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D av i d S i f r y

Copyright © 2008, Offbeat Guides. Offbeat Guides™ is a trademark of Sifry Enterprises, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Cover photo credit: Painted Ladies (Again) by Rev Dan Catt, http:// www.flickr.com/photos/35468159852@N01/1074738075

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Contents Maps

ii

Region Map

ii

City Map

iv

Neighborhood Map Street Map

vi viii

Fun things to do in San Francisco

3

Stuff about my trip

7

Greenspan: This Is The Worst Economy I’ve Ever Seen 7 San Francisco

9

Districts

10

Understand

11

History

11

Climate

14

Tourist Information

14

Talk

15

Get in

15

By plane

15

By train

17

By bus

19

By boat

20

By car

21

Get around

21

On foot

21

By public transit

24

By bike

28

By taxi

29

By car

30

Finding your way around

31

See Landmarks

31 32

Neighborhoods

33

Museums

35

Parks/outdoors Do Tours

36 37 37

Performing Arts

41

Events

42

Sports

43

Learn

44

Work

45

Buy

45

Eat

46

Drink

46

Beer

47

Sleep

48

Contact

49

Stay safe

50

Cope

51

Publications

51

Religious services

52

Respect

55

Get out

56

Golden Gate Understand

58 58

Pacific Heights

58

Cow Hollow

59

The Marina District

59

Fort Mason and the Presidio

60

Get in

60

By car

61

By bus

61

On foot

62

Get around

62

See

63

Parks

65

Galleries and museums

65

Architecture

66

Fort Mason

68

The Presidio Golden Gate Bridge Do

70 78 79

Theater and performing arts

81

Events and festivals

83

Buy

85

Eat

88

Budget

88

Splurge

90

Drink

93

Bars

93

Wine bars

96

Clubs

96

Coffee

97

Juice Bars

99

Sleep

99

Budget

100

Mid range

101

Splurge

104

Contact

105

Get out

105

Fisherman’s Wharf

106

Understand

106

Get in

107

By car

107

By cable car

108

By streetcar

108

By bus

109

By ferry

109

On foot

110

Get around

110

See

111

Bay cruises and ferries

117

Events and festivals

121

Buy

123

Eat

124

Budget

124

Mid range

126

Splurge

128

Drink

130

Bars

130

Coffee Sleep

132 133

Budget

133

Mid range

133

Splurge

135

Contact

136

Stay safe

136

Get out Nob Hill/Russian Hill

137 138

Understand

138

Get in

140

By car

140

By cable car

141

By bus

141

Get around

141

See

142

Do

144

Buy

144

Eat

146

Drink

148

Sleep Budget

148 149

Mid-range

149

Splurge

150

Contact Chinatown/North Beach Understand

151 152 152

Chinatown

152

North Beach

153

Get in By car

154 154

By cable car

155

By bus

155

On foot

156

Get around

156

See

157

Museums and galleries

160

Temples and churches

161

Architecture

163

Parks, monuments, and public art

165

Do

167

Walking Tours

168

Events and festivals

169

Buy

171

Eat

173

Budget

174

Mid-range

176

Splurge

179

Drink

182

Bars

182

Clubs and venues

186

Entertainment

188

Coffee

189

Juice bars

190

Sleep Budget

190 191

Mid-range

192

Splurge

193

Contact

194

Stay safe

194

Get out Union Square/Financial District

195 196

Understand

196

Get in

198

By car

198

By ferry

198

By public transit

199

On foot

200

See

200

Do

202

Buy

203

Eat

205

Drinks

206

Sleep

207

Budget

207

Mid-range

207

Splurge

208

Contact Civic Center/Tenderloin Understand Civic Center Tenderloin Get in

211 212 213 213 214 216

By car

216

By MUNI

217

By BART

218

By cable car

218

On foot

219

Get around

219

See

219

Museums and galleries

220

Parks and monuments

222

Architecture

223

Do

225

Performing arts

227

Events and festivals

233

Buy

235

Eat

236

Mid-range

237

Splurge

238

Drink

241

Bars

242

Entertainment and clubs

246

Coffee Sleep

247 248

Budget

248

Mid-range

249

Splurge

251

Contact

252

Stay safe

253

Get out

253

South of Market (SoMa)

255

Understand

256

Get in

256

By rail

256

By bus

257

By car

257

By boat

258

See

258

Do

262

Buy

263

Eat

264

Budget

264

Mid-range

264

Splurge

266

Drink Clubs Sleep

266 267 268

Budget

268

Mid-range

268

Splurge

269

Contact Western Addition

270 271

Understand

271

Get in

273

By Car

273

By Muni

273

See

273

Do

274

Buy

275

Eat

276

Drink

278

Sleep

279

Contact

280

Haight

281

Understand

281

Get In

284

By car

284

By public transit

284

Get around

285

See

285

Do

287

Buy

288

Eat Budget

289 289

Mid-range

291

Splurge

293

Drink

293

Bars

293

Coffee

295

Sleep

296

Contact

297

Stay safe

297

The Avenue

298

Understand

298

Get in

299

By Muni

300

By car

300

See

301

Movie Theaters

301

Golden Gate Park

302

Lincoln Park

306

Do

307

Buy

307

Eat

309

Budget

309

Mid-range

312

Splurge

316

Food Markets Drink

317 318

Bars

318

Coffee

319

Sleep

320

Contact

321

Twin Peaks/Lake Merced

323

Understand

323

Get in

324

See

324

Do

325

Buy

326

Eat

326

Drink

326

Sleep

327

Contact Castro/Noe Valley

327 328

Understand

328

Get in

329

By Muni By car

329 329

See

330

Do

330

Buy

331

Eat

332

Drink

334

Sleep

334

Contact The Mission/Bernal Heights

334 336

Understand

336

Get in

337

Get around

339

See

339

Theatres

340

Do

341

Buy

342

Eat Markets

343 348

Drink

348

Sleep

352

Contact Southeast San Francisco

352 353

Understand

353

Get in

354

See

355

Do

356

Buy

357

Eat

357

Drink

359

Sleep

360

Contact

360

History

362

Precolonial history

362

Arrival of Europeans and early settlement

362

1848 gold rush

366

Labor

368

Paris of the West

369

1906 Earthquake and Fire

371

Reconstruction

371

After rebuilding

373

Period after World War II

373

Urban renewal

374

Counterculture

375

1980s: “Manhattanization� and Homelessness

376

1989 Loma Prieta earthquake

378

1990s dot-com boom

379

Post boom

379

Historic Populations

380

Culture

381

Museums

382

Performing arts

383

Festivals and street fairs

385

Architecture and tourist attractions

385

Weather Historical Weather September Weather Forecast Events Wednesday, September 17

387 387 387 387 392 392

Thursday, September 18 Friday, September 19 Saturday, September 20 References Travel Notes

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Travel Notes

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Travel Notes

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Travel Notes

405

ii

Region Map

iii

iv

City Map

v

vi

Neighborhood Map

vii

viii

Street Map

ix

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Fun things to do in San Francisco Alcatraz: Alcatraz ■Tip Rating: 

■Updated By richiecdisc on November 15, 2005 ■Email Me ■See My San Francisco Page ■Send to a Friend getting there is half the funby richiecdisc, 1 more photos Send Photo to a FriendAnother great way to enjoy the Bay is to get out on a boat. You can do cruises or jump on a ferry to a destination like Tiburon or Sausalito, but since you’re bound to be going to Alcatraz while in the city, enjoy the free scenery en route. Alcatraz itself is a fascinating day trip in its own right and whether you arrive on a foggy or sunny day, you’ll be transported back in time to it illustrious past as home to famed criminals like Al Capone and Machine Gun Kelly. As part of the National Park service, it is highly regulated and you’re assured of a great value experience. It’s best to purchase your tickets from the Blue & Gold booths close to Pier 39 in Fisherman’s Wharf to avoid paying any kind of service fee. The round trip ferry ticket cost $16 but it includes your entrance and an audio headphone tour as well as many ranger activities you can take as you like. It’s quite easy to spend an entire day there if you like historical guided walks and you should allow a minimum of four hours for the visit from Wharf to Wharf. Most find it fascinating.Golden Gate Bridge: Bridge Over Trouble Water ■Tip Rating: 

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■Updated By Ciambella on June 18, 2007 ■Email Me ■See My San Francisco Page ■Send to a Friend Golden Gate Bridgeby Ciambella,  3 more photos Send Photo to a FriendSome bridge was born to be revered, and some to be loved. Some are painted with hideous colour, some with delicate hue. Some are used and abused, some adored and protected. Some live with mundane activities, some see many vicissitudes. Then some are blessed with such beauty and myth that fatal attraction can only be expected.

The Golden Gate Bridge belongs in that last category.

Golden Gate Bridge has been the site for more suicides than all the landmarks in the world combined. Three months after the bridge’s opening ceremony in 1937, the first person jumped over the four-foot rail into the water, 220 ft below. Since that day, there is an average of two suicides per month. In 70 years of the bridge’s history and over 1600 cases of jumpers, there are only 26 survivors.

Yet, for the number of people who have chosen it as a means to a final end, there are a far greater number who see the Golden Gate Bridge amidst the fog and sunlight and recognize that the bridge is a symbol of constancy and joy.

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The building of the Golden Gate Bridge was one of the most revolutionary events of its time, especially so because so few people perished in the endeavor as compared to similar bridge-building attempts in the past. In addition, although it took a staggering amount of money and creativity and persistence, the bridge was built to specifications — built to last.

This is the city where Mr. Bennett left his heart, where I found my love, where Charles and I spent tons of our hardearned money in many of our favourite shops, and where anyone can eat well no matter the depth of his or her pocket.

There are so many lauded aspirations and acclaimed activities that make San Francisco beautiful. It is heartbreaking to know that the two suicides each month who take a last view of this city see none of the hope and life that the city has to offer. Lombard Street: The Steepest & Most Crooked Street in the World ■Tip Rating:    ■Updated By Sandi-2004 on October 24, 2004 ■Email Me ■See My San Francisco Page ■Send to a Friend Lombard Streetby Sandi-2004

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Send Photo to a FriendActually, I have read that San Francisco has steeper & more crooked streets than this beautiful cobblestone, but this is the famous one that everyone loves. When you are in your car & approach the top of Lombard Street, you can’t see any pavement out ahead of you. It seems that your car with you & your family or friends in it will simply drop off a cliff because no street is in view. It definitely will give your stomach a few butterflies even though in your mind, you know the street HAS to be there. Lombard Street IS there but has begun it’s steep descent. It has hairpin curves one after another. It’s lined with beautiful flowers & lovely Victorian homes on either side. The fun of going down Lombard Street will definitely give you a few moments of fear and fun.

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Stuff about my trip Greenspan: This Is The Worst Economy I’ve Ever Seen stumblediggredditdel.ico.usnews ber 14, 2008 11:21 AM

trustmixx.comSeptem-

Read More: Alan Greenspan, Economic Failures, Economy, Economy Grim, Federal Reserve, FInancial Markets, Greenspan Abc, Greenspan Economy, Housing Market, Lehman Brothers, Merrill Lynch, Video,Politics NewsShow your support. Buzz this article up.Buzz up!Get Breaking News Alerts never spam ■Share ■Print ■Comments Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan offered a woeful outlook of America’s economic situation on Sunday, saying the crisis with the country’s financial institutions was as dire as he had ever seen in his long career, and predicting that one or more of those institutions would likely collapse in the near future. ”Oh, by far,” Greenspan said, when asked if the situation was the worst he had seen in his career. “There’s no question that this is in the process of outstripping anything I’ve seen and it still is not resolved and still has a way to go and, indeed, it will continue to be a corrosive force until the price of homes in the United States stabilizes. That will induce a series of events around the globe which will stabilize the system.” Appearing on ABC’s This Week, Greenspan would not definitively say whether the government should come to the rescue of Lehman Brothers, which has been forced to consider

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a possible sale after its stock shares plunged drastically this past week. Instead he called the situation surrounding the investment bank — and the bailout that occurred this past spring of Bear Stearns — as a “once in a half century, probably once in a century type of event.” The circumstances for Lehman may, as Greenspan noted, be different. Bloomberg News reported on Friday: “Rising speculation that Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. may fail is generating less concern among investors than when Bear Stearns Cos. imploded in March.” Much of the issue, Greenspan added, was the trouble in the housing market, which he predicted would become stabilized by next year. Pressed by host George Stephanopoulos as to whether another major financial institution — such as the struggling Washington Mutual, American International Group, or Merrill Lynch — would fail in the interim, the former Fed chair responded in the affirmative. ”I suspect we will [see one fail],” he said, “but in and of itself that does not need to be a problem. It depends on how it’s handled and how the liquidations take place. And, indeed, we shouldn’t try to protect every single institution. the ordinary cost of financial change has winners and losers.” In light of these dynamics, Greenspan noted that the government was left with tough decisions: which institutions are “so fundamental to the functioning” of society that they demanded a federal safety net? Earlier in the week, the former fed chairman noted that such choses extended to tax policy as well. In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Greenspan argued that the country couldn’t afford the tax cuts being proposed by John McCain without an equally massive reduction in spending. ”I’m not in favor of financing tax cuts with borrowed money,” he said. “I always have tied tax cuts to spending.” 

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San Francisco

â– Golden Gate Bridge from Marin County with San Francisco in background

San Francisco is a major city in California, the centerpiece of the Bay Area, well-known for its liberal community, hilly terrain, Victorian architecture, scenic beauty, summer fog, and extreme ethnic and cultural diversity. These are only a few of the aspects of the city that make San Francisco one of the most visited cities in the world. San Francisco is located on a small seven-by-seven mile (11x11km) square of land at the tip of a peninsula between San Francisco Bay and the Pacific coast. It has a population of almost 800,000, but is the center of a metropolitan area of millions. San Francisco is just one of the cities which makes-up the entire San Francisco Bay Area. San Francisco’s neighbors, cities and towns to the east of the Bay Bridge, north of the Golden Gate Bridge, and south of it are all in separate counties, each with their own city government and local public transportation systems.

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Districts Each district of San Francisco carries its own unique and district culture. This map is predominantly based on the 11 official governmental districts of San Francisco, but it has been adapted to suit the purposes of this guide. Some districts have been merged together and others have been broken up into popular neighborhood groupings.

■Golden Gate— Fashionable neighborhoods with expensive views, historical landmarks - The Presidio and Fort Mason, and the iconic Golden Gate Bridge. ■Fisherman’s Wharf— A waterfront neighborhood which encompasses Pier 39, Ghirardelli Square and the ferry launch to Alcatraz Island, as well as a plethora of seafood restaurants and souvenir stores. ■Nob Hill-Russian Hill— Two ritzy neighborhoods with upscale hotels, cable cars, panoramic views and steep inclines. ■Chinatown-North Beach— Two vibrant immigrant communities, stylish laid back ‘Little Italy’ next to the crowded and largest Chinatown outside of Asia. ■Union Square-Financial District— The center of shopping, theater and art in the city, next to the many skyscrapers of downtown. ■Civic Center-Tenderloin— While the ‘loin is grittier compared to its ritzier neighbors downtown, there’s still plenty of interesting architecture and attractions to see here. ■SoMa (South of Market)— A rapidly gentrifying neighborhood of downtown that is the center of a lot of new con-

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struction, including AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants. ■Western Addition— A historic neighborhood with many Victorian homes that was once a hotbed of African-American culture. Within the area is also Japantown, the center of San Francisco’s Japanese population. ■Haight— Famous for being the home of the Hippie movement, this once bohemian area, although gentrified, is still an eclectic treasure. ■The Avenues— Including both the foggy Sunset and Richmond Districts, the area is also home to the Golden Gate Park and Ocean Beach. ■Twin Peaks-Lake Merced— Covering most of southwestern San Francisco, this area is home to many of the taller hills of San Francisco and the large Lake Merced park which contains the San Francisco Zoo. ■Castro-Noe Valley— Colorful and cohesive, the Castro is historically known for being the cultural center of the city’s LGBTQ community. ■Mission-Bernal Heights— This colorful area is home to a large Hispanic community as well as new urban artisans. ■Southeast San Francisco— A mostly residential area, this district contains several bay-side neighborhoods, many nice parks, and Monster Park, home of the 49ers NFL team.

Understand History Prior to European settlement in the area, the peninsula that now contains San Francisco was home to the Yelamu tribe, who were part of the larger Ohlone language group which stretched south from the Bay Area to the Big Sur of California. Due to San Francisco’s characteristic foggy weather, the earliest European explorers completely bypassed the Golden Gate and the San Francisco Bay.

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The first European settlement in the area was founded by the Spaniards in 1776 as a mission community surrounding the Mission San Francisco de Asís, in what is today called the Mission Dolores in the Mission District. In addition to the mission, a military fort was built near the Golden Gate: the Presidio. Upon gaining independence from Spain in 1821, the area became part of Mexico, but otherwise, little changed in San Francisco. In 1835, an Englishman named William Richardson founded the town of Yerba Buena, the first significant settlement on the peninsula outside of the Mission Dolores area. As the new settlement gradually grew, Yerba Buena developed a street plan and became attractive to settlers. In 1846, the United States claimed California, and in July of that year, the U.S. Navy arrived to raise the America flag above Yerba Buena. Over the next couple of years, California officially became part of the United States following the Mexican-American War, and the name of the town was changed from Yerba Buena to San Francisco. With the California Gold Rush of 1848, San Francisco began to explode in population. Waves of immigrants came to the city to seek their fortunes, including large numbers of Chinese immigrants, one of the largest Chinese populations outside of Asia. During this time, many major businesses were created and flourished in San Francisco, and famous (and infamous) personalities settled in the city. Of course, with all this success came problems: the rapid growth of the city outstripped any efforts at city planning, meaning proper sanitation and infrastructure were largely undeveloped, which led to a cholera outbreak in 1855. Violence and corruption were evident, and anti-immigrant violence resulted in many race riots. For a good book on the tumultuous early history of San Francisco, read Herbert Asbury’s Barbary Coast.

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In the 1890’s, there was a large campaign to modernize and beautify the city, leading some officials to proudly call San Francisco the “Paris of the West”. But in 1906, a devastating earthquake shook the city and a resulting fire leveled much of the city. Nevertheless, officials at the time immediately set out on a plan to rebuild the city, with new parks, boulevards, the current civic center complex, and landmarks such as the Coit Tower atop Telegraph Hill. In 1915, San Francisco hosted the Panama-Pacific Exposition, to showcase the completely rebuilt city. Today, the Palace of Fine Arts complex is the only remnant of the exposition. In the wake of the Great Depression of the 1930’s, San Francisco remained largely unscathed. In fact, it was during this time that the Golden Gate Bridge and the Bay Bridge were conceived and built. It was also during this time that the Federal Government established a prison on Alcatraz Island, which would hold some of the most notorious criminals of the era. After World War II, San Francisco continued to grow in population. Urban planning projects at the time led to more highrises downtown (including the Transamerican Pyramid) and the destruction of neighborhoods to build freeways (many of which were later torn down after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake). In the same period, San Francisco became a center of counterculture and the hippie movement, contributing to San Francisco’s liberal outlook. San Francisco also became a center for homosexuals during this time, leading to the development of gay neighborhoods like the Castro. More recently, San Francisco has experienced a boom in business. Despite falling victim to the dot-com bubble burst in the 1990s, the city’s economy largely recovered and gentrification of neighborhoods like SoMa continues on.

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Today San Francisco is known for its liberal outlook and remains one of America’s top tourist destinations, and tourism is the city’s largest industry.

Climate San Francisco has a mild climate, with wet, mild winters and dry summers. In most months, you can expect the temperature be in the 60s or 70s degrees Fahrenheit (between 15 and 25 degrees Celsius). Be prepared for cool humid weather, even in the summer (except September), when persistent fog often envelops the city. San Francisco’s sharp topography has created a series of microclimates. For instance, there is more fog on the western side of the city, closer to the ocean. There can also be large variances in rainfall between different parts of the city thanks to the tall hills in the center of the peninsula (generally with more rain taking place on the western side, while the eastern side experiences more sunlight).

Tourist Information San Francisco’s visitor information centers offer maps, brochures and other information for tourists.

■San Francisco Visitor Information Center, 900 Market Street, next to the Cable Car turnaround at Market & Powell, Phone: +1 415 391-2000, Fax: +1 415 362-7323, http:// www.onlyinsanfrancisco.com/, Hours: May through October: M-F 9AM-5PM, Sa-Su and holidays 9AM-3PM. November through April: M-F 9AM-5PM, Sa and holidays 9AM3PM. Closed Easter, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year’s Day. Visitor Center run by the San Francisco Convention & Visitors Bureau. ■California Welcome Center, Pier 39, Building P, Second Level, Phone: +1 415 981-1280, info@pier39.com, http://www.

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visitcwc.com/destinations/sanfrancisco/index.php. One of several California Welcome Centers across the state.

Talk English is the dominant language spoken in San Francisco. Mandarin and Cantonese Chinese is also widely spoken by San Francisco’s large Chinese population. Spanish is also commonly spoken in San Francisco, especially among the Hispanic population, located in the Mission District.

Get in

â– Map of San Francisco

By plane There are three airports in the San Francisco Bay Area:

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■San Francisco International, located about 10 mi (16 km) south of the city. ■Oakland International, in the East Bay. ■Mineta San Jose International, in Silicon Valley, about 1 hour south of San Francisco. Oakland and San Jose tend to offer more discount airline flights, while San Francisco Airport attracts more international flights and can be more convenient for those staying in the city. San Francisco and Oakland Airports are connected to downtown SF by the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system (Oakland Airport indirectly through a non-free shuttle bus), which costs about $5 one-way. Taxis are considerably more expensive: a taxi from SFO to the city can easily cost upwards of $40, and over $60 from OAK. Shared vans will cost around $14. If you plan to drive from a car rental area near the SFO airport to downtown San Francisco, you can take the 101 freeway. Note that taxi and van prices from San Jose to San Francisco are significantly higher. Passengers arriving in SFO can walk (5 minutes from United’s terminal) or take a free airport shuttle (AirTrain) to the BART station (which is next to international terminal G). From Oakland Airport, BART operates a regular shuttle to the nearest station. The cost of this bus is $3 for adults ($1 for seniors/children), and it takes 10-15 minutes. Trains from there run directly to San Francisco, with a 5-20 minute frequency and cost about $3.00-$4.00. BART trains head directly to downtown San Francisco and the Mission District, from where taxis and the MUNI can take travelers anywhere in the city. The San Jose airport is served by a free shuttle to both VTA Light Rail and Caltrain. Passengers arriving in San Jose can

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use Caltrain to reach San Francisco directly (this costs $7.50 one-way). Caltrain also links with the BART system at the Millbrae intermodal station. Be aware that public transportation within the South Bay is not as developed as around San Francisco. Private pilots should consider Oakland rather than SFO, as the separate general aviation field there is more accommodating to light aircraft.

By train Amtrak, ☎+1 800 872-7245, serves the Bay Area with longdistance and intercity trains. San Francisco’s long distance station is across the bay, outside city limits. Passengers arrive in Emeryville or Oakland’s Jack London Square Station in the East Bay and may take an Amtrak California Thruway bus over the Bay Bridge to San Francisco’s Amtrak stop at 101 The Embarcadero (near the Ferry Building) and usually several other downtown destinations. (Note that Amtrak passengers are not subjected to any extra charge for the bus.) Travelers on some shorter distance Amtrak routes can also transfer to BART trains at the Richmond or Oakland Coliseum stations (see below). Alternatively, riders approaching the Bay Area from the south may transfer to Caltrain at San Jose’s Diridon Station for a direct ride to Fourth and King Streets in San Francisco. Amtrak routes serving the Bay Area are:

■The California Zephyr runs daily between Chicago and Emeryville with connections to/from the east coast. ■The Coast Starlight runs daily between Seattle, Portland, Emeryville, and Los Angeles. To reach San Francisco, either transfer to Caltrain in San Jose or to the Amtrak bus in Emeryville. ■The Capitol Corridor runs 16 times daily (11 on weekends and holidays) between Sacramento and Emeryville. Some

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trains also serve San Jose but Caltrain (see below) is a better bet between San Jose and San Francisco. The most convenient transfer to San Francisco is actually to BART at Richmond’s station, north of Emeryville, while the Oakland Coliseum station is another option on trains continuing south of Emeryville. Discount BART tickets can be purchased in the cafe car. ■The San Joaquins runs 4 times daily between Bakersfield, Stockton and Emeryville. Travelers on the San Joaquins can continue on to San Francisco via the Amtrak bus at Emeryville or by transferring to the BART at the Richmond station. Caltrain, ☎+1 510 817-1717, operates a regional rail service from San Jose to its San Francisco terminal at Fourth and King. The service also runs between San Jose and Gilroy during rush hour. Caltrain is very useful for travel between San Francisco and cities of the Peninsula, Silicon Valley or South Bay. On weekdays Caltrain provides two trains per hour for most of the day but run more during commute hours, including “Baby Bullet” limited services that cruise between San Francisco and San Jose in 57 minutes; on weekends and public holidays trains run hourly, except that after 10PM only one train runs, leaving at midnight. The 4th & King terminal is served by Muni Metro (see ‘Get around’ below) giving connections to the rest of the city. Fares vary depending on how far you go. Tickets must be purchased before boarding the train from ticket vending machines at all stations or from ticket clerks at staffed stations. Tickets are checked on the trains and anyone found without a ticket is liable to a substantial fine. Cyclists should use the designated car at the northern end of the train, and be aware that bike space is often limited during commute hours. Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART), ☎+1 415 989-2278, provides a regional frequent rail service connecting much of the East Bay and Contra Costa County with San Francisco and the San Francisco Airport through the Transbay Tube, a tunnel underneath San Francisco Bay. BART operates five routes, of which four reach San Francisco; there are three

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or four trains per hour on each route. In the East Bay and outer parts of San Francisco BART runs mostly on elevated track; in downtown San Francisco it runs in a subway under Market Street, and several underground stations provide easy access to downtown areas and simple transfers to the Muni Metro subway. BART also meets Caltrain at Millbrae. Bicycles are allowed on BART except between stations designated in the schedule brochure during commute hours. Fares vary depending with distance traveled, and start at $1.40 for trips within the city. You will need to insert your ticket into barriers when entering and exiting the system. Tickets hold a balance, deducting the appropriate price for each trip, so someone who plans to use the system several times can buy a $10 or $20 ticket and not worry about fares until the card is used up.

By bus ■GotoBus, ☎+1 617 354-2101, sells tickets to and from Los Angeles for a variety of bus companies. ■Greyhound, ☎+1 800 231-2222, has frequent intercity service from San Francisco’s beautiful but decaying Transbay Terminal at First and Mission streets. Several regional bus systems serve San Francisco from the immediate suburbs:

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■AC Transit, from Oakland, Berkeley, Alameda, and other East Bay cities. ■samTrans, from San Mateo County. ■Golden Gate Transit, from Sonoma and Marin counties. ■WestCAT, from Contra Costa County. ■Vallejo Baylink, (in conjunction with BayLink Ferry) from Vallejo.

By boat

■San Francisco and Alcatraz from a Sausalito ferry

In many ways a boat is the ideal way to approach San Francisco. The city’s spectacular skyline is best appreciated from the water, and from the deck of a boat the bay and its bridges and islands can be viewed as a whole. Cruise ships and private yachts are regular visitors to San Francisco, and passenger ferries regularly link other Bay Area cities to San Francisco. Ferries run to San Francisco from Larkspur, Sausalito and Tiburon in Marin County, from Vallejo in Solano County and from Alameda and Oakland in the East Bay. In San Francisco, the ferries dock at one or both of the city’s two piers at Fisherman’s Wharf and the Ferry Building. For more information:

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■Golden Gate Ferries, ☎+1 415 923-2000. Serving Larkspur and Sausalito. ■Blue and Gold Fleet, ☎+1 415 705-5555. Serving Alameda, Angel Island, Oakland, Sausalito, Tiburon and Vallejo. ■BayLink Ferry, ☎+1 707 648-4349. Serving Vallejo. ■Alameda Oakland Ferry, ☎+1 415 705-5555. Serving Alameda and Oakland. ■Harbor Bay Ferry, ☎+1 510 769-5500. Serving (a different location in) Alameda.

By car There are four major highway approaches to San Francisco. US 101 comes up the eastern side of the SF peninsula and is the most direct route from the south, although it often backs up with traffic. Interstate 280 is a more scenic route into the city from the same direction, but with poorer connections than 101. Interstate 80 approaches the city from the east over the San Francisco Bay Bridge. From the north, US 101 takes you over the Golden Gate Bridge.

Get around On foot Walking can be an enticing option to get from one neighborhood to another, so long as you are aware of where you are and keep your street smarts-- San Francisco is a city of friendly neighborhoods, but it is also “big city” --be aware of your surroundings and keep in mind the dangers that commonly accompany a city of San Francisco’s size. Streets which often go straight up and down hills may make driving difficult, but make for breathtaking views (as well as good exercise) for the pedestrian. There are many stairway walks scattered throughout the city when the streets are too steep. You can find maps that include hiking trails, bikeways, and the grade pitch of all streets marked in varying colors by how steep each segment is, that can help you orient to city

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walks suitable to your ability and temperament, such as the downloadable map issued by the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition. Note that locals rarely use the designations “street” or “avenue,” even when differentiating the numbered streets and avenues. Numbered roads designated “Street” are located south of Market in Downtown, Castro, Noe Valley, and Mission. Numbered roads designated “Avenue” put you in the Richmond and Sunset districts. Highlight walks include:

■Chinatown. Grant from Bush to Broadway takes you through the heart of the famous district. Returning by the parallel Stockton or Powell will give you a better feeling of the day to day life of the residents, and are both good for those looking for imported commodities such as tea or herbs. ■Ocean Beach. Ocean Beach is entirely open to pedestrians in both the Richmond and Sunset districts from the Cliff House restaurant and Sutro Baths in the north to the zoo in the south. For a shorter walk, the windmills near Lincoln at the end of Golden Gate park offers a good base for a stroll north. ■Telegraph Hill. Greenwich and Filbert Steps on the east side of Telegraph Hill, both strenuous and unforgettably beautiful, offer cottages and a flock of wild parrots to enjoy on the way up to the Coit Tower. ■North Beach. Columbus runs from North Point in Fisherman’s Wharf, through the grand church and famous cafés at the heart North Beach to the landmark TransAmerica pyramid, accessible to transit on nearby Market. ■Haight Ashbury. Haight from Divisadero to Stanyan covers the shopping district famous for hippie culture, at Stan-

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yan the street becomes a path through Golden Gate Park to a popular site (then and now) for relaxing and concerts. ■Cow Hollow. Union Street between Gough and Fillmore is one of the finest shopping streets outside of the city center. ■Mission. Mission between 15th and Cesar Chavez streets provides a look at a neighborhood famous for its Latino food and culture, as well as occasional gang activity; women alone should be careful here at night. Parallel to Mission, Valencia Street is the artery of the many higher end boutiques and offbeat cafés starting to characterize the neighborhood, and has little of the grit of Mission St. ■Pacific Heights. Fillmore between Pine and Broadway is lined with a good mix of shopping, views, steep slopes, and some of the city’s largest and most expensive homes. ■The Fillmore. Post from Laguna (near 38 bus stop) to Fillmore takes you through upscale shopping and restaurants in Japantown, and turning left onto Fillmore across Geary and on to Turk takes you past the internationally known jazz venue and a mix of Black and Korean owned shops. ■The Castro and Noe Valley. Market from Church to Castro St. and a left down Castro St to 19th takes you through the center of the city’s famous gay mecca. Continuing up

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Castro St over the hill from there takes you to 24th St, the main drag of bohemian Noe Valley.

By public transit

â– San Francisco Rail Systems

San Francisco has one of the most comprehensive public transportation systems in the United States; in fact, The Travel and Leisure Website has ranked San Francisco as having the best public transit in the country. Transport services within San Francisco are provided by several bodies; they are separate organizations and although they have many interchange stations, tickets are not normally transferable across the systems (except for monthly or longer period passes). The major transit systems are:

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■Muni - streetcars, metro, buses and cable cars within San Francisco city. ■BART - regional rail services across the Bay Area. ■CalTrain - regional rail services to San José. San Francisco’s Municipal Railway or Muni, ☎+1 415 673-6864, runs a network of local transport that covers most areas of touristic interest well. An all day Muni passport good on all Muni vehicles, including Cable Cars costs $11. Other passports and passes are available for longer periods: a 3-day pass costs $18, while a 7 day pass costs $24. The passports come in the form of scratch cards; be sure to scratch off the appropriate dates before using. Passports, as well as maps of the public transport system, can be purchased from the information booths at San Francisco airport, the Cable Car ticket booth at Market and Powell, and many other locations. Monthly “FastPasses” can be a good investment, especially for those under 18. They are $10.00 for youth and $45 for adults and offer unlimited rides on the entire system. A portable wallet-sized map of San Francisco, called PocketBay, and all its public transit (MUNI, BART, Caltrain) is also available at stores around the city or through their website online. Nearly all of the city’s bus stops also have posted copies of this map with the location of the stop marked, a godsend for lost pedestrians. 90 minutes of travel on the Muni system (Metro, F-line, Buses) costs $1.50; be sure to get and keep a transfer ticket when you pay for your first ride; Muni inspectors may demand it at any time as proof of payment. Cable Cars are not included in these transfers and cost $5.00 per ride (one way, no transfers), or $11.00 per day. Before 7:00AM and after 9:00PM, seniors and disabled pay $1.00 for cable car rides. Muni Passports and FastPasses greatly reduce this cost, including cable cars in the regular daily, weekly or monthly fares. Payment must be made using exact fare

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- at Muni Metro stations, insert coins into the barriers to enter. Note that many Muni stations do not have change machines, and some change machines only issue $5 bills instead of the coins required for travel. Muni station staff do not give change. Muni arrival times are available online for many lines at NextMuni. An unofficial site is RescueMuni.com, however, often has information on routes that are not listed officially. Muni consists of:

■Streetcar at foot of Market

■Muni Metro (Lines J, K, L, M, N, S and T) is a modern light rail and subway system. It connects many southern San Francisco neighborhoods to downtown, where you can transfer to BART’s four downtown stations and the CalTrain terminus at 4th and King. Tickets can be purchased from ticket vending machines before boarding; if the stop does not have such a machine and you do not have a ticket, you must board through the front door and buy one from the driver or risk being fined by a fare inspector. MUNI Metro operates seven days a week from 4:30AM to 1:30AM.

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Between 1:30AM and 5:00AM, OWL Bus Lines service the entire Metro System. ■Historic Streetcar F Line uses historic streetcars, in original colors from several cities in the US and Milan, Italy. The line runs from Fisherman’s Wharf south along the waterfront Embarcadero to the ferry building at the foot of Market Street, then up Market Street on the surface to the Castro district. Board through the front door and buy tickets from the driver if you do not already have a transfer or pass.

■The world-famous Cable Cars run on three lines in the steep streets between Market Street and Fisherman’s Wharf: the north-south Powell-Mason and Powell-Hyde lines and the east-west California Street line. These cars are a fun ride, especially if you get to stand on the running board, if a bit impractical for everyday use (though residents of Nob and Russian Hills do, in fact, use them on a daily basis). The cable car is such an attraction that, especially on weekends, it takes longer to wait in line to ride up Powell Street than it does to walk the short but sloping distance. Board through any door or just grab a pole on the running boards; tickets are checked and sold by a uniformed conductor. Do not buy tickets from anyone off the car except for clearly marked ticket booths - scam artists are common. ■Buses— Both diesel and electric, serve the rest of city. Board through the front door and buy tickets from or show your pass or transfer to the driver. Service ranges from a consistent two minutes on many lines leaving Market, to a more sporadic 20 minutes for buses to Treasure Island and between outlying neighborhoods. Bus delays, leading to waits of 20 to 30 minutes, are not uncommon and are a source of much grousing among locals. MUNI operates the bus service 24 hours day / seven days a week in San Francisco although late night owl service is limited in both lines and stops. Other public transportation options include:

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■BART, the regional metro, has eight stations in San Francisco, making it a nice way to get between well-trafficked parts of the city, especially downtown and the Mission. BART gets you across the Bay to Berkeley and Oakland and to the airports of San Francisco and Oakland. BART Trains run on 172 km (107 miles) of track, servicing 46 Metro Style Sations. BART Trains operate on third rail power and accelarate to speeds approaching 120 km/h (80 MPH). BART operates seven days a week from 4:00AM to 12:30AM. On Weekdays BART trains depart Central San Francisco Stations at two to three minute intervals. Outer stations in far outlying suburbs have a maximum wait of fifteen to twenty minutes between BART Trains. After 12:30AM, AC Transit and other east bay transit providers, provide overnight bus service, serving principal BART Sations until about 6:00AM. BART Trains operate on a two track system (one inbound and one outbound). Train routes are named for the two terminus cities, not for the line color as denoted on the system map. For more information on BART, see the ‘Get in’ section above. ■CalTrain has three stops within San Francisco. Other than the 4th and King terminal, these are the 22nd St. Station and the Bayshore Station (off of Tunnel Ave), neither of which are particularly attractive for visitors. Of interest to visitors who wish to travel outside of city is the Palo Alto Station (at University Avenue), across the street from the campus of Stanford University, and San Jose’s Diridon. CalTrain operates fast frequent commuter rail service, seven days a week. Service generally runs from 5:00AM to Midnight. For more information on CalTrain, see the ‘Get in’ section above.

By bike If you have strong legs and can tolerate traffic with intermittent bike lanes, bicycles can be a convenient form of transportation in San Francisco. The City is fairly small -- about 7 miles on each side (11 km) -- and it’s fairly quick to get from one end to the other. But much of the terrain is hilly and hard to pedal up. Do not be misled by maps depicting the city’s strict, regular street grid, as even the straightest

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of San Francisco’s streets might include steep hills or even staircases instead of a roadway. A classic and relatively easy ride is from the tip of Golden Gate Park’s narrow Panhandle in the Haight, along paths and JFK drive through the park to Ocean Beach. JFK drive is lightly trafficked, and closed to cars on Sundays. Downtown, SoMa, and the Sunset and Richmond districts are relatively flat. There are a number of bike paths and bike routes on city streets; the San Francisco Bike Coalition keeps a lot of information about them. There are a number of bike rental companies of town, including Bay City Bike, Bike and Roll and Blazing Saddles Bike Rentals with locations in Fisherman’s Wharf, and the Bike Hut and Pacific Bicycle in SoMa.

By taxi Taxis in San Francisco are, for a large city, surprisingly inefficient and expensive, starting at $3.10 just for getting in the door. You can get an idea of how much particular taxi trips cost in San Francisco using the San Francisco Taxicab Commission’s webpage. Except for taxi stations at or near downtown business hotels, or cruising just a few major arteries, taxis can be hard to find and hail -- and calling for a cab can mean a 30-45 minute wait, if the cab shows up at all. Now, if you’re anywhere near Union Square and are holding shopping bags, just by standing on the curb and hailing passing cabs will usually get you one quite quickly. It is significantly easier to catch a taxi on weekdays, not including Friday night. If you are heading to the airport, your best bet is to call ahead with a specific pickup time to one of the many taxi companies. You will also want to schedule your cab ahead of time because if you are going beyond 15 miles, you will end up paying 50% extra.

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By car Perpetually-clogged traffic, steep hills, a confusing system of one-way streets downtown, expensive parking, and a fleet of parking control officers who enforce parking laws with zeal can make driving in downtown extremely frustrating; visitors to the city should seriously consider alternatives to automobiles when possible. In addition, traffic from the Golden Gate Bridge uses surface streets either along CA-1, 19th Avenue or US-101 on Lombard and Van Ness. The greatest hazard of driving is on Lombard Street between Hyde and Leavenworth, where a stretch known as “The Crookedest Street in the World” runs one-way down a steep hill making eight hairpin turns. Oversized vehicles such as pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles, and recreational vehicles should NOT attempt to pass through the winding stretch of Lombard Street. The most difficult problem with your car in San Francisco will be parking. Parking throughout the city is scarce. Garages, where they are available, are quite expensive ($2030/day downtown). San Francisco has some of the strictest parking laws and enforcement in the country. For day trips into the city, consider a park-and-ride at a Peninsula Caltrain station, at a Peninsula BART station, or at an East Bay BART station. When parking on a hill (and there are many of them in San Francisco), remember to always apply that parking brake and turn your wheels so that the tires are against the curb (Facing uphill, the front wheels should be turned out until the tires are resting against the curb. Facing downhill, the front wheels should be turned in so that they are set against the curb). Failure to park properly doesn’t just run the risk of having your car roll downhill, but it is also against the law and you may be ticketed.

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Finding your way around Cross streets. As San Francisco streets are numbered (100 per block) from the beginning of the street, and even and odd numbers are always on opposite sides. It is best when asking directions to ask for a cross street or neighborhood name. For instance, if you are at the intersection of Haight Street and Clayton Street, and you ask the driver of the 33 Stanyan bus “Does this bus go to Market Street?” it will get you a yes, but the bus won’t get you downtown, it will get you south from that intersection to Market and 18th in the Castro district. Numbered streets and avenues. San Francisco has both numbered streets, in the Mission, the Castro, Noe Valley, and SoMa, and numbered avenues in the largely residential Sunset and Richmond districts. Mixing numbered streets and avenues when asking directions may leave you miles from your destination. This can be confusing, as San Franciscans will not say “Street” or “Avenue” unless it is required to avoid ambiguity. Thus, “I live on Fifth Avenue” but “I live near Fifth and Geary.” Street signs generally don’t have “Street” or “Avenue” either; they just say “GEARY” or “MASONIC”.

See San Francisco has much to see - these are just the most significant sights. For more detail see the individual district sections, often linked from this entry. A couple of passes are available which offer discounts to many interesting attractions.

■CityPass. A relatively cheap and easy way to cover many attractions of the city is the CityPass. For a fare of $59 (adults) and $44 (children 17 and under) you get admission to the

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San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), the Legion of Honor and the de Young Museum (both must be visited on the same day), the Aquarium of the Bay, a Blue and Gold Fleet bay cruise, and the Asian Art Museum OR the Exploratorium. A City Pass works for 9 consecutive days starting with the use of your first ticket (each ticket only accounts for one visit to each attraction). The pass also includes seven consecutive days of Cable Car and MUNI fares. ■Go San Francisco Card. Another easy way to cover many attractions and tours is the Go San Francisco Card. This card allows you to take some tours for free (Wine Country tour, San Francisco Sightseeing, City Tour), Bay Cruises, museums, aquariums, The Conservatory of Flowers, and many other activities. Other tours and activities are also discounted from $5.00 to 40%. The cost of the card is $45 for 1 day, $65 for 2 days, $89 for 3 days. $119 for 5 days, and $139 for 7 days.

Landmarks

■The Golden Gate Bridge, located at the Golden Gate, is perhaps the most recognizable landmark in San Francisco and one of the most famous bridges in the United States, and has been called one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World. The bridge spans the Golden Gate, a strait between San Francisco and Marin County to the north, and is one of the major road routes into and out of the city. ■The famous cable cars run up and down the hills of San Francisco between Market Street and Fisherman’s Wharf and offer quite a ride. See above under Get around for more info. ■The Presidio, located in the Golden Gate district, was founded in 1776 and was the longest-running military post in the U.S. before closing as a base in 1994. It is now a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and contains the Fort Point National Historic Site. From its vantage

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point overlooking the spectacular Golden Gate, Fort Point protected San Francisco harbor from Confederate & foreign attack during & after the U.S. Civil War. Its beautifully arched casemates display the art of the master brick mason from the Civil War period. The Palace of Fine Arts is a beautiful building, built for the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition and reminiscent of Roman and Greek architecture. ■Coit Tower, atop Telegraph Hill in North Beach, is dedicated to the San Francisco firefighters (who fought a massive blaze in 1906 after the earthquake that destroyed much of the city center), and the tower is rumored to be designed to resemble the nozzle of a fire hose. At 250’ high, it is a healthy hike from the nearby neighborhoods just below the hill. ■The Transamerica Pyramid is the tallest and most recognizable building in San Francisco, located among the skyscrapers and highrises of the Financial District. ■Alamo Square Park in the Western Addition district is home to the famous Painted Ladies row of Victorian houses on its east side along Steiner Street, with many other pretty Victorians encircling the lovely park. ■Lombard Street. The (nearly) crookedest street in America, between Hyde & Leavenworth on Russian Hill. The city has a twistier but less scenic hill-climb along Vermont Street, south of McKinley Square on Potrero Hill. You can get a view of Lombard from the Powell & Hyde cable car line. ■22nd Street between Vicksburg and Church in Noe Valley and Filbert Street between Leavenworth and Hyde on Russian Hill - At a 31.5% grade, these streets share the honor of steepest streets in San Francisco. ■The Mission Dolores Church in the Mission District is one of the oldest structures in the city with superb city views from Dolores Park. The walls of many nearby buildings, especially on alleys between Market and Valencia are painted with a fantastic collection of murals of all sorts.

Neighborhoods

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■Fisherman’s Wharf is a great place to see amazing street entertainers, eat excellent seafood, watch sea lions, visit museums, or take a cruise to the infamous Alcatraz Prison or the pleasant Angel Island. Working fishing boats still come into the small harbor at Jones and Jefferson, the endpoint of the Muni Historic F-streetcar. There are also small day and party boats available. The fresh breeze from the bay can provide a bracing setting. ■Chinatown, centered around Grant Street from Bush to Columbus, is part tourist trap, part an exhibit of local life. Good eating places remain, and the side streets especially have stores one wouldn’t find in a mall. Stockton Street, the street paralleling Grant to to west is the main street where most locals do their shopping for groceries. Be sure to sample some of the dim sum and other specialties offered in the many bustling shops. However, many local Chinese prefer to eat and shop in the new Chinatowns located in other neighborhoods such as the Inner Richmond neighborhood or on Clement Street between 2nd and 12th Avenues. The Muni #1 (California) and #2 (Clement, does not run at night) buses get people from one Chinatown to the other. ■The Civic Center has impressive Beaux Arts buildings including City Hall and the War Memorial Veterans Building, the celebrated Asian Art Museum, music and theater venues (including large concert halls and a renowned Symphony and Opera), and the main public library. ■The Castro is the center of San Francisco’s Lesbian/Gay/Bi/ Transgender (LGBT) community, with theaters and small shops and restaurants. ■Treasure Island. An artificial island half-way between San Francisco and Oakland connected to Yerba Buena Island which the Bay Bridge passes through. The island has excellent views of San Francisco & Oakland skylines and quirky structures from the international fairground-turned-navy

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base-turned neighborhood. Accessible by Muni bus #108 from the Transbay Terminal downtown.

