspired by nature. I have a great balance, a best of both worlds. Q. You still travel a lot for both business and pleasure? A. That’s right. I am getting ready to leave for Moscow, Russia, where I’ll be doing a presentation for students in an American school. I love to tell the kids about what I do and encourage them that they too can realize their dreams. For pleasure I fly to Colorado and New Mexico and, of course, New York City. n

HOMETOWN HINT When entertaining out-of-towners, Keller always takes them directly to the shores of Lake Michigan. “They know it’s big, but they don’t know how impressive it is,“ she said. “It looks like an ocean and it’s so relaxing. When I’m at work on a book I spend so much time at my desk. When I take a break and walk to the lake, I feel like I’ve been away for a weekend.” For the best in local dining, Keller recommends Muskegon’s Mia and Grace restaurant. “They use local, farm-fresh ingredients and offer a very creative, gourmet menu.” Homemade lavender vanilla bean sodas are a specialty.

images: Scott Mack

aurie Keller, author of the popular The Scrambled States of America children’s books, spent more than a decade building a career away from her native Michigan. The graduate of Grand Rapids’ Kendall College of Art and Design was first a Kansas Citybased illustrator for Hallmark Cards, and then delved into New York City’s publishing business. Now she’s enjoying the best of all worlds. She lives and works on her native turf—the wooded lakeshore north of Muskegon, Michigan while traveling extensively via the easy-to-navigate airports in Grand Rapids and Muskegon. Here she discusses her craft, travel and the place she loves to call home.

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SkyWest Magazine July/August 2011 edition