Museums When the morning is foggy, you may want to spend a few hours in one of the city’s many world-class museums. Golden Gate Park is home to the copper-clad M.H. de Young Memorial Museum, which houses an impressive collection of contemporary and indigenous art. The de Young Museum’s former Asian collection is now permanently housed in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, located in the Civic Center. Across from the de Young Museum stands the California Academy of Sciences, which re-opened in September 2008 after extensive renovations. The California Palace of the Legion of Honor is in Lincoln Park in the northwest corner of the Richmond district. In Nob Hill, the Cable Car Museum offers exhibits on the famous moving landmarks of San Francisco. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Moscone Center, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Zeum, the Cartoon Art Museum, the Museum of the African Diaspora and the Museum of Craft and Folk Art are all located in SoMa, south of Union Square. The Contemporary Jewish Museum, which was designed by Daniel Liebeskind and opened in June 2008, is the latest major addition to San Francisco’s museum scene. At the Hyde Street Pier in Fisherman’s Wharf you can go on board several historical ships, including the 1886 Balclutha clipper ship, a walking-beam ferry, a steam tug, and a coastal schooner. At Pier 45 just to the east, the World War II submarine USS Pampanito and the World War II Liberty Ship SS Jeremiah O’Brien can be visited. Nearby on Pier 39 is the excellent Aquarium of the Bay. The Exploratorium at the Palace of Fine Arts in the Marina will keep you busy for an entire day with their science

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and perception exhibits. Also in the Marina district is Fort Mason, home to a few cultural museums.

Parks/outdoors ■Golden Gate Park, in The Avenues district, is a massive (roughly 1/2 mile-by-four mile) urban oasis with windmills, bison, museums, a carousel and much more hidden among its charms. The park contains the antique palatial greenhouse of the Conservatory of Flowers, the modern and ethnic art focused de Young Museum, the large Japanese Tea Garden, and the Strybing Arboretum, a collection of plants from across the temperate world. ■Lincoln Park, in the Richmond, defines the extreme Northwestern corner of San Francisco. It provides majestic views of the Marin Headlands, the Golden Gate Bridge from the Ocean side, and the Pacific Ocean itself. At the extreme western end the well known Cliff House provides both semi-casual and a more formal eating and drinking place. The Legion of Honor museum at the center of the park houses many incredible artworks. ■Twin Peaks, accessible by car or on foot via Twin Peaks Boulevard (north of Portola Drive, just east of Laguna Honda). The small parking area at the northern tip of Twin Peaks Boulevard (875’ above sea level) is near the physical center of the city, and one of its highest points, providing spectacular views in all directions. Tour buses can get backed up here during the day, but it’s a great place to really appreciate the City from above, especially at and after sunset. Temperatures up there can be quite a bit lower than in the rest of the city, so bring a jacket. ■San Francisco Zoo. Located in the Lake Merced area at the end of the L streetcar line near Ocean Beach, this large and well maintained zoo is a great place to go if you are traveling with children or have a fondness for penguins, primates, lions or llamas. It is Northern California’s largest zoological park. ■Beaches. While not particularly well known for its beaches, San Francisco has a couple of good ones along the Pacific

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Ocean - but the water is brisk and the winds can be rough. Ocean Beach along the Sunset district is the largest and most famous beach, with plenty of sand and people enjoying themselves, but swimming is not recommended due to a very strong riptide. China Beach in Richmond is a smaller, rather secluded beach with lovely views.

Do Tours Harbor tours

â– Approaching the Island of Alcatraz

One of the best ways to see San Francisco is from the waters of San Francisco Bay. There are many companies offering San Francisco harbor tours of varying durations and prices but they all provide marvelous views of the bay, the bridges, the island of Alcatraz and the city. Only specific island tours are allowed to land at Alcatraz, but the typical harbor tour will circle the island at a slow crawl, giving you plenty of opportunity to photograph the now-inactive prison from the water. Also consider taking a ferry from San Francisco across the bay to Tiburon, Sausalito, or Alameda. Same views for a fraction of the price.

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Most tours leave from docks between Fisherman’s Wharf and adjacent Pier 39. Tickets can be purchased at kiosks along the waterfront walk. Buy tickets a day or two in advance during the summer high season. Boats usually leave roughly hourly starting around 10AM and ending around 5PM. Multi-lingual guides are available on some tours. Prices range from $20-$40, more for sunset, dinner, or whale watching tours.

■Even on a sunny day the bay can be chilly, so be sure to bring a sweater as well as sun screen. ■Some boats have snack bars on board, but bring your own water and treats to avoid paying high costs or going without. There are now limited refreshments and a souvenirs shop on Alcatraz. Companies offering harbor tours include:

■Red & White Fleet, http://www.redandwhite.com. ■Blue & Gold Fleet, http://www.blueandgoldfleet.com. ■Adventure Cat Sailing Charters, http://www.adventurecat.com. ■Hornblowers, asp?port=sf.

http://www.hornblower.com/port.

Walking/Biking tours ■All About Chinatown, http://www.allaboutchinatown. com. ■American Running Guides, Phone: +1 415 864-2103, http://americanrunningguides.com. Offers guided running tours for active travelers wanting to maintain a workout routine without being relegated to the hotel treadmill. Experienced runners take clients on classic routes throughout the city and on the Marin trails, just across the Golden Gate

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Bridge. This is a great way to see the city and get a workout before breakfast. Reservations required. ■Bike and Roll, http://www.bikeandroll.com/locations/ sanfran.aspx. ■Blazing Saddles Bike Rentals and Tours, with multiple locations in Fisherman’s Wharf, http://www.blazingsaddles.com. In addition to bike rentals, this company offers guided bicycling tours over the Golden Gate Bridge to Marin County, where you can return by ferry. ■Geogad Mobile Tours, http://www.geogad.com. Geogad has free MP3 walking tours for Union Square and Fisherman’s Wharf that can be downloaded directly from the Geogad website. These tours can be uploaded to any MP3 device and work best on MP3 players that can display the tour photos and maps. The tours are a great introductions to San Francisco as they explore the most popular destinations for travelers to San Francisco in a fun, relaxed way. Tours include Fisherman’s Wharf, the Ferry Building, Market Street, and Union Square. The tours are designed to make your sightseeing easy by linking San Francisco’s best sightseeing together with your favorite mobile device. ■San Francisco City Guides, http://www.sfcityguides.org. Founded in 1978, City Guides is a non-profit organization with more than 200 trained volunteers who lead free history and architectural walking tours in San Francisco. They are sponsored by the San Francisco Public Library.

Bus/Driving tours ■A Friend in Town, Phone: +1 800 960-8099, http://www. toursanfranciscobay.com. Offers personalized sightseeing tours conducted by a trained historian. Solo travelers or groups up to 30 are picked up and dropped off at their home, hotel, or anywhere within 100 miles of downtown San Francisco. ■Blue Heron Custom Tours and Travel, Phone: +1 415 337-1874, http://www.blueherontours.com. Private, custom tours for groups of six or fewer persons in and around the San Francisco Bay Area. Visit boutique wineries in Napa and Sonoma, San Francisco’s vibrant neighborhoods, the

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giant redwoods of Muir Woods, the hillside village of Sausalito, the magnificent California coast, and the beautiful Monterey Peninsula. ■GoCar, http://www.gocartours.com/sanfrancisco.html. These little yellow cars show you the way as they lead you on their tour of San Francisco. ■Mr. Toads Tours, Phone: +1 877 467-8623, http://www. mrtoadstours.com. Semi-private environmentally friendly tours are provided in 10-passenger, propane powered pre1930s touring cars. Highlights include Chinatown’s fortune cookie factory, Victorian homes, Lombard Street, HaightAshbury, Golden Gate Park, Presidio National Park, Golden Gate Bridge, Palace of Fine Arts, and Ghirardelli Square. Frequent daily departures from Fisherman’s Wharf and Union Square. Reservations recommended and can be made online. ■Gray Line Motorized Cable Car Tour. ■Isolda Anilovich - Russian-Speaking Tour Guide, Phone: +1 415 351-2232. (in English) (in Russian). Private, custom tours of San Francisco, Bay Area and Napa Valley are provided in native Russian language. Flexible accommodations to suit your interests, taste, and budget.

Other tours ■Guided Segway Tours, Phone: +1 415 474-3130, http:// www.sfelectrictour.com. New three hour guided tours on a Segway. Departures daily. See the San Francisco Waterfront, Marina Green, Fort Mason and more. Includes 35-45 minutes of training and 2 - 2 1/2 hours of sightseeing. Small group make this ideal for individuals and families. Reservations required. Tours are now also offered in Sausalito. ■Local Tastes of the City, (San Francisco Tours), Phone: 415-665-0480, http://www.localtastesofthecitytours.com. San Francisco City Food & Cultural Tours. Offers daily walking food tours of San Francisco’s Little Italy (North Beach) and Chinatown. In addition we can customize Wine Tours,

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Corporate Team Building Events, and Customized City Wide Group Tours. ■Ballpark Tours - San Francisco Giants AT&T Stadium, http://www.ballparktour.com/SBC_Park.html.

Performing Arts ■ San Francisco has a Half-Price Ticket Booth located right in the middle of Union Square, where tickets for most San Francisco theater performances can be purchased the day of the performance for half-price. Run by Theatre Bay Area, all service fees collected from the sale of tickets by TIX Bay Area goes right back into the theater community. ■Go to a concert, a play, a Jazz or a folk-song performance. There are performances most days to choose from, as by the San Francisco Opera, the San Francisco Symphony, in Herbst Theater (where the U.N. charter was signed), in the Old First Church, and for musicals in the Orpheum or the Golden Gate Theaters, all located in or near the Civic Center. The museum of the Legion of Honor, located in Lincoln Park overlooking the the Golden Gate (North end of 34th Ave), has organ concerts which can be heard in many of its galleries, Saturdays and Sundays at 4PM, as well as music performances in its Florence Gould Theater, as by the the San Francisco Lyric Opera. For the fall and spring Jazz festivals look into the SFJAZZ calendar. San Francisco also has many jazz Clubs, best found by browsing the web, as well as SFNation.com. Contemporary bands are featured at The Fillmore auditorium and less frequently at the large Bill Graham Civic Auditorium in the Civic Center. There is an annual blues festival in late September, at various locations. Many, but certainly not all, and no free events are listed by the City Box Office. There are at least two great free bluegrass music festivals each year - during February on the Marina and late September or October in Golden Gate Park. ■Ballet of the world class variety can be seen for only $10. San Francisco Ballet sells standing room tickets (with excellent views from the back of the orchestra) during the

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afternoon of each performance as well as two hours before showtime. ■Plays are performed at the Geary (by the American Conservatory Theater), Curran, and the Marines Memorial theatres, and at the three small New Conservatory theaters near the Civic Center. ■Musicals from Broadway and Los Angeles are shown at the traditional Golden Gate and Orpheum theaters on Market, near the Civic Center. For outrageous fun, princes and paupers go to Beach Blanket Babylon in North Beach. Teenagers are welcome at the Sunday Matinees. It considers itself the longest running musical revue in theater history.

Events ■Critical Mass. On the last Friday of each month, bicyclists in San Francisco (and about 200 like-minded cities worldwide) gather at the north end of Market Street on the Embarcadero and ride en masse to some destination, militantly demonstrating their right to occupy the roads. If you are driving in SF on a Critical Mass day, you will want to listen for radio traffic reports, but if you are stopped by the mass the best thing to do is maintain a good sense of humor and remember that it will all pass in about 5 minutes. Although, tempers can and do flare, and there have been cases where run ins with drivers and bicyclists have gotten violent.

LGBT community events San Francisco is famous for its exuberant and visible gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) community.

■ The San Francisco Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Pride Parade and Celebration is one of the largest gay pride parades and festivals in North America. It’s a huge, happy, chaotic celebration of diversity, politics, sexuality, and San Francisco wackiness, on the last weekend in June. It fills Market Street and some seven city blocks from there to City Hall. About a dozen stages and spaces offer everything from square dancing to hip-hop, from a family gar-

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den to Leather Alley. Hundreds of businesses, community groups, non-profits, and political groups attempt to connect with hundreds of thousands of celebrants. It’s a movement, it’s a market, it’s a party. Both parade and celebration are for everyone — straight as well as gay are welcome. See San Francisco/Civic Center#Do. ■Pink Saturday is a street party in the Castro on the Saturday night before the Pride Parade and Celebration. See San Francisco/Castro Street#Do. ■Halloween in the Castro. Halloween, the holiday when everyone puts on a mask, has long been a special time for gay, lesbian and bisexual people to take off the “straightlooking mask” they sometimes wore all year, and be themselves. What remains today is a huge, sometimes poorly controlled, street party in the Castro on the evening of October 31st each year. See San Francisco/Castro Street#Do.

Sports In addition to the spectator sports teams in San Francisco, there are also teams nearby in San Jose and Oakland.

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■San Francisco Giants, AT&T Park (in SoMa). Major League Baseball team. ■San Francisco 49ers, Monster Park (on Candlestick Point in Southeast San Francisco). National football league team. ■San Francisco Seals, Negoesco Stadium (on the University of San Francisco campus in Western Addition). United Soccer Leagues Premier Development League team. ■University of San Francisco Dons, University of San Francisco campus (in Western Addition). Various college sports including baseball, basketball, soccer and volleyball. ■San Francisco State University Gators, SF State campus (in Twin Peaks-Lake Merced). Various college sports including baseball, basketball and soccer.

Learn The University of California, San Francisco is one of the city’s largest employers and is dedicated solely to the education of health and the biomedical sciences. Also in the University of California system is the Hastings College of the Law, a major law school located in downtown San Francisco. The San Francisco State University is another major public university that offers a broader range of studies than the UC colleges in the city. Rounding off the city’s public colleges is the City College of San Francisco, a two-year community college. San Francisco also has numerous private colleges and universities such as the University of San Francisco located in the Richmond district.

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Work Being the world-class tourist attraction that it is, San Francisco’s economy is mostly centered on tourism. Its frequent portrayal in music, films, literature and popular culture has helped make the city and its landmarks known throughout the world. San Francisco has developed a large tourist infrastructure with numerous hotels, restaurants, and topnotch convention facilities. While it’s been a long time since people considered Montgomery Street in the Financial District to be the “Wall Street of the West”, San Francisco remains one of the principal banking and finance centers of the west coast of the United States. Many major financial institutions and banks are based in the city or have set up regional headquarters here. San Francisco’s proximity to Silicon Valley has made the city increasingly attractive for high-tech companies. In recent years, San Francisco has also been making itself a center of biotechnology.

Buy See the Districts articles for more listings. San Francisco has a wide range of small and locally-owned businesses throughout the neighborhoods of the city. In fact, San Francisco has for the most part repelled the development of large chain retailers and big box stores that are common across America. Fisherman’s Wharf has all your typical touristy souvenir shops and a few small shopping centers. Union Square has many national retailers and fancy boutique stores, as well as a few shopping centers thrown in to the mix.

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Eat See the Districts articles for more listings. San Francisco is a sensual, epicurean city with a vast array of restaurants. The price range is huge, and you can spend anywhere from a small fortune to a couple bucks for every type of cuisine. Vegetarians and vegans will find SF a paradise. Sushi is a local obsession, and though you can find a sushi bar on almost every street corner, the Richmond district has more than its fair share of excellent sushi chefs. San Francisco also has the largest Chinatown in North America, as well as one of the largest Chinese communities in the West, and many exceptional restaurants serving dim sum and other Chinese delicacies are found throughout The City. This localized Chinese cuisine has its feet in Hong Kong and America, and is different from what many visitors are accustomed to. Fisherman’s Wharf serves fresh seafood, especially clam chowder and crabs cooked to order. North Beach is the place to go for Italian food, and the Mission birth place of the misson style burrito for Mexican restaurants (and Latin American cuisine of all sorts). San Francisco restaurants are also very corkage friendly. Average corkage fee appears to be in the $15 range, with some of the more pricey places charging $25-35.

Drink See the Districts articles for more listings. The best way to find a good bar or club is to ask the advice of a local; but barring that a copy of The SF Bay Guardian or the SF Weekly will help you find something suited to your personal taste. Review website Yelp is based in San Francisco, and therefore offers very thorough coverage of San Francisco’s night life.

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San Francisco is very much of a “scene” town. Head to the Marina for mid-20s to mid-30s professionals (and those visiting from Los Angeles). Haight-Ashbury, famous for the “Summer of Love” and hippies, is still a place for alternative lifestyle, now has many neo-punks and hipsters in the mix. South of Market (SoMa) and the Mission District have left-over dot-commers and hipsters hanging out on every corner. The Castro primarily serves San Francisco’s gays. With a large Irish population, San Francisco has a number of very good Irish pubs extending out into the Sunset neighborhood. North Beach is home to several dance clubs and strip clubs. If you like soccer (football) and all things English, you should stop into the Kezar Pub, at the edge of the HaightAshbury District, or Lower Haight’s Mad Dog In the Fog. The pub quiz and bar food are good. Swill some pints and stay in the dark. Good for an entire day’s worth of drinking. It is also central to other “dive” bars on Haight, including the beer mecca Toronado.

Beer San Francisco, despite being much smaller than New York City, sports more microbreweries. Anchor Brewing Company (makers of Anchor Steam, found throughout the US) is brewed on Potrero Hill, though it is generally not open to the public (tours are available Friday afternoons by reservation). Similarly, Speakeasy Ales & Lagers opens its doors on Friday evenings, though its location in Hunter’s Point makes it hard to reach without a car. The other microbreweries are housed in brewpubs:

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■Beach Chalet & Park Chalet are at the Pacific end of Golden Gate Park, where you can enjoy a view of the ocean or sit in the lawn area. ■Pizza Orgasmica in the Richmond District specializes in California-style pizza. ■Magnolia Brewing Company is in the heart of the Haight, and operates a second restaurant down the street, The Alembic. ■San Francisco Brewing Company is on Columbus Ave in North Beach, in the shadow of the Coppola Building. ■Thirsty Bear, South Of Market, caters mostly to the happy hour crowd. ■21st Amendment, also in SOMA, is three blocks away from the Giants’ home at AT&T Park. Other destinations for beer drinkers include North Beach’s Rogue Ales Public House, the Embarcadero’s Gordon Biersch’s alehouse, the City Beer Store and Tasting Bar on Folsom St, the Mission’s Monk’s Kettle, and the famous Toronado Pub on lower Haight Street, which specializes in Belgians ales. Alameda and Marin Counties also host many microbreweries worth trying. And although Santa Rosa is 45 minutes north of San Francisco, no beer lovers should skip the renowned Russian River Brewing Company in downtown Santa Rosa.

Sleep See the Districts articles for more listings. San Francisco offers a wide range of accommodations, from a healthy supply of hostels and budget hotels to the lavish, luxurious hotels in the city center, as well as just about everything in-between. The majority of accommodations are in the northeastern portion of the city, in and around the

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popular areas of Downtown, Chinatown, and Fisherman’s Wharf. As one moves into the mostly residential neighborhoods to the west, the sleeping options filter down to small inns and bed and breakfasts. Decide if you want to be in walking distance of your destinations, or are up to driving and parking (which can be quite an undertaking in some of the busier areas of San Francisco) or taking public transit. If you have a specific destination in mind, look also in the Districts sections. If you’d rather stay closer to the San Francisco International Airport, there are plenty of standard airport accommodations in the cities surrounding the airport - Burlingame, Millbrae, San Bruno and South San Francisco. From there, one can drive or take the BART or Caltrain into San Francisco.

Contact The area code for San Francisco is 415. You need to only dial the seven digit phone number for calls within the city. For calls within the US or Canada, dial 1+area code+number, and for international calls, use the prefix 00. Pay phones are getting less and less commonplace as nearly everyone in San Francisco has a mobile phone. When you do find one, keep in mind only take coins and phone cards with a dial-to-use number. Local calls start at $.50. To get online, internet cafes are available at a sprinkling of city center locations. Many coffee houses and cafes also offer wireless connection for free or a small fee. Free access is available in Union Square. For a more scenic email check try the Apple Store on Stockton at Ellis near Market in Union Square or any of the many public libraries, especially the main branch on Market near Civic Center station.

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Additionally, those traveling with laptop computers will often find an open free signal across the city which is being deployed by a company called, Meraki. Any, “Free the Net� signal is unlocked and free to use. Blue mailboxes for mail such as letters and postcards are on many street corners. USPS post offices sell stamps and ship packages, and several private companies provide additional services.

Stay safe As with many other major cities in the world, San Francisco has its share of problems. The areas that one should be most cautious are in the neighborhoods of Bayview-Hunters Point, Visitacion Valley, Sunnydale, Western Addition, Ingleside, Tenderloin, the area around 6th and Market, and parts of the Mission and Potrero Hill. San Francisco is at the peak of a 3-year surge in violent crime, and most of these murders occur in the southeast of the City. Two Hispanic gangs have been known to shoot or stab people for wearing the wrong color, so it is recommended to keep red or blue articles of clothing to a minimum while walking through the Mission District, especially around 16th and Mission and 24th and Mission. The South of Market (SoMa) district used to be somewhat dangerous; however, recent gentrification (something that has become fairly common and a social issue in SF) has transformed it into a rather hip and much safer neighborhood with plenty of art galleries and clubs. However, it is best to be careful even now. San Francisco also has the largest homeless population per capita in the United States. If someone begs from you, you may either politely say that you do not have any change or just keep walking, and he or she will generally leave you alone. The main homeless area is around 6th and Market, heading towards City Hall, and in the Tenderloin. Haight Ashbury also has lots of panhandlers, and the area near

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Golden Gate Park at the end of Haight Street near McDonald’s is notorious for junkies and should be avoided at night. Pickpocketing can be expected, as with any other large city. Be especially cautious on crowded MUNI buses and during the busy holiday shopping season. When parking in Bay Area parking lots, be wary of anyone strange demanding payment for the space. Scam artists may patrol lots where there is no attendant and tell motorists to pay them directly in cash, making sure they don’t notice the payment machine. This can result in your car being towed. Be careful to check for ticks after hiking in fields in the bay area. There is a high rate of lyme disease transmission in the Bay Area. If a bulls’ eye rash develops at the tick bite site, immediately seek medical help and treatment with antibiotics.

Cope Publications

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■San Francisco Chronicle. The main newspaper in San Francisco, with circulation daily. $0.75 daily, $1.50 Sunday. ■San Francisco Examiner. Another daily newspaper, but this time free. ■San Francisco Daily. ■SF Weekly. A popular free-weekly distributed across the city. ■San Francisco Bay Guardian. Another popular freeweekly. ■San Francisco Bay View. Politics, economics, and news from a progressive African American perspective. ■AsianWeek. A weekly paper, one of the largest English language publications for Asian-Americans. ■Bay Area Reporter. Free-weekly serving the LGBT community. ■San Francisco Bay Times,. Another free-weekly LGBT newspaper. ■San Francisco Magazine. A monthly magazine devoted to Bay Area culture. ■MetroWize. A weekly publication dedicated to insider city and event info for San Francisco.

Religious services Buddhism:

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■Saraha Buddhist Center, 3324 17th Street, Phone: +1 415 503-1187, Hours: Su 10AM-5:30PM, M-Sa 10:30AM-5:30PM. ■Sokoji-Soto Zen Buddhist Temple, 1691 Laguna Street, Phone: +1 415 346-7540. ■Chinese Buddhist Monastery, 1230 32nd Ave, Phone: +1 415 664-9456. ■Gold Mountain Monastery, 800 Sacramento Street, Phone: +1 415 421-6117, http://www.drba.org. ■Vietnamese Buddhist Association of San Francisco, 243 Duboce Avenue, Phone: +1 415 431-1322. ■San Francisco Buddhist Center, 37 Bartlett Street, Phone: +1 415 282-2018, http://sfbuddhistcenter.org. ■Nichiren Hokke Buddhist Temple, 2016 Pine Street, Phone: +1 415 567-3020. Catholic churches:

■St. Patrick, 756 Mission Street, between 3rd & 4th Streets, across from Yerba Buena Gardens, near the Moscone Convention Center, http://www.stpatricksf.org, Hours: Su 7:30AM, 9AM, 10:30AM; 12:15PM, 5:15PM; M-Sa: 7AM, 8AM, 12:10PM (except W 12PM), 5:15PM. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints:

■Golden Gate Ward, 1900 Pacific Avenue, at Gough St, https://secure.lds.org/units/home/0,9781,600-1-7171212,00.html, Hours: Su 9AM, 10:20AM. Episcopal:

■Grace Cathedral, 1100 California Street, at Taylor, Phone: +1 415 749-6300, http://www.gracecathedral.org, Hours: Su 7:30AM, 8:15AM, 11AM. Choral Eucharist (This service is webcast live every Sunday!). Protestant:

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■City Church of San Francisco, 2460 Sutter Street, at Divisidero, http://www.citychurchsf.org, Hours: Su 9AM, 10:45AM. Jewish:

■Mission Minyan, 3543 18th Street, 2nd floor, at the Women’s Building between Guerrero and Valencia, http://www. missionminyan.com, Hours: F 6:30PM, Sa 9:40AM (every other week). ■Magain David Sephardim Congregation, 351 4th Ave, Phone: +1 415 752-9095. ■Richmond Torah Center- Chabad, 423 10th Avenue, http://www.rtchabad.org, Hours: Su: 9AM, M-F 7AM, F 6:30PM, Sa 9:30AM. ■Congregation Chevra Thilim, 751 25th Ave, Phone: +1 415 752-2866, Hours: Su-F 8AM, Sa 9:30AM. ■Adath Israel, 1851 Noriega Street, http://www.adathisraelsf.org, Hours: Shacharis: M-F 7:15AM, Shabbos 9AM, Sunday/Legal Holidays 8AM. Mincha/Ma’ariv: Su-Th, Summer: 7:15PM, Winter: 10 minutes before sundown, Friday, Summer: 7PM, Winter: 10 minutes before sundown. ■Keneseth Israel, 873 Sutter Street, http://kenesethisraelsf. org, Hours: F 20 minutes before sundown, Sa 9:30AM, 4PM. ■Chabad of Noe Valley, 94 29th Street, Phone: +1 415 8217046, www.chabadnoevalley.org, Hours: F 6PM (winter:

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sukkot through passover), 7PM (summer:passover to sukkot), Sa 10AM.

Respect San Francisco is renowned for its openness to diversity in race, gender, sexual orientations and personal style. This trait is widely considered to be one of the defining features of the city, and it draws both visitors and transplants alike. However, for someone who has not been exposed to such pervasive diversity and acceptance, it may come as a shock. Smokers beware: as in the rest of California, smoking is illegal in bars, restaurants, and other public places. Bay Area people can be particularly vocal about your personal habits. Be aware of nonsmoking areas, and try to be courteous about smoking in other places. They will probably not bother you about standing and smoking outside a restaurant or bar. On the other hand, smoking marijuana is remarkably welltolerated. If you are visiting from elsewhere in the U.S., you may be very surprised to find that marijuana is not considered to be a problem by San Franciscans, and even by The City’s police. While still illegal under federal law, a law was passed in 2006 officially making marijuana the lowest priority for the SFPD. This does not mean that you should smoke marijuana just anywhere -- as with cigarettes, it is considered improper etiquette to smoke marijuana in crowded areas.

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Get out For laid-back, involved-with-your-fellow-travelers kind of travel (cooking is shared, the sleeper busload camps ensemble), check out the Green Tortoise. GT runs buses up to Seattle and down to Baja California; to Black Rock City, Yosemite National Park, a National Parks loop including the Tetons, Yellowstone and more, and to New York. Bikes can be rented from around the northern waterfront (Pier 41/Fisherman’s Wharf/Aquarium Park area) or near Golden Gate Park for trips to Marin County via the Golden Gate Bridge. Stanyan near Haight at the end of the park has several good shops. Golden Gate Transit also sporadically serves the North Bay from San Francisco, and has bike racks on most buses. Nearby destinations suitable for day trips include:

■Oakland— A diverse and vibrant city, Oakland was once considered San Francisco “sister city,” and has been regaining that title in recent years due to a growing economy and a general renaissance of the city. It’s worth a visit for its many distinct and charming neighborhoods. ■Berkeley— Home to the University of California, Berkeley and one of the nation’s most progressive communities. Also a hub of liberal political activism for the past several decades. It is also home to quite a few superb restaurants. Alice Waters’ French-inspired Chez Panisse in the north of the city, and is often listed as one of the best restaurants in the world, offering regional and seasonal organic food prepared simply but skillfully. Prices vary, and the restaurant has more and less formal dining areas, but dinner and wine for under $100 is easily possible. ■Healdsburg— Charming Wine Country town located among some of California’s greatest wine appellations: Alexander Valley, Dry Creek Valley, Russian River Valley and Chalk Hill. Relaxed yet sophisticated atmosphere, Healds-

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burg offers excellent restaurants, shopping and wine tasting. About 70 miles North of the Golden Gate Bridge. ■Napa Valley— The main wine growing region in the United States, a trip to the many wineries makes for a fun day, while those wanting a longer adventure can relax in any one of the many spas, bed and breakfasts, or other lodging options. ■Muir Woods— A 560 acre forest of old-growth redwood trees located in Mill Valley just north of the Golden Gate Bridge, Muir Woods is a pleasant respite from the city, and accessible by Golden Gate Transit. ■Point Reyes National Seashore— Located just north of San Francisco along the Pacific Coast Highway (State Highway 1), Point Reyes is a beautiful seashore that is particularly nice to visit when gray whales are migrating along the coast, usually best in mid-January and then from March through May. Point Reyes Station is the main town at the base of the massive peninsula and has plenty of restaurants and places to stay. ■Monterey is an otherwise quiet beach town home to one of the country’s best aquariums. ■Santa Cruz— Located on the coast north of Monterey Bay, this funky town is home to surfers, the beautiful and techsavvy University of California, Santa Cruz, and a popular boardwalk. The Santa Cruz Mountains north of town are a great place for outdoor recreation such as hiking, and home to misty forests of famous, enormous redwood trees. The city is accessible by Amtrak-run shuttle bus (about 50 minutes) from San Jose Diridon station. ■Vallejo is home to a wildlife discovery theme park, Six Flags Discovery Kingdom. ■Yosemite National Park— Tours from San Francisco make for a wonderful day trip. Make sure to visit the amazing Giant Sequoias.

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Golden Gate

■The iconic Golden Gate Bridge The Golden Gate area is in the northern section of San Francisco. It is made up of two National Historic Landmarks — The Presidio and Fort Mason — as well as several upscale neighborhoods including Pacific Heights, Cow Hollow, and the Marina District. It has some of the most beautiful scenery and intact natural environments in the city. It is roughly bounded by the San Francisco Bay to the north and west, Lake and California Sts to the south, and Van Ness Ave to the east. The Golden Gate Bridge connects this district with Marin County across the Bay to the north.

Understand Pacific Heights Pacific Heights, located 370 feet above sea-level and overlooking the Bay, was little more than a sandy hill until 1870, when the Cable-Car line was extended and connected the area to downtown. Today, it’s favored by visitors for its impressive panoramic views of San Francisco Bay and the

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Presidio, its abundance of opulent Victorian mansions, historic chateaus, and foreign embassies, and finally its many upscale restaurants. The three blocks on Broadway St, between Lyon St and Divisadero St, have particularly good vistas and are known as the “Gold Coast.” Some of the buildings date back as far as 1853, with the majority being constructed after the 1906 earthquake. Considered today to be the home of “old money” families and young urban professionals, it was first settled by the “nouveau riche” of the late 1800s. The neighborhood is predominantly peaceful and residential with most of its activities centered around Fillmore St. It was also the backdrop for the 1990 movie “Pacific Heights” starring Melanie Griffith.

Cow Hollow Cow Hollow derived its name form the many dairy farms that were established there in the mid-1800s. However, with the advent of the Gold-Rush, the neighborhood flourished. Prominent San Franciscans began to settle the area and erected grandiose well-appointed Victorian, and then later Edwardian mansions. By 1891, the area had become so popular that all the dairy farms were closed down. Today, this once luscious grazing land is more renowned for its impressive mansions and its eclectic mix of antique stores, art galleries, bars, and restaurants. Union St is the main drag, where the Union St Festival is held annually.

The Marina District The Marina district was built on landfill — some of it wreckage of the 1906 earthquake — in the early 20th century to provide a fairgrounds for the 1915 World’s Fair (also called the Panama-Pacific Exhibition). Its poor foundation made it the focus of most of the damage (and media attention) in the Loma Prieta Earthquake of 1989. Today it is an affluent, residential neighborhood with well trimmed hedges and colorful flower window boxes. Bounded by the Bay, the neighborhood actually has an impressive marina, which is home to a couple of prestigious yacht clubs. Marina Green, an 8

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block stretch of grass running along the edge of the Bay, is a favorite place for jogging, strolling, picnicking, and kite flying. Only a few blocks away, Chestnut St is where shoppers can peruse boutiques or people watch while sipping on a latte. “Culture vultures� circle round Fort Mason, with its array of museums, art galleries and quirky theatres.

Fort Mason and the Presidio Fort Mason and the Presidio are two former military posts on the northern tip of the San Francisco peninsula. Today, both are national historic landmarks and come under the remit of the Golden Gate National Recreational Area. Fort Mason is smaller and has a world class youth hostel as well as several museums and theaters. The Presidio is huge, with 1,480 acres of rolling hills, forests, hiking trails, historic buildings, architecture, beaches, and marsh lands. It has one of the most intact natural environments you will find on the peninsula and is a must for every itinerary.

Get in

â– Golden Gate Map

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By car The main entryways are Van Ness Ave from the south and Bay St from the east. From the north and west, take Highway 101 through the Presidio to Lombard St. Chestnut St, one of the main shopping and restaurant streets, is one block north of Lombard St — parking is scarce and can sometimes take up to an hour to find. The best choice for parking may be the free area in Fort Mason, at Beach and Buchanan Sts, another 4 short blocks north of Chestnut. Union St, being Cow Hollow’s main street, is three blocks south of Lombard St.

By bus Public transportation, provided by MUNI, is plentiful and frequent.

■Cross town routes. The 28 bus gets you along Lombard St into Fort Mason from the Daly City BART station, traveling first a long way up 19th Ave and through the Presidio by the Golden Gate Bridge. Buses 29 and 43 traverse much of the western part of San Francisco before terminating in the area, with the 29 stopping in the Presidio and the 43 running through the Presidio before stopping in the Marina district. The 22 Fillmore bus (24-hour service), from the 16th St BART Station, goes north on Fillmore St all the way to the Marina Green. ■From downtown. From the CalTrain station, traveling through downtown past the Montgomery St BART station (outbound) or the Powell St BART station (inbound), the 30 Stockton bus (which runs about every 6 minutes during the day, until 1AM) gets you to Chestnut St and near the Palace of Fine Arts. You can also take the 41, 45 (both serve Union St), 76, and 12. Routes 1, 2, 3, and 4 serve Pacific Heights and Lower Pacific Heights. In addition to the many MUNI routes, there is also the free PresidiGo shuttle service with two lines: a Downtown line

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that runs directly between the Transbay Terminal in downtown to the Presidio, and an Around the Park line which runs throughout the Presidio.

On foot If you enjoy walking, you can take the Historic F-line street car from downtown, along the Embarcadero, to Fisherman’s Wharf, and walk along San Francisco Bay past Fort Mason — it’s a bit of hill — to the Marina Green. If you’re downtown, simply follow Van Ness Ave all the way north and take a left anywhere from California St to Lombard St.

Get around With six lanes, going east-west, Lombard St is the main road and considered (along with north-south Van Ness) to be part of Highway 101. The winding section of Lombard St is due east, on Russian Hill. This is a fantastic area to either walk or cycle through as it is predominantly flat (with the obvious exception of Pacific Heights), and also because it’s a very safe area. Given the area’s popularity with joggers, walkers, power-walkers, and cyclists, you will definitely not be alone. Chestnut St is the business section of the Marina and considered among the poshest of San Francisco’s streets. Union St and Fillmore St are the other two main shopping areas in this district. To the north, along San Francisco Bay, runs the 74 acre stretch of Marina Green. Your walk can continue along the bay to the west, through the Presidio, along the restored Crissy field marshes, all the way to the Golden Gate Bridge; or to the east, a short climb through Fort Mason and down into Fisherman’s Wharf. If you are interested in biking around the area — “biking the bridge” is very popular activity — there are several companies that rent bikes out to tourists by the hour or for the

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day, including Bay City Bike, Bike and Roll, and Blazing Saddles Bike Rentals.

See There are lots of things to see in this district ranging from the pristine natural landscapes of the Presidio, to man made marinas, Victorian architecture, and the Golden Gate Bridge. In places like the Presidio and Fort Mason you’ll find an interesting blend of both, with modern offices, historical buildings, and museums making there home alongside sandpipers, coyotes, and fox squirrel. “City slickers” should be more at home futher inland where they’ll find galleries and museums, architecture, and urban parks. Naturalists will be more at home along the coast line, from Fort Mason all the way along into the Presidio.

■The Six Gallery, 3119 Fillmore St, between Pixley St and Filbert St. On Friday, October 7, 1955, the “Six Gallery reading” took place here. It was a seminal moment in the Beat Generation movement and attracted such poets and writers as Alan Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, Philip Lamantia, Michael McClure, Philip Whalen, and Jack Kerouac. The gallery has since closed but you can still visit the site where this watershed event took place. Price: Free. ■Wave Organ, at the end of Yacht Road, after the Golden Gate Yacht Club, Hours: It’s best at high-tide — 5:30AM. Designed by George Gonzales and Peter Richards in 1986, the Wave Organ is a system of PVC pipes that harness the power of the ocean to create music... or at least what can be interpreted as music! There is a unique space at the end of a spit of land where you can sit and enjoy the sounds, and even if it’s not your kind of music, there are some excellent

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views and it’s also a great place to relax and have a picnic. Price: Free.

■Glassy waters and tall masts at the Marina

■Yacht Clubs. You can’t come to the Marina district without actually seeing, well... the marina! Here where you will find an impressive flotilla of vessels — both sail and power. There are various “small craft” harbors located at either end of Marina Green, but the two main yacht clubs are:

■Golden Gate Yacht Club, 1 Yacht Road, at the end of Yacht Road, Phone: +1 415 346-2628, generalmanager@ggyc.com, http://www.ggyc.com/index.php. Founded in 1939, this club is both a popular destination for pleasure cruises and for competitive regatta racing. It’s plainer than its neighbor the SFYC, however it got a major boost of late when Larry Ellison and the Oracle guys signed up and the club became the challenge club of record for the America’s Cup.

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■St Francis Yacht Club, 700 Marina Blvd, at the end of Baker St, Phone: +1 415 563-6363, Frontdesk@StFYC.com, Fax: +1 415 563-8670, http://www.stfyc.com/. Founded in 1927, this club has over 2,400 members and is also popular as both a cruise and regatta venue. It is reputedly the most exclusive yacht club in San Francisco and there are some serious vessels docked here.

Parks The two largest parks in this area are listed separately under the Fort Mason section and The Presidio section below. The Marina Green Park is listed under the Do section below as it’s primarily used as a recreational area. Other parks include:

■Alta Plaza Park, between Jackson St and Steiner St, Clay St and Scott St, Phone: +1 415 567-1265, laurenhallsf@yahoo. com, http://www.sfnpc.org/altaplazahistory. A charming and immaculately manicured Pacific Heights park with great vistas over the Bay. It has tennis courts and a playground, and is a pretty good place for a picnic, or even just a rest if you’ve just scaled the hill. ■Lafayette Park, between Sacramento St and Washington St, Laguna St and Gough St, Phone: +1 415 831-2750, kim@ kimbarnes.net, http://www.sfnpc.org/lafayetteparkhistory. Another little oasis park in the heart of Pacific Heights — like its neighbor Alta Plaza Park, it is pristinely kept by local residents and it also has excellent views over the Bay.

Galleries and museums Many of the galleries and museums are listed separately under the Fort Mason section and The Presidio section below. Here are some others:

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■Hourian Art Galleries, 1843 Union St, between Octavia St and Laguna St, Phone: +1 415 346-6400, houriangallery@ aol.com, http://www.hourianart.com/index.php, Hours: 10AM-6PM daily. Has an interesting collection of Persian miniatures crafted using arabesque patterns and bright color. The owner also sells some of his own art and is happy to talk to you about it. Price: Free. ■Images of the North, 2036 Union St, between Buchanan St and Webster St, Phone: +1 415 673-1273, gallery@ImagesNorth.com, Fax: +1 415 673-1272, http://www.imagesnorth. com/, Hours: Tu-Sa 11AM-5:30PM and by appt. Features a eclectic collection of prints, sculpture, and jewelry from Alaskan and Canadian Inuit artists. The artwork sold here is an interpretation of Arctic life and culture. Price: Free. ■Wonders of Tibet, 1771 Union St, between Gough St and Octavia St, Phone: +1 415 409-2994, wot@wondersoftibet. com, Fax: +1 415 409-2995, http://wondersoftibet.com/, Hours: M-F 10AM-6PM, Sa 10AM-4PM. A Tibetan inspired gallery where you will find all kind of original Buddhist treasures like; jewelry and beads, rugs, Dharma, antiques, artifacts, and gifts. Price: Free.

Architecture Architecture buffs will definitely enjoy taking a stroll through the Pacific Heights and Cow Hollow neighborhoods, where ornate (and huge!) Edwardian and Victorian mansions are on display. Many are privately owned so be respectful, but some are open to the public. If you are a fan of the Spanish Colonial Revival-style, continue your tour through The Presidio section below where you will find many fine examples.

■Atherton House, 1990 California St, at Octavia St, http:// www.noehill.com/sf/landmarks/nat1979000527.asp. An 1881 Victorian mansion that was built for Mrs. Doming de Goni Atherton by an unknown architect. It was one of the first Queen Anne residences in San Francisco. It is reported

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to be haunted, and is a stop on the haunted tour of San Francisco... boo! Price: Free. ■Haas Lilienthal House, 2007 Franklin St, at Washington St, Phone: +1 415 441-3000, hrkraft@sfheritage.org, Fax: +1 415 441-3015, http://www.sfheritage.org/home.html, Hours: Tours: Su 11AM-4PM, W and Sa noon-3PM. Tours leave every 20 to 30 minutes and last about 1 hour. This is a 11,500 square foot Queen Anne Victorian, built solely out of redwood in 1886 for William Haas. It has been fully preserved as per its original design. It presently houses the San Francisco Architectural Heritage who offer tours inside the house and around the grounds. Price: General admission: $8, Seniors and Children 12 and under: $5. ■The Leale House, 2475 Pacific Ave, between Steiner St and Fillmore St. This house was built in 1853 and as such it is one of the city’s oldest residences. A ferry-boat captain known as Captain Leale bought the house three decades later and remodeled it in the popular “Italianate” style. ■The Octagon House, 2645 Gough St, at Union St, Phone: +1 415 441-7512, http://www.nscda.org/, Hours: Open to the public on the second Sunday of every month, and the second and fourth Thursday of every month, from noon-3PM. Dating from 1861, this eight-sided house with its cupola top, dormer windows, and roof lanterns was built in the belief that such octagonally shaped houses promote healthier living. Today, the building is a American Colonial museum. It has many artifacts on display including antique furniture and historical documents. It is run by the National Society of the Colonial Dames. Price: Free. ■San Francisco Public Library — Golden Gate Valley Branch, 1801 Green St, at Octavia St, Phone: +1 415 3555666, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Tu 10AM-6PM, W 2PM8PM, Th 1PM-7PM, F 1PM-6PM, Sa 1PM-6PM. Built in 1917 by architect Ernest Coxhead, this unique “Beaux-Arts” library was modeled on a Roman basilica. Today, in the “21st century” it has free internet facilities. ■Spreckles Mansion, 2080 Washington St, at Octavia St. This white “Beaux-Arts” limestone mansion was built in 1913 by sugar baron Adolph Spreckles. It has 55 rooms including a Louis XVI Ballroom. The mansion is currently a

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private residence which is owned by the famous romancenovelist, Danielle Steele. â– Vedanta Temple, 2963 Webster St, at Filbert St, Phone: +1 415 922-2323, temple@sfvedanta.org, http://www.sfvedanta.org/. This temple was built in 1905 by architect Joseph Leonard. Architecturally the building reflects the Vedantic philosophy that all roads lead to one God; hence the building has a mix of architectural styles like Edwardian, Moorish, Queen Anne, Colonial, and Oriental among others. It has five different kinds of towers on the top including a Russian-style onion dome and a European-style castle turret. The extraordinary temple was the first Hindu temple built in the West. Price: Free.

Fort Mason

â– Evening shadows at Fort Mason Fort Mason was a U.S. Military coastal defense post and port for over 100 years. In 1985, it was ordained as a National Historic Landmark, primarily for its vital logistical role during World War II and then later the Korean War. Today, it is part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and is under the remit of the National Park Service. Situated on a headland, Upper Fort Mason has great views of the Golden Gate Bridge and of Alcatraz. Lower Fort Ma-

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son, which comprises approximately 13 acres, is the site of the former military port and today houses the Fort Mason Center, which is committed to nonprofit and cultural activities with an emphasis on entertainment, recreation, and education in the fields of; the visual/performing arts, humanities, and ecology/environment. It has three museums and six theaters and hosts nearly 20,000 events each year. Most of the activities are provided at nominal or sometimes no cost to the public. The small, specialized museums in Fort Mason include:

■Museo ItaloAmericano, Fort Mason Center, Building C, Phone: +1 415 673-2200, sfmuseo@sbcglobal.net, Fax: +1 415 673-2292, http://www.museoitaloamericano.org/, Hours: Tu-Su noon-4PM, M by appointment. Hosts photo exhibits and the work of modern Italian artists. Price: Free. ■African American Historical and Cultural Society, MacArthur Ave, Phone: +1 415 441 0640, Hours: W-Su noon5PM. Displays historical and contemporary African-American arts. Price: Free — on the first Wednesday of every month. ■San Francisco Museum Of Modern Art — Artists Gallery, Fort Mason Center, Landmark Building A, Phone: +1 415 441-4777, artistsgallery@sfmoma.org, http://www.sfmoma.org/museumstore/artists_overview.html, Hours: TuSa 11:30AM-5:30PM. Housed over two floors, the SFMOMA displays the art — in a variety of styles and media — of over 1,000 emerging and established Northern Californian artists. Price: Free. ■The Long Now Foundation Museum, Landmark Building A, Phone: +1 415 561-6582, services@longnow.org, Fax: +1 415 561-6297, http://www.longnow.org/, Hours: M-F 10:30AM-5PM, Sa-Su 11AM-6PM. The Long Now foundation was established to foster a better understanding of a “slower/better” mind set — as opposed to “faster/cheaper” one.

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As well as holding many seminars and talks, they also have a museum and store at their premises. Price: Free.

The Presidio The Presidio ( and) was founded in 1776 and was the longest-running military post in the U.S. before closing as a base in 1994. It is now a part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and Congress has designated it a National Historic Landmark District, which is the highest historic designation that can be given in the U.S. The Park itself is a beautiful 3 square miles of mostly hilly and wooded areas. The Presidio has around 800 buildings within its perimeter, many of which are of historical significance. Some of the buildings have residential tenants, others commercial ones. At the end of 2005, about 2,500 people lived in the Presidio and it is home to the headquarters of Lucasfilm (owned by George Lucas, the creator of “Star Wars�), a unique situation for a national park. Part of their drinking water comes from Lobos Creek (Rio de los Lobos), the last free-flowing creek in San Francisco. The Presidio Trust, that manages the majority of the Park, is currently renovating the remainder of the buildings, with a view to increasing its list of residents to 5,000. The Presidio contains 11 miles of hiking trails, including the Golden Gate Promenade, the Coastal Trail, an ecology trail, and portions of the Bay Area Ridge Trail, the Bay Trail, and the Anza National Historic Trail. Cyclists can explore the area on 14 miles of paved roads and along some unpaved parts of the Bay Area Ridge Trail. A world-class board-sailing area borders Crissy Field, while fishing and crabbing opportunities abound from the nearby rocks and pier. Along the way there are also many historical and architectural points of interest as well as some fantastic vistas and natural scenery.

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Visitor centers and museums ■Arion Press, 1802 Hays St, at Belles St, Phone: +1 415 6682548, arionpress@arionpress.com, Fax: +1 415 668-2550, http://www.arionpress.com/, Hours: Tours: Th 3PM. Arion Press is an considered the best publisher of fine press books in the nation. They offer tours of their gallery, which has a large collection of limited edition books and prints; and of the production facility, including the pressroom, and the typefoundary that contains the oldest hot metal type foundry in the country. Price: Tours: $7. ■Battery Chamberlin, Battery Chamberlin Rd, Phone: +1 415 561-4323, http://www.nps.gov/prsf/planyourvisit/battery-chamberlin.htm, Hours: On the first full weekend of each month, between 11AM-3PM, you can take part in demonstrations of the gun and visit a small seacoast defense museum at the battery. Battery Chamberlin, built near Baker Beach in 1904, was constructed as part of a modernization effort to accommodate the lighter, stronger, more powerful coastal defense weapons developed in the 1880s. Today Battery Chamberlin holds the last 6-inch “disappearing gun” of its type on the West Coast. Price: Free. ■Crissy Field Center, 603 Mason St, on the corner of Mason St and Halleck overlooking the marsh, Phone: +1 415 5617690, tellmemore@parksconservancy.org, Fax: +1 415 5617695, http://www.parksconservancy.org/our_work/crissy/, Hours: W-Su 9AM-5PM. The Crissy Field Center includes an activity area, learning and computer labs, a teaching kitchen, library, and an information area and bookstore. The center offers a rich array of education programs that serve the entire San Francisco community. Focusing on the convergence of Urban and Natural Environments, educational programs and activities promote multicultural perspectives, environmental stewardship, and community service. They also have a small cafe inside the premises serving up organic, locally sourced food. Price: Free. ■Exploratorium, 3601 Lyon St, at Jefferson St, Phone: 1 415 397-5673, visit@exploratorium.edu, Fax: +1 415 561-0307, http://www.exploratorium.edu/, Hours: Tu-Su 10AM-5PM. A great kid friendly option, with lots of interactive exhibits

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teaching about science, with intriguing displays about the mind, natural systems, sound, sight, and much much more. Price: Adults: $14, Students/seniors/teens: $11, Children: $9, Children under age 3: Free (Free on first Wednesday of each month). ■Fort Point National Historic Site, Marine Dr, Long Ave and Marine Dr, Phone: +1 415 556-1693, http://www.nps.gov/ fopo/, Hours: Video orientations, guided tours, self-guiding materials, exhibits, and publication sales are offered Th-M 10AM-5PM. From its vantage point overlooking the spectacular Golden Gate, Fort Point protected San Francisco harbor from Confederate and foreign attack during and after the U.S. Civil War. Its beautifully arched casemates display the art of the master brick mason from the Civil War period. It is best approached from the Marina District along the water through the kites and bay-views of the connected Crissy Field Park. Price: Free. ■Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, 991 Marine Dr, Phone: +1 415 561-6622, farallones@noaa. gov, Fax: +1 415 561-6616, http://farallones.noaa.gov/, Hours: W-Su 10AM-4PM. The Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary Visitor Center provides information on the sanctuary and features hands-on educational exhibits on local marine life. The visitor center is housed in the historic Coast Guard Station at the west end of Crissy Field. The Life Saving Service and Coast Guard were housed here from 1890 to 1990, providing a variety of services ranging from search and rescue operations to navigational assistance. Price: Free. ■William Penn Mott, Jr. Visitor Center, Building 50, Moraga Ave, at Graham St, Phone: +1 415 561-4323, http:// www.nps.gov/archive/prsf/places/vc.htm, Hours: 9AM-5PM daily. Information on points of interest and Presidio history is available at the Visitor Center, temporarily located in the Presidio Officers’ Club. Several videos can be viewed in the theater and a bookstore offers topical books and other media. Price: Free.

Historical points of interest

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■Battery East, off Marina Dr, Phone: phone. This fortification weas built in the 1870s, to withstand newer and heavier ordinance. You can view the earthen works and brick-lined magazines built to protect large Rodman guns and their ammunition. ■Cavalry Stables and Pet Cemetery, Cowles St, between Lincoln Blvd and McDowell Ave, Phone: +1 415 561-4323, http://www.nps.gov/prsf/planyourvisit/cavalry-stablesand-pet-cemetery.htm. Five brick cavalry stables were built in 1914. Each stable could house 102 horses, enough for a cavalry company. A paddock stood between the stables and the cavalry barracks on the hill behind, and a blacksmith shop was in front. After the cavalry left the stables, they were adapted to other uses — the Pet Cemetery was started and also a veterinary hospital. Price: Free. ■Crissy Airfield, Crissy Field, 603 Mason St, Phone: +1 415 561-7690, tellmemore@parksconservancy.org, http://www. nps.gov/archive/prsf/history/crissy/crissyaf.htm. From 1921 to 1936 Crissy Army Airfield was the center of West Coast military aviation. During these years of explosive advances in air power, pilots from Crissy performed maneuvers and mock battles, flew endurance flights, surveyed the west by air, and scouted for forest fires. Price: Free. ■Fort Winfield Scott, Ruckman Ave, near Appleton St, http://www.nps.gov/archive/prsf/coast_defense/harbor_defense_sf/fort_scott/index.htm. Situated near the gun batteries of the coastal bluffs, Fort Scott was established in 1912 to serve as headquarters for the Coastal Artillery Corps of the San Francisco Bay area. Spanish Revival style buildings, the first of this style to be built on the Presidio, characterize the post, and the U-shaped parade ground breaks from traditional quadrangular design. The post was eventually converted to an Army Education Center. Price: Free. ■Infantry Row, Infantry Terrace, near Moraga Ave, http:// www.nps.gov/prsf/planyourvisit/infantry-row.htm. Buildings 101 through 105, known as “Infantry Row,” were constructed to accommodate troops consolidated at the Presidio after the Indian Wars. These were some of the first brick barracks constructed in the west, showing that the Presidio was to be a permanent post. Built in the late 1890s, these

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barracks display Colonial Revival style architecture with Romanesque elements. Price: Free.

■Letterman Complex, Letterman Dr, between Lombard St and Presidio Blvd, Phone: +1 415 561-4323, http://www. nps.gov/prsf/planyourvisit/letterman-complex.htm. Established in 1898 to care for sick and wounded soldiers, it is the Army’s oldest named general hospital and during WWII it became the largest Army hospital in the country. Today the complex is home to Lucas Films and lots of Star Wars fans make the pilgrimage there each year. You won’t get inside unless you know someone, but you can practice your “Jedi” skills outside with Yoda, at the “Yoda Fountain.” Price: Free. ■Main Post, Lincoln Blvd, at Montgomery St, mainpost@ presidiotrust.gov, http://www.nps.gov/prsf/historyculture/ main-post.htm. The Main Post is at the heart of the Presidio. It marks the site of a Spanish garrison established here in 1776 and it is home to the oldest buildings in the Presidio, dating back to 1861. Price: Free.

■Pershing Square, Pershing Dr, between Bliss Ct and Craig Ct, mainpost@presidiotrust.gov, http://www.nps.gov/prsf/ historyculture/pershing-square.htm. The flagpole in Pershing Square (at the Main Post) marks the site of a disastrous 1915 fire that destroyed the residence and killed the wife and three daughters of General John “Black Jack” Pershing of World War I fame. Just east lies the site of the original Spanish presidio, built in 1776 on this windswept slope. A boulder by the sidewalk approximates the northwest corner of the original presidio, which formed a square about 300 feet (100 m) on each side. Two bronze cannon at this site, forged in the 1600s, were originally mounted at Castillo de San Joaquin, a fort built at the point overlooking the Golden Gate. They are among the oldest cannon in North America. Price: Free.

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■Public Health Service Hospital, Wedemeyer St and 15th Ave, off Hayes St, Phone: +1 415 561-4183, phsh@presidiotrust.gov, http://www.nps.gov/prsf/planyourvisit/publichealth-service-hospital.htm. Built in 1875, the Public Health Service Hospital initially tended the needs of merchant seamen. Eventually the hospital also cared for members of the U.S. Coast Guard and other governmental agencies, Native Americans and Vietnam refugees. In addition, important research on plague diseases was conducted here. A new hospital replaced the old in 1932, and two wings were added in the 1950s. The hospital closed in 1981. ■San Francisco National Cemetery, 1 Lincoln Blvd, near Fisher Loop, Phone: +1 415 561-2008, http://www.nps.gov/ archive/prsf/history/cemetery_history.htm. Many military personal have been buried here over the years, including a General from the American Civil War and 35 Medal of Honor recipients. ■West Coast Memorial to the Missing of World War II, at Kobbe Ave and Lincoln Blvd, near Baker Beach, Phone: +1 415 561-4323, http://www.nps.gov/prsf/historyculture/ world-war-ii-memorial.htm. One of three memorials on U.S. soil dedicated to missing service members of WWII, the West Coast Memorial is a curved wall of California granite set in a grove of Monterey pine and cypress. Overlooking the Pacific Ocean, it bears the names of 413 members of the

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Armed Forces who lost their lives or were buried at sea in the offshore Pacific coastal waters.

Architecture

■The Palace of Fine Arts Roman rotunda

■The Golden Gate Club, 135 Fisher Loop, at Infantry Terrace, Phone: +1 415 561-5444, events@presidiotrust.gov, http://www.presidio.gov/event/rental/goldengateclub/. With its beautiful Spanish Colonial Revival-style exterior, it was originally dedicated in 1949 as a first-class service club for enlisted men and women and was the site of several historic treaty signings during the early days of the Korean War. Stylishly remodeled, the club is now a full-service conference and events center. Price: Free. ■Officers Club, 50 Moraga Ave, at Graham St, Phone: +1 415 561-5444, events@presidiotrust.gov, http://www.presidio. gov/event/rental/officersclub/. Originally built by the Spanish with adobe walls, it was remodeled in the 1930s in the Spanish Colonial Revival-style adorned with rustic Spanishtile gable roofs, heavy, rough timber lintels and beams, and decorative ironwork. Price: Free. ■Old Post Hospital, Funston Ave, at Lincoln Blvd, http:// www.nps.gov/prsf/planyourvisit/old-post-hospital.htm.

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Built in 1864, it displays both Italianate and Greek Revival architectural styles. Constructed during the Civil War, it is one of the oldest standing buildings on the Presidio. The original structure was modified by adding wings and enclosing the porches. In 1897, an octagonal surgical tower with windows on all sides was added to provide a well-lit operating room. Price: Free. ■Palace of Fine Arts, 3301 Lyon St, at Bay St, Phone: +1 415 567-6642, info@palaceoffinearts.org, Fax: +1 415 567-4062, http://www.palaceoffinearts.org/, Hours: 6AM-9PM daily. The only structure remaining from the 1915 World’s Fair, it features a classical Roman rotunda (1,100 feet wide, 162 feet high) with curved colonnades (30 Corinthian columns frame a wide walkway in the colonnade) situated in a idyllic park setting with a classical European-Style lagoon. It’s a great place to unwind, have a picnic, and watch the swans float elegantly by. It also has a theater offering a variety of shows, musical and cultural events. As of July 2008, it is being renovated. Price: Free. ■Post Interfaith Chapel, Fisher Loop, Building 130, near Infantry Terrace, Phone: +1 415 561-3930, paul@interfaithpresidio.org, http://www.interfaith-presidio.org/, Hours: M-Th 10AM-2PM, Su 10AM-1PM. Built in the early 1930s, this cruciform-shaped sanctuary is a fine example of Spanish Colonial Revival style architecture, with features that embellished early mission churches. Stained glass windows depict virtues of military character, and a large wall mural

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by Victor Arnautoff (famed Coit Tower muralist) depicts the peacetime activities of the Army. Price: Free.

Golden Gate Bridge

â– ... a spectacular view through the Golden Gate Bridge

US 101 (from Park-Presidio or Lombard St entrance), +1 415 921-5858 (email:bridgecomments@goldengate.org). Open 24 hours, occasionally closed Sunday morning for events. $5 (toll driving south into San Francisco; free on foot or bike). Vehicular traffic in both directions share a single deck; yellow pylons are used to allot lanes to one direction or the other depending on traffic conditions. Observation areas and parking lots are provided on both the north and south sides of the bridge; the best way to enjoy the bridge is to park and walk across, not least because you don’t have to pay a toll. Note that winds are high and it can be cold and foggy; dress appropriately. Bikes can also be difficult to navigate in the high winds and narrow pathway. The Golden Gate Bridge is one of the most iconic bridges in the United States, and has been called one of the Seven

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Wonders of the Modern World. The bridge spans the Golden Gate, a strait between San Francisco and Marin County to the north, and is one of the major road routes into and out of the city. The masterwork of architect Joseph B. Strauss, whose statue graces the southern observation deck, the bridge took seven years to build, and was completed on May 27, 1937. Not actually golden in color — a common misconception — the bridge is painted a deep red-orange color known as “International Orange,” also known as “Orange Vermillion.” The color was specifically chosen to make the bridge more easily visible through the thick fog that frequently shrouds the bridge. Erroneous legend has it that the bridge is continuously painted, with crews starting at one end and, on getting to the other end, turning around and starting over again. In fact, the bridge is only painted once every few years, but touch up work is done continuously by a team of 40 painters. The San Francisco end of the bridge is accessible by the Muni 28 bus line from Fort Mason in the Marina District near Fisherman’s Wharf. The fastest way to reach it from downtown is to take the 38 or 38L up Geary to “Park Presidio” (after 12th Ave) and transfer to a Fort Mason bound 28. Golden Gate Transit buses serve the bridge on request, but buses are very infrequent and unpredictable except at afternoon commute times, when they are crowded.

Do Due to the “outdoorsy” nature of the area, many of the activities here are centered around nature, exercise, and recreation. If you feel like catching a show, there are also many theaters here of all descriptions.

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■Exercise and Play, Marina Green dr, along Marina Blvd between Buchanan St and Scott St, Phone: +1 415 831-2700. Marina Green is a long, flat strip of grass at the front of the Marina that runs along the Bay, equidistant between the Presidio and Fort Mason. The “Green” teems with joggers, cyclists, dog walkers, kite flyers, volleyball players, frisbee throwers, and rollerbladers — all getting their health kick exercising in an iconic location. The activities continue all the way through Crissy Fields (“The City’s Front Yard”) to the foot of the Golden Gate Bridge where you will find surfers patiently waiting for that next “big one.” ■Farallon Islands Nature Cruises, San Francisco Yacht Harbor/Marina Green, just outside the Harbormaster’s office, Phone: +1 415-441-1106 (Oceanic Society), menglund@ oceanic-society.org, Fax: +1 415-474-3395, http://www.oceanic-society.org/, Hours: Office Hours: M-F 8:30AM-5PM Cruise: Departs Sa-Su, Check-in time is 7:30AM, boat leaves 8AM. Learn about the importance of preserving our natural environment on a 8 hour cruise to this National Wildlife Refuge, 27 miles off the coast of San Francisco in the Gulf of the Farallons. The islands’ 211 acres of rocks and surrounding waters are home to Sea-Lions, Tufted Puffins, Pigeon Guillemots, and Rhinoceros Auklets among other species. In total, twenty three species of marine mammals, including 18 species of whales and dolphins reside in these waters. Price: Adults $105. ■Steps at Broadway and Lyon, Pacific Heights, at Broadway St and Lyon St. If you climb these steps you can get a breathtaking view of the Palace of Fine Arts, the Marina, and the Bay. The Steps are known locally as the “San Francisco Stair Master”... and with good reason! ■Walking Tours. There are a number of themed walking tours available in the area including:

■Heritage Walks, 2007 Franklin St, at Washington St, Phone: +1 415 441 3000, natasha@sfheritage.org, Fax: +1 415 441-3015, http://www.sfheritage.org, Hours: Hours vary — see website. These architectural tours of Pacific Heights and Cow Hollow are given by the San Francisco Architec-

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tural Heritage Foundation and focus mainly on its abundance of “Painted Ladies” (no... not grandma! — it refers to Edwardian and Victorian mansions) as well as the historical underpinnings of the area. They offer several different tours of varying lengths so check their website for specific details. Price: $8-$10.

■San Francisco Ghost Hunt Walking Tour, Depart from the lobby of the Queen Anne Hotel, 1590 Sutter St, corner of Sutter St and Octavia St, Phone: +1 415 922 5590, sfghosthunt@yahoo.com, http://www.sfghosthunt.com/, Hours: W-Th 7PM. Who’s afraid of ghosts? Well, if you have the backbone for it, you can visit places long suspected of being haunted by ghostly visitations and spirits on this one hour guided tour. Price: Reservations not required; Adults: $20 Under 16’s: $10.

Theater and performing arts ■BATS Improv at Bayfront Theater, Fort Mason Center, Bldg B, 3rd floor, Lower Fort Mason, Phone: +1 415 474-8935, bats@improv.org, Fax: +1 415 474-9385, http://www.improv. org, Hours: Shows usually start at 7PM/8PM. BATS is a performing arts theater company that focuses on all forms of improvisational format, including theatersports. They also provide classes for anyone interested. Price: $8-$20. ■Blue Bear Performance Hall, Fort Mason Center, Bldg D, 2nd floor, Lower Fort Mason, Phone: +1 415 673-3600, contact@bluebearmusic.org, http://www.bluebearmusic. org. The Blue Bear Performance Hall is used mostly for school musical performances. They have a music school that teaches all kind of music from Jazz to rock-n-roll to

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musicians of all ages. The hall also hosts some independent stage productions.

■Clay Theater, 2261 Fillmore St, between Clay St and Sacramento St, Phone: +1 415 267-4893, http://www.landmarktheatres.com/market/SanFrancisco/ClayTheatre.htm. The Art Deco/Neo-Classical Clay theater was built in 1910 and is one of the oldest movie theaters in the city. It specializes in indie and international films. It’s a small little theater, with smallish seats and an even smaller screen; but it’s got a cozy atmosphere, its popcorn comes laden with butter, and overall it’s a great place to catch an art house film. Price: General: $10.50 Bargain Matinee: $8.00 (M-F before 6PM, Sa-Su 1st showing). ■Cowell Theater, Fort Mason Center, Middle Pier, behind Herbst Pavilion, Phone: +1 415 441-3400, http://www.fortmason.org/performingarts/cowell.shtml, Hours: See website for schedule and times. Hosts theater, dance, talks, and film festival productions among other things. Price: $0-$60. ■Magic Theatre, Fort Mason Center, Bldg D, 3rd floor, Lower Fort Mason, Phone: +1 415 441-8822, boxoffice@magictheatre.org, Fax: +1 415 771-5505, http://www.magictheatre.org, Hours: W–Sa 8PM, Su 2:30PM and 7PM. The Magic Theater is where you can go if you are interested in seeing productions from new and established American playwright’s such as the Pulitzer Prize-winner, Sam Shepard. Price: $25-$75. ■Palace of Fine Arts Theatre, 3301 Lyon St, Phone: +1 415 567-6642, info@palaceoffinearts.org, Fax: +1 415 567-4062, http://www.palaceoffinearts.org/, Hours: See website for schedule and times. This 1,000 seater theater hosts concerts, comedy shoes, film events, and lectures. Price: $20$150. ■Young Performers Theatre, Fort Mason Center, Bldg C, 3rd floor, Lower Fort Mason, Phone: +1 415 346-5550, sf_ ypt@hotmail.com, http://www.ypt.org, Hours: Sa 1PM, Su 1PM and 3:30PM. Shows do not run every week, see website

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for exact dates. The Young Performers Theatre is a professional children’s theater. It hosts a dozen or so shows each year and offers also classes in the dramatic arts, creative drama, comedy and musical theater. Price: Adults: $10, Children under 13: $7.

Events and festivals ■Ethnic Dance Festival, Palace of Fine Arts, Phone: +1 415 474-3914, info@worldartswest.org, Fax: +1 415 474-3922, http://www.worldartswest.org/main/home.asp, Hours: June — Sa 2PM and 8PM, Su 2PM. The festival is held over four weekends in June and celebrates traditional ethnic dances like Flamenco, Balinese, Fuego Nuevo, Irish, and YaoYong. It’s colorful, energetic, and exciting... and you might actually learn a thing or two for the dance floor! Price: Opening Night Gala: $175, Single ticket: $22-$44, All four weekends ticket: $80-$158. ■Easter Parade and Spring Celebration, Union St, Gough St to Fillmore St, Phone: 800 310-6563, http://www. sresproductions.com/union_street_easter.html, Hours: Easter Su 10AM-5PM. The kid-friendly but diverse festivities include; a petting zoo, pony rides, live music, train rides, alfresco dining, and a parade. It attracts about 35,000 attendees annually. Good family fun for all! Price: Free. ■Escape from Alcatraz Triathlon, Phone: 310 473-0411, lisa.jenkins@imgworld.com, http://www.escapefromalcatraztriathlon.com/site3.aspx, Hours: Second Su in June. Ok, hands up who can swim 1.5 miles through chilly waters, jump on a bike and cycle 18 miles, and then polish it all off with a mere 8 mile run... any takers? Well every year this event attracts 2,000 people who can, including world champions and Olympic medalists. The course winds its way through Fort Mason, along Marina Green and through the demanding trails of the Presidio and beyond. Anywhere along the route is good from a spectators point of view, but the transition area and the finish is at Marina Green. Price: Free. ■Fantasy of Lights, Union St and Fillmore St, Union St — between Van Ness Ave and Steiner, Fillmore St — between

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Union St and Lombard St, Phone: 800 310-6563, http://www. sresproductions.com/fantasy_of_lights.html, Hours: First Sa in December, 6PM-9PM. This is a month long celebration that sees local shop owners adorning their windows with the prettiest of lights, in an attempt to capture the coveted prize of “Best Lighting Effect.” It all starts with an opening night parade when the lights are officially turned on and is followed by a month of programs and events. Although it’s certainly pretty, it’s probably not going to help with the global warming problem! Price: Free. ■San Francisco Blues Festival, Great Meadow, Fort Mason, Marina Blvd and Laguna St, Phone: +1 415 979-5588, info@sfblues.com, http://www.sfblues.com/, Hours: Last weekend in Sept: F-Su. This is the oldest continually running blues fest in the world and it attracts some great Blues performers every year. Previous performers included B.B. King, Carlos Santana, and Little Richard among others. For the famished, they also have some flavorful New Orleans style barbeques to compliment the music. Price: Advance: $35 per day, At the gate: $40 per day, Two-day ticket: $55, Single-day reserved lawn seating: $50, Two-day reserved lawn seating: $80, Children under 10 free. ■San Francisco International Film Festival, 39 Mesa St, Suite 110, near the Officers Club, Phone: +1 415 561-5000, gga@sffs.org, Fax: +1 415 561-5099, http://fest08.sffs.org/ films/, Hours: Two weeks in Apr/May. This festival has been going on now for over 50 years. It is organized by the San Francisco Film Society who are based in the Presidio, but the arthouse movies, documentaries, and short films are shown throughout the city. Price: $12, Matinees: $8. ■Tribal, Folk, and Textile Art Show, Fort Mason Center, Lower Fort Mason, Phone: +1 310-455-2886, info@caskeylees.com, http://www.caskeylees.com/shows/8/tribal/sf/, Hours: F 11AM-7PM, Sa 11AM-7PM, Su 11AM-5PM. More than 100 international dealers and galleries showcase their tribal, folk, and textile art at this show. Thousands of pieces will be on display from places such as Africa, the Himalayas, the Middle East, and the Americas. Price: $20 daily. ■Union St Art Festival, between Union St and Gough St, Phone: 800 310-6563, Fax: +1 415 456-6436, http://www.

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unionstreetfestival.com/, Hours: First weekend in June: SaSu 10AM-6PM. This festival attracts many local artists who line the streets displaying their arts and crafts, along with live jazz and classical music performances. The festival is one of San Francisco’s largest annual free events, and attracts around 100,000 attendees each year. The festival has over a hundred arts and crafts booths, as well as two live entertainment stages, and an organic farmer’s market. Price: Free.

Buy The three main shopping thoroughfares are Union St (Cow Hollow), Fillmore St (Pacific Heights) and Chestnut St (The Marina). Most stores here are of the small specialist boutique varitey — a mix of unique and trendy chain shops reflecting the upscale nature of the neighborhoods. Union St is unquestionably one of the best streets in the city to window shop on (and hey, that costs nothing!), so take a slow stroll down Union St and enjoy the vibrancy and atmosphere of the shops, galleries, eateries, cafes and passers-by. With a friendly, neighborhood feel, Fillmore St displays its charm through eclectic Victorian buildings that the stores are housed in. The street has a relaxed vibe, shopping here is a leisurely activity — many stores don’t open until 11AM, some are closed on Mondays and most are closed on holidays. Chestnut St in the Marina is the one-stop street for anything you could need. Word to the wise — watch out for all the double-wide and double-decker baby strollers... they’ll run you down.

■Ambiance, 1864 Union St, between Octavia St and Laguna St, Phone: +1 415 923-9797 or +1 415 923-9796, http://www. ambiancesf.com/index.html, Hours: M-F 11AM-7PM, Sa 10AM-7PM, Su 11AM-7PM. The store has a great selection of women’s clothes and jewelry. ■Bee Market, 3030 Fillmore St, between Filbert St and Union St, Phone: +1 415 292-2910, beemarket@earthlink.net, Fax: +1 415 292 2911, http://www.bee-market.com/main.html,

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Hours: M-F 10AM-6PM, Sa 10AM-4PM. Owned by French woman Virginie Wallace, this European furniture store always has something interesting on offer. Their French inspired collection is simple yet elegantly crafted and blends both classical and modern elements of furniture design. ■Blu, 2259 Fillmore St, between Clay St and Sacramento St, Phone: +1 415 776-0643, Hours: M-Sa 11AM-7PM, Su noon6PM. Women’s modern European clothes and accessories store. ■Books Inc, 2251 Chestnut St, at Avila St, Phone: +1 415 9313633, website@booksinc.net, http://www.booksinc.net/ NASApp/store/IndexJsp, Hours: Su-Th 9AM-10PM, F-Sa 9AM-11PM. Unusual and quirky book store that holds a storytelling hour for kids every Sunday afternoon. ■Gallery of Jewels, 2101 Union St, at Webster St, Phone: +1 415 550-0226 or 877 639-0226, shawn@galleryofjewels. com, Fax: +1 415 550-0424, http://www.sanfranciscomerchants.com/noevalley/galleryofjewels/1.htm, Hours: M-F 10AM-6PM, Sa 10AM-4PM. The gallery and sells distinctive, limited edition jewelry handcrafted by local and International designers. They have an good variety of silver, gold and platinum accessories and sell jewelry for both men and women. ■Girlfriends, 1824 Union St, at Octavia St, Phone: +1 415 6739544, http://www.girlfriendsboutique.com/, Hours: M-Sa 10AM-8PM Su 11AM-6PM. To help you prepare for bikini season, this store has all you need to accessorize for the beach. The store has been visited by some famous “Girlfriends” including Courtney Cox, Gwenyth Paltrow and Britney Spears. ■Golden Gate Bridge Gift Center, Golden Gate Bridge Plaza, Golden Gate Bridge Toll Plaza — southeast side, Phone: +1 415 923-2333, http://goldengatebridge.org/gift/, Hours: 8:30AM-7:30PM daily. You can purchase souvenirs of the Golden Gate Bridge here. ■House of Magic, 2025 Chestnut St, at Fillmore St, Phone: +1 415 346-2218, houseofmagic@earthlink.net, Fax: +1 415 6810232, http://www.houseofmagic.com/. They have a great selection of costumes and gags all year round; including

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wands, disguises, prosthetics, vintage collectibles, as well as starter kits to help you become a magician. ■Kiehl’s, 2360 Fillmore St, between Clay St and Washington St, Phone: +1 415 359-9260, http://www.kiehls.com/_us/_en/ home/index.aspx, Hours: M-Sa 10AM-7PM, Su 11AM-6PM. Chain store offering facial and body scrubs, cleansers, and fragrances for both men and women. Lots of free samples for you if you cannot make up your mind. ■Margaret O’Leary, 2400 Fillmore St, at Washington St, Phone: +1 415 771-9982, fillmore@margaretoleary.com, http://www.margaretoleary.com/, Hours: M-Sa 10AM-6PM, Su 11PM-5PM. Ladies store specializing in high-end knits and accessories. ■My Roommate’s Closet, 3044 Fillmore St, at Union St, Phone: +1 415 447-7703, info@myroommatescloset.com, http://www.myroommatescloset.com/index.html, Hours: Tu-F 11AM-6:30PM, Sa 11AM-6PM, Su-M noon-5PM. Describing themselves as a “boutique outlet” they sell high-end designer clothing (Vera Wang etc) from other boutiques at deeply discounted prices. Sizes are limited though. ■Nest, 2300 Fillmore St, at Clay St, Phone: +1 415 292-6199, Fax: +1 415 674-1216, http://www.nestsf.com/, Hours: M-F 11AM-8PM, Sa 10AM-8PM, Su 11AM-6PM. French-inspired furniture, gifts, and accessories. ■Oliviers & Co., 2208 Fillmore St, near Sacramento St, Phone: +1 415 474-1408, customer.service@oliviersandco. com, http://www.oliviersandco.com/FO/, Hours: M-Sa 10AM-7PM, Su 11AM-6PM. Boutique store that sells provincial olive and balsamic vinegars from all over the world — like Sicily and Haute Provence. ■Past Perfect, 2230 Union St, between Fillmore St and Steiner St, Phone: +1 415 929-7651, Hours: 11:30AM-7PM daily. Antique store with a large and eclectic selection of vintage goods and artwork to choose from. ■Red Dot Chestnut, 2176 Chestnut St, at Pierce St, Phone: +1 415 346-0606, redinfo@reddotshops.com, http://www. reddotoutlet.com/, Hours: M-Sa 11AM-7PM, Su 11AM-6PM. Selling designer goods at a discount — clothes, shoes, bags

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and jewelry. They also have some unique items like vegan handbags. ■Safeway, 15 Marina Blvd, between Beach St and Buchanan St — near Fort Mason, Phone: +1 415 563-4946, www.safeway.com, Hours: M-Su noon-midnight. Large, local Marina Safeway. ■Vino!, 2425A California St, between Fillmore St and Steiner St, Phone: +1 415 674-8466, vino_wine_shops@bigmagic. com, Fax: +1 415 674-8461, Hours: M-F 11AM-8PM, Sa 10AM8PM, Su 11AM-6PM. They have a great selection of wines (circa 300 varieties) to suit every budget.

Eat There is an excellent selection of restaurants in this area; everything from regional Chinese restaurants to Tapas bars, and from Japanese sushi houses to American steakhouses, romantic French bistros, and Italian restaurants. A lot of the food plated here is of the healthier variety — a reflection of the heightened overall health consciousness of residents in this area. Therefore, many of the restaurants serve up food that’s organic, vegetarian, or produced from locally sourced ingredients... is there any other way!? Like most other businesses in the area, most restaurants are on Chestnut St, Union St, and Fillmore St; or indeed, one of the side streets leading off them.

Budget ■Ace Wasabi Rock and Roll Sushi, 3339 Steiner St, just north of Lombard St, Phone: +1 415 567-4903, Fax: +1 415 749-1873, Hours: M-Th 5:30PM-10:30PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-11PM, Su 5PM-10PM. This sushi place is popular with the locals, offering good sushi with a rock and roll theme. Quirky and a bit of fun. Price: $5-$14.50. ■Acre Cafe, The Thoreau Center, Building 1013, 1st Floor, Lincoln Boulevard at Torney Ave, Phone: +1 415 561-2273, Javier@acregourmet.com, http://www.acregourmet.com/

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ourservices/concessions.html, Hours: M-F 7AM-3PM. This cafe is situated in the Presidio and it has excellent views over the landscape. It’s popular with workers from the nearby offices but fatigued tourists stumble in every now and again. They serve simple international food like organic soups, salads, and sandwiches with a heavy focus on fresh healthy ingredients like free range chicken. Price: $7-$11. ■Barney’s Gourmet Hamburgers, 3344 Steiner St, between Chestnut St and Lombard St, Phone: +1 415 563-0307, http://www.barneyshamburgers.com/, Hours: M-Th 11AM10:30PM, F-Sa 11AM-11PM, Su 11AM-9:30PM. Great gourmet burgers here at a very affordable price. They have a great selection of burgers including interesting some vegetarian options like “tofu burgers,” and fyi, all their burgers can be wrapped in lettuce instead of a bun... hey give it a try! They also serve salads and sandwiches. Price: $8-$12. ■Gatip Classic Thai Cuisine, 2205 Lombard St, at Steiner St, Phone: +1 415 292-7474, Fax: +1 415 292-2324, https://webpos.wlinformation.com/gatipsf/, Hours: Su-Th 5PM-10PM F-Sa 5PM-10:30PM. Spicy Northern Thai cuisine in the Marina at an affordable price. Price: $7-$12. ■The Grove Fillmore, 2016 Fillmore St, between California St and Pine St, Phone: +1 415 474-1419, Hours: M-Th 7AM11PM, F 7AM-11:30PM, Sa 8AM-11:30PM, Su 8AM-11PM. This cafe style restaurant has got a wholesome Californian menu with staples like salads, bagels, sandwiches, and cheese plates etc. They also do a very affordable breakfast where you can get options like “Huevos Rancheros” and “Country baked eggs” for under 10 bucks. Price: $7-$12. ■Home Plate, 2274 Lombard St, between Pierce St and Steiner St, Phone: +1 415 922-4663, Hours: M-Su 7AM-4PM. Wonderful breakfast/brunch place on Lombard St. Its always busy on weekends and it can feel a tad cramped but the food is worth it — delicious homemade scones with homemade jam and preserves, omelettes, pancakes/waffles, and eggs benedict. This is certainly one of the best breakfast places in the city! Price: $5-$10. ■Pluto’s Fresh Food for a Hungry Universe, 3258 Scott St, at Chesnut St, Phone: +1 415 775-8867, http://www.plutosfreshfood.com/, Hours: M–F 11AM–10PM, Sa–Su 10:30AM–

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10PM. Fun American restaurant that’s part of a chain. It’s mostly green salads and sandwiches here — custom made to your discerning specifications! Price: $7-$12.

Splurge ■A16, 2355 Chestnut St, between Scott St and Divisadero St, Phone: +1 415 771-2216, email. This is part wine bar part restaurant; they serve simple Italian favorites (pizza, pastas, salumi) from the Campania region of Italy. They also have traditional wood-burning ovens to perfect your pizza. ■Annie’s Bistro, 2819 California St, at Divisadero St, Phone: +1 415 922-9669, Fax: +1 415 922-5567, http://www.anniesbistro.com/, Hours: M-W 5:30PM-9:30PM, Th 5:30PM-10:30PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-10:30PM, Sa-Su 10:30AM-2:30PM. Great little bistro that has an extensive collection of Californian wines. The menu reflects the usual staples that you’d expect to find at a bistro like pain perdue, crepes, and crème brulee; however, it also has many more traditional Californian dishes as well. Price: $25-$35. ■Betelnut Pejiu Wu, 2030 Union St, between Webster St and Buchanan St, Phone: +1 415-929-8855, Fax: +1 415 9298894, http://www.betelnutrestaurant.com/, Hours: Su-Th 11:30AM-11PM, F-Sa 11:30AM-midnight. “Pejiu Wu” — means side street beer house. Along with oversized mugs of Asian beer you will find Pan-Asian authentic regional dishes. The food here tends to be quite hot. With its authentic style cuisine, it has become a Cow Hollow establishment. Look out for the long lines though and the staff can sometimes be a bit unfriendly too. Price: $22-$55. ■Boboquivari’s, 1450 Lombard St, between Franklin St and Van Ness Ave, Phone: +1 415 441-8880, comments@ boboquivaris.com, Fax: +1 415 441-8805, http://www.boboquivaris.com/, Hours: 5PM-11PM daily. Popular steakhouse in the Marina, Bobo’s is a “surf-n-turfers” dream. The menu boasts excellent steaks (porterhouse, fillet mignon, New York bone-in) combined with mussels, shrimp, lobster, and Dungeness crab... yummy! Bobo’s is a colorful, if upscale

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restaurant, that is very popular and almost always busy. Price: $30-$65. ■Brazen Head, 3166 Buchanan St, at Greenwich St, Phone: +1 415 921-7600, Fax: +1 415 921-0164, http://www.brazenheadsf.com/, Hours: Bar Hours: 4PM-2PM Dinner: 5PM-1PM. Serving wholesome American cuisine including their signature dish “Certified Angus Beef NY Pepper Steak” — this restaurant is a very well kept local secret. Price: $18-$30. ■Capannina, 1809 Union St, at Octavia St, Phone: +1 415 4098001, info@capannina.us, http://www.capannina.us/, Hours: M-Th 4:30PM-10:30PM, F-Su 4:30PM-11PM. A new Italian restaurant that focuses on the familiar and tempting classics of Italian cuisine. They have a “prix-fixe” as well as an “a la carte” menu. Price: $25-$75. ■Eastside West Restaurant and Raw Bar, 3154 Fillmore St, at Greenwich St, Phone: +1 415 885-4000, eswrawbar@ aol.com, Fax: +1 415 885-4001, http://www.eastsidewest. com, Hours: Dinner: Th-Sa 4PM-midnight, Su-W 4PM-10PM Brunch: Sa-Su 10:30AM-4PM. They have excellent seafood here — shrimp, mussels, crabs, lobsters, and oysters. It’s perfect for appetizers and drinks on a weekend afternoon; or how about their happy hour M-F 4PM-7PM, with $1 oysters and $2 draft beers... the perfect combination! Price: $14$40. ■Hime, 2353 Lombard St, at Scott St, Phone: +1 415 931-7900, info@himerestaurant.com, Fax: +1 415 931-7905, http:// www.himerestaurant.com/, Hours: Su-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-11PM. Hime is a upscale Japanese and sushi fusion restaurant in the Marina that offers a twist on more traditional Japanese Izakayas. It serves pretty good sushi and sashimi in a airy yet cozy feeling dinning room. It attracts a lot of couples and is a good place to steal food from your partner’s plate! They also have a decent selection of Saki as well. Price: $30-$45. ■Isa, 3324 Steiner St, just off of Chestnut St, Phone: +1 415 5679588, Fax: +1 415 409-1879, http://www.isarestaurant.com/, Hours: M-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30-10:30PM. Comfortable environment with an innovative fusion menu made up of small plates that blend French style with Asian flavors.

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Owner Luke Sung is one of San Francisco’s most celebrated young chefs. Price: $10-$30. ■Izzy’s Steaks & Chops, 3349 Steiner St, between Lombard St and Chestnut St, Phone: +1 415 563-0487, izzys3345@ aol.com, http://Izzyssteaksandchops.com, Hours: M-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30-10:30PM, Su 5-10PM. Classic steak restaurant with wood floors, saw dust, comfortable booths, steak sauces, and the requisite cowboy hat to boot! Their pricing is affordable and their steaks big and tasty. Price: $17-$37. ■Jackson Fillmore Trattoria, 2506 Fillmore St, at Jackson St, Phone: +1 415 346-5288, dkrietzman@jacksonfillmoresf. com, Fax: +1 415 454-1768, http://jacksonfillmoresf.com/, Hours: Tu-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-10:30PM, Su 5PM9:30PM. This 3 star trattoria serves up old-style southern Italian food and wine from the region. The food is excellent and affordable (given the quality) and the place is usually crowded as a result. Price: $25-$45. ■Liverpool Lil’s, 2942 Lyon St, between Greenwich St and Lombard St, Phone: +1 415 921-6664, Fax: +1 415 921-1019, http://www.liverpoollils.com/, Hours: Su 10AM-11PM, M 11AM-11PM, Tu-F 11AM-1AM, Sa 10AM-1AM. This restaurant was established in 1973 and has a good atmosphere, and also fantastic views over the Presidio from the curbside tables. They serve good burgers/sandwiches and traditional American food. Price: $13-$30. ■Perry. Over 40 years old, this restaurant is another Cow Hollow tradition. It is known for its classic American Cuisine. ■Pres a Vi, 1 Letterman Dr, Bldg D, Ste 150, cross St Chestnut St, Phone: +1 415 409-3000, info@presavi.com, Fax: +1 415 409-3022, http://web.mac.com/presavi/Pres_a_Vi/ Pres_a_Vi_Home.html, Hours: M-Tu 11:30AM-9PM, W-Sa 11:30AM-10PM, Su 10AM-9PM. Serves international cuisine using fresh locally sourced ingredients. They have a “small plates style” — allowing you to sample different foods and even share amongst others at the table. When the weather

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is good you can dine outside on their extensive patio. Price: $14-$50. ■Presidio Social Club, 563 Ruger St, Bldg 563, at Lyon St, Phone: +1 415 885-1888, Fax: +1 415 885 9188, http://www. presidiosocialclub.com/, Hours: M-Sa 5:30PM-11PM, Su 4PM-9:30PM. Serving traditional American and international cuisine like fish and chips, Kobe beef, and liver and onions. They have a large outdoor veranda that is an excellent place to dine... weather permitting! There is also a lively bar on the premises if you fancy a few stiff drinks. Price: $18-$27. ■Rose. Features Italian and Californian fare created using fresh organic and local produce; this is certainly a restaurant for the more environmentally conscious. It’s a very romantic spot and a favorite among locals.

Drink The area is not particularly well known for its cutting edge nightlife; it’s more residential vis-à-vis downtown, and it does not have the cool cachet of trendy hotspot SoMa, nor the hipster popularity of North Beach and The Mission. So, if you’re looking for a progressive clubbing scene, you probably won’t find it here. What the area does offer though is many upscale bars, wine bars, sleek lounges, and clubs. The scene here can be pricey and many people deliberately avoid the bars and clubs here feeling that they are too pretentious, and consequently sterile. However, this can be a mistake as there are also plenty of cheaper options where you can get equally raucous and debaucherous on your nights out... thank God for that!

Bars ■Bar None, 1980 Union St, between Bunchanan St and Laguna St, Phone: +1 415 409-4469, partybarnone@yahoo.com, http://www.barnonesf.com/, Hours: M-Fr 4PM-2AM, Sa-Su noon-2AM. Featuring pool, darts, beer pong, a good selec-

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tion on the jukebox and the “Power Hour” — Su-Th 9PM10PM, $2 Wells and Drafts. ■Black Horse London Pub, 1514 Union St, at Van Ness Ave, Phone: +1 415 928-2414, http://www.sfblackhorsepub. com/, Hours: 5PM-midnight. They advertise this place as the smallest bar in San Francisco... “Small Pub, Big Heart.” It is exactly 7 wide and 19 foot long... not for the claustrophobic! It may be small but this is a fun little bar with a list of “Tenets” on the wall; including “Thou Shall give priority seating to all Women in the Bar. (If you need further explication, please see “Exit.”)” and “Thou Shall have one pub and one pub only. (Ours…).” ■Blue Light, 1979 Union St, between Buchanan St and Charlton Ct, Phone: +1 415 922-5510, lcossey@sbcglobal.net, Fax: +1 415 922-5852, http://bluelight.ypguides.net, Hours: Bar: M-F 4PM-2AM, Sa-Su 11AM-2AM Kitchen: Kitchen M-F 5PM10PM, Sa noon-10PM, Sunday 11AM-10PM. Their “Taco Tuesday” is a long standing favorite amongst locals and features $3 margaritas for the ladies. Guys are equally well served with $2 Coronas, and with $1 tacos, who could go hungry? ■Bus Stop, 1901 Union St, between Charlton Ct and Laguna St, Phone: +1 415 567-6905, http://www.busstopbar.com/, Hours: M-F 10AM-2AM, Sa-Su 9AM-2AM. The Bus Stop has a comfortable “homey” atmosphere with 17 TVs, and sports memorabilia on the walls. It attracts a twenty-something/ thirty-something crowd. Price: Happy Hour (M-F 4PM-6PM has $1.50 domestic beers and half price cocktails). ■G Bar, 488 Presidio Ave, at California St, Phone: +1 415 4094227, Hours: M-W 6PM-1AM, Th-F 6PM-2AM, Sa 7PM-2AM. Small, upscale and trendy space in Pacific Heights that has unmistakable violet lighting throughout and lots of strange artwork inside. It attracts mostly young local professionals but tourists venture there too. Chilled out mellow vibe with DJs nightly. ■Harry’s Bar, 2020 Fillmore St, between California St and Pine St, Phone: +1 415 921-1000, www.harrysbarsf.com, Hours: M-F 11:30AM-2AM, Sa-Su 10AM-2AM. Good neigh-

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borhood bar in Pacific Heights with a casual atmosphere. Popular with local professionals. ■Kelley’s Tavern, 3231 Fillmore St, at Moulton St, Phone: +1 415 567-7181, loose@kelleystavern.com, http://www.kelleystavern.com/, Hours: M-F 5PM-2AM, Sa-Su 3PM-2AM. Busy, and huge Irish/sports bar in the heart of Cow Hollow/Marina neighborhoods. The nightly entertainment runs from football to live music depending on the night. Look for the lucky four leaf clover outside. ■Lion Pub, 2062 Divisadero St, at California St, Phone: +1 415 567-6565, Hours: 4PM-2AM daily. Small intimate Pacific Heights bar specializing in fresh cocktails. It’s well decorated inside with marble tables, candles, and even a fireplace (doh... it’s fake!). They also lay out an impressive spread of free, fresh bar snacks like cheese and crackers etc. ■Marina Sports Bar and Grill, 2400 Lombard St, at Scott St, Phone: +1 415 440-2000, Hours: M-F 4PM-2AM, Sa-Su 9AM-2AM. Very large bar which is always popular on game night. Lots of sports memorabilia and 49ers photos adorning the walls. ■Mauna Loa Club, 3009 Fillmore St, between Filbert St and Union St, Phone: +1 415 563-5137, Hours: M-F 2PM-2AM, SaSu noon-2AM. Pretty cool little Hawaiian bar decked out in island regalia. They have a nice circular bar, open windows that peer out over Fillmore St, and lots of games inside to keep you occupied. They have a pretty decent happy hour M-F 4PM-7PM, to get your night started. ■Monaghan’s, 3259 Pierce St, at Chestnut St, Phone: +1 415 567-4466, info@monaghanssf.com, http://monaghanssf. com/, Hours: M 4:30PM-2AM, Tu-F 2PM-2AM, Sa-Su noon2AM. Another Irish bar come sports bar in the marina district which draws an eclectic crowd. They have a long happy that runs M-F 4PM-7PM; and nightly specials includ-

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ing “Ladies Night” on Thursdays where cocktails are half price... yipee!

Wine bars ■California Wine Merchant, 2113 Chestnut St, at Steiner St, Phone: +1 415 567-0646, greg@californiawinemerchant. com, Fax: +1 415 567-1639, http://www.californiawinemerchant.com/, Hours: M-W 10AM-midnight, Th-Sa 10AM1:30AM, Su 11AM-11PM. Formerly just a wine retail shop, the California Wine Merchant is now a hip little spot where you can enjoy a few glasses of wine, watch people walk by on Chestnut St, or pick up a few bottles to bring home. ■Nectar Wine Lounge, 3330 Steiner St, just off Chestnut St, Phone: +1 415 345-1377, info@thenectarwinelounge.com, Fax: +1 415 345-1305, http://www.nectarwinelounge.com/, Hours: M-Th 5PM-10:30PM, F-Sa 5PM-midnight, Su 3PM10PM. Order your wine from the experts — this sleek wine bar comes complete with wine-connoisseur bartenders. Great stop off point before or after dinner. ■Ottimista Enoteca Cafe, 1838 Union St, between Octavia St and Laguna St, Phone: +1 415 674-8400, info@OttimistaSF. com, Fax: +1 415 674-8333, Hours: Tu-Th 2PM-11PM, F noon2AM, Sa 11AM-2AM, Su 11AM-10PM. Nice little upscale Italian wine bar that has mostly Italian and Californian wines in their exposed cellar. They have a decent selection of circa 40 wines by the glass; 250 by the bottle. They also serve small plates of food to compliment your wine.

Clubs ■The Comet Club, 3111 Fillmore St, at Filbert St, Phone: +1 415 567-5589, Hours: Tu-Su 5PM-2AM. Good place to go if you like to boogie-on-down to the sounds of the 70s and 80s! It’s a bit of a cramped space though and can get crowded as a result. ■Gravity, 3251 Scott St, between Chestnut St and Lombard St, Phone: +1 415 776-1928, matt@gravityroomsf.com, Fax: +1 415 776-0582, http://www.gravityroomsf.com/, Hours:

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7PM-2AM daily. Modern Hip Hop dance club that attracts the twenty-something crowd. They claim to be unpretentious, yet they have a pretty strict dress code here... so no jeans, sneakers, or t-shirts! It’s not only the name of the club that will bring you down to earth, but the drinks here also cost a pretty penny too! ■The HiFi Lounge, 2125 Lombard St, between Fillmore St and Steiner St, Phone: +1 415 933-6299, nick@maximumproductions.com, http://www.maximumproductions. com/, Hours: W-Th 8PM-2AM, F 5PM-2AM, Sa 8PM-2AM. The HiFi Lounge is where people come to dance the night away. It also features live DJs, games, and big screen TVs. Happy hour begins at 5PM and they offer $2 Budweisers and $3 well Drinks. Their “Girls of Taste” (wine tasting for women) is not to be missed and is held once a month. ■MatrixFillmore, 3138 Fillmore St, at Pixley St, Phone: +1 415 563-4180, matrixfillmore@plumpjack.com, Fax: +1 415 474-8792, http://www.matrixfillmore.com/matrixfillmore/, Hours: M–Th 8PM–2AM, F–Su 6PM–2AM. Back in the day this place used to be rock and roll magnet, attracting the likes of The Doors,Velvet Underground, and The Grateful Dead who all jammed here. Today, after a renovation, it draws a different set — mostly well-heeled twenty and thirty-somethings... cocktails in hand! But it does feature local DJs and bands nightly and it’s a decent place to go for a cocktail and a lively time.

Coffee This area has a great “cafe culture,” with lots of good Americana-style cafes. It’s a great place to sit down and unwind at a curbside table, sipping away on latte, after a hard day trekking around. Not listed here are the more ubiquitous coffee chains like Starbucks, The Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, and Peet’s Coffee; although these are very well represented here too, particularly along Union St, Chestnut St, and Fillmore St.

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■Hot chocolate à la Bittersweet Cafe

■Bittersweet Cafe, 2123 Fillmore St, Phone: +1 415 346-8715, info@bittersweetcafe.com, http://www.bittersweetcafe. com/, Hours: Su-Th 10AM-8PM, F-Sa 10AM-10PM. Watch out people, this place wants to “help you rediscover chocolate,” and Bittersweet is a an excellent little “chocolate cafe.” The cafe itself is warm and inviting inside, and their original selection of drinks like ”White Chocolate Dream” and ”Chocolate Thai Iced Tea,” are delicious and dangerously tempting. ■The Grove, 2250 Chestnut St, between Scott St and Pierce St, Phone: +1 415 474-4843, Hours: M-Th 7AM-11PM, F 7:00AM-11:30PM, Sa 8AM-11:30PM, Su 8AM-11PM. Marina coffee house with a great selection of teas here as well as salads and pastries. Sidewalk alfresco tables give it a European flavor. ■Judy’s Cafe, 2268 Chestnut St, between Scott St and Pierce St, Phone: +1 415 922-4588, Fax: +1 415 922-4588, Hours: M-F 7:45AM-2:15PM, Sa-Su 7:45AM-3PM. Quaint European style Marina cafe serving healthy portions of food. ■La Boulange, 1909 Union St, at Laguna St, Phone: +1 415 440-4450, Fax: +1 415 928-3701, http://www.baybread.com/ union.php, Hours: M-Su 7AM-7PM. Traditional French bakery and cafe. The owner was born in Bordeaux France and

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has a lifetime of baking experience. The cafe sells bread made of organic flour from their very own wheat mill. ■Tully’s Coffee House, 2455 Fillmore St, between Jackson St and Washington St, Phone: +1 415 929-8808, customer. comments@tullys.com, Fax: 1 206 233-2077, www.tullys. com, Hours: M-F 5:30AM-9PM, Sa 6AM-9PM, Su 6AM-8PM. Cozy cafe with decent coffee and wi-fi available. They also have a flat screen in store to keep you up to date with the news etc. The outdoor seating is also a nice touch. ■Union St Coffee Roastery, 2191 Union St, between Fillmore St and Webster St, Phone: +1 415 922-9559, Hours: 6:30AM-10PM daily. Decent coffee, an excellent location, plenty of seating, and very friendly staff are what attract patrons here.

Juice Bars ■Jamba Juice Union Street, 1998 Union St, at Buchanan St, Phone: +1 415 563-8923, Fax: +1 415 674-0102, http://www. jambajuice.com/, Hours: M-F 6AM-7PM, Sa-Su 6:30AM-7PM. Chain serving fresh fruit smoothies, hot vegetable soups, and high-nutrition breads. ■Jamba Juice Chestnut Street, 2066 Chestnut St, at Steiner St, Phone: +1 415 674-0100, http://www.jambajuice.com/, Hours: M-F 6AM-7PM, Sa-Su 6:30AM-7PM. Chain serving fresh fruit smoothies, hot vegetable soups, and high-nutrition breads.

Sleep The neighborhoods in this District are really just that — neighborhoods; as such, you won’t find many of the larger luxury chain-hotels here. Many of the areas accommodations are located on Lombard St, which runs east from Russian Hill to the Presidio in the West, and actually forms an informal boundary between the Marina and Cow Hollow. Most of the accommodations along Lombard range from run down motor lodges to slightly more respectable bed

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and breakfasts. Thankfully, as the area is not as congested as downtown, many of the hotels/motels offer free parking.

Budget ■Americas Best Value Inn - Golden Gate, 2322 Lombard St, between Pierce St and Scott St, Phone: +1 415 921-4980, sfamericasbestvalueinn@yahoo.com, Fax: +1 415 921-4042, http://sfamericasbestvalueinn.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 11AM. A 100% non smoking hotel with 40 rooms; the Golden Gate is on Lombard St and so has good access to public transportation. They have a restaurant and bar on the premises, and offer free wi-fi, free continental breakfast, and limited free parking. Price: $84-$124. ■Country Hearth Inn, 2707 Lombard St, at Baker St, Phone: phone. This hotel is ideally located less than a block from the green expanses of the Presidio. They offer a complimentary continental breakfast and limited free parking. ■Edward II Inn and Suites, 3155 Scott St, between Greenwich St and Lombard St, Phone: 800 473-2846, innkeeper@ edwardii.com, Fax: +1 415 931-5784, http://www.edwardii. com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. This three-story English themed hotel is quite charming and romantic, with an “old-world” feel. They even have their own pub downstairs! They also offer a free complimentary breakfast for guests. Price: $79-$99. ■Greenwich Inn, 3201 Steiner St, at Greenwich St, Phone: +1 415 921-5162, info@greenwichinn.com, Fax: +1 415 921-3602, http://www.greenwichinn.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 11AM. Budget hotel with free parking, located just one block from Union St. It has 32 recently renovated guest rooms and offers an in-room coffee service and a complimentary newspaper daily. Price: $54-$104. ■Hostelling International-Fisherman’s Wharf Hostel, Fort Mason, Building 240, Upper Fort Mason, Phone: +1 415 771-7277, jtsang@norcalhostel.com, http://sfhostels.com/ fishermans-wharf/features/, Check In: 2:30PM, Check Out:

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11PM. Even if you’re unsure about hostels, you should still consider this place; the location alone makes it worth your while, as it is in a park-like setting with great views of the Golden Gate Bridge and Alcatraz and is within easy walking distance of Fisherman’s Wharf. It has a total of 150 Beds in dormitory style rooms. Quite clean and safe, with wi-fi, laundry facilities, lockers, and free breakfast. Price: Dorms: $23-$30 Private family rooms: $60-$100. ■Presidio Inn & Suites, 2361 Lombard St, between Pierce St and Scott St, Phone: +1 415 931-7810, presidioinn@sbcglobal.net, Fax: +1 415 931-5318, http://www.presidioinn. com/. Small budget European style inn located in the Marina District. They have free wi-fi and offer a complimentary breakfast. It’s just one block from Chestnut St. Price: $70-$140. ■Redwood Inn, 1530 Lombard St, between Franklin St and Gough St, Phone: +1 415 776-3800, info@sfredwoodinn.com, Fax: +1 415 928-1934, http://www.sfredwoodinn.com/, Check In: 2PM, Check Out: 11AM. Standard, but clean budget motel which is just one block away from Van Ness Ave, so it’s convenient for public transportation and for getting to other areas like Fisherman’s Wharf. Price: $75-$90. ■Travelodge Golden Gate, 2230 Lombard St, between Greenwich St and Steiner St, Phone: + 1 415 922-3900, Travelodge2230@Gmail.com, Fax: +1 415 921-4795, http://www. travelodge.com/Travelodge/control/Booking/property_inf o?propertyId=09598&brandInfo=TL, Check In: 2PM, Check Out: 11AM. This hotel had a recent renovation in 2004 and has cable TV and high speed internet. As with many of the other hotels in this area, they also offer free parking. Price: $90 year round.

Mid range ■Buena Vista Motor Inn, 1599 Lombard St, between Franklin St and gough St, Phone: +1 415 923-9600 or 800 835-4980, info@buenavistamotorinn.com, Fax: +1 415 4414775, http://www.buenavistamotorinn.com/buena-vistamotor-inn-site-map.asp, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Another standard motor inn, this one offers free parking

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and a complimentary continental breakfast to get you going in the morning. Price: $80-$140. ■Chelsea Motor Inn, 2095 Lombard St, at Fillmore St, Phone: +1 415 563-5600, Reservations@ChelseaMotorInn. com, Fax: +1 415 567-6475, http://www.chelseamotorinn. com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Features an English Tudor style building with a antique roof. Clean, good quality rooms at a reasonable price. Nothing too special, but it is centrally located. Price: $77-$145. ■Cow Hollow Motor Inn & Suites, 2190 Lombard St, at Steiner, Phone: +1 415 921-5800, reservations@cowhollowmotorinn.com, Fax: fax. Centrally located in the Cow Hollow neighborhood, this motel offers 112 standard and reasonably priced rooms. The decor is definitely dated and will not suit everyone — they have floral wallpaper that might just keep you up at night! However, the rooms are comfortable and they do offer free parking. ■Hotel del Sol, 3100 Webster St, at Greenwich St, Phone: +1 415 921-5520, gsterman@jdvhotels.com, Fax: +1 415 9314137, http://www.jdvhotels.com/del_sol/?cid=gl_del, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Voted CitySearch San Francisco’s “Best Budget Hotel”, “Best Family-Friendly Hotel,” and “Best Hotel Pool” in 2006. Part of the fancy Joie de Vivre hotel group, this formerly nondescript motor lodge was rejuvenated with some cool colors, interior design, and upgraded management. Price: $119-$199. ■La Luna Inn, 2599 Lombard St, between Broderick St and Divisadero St, Phone: +1 415 346-4664 or 866-900-0157, thammer@ctwohotels.com, Fax: +1 415 346-4665, http:// www.lalunainn.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. A rejuvenated 1960s Motor Inn. The bespoke furniture and colorful decor creates a bright, fun, and fanciful atmosphere here. Price: $79-$129. ■Laurel Inn, 444 Presidio Ave, between California St and Sacramento St, Phone: +1 415 567-8467 or +1 800 552-8735, khegre@jdvhotels.com, Fax: +1 415 928-1866, http://www.jdvhotels.com/laurel_inn/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Built in 1963, this renovated hotel has a comfortable yet fashionable interior. Each room is spacious and similar in

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size to a studio apartment with some even having kitchenettes. Price: $159-$209. ■Lombard Motor Inn, 1475 Lombard St, between Van Ness Ave and Franklin St, Phone: 1 415 441-6000, Fax: +1 415 4414291, http://www.lombardmotorinn.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Standard motor inn at an affordable price. The building interior is getting a bit old and worn, however it is clean. If you’re a light sleeper, try to get a room that doesn’t overlook the busy street. Price: $77-$135. ■Marina Inn, 3110 Octavia St, at Lombard St, Phone: +1 415 928-1000, info@marinainn.com, Fax: +1 415 928-5909, http://www.marinainn.com/, Check In: 2PM, Check Out: noon. Comfortable and traditional style inn with a quiet B&B atmosphere. They have 40 guest rooms and offer complimentary continental breakfast and free newspapers. Price: $69-$159. ■Marina Motel, 2576 Lombard St, between Broderick St and Divisadero St, Phone: +1 415 921-9406, marinamotel@ value.net, Fax: +1 415 921-0364, http://www.marinamotel. com/html/reserve-cheap-san-francisco-lodging.asp, Check In: 3PM-11:30PM, Check Out: 11AM. Classic motor inn with a Mediterranean flavor — flower boxes fragrance the quaint European style rooms. They offer free wi-fi, free parking, and complimentary in room coffee. Price: $85-$135. ■Motel Capri, 2015 Greenwich St, at Buchanan St, Phone: +1 415 346-4667, info@motelcaprisfo.com, Fax: +1 415 346-3256, http://www.motelcaprisfo.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. This is a small family run motel with just 46 guest rooms. Thankfully, this one is set back one block from the noisy Lombard St in a quieter residential area. This is definitely an older, slightly jaded motel, but the rooms are clean and the staff are extremely friendly. It’s close to the shopping on Union St as well. Price: $100-$135. ■Travelodge at the Presidio, 2755 Lombard St, between Baker St and Lyon St, Phone: +1 415 931-8581, tlsfpresidio@ whg.com, Fax: +1 415 776-0904, http://www.travelodgepresidio.com, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 11AM. Standard Travelodge, but set in an excellent location right on the cusp of the Presidio. If you like having the natural world close to your doorstep, then this is the place for you. With its prox-

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imity to the Palace of Fine Arts and the historic buildings of the Presidio, it’s also a good place to come if you are a fan of architecture. Price: $60-$140.

Splurge ■Francisco Bay Inn, 1501 Lombard St, at Franklin St, Phone: +1 415 474-3030 or 1-800-410-7007, franciscobay@ staysf.com, Fax: +1 415 567-7082, http://www.franciscobayinn.com/, Check In: 2PM, Check Out: 11AM. Located conveniently on Lombard St and has newly renovated rooms. All of the rooms and hallways are 100% non-smoking. Free parking. Price: $149-$214. ■Hotel Drisco, 2901 Pacific Ave, at Broderick St, Phone: +1 415 346-2880, gl@jdvhotels.com, Fax: +1 800 634-7277, http://www.jdvhospitality.com/hotels/hotel/6, Check In: 4PM, Check Out: noon. Built in 1903, this is a higher-end, boutique hotel right in the heart of Pacific Heights. Price: $189-$259. ■Jackson Court Hotel, 2198 Jackson St, at Buchanan St, Phone: +1 415 929-7670, ej@jacksoncourt.com, Fax: +1 415 929-1405, http://www.jacksoncourt.com/, Check In: 2PM7PM, Check Out: 11AM. This is an opulent three-story brownstone Victorian mansion set in upscale Pacific Heights. With only 10 rooms, it’s more of a B&B than a hotel. The price includes a continental breakfast and afternoon tea... how English ! Price: $160-$230. ■Union St Inn, 2299 Union St, at Steiner St, Phone: +1 415 346-0424, Fax: +1 415 922-8046, http://www.unionstreetinn. com/index.html, Check In: 2PM-7PM or by special arrangement, Check Out: noon. Edwardian home with spacious

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airy rooms and a quaint cottage garden in the back. Price: $190-$330.

Contact Most of the cafes listed under the Coffee section above have free wi-fi facilities available upon purchase of a beverage. You can get on the internet for free at the Golden Gate Valley Branch of the San Francisco Public Library — listed under the Architecture section above. Other branches include:

■San Francisco Public Library — Marina Branch, 1890 Chestnut St, at Webster St, Phone: +1 415 355-2823, http:// sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Su 1PM-5PM, M 10AM-6PM, Tu 10AM6PM, W 1PM-9PM, Th 1PM-9PM, F 1PM-6PM, Sa 10AM-6PM. Free internet facilities. ■San Francisco Public Library — Presidio Branch, 3150 Sacramento St, between Lyon St and Baker St, Phone: +1 415 355-2880, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Tu 10AM-9PM, W 1PM-9PM, Th 10AM-9PM, F 1PM-6PM, Sa 10AM-6PM. Free internet facilities.

Get out Golden Gate Park — If you’re a fan of either Fort Mason or the Presidio, why not continue your tour into the enormous Golden Gate Park, where you’ll find many more museums set in a natural park environment. Fisherman’s Wharf — If you like everything nautical and would like some more, you should check out the flotilla of fishing vessels at the Wharf.

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Fisherman’s Wharf Fisherman’s Wharf is San Francisco’s most popular destination among travelers, with circa 12 million visitors flocking here each year. For over a century its historic waterfront was the hub of the city’s fishing fleet and is still famous for the for the depth and variety of its harvest, as well as for having some of the best seafood restaurants in the city. Today, it’s also renowned for its numerous tourist attractions such as museums, souvenir stores, historical buildings and piers, and scenic vistas over the Bay. It is located at the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula, along the San Francisco Bay. It runs all the way from Pier 39, through to Municipal Pier at the end of Aquatic Park. It is bordered by Van Ness Ave to the east and Bay St to the south.

Understand Three generations of fishermen have worked on the Wharf since the 19th century and the days of the Gold Rush. Once boasting an impressive flotilla of nearly 500 fishing vessels, the fleet’s numbers have dwindled over time. Today, the boats moored at the Wharf are only equipped to supply San Francisco’s restaurants with a small portion of their seafood appetites. Most of the remaining vessels are moored at Fish Alley, close to Pier 47. Every year the Wharf attracts millions of visitors to its numerous and eclectic attractions including; the sea lions at Pier 39, the Maritime Museum, the chocolate factory at Ghirardelli Square, Hyde St Pier, and of course the infamous Alcatraz. There are also some great vistas overlooking the Bay, and a plethora of restaurants to enjoy them from. Additionally, many people visit the Wharf to either take a ferry or a cruise around the Bay. The Wharf is also home to many events such as the Fourth of July celebrations, Crab Season,

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and Fleet Week. Being a tourist haven, expect to see large crowds, an abundance of t-shirt stores, novelty museums, and street performers all vying for your attention. Many locals are put off by the crowds on the Wharf, and the seemingly “tacky” nature of many of the tourist stores and attractions. However, all things considered, there is probably enough here to keep everyone happy.

Get in

■Map of Fisherman

Getting here on foot or via public transportation are certainly the best options if you are already in or near San Francisco.

By car Driving here is easiest (but often slow) by going north on Van Ness Ave (which is part of U.S. Highway 101) up to North Point St (a block beyond Bay), turning right, and then locating a parking space after a few blocks. There are a number of smallish lots, and two major garages near Pier 39, at Stockton and Beach. If you plan to spend much time, you may want to park on a street farther away (but watch the posted limits) and take public transportation to the Wharf.

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If you are so inclined and have good brakes, you can go from Van Ness Ave onto Lombard St east, up Russian Hill and down the “crookedest street” in San Francisco. Turn north on any of the streets (except Taylor, because of the cable cars) into Fisherman’s Wharf. Stockton St, 2.5 blocks past Columbus Ave, gets you to the garages. Note that pedestrians and cable cars have the right of way. From the Bay Bridge it is best to get off soon, head north and east towards the Embarcadero, and then go west into the Fisherman’s Wharf area. These exits are still being reconfigured to cope with future earthquakes. You’ll see the garages across the way near Pier 39. San Francisco is small, so consider taking a taxi, at a cost of around $10 from downtown, and double the price from outlying areas.

By cable car ■ The Powell/Mason cable car line brings you a few blocks south of the center of the district, at Taylor and Bay Sts. ■ The Powell/Hyde cable car line brings you to Fisherman’s Wharf western end, at the intersection of Hyde and Beach Sts. Both cable car lines start at Market and Powell, near the BART and Muni station there, pass Union Square, and traverse the charming hills and houses of San Francisco before reaching Fisherman’s Wharf. The fare is $5 each way ($1 for seniors or disabled before 7AM and after 9PM), or use a Muni all-day Passport ($11).

By streetcar ■ The historic F streetcar line (regular $1.50 Muni fare, $0.50 for seniors/disabled/youth) comes up on Market from Castro Street, turns west at the Embarcadero in front of the

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Ferry Building, and traverses much of Fisherman’s Wharf. You can exit at any of the Market St BART or MUNI Metro stations to catch the streetcar to Fisherman’s Wharf. ■ There is a long-term plan to add an E-line with the same equipment, to go from the Caltrain station in South-ofMarket (SoMa) to Fisherman’s Wharf, and eventually past Aquatic Park, through a tunnel under Fort Mason into the Marina district.

By bus ■MUNI offers several bus routes to Fisherman’s Wharf. The frequent 30 Stockton trolley bus and the 47 Van Ness bus go from the Caltrain station to Fisherman’s Wharf, using very different routes. The 30 bus goes through downtown, passes Chinatown and North Beach, and then west via North Point St up to Van Ness. The 47 bus takes longer; it goes first through the grubby parts of the South-of-Market (SoMa) area, then via the Civic Center up Van Ness, and finally east on North Point St. Additionally, the 9X San Bruno Express, 10 Townsend, 19 Polk, and 20 Columbus also serve the area. The 39 Coit heads up to Coit Tower in North Beach. Fares are $1.50, $0.50 for seniors/disabled/ youth.

By ferry Several companies offer ferries serving the piers of Fisherman’s Wharf:

■Blue & Gold Fleet, Pier 39, Phone: +1 415 705-8200, info@ blueandgoldfleet.com, Fax: +1 415 705-5429, http://www. blueandgoldfleet.com/, Hours: Times vary — see website. Offers ferries from Sausalito, Tiburon, Angel Island, Vallejo, and Alameda/Oakland to Pier 41. Price: Price varies by departure point: adults $6-$12.50 one-way, children $3.25$6.25 one-way. ■Alameda/Oakland Ferry, Pier 41, Phone: +1 510 749-5972, epsanche@ci.alameda.ca.us, http://www.eastbayferry.

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com/, Hours: Times vary — see website. Offering ferry service to/from Alameda/Oakland and Angel Island. Price: Adults $6 one-way, seniors $3.50, children $3.25 one-way. ■Vallejo Baylink Ferry, Pier 41, Phone: +1 877 643-3779, info@baylinkferry.com, Fax: +1 707 562-3141, http://www. baylinkferry.com/, Hours: Times vary — see website. Offering ferry service to/from Vallejo. Price: Adults $12.50 oneway, seniors/children $6.25 one-way.

On foot Due to its proximity to the Downtown area, one of the best ways to get to the Wharf is simply to walk! Eastbound through Fort Mason from the Marina (15 mins), northbound along Columbus Ave from North Beach and Chinatown (25 mins), or from either the the Ferry Building or the Financial District, walk northbound along the Embarcadero promenades (25 mins).

Get around Fisherman’s Wharf is best seen on foot, but there are also pedicabs, horse-drawn carriages, and of course the F-Line streetcar, all of which will take you up and down the Wharf. There are also several companies in the district that rent bikes out to tourists by the hour or for the day, including Bay City Bike, Bike and Roll, and Blazing Saddles Bike Rentals. The California Welcome Center is located on the second level of PIER 39, and they offer visitor maps and information on Fisherman’s Wharf which will help you navigate your way around.

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See The Wharf is a very compact area and attractions are centered mainly along the half-mile stretch of Jefferson St. So, ambling along Jefferson from from east to west you’ll discover:

Pier 39, the Embarcadero at Beach St, located on the eastern fringe of Fisherman’s Wharf, Phone: +1 415 705-5500, groupsales@pier39.com, http://www.pier39.com/. A 45-acre pier-complex featuring 100 specialty stores, 12 full service restaurants, theater, cruises, live entertainment, and more. Price: Free. ■Aquarium of the Bay, Pier 39, at the foot of Pier 39, on the eastern side, Phone: +1 415 623-5300, info@aquariumofthebay.com, Fax: +1 415 623-5324, http://www.aquariumofthebay.com/, Hours: Open daily except Dec. 25. Summer hours: 9AM-8PM daily. Most other times M-Th 10AM-6PM, F-Su 10AM-7PM. A great place and the right size for kids, with an underwater tunnel, where the fish look at you instead of vice versa, and ponds where you touch various live marine animals. Price: $14.95 adults; $8 seniors (age 65+) and children (ages 3-11); $37.95 family (2 adults, 2 children). Children under 3 free.

■Marina, West and East Marinas, on both sides of Pier 39, Phone: phone. Don’t get lost amongst all the tourist stores, and forget that Pier 39 is a pier after all — so why not check out the impressive flotilla of vessels moored at its 11 docks on either side of the pier.

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■The sea lions, Pier 39’s West Marina, Phone: +1 415 289SEAL (7325), admin@tmmc.org, http://www.marinemammalcenter.org. A short time after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake struck, these “Sea Lebrities” (as they are affectionately known) moved bag-and-baggage into the west marina at Pier 39. There can be as many as 900 sea lions there during the winter months. In the summertime many of them migrate but there is always a steady population at Pier 39’s K-Dock all year round. The Marine Mammal Center’s Kiosk is located next to the sea lions where volunteers are happy to answer questions about the mammals. Price: Free. ■Street Performers, the Crystal Geyser Alpine Spring Water Center Stage, at the end of Pier 39, http://www.pier39. com/Events/ThisMonth/streetperformers.htm, Hours: Daily Show Times: 12:15PM, 1:30PM, 3PM, 4:30PM, 5:45PM, 7PM, 8PM & 9PM. Colorful jugglers, magicians, clowns, mimes, and comedians of all descriptions entertain Pier 39 visitors throughout the day. Price: Free.

■USS Pampanito Submarine, Pier 45, at Taylor St and the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 775-1943, pampanito@ maritime.org, Fax: +1 415 561-6660, http://www.maritime. org/pamphome.htm, Hours: Th-Tu 9AM-8PM, W 9AM-6PM; Winter hours: M-Th 9AM-6PM, F-Su 9AM-8PM. This is a National Historic Landmark — an authentic WWII submarine with many original artifacts on display. Up to 80 personnel ran this submarine and it couild be at sea for up to several weeks at a time. Price: $9 adults, $5 seniors, $4 children/active military, free for children under 6. ■SS Jeremiah O’Brien, Pier 45, at Taylor St and the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 544-0100, liberty@ssjeremiahobrien. org, Fax: +1 415 544-9890, http://www.maritime.org/pamphome.htm, Hours: 9AM-4PM daily. Located behind the Pampanito submarine is this WWII Liberty Ship open for tours. The SS Jeremiah O’Brien is the sole survivor of the armada of Allied ships which was involved in D-Day, and one of only two remaining WWII Liberty Ships surviving today (the other being the SS Lane Victory in San Pedro). Price:

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$8 adults; $5 seniors, $4 children, free for children under 6 and active Military. ■Amusing America Exhibit, Pier 45, at the foot of Taylor St, Phone: phone. An fun exhibit that traces the history of amusement attractions in American cities, with a focus on San Francisco. ■Musee Mecanique, Pier 45, Shed A, behind Fisherman’s Grotto No. 9, Phone: +1 415 346-2000, coad01@yahoo.com, http://www.museemechanique.org/, Hours: M-F 10AM-7PM, Sa-Su and Holidays 10AM-8PM. Has quite an interesting collection of about 300 coin-operated musical instruments and antique arcade machines, that date from the turn of the century. ■Fishermen’s and Seamen’s Chapel, Pier 45, Taylor St and Embarcadero, http://www.fishermanswharf.org/outreach.aspx?q=10015&c=3. This tiny chapel is a memorial to the “Lost Fishermen”... those that have lost their lives on the seas. Every year they hold a special service to commemorate these fishermen. The annual “Blessing of the Fleet” also starts from here every October. Price: Free. ■Wax Museum at Fisherman’s Wharf, 145 Jefferson St, Suite 500, between Mason St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 202-0400, jguire@waxmuseum.com, Fax: +1 415 771-9248, http://www.waxmuseum.com/, Hours: 10AM-9PM daily. It has more than more than 270 wax portraits of entertainers, heroes, villains, etc. Price: Adult (18-54) $12.95, Child (6-11) $6.95, Junior (12-17)/ Senior (55+) $9.95. ■Ripley’s Believe It Or Not! Museum, 175 Jefferson St, between Mason St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 771-6188, sanfran@ripleys.com, Fax: +1 415 771-1237, http://www. ripleysf.com, Hours: Mid June - Labor Day Su-Th 9AM-11PM, F-Sa 9AM-midnight; rest of the year Su-Th 10AM-10PM, F-Sa 10AM-midnight. Set over 2 floors it has over 10,000 spuare feet of galleries, exhibits, illusions, and interactive displays.

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Price: $14.99 (ages 13 and older), $8.99 children (ages 5-12), $12.50 seniors and students (with I.D.).

■The fishing fleet at the Wharf

■Fish Alley, turn right off Jefferson at Leavenworth. Don’t forget to go and see the real fishing boats at what’s known as Fish Alley — after all it is “Fisherman’s Wharf ”. If you want to see them actually hauling in their catch, you’ll have to be there around 6AM to 7AM. Price: Free. ■The Cannery, Del Monte Square, at the foot of Columbus St, Phone: +1 415 771-3112, info@thecannery.com, Fax: +1 415 771-2424, http://www.thecannery.com. Built in 1907 with its award-winning architecture, overlooks San Francisco Bay and once upon a time was the largest peach cannery in the world. Today it’s a bustling marketplace featuring three levels of restaurants, shops, offices, and live entertainment. In the middle it has a secluded courtyard with outdoor bars and cafes. San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, begins at the Hyde St pier, Phone: +1 415 447-5000, Fax: +1 415 556-1624, http://www.nps.gov/safr/. The park consists of a visitor center, Hyde St Pier and the fleet of historic ships moored there, the Maritime Museum, Aquatic Park, and the

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Municipal Pier. ■Visitor Center, The Cannery, Del Monte Square, at Hyde and Jefferson, across the street from the bridge, Phone: +1 415 447-5000, Hours: May 25 - September 30: 9:30AM-7PM, October 1 - May 24: 9:30AM-5PM. The Visitor Center has a visitor information desk and there are also a bunch of small craft and hands-on exhibits that depict San Francisco’s rich maritime heritage. Price: Free. ■Hyde St Pier, at the foot of Hyde St, Phone: Ranger Office: +1 415 561-7170, Hours: May 25 - September 30: 9:30AM5:30PM daily (last entry 5PM). October 1 - May 24: 9:30AM5PM (last entry 4:30PM). Prior to the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge and the Bay Bridge, this historic ferrypier was the primary automobile ferry terminal that connected San Francisco with both Marin County and the East Bay. Price: Free.

■Balclutha on the Hyde St Pier

■Fleet of Historic Vessels, moored at Hyde St Pier, at the foot of Hyde St, http://www.nps.gov/archive/safr/local/ship.

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html. Six major ships are on display on the Hyde St Pier. Some are available for a self-guided tour, others by docentled tours. On payment of the $5 National Park Service fee several can be boarded, depending on tides; kids can join for free. Among the ships you can see are the Balclutha, an 1886 steel-hulled square rigged sailing ship, the Eureka, an 1890 steam ferryboat (which also has an exhibit of antique cars on board), the C.A. Thayer, an 1895 lumber schooner, and the Hercules, a 1907 steam tug. Price: Boarding pass for historic vessels: $5 adults, supervised children under 16 free. ■Maritime Museum, located in Aquatic Park at the western end of Fisherman’s Wharf, Phone: +1 415 556-3002, http:// www.nps.gov/archive/safr/local/mus.html, Hours: 10AM5PM daily — CURRENTLY CLOSED UNTIL 2009. Shaped like a ship, this building houses nautical treasures of all descriptions; model ships, figureheads, maritime paintings, nautical photographs, and various artifacts. For the moment, the exhibits have been moved to the Maritime National Historical Park Visitor Center at Jefferson and Hyde. Price: Free. ■Aquatic Park and Municipal Pier, located at the western end of Fisherman’s Wharf, http://www.virtuar.com/ ysf2/ap-Aquatic.htm. This area was once part of Fort Mason but is now a complex for museums and artisans, and a great place to take a break from the bustle of Fisherman’s Wharf. There is a small beach at the foot of the park where you’ll see kayakers, kite fliers, swimmers from the nearby Polar-Bear Club, and even rock sculptors at work. At the end of the park is Municipal Pier — the closest you can get to Alcatraz on foot or bike. After dark it can be a bit desolate. Price: Free.

■Ghirardelli Square, 900 North Point St, at the corner of Beach St and Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 775-5500, info@ghirardellisq.com, Fax: +1 415 775-0912, Hours: hours. It was officially declared a city landmark in 1965, and today it’s still possible to view the remnants of the old chocolate-making machinery there. The square is packed with boutiques,

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restaurants, specialty stores, and galleries. It also has great views over the Bay.

Bay cruises and ferries From Fisherman’s Wharf, one has a wide variety of options to explore the City and the Bay by water.

■Serenity at Angel Island

■Angel Island, http://www.angelisland.org/, Hours: Angel Island is open from 8AM to sunset year around. Take a ferry to this historic California State Park and Wildlife preserve — the “Jewel of San Francisco Bay”. Spend a whole day on the largest island in San Francisco Bay — which was known as the “Ellis Island of the West”. There are lots of activities once you get there — picnicking, hiking, biking, boating, camping, and baseball, or just spend a day lounging on one of the many beaches there. ■Bay Cruises. Bay cruises are very popular 60-90 minute boat tours that usually take you underneath the shadows of the Golden Gate Bridge, around Alcatraz, and along San Francisco’s historic 150 year old waterfront. They also offer great views of the city’s skyline. Some of them come with lively guides, others with headphone audio equipment. Some cruise providers have extended routes that take you past Angel Island and close to the shores of Tiburon and

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Sausalito. Others provide alternate routes that sail under the Bay Bridge as far as AT&T Park, along the San Francisco skyline, around Treasure Island, and along Alcatraz Island. Several operators provide specialist cruises of all descriptions including ‘Sunset Cruises’ and ‘Dining Cruises’ among others. ■Ferries. You can also take a simple ferry across the bay to Sausalito, Tiburon, Vallejo, or Alameda/Oakland, and explore on from there. The following companies provide cruises or ferry service from Fisherman’s Wharf.

■Adventure Cat Sailing Charters, J Dock next to Pier 39, at Beach St and the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 212.209.3370 or 800 498-4228, http://www.adventurecat.com/, Hours: Cruise times vary — see website. Offer a 90 minute Bay Cruise on a 55-foot luxury Catamaran and also Sunset Cruises in the evening. Price: Bay Cruise: Adult: $30, Children 6-12: $15,Kids 5 and under: $2; Sunset Cruise: Adult: $45 (no discount for children) — Includes light hors d. ■Blue & Gold Fleet, Pier 39, at Beach St and the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 705-8200, info@blueandgoldfleet. com, Fax: +1 415 705-5429, http://www.blueandgoldfleet. com/, Hours: Cruise times vary — see website. In addition to their Bay Cruise from Pier 39, Blue & Gold Fleet offers ferries from Pier 41 across the bay to Sausalito, Tiburon, Angel Island, Vallejo, and Alameda/Oakland. Price: Bay Cruise: adults $22, seniors (62+) and teens $18, children (5-11) $14. Ferries (price varies by destination): adults $6-$12.50 oneway, children $3.25-$6.25 one-way. ■Vallejo Baylink Ferry, Pier 41, at Jefferson St and the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 877 643-3779, http://www.baylinkferry.com/. Offering ferry service to Vallejo. Price: Adults $12.50 one-way, seniors/children $6.25 one-way. ■Alameda/Oakland Ferry, Pier 41, at Jefferson St and the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 510 749-5972, http://www.eastbayferry.com/, Hours: weekends/holidays only from late

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May through October. Offering ferry service to Alameda/ Oakland and Angel Island. Price: Adults $6 one-way, seniors $3.50, children $3.25 one-way. ■Red & White Fleet, Pier 43½, Taylor St and the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 673-2900, Fax: +1 415 447-0619, http:// www.redandwhite.com/, Hours: Cruise times vary — see website. They offer a 1 hour “Golden Gate Bay Cruise”. They also offer a 2 hour “California Sunset Cruise”. Price: Bay Cruise: Adults $22, children/teens (5-17) $16 Sunset Cruise: Adult (18+) $48; and Youth (5-17) $33.

Alcatraz

■Alcatraz during Fleet Week

Pier 33, Alcatraz Landing, Phone: Box office: +1 415 981-7625, marketing@alcatrazcruises.com, Fax: +1 415 986-1721, http:// www.alcatrazcruises.com, Hours: Cruises start at 9AM and continue throughout the day. Ten to 14 daily departures depending on the time of year. Evening tours offered Thursdays-Mondays. Information on the island can be found on the National Park Service’s website. Price: Adults from $26, Children from $16, Seniors from $24.50. Alcatraz is a decommissioned island federal penitentiary nestled beautifully in the bay. Before it was a prison it served first as a lighthouse (the West Coast’s first light-

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house), then a military outpost, and then a military prison. After this, it served as a federal prison for 29 years between 1934 and 1963. Its location was near perfect due to its isolation and the frigid waters and hazardous currents of the Bay, which made escape attempts difficult to say the least. Known by it’s nickname “The Rock”, this prison was once home to some of the most notorious inmates in U.S. history. Famous inmates included Al Capone, who served four and a half years here, and Robert Stroud — “The Birdman of Alcatraz,” — who spent a long 17 years here. The notorious gangster and bootlegger, George “Machine Gun” Kelly, also served time at the Rock. It was claimed (by the penitentiary) that no one ever escaped from the prison alive, despite 29 separate attempts. Take a tour and listen to an audio tape in English, Japanese, Chinese, or other languages. The most interesting aspect of the tour is that you can go into the prison and see what it was like to be imprisoned. The tour takes you all around the interior of the prison, including into some of the tiny cells, the segregated cells, the old barber shop and mess hall, and then out into the parade grounds and exercise yard. It might be more interesting if you’ve watched the movie Escape from Alcatraz and seen what happened in Alcatraz when it was operating as a prison. Tickets for the Ferry to Alcatraz are available at the Alcatraz Cruises website, but they sell out fast so buy in advance. Only one company is allowed exclusive access to dock at Alcatraz.

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Events and festivals

■Dungeness Crabs at the Wharf

■Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony at Ghirardelli Square, Ghirardelli Square, at Beach and Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 775-5500, info@ghirardellisq.com, http://www.ghirardellisq.com/ghirardellisq/, Hours: End of Nov: noon5:30PM. Why not ring in the holiday season by attending the festivities at Ghirardelli Square. There’s theater, live music, and then at the end they decorate the 45 foot Christmas tree with ornaments, lights, and chocolate bars... yum! Price: Free. ■Crab Season. The festivities and excitement of Crab Season begin in November after a priest has officially blessed the fleet, sending eager crabbers out to land their catch. Local vendors fire up their blackened pots in preparation for the arrival of the delicious, and much sought-after Dungeness Crab. Approximately 1 million pounds of Dungeness are caught every year, ensuring that the feast lasts for several months. ■Fleet Week, Phone: +1 650 599-5057, SFFleetweek@airshownetwork.com, http://www.military.com/fleetweek. Usually held in the first week of October, it’s a tribute to the men and women in the armed forces. A flotilla of Navy

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ships dock on the Wharf in parade fashion, and there are many free Deck tours available from crew members. There are also several air displays by the Navy’s Blue Angels, Team Oracle, and the Air Force’s F-16 Demonstration Team. Price: Free, although you can pay up to $150 to watch the Air Show from premium select locations along the Marina Green and waterfront area. ■Fourth of July, Hours: 2PM-10PM, 9:30PM fireworks. San Francisco’s main Independence Day celebrations take place on Fisherman’s Wharf. There is lots of free entertainment during the day, particularly around Aquatic Park and all down Jefferson St. The festivities culminate with an impressive fireworks display from the foot of Municipal Pier, and at the other end of the Wharf from barges moored off the north of PIER 39. Price: Free. ■Ghirardelli Square Chocolate Festival, Ghirardelli Square, at Beach and Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 775-5500, info@ghirardellisq.com, http://www.ghirardellisq.com/ ghirardellisq/, Hours: First or second weekend in Sept: SaSu noon-5PM. Chocoholics — induluge your decadent side at this annual chocolate fest. Activities include chocolate tasting, chocolate sculpting, chocolate cooking demonstrations, and a chocolate eating competition... oh dear! Price: Free (chocolate tasting requires ticket purchase: $10-$20). ■Holiday Festival of Lights, Hours: Dec 14th 2008. The Holiday Festival of Lights is the official start of the holiday season in the city. Stores hang out decorations and lights and the piers are adorned with shimmering lights. Price: Free. ■Opening Day on the Bay, Fisherman’s Wharf Waterfront, Phone: +1 415 331-0702, http://picya.homestead.com/index.html. An annual boat parade, held on the last Sunday in April, that signals the start of the Northern Californian sailing season. Up to 200 vessels, decked out in full regalia, participate each year and sail from the Golden Gate Bridge to Pier 39. Impertial judges are on hand to award prizes in

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several esteemed categories. The event is organised by the Pacific Inter-Club Yacht Association. Price: Free.

Buy There are five principal shopping centers in Fisherman’s Wharf. However, all along the Wharf and its side streets, you will find an abundance of souvenir stores, T-shirt stores (“I’m with stupid” and “Alcatraz Outpatient”), electronic stores (digital cameras etc), candy and sweet stores, jewelry stores, craft stores, and various other specialty stores of all descriptions. Three of the major shopping centers of Fisherman’s Wharf are also attractions in their own right: Pier 39, The Cannery, and Ghirardelli Square, which are all listed under the See section above. Each one has multiple shops to explore.

■The Anchorage Shopping Center, Anchorage Square, Leavenworth at Beach St, Phone: +1 415 775-6000, ext. 203, http://www.anchoratthewharf.com. Covering just onesquare block in Fisherman’s Wharf, there are over 30 specialty shops and restaurants here. ■North Point Shopping Center, 900 North Point St, between Mason St and Powell St. Less touristy, and set back a few blocks from the actual Wharf, this shopping center contains 15 Shops, including a Safeway supermarket, Wal-

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greens drug store, GNC, and Radio Shack, as well as services such as ATMs and 24 Hour Fitness center.

Eat Many of the restaurants here are seafood restaurants, so if you’re not into seafood at all, it’s best to go to any other section of town. North Beach (Italian) and even Chinatown are within healthy walking distances. Many of the older established restaurants have Italian names like “Castagnola’s” and “Alioto’s” — a reflection on the fact that many of the Wharf ’s first fishermen were immigrant Italians. Alas, much of the fare available is overpriced, but not all, there are still plenty of places on the Wharf where you can fill up on the cheap. If you’re tired of the manic crowds, get take out and bring it up to Aquatic Park where there is lots of room to sit and enjoy you’re food in peace.

Budget

■A Wharf specialty... Clam Chowder in a bread bowl

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■Boudin, Fisherman. Home of the sourdough bread with a recipe they’ve nurtured since 1849, where you can get (among other things) their popular clam chowder in a bread bowl. Visit their flagship location (the Bistro Boudin) at 156 Jefferson St, where you can shop for gifts here or stroll around their museum to learn about Boudin’s history. ■China Station Restaurant, 333 Jefferson St, between Jones St and Leavenworth St, Phone: +1 415 928-2106, Hours: 10AM-9PM daily. Small restaurant, located at the Anchorage Center, serving low-fat, fresh Chinese food made to order. No MSG here either. Price: $7-$14. ■Chowder and Crab Sidewalk Stands, 200 Jefferson St, at Taylor St. Get clam chowder in a bread bowl, Dungeness crab (in season November through June), fish and chips, shrimp cocktails, calamari salad, etc. from this busy outdoor marketplace. If you’re getting a crab, ask for a fresh one and they’ll cook it up for you on the spot. Price: $4 and up. ■Chowders, Pier 39, Building A, Level 1, at Beach St and The Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 391-4737, info@chowderspier39.com, http://www.chowderspier39.com/, Hours: Same hours as Pier 39. Serving fresh seafood cocktails, clam chowder in a bread bowl, fish and chips, sandwiches, and salads. They also have a small “Not so Fishy... ” menu for those who don’t like seafood. Price: $5-$11. ■Darren’s Cafe, 2731 Taylor St, between Beach St and Jefferson St, Phone: +1 415 673-3345, Hours: Tu-Su 11AM-8PM. Reasonably priced “mom and pop” Vienamese/breakfast place on the Wharf. They serve Vitenamese dishes, soup, and sandwiches as well as more traditional breakfast options like country potatoes and omlettes. Small but friendly! Price: $6-$9. ■Fisherman’s Wharf Deli and Taqueria, 2640 Mason St, between Beach St and Jefferson St, Phone: +1 415 788-1110, Hours: M-Th 7:30AM-6:30PM, F-Su 7:30AM-7:30PM. Inexpensive breakfast and lunch restaurant serving both Mexican and American fare like tacos, burritos, omlettes, toast, bagels, burgers, salads, and sandwiches. They also have in-

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ternet facilities costing $3 for 20 min, $5 for 40 min, and $7 for an hour. Price: $4-$8. ■In-N-Out Burger‎, 333 Jefferson St, near Jones St, Phone: 800 786-1000, http://www.in-n-out.com/, Hours: Su-Th 10:30AM-1AM, F-Sa 10:30AM-1:30AM. Standard In-N-Out Burger, but it has the distinction of being the only one in the city. They serve “fersh burgers” and fries cut straight from the potato in front of you... it’s still fast food, but it’s definitely better than the usual fare. This place gets seriously packed but the line does tend to move quickly. Price: $5-$8. ■La Salsa, Pier 39, Building P, Level 2, at Beach St and The Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 291-0717, Hours: Same hours as Pier 39. Serving fresh Mexiacn food like tacos, burritos, and quesadillas at Pier 39. Price: $5-$10.

Mid range ■Caesar’s Italian Restaurant, 2299 Powell St, at Bay St, Phone: +1 415 989-6000, caesars.italian@att.net, Fax: +1 415 989-8025, http://caesars.citysearch.com/, Hours: Tu-Sa 11:30AM-2:30PM, 4:30PM-9:30PM, Su 1:30PM-9:30PM. Great Italian restaurant on the Wharf... they have been around for over 50 years. Try the tender calamari. Price: $12-$30. ■Cafe Pescatore, 2455 Mason St, at North Point St, Phone: +1 415 561-1111, nathan.hobson@cafepescatore.com, Fax: +1 415 292-4549, http://www.cafepescatore.com/, Hours: M-Th 7AM-9PM, F-Su 7AM-10PM. A mid-range Italian trattoria that focuses on the staples of Italian food like pasta, pizza, and risottos. It being Fisherman’s Wharf, they do have a particular focus on seafood however. Price: $14-$25. ■Eagle Cafe, Pier 39, Ste 201, at Beach St and the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 433-3689, Webmaster@DaveVdW.net, http://www.eaglecafe.com/, Hours: 7:30AM-9PM daily. One of the more reasonably priced places to eat on the Wharf. Traditional fare served. Pancakes are a favorite. Price: $7$30. ■Cioppiono’s on the Wharf, 400 Jefferson St, on the corner of Jefferson and Leavenworth Sts, across from the Can-

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nery Building on the bayside of Fisherman. Family dining with indoor and outdoor seating. Cioppino is a flavorful San Franciscan seafood soup. ■McCormick and Kuleto’s Seafood Restaurant, Ghirardelli Square, 900 North Point St, at Beach St and Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 929-1730, susanr@mccormickandkuletos.com, Fax: +1 415 567-2919, http://www.mccormickandschmicks.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=content.display&am p;pageid=96&id=16, Hours: M-Th 11:30AM-10PM, F-Sa 11:30AM-11PM, Su 10:30AM-10PM. A good seafood restaurant that also serves other fare such as pastas and steaks. The restaurant is perched atop Ghirardelli Square and has magnificent views of the Bay, as well as a spacious and airy feel inside. Price: $11 and up. ■Pier Market, Pier 39, at Beach St and The Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 989-7437, info@piermarket.com, http://www. piermarket.com/, Hours: M-Th 11AM-11PM, F-Sa 11AM-12AM. Pier Market is a real market and restaurant at Pier 39. It’s definitely one of the better seafood options on the Wharf; the fish always seems to be fresh, th e service is fast and friendly, and the prices are pretty low given the quality. Price: $10-$33. ■Rainforest Cafe, 145 Jefferson St, Suite 400, between Mason St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 440-5610, http://www. rainforestcafe.com/, Hours: Su-Th 11AM-9PM, F 11AM-10PM, Sa 11AM-11PM. A jungle-themed restaurant with a wide variety of fare from chicken, seafood, pasta, pizza, and beef. Popular with young children. Price: $5-$24. ■Sea Lion Cafe, Pier 39, part of Neptune’s Palace at the end of Pier 39, Phone: +1 415 434-2260, info@pier39restaurants. com, Fax: +1 415 434-4208, http://www.pier39restaurants. com/bay_view.htm, Hours: 11AM-8PM daily. Good restaurant if you’re with kids, it serves fish & chips, fresh seafood entrées, cafe sandwiches, salads, and pasta dishes while watching the sea lions (but expect to pay a “San Francisco

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Minimum Wage Surcharge” with every meal). Price: $9$30.

Splurge ■Alioto’s, No. 8 Fisherman. Established in 1925 by the Alioto family, it plates Sicilian recipes incorporating the local, fresh seafood. ■Castagnola’s, 286 Jefferson St, across from Ripley’s and the Wax Museum, and the nearby Ghirardelli Square, Phone: +1 415 776-5015, Fax: +1 415 776-0463, http://www.castagnolas.com/, Hours: 11AM-9PM daily. Voted San Francisco’s No. 1 Seafood and Family Restaurant of 1998 by The National Academy of Restaurant Evaluation and The Best of San Francisco Pocket Guide. They specialize in seafood and Italian Cuisine, complimented by quality Californian wines. Price: $20 and up. ■Crab House at Pier 39, Pier 39, Second Level, West Side, at Beach St and the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 434-2722, comments@crabhouse39.com, Fax: +1 415 434-4038, http:// www.crabhouse39.com/, Hours: 11AM-11PM daily. Voted “Best Crab in San Francisco” and famous for it’s “Killer Crab” — 2 pounds of Dungeness Crab! Comes with great views of the Golden Gate Bridge. Price: $18-$60. ■Forbes Island, Sea Lion Harbor — H Dock, between Pier 39 and Pier 41, Phone: +1 415 951-4900, http://www.forbesisland.com/, Hours: W-Su 5PM-10PM. Fancy a bit of an adventure for your next dining experience? Well, how about dining on the world’s only floating island? Forbes Island is a floating wooden island (100 foot by 50 foot) complete with a lighthouse, waterfall, and real palm trees. It was built in 1975 and was originally intended to be a floating home... the creator was inspired by the novel “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.” The dining room is partially under water and portholes give you a underwater view from your table. It’s moored about 100 yards from the sea lions at Pier 39 and a pontoon ride will have to take you there

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and back... so don’t drink too much! The cuisine is French. Price: $30-$45. ■Nicks Lighthouse, 2815 Taylor St, at Jefferson St, Phone: +1 415 020-1300, Fax: +1 415 989-1544, http://www.nickslighthouse.com/, Hours: Su-Th 11AM-10:30PM, F-Sa 11AM-11PM. Warm and aromatic Italian restaurant serving popular family fare. Price: $12-$37. ■No. 9 Fisherman’s Grotto, No. 9 Fisherman’s Wharf, Taylor St and Jefferson St, Phone: +1 415 673-7025, reservations@ fishermansgrotto.com, http://www.fishermensgrotto.com/, Hours: Su-F 10AM-10PM, Sa 10AM-11PM. On the side of the plaza, this restaurant is an old favorite. The small ground floor room has a warm Venetian inspired ambiance; the upstairs is larger and more modern. Its windows overlook the fishing boats. Price: $14-$49. ■Sabella and LaTorre, 2809 Taylor St, Taylor St and Jefferson St, Phone: +1 415 673-2824, ttlatorre@comcast.net, Fax: +1 415 923-0585, http://www.bestofsanfrancisco.net/sabellalatorre.htm, Hours: Restaurant: 10:45AM-10:45PM; Crab Stand: 7AM-10:45PM. A family owned restaurant that’s been open since 1927 providing fresh seafood, family fare, and a full bar. They’re known in particular for their “cracked crab”. Price: $11-$37.50. ■Scoma’s Restaurant, Pier 47 on Al Scoma Way, where Jones and Jefferson Sts intersect, Phone: +1 415 771-4383, seafood@scomas.com, Fax: +1 415 775-2601, http://www. scomas.com/, Hours: M-Th 11:30AM-10PM, F-Su 11:30AM10:30PM, Closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, and Christmas Day. The Bar is open daily 30 minutes prior to lunch service. Overlooking the Bay and Alcatraz, and nestled amongst the fishing boats on Pier 47, this restaurant is

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popular among locals and tourists alike for it’s fresh seafood. Price: $20 and up.

Drink Bars The Wharf is not particularly well known for its nightlife scene. Most of what is there is of the “smart casual” variety, in restaurant bars and hotel bars. As the Wharf is primarily commercial, and not residential, the clientele consist mostly of either tourists, or workers from the local businesses. There are still some interesting water holes however, including:

■A simple meal... an Irish coffee at the Buena Vista Cafe

■Buena Vista Cafe, 2765 Hyde St, at Beach St, Phone: +1 415 474-5044, sfbuenavista@aol.com, Fax: +1 415 474-2207, http://www.thebuenavista.com/, Hours: M-F 9AM-2AM, Sa-

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Su 8AM-2AM. Famous for its Irish Coffee and great views over the Bay. Price: Entrees $9-$17. ■Club 383, 383 Bay St, Phone: +1 415 399-9555, Hours: Th-Sa 9PM-2AM. Has a trendy lounge feel with reasonably priced drinks. ■Dirty Martini, 2801 Leavenworth St, at Beach St, Phone: +1 415 775-5110, mgr@dirtymartinisf.com, http://www.dirtymartinisf.com/, Hours: M-Th 4PM-2AM, F-Su 2PM-2AM. Featuring “Happy & Hungry Hour: 4PM-8PM daily — $3 coronas, $5 margaritas, $5 specialty drinks. Light menu is available. Free snacks, free pool. ■Fiddler’s Green, 1333 Columbus Ave, between North Point St and Beach St, Phone: +1 415 441-9758, http://www. fiddlersgreensf.com/, Hours: 9AM-2AM daily. Irish bar and restaurant featuring live music and DJ’s. ■Jacks Cannery Bar, 2801 Leavenworth St, at Beach St, Phone: +1 415 931-6400, Hours: 10AM-2AM daily. Opened in 1932. The bar has a 90 foot oak-paneled hall. 110 Beers on tap! ■Knuckles Sports Bar, 555 North Point St, between Jones St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 486-4346, info@knucklessportsbar.com, http://knucklessportsbar.com/, Hours: Bar 10:30AM-11:30PM, Restaurant 6:30AM-11PM. A lively sports bar with a huge 61” big-screen and filled with sports memorabilia. ■Las Margaritas, Del Monte Square, 2nd Level, South Bldg, Jefferson St and Leavenworth St, Phone: +1 415 776-6996, Hours: 10AM-11:30PM daily. A Fruit Margarita in the Cannery anyone? ■Lou’s Pier 47 Restaurant and Blues Club, 300 Jefferson St, at Al Scoma Way, Phone: +1 415 771-LOUS (5687), louspier47@yahoo.com, Fax: +1 415 771-7060, http://www. louspier47.com/, Hours: Open at 11AM daily. Lou’s has live Blues music 7 days a week. Price: Cover Charge: M-Th: 4PM8PM $3, 8PM-close $5, F: 4PM-8PM $3, 8PM-close $10, Sa:

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4PM-8PM $5, 8PM-close $10, Su: 4PM-8PM $3, 8PM-close $5, Sa noon-3PM show is free. ■O’Neill’s Irish Pub, Ghirardelli Square, at Beach St and Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 771-8560, http://www.tisoneills. com/ghirardelli/welcome.html, Hours: noon-2AM daily. Irish Bar with great views over the Bay and of the Golden Gate Bridge. Given its swanky location, the drinks are unsurprisingly a little more expensive. ■Red Jack Saloon, 131 Bay St, at Midway St, Phone: +1 415 989-0700, Hours: 11AM-2AM daily. Dive Bar, set back a few blocks from the Wharf, it’s popular with Eastcoasters and Red Sox fans. Cheap drinks and a decent juke box.

Coffee ■Coffee Adventures, 1331 Columbus Avenue, between Leavenworth St and North Point St, Phone: +1 415 441-0301, coffeeadventures@sbcglobal.net, http://coffeeadventurescafe. com/, Hours: M-F 7AM-7PM, Sa-Su 8AM-7PM. Nice little “art cafe” with an extensive selection of coffees and teas. They also serve bagels, fresh sandwiches, and even “Bagelwiches.” Occasionally they exhibit local artwork on the walls to add to the ambiance. ■Ghirardelli Choclaterie and Cafe, Ghirardelli Square, at Beach St and Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 474-3938, Hours: M-Th 8:30AM-8PM, F 8:30AM-10PM, Sa 9AM-10PM, Su 9AM-8PM. Serving premium espresso drinks, pastries, and desserts. ■San Francisco Coffee Roasting Co., PIER 39, Building Q, Level 1, at Beach St and The Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 393-9554, http://www.sanfranciscocoffeeroasting.com/index.php, Hours: Su-Th 7AM-10PM, F-Sa 7AM-11PM. Cappuccinos, Lattes, espressos, and Mochas at Pier 39. ■San Francisco Tea & Coffee Co., Pier 39, at Beach St and The Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 421 5119, http://www. sfteaandcoffee.com/, Hours: M-F 10AM-8PM, Sa-Su 10AM-

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10PM. Serving a broad range of organic teas, herbal teas, white teas, rooibos, and coffee.

Sleep Many of the nation-wide chains have hotels in the area but the prices can be very high, so expect to pay a premium. There are very few budget options here, so if you’re travelling on a shoestring and need somewhere for under $100, you’ll have to either go south a bit towards North Beach, or west towards the Marina. Either way you’ll just be a 10 minute or so walk from the action. If you are insistent on staying within the Wharf area, do check for the actual location if you want to be right in Fisherman’s Wharf — the names of the accommodations can be confusing.

Budget ■Bayside Inn at the Wharf, 1201 Columbus Ave, at Bay St, Phone: +1 415 776-7070, baysideinnwharf@yahoo.com, Fax: +1 415 -474-5887, http://www.baysideinnwharf.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Set back from the crowds of the Wharf, this small, and slightly run down 25 room inn, has a good location nestled on the boundary between the Wharf and North Beach. They have a swimming pool, free wi-fi, and a business services area. Price: $120-$190. ■Wharf Inn, 2601 Mason St, at Beach St, Phone: +1 415 6737411, mlaplante@wharfinn.com, Fax: +1 415 776-2181, http:// www.wharfinn.com/index.html, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 11AM. Small, friendly, and in the heart of Fisherman’s Wharf. It has free parking. Price: $160-$195.

Mid range ■Best Western Tuscan Inn Fisherman’s Wharf, 425 North Point St, Phone: +1 415 561-1100 and +1 800 648-4626, Fax: +1 415 561-1199, http://www.tuscaninn.com, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Selected as one of the “World’s Best

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Places to Stay,” by Conde Nast Traveler’s Gold List 2005. Price: $180-$250. ■Courtyard-Fisherman’s Wharf, 580 Beach St, between Mason St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 775-3800, Fax: +1 415 441-7307, http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/sfocfcourtyard-san-francisco-fishermans-wharf/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Part of the Marriott group this nonsmoking, four story hotel is just 2 blocks from Ghirardelli Square. Price: $210-$290. ■Hilton Fisherman’s Wharf, 2620 Jones St, 2 blocks southwest of Pier 39, Phone: +1 415 885-4700, Fax: +1 415 771-8945, http://www1.hilton.com/en_US/hi/hotel/SFOFWHF-HiltonSan-Francisco-Fisherman-s-Wharf-California/index.do, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Non-Smoking Hotel. Price: $240-$360. ■Holiday Inn Express San Francisco — Fisherman’s Wharf, 550 North Point St, between Jones St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 409-4600, res-hiex-sfwharf@ihg.com, Fax: +1 415 409-5111, http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/h/d/ex/1/en/ hotel/sfonp?&firstpoint=dcb1&cm_mmc=mdpr-_GoogleMaps-_-ex-_-sfonp, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. One of the better rated hotels on the Wharf. Price: $200$270. ■Holiday Inn — Fisherman’s Wharf, 1300 Columbus Ave, between Jones St and Leavenworth St, Phone: +1 415 7719000, Fax: +1 415 771-7006, http://www.hifishermanswharf. com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Among the bars, cafes, and the vast number of specialty shops in Fisherman’s Wharf. Price: $220-$270. ■Radisson Hotel Fisherman’s Wharf, 250 Beach St, between Powell St and Mason St, Phone: +1 415 392-6700, rhi_sffw@radisson.com, Fax: +1 415 986-7853, http://www. radisson.com/sanfranciscoca_wharf, Check In: 4PM, Check Out: noon. Nice hotel, centrally located (only two blocks from Pier 39). Heated outdoor swimming pool. Price: $190$400. ■Suites at Fisherman’s Wharf, 2655 Hyde St, between Bay St and North Point St, Phone: +1 415 771-0200, guestservicessfw@yahoo.com, http://www.shellhospitality.com/

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hotels/suites_fisherman/accommodations.html, Check In: 4PM, Check Out: 10AM. The Suites is a small, (24 suites), but comfortable and modern hotel that offers one or twobedroom floor plans with all the amenities of home. Price: $175-$250.

Splurge ■Argonaut Hotel, 495 Jefferson St, at the end of the Powell-Hyde cable car line and right across from the historical ships, with nautical exhibits next to the lobby, Phone: +1 415 563-0800, Fax: +1 415 563-2800, http://www.argonauthotel. com, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. A high-end luxury boutique hotel overlooking the Bay and very centrally located on the Wharf. Ask for a room away from the front if you mind noise. It’s a 100% smoke free environment. Price: $250-$450. ■Hyatt-At Fisherman’s Wharf, 555 North Point St, between Jones St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 563 1234, Fax: +1 415 486-4444, http://fishermanswharf.hyatt.com/hyatt/ hotels/index.jsp, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Modern hotel with full-service and clean and comfortable rooms. Price: $250-$350. ■Marriott Fisherman’s Wharf, 1250 Columbus Ave, between Bay St and North Point St, Phone: +1 415 775-7555 and +1 800 551-6433, Fax: +1 415 474-2099, http://www.marriott. com/sfofw, Check In: 4PM, Check Out: noon. 285 Rooms and 11 suites. Price: $200-$300. ■Sheraton-At Fisherman’s Wharf, 2500 Mason St, at North Point St, Phone: +1 415 362-5500, Sheratonsf@ihrco. com, Fax: +1 415 956-5275, http://www.starwoodhotels.com/ sheraton/property/overview/index.html?propertyID=315,

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Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. This hotel is newly renovated and centrally located. Price: $230-$290.

Contact The Fisherman’s Wharf Deli and Taqueria, listed under the Eat section above, has internet facilities. Other options include:

■California Welcome Center, Pier 39, P Building-2nd Level, on Pier 39, next to the Frequent Flyers, Phone: +1 415 981-1280, info@pier39.com, http://www.visitcwc.com/ destinations/sanfrancisco/index.php, Hours: Winter hours: 10AM-5PM daily. Summer hours: 10AM-6PM daily. In addition to maps and info, the welcome center also offers a computer with internet access. Price: $5 for 20 min.

Stay safe Fisherman’s Wharf sometimes attracts an unsavory element; with questionable charitable organizations, timeshare marketers, and ‘Three Cup Shuffle’ scam artists. It’s wise to steer clear of these traps, and be mindful of how you spend your money. Beware of pickpocketing, it is a common occurrence at Fisherman’s Wharf. Follow the usual steps for avoiding being pickpocketed, such as keeping your wallet inside your front pocket or an inside jacket pocket.

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Get out The Marina — If you are interested in boats in general, why not take a 15 minute walk over through Fort Mason and into the Marina District. There you will find some impressive yacht clubs with both sail and power boats.

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Nob Hill/Russian Hill

■Looking down Lombard Street Nob Hill-Russian Hill is an area in the northeastern part of San Francisco, made up of the two adjoining neighborhoods. Nob Hill is an affluent neighborhood dating back to the gold rush, today renowned for its lavish hotels, charming shops and restaurants, views of the city, and the cable car lines which pass through the neighborhood. Just to the north is Russian Hill, a quieter residential area most well known for its pleasant walks and the crooked section of Lombard Street. The district is bounded roughly by Van Ness Avenue to the west, Bay Street to the north, Sutter Street to the south, and Powell Street and Columbus Avenue to the east.

Understand Nob Hill is one of the city’s most affluent neighborhoods. The advent of the Cable-Car made this hill-top accessible, and the City’s early railroad and Gold Rush millionaires rushed to settle here, far away from the unruliness of the Waterfront and Barbary Coast. In fact the hill derived its

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name from a slang term used to describe men of wealth and prominence -‘Nabobs’. Today, it is most renowned for it’s famous hotels and for city landmarks such as the impressive Grace Cathedral. At its peak is Huntington Park, with the Roman “Fountain of Tortoises” located at its center. The area was almost completely destroyed in the 1906 Earthquake and Fire, but ensuring its survival were a host of luxury hotels that were built over their charred ruins. Given its lofty elevation, the hill has great select views over the City and Bay. Russian Hill is a hilly residential neighborhood located west of North Beach (and Telegraph Hill) and north of Nob Hill. These three hills have largely given San Francisco its “hilly” charm. The boundaries of Russian Hill are generally considered to be Van Ness Avenue on the west, Pacific Avenue on the south, Columbus Avenue on the east (northeast), and San Francisco Bay on the north. In spite of the hilly terrain, the streets of Russian Hill are laid out mainly in a grid pattern, resulting in some of the steepest grades in the City, e.g., Filbert between Jones and Leavenworth. Because of the steepness of the hill, several streets, e.g., portions of Vallejo, Green, Greenwich and Larkin are blocked to motor vehicles and replaced by staircases. There are also beautifully landscaped pedestrian-only lanes such as Macondray Lane and Fallon Place. The most touristy block in Russian Hill is the winding Lombard Street, between Hyde and Leavenworth, with eight switchbacks, beautiful landscaping, and an arresting view of Telegraph Hill, Alcatraz Island and the East Bay. The hill’s name goes back to the Gold Rush-era when settlers discovered a small cemetery at the top of the hill which contained Russian colonists who had created a settlement here during the 18th century. The cemetery was removed, but the hill’s name remains to this day. There is no significant Russian presence here as the city’s Russian community is located primarily in the Richmond District.

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Get in

â– Nob Hill-Russian Hill map

By car Driving into this district is not recommended due to the steep hills, narrow and dead-end streets, lack of parking, and sometimes confusing traffic diversions. Avoid any street that is also a cable car line (Hyde between Washington and Fisherman’s Wharf, Mason between Columbus and Washington, and Jackson/Washington between Powell and Hyde), as the cable cars stop at every intersection, and they usually stop in the intersection. If you must drive in, the best streets to take are Van Ness Avenue (running north-south along the western edge of the district), Columbus Avenue (running northwest-southeast through the northeastern corner of the area) and the east-

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west Broadway Street, which becomes a tunnel between Powell and Larkin Streets. When parking in this hilly district, remember to always apply that parking brake and turn your wheels so that the tires are against the curb.

By cable car All three Cable Car lines cross at Powell and California. The Powell-Hyde and Powell-Mason cable car lines run between Union Square and Fisherman’s Wharf. The Powell-Hyde line runs on Powell Street, Jackson/Washington Streets, and Hyde Street, running up and down Nob and Russian Hills and stopping at the top of the crooked section of Lombard Street. The Powell-Mason line runs on Powell and Mason Streets on the east edge of the district. The California cable car line runs east-west on California Street between Market Street in the Financial District and Van Ness Avenue.

By bus MUNI bus routes #1-California, #12-Folsom/Pacific, #19Polk, #20-Columbus, #27-Bryant, #30-Stockton, #45-Union/ Stockton, #47-Van Ness and #49-Van Ness/Mission pass through the district. The #1, #12 and #45 run east-west through the district, the #19, #47 and #49 runs along the western edge of the district, the #20 and #30 run on Columbus through the northeastern corner of the district, while #27 crosses across the southwestern part of the district.

Get around This district is small enough for walking, but being very hilly, it can be somewhat strenuous.

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See

■Grace Cathedral

■Cable Car Museum, 1201 Mason Street, at Washington, Phone: +1 415 474-1887, http://www.cablecarmuseum.org, Hours: Daily April-September: 10AM-6PM. Daily OctoberMarch: 10AM-5PM. Here you can see the mechanisms that drive San Francisco’s famed cable cars, as well as plenty of cable car memorabilia and information on the history of the cable cars. Price: Admission is free. ■Lombard Street, between Hyde and Leavenworth. Do see the “crookedest street in the world”, a one-block portion of Lombard Street that contains eight hairpin turns, created to reduce the hill’s natural steep slope. The best time to see and photograph the winding street (from Leavenworth St)

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is in the morning because Lombard Street runs east-west and slopes eastward. The best time to see and photograph the view from the top (from Hyde St) is in the afternoon. At night there are great views of Telegraph Hill and Coit Tower. The wild parrots of Telegraph Hill frequently fly over head in the morning. ■Famous hotels. Pretend you are a guest, and not just a visitor and have a look around the lobbies of some swanky San Francisco hotels. The Fairmont and Mark Hopkins have impressive lobbies that will leave you counting your pennies to see if you can afford a room. See below under Sleep section for further info. ■Filbert Street, between Hyde and Leavenworth. At a 31.5% grade, this is one of the very steepest streets in the entire Western Hemisphere. Like many of the steeper streets in the city, it has steps along the sidewalk and its own special set of parking rules, so that people and cars don’t all come tumbling down! Price: Free. ■Francisco Street, Between Hyde and Leavenworth. This block contains twelve spectacular mansions in a variety of styles. It is very close to the crooked section of Lombard Street and is worth the minor detour on the way. ■Grace Cathedral, 1100 California Street, between Taylor and Jones, Phone: +1 415 749-6300, http://www.gracecathedral.org, Hours: M-F 7AM-6PM, Sa 8AM-6PM, Su 7AM7PM, cathedral holidays 8AM-4PM. The main Episcopalian church of the city, based on Notre Dame cathedral in Paris. (They request a donation and the tour is an hour long. You learn a lot but at times it is way too detailed) ■Grand Lodge F&AM of California, 1111 California Street, between Taylor and Jones, Phone: +1 415 776-7000, http://www.freemason.org. In addition to the lodge room and corporate offices, this place also has a museum of Freemasonry. ■Polk Street, between Broadway and Union. These five blocks form the heart of the Russian Hill neighborhood district. There are over 20 restaurants, 10 bars and cafes,

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and 20 shops. Dinner at many of the restaurants typically require reservations. ■Shakris Fine Asian Works of Art, 954 Bush Street, between Taylor and Jones, Phone: +1 415 929-0280, info@ shakris.com, Fax: +1 415 922-3838, http://www.shakris.com. This galley houses a broad collection of Asian antiques that span thousands of years of history. It has arts from China, Japan, India, Indonesia and Thailand among other countries. Popular categories include ceramics, paintings, metalwork, erotic art, carvings, and jade sculpture.

Do ■The Old First Church, 1751 Sacramento Street, at Van Ness, http://www.oldfirstconcerts.org/. The Old First Church has concerts F 8PM & Su 4PM, and some other evenings, throughout the year. Price: Ticket prices are typically $10-$15. ■Lumiere Theatre, 1572 California Street, at Polk, Phone: +1 415 421-8497, http://www.landmarktheatres.com/market/ SanFrancisco/LumiereTheatre.htm. Screening independent films, foreign releases and documentaries. ■Masonic Auditorium, 1111 California Street, between Taylor and Jones, Phone: +1 415 776-4702, http://www.masonicauditorium.com. Hosts many concerts and other special events.

Buy ■Argonaut Book Shop, 786 Sutter Street, at Jones, Phone: +1 415 474-9067, Fax: +1 415 474-2537, http://www.argonautbookshop.com, Hours: M-F 9AM-5PM, Sa 10AM-4PM. The bookshelves here are any war buff’s haven, with a treasure trove of books on the history of California and the American West. It also has good collections on the American Civil

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War, American railroads, regional Americana, antiques and maritime books. ■Atelier Des Modistes, 1903 Hyde Street, at Green, Phone: +1 415 775-0545, http://www.atelierdesmodistes.com, Hours: W-Sa 12PM-8PM. Bridal gowns and jewelery. ■Cris, 2056 Polk Street, at Broadway, Phone: +1 415 474-1191, Hours: M-F 11AM-6:30PM, Sa 11AM-6PM, Su 12PM-5PM. A consignment shop with high-end goods. ■HUF, 816 Sutter Street, at Jones, Phone: +1 415 614-9449, http://www.hufsf.com. Get your Vans, your Adidas, and your Nikes on at this sneaker shop named after former pro skater Keith “Huf ” Hufnagel. This place offers a highly exclusive selection of skater and sports shoes. ■Kissmet, 2354 Polk Street, Between Union and Green, Phone: +1 415 931-9979‎, Hours: Tu-Su Noon-7PM. A cute Asian importer that has great small gifts for children. Price: $10. ■Lombardi’s Sports, 1600 Jackson Street, at Polk, Phone: +1 415 771-0600, http://www.lombardisports.com, Hours: M-W 10AM-7PM, Th-F 10AM-8PM, Sa 10AM-6PM, Su 11AM6PM. A massive sporting goods store, with two floors of merchandise. ■Molte Cose, 2044 Polk Street, between Broadway and Pacific, Phone: +1 415 921-5374. “Molte Cose”, or “many things” in Italian, fits the name of this shop. Tons of cool adornments, clothes and accessories. ■Velvet da Vinci, 2015 Polk Street, (between Broadway and Pacific), Phone: 415-441-0109, http://www.velvetdavinci. com, Hours: Tues-Sat 12-6PM, Sun12-4PM. Established in 1991, the gallery shows contemporary jewelry by international artists and craft-based sculpture. Housed in an old furniture factory the gallery has 10 exhibitions a year and is a must see for fans of cutting-edge jewelry. ■You Say Tomato, 1526 California Street, at Larkin, Phone: +1 415 921-2828, http://www.yousaytomato.biz, Hours: Tu-F

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10AM-7PM, Sa-Su 10AM-5PM. English food store that will appease the expats.

Eat There are many great options in these two Districts -- lots of smallish, cozy eateries. Frequently the nicer restaurants require reservations.

■Big Four Restaurant, 1075 California Street, between Cushman and Taylor, Phone: +1 415 771-1140, http://www. huntingtonhotel.com/big_restaurant/big_restaurant.cfm, Hours: Breakfast M-F 7AM-10AM, Sa-Su 7AM-11AM, Brunch Su 11AM-2PM, Lunch M-Sa 11:30AM-3PM, Dinner daily 5:30PM-10PM. In the Huntington Hotel. Price: $13-$35. ■Crustacean Restaurant, 1475 Polk Street, at California, Phone: +1 415 776-2722, Fax: +1 415 776-1069, http://www. anfamily.com/Restaurants/crustacean_sanfrancisco/ displaypages/homepage.html, Hours: Lunch Su 11:30AM3:30PM, Su-Th 5PM-9:30PM, F-Sa 5PM-10:30PM. Mixed reviews about this Vietnamese restaurant, so make your own decision. However, the roast crab has consistently garnered good reviews. ■Frascati, 1901 Hyde Street, at Green, Phone: +1 415 928-1406, frascati@pacbell.net, Fax: +1 415 928-1983, http://www. frascatisf.com, Hours: M-Sa 5:30PM-9:45PM, Su 5:30PM9PM. A pan-European that is somewhat fancy but still relaxed and features local food. ■Front Room Pizza, 1550 California Street, between Larkin and Polk, Phone: +1 415 771-1591, http://thefrontroomsf.com,

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Hours: Su-W 11AM-11:45PM, Th 11AM-Midnight, F-Sa 11AM12:45AM. Arguably the best pizza in Nob Hill. ■Harris’ Restaurant, 2100 Van Ness Avenue, at Pacific, Phone: +1 415 673-1888, Fax: +1 415 673-8817, http://www. harrisrestaurant.com/. ■Hyde Street Bistro, 1521 Hyde Street, at Jackson, Phone: +1 415 292-4415, http://www.hydestreetbistrosf.com/, Hours: W-M 5:30PM-10PM. Price: $20. ■Nara Sushi, 1515 Polk Street, between California St & Sacramento St, Phone: +1 415 567-1515, lee@sfnarasushi.com, http://www.sfnarasushi.com, Hours: Su-W 11:30AM-Midnight, Th-Sa 11:30AM-2AM. Popular with locals that rave about the freshness of the sushi here. Solid sushi at good prices, and large quantities too. ■Nob Hill Cafe, 1152 Taylor Street, between Clay and Pleasant, Phone: +1 415 776-6500. A north Italian Bistro that serves lunch, dinner and a Sunday brunch. ■Okoze Sushi, 1207 Union Street, at Hyde Street, Phone: +1 415 567-3397, Hours: Su-W 5:30PM-10:30PM, Th-Sa 5:30PM11PM. A good sushi restaurant very near the cable car lines on Hyde Street. There is typically no need for a reservation. Price: $25-$40. ■O’Reilly’s Holy Grail, 1233 Polk Street, at Bush, Phone: +1 415 928-1233, info@oreillysholygrail.com, Fax: +1 415 928-1224, http://www.oreillysholygrail.com. A classy Irish restaurant (yes, it’s possible). Opened in 2005 in a restored landmark (Maye’s steak-house, for old-timers). Have the Colcannon (potatoes and cabbage) pounded together in a mortar and then stewed with butter with your meat. ■Ristorante Milano, 1448 Pacific Avenue, at Morrell/McCormick, between Hyde and Larkin, Phone: +1 415 673-2961, http://www.milanosf.com/, Hours: M-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-10:30PM, Su 5PM-10PM. Price: $9-$23. ■Zarzuela, 2000 Hyde Street, at Union, Phone: +1 415 3460800, Hours: Tu-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-10:30PM. ■Za Gourmet Pizza, 1919 Hyde Street, Between Union St. and Green St., Phone: +1 415 771-3100, Hours: M-W Noon-

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10PM, Th-Su Noon-11PM. A good, cheap pizza-by-the-slice restaurant that is open relatively late. Price: $5-$10.

Drink ■Bacchus Wine Bar, 1954 Hyde Street, between Union St & Warner Pl., Phone: +1 415 928-2633, Hours: Nightly 5:30PM2AM. Small intimate 20 seater bar that is a good place to go to get a nice glass of wine or a sake cocktail. ■Bigfoot Lodge, 1750 Polk Street, between Washington and Clay, Phone: +1 415 440-2355, http://www.bigfootlodge.com, Hours: Daily 3PM-2AM. Interesting decor (Giant Bigfoot statue) and serving basic but decent driks. Sometimes they light the bar on fire. ■Nob Hill Tavern, 1390 California Street, at Hyde, Phone: +1 415 673-9294, Hours: M-F 4PM-2AM, Sa 7PM-2AM, Su 5PM2AM. About as basic as it gets. Best prices in the neighborhood. ■Red Devil Lounge, 1695 Polk Street, at Clay, Phone: +1 415 921-1695, http://www.reddevillounge.com. Good live music venue. ■Tonga Room, 950 Mason Street, at California, Phone: +1 415 772-5278, http://www.fairmont.com/sanfrancisco/GuestServices/Restaurants/TheTongaRoomHurricaneBar.htm. Polynesian themed bar in the Fairmont. Expensive drinks but kind of fun. ■Zeki’s Bar, 1319 California Street, at Helen between Hyde and Leavenworth, Phone: +1 415 928-0677, http://www.zekisbar.com, Hours: Daily 4PM-2AM. A step up from Nob Hill Tavern.

Sleep ■Heritage Marina Hotel, 2550 Van Ness Avenue � San Francisco, California 94109, Phone: (415) 776-7500, http://

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www.heritagemarinahotel.com/. Hotel way downtown and central. But: interiour old and decayed, lousy breakfast, bad cleanliness - we picked up bed bags

Budget ■Hotel Mithila, 972 Sutter Street, at Hyde, Phone: +1 415 4419297, info@mithilahotel.com, Fax: +1 415 441-2379, http:// www.mithilahotel.com/. Established in 1920, this is a relatively clean hotel and reasonably priced. Price: Average Price $115.

Mid-range ■Best Inn, 2850 Van Ness Avenue, between Chestnut and Lombard, Phone: +1 415 776-3220, info@vannessinn.com, Fax: +1 415 921-7451, http://www.vannessinn.com/, Check In: 2PM - $50 deposit and credit card required upon check in, Check Out: 11AM. Nothing fancy, but a clean and comfortable hotel, situated a few blocks south of the Wharf. Price: Average Price $180. ■Cornell Hotel De France, 715 Bush Street, at Powell, Phone: +1 415 421-3154, http://www.cornellhotel.com/. Price: $80-$180. ■Golden Gate Hotel, 775 Bush Street, between Mason and Powell, Phone: +1 415 392-3702, info@goldengatehotel.com, Fax: +1 415 392-6202, http://www.goldengatehotel.com/. Charming budget hotel. Price: $95-$150. ■Grosvenor Suites, 899 Pine Street, at Mason, Phone: +1 415 421-1899, http://www.grosvenorsuites.com. ■Holiday Inn Golden Gateway Hotel, 1500 Van Ness Avenue, at Pine, Phone: +1 415 441-4000, http://www.goldengatewayhotel.com. ■Hotel Carlton, 1075 Sutter Street, at Larkin, Phone: +1 415 673-0242, Fax: +1 415 673-4904, http://www.jdvhotels.com/ carlton. A reasonably-priced boutique hotel with decora-

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tions that feature international travel. Hotel Carlton is a non-smoking and pet-friendly hotel, and is certified by San Francisco as a green business. Saha Restaurant in the lobby serves Arabic fusion cuisine.

Splurge ■Fairmont Hotel, 950 Mason Street, at California, Phone: +1 415 772-5000, Fax: +1 415 772-5013, http://www.fairmont. com/sanfrancisco. One of the most famous hotels in the city, having been gutted in the 1906 earthquake and fire, and rebuilt. The lobby is fantastic, and many rooms have fantastic views. Price: The grandest suite costs $10,000 a night, but you can get a nice room for $300-400. ■Huntington Hotel, 1075 California Street, at Taylor, Phone: +1 415 474-5400, Fax: +1 415 474-6227, http://www.huntingtonhotel.com. A former apartment building-turned-luxury hotel with individually decorated rooms. ■Intecontinental Mark Hopkins, 1 Nob Hill Place, at California and Mason Streets, Phone: +1 415 392-3434, http:// www.san-francisco.intercontinental.com. Historic hotel atop Nob Hill. Convenient for walking tours of the city. ■Petite Auberge, 863 Bush Street, between Taylor and Mason, Phone: +1 415 928-6000, Fax: +1 415 673-7214, http:// www.jdvhotels.com/petite_auberge. The Petite Auberge is a French provincial style inn. Guests enjoy the cozy parlor with crackling fire, afternoon wine and hors d’oeuvres. Many of the 26 guestrooms and suites offer fireplaces. All guests receive a gourmet breakfast buffet each morning. ■Stanford Court Hotel, 905 California Street, at Powell, Phone: +1 415 989-3500, Fax: +1 415 391-0513, http://www. marriott.com/hotels/travel/sfosc-the-stanford-court-arenaissance-hotel. Another 4-star hotel with marble baths and free limousine service. ■White Swan Inn, 845 Bush Street, between Taylor and Mason, Phone: +1 415 775-1755, Fax: +1 415 775-5717, http:// www.jdvhotels.com/white_swan_inn. With a fireplace in all 26 guestrooms and suites, the White Swan Inn in San Francisco is a romantic and atmospheric small hotel in the Nob

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Hill/Union Square area. Dark wood paneling, rich floral carpets, comfortable furniture covered with elegant fabrics and enchanting English art and collectibles set the tone. All guests enjoy evening turndown service, a gourmet breakfast buffet, and evening wine and hors d’oeuvres served fireside in the cozy parlor. ■York Hotel, 940 Sutter Street, between Hyde and Leavenworth, Phone: +1 415 885-6800, Reservations@PersonalityHotels.com, http://www.yorkhotel.com.

Contact

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Chinatown/North Beach Chinatown-North Beach in San Francisco combines two adjoining neighbors, both of whom are among the city’s most popular immigrant neighborhoods. Culturally and aesthetically, they could not be more different yet their streets mesh seamlessly together. Chinatown is the oldest and one of the largest Chinatowns in the US. More than just a tourist destination, it is a functioning, living, and breathing Chinese community that can offer intriguing cultural experiences even to the most jaded old China hand. Its tiny and crowded streets bristle with activity and energy. North Beach, on the other hand, is much more laid back. This “Little Italy,” with its cafes and alfresco dining, has a real European charm and flavor reminiscent of the romance of Europe and Italy. The area runs from roughly Bay Street to the north, Columbus Avenue and Powell Street on the west, San Francisco Bay on the east, and Washington Street on the south with an extension to Sutter Street between Kearny and Powell Streets to encompass the rest of Chinatown.

Understand Chinatown With pagoda-tiled roofs, Cantonese conversations, busy live-produce markets, mahjong players, and little old Chinese ladies confidently spitting on the pavement — Chinatown is a unique part of San Francisco. Established in 1850, in the area around Portsmouth Plaza, San Francisco’s Chinatown is reputed to be the oldest and one of the largest and most famous of all Chinatowns outside of Asia. Many of the Chinese who settled here were merchants or immigrant workers, working on either the transcontinental railroad or

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as mine workers during the Gold Rush. Today, it is home for more than 15,000 Chinese and Chinese-Americans, many of whom are low-income, elderly, and foreign born, living in dense tenements. It is also a cultural link for the hundreds of thousand Chinese and Chinese-Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area. Chinatown holds a prominent position in the history of Chinese and Chinese-Americans in the United States, from the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 to the present day. The residual “bachelor” society one finds in San Francisco’s Chinatown today cannot be understood without some knowledge of these hostile decades. The tourist section of Chinatown is mainly along Grant Avenue, from Bush to Broadway. Grant Avenue was made famous by Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Flower Drum Song. The Chinatown market area is mainly along Stockton Street, one block above (west of ) Grant Avenue, and the east-west streets crossing Stockton. Other San Francisco concentrations of Chinese shops and restaurants are located in the Inner Richmond District, mainly along Clement, and the Outer Sunset District, mainly along Irving.

North Beach Forming part of the old Barbary Coast (an extinct neighborhood infamous for its crime, prostitution, and general unruliness), and popular with both locals and tourists alike, North Beach remains one of the most popular and beloved neighborhoods in San Francisco. Nestled between Chinatown to the south and Fisherman’s Wharf to the north, North Beach is the Italian part of town and is known by the moniker “Little Italy.” Telegraph poles, painted in the colors of the Italian flag (green, white, and red), delineate the boundaries between these two neighbors. It is one of the oldest neighborhoods in the city and is rich in both history and culture. The neighborhood derived its name as the Bay shoreline originally reached as far as Taylor and Francisco streets, and the area was indeed a real beach until the city subsequently filled it in. The portion of Grant Avenue that runs straight through North Beach is the oldest street in San Francisco. Authentic old-world Italian cafes, restaurants,

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delicatessens and bakeries line the steep streets. North Beach was also the West Coast’s capital for the Beatnik movement in the 1950s — you can still see many of the places where Jack Kerouac and the “Dharma Bums” hung out and wrote their dark poetry. Other literati celebrites that hung out there were; Alan Ginsberg, Neal Cassidy (Dean Moriarity in Kerouac’s On The Road), and Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Alan Ginsberg wrote his most famous poem ‘Howl’ whilest living at 1010 Montgomery Street. Today, the neighborhood is also very well known for its happening nightlife scene. Nightclubs and bars abound — particularly at the intersection of Columbus Avenue and Grant Avenue. At its base, Broadway is a mini red-light district, made famous in the 1960s by Carol Doda with her “twin 44s.” The area is still full of adult bookstores and strip clubs; despite this, strangely, like everything in San Francisco, it retains a certain charm. Washington Square (another old Beat hangout), in front of the Saints Peter and Paul Church, is a very popular hangout with locals, and a great place to relax. North Beach has also some famous residents — past and present, like baseball legend Joe DiMaggio and movie director Francis Ford Coppola.

Get in

By car Driving into the area is not recommended, but if you must, the closest parking garage to Chinatown is underneath Portsmouth Plaza, on Kearny Street (which is a one-way street north) between Clay and Washington. Other Chinatown garages are the Golden Gateway at 250 Clay Street, North Beach at 755 Vallejo Street, and St. Mary’s Square at 433 Kearny Street. All garages are open 24 hours a day, except for Golden Gateway. There are also a few small parking garages scattered throughout North Beach, including Imperial Parking at 425 Broadway Street. Driving to the base of

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Coit Tower is definitely not recommended, as there is a very limited amount of parking at the top of the hill.

By cable car Each of the three Cable Car lines pass through Chinatown. If you exit BART or the MUNI Metro at the Powell St. Station you can catch the Powell-Mason or the Powell-Hyde cable car line at Powell and Market. Both routes will take you into Chinatown, but the Powell-Mason line is a better bet for getting to North Beach as the Powell-Hyde line turns west at Jackson and proceeds into Russian Hill. To reach Chinatown’s famous Grant Avenue via the cable car, exit BART or the MUNI Metro at the Embarcadero Station and catch the California cable car line at California and Market.

By bus Of course, if you’d rather avoid the long lines and crowded trip that a cable car ride entails, there are several good MUNI bus lines that serve the area. To get to Chinatown from the BART/MUNI Metro, exit at the Montgomery Street Station, walk one block up Post Street, and catch the 30-Stockton or 45-Union SF-Muni bus line on Kearny near Post. The 30 or 45 bus will turn left onto Sutter and then right onto Stockton; after passing through the Stockton Tunnel, the bus will stop twice in Chinatown, on Stockton near Clay and on Stockton near Pacific. To get to North Beach from Market Street, the 9X-San Bruno Express, 10-Townsend, 20-Columbus, 30, or 45 lines will do nicely. From the east, the 1-California and 12-Folsom/Pacific lines pass through Chinatown. The 39-Coit goes from Fisherman’s Wharf up to the Coit Tower, but can be obstructed by traffic that clogs the parking lot there, but there are plans to change this.

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On foot Chinatown is also an easy walk from Union Square (walk north on Stockton through the tunnel or north on Grant through the Chinatown Gate at Grant and Bush). Similarly, North Beach can be easily accessed by walking northbound from Market Street, straight through the Financial District. Both neighborhoods can also be easily reached from Market Street by simply walking northbound on Grant Avenue. To get to the area from Fisherman’s Wharf, walk southbound straight down Columbus Avenue.

Get around There can be little doubt that once you have arrived in the Chinatown-North Beach area, by far the best way to get around is on foot. Due to the busy and cluttered nature of both neighborhoods, and also because of the lack of parking options, driving around is certainly not recommended — especially in Chinatown. Buses however can also be a help, particularly when you are going in a North-South direction (or vice versa). Pedicabs also operate a route along the Embarcadero and through Chinatown and then North Beach. Stop one of them if they’re empty and negotiate a price. For a bit extra many of them do walking tours of Chinatown. There are many more parks, public seating, and cafes with curbside tables in North Beach, so why not see Chinatown first. That way, by the time you’d made it through its bustling streets you’ll be ready for a coffee and a sit down in North Beach.

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See The listings in this article are geographically organised in roughly a south-to-north direction; meaning that they start with Chinatown first — then North Beach.

■Stockton Street Produce Markets, Stockton St, runs parallel to Grant Ave, one block west — between Sacramento St and Vallejo St. The fruit, vegetable, and live produce markets on Stockton Street are a must for any adventurous traveler. The greatest concentration of Chinese shops and Chinese shoppers can be found in the three blocks from Washington to Broadway. They are notoriously busy, and not for the faint of heart as locals deftly paw over each and every piece of fruit... you have to be quick! Tangerines are important during Chinese New Years. You may need a gut check as well in the live produce markets — there are all kinds of live fauna flapping about from frogs and turtles, to chickens and ducks. The best time to explore Stockton Street is on weekdays; weekends are even more crowded, when Chinese families that have moved up to the suburbs return for shopping on Stockton Street. To avoid the crowds, explore the area in the morning or late afternoon. Many of the shops close around 6pm, but the eateries will remain open into the evening hours. ■Chinatown Alleys. Though Grant Avenue has a lot to offer, it is quite touristy; thus, it is essential that you examine the more authentic areas in the alleys, such as Waverly Place, Pagoda Place, Spofford Lane, and Ross Alley, between Grant and Stockton. Ross Alley is the oldest alley in the city and many movies have had scenes shot here including Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. These alleys have got a real old-world feel and you will hear Cantonese conversations and the clicking sound of mahjong tiles being shuffled. ■Golden Gate Fortune Cookie Factory, 56 Ross Alley, between Jackson St, Washington St, Stockton St and Grant Ave, Phone: + 1 415 781-3956, Hours: 7AM-8:30PM daily. Opened in 1962, this tiny factory produces more than 20,000 fortune cookies a day. The factory is in a small alley and it is

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tiny with only 3 people making fortune cookies. Tourists are welcome to walk in off the street — you get a flat (unbended) fortune cookie sample but photos cost 50 cents and the moment you walk in they are asking you in their broken English what cookies you want to buy. It is a must see though! Price: Free entry, $10 for a huge bag of cookies.

■City Lights Bookstore, with Jack Kerouac Alley and Vesuvio

■City Lights Bookstore, 261 Columbus Ave, at Broadway St, Phone: +1 415 362-8193, Fax: +1 415 362-4921, http://www. citylights.com, Hours: 10AM-Midnight daily. Co-founded by Beat poet Lawrence Ferlenghetti, City Lights was one of the centers of the Beat community in the 1950s. It’s iconic and has become synonymous with the literati Beat movement. Oh, don’t forget to check out the books, they have a huge collection of Beat prose and poetry. Why not buy a copy of On the Road while you’re there — you won’t find a better place to get it! ■Jack Kerouac Alley, Jack Kerouac Alley, at Columbus Ave and Broadway St. This tiny paved pedestrian alley was named after the famous Beat Generation writer Jack Kerouac who used to hang out in the alley a lot. It was intended to form a literary (and actual) connection between

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the communities of Chinatown and North Beach. There are plaques embedded into the street which are engraved with Chinese and Western poems from Kerouac, Confucius and John Steinbeck among others. ■Telegraph Hill. Telegraph Hill earned its name in the days of the Gold Rush when it was used as a signaling post to relay messages about incoming ships to the Bay. Coit Tower was erected at its peak in 1933 and rewards a weary traveler with some wonderful views over the city. Over time a quiet residential neighborhood built up along the hillside, and their magnificent flowing gardens have always been something to admire on your way up or down. Other neighbors include a colony of colorful feral parrots, predominantly red-masked parakeets, which grew up as descendants of escaped domesticated pets... Freedom! One can drive to the top, but it’s better to take one of the narrow steps leading up and down the sides of the hill (including the Greenwich and Filbert Steps), as they offer better views over the Bay.

■Filbert Steps. The Filbert Steps are the part of Filbert Street that runs between Battery Street and Telegraph Hill Boulevard in North Beach, San Francisco. The steps end next to Coit Tower, and offer a scenic — though some what strenuous — route for visitors of the tower. In fact, following the steps is at times faster than driving to Coit Tower due to the high demand for relatively few parking spots near the site. Visitors of the steps will see public gardens, stylish homes and views of North Beach and the bay; if a path is not gated or specifically signed with “No Trespassing,” then it is most likely public. Also, it pays to be adventurous: some of the best gardens and views are off the stairs. Finally, there is more than one way up and down; if you make a round trip you should find a new route for the return leg. Just avoid private property.

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Museums and galleries ■Chinese Culture Center, 750 Kearny St, 3rd floor, From Portsmouth Sq: just walk across the footbridge that crosses Kearny St to the Hilton Hotel, Phone: +1 415 986-1822, info@c-c-c.org, Fax: +1 415 986-2825, http://www.c-c-c.org/, Hours: Tu-Sa 10AM-4PM. The center was established in order to promote understanding of Chinese and Chinese American history, art, and culture in the US. They have a small gallery with changing Chinese art exhibitions. Price: Free. ■Chinese Historical Society of America Museum & Learning Center, 965 Clay St, between Stockton St and Powell St, Phone: +1 415 391-1188, info@chsa.org, Fax: +1 415 391-1150, http://www.chsa.org/, Hours: Tu–F 12PM–5PM, Sa 11AM–4PM. This is well worth a visit, with exhibits on the history and experience of Chinese immigrants to San Francisco over the past 150 years. Price: $3 adults, $2 students/ seniors, $1 children. ■Kee Fung Ng Gallery, 757 Grant Ave, between Sacramento St and Clay St, Phone: +1 415 434-1844. Has an extensive collection of scroll paintings, framed art work, statues and other carvings. They also personalize signature stone seals for you as you wait, and can help you with the process of selecting the style and Chinese characters to use. Price: Free. ■Stylers Art Gallery, (時代畫廊), 661 Jackson St, between Kearny St and Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 788-8639, http:// www.stylersart.com, Hours: M-F 11AM-5PM; Sa-Su 10:30AM5:30PM. Enjoy authentic Chinese artwork at this tiny gallery. They also offer classes in calligraphy for those who want to take their appreciation a step further. Price: Free. ■Beat Museum, 540 Broadway St, at Columbus Ave, Phone: 1-800-537-6822, http://www.thebeatmuseum.org/, Hours: Tu-Su 10AM-10PM. Features quite an extensive collection of exhibits, books and manuscripts etc., that focus on Jack Kerouac and the literary Beat Generation. Plenty of books and T-Shirts for sale here as well. Price: $5. ■North Beach Museum, 1435 Stockton St, between Green St and Vallejo St, Phone: + 1 415 391-6210, Hours: M-Th 9AM-

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4PM, F 9AM-6PM. Photographs, pictures and artifacts that shed light on the rich history of North Beach. Price: Free.

Temples and churches

■Old St. Mary’s Church, 660 California St, between Grant Ave and Kearny St, Phone: +1 415 288-3800, http://www. oldsaintmarys.org/, Hours: M-F 7AM-7PM, Sa 10AM-7PM, Su 8AM-3PM. This is a Chinatown landmark. A beautiful brick building, it is the oldest Roman Catholic church in San Francisco. Price: Free. ■Tin How Temple (天后古廟), 125 Waverly Pl, 4th floor, between Washington St, Clay St, Stockton St, and Grant Ave, Hours: 10AM-4PM daily. This tiny temple is the oldest Taoist temple in the country. It is dedicated to Matsu, the Taoist goddess of the Sea. Hundreds of gold and red colored lanterns adorn the ceilings, whose relative size depends on the size of the donation made. The lanterns are inscribed with the name of the donor, in the hope that it will bring them a long and fulfilling life. Price: Free (Donations accepted). ■Norras Temple, 109 Waverly Pl, between Washington St, Clay St, Stockton St, and Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 362-1993, Hours: 10AM-4PM daily. This is the oldest Buddhist temple in the city and was named after the Norras Buddhist Temple in Tibet. It has an impressive gilded-wood altar that was imported from China. Price: Free. ■Matsu Temple, 30 Beckett St, between Pacific Ave, Jackson St, Kearny St and Grant Ave. Dedicated to Matsu, goddess of the Sea, but has only been around since 1986. Price: Free, a small donation will get you a good luck charm to wear around your neck. ■First Chinese Baptist Church, 15 Waverly Pl, between Washington St, Clay St, Stockton St, and Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 362-4139, office@fcbc-sf.org, Fax: +1 415 362-7644, http://www.fcbc-sf.org/. Established in the year 1880, as one of the oldest churches in the city, it is worth a visit. It was destroyed in the 1906 earthquake, but rebuilt with the help

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of American Baptists across the US. It is known as a bilingual and bicultural church and its ministry has historically reached out to immigrants and newcomers. Price: Free. ■Buddhas Universal Church, 720 Washington St, between Kearny St and Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 982-6116, bucsf@ sbcglobal.net, Fax: +1 415 421-3325, http://www.bucsf.com/. At five stories tall, this is the largest Buddhist church in the US and is home to the largest Buddhist congregation in San Francisco. The altar was shaped to represent the ship of the Dharma (teachings of the Buddha) and its teak-paneled walls are supposed to be the sails of the ship. Price: Free. ■Kong Chow Temple, 855 Stockton St, between Clay St and Sacramento St, Phone: +1 415 788-1339. Founded in 1857, this is a Taoist temple in honor of the God of honesty and trust — the deity, Kuan Ti. It has many colorful altars, where color is used as metaphor — green for longevity, red warns off evil spirits, and gold projects majesty. Price: Free — donations accepted. ■St. Francis of Assisi Church, 610 Vallejo St, at Columbus Ave, Phone: +1 415 983-0405, ShrineSF@flash.net, Fax: +1 415 983-0407, http://www.shrinesf.org/, Hours: 11AM-5PM daily. Established during the days of the Gold Rush, this Church does not host an active parish, however it still functions as a national shrine and tribute to St. Francis of Assisi. It also has a gift shop where you can purchase crosses, frescoes, rosaries, holy cards, as well as many other trinkets. Price: Free. ■Sts. Peter and Paul Church, 660 Filbert St, overlooking Washington Square, Phone: +1 415 421-5219, Fax: +1 415 4211831, http://www.stspeterpaul.san-francisco.ca.us/church/, Hours: Su Services: 7:30AM, 9AM, 10:15AM, 11:30AM, 12:45AM, 5:30PM M-F Services: 7AM, 8AM, 9AM, 12:15PM. A white statuesque, neo-Gothic Roman Catholic Cathedral situated directly in front of Washington Square. After Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe wed at City Hall in 1954,

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they were famously photographed afterwards at the this Church. Price: Free.

Architecture

■Coit Tower Much of the architecture in Chinatown and North Beach was destroyed by the 1906 earthquake and subsequent fire. However, there are still some structures that are worth seeing including the Saints Peter and Paul Church and Old Saint Mary’s Church, listed under Temples and Churches above. Chinatown is a mix of Edwardian and Chinoiserie architecture that was built after the fire and it has some interesting pagoda buildings. It may not be authentic Chinese architecture, but it retains a certain charm. The Chinese here also eschewed the traditional grid system of American cities, and a whole series of interesting alleys permeate through Chinatown. Other architectural points of interest include:

■Chinatown Gate, Grant Ave, Grant Ave and Bush St. Erected in 1970, this ornate dragon-crested gate, marks the southern entrance to Chinatown. The Gateway is inscribed

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with the saying “All under heaven is for the good of the people,” by Dr. Sun Yat-sen. ■Bank of Canton, 743 Washington St, between Kearny St and Grant Ave, Hours: M-Th 9AM-5PM, F 9AM-6PM, Sa 9AM-4PM. Built in 1891, it was destroyed and rebuilt in 1909, originally the building housed the country’s only Chinese telephone exchange. The exchange closed in 1949 and the building was subsequently restored and turned into a bank in 1960. The building is arguably the first important building in Chinatown. It is a three-tiered pagoda style building. ■Sing Fat Building and Sing Chong Building, at the corner of California St and Grant Ave. Two great examples of multi-tiered pagoda buildings on opposite sides of the intersection. The Sing Chong Building was one of the first buildings rebuilt after the fire, and today it is one of the most photographed buildings in the city. ■Bank of America, 701 Grant Ave, at Sacramento St, Hours: M-F 9AM-6PM, Sa 9AM-2PM. Pagoda style building with a three tiered roof and decorated with ornate gold dragons and medallions on the outside. ■Engine No. 1 — Firehouse, 451 Pacific Ave, between Montgomery St and Samaome St. One of the original Fire Houses in the city, it used horse-drawn equipment, it was built in 1868. It was subsequently destroyed by the 1906 fire (ironically!) and was rebuilt in 1909 by architect Newton J. Tharp as a two-story building with large arched entrance. The new architecture was heavily influenced by the “City Beautiful” movement.

■Columbus Tower/Sentinel Building, 916 Kearny St, at Columbus Ave. This flatiron (wedge shaped) copper-green building is an unmistakable San Francisco beauty. The “Grateful Dead” once recorded some of their songs there. Today it is owned by movie-director, Francis Ford Copolla. It now has a cafe on its ground floor, where you can grab a

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coffee whilst admiring its impressive setting, at the foot of North Beach. ■Coit Tower, 1 Telegraph Hill Blvd, limited parking; or take #39 Muni bus from Washington Square, Phone: +1 415 3620808, mzakheim@earthlink.net, http://www.coittower. org/, Hours: 10AM-5PM daily. Visible from all parts of San Francisco and the Bay Area, Coit Tower stands atop Telegraph Hill, and gives an excellent view of the rest of the Bay. The tower was built by the Federal Works Projects Administration in 1933 with money bequeathed by eccentric San Franciscan Lillie Coit. Coit was said to have chased after firefighters as a young girl, and as an older woman sponsored her favorite fire company. A fan of the volunteer city firefighters, and local legend has it that the shape of the tower is supposed to simulate the end of a fire hose — although the architects denied this claim. The first and second floors house beautiful examples of New Deal-era idealist murals, and the top floor (reached by elevator) has featured paintings or other art. Artists put in their own signatures and messages in the murals, which interpretive plaques point out. Price: $5 (elevator to top floor; the rest is free).

Parks, monuments, and public art ■Portsmouth Square (花園角廣場), bordered by Kearny St, Washington St, Clay St, and Walter Lum Pl. This is the largest area of open space in Chinatown. It is known as the “Heart of Chinatown” because the neighborhood began along one of its sides and extended from there to become what is known as Chinatown today. The square bristles with activity, and here you find local residents playing cards or Chinese chess, and practicing Tai Chi. The square contains several memorials, statues, and plaques — including a bronze replica of the Goddess of Democracy statue and a marker commemorating Robert Louis Stevenson. ■St. Mary’s Park (聖瑪利公園), south side of California St, opposite Old St. Mary’s Church, Hours: 6AM-10PM. This park boasts an Art Deco statue of Sun Yat-Sen, created by sculptor Benny Bufano in the 1930s. It also has a plaque

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commemorating those soldiers of Chinese ancestry that died in both World Wars. ■Woh Hei Yuen Park (和喜園), at Powell St between John and Jackson Sts. Small park and recreation center that has some interesting public art like the Five Carved Stones by Marcia Donahue and Tectonic Melange by Lampo Leong. Its name translates to “Garden of Peace and Joy”. ■Ping Yen Mural, at Stockton St and Pacific Ave. Created by Darryl Mar, this mural celebrates the history of Chinatown and what life is like there today. ■Chinese Railroad Workers Mural, 827 Stockton St, on the Chinese Charity Cultural Services Center between Sacramento St and Clay St. A mural by Amy Nelder, depicting the early Chinese workers who settled the area in the 1870s to work on the transcontinental railroad. Unfortunately, they were often the target of racism, ignorance, and intolerance. ■Washington Square, at Union St and Powell St. Every day, 8AM-10AM, locals practice tai-chi, the martial art and meditation practice. Different sections of the park will host everything from jazzercise to sword-play. Sunny days will bring out locals lounging on their blankets. Art fairs are frequent, and the oyster-beer fair in March is very popular. Note the sculpture to volunteer firefighters on the Columbus Ave side. The Sts. Peter and Paul church of the Salesians borders the northern side. Joe Dimaggio and Marilyn Monroe were photographed outside of the church, but they could not be married inside because she was divorced. Monroe and Dimaggio had their reception around the corner at a place which is now called “Pena Pacha Mama” (Powell St between Union & Green). The park used to be a favorite among the Beat poets as well — Jack Kerouac used to hang out here frequently enjoying the sunshine with a bottle of port. ■Juana Briones Monument, at Stockton St and Filbert St, http://www.brioneshouse.org. See the monument erected in honor of this humanitarian and pioneer settler of Yerba Buena (now North Beach). ■Pioneer Park, atop Telegraph Hill. This park sits atop Telegraph Hill and surrounds the base of Coit Tower. It has

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some excellent 360 degree vistas around the city and there are some coin operated binoculars to help you enjoy the view. ■Sydney G. Walton Square, Front and Davis, Pacific and Jackson Sts. Small (one square block), well maintained park/square in the heart of the city, located right beside the financial district. Tai Chi practitioners exercise here in the early morning hours. ■Levi’s Plaza Park, 1160 Battery St, at Filbert St. Located in front of the Levi Strauss headquarters, this immaculately kept little park is perhaps the perfect spot for a picnic... especially if you’re exhausted after climbing over Telegraph Hill! It has a soothing fountain as its centerpiece. Having said that, ever present security guards at the park can bring you down from your mellow moments here... just don’t dip your feet in the water!

Do ■Jun Yu. Need a haircut? Why not let one of Chinatown’s local celebrities cut it for you. Since 1963, this elderly Chinese barber has sheared the locks of some of Hollywood’s best including Michael Douglas and Sinatra. The photos in the front window tell the story. When he has no customers to attend to, he breaks out a violin and Ross Alley fills with his tune. ■Beach Blanket Babylon, Club Fugazi, 678 Beach Blanket Babylon Blvd, at Green St, Phone: +1 415 421-4222, bbb@ beachblanketbabylon.com, http://www.beachblanketbabylon.com/, Hours: W-Th 8PM, F-Sa 6:30PM and 9:30PM, Su 2PM and 5PM (Matinees). This zany Steve Silver cabaret, is the longest running musical revue in US theater history. The show is an internationally acclaimed San Francisco institution, and famous for its use of enormous hats, some of which are up to ten feet tall! It has even been seen by Queen Elizabeth. Price: $25-$73. ■The Purple Onion, 140 Columbus Ave, between Jackson St and Pacific Ave, Phone: +1 415 956-1653, sciuesciue@

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caffemacaroni.com, http://www.caffemacaroni.com/ purple.shtml. Catch a show at this famous and influential cellar comedy club. It has hosted comedy greats such as a Mort Sahl, Phyllis Diller, Robin Williams, Lenny Bruce, and Woody Allen among others.

Walking Tours Walking is not only the most environmentally friendly way to see this area, it is also undoubtedly the best way, as it allows one to experience its rich ambiance and charms first hand. A knowledgeable guide can be a big help in this regard, and several companies offer different kinds of walking tours through both Chinatown and North Beach:

■San Francisco City Guides, Phone: +1 415 557-4266, tours@sfcityguides.org, http://www.sfcityguides.org/. Take an informative and free tour of either North Beach or Chinatown from the people who know it best — the locals. Price: Free. ■Barbary Coast Trail, Phone: +1 415 454-2355, info@barbarycoasttrail.org, http://www.barbarycoasttrail.org/. Take a tour of San Francisco’s historic Barbary Coast. A series of bronze medallions and arrows are embedded into the sidewalks and help you navigate through the Barbary Coast Trail’s historic sites. You can either download a map ($8.95) or audio tour ($25) or take one of their guided tours which are available by appointment only ($22 per person with a $352 minimum). ■Culinary Walking Tour of North Beach and Little Italy, Departs: Mario. North Beach is famous for its food and cafe culture, so why not take a four hour guided tour of its family bakeries, sidewalk cafés and traditional Italian pastry shops. The tour includes an authentic Italian meal as well as a narration of North Beach history. ■GraceAnn Walden’s SF North Beach Walking tours, Phone: +1 415 302-5898, gaw@sbcglobal.net, http://www. graceannwalden.net/html/walking_tours.html. Every Saturday, restaurant critic and radio personality GraceAnn

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Walden conducts a walking tour of North Beach. The tour includes a historical narration, and it takes you to see a 125 year old brick-oven bakery, a stylish restaurant, and an Italian bakery. Lunch accompanied by wine is included. Reservations are necessary. Private tours of North Beach are available on weekdays for 12 or more. The tour was named one of the 100 Best Things about San Francisco by Gourmet Magazine. Price: $80 all inclusive. ■Local Tastes of the City Tours, Phone: +1 415 665-0480, http://www.localtastesofthecitytours.com/index.php. They offer an affordable $59 3 hour tour of North Beach, starting at either 10AM or 2PM. You get to sample coffees, handmade chocolates, pastries, breads and olive oils. A historical lecture accompanies the tour and they will take you to some of the old Beat Generation hangouts. They also offer a separate 3 hour tour of Chinatown starting either 10AM or 2PM. Here you will get to sample Chinese Teas and Dim Sum, as well as see how fortune cookies are made at the Fortune Cookie Factory. Finally, they do a combined 2 hour night tour of both Chinatown and North Beach which starts at 6PM and also costs $59.

Events and festivals ■Chinese New Year Festivities, http://www.sfgate.com/ traveler/events/cny/, Hours: Jan or Feb. Celebrated for over 5,000 years, the San Francisco version of the Chinese New Year dates back to the Gold Rush Days. The parade is colorful, vibrant and loud, with decorative costumes, lions, deafening firecrackers, “lucky-money” envelopes, colorful banners, over 100 ornately themed floats, martial arts groups, stilt walkers, acrobats, and of course a 200 foot Golden Dragon that has a six foot-long head... Alright? Price: Free. ■Autumn Moon Festival, Phone: +1 415 982-6306, info@ moonfestival.org, http://www.moonfestival.org/, Hours: Mid-late Sept for two days, 11AM-6PM each day. Commemorating the autumn equinox, a full moon, and Chang O (an immortal Goddess that lives in the moon), this festival is an important event in the Chinese lunar calendar. It has parallels with America’s Thanksgiving Day, as it encourages

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contemplation and giving thanks for the rich bounty of the summer harvest. The festivities include, Chinese acrobats, lions, music, dance and Chinese opera among other things. Price: Free. ■Oyster Beer Festival, Usually takes place in Washington Square, Phone: + 1 415 989-6222, http://sfoysterfest.com/, Hours: Takes place mid-late May for two days, 12PM-7PM each day. Fun festival centered around the simple pleasures of Guinness Stout and Oysters. Lots of live entertainment and events such as the “Shuck and Suck Competition” and Irish dancing. On top of the admission price which includes the entertainment, cooking demos and a free raffle — 20oz beers will set you back $6 and 6 barbequed oysters go for about $9. Price: General Admission: $20 in advance; $25 at the door, Reserved Seating Tickets $45. ■North Beach Festival, Washington Square Park, 12001500 blocks of Grant Avenue and adjacent streets in North Beach, Phone: +1 415 989-2220, Fax: +1 415 989-6427, http:// www.sfnorthbeach.org/festival/, Hours: Takes place in Mid June. A North Beach tradition that celebrates its Italian heritage. It features live music and entertainment, poetry readings, classical concerts, dancing, ArtE di Gesso (chalk art on the street), and varied Arts and Crafts Exhibitions. Price: Free. ■Art in the Alley, Jack Kerouac Alley, between the City Lights Bookstore and Vesuvio at Columbus Ave and Broadway St, Phone: +1 415 263-8959, artinthealley@yahoo.com, http://vesuvio.com/alley.html, Hours: May 2009? See website for exact dates and times. Taking place twice a year in Kerouac Alley (a beautiful, if tiny, cobble stoned alley that was named after Jack Kerouac), this is an open-air art exhibition that showcases the work of local artists. Price: Free. ■Columbus Day Parade, all along Columbus Avenue, Phone: +1 415 703-9888, parade@sfcolumbusday.org, http://www.sfcolumbusday.org/index.html, Hours: Starts at 12:30PM. This parade, which celebrates Christopher Columbus and Italian heritage, attracts almost half a million spectators each year. The parade dates all the way back to 1869, making it the city’s oldest civic event. Handmade floats run all the way from Fisherman’s Wharf, and up Co-

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lumbus Avenue as far as Vallejo Street, where the parade does a 180 finishing in Washington Square. Price: Free.

Buy Chinatown and North Beach are unique immigrant neighborhoods, and consequently there are almost no large chain-stores to be found. In Chinatown, Grant Avenue is the main shopping thoroughfare for tourists. Here you will find Oriental handicrafts of all descriptions, from jade statues, to Asian rugs and kimonos. It also has many souvenir stores and small market stalls that sell typical tourist knickknacks. Stockton street runs parallel to Grant on its west, and has many fresh produce and household ware stores that are popular with locals. North Beach has predominantly small boutique stores selling mostly clothing and jewelry, arts and handicrafts, furniture and Italian wares. Here is a selection of the stores available:

■Imperial Tea Court, 1411 Powell St, at Broadway St, Phone: +1 415 788-6080, imperial@imperialtea.com, http://www. imperialtea.com/, Hours: Tu-W 10AM-6PM, Th-F 10AM7PM, Sa-Su 10AM-6PM. Opened in 1993 it features authentic, hand-crafted Chinese teas. The selection includes; organic, white, green, oolong, black, pu-erh, herbal, yellow and scented teas. ■Chinese Bookmarks, Ross Alley, on the left hand side of Ross Alley (when entering from Jackson Street) and near the beginning, Hours: Hours : Vary (Sometimes he’s there, sometimes he’s not!). Tired of the same old souvenir stores? Looking for a more authentic souvenir? Down Ross Alley you’ll sometimes find an old Chinese man in a doorway, who for a few dollars, will inscribe your name in the Chinese alphabet onto a handcrafted bookmark. Price: $2-$4. ■Asian Image, 800 Grant Ave, at Clay St, Phone: +1 415 3982602, Hours: 10AM-10PM daily. Two floors of sartorial trea-

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sures such as velvet jackets and Thai silk shirts. It also sells Asian books and many other eclectic Asian wares. ■China Station, 456-460 Grant Ave, between Pine St and Bush St, Phone: +1 415 397-4848, Hours: M-Sa 10AM-10PM, Su 10AM-9PM. If you like reasonably priced souvenirs, this is the place for you. They have a very broad selection, selling everything from Chinese exercise balls to Buddha statues. ■Dragon House, 455 Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 781-2351, dragonhousesf@gmail.com, Fax: +1 415 781-2351, http://dragonhousesf.com/default.aspx. Sells genuine antiques and fine art from China, Japan, Tibet and Mongolia. ■Peking Bazaar, 826-832 Grant Ave, between California St and Sacramento St, Phone: +1 415 982-9847, Hours: 10AM10PM daily. Huge sprawling store selling a wide range of discount imported goods from Asia including lanterns, candles, sarongs, silk kimonos, geisha outfits and Chinese dolls. ■A. Cavalli & Co, 1441 Stockton St, between Vallejo St and Green St, Phone: +1 415 421-4219, Hours: 9:30AM-5:30PM daily. This shop with its friendly proprietor sells everything Italian, from ornate imported espresso and pasta makers, to Italian newspapers, magazines, CDs, and DVDs. ■Biordi Arts, 412 Columbus Ave, at Vallejo St, Phone: +1 415 392-8096, http://www.biordi.com/, Hours: M-Sa 9:30AM6PM. For 50 years the owners have been selling imprinted Renaissance style Italian Majolica as well as Italian Hand painted Dinnerware. ■Goorin Brothers Hat Makers, 1612 Stockton St, at Washington Sq, Phone: +1 415 402-0454, Fax: +1 415 431.9199, http://www.goorin.com/, Hours: M-F 11AM-7PM, Sa 10AM8PM, Su 11AM-4PM. These guys are determined to bring hats back in a big way. Along the way they’ve had many famous customers including Tom Cruise and JayZ. How big is your head? ■Coit Liquor, 585 Columbus Ave, at Union St, Phone: +1 415 986-4036, team@coitliquor.com, Fax: +1 415 296-7825, http://coitliquor.com/, Hours: Su-Th 11AM-11PM, F-Sa 11AM2AM. Selling wines, spirits and beers for over 40 years, they

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specialize in the varieties that are hardest to find. They have an extensive Southern-Italian wine collection. ■Trader Joe’s, 401 Bay St, at Mason St, Phone: +1 415 351-1013, Hours: 9AM-9PM daily. Probably the areas only supermarket chain, Trader Joe’s is probably most famous for selling the Californian wine affectionately known as “2 buck Chuck” (Charles Shaw wine).

Eat The area is a veritable smorgasbord of dining opportunities, enough for even the most discerning palette. Chinatown is famous for its cheap eats (like Dim Sum) and “family style” eating in restaurants. You can fill up for as little as $3, but there are more expensive full service restaurants here as well. North Beach is generally pricier and the focus is mainly on Italian favorites like pizza, pasta, and risotto accompanied by a nice bottle of wine. With many of its restaurants situated directly on Columbus Avenue, it’s a great place for alfresco style dining. There are however more affordable options in North Beach, including several great cafes, delis, and American diner style restaurants, where you can get a good quality meal at a more reasonable price.

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Budget

■Anyone for lunch?

■Sam Wo (三和粥粉麵), 813 Washington St, at Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 982-0596, Hours: 11AM-3AM daily. Well-known among Bay Area residents, this is a place that people either love or hate — food is cheap, service is terrible, and the conditions are squalid, but for some there is no better restaurant in all of Chinatown. The barbecue pork rolls are a favorite, and the wonton soup is terrific. Price: $2.50-$8. ■Dol Ho (多好茶室), 808 Pacific Ave, up from Stockton St, Phone: +1 415 392-2828, Hours: Th-Tu 7AM-5PM. For excellent dim sum at a price that’s a bargain compared to the touristy joints on Grant, this is a great place to eat. Most, if not all, of the clientele are Chinese, and this is a good thing. Price: $1.75-$6. ■Y Ben (會賓樓), 835 Pacific Ave, up from Stockton St, Phone: +1 415 397-3168, Hours: 7AM-10PM daily. If Dol Ho is too much of a hole in the wall for your tastes, try Y Ben diagonally opposite just up the street for dim sum of simi-

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lar excellent quality and low prices. Price: $4-$32 (shark fin soup), most dishes are about $7. ■Bow Hon (寶漢), 850 Grant Ave, between Clay St and Washington St, Phone: +1 415 362-0601, Hours: 11AM-10:30PM daily. This small restaurant serves traditional clay pot dishes. Cash only. Price: $3.95-$10. ■Uncle’s Cafe, 65 Waverly Pl, At the corner of Clay and Waverly Pl, Phone: +1 415 982-1954, Hours: 7AM-9PM daily. Is authentic, and incredibly cheap. There are large portions, and the staff will warn you if you order too much food or an item that is too large for your party. Well worth the money and not overcrowded. Price: $3.95-$12. ■Vietnam Restaurant, 620 Broadway St, at Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 788-7034, Hours: 9AM-3AM daily. Situated right next-door to Sam’s this is a healthier late night option to the burger and fries. The place is tiny (the open grill is right behind the cash-register), the decor dated, and the three Vietnamese ladies who run it are about as friendly as a poke in the eye, but the food is excellent, fresh, well seasoned, and very cheap. The crab soup is a favorite as is the inimitable $3.50 pork sandwich... yummm! Price: $3.50$10. ■Taqueria Zorro, 308 Columbus Ave, at Broadway St, Phone: +1 415 392-9677, contactus@taqueriazorro.com, Fax: +1 415 392-1299, http://www.taqueriazorro.com/, Hours: 10AM-10PM daily. Excellent little budget taqueria with good quality food at a very reasonable price. It’s clean, the portions are generous and the service is excellent. They can sometimes put together a large burrito in less than a minute from time of order to time of eating... whoooa! Juke box and large screen TV in the back. Price: $6-$10. ■Sam’s, 618 Broadway St, at Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 391-1539, Hours: M-F 11AM-9PM. If you like greasy but very tasty fast food then you’ve come to the right place. Sam’s is a small dingy late night diner but they do a mean burger and fries. It’s very popular with local workers from the busy Broadway area. Price: $5-$10. ■Buster’s, 366 Columbus Ave, corner of Columbus Ave and Vallejo St, Phone: +1 415 392-2800, Hours: Su-Th 11AM-12AM, F-Sa 11AM-2AM. Another classic late-night spot for the ine-

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briated and starving. The sign outside says that they have the best Philly-cheese steaks in the city... almost certainly not true, but with its fresh ingredients — it’s pretty good nonetheless. They also do a very good burger at a reasonable price. Friendly staff and open late to cater to the party crowd. Price: $5-$10. ■Giordano Bros., 303 Columbus Ave, at Broadway St, Phone: +1 415 397-BROS, Fax: +1 415 397-2794, Hours: M-Th 11AM-12:30AM, F-Sa 11AM-2AM, Su 11AM-12:30AM. Enjoy a great sandwich? Well their creations were voted “Best Sandwich” by the readers of SF Weekly. Price: $7-$10. ■BurgerMeister, 759 Columbus Ave, at Greenwich St, Phone: +1 415 296-9907, http://www.burgermeistersf.com/, Hours: 11AM-12AM daily. Excellent and varied selection of burgers at a reasonable price. Inside it has typical retro Americandiner decor and the service is fast and friendly. This place is very popular and was voted “Best Burger 2007” in San Francisco by the readers of SF Weekly. Price: $10-$12. ■Curly’s Coffee Shop, 1624 Powell St, close to Washington Sq, Phone: +1 415 392-0144, Hours: M-F 7:30AM-4PM, Sa-Su 8AM-4PM. Basic and affordable diner food served here. Breakfast is very popular with the locals. Price: $4-$10. ■Pat’s Cafe, 2330 Taylor St, at Columbus Ave, Phone: +1 415 776-8735, http://www.patscafe.com/, Hours: Breakfast and Lunch: M-F 7:30AM-3PM, Dinner: Th-M 5:30PM to 9PM. Charming little cafe serving traditional American fare, with friendly staff and very reasonable prices. Price: $5-$10. ■Rico’s Fine Mexican Restaurant, 943 Columbus Ave, at Lombard St, Phone: +1 415 928-5404, Fax: +1 415 776-5160, Hours: 10AM-10PM daily. Popular Mexican restaurant at the northern end of North Beach. It has an extensive menu and the service is pretty good. Price: $8-$20.

Mid-range ■Hunan Home’s Restaurant, 622 Jackson St, between Kearny St and Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 982-2844, bmw1688@ aol.com, Fax: +1 415 982-3508, http://hunanhome.ypguides. net/, Hours: F-Sa 11:30AM-10PM, Su-Th 11:30AM-9:30PM.

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Very highly rated Taiwanese food at a reasonable price. Price: $9-$28. ■Yuet Lee, 1300 Stockton St, at Broadway St, Phone: +1 415 982-6020, Hours: W-M 11AM-3AM. No-nonsense Chinese restaurant with an eclectic but authentic menu, with offerings like stir-fried Watercress and Fresh Frog Rice Soup. Price: $8-$25. ■House of Nanking, 919 Kearny St, Cross Street — Jackson St, Phone: +1 415 421-1429, Hours: M-Sa 11AM-10PM, Su 12PM9:30PM. An excellent low-brow sit-down Chinese restaurant. Let the waiter order for you. Price: $6-$12. ■Figaro, 414 Columbus Ave, between Green St and Stockton St, Phone: +1 415 398-1300, http://www.figaroristorante. com/, Hours: 5:30PM-11:30PM daily. Used to be a bakery in the 1920s, today it’s a cozy restaurant serving traditional authentic Italian cuisine. It has a heated patio garden at the back. Price: $12-$24. ■Calzone’s Pizza Cucina, 430 Columbus Ave, between Green St and Stockton St, Phone: +1 415 397-3600, http:// www.calzonesf.com/, Hours: M-Su 11AM-1AM. You can’t miss this restaurant — it’s the one with the large awning and all the curbside tables that overlook Columbus Street. They make great fresh mojitos here and the pizza is pretty good too. Price: $13-$20. ■Michelangelo Cafe‎, 579 Columbus Ave, between Green St and Stockton St, Phone: +1 415 986-4058, Hours: M-Th 5PM-11PM, F-Sa 12PM-11PM, Su 12PM-10PM. Small, cozy and ornately decorated Italian restaurant in the heart of North Beach. Great service! Price: Entrees $15-$25. ■Mo’s Gourmet Hamburgers, 1322 Grant Ave, between Vallejo St and Green St, Phone: +1 415 788-3779, http://www. mosgrill.com/, Hours: Su-Th 9AM-10PM, F-Sa 9AM-11:30PM. American style diner that definitely has one of the best burgers in San Francisco. Mo’s has a unique rotary-style grill in the front window to lure unsuspecting hungry people in. When you leave though — you will not be hungry — Mo’s burgers are HUGE, and are best complimented with a

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frosted cold glass of beer! Price: Burgers, fries and a coke around $12. ■Bocadillos, 710 Montgomery St, at Washington St, Phone: +1 415 982-2622, info@bocasf.com, Fax: +1 415 982-0177, http:// www.bocasf.com/site/start.html, Hours: M-W 7AM-10PM, Th-F 7AM-10:30PM, Sa 5PM-10:30PM. Basque restaurant in North Beach, good champagne and rose wine selection. Menu favorites: Serrano ham, crab fritters. Tapas, small plates, moderately priced. Modern decor with windows onto Washington Street. Bubble Lounge is next door, also specializing in huge champagne collection. Gets very welldressed crowd in after work and later evening. No line (yet) and serves parties up to 10, but small space. Price: Entrees $9-$15. ■Caffè Puccini, 411 Columbus Ave, at Vallejo St, Phone: +1 415 989-7033, Hours: 6AM-12AM daily. Puccini serves a mean cappuccino and a delicious homemade lasagna. The walls are adorned with opera posters, and the sounds of Verdi and spoken Italian are in the air. Excellent tiramisu, the Italian layered custard and chocolate dessert. Price: $9-$15. ■Iluna Basque, 701 Union St, at Powell St, Fax: +1 415 4020099, http://www.ilunabasque.com/, Hours: Su-Th 5:3010:30PM, F-Sa 5:30-11:30PM. One block kitty corner from Washington Street park on the Russian Hill side. Basque tapas plates, small, moderately priced. Great wine list. Founded by 23-year old restauranteur Mattina Noblia (former top chef at Piperade), hosts excellent meat and roasted options with a great glass of wine. Dark red curtains, late hours and great food. Price: Entrees $10-$16. ■L’Osteria del Forno, 519 Columbus Ave, at Green St, Phone: +1 415 982-1124, http://www.losteriadelforno.com/, Hours: M, W-Sa 11:30AM-10:30PM, Su 11:30AM-10PM. No reservations. A charming, crowded, locally known date restaurant, L’Osteria has a line out the door after 5PM, so arrive early. The small semi-surly staff cooks up wonderful, affordably-priced dishes in the kitchen’s one oven, so things can take a little while... specials on the menu: the roast pork, baked penne, and salmon carpaccio are favorites. Excellent

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Italian wine selection by the glass and bottle. Cannot seat more than 4 in a party. Price: Entrees $10-$18. ■North Beach Pizza, 1499 Grant Ave, at Union St, Phone: +1 415 751-2300, http://www.northbeachpizza.com/, Hours: 10AM-1AM daily. One of the best pizzas in the city, and right in the heart of North Beach. Price: $8-$25. ■Mama’s, 1701 Stockton St, On Washington Sq, Phone: +1 415 362-6421, http://mamas-sf.com/, Hours: Tu-Su 8AM-3PM. Unbelievably popular place with locals, you only need to see how long the lines are outside at breakfast to understand the popularity of Mama’s — it has become a North Beach institution. In 2007, it won Zagat’s — “Best Breakfast in San Francisco” Price: Breakfast and lunch go for about $9-$11. ■Fog City Diner, 1300 Battery St, at the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 982-2000, Fax: +1 415 982-3711, http://www. fogcitydiner.com/, Hours: M-Th 11:30AM-10PM, F 11:30AM11PM, Sa 10:30AM-11PM, Su 10:30AM-10PM. Looking like a long shiny aluminum trailer from the outside, the famous Fog City Diner (it’s the one from the old visa add) serves high-end all-American food. As it’s so close to Fisherman’s Wharf, it is popular with both tourists and locals. Price: $10$20.

Splurge ■Empress Of China, 838 Grant Ave, between Washington St and Clay St, Phone: +1 415 434-1345, info@empressofchinasf. com, http://empressofchinasf.com/, Hours: 11:30AM-10PM daily. At eight stories high, this Chinese restaurant has excellent views to enjoy with your meal. The dining room is quite elegant and certainly ornate if a bit on the small side small. It attracts mostly a tourist crowd, which probably says something about the food! Price: $20-$45. ■Great Eastern, 649 Jackson St, at Kearny St, Phone: +1 415 986-2500, Hours: 10AM-2:45PM, 3:30PM-1AM daily. This place has a HUGE menu that focuses primarily on the fruits of the sea like Dungeness crab, oysters and giant prawns.

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They are also known for doing a pretty good duck. Price: $12-$258. ■Jai Yun, 680 Clay St, between Kearny St and Montgomery St, Phone: +1 415 981-7438, http://menuscan.com/jaiyun/, Hours: 6:30PM-9:30PM daily. This quirky Chinese restaurant has a “prix-fixe” menu and reservations are required. It serves excellent ornate Shanghai style dishes with a “nofuss” style table service. By the way, there is no fixed menu — it changes based upon what the chef selects that day. Price: $30-$150. ■Tommy Toy’s Haute Cuisine, 655 Montgomery St, at Washington St, Phone: +1 415 397-4888, http://www.tommytoys.com/, Hours: M-F 11:30AM-2:30PM, 5:30PM-9:30PM, SaSu 5:30PM-9:30PM. Another high-end Chinese restaurant. It has both a “prix-fix” seven course banquet and also an “a la carte” menu as well. This restaurant gets rave reviews for its food and for its elegant decor. Price: $20-$70. ■The House, 1230 Grant Ave, at Columbus Ave, Phone: +1 415 986-8612, http://www.thehse.com/, Hours: M-Th 11AM-3PM, 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 11AM-3PM, 5:30PM-11PM, Su 5PM-10PM. Reservations recommended. The home of Asian fusion cuisine. The dining space is tiny, but the possible ensuing wait is worth it. Don’t miss the scallop-topped Caesar salad or the often-imitated seared Ahi tuna. Price: $17-$30. ■Steps of Rome Trattoria, 362 Columbus Ave, between Grant Ave and Vallejo St, Phone: +1 415 986-6480, http:// www.stepsofrome.com/trattoria/index.php, Hours: M-F 5PM-10:30PM, Sa-Su 5PM-11PM. This small restaurant was voted “Best Italian 2004” by SF Weekly readers. It usually attracts a lot of young couples. Price: $12-$35. ■R & G Lounge, 631 Kearny St, at Commercial St, Phone: +1 415 982-7877, info@rnlounge.com, http://www.rnglounge. com/, Hours: M-Su 11:30AM to 9:30PM. An authentic upscale Cantonese Restaurant and Lounge. All types of seafood including Salt and Pepper Crab. Price: Entrees $10-$35. ■Caffe Sport, 574 Green St, off Columbus Ave, Phone: +1 415 981-1251, http://caffesport.ypguides.net/, Hours: T-Sa 12PM-2PM, 5PM-10:30PM. Italian food meets hippy bus. Plates of pasta served family style. Some very nice seafood pastas. They may bring what you order, or perhaps what

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the chef thinks would go together better. They have house wine, served in water tumblers. Small, a little noisy, a lot of fun. Opens special hours for World Cup faithful. Cash only. Price: Entrees $15-$24. ■Ristorante Gondola, 15 Columbus Ave, between Gibb St and Ils Ln, Phone: +1 415 956-5528, Hours: Lunch: M-F 11:30AM-2:30PM, Dinner: M-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM10:30PM. Simple Italian with varied menu. Not in the crowded blocks so tends to have easy seating and less intrusive staff. The pumpkin ravioli is a favorite. Affordable, with excellent Italian wine selection. No restriction on size of party. Parking at Chinese Catholic Center on Jackson. Price: $34-$45. ■The Stinking Rose, 325 Columbus Ave, near Broadway St, sfcomments@thestinkingrose.com, http://www.thestinkingrose.com/, Hours: 11AM-11PM daily. The original in what has become a chain of garlic restaurants offering sumptuous, contemporary California-Italian cuisine prepared and adorned with garlic. Motto: “We Season Our Garlic With Food!®” Price: Entrees $19-$30. ■Washington Square Bar and Grill, 1707 Powell St, between Columbus Ave and Union St, Phone: +1 415 982-8123, wsbgguy@aol.com, http://wsbg.ypguides.net/, Hours: M-F 11:30AM-2AM, Sa-Su 10:30AM-2AM. Affectionately known as the “Washbag” this has always been a popular place for locals to hang out, including politicians, journalists and celebrities. It has Jazz seven nights a week. Price: Entrees from $11-$36. ■Joey & Eddie’s, 1652 Stockton St, at Washington Sq, Phone: +1 415 989-7800, http://www.joeyandeddies.com/, Hours: Dinner: Su-Th 5:30PM-11PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-12PM, Brunch: Su 11:30AM-2:30PM. Overlooking Saints Peter and Paul Church and in front of Washington Square, this restaurant used to be known as Moose’s. It serves contemporary New York style Italian food and the views over the park are excellent. Price: $18-$27. ■Joe DiMaggio’s Italian Chophouse, 601 Union St, at Washington Sq, Phone: +1 415 421-5633, http://www.joedimaggiosrestaurant.com/, Hours: Kitchen: 5PM-11PM, Bar: 3PM-1AM daily. Very elegant and modern looking restau-

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rant — on the inside and on the outside. Superb location overlooking the park, and the steak is really good here, but there is a dress code it’s very pricey! Price: $30-$60. ■North Beach Restaurant, 1512 Stockton St, at Columbus Ave, Phone: +1 415 392-1700‎, NorthBeachRestaurant@ yahoo.com, Fax: +1 415 392-1587‎, http://www.northbeachrestaurant.com/, Hours: 11:30AM-11:45PM daily. Fine dining from the Tuscany region of Italy. This restaurant has a lavish interior with cherry wood walls, high ceilings and Florentine tiled floors. There are four dining rooms in total and there is a Cigar Room and Wine Cellar in the basement. Price: $30-$60. ■Fior D’Italia, 2237 Mason St, between Chesnut St and Francisco St, Phone: +1 415 986-1886, fior@fior.com, Fax: +1 415 441-8774, http://www.fior.com/, Hours: 11:30AM10:30PM daily. Set a few blocks back from the Wharf area, this is America’s Oldest Italian Restaurant, and it has been open since 1886. A favorite among locals and visitors alike, it serves authentic Northern Italian cuisine. Price: Entrees from $16-$36.

Drink Chinatown has less drinking establishments, but North Beach with its abundance of bars and clubs is one of the major nightlife hotspots in the San Francisco. It attracts revelers from all over the city who are looking for a good time and somewhere to party into the wee hours of the morning... so put your drinking cap on!

Bars ■Li Po’s, 916 Grant Ave, at Washington St, Phone: +1 415 982 0072, Hours: 2PM-2AM daily. This dive bar is great to pop into while in Chinatown. Although it has nothing on tap, bottled beer is available. Check out the seedy booths in the

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back lit by a single red bulb. Or catch a live act in the dimlylit basement on the weekends. ■Bow Bow Cocktail Lounge (寶寶), 1155 Grant Ave, near the intersection of Kearney St and Columbus Ave, Phone: +1 415 421-6730, Hours: 3PM-2AM daily. Little hole in the wall dive bar, run by the irrepressible hostess/owner, Candy Mama. A 50-something woman originally from Taiwan. She’s a spitfire and a complete rock star. She’ll end up doing shots with you, sneaking shots into your drinks, forcefeeding you endless peanuts and making adorable and incessant conversation. The crowd’s an eclectic mix, which makes for great people-watching. Especially when the karaoke is broken out. ■Buddha Bar, 901 Grant Ave, at Washington St, Phone: +1 415 362-1792, Hours: 12PM-2AM daily. Another favorite dive bar in Chinatown, this is a cramped yet lively place that’s great for people watching. ■Red’s Place, 672 Jackson St, at Beckett St, Phone: +1 415 956-4490, Hours: 11AM-2AM daily. It is the oldest operating bar in Chinatown. It’s a quiet place, ideal for conversations. ■15 Romolo, 15 Romolo Place, at Broadway St, half block in from Columbus Ave intersection, Phone: +1 415 398-1359, Hours: 5:30PM-2AM daily. The hidden bar has a lovely dark red decor. Formerly the “Basque Hotel” this historic hotel and bar becomes quite crowded on one of the busiest blocks during a Friday and Saturday night in North Beach. It’s also positioned on a steep street, with a side entrance that seems furtive and secret. ■North Star, 1560 Powell St, at Green St, Phone: +1 415 3970577, Hours: 1PM-2AM daily. The North Star is a standard bar that you will find almost everywhere in the U.S. It has pool tables, a bar, and as the evening goes on becomes standing room only. This is a good bar for hanging out with friends and making new ones. ■Specs, 12 William Saroyan Pl, down a small alley off of Columbus Ave, around the corner from Tosca, Phone: +1 415 421-4112, Hours: F-Sa 5PM-2AM, Su-Th 4:30PM-2AM. Mari-

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ner’s hangout and general dive bar in North Beach, this is a hidden gem. ■Tosca, 242 Columbus Ave, between Broadway St and Pacific Ave, Phone: +1 415 391-1244, http://www.sftravel.com/ food/tosca.html, Hours: M-Su 5PM-2AM. Another landmark North Beach Cafe/Bar, Tosca is dark but atmospheric interior complete with some cool red-leather booths. The bar is named after the opera Tosca and has an intense list of operas on the jukebox. Willie Brown, former mayor, hangout. It’s known for its specialty “Coffeeless Cappuccino” — steamed milk with brandy and chocolate. There are about 15 cappuccinos lined up on the bar ready to serve, they are so popular. ■Vesuvio’s, 255 Columbus Ave, next door to the famous City Lights Bookstore, http://www.vesuvio.com/, Hours: 6AM2AM daily. This quirky and historic bar was founded in 1948, and is famous for its association with jazz, poetry, and the Beat Generation. Neal Cassidy first made a pit stop here in the mid fifties, and ever since it became a favorite hangout for literati celebrities, including Jack Kerouac. While you’re there, why not order “The Jack Kerouac” — a healty dose of tequila, rum, and cranberry juice. The bar is located nextdoor to the iconic City Lights Book store and what is now known as “Jack Kerouac Alley”. ■The Saloon, 1232 Grant Ave, between Columbus Ave and Vallejo St, Phone: +1 415 989-7666, http://www.sfblues.net/ Saloon.html, Hours: 12PM-2AM daily. Old Blues/Jazz bar that has survived the raucous Barbary Coast and the 1906 earthquake. This is the oldest bar in San Francisco and it certainly looks like it too — it’s grotty and rough looking inside and out, and it’s extremely loud, but it can also be great fun and a must if you love the Blues. Price: Weekends — $5 cover charge. ■Savoy-Tivoli, 1434 Grant Ave, between Green St and Union St, Phone: +1 415 362-7023, Hours: Tu-F 5PM-1:30AM, Sa 3PM-1:30AM. Roomy, fun open-air bar on Grant Avenue, this bar is a favorite with both tourists and locals alike. It

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has been around since 1906 and attracts an eclectic yet discerning crowd. ■Columbus Cafe, 562 Green St, Columbus Ave and Green St, Phone: +1 415 274-2599, Hours: Sa-Su 12PM-2AM, M-F 2PM-2AM. Great bar situated in a huddle of bars around the intersection of Grant Avenue and Green Street. It draws a lively and predominantly young crowd. It does a two-forone happy hour on beers and also $3 Fernets. Watch out though, it can get crowded. ■Grant and Green Saloon, 1371 Grant Ave, at Grant Ave and Green St, Phone: +1 415 693-9565, http://www.myspace. com/grantandgreensf, Hours: M-Th 4PM-2AM, F 12PM-2AM, Sa-Su 10AM-2AM. Named after the intersection it resides on this popular if slightly dingy bar. They have live bands playing every night. ■Amante, 570 Green St, Columbus Ave and Green St, Phone: +1 415 362-4400, info@amante.com, http://www.amantesf. com/, Hours: 5PM-2AM daily. Trendy bar with sumptuous decor, high ceilings and lots of open spaces. It’s a little bit pricier than other bars in the area and attracts a younger well dressed crowd. ■O’ Reilly’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 622 Green St, at Columbus Ave, Phone: +1 415 989-6222, oreillys@earthlink.net, Fax: +1 415 989-6228, http://www.oreillysirish. com/, Hours: M-F 9AM-2:AM,Sa-Su 8AM-2AM Happy Hour: M-Fr 2PM-7PM daily. Typical Irish bar in the heart of North Beach. They serve both lunch and dinner and for the price the food is excellent. They also have a very long happy hour. ■Gino & Carlo Cocktail Lounge, 548 Green St, Columbus Ave and Green St, Phone: +1 415 421-0896, Hours: 6AM-2AM daily. One of a trilogy of bars that line up on Green Street, it’s a classic North Beach neighborhood bar. It’s colorful, has a great juke box, and attracts lots of locals looking to socialize. ■San Francisco Brewing Company, 155 Columbus Ave, at Pacific Ave, Phone: +1 415 434-3344, brewmaster@sfbrewing.com, http://www.sfbrewing.com/, Hours: 12PM-1AM daily. Excellent little micro-brewery at the foot of North Beach. They claim to be the city’s original brewpub and

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they have enough varieties to give even the most hardened drinker problems, like Emperor Norton Lager and Oofty Goofty Barleywine. ■Kells Irish Restaurant & Bar, 530 Jackson St, at Columbus Ave, Phone: +1 415 955-1916, http://www.kellsirish.com/ sfc/index.php, Hours: M-W 11:30AM-12:30AM, Th-F 11:30AM2AM, Sa 4:30PM-2AM. On a secluded narrow street, this is more of an upscale Irish bar and attracts twenty and young thirty-something workers from the nearby financial district who are looking to unwind. It has another bar upstairs which tends to be quieter. ■The International Cocktail Lounge, 1000 Columbus St, at Columbus Ave and Chestnut St, Phone: +1 415 775-6036, Hours: 12PM-2AM daily, Happy Hour: 4PM-8PM daily. Nice little bar with a well worn-in interior, moderately loud jukebox and friendly bar staff. Cheap prices and they have a pool table and a couple seats by the door for the smokers. Nice mix of locals and tourists, very low key and down to earth. A very good place to make new friends and gets a good young crowd after about nine. ■Pier 23 Cafe, Pier 23, The Embarcadero, north of Filbert St, Phone: +1 415 362-5125, mac@pier23cafe.com, Fax: +1 415 362.8138, http://www.pier23cafe.com/Home.html, Hours: M-F 11:30AM-2AM, Sa 10AM-2AM, Su 10AM-10PM. Lively and colorful, you can’t miss this place on your way down the piers of the embarcadero. It’s part bar, part restaurant, and part cafe — ever popular with locals, it has an outdoor drinking deck... ahoy there!

Clubs and venues ■Fuse, 493 Broadway St, at Kearny St, Phone: +1 415 788-2706, http://www.fusesf.com/, Hours: 6PM-2AM daily. Catering to a musical taste that leans towards electronica, Fuse regularly features DJs that spin a variety of house and down tempo. This being San Francisco, the crowd tends to show up on the late side, but when they turn out they arrive in force. Fuse isn’t that big so, if you arrive after everyone, be prepared to wait in line. The dance floor is minimal, establishing a space that’s more for drinking and enjoying the music

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than getting funky. However, the quality of music is fun, and the bar staff is very friendly. ■Mojito, 1337 Grant Ave, between Vallejo St and Green St, Phone: +1 415 398-1120, http://mojitosf.com/, Hours: Tu-Su 11AM-2AM. Stylish Latin cocktail bar with a dance floor and live music to get you going. ■DragonBar, 473 Broadway St, at Kearny St, Phone: +1 415 834-9383, troy@dragonbarsf.com, http://www.dragonbarsf.com/, Hours: Th 9PM-2AM, F-Sa 8PM-2AM. The DragonBar was once the HiBall Lounge, the original bar that brought back Broadway Street over 10 years ago. Located in the heart of North Beach, “the interior transcends trendy minimalist design with a seductive drenching of Asian elements — pictures of geishas, oversized bamboo sticks and a slew of giant paper lanterns. It also boasts the most flattering lighting scheme on the block. Using red lights in an otherwise dark spot, the confines will have you looking better than the hot-bodied Broadway Street dancers.” says Citysearch.com. The DragonBar is a great place to have a cocktail with your friends then dance the night away. In addition to the two bars, the dance floor is large and there is a smoking patio that has frontage along the Broadway Strip. ■Zebra Lounge, 447 Broadway St, between Montgomery St and Kearny St, Phone: +1 415 788-0188, info@zebrasf.net, http://www.zebraloungesf.net/, Hours: Tu-Su 9PM-2AM. Upscale and trendy new lounge and nightclub with DJs and a reasonably sized dance floor. It gets a young crowd. ■Velvet Lounge, 443 Broadway St, at Montgomery St, management@thevelvetlounge.com, http://www.thevelvetlounge.com/, Hours: Th-Sa 9PM-2AM. Decked out with sumptuous deep colored drapes, this plush joint is definitely a place where people “hook-up.” The bartenders are pretty good and the drinks are stiff! It has two bars, two dance floors, and plays mostly hip-hop and dance music. It attracts a young crowd most of whom seem to be in their early twenties. ■Jazz at Pearl’s, 256 Columbus Ave, at Broadway St, Phone: +1 415 291-8255, http://www.jazzatpearls.com/, Hours: M-Sa 7:30PM-12AM. Like live Jazz? Age between 21 and 100? Can afford a small cover charge? — then this is the place for you.

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It was voted Best Jazz Club in San Francisco by the San Francisco Chronicle. ■Bimbo’s 365 Club, 1025 Columbus Ave, at Chestnut St, Phone: +1 415 474-0365, events@bimbos365club.com, http:// www.bimbos365club.com/, Hours: Box office: M-F 10AM4PM, Club hours: Vary. Bimbo’s is an glamorous upscale event venue and nightclub that holds up to 700 people. It has three bars, a dance floor and stage. Robin Williams does his act here quite regularly.

Entertainment Back in the days of the Gold Rush, Osgood Street (O-So-Good Street!) in North Beach, used to be considered the red-light district. Today, the section on Broadway Street between Columbus and Samsome Street, is an area that many consider to be the city’s red-light district. It has many exoticdance clubs like Larry Flynt’s Hustler Club, Roaring 20s, Showgirls, and Crazy Horse Gentlemen’s Club‎. Probably one of the more famous clubs is the Condor. Carol Doda made this place famous in 1964 by injecting silicone into her chest and creating what would become known as “the new Twin Peaks of San Francisco.” A plaque on the ouside commemorates the venue; The Condor; Where it all began; The birthplace of the world’s first topless & bottomless entertainment; Topless — June 19, 1964 Bottomless — September 3, 1969 Starring Ms. Carol Doda; San Francisco, California The undiscriminating heckles from over-zealous doormen enticing customers into the shows can be a bit tacky and off-putting, especially for those who enter the area to go to the other non-strip clubs. Consequently, many people are put off from even entering the area.

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Coffee North Beach in particular is famous its “caffe culture.” It has an excellent variety of cafes, many of which serve award winning coffee, sometimes imported all the way from Italy. Here is a selection of the more popular ones;

■Caffe Trieste, 601 Vallejo St, Vallejo St and Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 392-6739, http://www.caffetrieste.com/, Hours: F-Sa 6:30AM-12AM Su-Th 6:30AM-11PM. Has become a North Beach landmark. Although a little bit scruffy, it has excellent coffee — certainly one of the best cups of coffee in North Beach, and it’s very popular with the locals. One famous local patron was Jack Kerouac and reportedly Francis Ford Copolla wrote part of the Godfather here. ■Steps of Rome Caffe, 348 Columbus Ave, at Grant Ave, Phone: +1 415 397-0435, http://www.stepsofrome.com/caffe/ index.php, Hours: M-Th 10AM-2AM, F-Sa 10AM-3AM, Su 10AM-2AM. Sister to the Steps of Rome Trattoria, this 2-tier caffe is almost always packed and attracts a much younger crowd. It’s popular for parties and 21st’s. Cappuccino with Tiramisu is a favorite here... yummm! ■Stella Pasticceria e Caffe, 446 Columbus Ave, between Green St and Vallejo St, Phone: +1 415 986-2914, Fax: +1 415 397-9140, Hours: M-Th 7:30AM-7PM, F-Sa 7:30AM-12AM, Su 8:30AM-7PM. Small, elegant cafe/bakery, that serves fresh affordable coffee with delicious treats like cannoli and tiramisu available on the side. ■Caffe Greco, 423 Columbus Ave, between Green St and Vallejo St, Phone: +1 415 397-6261, http://caffegreco.com/, Hours: Su-Th 7AM-11:30PM, F-Sa 7AM-12AM. Probably North Beach’s most popular cafe, especially with locals. It has a real European atmosphere and imports its coffee from Italy. Curbside tables add to the ambiance. ■Caffe Roma, 526 Columbus Ave, at Union St, Phone: +1 415 296-7942, http://www.cafferoma.com/, Hours: M-Th 6AM-

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7PM, F 6AM-8PM, Sa 6AM-10PM, Su 7AM-7:30PM. Excellent coffee but a little bit pricey by comparison. ■Bohemian Cigar Store, 566 Columbus Ave, at Washington Sq, Phone: +1 415 362-0536, Hours: M-Sa 10AM-midnight, Su 10AM-11PM. Excellent espresso and a relaxed, friendly atmosphere with curbside tables that overlook Washington Square. Its cappuccino is prize-winning. ■Melt, 700 Columbus Ave, at Filbert St, Phone: +1 415 3929290, Hours: Su-Th 9AM-10PM, F-Sa 9AM-12AM. Excellent bohemian corner cafe/eatery that is right on the edge of Washington Square. It has a relaxed coffee-house atmosphere and is a great place to refuel with a panini, a salad or one of their excellent cheese platters. Often features live entertainment and old movies on a big screen. ■XoX Truffles, 754 Columbus Ave, between Filbert St and Greenwich St, http://www.xoxtruffles.com/, Hours: M-Sa 9AM-6PM. Run by local Chef Jean-Marc Gorce, this teenytiny place is more of an award-winning truffle vendor than coffee shop. However, the coffee is fresh and even if you just order a small house-blend for just $1 — you’ll get a free truffle (worth 75 cents)... Not Bad eh!

Juice bars ■Juicy Lucy’s, 703 Columbus Ave, between Filbert St and Greenwich St, Phone: +1 415 786-1285, Hours: M-Su 11AM6PM. Juicy Lucy’s is a local gem an all organic juice and food bar. It’s got kind of a Hippie flavor (there is a hay-bale inside) and is very popular with locals.

Sleep Many of the hotel accommodations in the area are of the S.R.O (Single Room Occcupancy) variety, especially in Chinatown. These are of less interest to tourists as they usually rent them out by the month ($600-800 p.m.). There are more traditional hotels however including:

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Budget ■Grant Plaza Hotel, 465 Grant Ave, at Pine St, Phone: +1 415 434-3883, info@grantplaza.com, Fax: +1 415 434.3886, http://www.grantplaza.com/, Check In: 2:30PM, Check Out: 12PM. Good for 1 or 2 night stay. Rates are reasonable. Make sure you ask for one of the outside rooms that overlook Grant Avenue, the inside rooms are small, dark and dingy. Close to parking garages and walking distance to many restaurants, bars and attractions. Staff is friendly. Price: $70-$95. ■The Green Tortoise Hostel, 494 Broadway St, at Columbus Ave, Phone: +1 415 834-1000 or +1 800 867-8647, http:// www.greentortoise.com/san.francisco.hostel.2.html, Check In: 2PM, Check Out: 11AM. A favorite of backpackers worldwide, price includes free internet and wi-fi, free breakfast every morning and dinner 3 nights a week, a 24-hour sauna, pool table, common room, free beer at the Beer Olympics on Tuesday nights and free live music on Sundays. An ideal location, right between Chinatown and North Beach and a short walk from downtown. Price: dorms from $25, private from $59. ■St Paul Hotel, 935 Kearny St, between Jackson St and Pacific Ave, Phone: +1 415 986-9911, stpaul@mosserco.com, http://stpaulhotelsf.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 12PM. This budget hotel has 150 rooms and it is located in between Chinatown and North Beach, on Kearny street. You will have a sink in your room but you will have to share shower/bath rooms. Price: $43-$50. ■San Remo Hotel, 2237 Mason St, near Lombard St and Columbus Ave, three blocks south of the main tourist area and near the other cable car line, Phone: +1 415 776-8688, info@sanremohotel.com, http://www.sanremohotel.com, Check In: 2PM-10PM and 11PM F-Sa, Check Out: 11AM. At the other end of the spectrum is the San Remo Hotel, All rooms except a rooftop suite are under $100. It was built right after the 1906 earthquake, became apartments later, and has been nicely reconverted to a hotel. It appears to be a favorite place for European tourists. It is quiet, all non-smoking, has no room phones nor TVs, and shared baths. A nice and

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large Italian restaurant, Fior d`Italia, self proclaimed “The oldest Italian restaurant in the United States,” has moved into its street floor. Price: $75-$85. ■Castro Hotel, 705 Vallejo St, between Emery Ln and Stockton St, Phone: +1 415 788-9709. Fancy a short stay at an S.R.O., well here’s one that rents by the week. The rooms are clean, it’s in the heart of North Beach, it’s safe — being directly opposite the police station, and it gets good reviews. Price: $165 per week.

Mid-range ■S W Hotel Inc, 615 Broadway St, near Columbus Ave, Phone: +1 415 362-2999, swhotel@swhotel.com, Fax: +1 415 362-1808, http://www.swhotel.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 11AM. Named after its owner Sam Wong, this budget hotel is decorated with everything Asian. The rooms are a bit smaller than standard but it is situated in a very central location in Chinatown and the price is reasonable. Price: $140-$160. ■Hotel des Arts, 447 Bush St, between Grant Ave and Kearny St, Phone: +1 415 956-4322, reservations@sfhoteldesarts.com, Fax: +1 415 956-0399, http://www.sfhoteldesarts. com/index.php, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 12PM. The hotel displays the work of contemporary local artists. Price: $69$149. ■Hotel Boheme, 444 Columbus Ave, between Vallejo St and Green St, Phone: +1 415 433-9111, info@hotelboheme.com, Fax: +1 415 362-6292, http://www.hotelboheme.com, Check In: 2PM, Check Out: 12PM. Hotel Boheme is located in a popular Italian neighborhood with decorations that pay tribute to San Francisco’s Beat Generation. The building may be hard to find, with only a single innocuous doorway covered by a small awning. Buzz at the door to enter but you get a key for this door on check in. Past the door is a steep and narrow staircase leading up to the next floor. On the second floor to the right of the landing is the hotel office. A bottle of Sherry surrounded by cordial glasses is set out for guests on the landing sideboard each night. Hotel

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staff are always friendly, helpful and knowledgeable about everything San Francisco. Price: $174-$194.

Splurge ■The Orchard Garden Hotel, 466 Bush St, between Grant Ave and Kearny St, Phone: +1 415 399-9807, mhaney@theorchardgardenhotel.com, Fax: +1 415 393-9917, http://www. theorchardgardenhotel.com/?source=adwords&gclid =COuw153-v5QCFScuagodBwYFUQ, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 12PM. A stylish eco-friendly hotel, claiming to be San Francisco’s “greenest” hotel, this lodging gets almost universally good reviews. Price: $200-$309. ■Ritz-Carlton San Francisco, 600 Stockton St, at Pine St, Phone: +1 415 296-7465, Fax: +1 415 291-0288, http://www. ritzcarlton.com/en/Properties/SanFrancisco/Default.htm, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 12PM. This hotel has a spacious lounge, fitness center, pool, and 4 star dining room in a Beaux-Arts building. It has 336 guestrooms, including 60 suites. Price: $449-$500. ■San Francisco Hilton Hotel, 750 Kearny St, between Washington St and Clay St, Phone: +1 415 433-6600, Fax: +1 415 765-7891, http://sanfranciscohiltonho-px.trvlclick. com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 12PM. Situated at the nexus of Chinatown, North Beach and the Financial District, this 27 storey hotel has some stunning views over the city and of San Francisco Bay. Price: $209-$409. ■Hotel Triton, 342 Grant Ave, at Bush St, Phone: +1 415 3940500, Fax: +1 415 394-0555, http://www.hoteltriton.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 12PM. Located just outside Chinatown, directly across from the south gate. Trendy, modern, and a little pricey. But the rooms are nicely appointed, and they offer a free tasting of local wines every afternoon. Price: $229-$300. ■Washington Square Inn, 1660 Stockton St, at Washington Sq, Phone: +1 415 981-4220 or 1-800-388-0220, info@wsisf. com, Fax: +1 415 397-7242, http://www.wsisf.com/, Check In: 3PM-9PM, Check Out: 11AM. Modeled after boutique European hotels it offers many services including a complimen-

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tary breakfast, and evening hors d’oeuvres. Rooms are well appointed with European antiques, cable TV, and private baths. Centrally located in North Beach it has views over Russian Hill, Telegraph Hill, and Washington Square Park. Price: $179-$209.

Contact There are an abundance of coffee shops in North Beach that offer free wi fi facilities upon purchasing a beverage. There are also two library branches that have internet computers.

■San Francisco Public Library — Chinatown Branch, 1135 Powell St, between Jackson St and Washington St, Phone: +1 415 355-2888, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Su 1-5, M 1-9, Tu 10-9, W 10-9, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sa 10-6. Free internet facilities. ■San Francisco Public Library — North Beach Branch, 2000 Mason St, at Greenwich St, Phone: +1 415 355-5626, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: M 12-6, Tu 10-9, W 1-9, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sa 1-6. Free internet facilities.

Stay safe North Beach remains busy with revelers and party-goers well into the early hours of the morning, but Chinatown, despite its crowds during the day, becomes eerily quiet after around 6-7PM. Chinatown has also had a somewhat of a poor reputation for pugnacious youngsters (as young as 12) that tend to hang around in groups, and also for bonafide gangs. Therefore, a sensible amount of care should be taken when enjoying the sights and sounds of Chinatown.

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Get out On the road again... ? Well, if you are following in the footsteps of the Beat literati that loved this area so much, why not continue your tour into other areas of the city?

■29 Russell Street, at the bottom of Nob Hill, is where Jack Kerouac lived and wrote during the 50s. ■The Six Gallery, 3119 Fillmore Street in the Cow Hollow area, hosted a seminal moment in the history of the Beat movement — The Six Gallery reading. The gallery is of couse long closed, but you can still visit this historic site.

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Union Square/ Financial District

■Union Square Union Square-Financial District is an area of Downtown San Francisco, bounded by Market Street to the southeast, the San Francisco Bay to the east, Mason Street to the west, and Sutter Street (between Mason and Kearny) and Washington Street (between Kearny and the bay) to the north.

Understand Surrounded by upscale hotels, Union Square is one of the largest shopping areas in the U.S. and is home to some of the nation’s finest department stores, malls and specialty stores. As if that wasn’t enough, it also boasts many fine art galleries, some of the best restaurants in the city, and it also serves as San Francisco’s main theater district, featuring many Broadway and Off-Broadway shows. The city earmarked the area as park in 1850, and its name was derived from the many lively, pro-Union Civil War demonstrations that were held there. The square itself, a public plaza, which

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is bordered by Post, Stockton, Geary, and Powell streets, got a major refurbishment in 2002 when most of its grass was paved over with granite stone. Built in 1903, the monument dedicated to the Goddess Victory still remains at the heat of the square. Today, people use the square mostly as a space to relax and soak up a bit of sun, and to wallow in the atmosphere created by the surrounding cable-cars, hotels and shoppers. The Financial District is rated among the top four financial centers in the United States and its many skyscrapers add a very impressive skyline to the city. It is home to the headquarters of the 12th District of the United States Federal Reserve, as well as the iconic Transamerica Pyramid Building. It also houses the corporate headquarters of many financial giants such as Visa, Wells Fargo Bank, Mckeeson Corporation and Charles Schwab Corporation. Despite the fact that the area was almost completely destroyed by the 1906 earthquake and fire, many of its original skyscrapers have survived. Today the architecture reflects a mix of both contemporary, as well as more historic buildings such as the Merchant and Exchange building, the Bank of America Building and the Russ building. There are also plenty of shopping opportunities in the area with centers such as the Embarcadero Center, the Ferry Building, and the Rincon Center. It begins at Montgomery, which was once known as the “Wall Street of the West�, and ends at the Embarcadero.

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Get in

■Map of Union Square-Financial District

By car On-street parking is all but non-existent. Parking garages, while plentiful, can be expensive. Major parking garages for the Union Square area can be found at the NE corner of Sutter and Stockton, between Ellis and O’Farrell between Stockton and Powell, on Sutter between Kearny and Grant, and under Union Square.

By ferry Several ferry companies operate service from around the bay to the Ferry Building on the waterfront.

■Golden Gate Ferry, Phone: +1 415 923-2000, http://goldengateferry.org. Service to and from Larkspur and Sausalito. Price: $7.10 one-way adults, $3.55 one-way seniors/youth. ■Blue & Gold Fleet, Phone: +1 415 705-5555, http://www. blueandgoldfleet.com. Offering services between the Fer-

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ry Building and Angel Island, Oakland/Alameda, Tiburon and Vallejo. Price: One-way fares range from $14.50 adults, $8.50 children to $6 adults, $3.25 children, depending on destination. ■BayLink Ferry, Phone: +1 707 648-4349, http://www.baylinkferry.com. Service to and from Vallejo. Price: $12.50 one-way adults, $6.25 one-way seniors/children. ■Alameda Oakland Ferry, Phone: +1 415 705-5555, http:// www.eastbayferry.com. Service to and from Alameda and Oakland. Price: $6 one-way adults, $3.50 one-way seniors, $3.25 one-way children. ■Harbor Bay Ferry, Phone: +1 510 769-5500, http://www. alamedaharborbayferry.com. Service to and from Bay Farm Island in Alameda. Price: $6 one-way adults, $3.50 one-way seniors, $3.25 one-way children.

By public transit

■Cable car at Powell and Market

Extensive public transit is offered through the neighborhood, provided either by the regional BART system or the city-wide MUNI system, which encompasses the MUNI Metro, buses, cable cars, and the F-Line streetcar.

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BART and all of the MUNI Metro lines ( J, K, L, M, N and T) run under Market Street with three stations serving this part of downtown: the Embarcadero, Montgomery Street and Powell Street. The Powell Street stop is just a few blocks down Powell from Union Square. The Powell-Hyde and Powell-Mason cable car lines runs from Powell and Market past Union Square to Fisherman’s Wharf. From the Embarcadero station you can catch the California cable car line. The F Streetcar Line runs along Market Street and up the Embarcadero to Fisherman’s Wharf. There are several streetcar stops along Market Street. Numerous MUNI bus lines run through the area as well, such as the 38-Geary which runs past Union Square and the 1-California which runs through the Financial District past the Embarcadero Center. The #9X, #10, #30 and #45 lines run north-south through the district, connecting to Chinatown, North Beach, and Fisherman’s Wharf to the north.

On foot From Fisherman’s Wharf, take a 25 minute walk down the Emabarcadero, which will take you all the way down to the Ferry Building, at the edge of the Financial District. From west of the area, it is also easily accessible by getting first to Market Street and then walking eastbound.

See

Union Square. The most important site is the square itself, which was revamped in 2002 to provide more space for outdoor events and less space for napping homeless people (an earlier version of the square appeared in the film The Conversation). The square now includes a theater ticket outlet, gift

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shop, and Emporio Rulli cafe, along with an underground parking garage. For blogging people-watchers, there is free wi fi provided by the city. Look under the leaves of the greenery in the planters, and you’ll find a few power outlets for your laptop. ■Architecture. Union Square is the bustling name-brand shopping area for the city, where high-end chains put their West Coast flagship stores, or at least a major retail outlet. The neighborhood’s visual extravaganzas tend to be stores, including the beautifully restored glass dome and rotunda salvaged from the former City of Paris department store (at the Neiman Marcus store that replaced it 1981, at Geary and Stockton), the interior lavishness of the flagship Williams Sonoma, and Niketown on Post. This area of downtown is also a hotbed of Art Deco and Beaux Arts architecture. Pacific Heritage Museum, 608 Commercial Street, at Montgomery, Phone: +1 415 399-1124, http://www.ibankunited.com/phm, Hours: T-Sa 10AM-4PM. Exhibits on the art and culture of the peoples of the Pacific Rim. Price: Free. Transamerica Pyramid, Montgomery and Washington, http://thepyramidcenter.com/tourism/tourism.htm. San Francisco’s tallest and most famous skyscraper, controversial when it opened, but now accepted. There used to be an unusual observation deck on the ground floor with 4 big TV monitors, showing live views of the city transmitted from cameras at the top of the building. They now have a happy worker at the bottom that tells you anything and everything you want to know about San Francisco and has some great stories. Then he tells you that they no longer have the 4 big TVs and are building a restaurant where you can view the city from inside. (7/5/2008) Ferry Building, One Ferry Building, at the end of Market Street on the bay, Phone: +1 415 6930996, http://www.ferrybuildingmarketplace.com. A historic ferry terminal which survived the 1906 earthquake and fire, and had 100,000 people pass through it every day before the big bridges were built. Ferries across the bay still depart from here, and there are also several restaurants and shops in the building. A large farmers market takes place year-round on Tuesdays and Saturdays and on Thursday evenings in the summer. Together with its surroundings, the Ferry Building

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is very beautiful by night. Wells Fargo History Museum, 420 Montgomery Street, Phone: +1 415 396-2619, http://www. wellsfargohistory.com/museums/museums_sf.htm, Hours: M-F 9AM-5PM. This interesting museum has many artifacts associated with the bank company, such as old stagecoaches. Price: Free. San Francisco Railway Museum, 77 Steuart Street, at Steuart and Don Chee Way, near the foot of Market, Phone: +1 415 974-1948, http://www.streetcar.org/sfrm/index. html, Hours: W-Su 10AM-6PM. Exhibits on the history of transportation in San Francisco, with an emphasis on rail systems. Embarcadero Center. Consists of many buildings between Sacramento and Clay Streets running from the Embarcadero to Battery Street housing a shopping center, offices, and the Hyatt Regency hotel, which has a wonderful 17 story atrium used in the film, the Towering Inferno. ■Water Fountains. A quick overview of San Francisco geography is provided by the San Francisco Fountain on the steps of the Grand Hyatt on Stockton just north of Post. This massive wall of sculpture was created by Ruth Asawa, using schoolchildren’s bread dough models as a basis for the casting. Another famous water feature is Lotta’s Fountain, at the intersection of Geary, Kearney, and Market. Donated by singer Lotta Crabtree in 1875, it is the city’s oldest piece of public art. You can also see the controversial Vaillancourt Fountain at Justin Herman Plaza at the foot of Market Street, believed by many to be a parody of the former (and much loathed) Embarcadero Freeway.

Do ■Ferry Building Reborn Geogad Mobile Tour, http:// www.geogad.com/geogad/tour?tid=6. Explore the area surrounding the Ferry Building and learn of the history of these buildings at your own pace. This free MP3 walking tour can be downloaded directly from the Geogad website. Then you can upload the tour to any MP3 device, but you

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will get the most from the tour if your MP3 player can display the included photos and maps.

Buy The purpose of Union Square is shopping. Most upscale national chains can be found in the neighborhood, including Macy’s western flagship store on the south side of the square, Neiman Marcus on the southeast corner, Saks on the north side, and Nordstrom two blocks south, on Market opposite the cable car turnaround. Other chains include Victoria’s Secret, Borders, Harry & David, Sur La Table, a four-level Ross, a four-level Loehmann’s, one of the rare H&M stores in the U.S., Forever 21 in a restored bank, Armani, Crate and Barrel, and numerous upscale stores at San Francisco Shopping Centre. More interesting are the stores that can’t be found in every suburban mall. There are numerous art galleries and a fascinating selection of local or unusual businesses. The Financial District also has some decent shopping centers to choose from.

■Gump’s, 135 Post Street, between Kearny and Grant, Phone: +1 415 766-7628, http://www.gumps.com/, Hours: M-Sa 10AM-6PM, Su Noon-5PM. San Francisco’s source of luxury housewares, from couches to crystal. Though famous names like Waterford appear on the shelves, the selection emphasizes home furnishings as art, often with an elegant Asian feel. The dominant style is not quite modernist but hardly middle-American traditional. It’s difficult to do justice to a native’s feelings toward Gump’s without sounding like a bad marketing piece. This is the “look” that says one’s parents and grandparents went to the right private schools. If your home looks like Gump’s, you’ve not only “arrived” -- you’ve been here longer than just about anyone else. As well as housewares, Gump’s sells jewelry, holiday decor, and the odd bit of upscale soap. ■Britex, 146 Geary Street, between Grant and Stockton, Phone: +1 415 392-2910, http://www.britexfabrics.com/, Hours: M-Sa 10AM-6PM. Arguably the largest fabric store on

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the left coast, filling four floors of a narrow building. Don’t look for calicos for your quilting project: this is the land of luxury fabrics for faking couture at home. If you’ve ever wanted to make a cheap sweater look expensive by adding deluxe buttons, head straight for the third floor, where 30,000 styles await your approval (don’t even think of touching a button. The clerks do that.) Britex is also notable for selling remnants that are big enough for a real project. ■Williams Sonoma, 340 Post Street, between Stockton and Powell, Phone: +1 415 362-9450, http://www.williams-sonoma.com/. While it is technically a national chain, the Union Square store is the flagship store, and it’s a cathedral to the gracious kitchen. Acres of housewares gleam beneath twin spiral stairs that lead to the land of crystal and tablecloths. This isn’t your mother’s mall-store Williams Sonoma. There are usually pretty good free samples being passed out, too. ■Thomas Pink, 255 Post Street, between Grant and Stockton, Phone: +1 415 421-2022, http://www.thomaspink. co.uk/, Hours: M-F 10AM-7PM, Sa 10AM-6PM, Su 11AM-6PM. This place might seem obsessed with its eponymous color, if you judge by the store displays, but the upscale clothier also knows about white, beige, blue, and yellow. ■Wilkes Bashford, 375 Sutter Street, between Grant and Stockton, Phone: +1 415 986-4380, http://www.wilkesbashford.com/, Hours: M-W and F-Sa 10AM-6PM, Th 10AM-8PM. This is just the place to pop in for a $1,000 jacket, a $500 cashmere sweater, or those delicious Jimmy Choo shoes. Every now and again, there is a major sale on the top floor. You don’t need to watch for the sales banners -- just notice when the crowds mobbing into the store look suspiciously like the same people who bussed your table the night before. ■Embarcadero Center, between Sacramento and Clay Streets running from the Embarcadero to Battery Street, Phone: +1 415 772-0700, http://www.embarcaderocenter. com, Hours: M-F 10AM-7PM, Sa 10AM-6PM, Su 12PM-5PM. Spanning 5 city blocks, this center is one of the largest

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mixed-use centers in the Western United States. It has over 100 stores and a 5-screen movie complex. ■Rincon Center, 101 Spear Street, between Mission and Howard near the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 777-4100. This is mostly for dining but there are also many shops here as well.

Eat Though Union Square appears to be awash in cafes, it’s one of the more difficult neighborhoods for good eating. Dining selections are crowded and geared toward the tourist market, though there are a few iconic restaurants that have must-see status just from their fame and age. It’s also a center of high-end hotel dining. However, a short side trip west on O’Farrell or Geary to the Tenderloin for bargain Indian or Vietnamese food, a quick walk up Grant to Chinatown or (further) to North Beach may be worthwhile alternatives to fast food, long waits, or $200 a plate meals. In the Financial District there are various restaurants catering to those who work in the surrounding buildings.

■Aqua, 252 California Street, between Front and Battery, Phone: +1 415 956-9662, http://www.aqua-sf.com/. Simply prepared fresh seafood. Also landed a spot on reputed restaurant-critic Michael Bauer’s list of “One Hundred Best Restaurants”, of the San Francisco Chronicle. ■Boxed Foods Co, 245 Kearny St, between Hardie Pl & Sutter St, Phone: +1 415 981-9376. Healthy and delicious option for the working crowd. The line goes out the door around lunchtime so phone in or order early in order to beat the lunch time rush. The ingredients are fresh and wholesome. The Boxed Chicken Salad comes highly recommended. ■John’s Grill, 63 Ellis Street, between Powell and Stockton, Phone: +1 415 986-0069, http://johnsgrill.ypguides.net/, Hours: M-Sa 11AM-10PM, Su 5PM-10PM. ■Krivaar Cafe, 475 Pine Street, between Montgomery and Kearny, Phone: +1 415 781-0894. A great local deli that serves

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an assortment of Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, Armenian and American dishes at good prices. Their hummus is considered the best in San Francisco. ■Kuleto’s Restaurant, 221 Powell Street, at O’Farrell, Phone: +1 415 397-7720, http://www.kuletos.com/, Hours: Breakfast M-F 7AM-10:30AM, Sa-Su 8AM-10:30AM, Lunch/Dinner SuTh 11:30AM-10:30PM, F-Sa 11:30AM-11PM. Price: $10-$25. ■Little Delhi, 83 Eddy Street, at Mason, Phone: +1 415 3983173, Hours: Daily 11AM-11PM. This restaurant is a very good Indian restaurant at very reasonable prices. Decor and ambience is average, but high on taste and cleanliness. ■One Market Restaurant, 1 Market Street, between Steuart and Spear, near the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 777-5577, http://www.onemarket.com/. ■Puccini & Pinetti, 129 Ellis Street, between Powell and Cyril Magnin, Phone: +1 415 392-5500, http://www.pucciniandpinetti.com. ■Tadich Grill, 240 California Street, between Battery and Front Streets, Phone: +1 415 391-1849, Hours: M-F 11AM9:30PM, Sa 11:30AM-9:30PM. The longest operating restaurant in California that dates back to the Gold Rush. You’ll find delicious seafood and a classic atmosphere where groups can sit in their own wood-paneled quarters. ■Yank Sing, 101 Spear Street, in the Rincon Center near the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 781-1111, http://www.yanksing. com, Hours: M-F 11AM-3PM, Sa-Su 10AM-4PM. This is the best place for dim sum, and thus you might need to wait 30 minutes (at most) to have a table. You do not need a menu to order your food; The staff lets you choose what you want to eat from carts pushed around from the dining room. The shrimp, dumplings, and duck here are delicious. The setting of the restaurant is also wonderful.

Drinks ■Cantina, 580 Sutter St, between Mason St & Powell St, Phone: +1 415 398-0195. One of the best places to get a cocktail in the city, the bartenders here know their stuff and are

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friendly as well. Kinda snug, but the attention to detail in the decor, and the drinks is well worth it. ■EO Trading, 312 Sutter St, at Grant, Phone: +1 415 693-0303. Decked out in an upscale without trying decor, EO Trading has the kind of cocktail list that impresses but doesn’t overwhelm. The menu of small plates and appetizers of Asian fusion cuisine, read satay platters and a selection of naan bread is the perfect partner for their lychee martinis and Anchor Steam beers. Happy hour is from 3 to 6PM.

Sleep This is the hotel district, with a broad range of choices, from chain to boutique.

Budget ■Hostelling International-Downtown, 312 Mason Street, at O’Farrell, Phone: +1 415 788-5604, http://www.sfhostels. com/downtown. Clean, cheap, safe and fun. Price: $23 dorms. ■Pacific Tradewinds Backpackers, 680 Sacramento Street, between Kearny and Spring, Phone: +1 415 433-7970, http://www.sanfranciscohostel.org. The highest rated and smallest hostel in San Francisco. On the edge of Chinatown and Financial District. Friendly, clean, modern and safe. Free internet. Price: $22-24/night.

Mid-range ■The Donatello, 501 Post Street, at Mason, Phone: +1 415 441-7100, http://www.shellhospitality.com/hotels/donatello_hotel. 94 deluxe rooms, the most spacious accommodations in San Francisco. Elegantly decorated with original

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Italian art, Travertine marble, Venetian glass and European antiques. ■Hotel Bijou, 111 Mason Street, at Eddy, Phone: +1 415 7711200, Fax: +1 415 346-3196, http://www.hotelbijou.com. Hotel Bijou is inspired by San Francisco’s rich cinematic history, adorned with movie palace stylings and Hollywood portraits, and features a mini movie theater in the lobby. ■Handlery Union Square Hotel, 351 Geary Street, between Powell and Mason, Phone: +1 415 781-7800, Fax: +1 415 781-0269, http://www.handlery.com/sf. A family hotel with a European flair, and the feel of upscale boutique accommodations providing warm, personal attention. The cable car is located at the corner and attractions are within walking distance.

Splurge ■Chancellor Hotel, 433 Powell Street, between Sutter and Post just north of Union Square, Phone: +1 800 428-4748, http://www.chancellorhotel.com. This classic hotel overlooks Powell Street, home to one of the famous cable car lines. It is a short walk from Union Square and is surrounded by many shopping centers. ■Galleria Park Hotel, 191 Sutter Street, at Kearny, Phone: +1 415 781-3060, Fax: +1 415 433-4409, http://www.jdvhotels. com/galleria_park. A stylish boutique hotel at the crossroads of the Financial District and Union Square. Completely renovated in early 2007. Includes half-acre private urban park with city views, luxury linens, flat-screen TVs and complimentary wine hour. ■Hotel 480, 480 Sutter Street, Phone: 415-398-8900, http:// www.hotel480.com. A trendy San Francisco boutique hotel. Price: Splurge. ■Hotel Nikko, 222 Mason Street, between O’Farrell and Ellis, Phone: +1 415 394-1111, http://www.hotelnikkosf.com/. Located close to Union Square. Swanky large hotel with a boutique feel and very large bathrooms. Fun travel tip is to ask for the few rooms with Japanese style amenities. Hotel dining includes restaurant ANZU. ANZU serves fresh sushi

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and excellent steak. Also located inside the hotel’s lobby is the Rrazz Room Theater, with nightly cabaret and R&B. ■Hotel Rex, 562 Sutter Street, between Powell and Mason, Phone: +1 415 433-4434, Fax: +1 415 433-3695, http://www. jdvhotels.com/rex. The Hotel Rex was inspired by the San Francisco art and literary salons of the 1920’s and 30’s. The clubby lobby surrounds guests with distinctive period furnishings, walls of antiquarian books, and a collection of exotic objects, original portraits and murals. The hotel’s Café is a blend of Northern California cafe and authentic French bistro. One block from Union Square. ■Hotel Vitale, 8 Mission Street, at the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 278-3700, Fax: +1 415 278-3750, http://www.jdvhotels. com/vitale. Great luxury boutique hotel, right on the waterfront, across from the historic Ferry Building Marketplace. Rooms with city or spectacular bay views, rooftop day-spa, and very popular Cafe Americano Restaurant and Bar with outside terrace seating. Price: $250-$500. ■Hyatt Regency San Francisco, 5 Embarcadero Center, at the Embarcadero Center, next to the California and Market cable car turnaround, Phone: +1 415 788-1234, Fax: +1 415 398-2567, http://sanfranciscoregency.hyatt.com. ■JW Marriott, (former Pan Pacific), 500 Post Street, at Mason, one block west of Union Square, Phone: +1 415 7718600, http://marriott.com/property/propertypage/SFOJW. This AAA four diamond hotel has 338 rooms. ■Le Méridien, (formerly the Park Hyatt), 333 Battery Street, between Commercial and Sacramento, next to the Embarcadero Center, Phone: +1 415 296-2900, http://www. starwoodhotels.com/lemeridien/property/overview/index. html?propertyID=1957. The Le Meridien at Embarcadero Center is a luxury hotel that mostly caters to business travelers. It is part of Embarcadero Center, which includes retail shops and restaurants on the street and lobby levels, 4 office towers, and a second hotel, the Hyatt Regency, which borders Justin Herman Plaza. The Le Meridien has large rooms and very nice furnishings and art work. If you stay

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at this hotel, make a point not to eat breakfast here, as it is expensive and there are other good options nearby. ■Mandarin Oriental, 222 Sansome Street, at Pine, Phone: +1 415 885-0999, Fax: +1 415 433-0289, http://www.mandarinoriental.com/sanfrancisco. A 150 room hotel located on top eleven floors of the First Interstate Center, the third tallest building in the city of San Francisco. The view from the rooms are exceptional, with floor to ceiling windows and great views. ■Omni San Francisco Hotel, 500 California Street, at Montgomery, Phone: +1 888 444-6664, http://www.omnihotels.com/hotels/default.asp?h_id=62. The Omni San Francisco Hotel provides luxury accommodations in the heart of downtown San Francisco. Located on the cable car line at the base of Nob Hill, the hotel is only a short walk to Union Square, the San Francisco neighborhood that has become a mecca for high end shopping and art galleries. ■The Palace Hotel, 2 New Montgomery Street, at Market, Phone: +1 415 512-1111, http://www.sfpalace.com. Located in the Financial District, one block from Market Street. Established in 1875, The Palace has 552 guest rooms. In 1945, the official banquet honoring the opening session of the United Nations was held in The Garden Court at The Palace. ■Parc 55 Hotel, 55 Cyril Magnin Street, between Ellis and Eddy, Phone: +1 800 595-0507, http://www.parc55hotel. com. Two blocks from Union Square in downtown San Francisco. ■Westin-St Francis Hotel, 335 Powell Street, west side of Union Square, between Post and Geary, Phone: +1 415 3977000, http://www.westinstfrancis.com. Now a member of the Westin chain, this is the iconic San Francisco hotel. The lavish lobby and cafe area are used as a meeting place by quite a lot of people who aren’t guests there, despite the pricey lattes and ritzy atmosphere. In a peculiar bit of design, the lobby has a side entrance to the Harry & David store, should you need to pop over for a few chocolate-cov-

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ered cranberries. Although the St. Francis has a reputation for priciness, it runs off-season specials.

Contact â– Golden Gate Perk Internet Cafe, 401 Bush Street, at Kearny, Phone: +1 415 362-3929, Hours: M-F 8:30AM-8PM, Sa 11:30AM-5PM. Free wifi, computer terminals for rent.

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Civic Center/ Tenderloin

â– Blue skies at Civic Center Plaza and City Hall

Civic Center-Tenderloin is an area of Downtown San Francisco. As the name implies, the Civic Center is the primary center of government within the city and many important civic institutions are housed here. Aside from its official duties, it also moonlights as a cultural center with many fine museums, theaters, opera houses, and symphony halls located here. Over the years however, it has developed a reputation for attracting many of the city’s drug-addicted and homeless to its open plazas. The Tenderloin is one of San Francisco’s lowest income neighborhoods. It has a rich history and eclectic community, but unfortunately it also has a reputation for poverty, drugs, and crime, particularly violent street crime. The Civic Center-Tenderloin area is bounded roughly by Market St to the southeast, Mason St to the east, Franklin St to the west, and Sutter St to the north.

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Understand Civic Center The Civic Center is on Van Ness Ave, north of its intersection with Market St. The city began developing the area in 1913, and most of the buildings there are of a “Classical Style”, with their development being heavily influenced by the “City Beautiful Movement”. Most of the city’s integral governmental institutions are located here; like City Hall which dominates the Civic Center with it’s impressive “Beaux-Arts” style dome. There are two main plazas in the area; Civic Center Plaza and United Nations Plaza. The Civic Center Plaza (in front of City Hall) has been a popular place for holding rallies, protests, and festivals. As well as being a hub for city government, the area is also a serious cultural center. “Culture vultures” flock here at night to see performances of the San Francsico opera, symphony, and ballet, as well as to attend theater, galas, concerts, plays, and special events. During the day you can get your “culture fix” by visiting one of the many excellent museums and galleries such as the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco Performing Arts Library and Museum, and the San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery. There are also several other smaller private galleries in the area. Architecture aficionados will be happy to know that some of the most beautiful buildings in the city are cloistered within a few square blocks here. Examples include, The War Memorial Opera House, the Asian Art Museum, the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, and the War Memorial Veterans building with the Herbst Theater (the U.N. charter was signed in Herbst Theater in 1945). There is also a popular farmers market held twice weekly in United Nations Plaza.

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Tenderloin Many guidebooks will tell you to avoid a large part of downtown — the Tenderloin. It’s true that this “bad neighborhood” is rife with panhandlers, adult bookstores, and massage parlors, but it’s also full of good, cheap ethnic restaurants and colorful dive bars. The ‘Loin is probably the last area of downtown to experience real gentrification, a process that seems to be taking its time, but the early signs are already here. Culture vultures will find several cutting edge, alternative/experimental theaters and high-culture galleries, which are attracted by the neighborhoods low rents and proximity to downtown. Sleek lounges and trendy clubs are also increasingly making a home in this eclectic neighborhood, side by side with the traditional dive bars it has always been known for. The name “Tenderloin” comes from the overall shape of the area’s boundaries: triangular, like the cross-section of a tenderloin steak. According to a different explanation the area was originally called “The Tenderloin” by the police officers, since they were paid more to work there — the most notorious part of the town. There are many different ways to define its boundaries; the official and original three corners (making a Tenderloin shape) may be delineated by Market St and Larkin St to the south, Geary St and Larkin St to the northwest, and Market St by Geary St to the northeast. Today the area would be more better defined between Polk St, Sutter St, Mason St, Market St, and Golden Gate Ave. Although it has a reputation as one of the tougher parts of town, in reality the Tenderloin is quite variegated and can change drastically from block to block. There are many different sub-neighborhoods within the ‘Loin. Much of the area on the east side of Mason St (above O’Farrell St) is high-rent and more properly considered part of downtown Union Square. The western area around Hyde and Larkin Sts, from Turk St to O’Farrell St, is a colorful Vietnamese neighborhood known as “Little Saigon”.

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Geary St, Post St, and Sutter St, especially the blocks west of Jones St, are part of the so-called “Tendernob” or “Tenderloin Heights” bordering Nob Hill; sometimes this definition also includes southern Nob Hill as far north as California St or Sacramento St (especially the western blocks around Polk St). The Tendernob (at least on the ‘Loin side) is considered a nightlife hotspot by some folks who like their drinking milieu a bit rough around the edges. It connects with Polk St on the western edge of the Tenderloin. Known variously as “Polk Gulch”, “Polk Village”, or the “Outer Tenderloin”, this very lively area of Polk St, from Geary St to Union St, is populated with all types of restaurants, cafes, bars, venues, bookstores, and other shops. Finally, an area bordered by O’Farrell, Geary, Leavenworth, and Taylor Sts, is sometimes called the “Tandoor-loin” because of the high concentration of excellent and affordable Indian restaurants. Dashiell Hammett’s novel, “The Maltese Falcon,” was set in the Tenderloin, and the 1941 movie adaptation for the Maltese Falcon, starring Humphrey Bogart as Sam Spade, was also set in the Tenderloin.

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Get in

â– Map of the Civic Center-Tenderloin

By car Directions for driving to the Civic Center are marked on the freeways. Once inside the City limits, two main arteries serve the area — Van Ness Ave and Market St. There are several garages, such as the Performing Arts Garage at Grove St and Gough St, an underground garage under the Civic Center Plaza (entrance on McAllister St), open from 6AM to Midnight, or 24-hour valet parking at Opera Plaza on Turk St just off Van Ness Ave. Where the freeway was prior to 1989 earthquake (between Grove St at Gough St and Turk St at Franklin St) there are several smaller open

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air lots, which will charge about $10 for all day or $6 for an evening. Those lots are gradually being displaced by new construction. Street parking in the Tenderloin is extremely difficult to find, but parking garages are plentiful.

By MUNI The neighborhood is well-served by public transit, provided by MUNI in the form of the Metro system, the F-Line streetcar and various bus lines. MUNI Metro lines J, K,L, M and N serve the Powell/Market and Civic Center/United Nations Plaza stations under Market St along with the BART line. The MUNI Metro also serves the Van Ness/Market station, which is part of the same subway tunnel but is not shared with BART. The historic F streetcar line (regular $1.50 Muni fare, $0.50 for seniors) runs on Market St between Castro St and the Ferry Building (where it turns north on The Embarcadero to Fisherman’s Wharf ), passing by both the Civic Center and the Tenderloin. From the CalTrain station the #47 bus takes you to along the western border of the area (Van Ness Ave) to City Hall. Other MUNI bus lines serving the area are: 49 Van Ness, 9 San Bruno, 31 Balboa, 5 Fulton, 19 Polk, 21 Hayes and 38 Geary.

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■Civic Center BART Station

By BART BART runs under Market St with two stops in the area; both the Powell/Market and Civic Center/United Nations Plaza Both BART stations will put you well within walking distance of any Tenderloin attraction; the latter is the most convenient BART stop for the Civic Center.

By cable car One or other of two cable car lines can take you from Fisherman’s Wharf, Chinatown, Nob Hill, or Russian Hill to the intersection of Market St and Powell St in Union Square — near the Powell/Market BART and Muni station. From here it’s just one block to the Tenderloin. The fare is $5 each way ($1 for seniors or disabled before 7AM and after 9PM), or use a Muni all-day Passport ($11).

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■ The Powell/Mason cable car ■ The Powell/Hyde cable car

On foot Given that the area is centrally located downtown, it is extremely accessible on foot. From the SoMa area walk northbound on anywhere from Fifth St to 11th St. Market St forms its broad southern boundary and makes the area easily accessible from either the east (Union Square-Financial District) or west (The Castro), and from the north (Nob Hill-Russian Hill) it’s just a 10-20 minute walk directly due south.

Get around As this is a relatively small area, the best way to get around is on foot. To help you navigate around there is a Visitor Information Center located at 900 Market St on the lower level of Hallidie Plaza, next door to the cable car turntable at Powell and Market streets. The V.I.C. is open M-F 9AM5PM; Sa, Su, and holidays 9AM-3PM, PST. Telephone inquiries may be made M-F from 8:30AM to 5PM PST, by calling +1 415 391-2000 or +1 415 392-0328.

See ■Little Saigon (Sài Gòn Nhỏ), Larkin St between Eddy St and O’Farrell St. A tiny two block strip of Larkin St houses an active Vietnamese American community where the vast majority of shops and restaurants are Vietnamese owned and operated. Little Saigon functions as a both a Vietnam-

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ese commercial and cultural center, and there are some excellent restaurants and stores here.

Museums and galleries ■The Art Institute of California — San Francisco, 1170 Market St, at Civic Center Plaza, Phone: +1 415 865-0198, aicasfadm@aii.edu, Fax: +1 415 863-5831, http://www. aicasf.artinstitutes.edu, Hours: Check their website for a schedule of exhibits. The institute holds public multimedia exhibitions in the fields of media arts, fashion, animation and design.

■Asian Art Museum

■Asian Art Museum, 200 Larkin St, between McAllister St and Fulton St, Phone: +1 415 581-3500, pr@asianart.org, Fax: +1 415 581-4700, http://www.asianart.org, Hours: TuSu 10AM-5PM (with extended evening hours every Th until 9PM) Closed New Year. Built in 1917, and formerly the old library building, this building is a fantastic blend of “Beaux Arts” and modern design elements. It was designed by renowned architect Gae Aulenti (architect of the Musée d’Orsay, Paris). Inside, you’ll find many interesting architec-

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tural details including the grand staircase, loggia, vaulted ceilings, the great hall, stone floors, period light fixtures, and inscriptions. The museum is one of the largest and newest museums of Oriental art. It has circa 15,000 artifacts covering 6,000 years of Asian history. The Asian Art Museum hosts many special exhibits as well. ■Frey Norris Gallery, 456 Geary St, between Mason St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 346-7812, raman@freynorris.com, Fax: +1 415 346-7877, http://www.freynorris.com/, Hours: Tu-Sa 11AM-7PM, Su 11AM-5PM. Their gallery features contemporary art from a broad range of media. Their Annex exhibits female surrealist art covering the 1920s to the 1970s. Price: Free. ■John Pence Gallery, 750 Post St, between Jones St and Leavenworth St, Phone: +1 415 441-1138, art@johnpence. com, Fax: +1 415 441-1178, http://www.johnpence.com/, Hours: M-F 10AM-6PM, Sa 10AM-5PM. This 8,000 square foot gallery exhibits art of the realism movement (particularly academic realism) as well as “Beat Generation” art works. Price: Free. ■Linc Art Gallery, 1632C Market St, between Franklin and St Gough St, Phone: +1 415 503-1981, hope@lincart.com, http://www.lincart.com, Hours: Tu-Sa noon-6PM. Lincart exhibits contemporary fine art and design at their gallery. Since its inception in 2000, it has exhibited over 50 shows, most of which were solo exhibitions from artists like Yayoi Kusama, Graham Gillmore, Tucker Nichols, and Pip Culbert. Price: Free. ■Luggage Store Gallery, 1007 Market St, at 6th St, Phone: +1 415 255-5971, iaro@aol.com, Fax: =. They organize exhibitions, performing arts events, arts education, and public art programs in order to encourage and facilitate the flow of artistic ideas between the different cultural and socioeconomic stratums in society. They also host exhibits at the Luggage Store Annex (a.k.a. 509 Cultural Center) at 509 Ellis Street (near Leavenworth St).

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■San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery, War Memorial Veterans Building, 401 Van Ness Ave, at McAllister St, Phone: +1 415 554-6080, meg.shiffler@sfgov.org, Fax: +1 415 554-6093, http://www.sfacgallery.org, Hours: The Gallery at 401 Van Ness: W-Sa noon-5PM, The Window Site at 155 Grove St: 24 hours daily, Art at City Hall: M-F 8AM-8PM. The San Francisco Arts Commission Gallery supports a diverse range of Bay Area “Visual Art” culture by supporting artists projects through collaboration with community organizations, commissioning contemporary art, and curated exhibitions. They also have window installations at 155 Grove St and another in City Hall. Price: Free. ■San Francisco Performing Arts Library and Museum, War Memorial Veterans Building, 401 Van Ness Ave, 4th Floor, at McAllister St, Phone: +1 415 255-4800, info@ mpdsf.org, http://www.sfpalm.org, Hours: Library Hours: W-F 11AM-5PM, Sa 1PM-5PM; Exhibition Hours: Tu-F 11AM5PM; Sa 1PM-5PM.. The Museum is dedicated to celebrating all aspects of the performing arts in San Francisco, from the mid 19th century to the present day. It hosts exhibitions and lectures by leading artists to encourage an appreciation of the diversity of the performing arts. Price: Free.

Parks and monuments ■Civic Center Plaza, between Polk St and McAllister St. This grassy plaza is situated at the heart of the Civic Center and its tree-lined central avenue visually draws the eye to the imposing structure of City Hall. Protests and demonstrations of all political persuasions are frequently staged here. There is a parking lot underneath the plaza. ■James Lick (Pioneer) Monument, behind the Mail Library branch - near the Asian Art Museum. The monument is a tribute to California and its early pioneers like Sir Francis Drake. Atop sits a bear, and a man carrying both spear and shied — all three objects are imagery that represent California. ■Large Four Piece Reclining Figure, 201 Van Ness Ave. This bronze sculpture was created by English artist Henry

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Moore in 1973. It poses happily outside Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall. ■Sgt. John Macaulay Park, Larkin St and O’Farrell St. Named in honor of a police sergeant who died on duty, this vibrantly colored park and playground only allows adults in if they are accompanied by kids. It has become a bit of an urban oasis set amidst the grittiness of the Tenderloin. ■United Nations Plaza, at Market St and Hyde St. The UN Charter was signed in the Civic Center in 1945, and this plaza was constructed in honor of its ideology. Designed by architect Lawrence Halprin, and completed in 1975, this is a three acre red-bricked pedestrian plaza. Brick columns inscribed with UN members country names line the plaza, and the UN Fountain sits at its center. Intended to be a visual gateway to the Civic Center, today it’s more of a pit stop for homeless people.

Architecture The Civic Center with its “Classical” architecture was declared a national landmark in 1978. It has several buildings that are of architectural interest including the Asian Art Museum listed under Museums and galleries above; as well as the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, the buildings that comprise the San Francisco War Memorial and Performing Arts Center (SFWMPAC), the Orpheum Theater, Golden Gate Theater, the Curran Theater, and the interior of the Great American Music Hall, which are all listed under Performing arts below. Other architectural points of interest include:

■Alcazar Theater, 650 Geary St, between Jones St and Leavenworth St, Phone: +1 415 441-4042, Fax: +1 415 4419567, Hours: M-Sa 9:30AM-5PM. Built in 1911 in honor of the Shriners (Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine); this Byzantine-style Islamic temple (now a 500 seat theater showing Broadway and off-Broadway shows),

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is now a historical city landmark. The architect was T Patterson Ross. Price: Free.

■City Hall

■City Hall, 1 Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, between Van Ness Ave, McAllister St, Dr. Carlton B. Goodlett Place, and Grove St, Phone: +1 415 554-4933, City.Hall.Building.Management@sfgov.org, Fax: +1 415 554-4936, http://www.ci.sf. ca.us/site/cityhall_index.asp?id=4354, Hours: Brochures are available for visitors to take a self-guided tour: M-F 8AM8PM Docent led tours: M–F 10AM, noon, 2PM. Designed by Arthur Brown Jr., and opened in 1915, the architecture of the building was heavily influenced by the “City Beautiful Movement,” which in turn reflected the American Renaissance style of the time. Its “Beaux-Arts” dome (the fifth largest in the world) was modeled after that of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, Italy. The building itself is huge, 393 feet long, by 273 feet wide, and 307 feet high — occupying a full two

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blocks of San Francisco’s downtown real estate. It is considered by many admirers to be the most impressive building in the city. Inside, it features a large rotunda with a grandiose staircase leading up to the second floor. The walls are adorned with oak paneling and the ceilings with crystal chandeliers. In 1954 Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe wed here. Price: Tours: Self guided and docent led tours are free unless you’re a private group of eight or more persons. ■Federal Office Building, 50 United Nations Plaza, just north of Market St, between Hyde St and Leavenworth St. Architect, Arthur Brown Jr., who also designed City Hall and several other Civic Center landmarks, designed this building. It was completed in 1936 making it the last building to be completed in the seven-building complex of the Civic Center. It is an interesting six story, D-shaped, “Beaux Arts” building. It also has a 24,000 square-foot interior courtyard and many of its features such as the lobby and main stairway are subject to historical preservation laws. Unfortunately, the building is currently closed and can only be appreciated from the outside. Price: Free. ■San Francisco Public Library - Main Library, 100 Larkin St, at Grove St, Phone: +1 415 557-4400, webmail@sfpl. org, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: T-Th 9AM-8PM, F-Sa noon6PM, Su noon-5PM, M 10AM-6PM; Tour Hours: Offered on the first Tuesday of every month at noon. Completed in 1995 at a cost of $109 million, the main library branch is over 375,000 square feet of modern architecture. It has seven floors, over 2,000 seats, and an impressive foyer that has a five story high atrium. At the top of the atrium is a bright sky-light and a roof terrace. Price: Internet: Free Tours: Free.

Do ■Dashiell Hammett Walking Tour, 100 Larkin St, n.w. corner of the new main library, Phone: +1 510 287-9540, dashdude@donherron.com, http://www.donherron.com/ tour.html, Hours: May and Oct: Su noon-4PM. If you’re a fan of mystery books, film, or would just like to recapture what

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San Francisco was like in the 1920s and 1930s; then you’ll love this tour. It takes you round all the places where Hammett wrote his famous books. It also visits the exact locales where his famous characters like Continental Op and Sam Spade got into their storied adventures. The tour is about 4 hours long. Price: $10. ■Glide Memorial Church, 330 Ellis St, between Taylor St and Jones St, Phone: +1 415 674-6000, info@glide.org, http://www.glide.org/, Hours: M 7AM-2:30AM, Tu,Th 7AM11:45PM, W,F 7AM-11PM, Sa-Su 7AM-1:30PM. Famous for its gospel music, as well as for its inner-city missions. The church is a pillar of this community and plays a vital role in Tenderloin day-to-day life; anyone truly trying to understand the area should visit here. Sunday services are a major musical event attracting crowds, and yes, even long lines to get in! Price: Free. ■Heart of the City Farmer. The farmer’s market held Sundays and Wednesdays offers a less expensive alternative to the yuppie Ferry Building Farmer’s Market, though it helps if you’re seeking the ingredients for Asian food. On other days, there are often tents with vendors selling jewelry, scarves, clothing, snacks, house wares, and who-knowswhat. The fun is in the surprises. ■St. Boniface, 133 Golden Gate Ave, just off Jones St, Phone: +1 415 863-7515, stbonifacesf@aol.com, Fax: +1 415 863-7602, http://www.saintbonifacesf.org/. The Catholic church features its original elaborately decorated interior from 1900, so why not come in and say a prayer! A Franciscan parish, it is also known for allowing the homeless to sleep in the pews on weekdays. Price: Free. ■San Francisco City Guides, Main Library, 100 Larkin St, at Market St, Phone: +1 415 557-4266, tours@sfcityguides. org, http://www.sfcityguides.org, Hours: Tours are offered year round, times and dates vary by tour - see website for schedule. They offer walking tours of the Civic Center, the Tenderloin, the main library, and City Hall, free of charge.

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The tours highlight the history, architecture, culture, events, and folklore of the area. Price: Free.

Performing arts

■Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall — take it away, maestro! The Civic Center is the center of opera, ballet, symphony, and theater in the city. Even if one hasn’t bought a ticket in advance, there are often returned tickets available at the box offices before a performance. Make a night of it when you are here; take a walk around the Civic Center, enjoy the architecture, sit for dinner, or just have a cappuccino in one of the cafes before the overture.

■The Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, 99 Grove St, between Dr. Carlton B Goodlett Pl and Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 974-4060, Fax: +1 415 974-4073, http://www.billgrahamcivic.com/, Hours: The auditorium is not open to visitors or for tours, but only during event times which vary. This four story tall, “Beaux-Arts” style building occupies an entire city block in the heart of the Civic Center and has 7,000 seats inside. Large and small bands, exhibits, concerts, and galas are all hosted at the Civic Auditorium. Check Ticket-

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master to see what’s playing. Price: Price varies depending on act. ■EXIT Theatre, 156 Eddy St, between Mason St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 673-3847, mail@sffringe.org, Fax: +1 415 931 2699, http://www.sffringe.org/, Hours: See website for exact hours. EXIT Theatre is a no-frills experimental/alternative theater in the Tenderloin. There are two performance spaces inside: Exit Theatre and Exit Stage Left; they have another theater “EXIT on Taylor” which is located at 277 Taylor St. They host productions like “Waiting for FEMA” and “Babylon Heights” by Irvine Welsh. They also host the Fringe Festival (listed under Events and festivals below), which is the largest grass roots theater festival in the San Francisco Bay Area. Price: $6-$9. ■Great American Music Hall, 859 O’Farrell St, between Larkin St and Polk St, Phone: +1 415 885-0750, info@gamh. com, Fax: +1 415 885-5075, http://www.gamh.com, Hours: Shows: Hours Vary Box Office: M-F 10:30AM-6PM, Show Nights 10:30AM-9PM, Closed Sa-Su (except during shows opens 1 hour before show time). Reputed to be the city’s oldest nightclub, this ornate 600 capacity music venue presents hip music acts, some well-known among the cognoscenti, some so cutting edge that there’s blood on the pavement. In the 1930s, this was fan-dancer Sally Rand’s “Music Box.” The interior, which was designed by a French architect, is known for its ornate balconies and columns. Price: Ticket prices vary by act but typically run from $10$30. ■Last Planet Theatre, 351 Turk St, between Hyde St and Leavenworth St, Phone: +1 415 440-3505, http://www.lastplanettheatre.com/, Hours: See website for performance dates/times. Producing what they call “dream plays,” the Last Planet Theater is a niche experimental theater that eschews the conventions of mainstream theater. Price: About $18. ■The New Conservatory Theatre Center, 25 Van Ness Ave, half a block from Market St and the Van Ness MUNI station, Phone: +1 415 861-8972, boxoffice@nctcsf.org, http:// www.nctcsf.org, Hours: Box Office Hours: W-Sa 1:30PM7PM, Su-Tu noon-3PM Show Times: Performances are typi-

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cally W-Sa 8PM, Su 2PM, year round. The three small New Conservatory theaters present novel, musical, comic, and educational plays. Price: Tickets generally cost $18-$40. ■Phoenix Theater, 414 Mason St, Suite 601, at Geary St, Phone: +1 415 861-8972, lbaf23@aol.com, Fax: +1 415 6645001, http://www.phoenixtheatresf.org/, Hours: See website for performance dates/times. The Phoenix is a small theater that showcases the work of local and international playwrights. Price: About $25. ■San Francisco War Memorial and Performing Arts Center, 401 Van Ness Ave, Room 110, between Grove St and McAllister St, Phone: +1 415 621-6600, info@sfwmpac. org, Fax: +1 415 621-5091, http://sfwmpac.org/, Hours: Tour hours: M 10AM-2PM — on the hour. This 7.5 acre complex comprises the War Memorial Opera House, Memorial Court, the War Memorial Veterans Building (including Herbst Theatre and the Green Room — which is a classically styled reception hall), the Harold L. Zellerbach Rehearsal Hall, and Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall. The opera house and the veterans buildings (which are for the most part identical), along with the court, were intended to be appreciated in unison, and to compliment the surrounding architecture of the Civic Center. Their “Beaux-Arts” structures employ the Roman Doric Order and were designed by architect Arthur Brown, Jr. Both buildings were completed in 1932. Guided tours of the buildings are available. Price: Free.

■Herbst Theater, War Memorial Veterans Building, 401 Van Ness Ave, at McAllister St, Phone: +1 415 392-4400, info@ performances.org, Fax: +1 415 986-0411, http://sfwmpac. org/herbst/ht_index.html, Hours: Box office: Opens 1.5 hours prior to performance. Herbst Theater, next to the Opera house in the similarly-styled War Memorial Veteran’s building is host to a wide variety of activities. One can find plays, readings by well-known authors, chamber music, jazz performances, etc throughout the year. The monthly Friday evening talks of the Long-now Foundation, projecting the far future, are presented here or in the Fort Mason Cen-

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ter. Inside the theater it has impressive foyer, chandeliers, beaux-arts murals (symbolism for the different aspects of mankind), and over 900 seats. The UN Charter was signed here in 1945. Price: Adult: $18-$81 Child: $10.

■San Francisco Ballet, War Memorial Opera House, 301 Van Ness Ave, at Grove St, Phone: +1 415 861-5600, sfbmail@ sfballet.info, Fax: +1 415 865-0740, http://www.sfballet.org, Hours: Box Office: M-F 10AM-4PM (10AM until start of performance on performance dates Performances: T-Su usually 8PM or 7:30PM with Sa-Su matinee 2PM. The repertory season begins in January and continues through May. Price: $18-$250.

■War Memorial Opera House

■San Francisco Opera, War Memorial Opera House, 301 Van Ness Ave, at Grove St, Phone: +1 415 864-3330, Fax: +1 415 626-1729, http://www.sfopera.com/, Hours: Box Office: M 10AM-5PM, Tu-F 10AM-6PM Performances: Tu-F usually 7:30PM or 8PM, Sa 12:30PM or 8PM, Su 1PM, 2PM, or 3PM.

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See website for exact schedule. There are Fall, Spring, and Summer seasons. The summer season focuses on lighter and popular operas. Performances are in the War Memorial Opera House on Van Ness Ave which has over 3,000 seats. The interior has a grandiose entrance hall with marble floors and a 38 foot high barrel vaulted ceiling. Two wide marble stairways at either end of the foyer, take you up to the main floor. The proscenium arch inside the theater is ornately decorated with gilded sculptures. In December and late spring the Opera House is used by the San Francisco Ballet. Price: $15-$290.

■San Francisco Symphony, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, 201 Van Ness Ave, at Grove St and Van Ness Ave, Phone: +1 415 864-6000, info@sfsymphony.org, Fax: +1 415 554-0108, http://www.sfsymphony.org/, Hours: Box Office: M-F 10AM-6PM, Sa noon-6PM Performances: W-Su usually 8PM or 8:30PM with Sa-Su matinee 2PM, See website for exact schedule. San Francisco has an excellent symphony orchestra, with Michael Tilson Thomas (MTT) as the principal conductor. The Season goes from September to April, with a break in the middle of December and January. When the San Francisco Symphony is on tour, other orchestras visit to fill the void. In July there is a “Summer in the City” program of light music; August is quiet. Opened in 1980, the building’s sweeping wraparound architecture was elegantly designed to compliment the other buildings in the War Memorial complex. Inside, the building was designed to maximize acoustical tones with the exterior glass wall being used as a backdrop to capture sound. To further enhance and refine the sound it has adjustable acrylic acoustical panels around the stage area. There are circa 2,700 seats inside. Price: $10-$50.

■SHN, 1192 Market St, at McAllister St, Phone: +1 415 551-2000 (recorded information) or +1 415 551-2075, feedback@shnsf.

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com, Fax: +1 415 431-5052, http://www.shnsf.com/index.asp, Hours: Show times: vary Box office hours: vary, See website for details. SHN runs three theaters in the area that focus on the usual Broadway classics like A Chorus Line, Grease, and of course The Phantom of the Opera. Price: $25-$99.

■Curran Theater, 445 Geary St, between Taylor St and Mason St, http://www.shnsf.com/theatres/index.asp?key=44. Built in 1922, this theater was designed by architect Alfred Henry Jacobs. It has a very ornate and well-maintained interior featuring chandeliers and an intricately hand-painted ceilings. ■Golden Gate Theater, 1 Taylor St, at Golden Gate Ave, http://www.shnsf.com/theatres/index.asp?key=48. Built in 1920 and influenced by the “Art Deco” and “Gothic Revival” styles, this theater has over 2,800 seats. It was designed by architect Gustave Albert Lansburgh.

■The Orpheum Theater, 1192 Market St, at McAllister St, http://www.shnsf.com/theatres/index.asp?key=52. Over 80 years old, this official historical landmark theater received a another facelift in 1998; it now has over 2,400 seats. The theater has hosted everything from silent films to Broadway theater, and special shows such as “Late Night with Conan O’Brien.” It is modeled in the style of a 12th century Spanish Cathedral, being heavily influenced by both “Spanish Moorish” and “Spanish Baroque” architecture. It has ornate architectural detailing inside and was designed by architect Benjamin Marcus Priteca.

■Warfield Theater, 982 Market St, between Mason St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 567-2060, Hours: Hours vary but

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shows usually start at 8PM. This historic theater on Market St has a balcony and approximately 2,700 seats. Built in the 1920s, it was renovated in 1969 and today it is as popular as ever hosting some major acts like Velvet Revolver and Bill Maher. Price: Prices vary depending on act.

Events and festivals ■Black and White Ball, Civic Center Plaza, Phone: +1 415 864-6000, Fax: fax. If you have the budget, why not “hobnob” at San Francisco’s classiest party. Taking up four entire blocks of the Civic Center, this ball attracts a well-heeled crowd, as well as those who who are just splurging. The ball began in 1956 and features several high profile bands (the Grateful Dead played here in 1969), and includes a performance by the San Francisco Symphony orchestra. $200 gets you in the door, feeds you, and lets you enjoy the music, dancing, and entertainment. If you want to formally dine at the Patrons Dinner, you’ll have to shell out a lot more. ■Fringe Festival, 156 Eddy St, between Taylor St and Mason St, Phone: phone. This bohemian 10 day festival is all about theatrical experimentation and having fun... even if you don’t know what you’re doing exactly. Chaos rules here; even the list of performers are selected randomly at the last minute and participants are effectively given “carte blanche” to be as artistically free as possible. This leads to a lot of wackiness and of course a healthy dose of good old nudity! It takes place in several theaters but it is run by the EXIT Theater in the Tenderloin. ■San Francisco Pride Festival, All streets between Van Ness Ave, Market St, Golden Gate Ave, and Hayes St, Phone: +1 415 864-3733, info@sfpride.org, Fax: +1 415 864-5889, http://www.sfpride.org/, Hours: Final full weekend in June: Sa noon-6PM, Su noon-7PM. Known as “San Francisco Pride” for short, it’s one of the largest gay pride festivals in North America, a huge, happy, chaotic celebration of diversity, politics, sexuality, and San Francisco wackiness. The two day festival grew up around the parade (below) which takes place on Sunday. Some seven city blocks between City

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Hall and Market St are closed to vehicles, and about a dozen stages and spaces offer everything from square dancing to hip-hop, from a family garden to Leather Alley. Hundreds of businesses, community groups, non-profits, and political groups attempt to connect with hundreds of thousands of celebrants. It’s a movement, it’s a market, and it’s a party. Car and bus traffic is interrupted during the celebration, and parking is even worse than usual; take BART or Muni trains (which run underground, and put on extra cars to carry the load) instead. Both parade and celebration are for everyone — straight as well as gay are welcome. Price: Free (donations encouraged).

■San Francisco Pride Parade, Along Market St from Beale St to 8th St, Phone: +1 415 864-3733, info@sfpride.org, Fax: +1 415 864-5889, http://www.sfpride.org/, Hours: Final full weekend in June: Su only 10AM-2PM (approx). San Francisco’s annual “Gay Pride Parade” long ago grew into a twoday “Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Pride Celebration” (see above). The parade itself, which takes place on the Sunday, features over a hundred contingents, and takes over four hours from start to finish. Hundreds of thousands of people line the parade route to watch. If you want a good spot, arrive two hours before the 10AM start, and set up closer to Beale St than the Civic Center. Be careful about climbing on bus shelters, scaffolding, or light poles to get a better view: people do fall and injure themselves. The only thing better than watching the parade is marching in it. If you can make contact in advance, you likely can find some contingent with affinity which will welcome you. Price: Free.

■Tet Festival, Larkin St and Ellis St, Phone: +1 415 351-1038, info@vietccsf.org, Fax: +1 415 351-1039, http://vietccsf.org/ viet/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&amp ;id=68&Itemid=111, Hours: Mid-January to mid-February 9:30AM–6PM. Celebrate New Year’s Vietnamese style at this festival. It attracts almost 30,000 each year to the area.

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It’s mostly Vietnamese-Americans in attendance, but everyone is welcome and it’s a great opportunity to sample some of the delicious Vietnamese dishes that they have in the Tenderloin, and of course to throw around some “luckymoney.” Price: Free.

Buy There are very few chain stores here and limited shopping opportunities. This has probably got more to do with socioeconomic reasons than anything else. If you are looking for your more recognizable stores try its glamorous neighbor Union Square, and on the other side of Market St in the SoMa neighborhood, you’ll find plenty of large shopping malls. What this area does have however, is a varied collection of smaller esoteric stores.

■Karma Culture, 682 Geary St, between Jones St and Leavenworth St, Phone: +1 415 674-9600. A small family owned Thai store that focuses on women’s apparel, gifts and varied knickknacks. Reasonable prices and accommodating staff — sometimes you get to pick a free gift on the way out... like a small purse, incense or candles. ■Kayo Books, 814 Post St, at Leavenworth St, Phone: +1 415 749-0554, kayo@kayobooks.com, http://www.kayobooks. com/, Hours: Th-Sa 11AM-6PM. “Specializing in vintage collectible paperbacks from the 1940s to 1970s and esoteric books of all persuasions... ” They have a large stock of rare and out of print books, many of which are of the lurid and sleazy persuasion. ■Napa Valley Winery Exchange, 415 Taylor St, between Geary St and O’Farrell St, Phone: +1 415 771-2887, wine@ nvwe.com, Fax: +1 415 441-9463, http://www.nvwe.com/, Hours: M-Sa 10AM-7PM, Su 10AM-5PM. Well known wine store featuring hard to get and small production wines. ■San Francisco Antique and Artisans Market, United Nations Plaza, at Market St, Phone: +1 415 255-1923, reser-

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vations@sfanamkt.com, http://sfanamkt.com/index.html, Hours: M, Th, and F 8AM-6PM. Three times a week, over 100 vendors come together to sell antiques, gifts, and keepsakes from all over the world. Appropriately the market is held at UN Plaza. ■San Francisco Art Exchange, 458 Geary St, between Taylor and Mason St, Phone: +1 415 4418840, info@sfae.com, Fax: +1 415 673-3697, http://www.sfae.com/, Hours: Su-W 10AM-6PM, Th-Sa 9AM-10PM. This is a gallery for those interested in rock paintings and photographs, and they also sport a large Beatles collection and paintings by Ronnie Wood and Alberto Vargas. A must for music enthusiasts, if you have the budget. Price: Prices are high, with most pieces over $1,000 dollars. ■Shooting Gallery, 839 Larkin St, between Geary St and Myrtle St, Phone: +1 415 931-8035, http://www.shootinggallerysf.com/, Hours: Tu-Sa noon-7PM. Accessible and real art gallery. On it white-washed walls it features its latest raw art — “Low Brow” (school/gutter-punk art) and also erotic art. ■Space Gallery, 1141 Polk St, between Hemlock St and Sutter St, Phone: +1 415 377-3325, info@spacegallerysf.com, http:// www.spacegallerysf.com, Hours: M-Sa 4PM-2AM. Two story art gallery that has a full bar serving wine, beer and cocktails. This place is super-hip — they even serve 40oz bottles of Olde English Malt Liquor!

Eat Given the sometimes grittiness of the area, much of the food is very affordable. Vietnamese, Thai, and Indian restaurants are well represented in the Tenderloin. One of the best options for a cheap lunch is picking up a “Vietnamese sandwich” from any of a number of corner delis in the area (they’re packed especially thick along Larkin St). For about $2.50 you can expect to get a generous helping of your choice of meat and shredded vegetables sandwiched into a quarter of a baguette and dressed with a thin, tangy sweet and sour sauce. Be sure to bring cash, as these places don’t take any credit cards. There is actually a decent selection of

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restaurants in the area, but if you are not satisfied, there are many other excellent eateries just west of the Civic Center, around Hayes St, and northeast of the Tenderloin around Chinatown and North Beach. Generally speaking, for midrange to high-end restaurants in the area seating is easier around 8PM, when opera and symphony patrons depart.

Mid-range ■Bodega Bistro, 607 Larkin St, at Eddy St, Phone: +1 415 211218, Fax: +1 415 921-1216, http://www.bodegabistrosf.com/, Hours: Lunch: 11AM-3PM daily, Dinner: Su-W 5PM-9:30PM daily, Th-Sa 5PM-10PM daily. In Vietnamese Bo-de-ga in Vietnamese means beef-lamb-chicken — all popular Vietnamese dishes. The menu also draws equal inspiration from French cuisine making this an unusual dining experience. Price: $8-$23. ■Kim Thanh, 607 Geary St, at Jones St, Phone: +1 415 9286627, Fax: +1 415 928-7821, Hours: M-F 11AM-11PM, Sa-Su 5PM-11PM. Check out the aquariums in the window if you want to know what’s for dinner. If you’ve never seen a geoduck, you will not soon forget it. Price: $7-$12. ■Kyoto Sushi, 1233 Van Ness Ave, at Post St, Phone: +1 415 351-1234, http://www.kyotosushi-sf.com/, Hours: M-Th 11AM-10:30PM, F 11AM-11PM, Sa 11:30AM-11PM, Su 4:30PM10:30PM. With the multitude of sushi places it is hard to say which is best, but this one rates at the top for taste, freshness, and authenticity. Price: $11-$23. ■Maharani, 1122 Post St, between Van Ness Ave and Polk St, Phone: +1 415 775-1988, info@maharanirestaurant.com, Fax: +1 415 775-1640, http://maharanirestaurant.com/, Hours: Su-Th 5PM-9:45PM, F-Sa 5PM-10:15PM. Four star Indian restaurant with great food and a romantic rear hideout. Price: $8-$22. ■Original Joe’s, 144 Taylor St, between Turk and Eddy St, Phone: +1 415 775-4877, http://www.originaljoessf.com/, Hours: 10:30AM-1:30AM daily. $4 well drinks)” lat=”” long=”” email=”info@originaljoessf.com” fax=”+1 415 775-0435”>Joe’s is a local institution, a Rat Pack dream of an Italian restau-

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rant. The after-hours haunt of the theatrical and musical set in the 1950s and 1960s, Joe’s fortunes fell with those of the surrounding neighborhood, and it’s considerably frayed at the cuffs now. But the owner and staff maintain dignity through adversity — all the waiters wear tuxedos and are delightfully polite and thoughtful — and the tasty food in generous portions is probably the best meal you can find after midnight in SF, bar none. Reasonable prices, great service, oh-so-cool atmosphere — don’t miss Joe’s if you can. Unfortunately, in 2007, it closed due to a kitchen fire, and there are no plans to re-open. Price: $10-$15 ($4 well drinks). ■Vietnam II, 701 Larkin St, between O’Farrell St and Ellis St, Phone: +1 415 885-1274, Hours: 9AM-11PM daily. pho)$16.95 (fresh lobster)” lat=”” long=”” email=”” fax=”“>At any number of eateries around the ‘Loin, you can order pho, the Vietnamese beef and noodle soup that’s correctly written with some curly bits over the “o,” and correctly pronounced somewhere between “phuh” and “phah.” It will always cost about five dollars; it will always come with your choice of meat (slices of rare beef, well-done brisket, tripe, tendon, and meatballs are the most common) simmering in a clear, pungent broth along with a tangle of thin rice noodles; it will always be accompanied by a heap of mung bean sprouts, leafy basil and mint stalks, lime wedges, and slices of chili pepper; and it will always be served in bowls ranging from merely large to mind-bogglingly enormous. But only at Vietnam II will you enjoy your pho while gazing upon an indoor koi pond, and browsing through a vast menu of other delicacies. Everything from deep fried quail to pig intestine porridge is available to the adventurous, along with Chinese standards like lo mein and fried rice. Price: $4.95 (pho)-$16.95 (fresh lobster).

Splurge

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■Bistro Clovis, 1596. Delivers a authentic feeling inside and outside with the historic streetcars clanking on Market St. Affordable, friendly service. ■California Culinary Academy, 625 Polk St, at Turk St, Phone: +1 415 771-3500, icano@caculinary.edu, http:// www.baychef.com/about_restaurants_catering.asp, Hours: Lunch Dinner: Tu 11:30AM-1PM, 6PM-8PM, W 11:30AM-1PM 6PM-8PM, Th 11:30AM-1PM 6PM-8PM, Fr 11:30AM-1PM 6PM8PM. Dining in the Careme room allows you to see what goes into your Cordon Bleu dinner. Requires reservations. The Grill serves simple dishes, prepared by the fresh men class. Price: $31-$50. ■Canto do Brazil, 41 Franklin St, at Oak St, Phone: +1 415 626-8727, http://www.cantodobrazilrestaurant.com/, Hours: M-Sa 11AM-3PM, Su-Th 5PM-9PM, F-Sa 5PM-10PM. Traditional Brazilian food, very affordable, but mixed reviews on service. Price: Dinner: $14-$21. ■First Crush Restaurant Wine Bar and Lounge, 101 Cyril Magnin St, at Ellis St, Phone: +1 415 982-7874, shahram@ firstcrush.com, Fax: +1 415 982-7800, http://www.firstcrush. com/, Hours: Su-W 5PM-11PM, Th-Sa 5PM-midnight. If you like romantic restaurants and have also fallen in love with California — well this is the place for you. Popular with couples, this restaurant serves up modern Californian and American cuisine and they’ve a HUGE selection of Cal wines to wash it down with. Price: $20-$30. ■Fleur De Lys, 777 Sutter St, between Taylor St and Jones St, Phone: +1 415 673-7779, Fax: +1 415 673-4619, http://www. fleurdelyssf.com/, Hours: M-Th 6PM-9:30PM, F-Sa 5:30PM10:30PM. This windowless Michelin Star restaurant is one of the finest formal French restaurants in the US and it frequently wins awards. The service is excellent and the food exceptional. They have a “prix-fixe” menu and over 700 wines to choose from. Price: $72-$170. ■Grand Cafe Brasserie and Bar, 501 Geary St, at Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 292-0101, frank.micalizzi@grandcafe-sf.com, Fax: +1 415 292-0150, http://www.grandcafe-sf.com/, Hours: Breakfast: M-F 7AM-10:30AM, Brunch: Sa 8AM-2:30PM, Su 9AM-2:30PM, Lunch: M-F 11:30AM-2:30PM, Dinner: Su-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-11PM. With 30-foot high ceilings

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supported by pillars, sunken tables, sculptures, and artwork adorning the walls, it’s not hard to see that this place was once an elegant ballroom. Today it’s an elegant dining room where they serve excellent French cuisine. Price: $30-$100. ■La Jardiniere, 300 Grove St, at Grove St and Franklin St, Phone: +1 415 861-5555, info@jardiniere.com, Fax: +1 415 861-5580, http://www.jardiniere.com, Hours: Dinner: Su-W 5PM-10:30PM, Th-Sa 5PM-11:30PM, hours are extended to accommodate neighborhood performances. French food in American style, quite pricey, great decor, appetizers, deserts, mixed reviews on entrees. They have both an “a la carte” and a “prix-fixe” menu. Price: $50-$150. ■Market Street Grill, 1231 Market St, between 8th St and 9th St, Phone: +1 415 487-4414, ajones@hotelwhitcomb. com, Fax: +1 415 861-1460, http://www.marketstreetgrillsf. com/main/msg-home.asp?p=1, Hours: Breakfast; 6:30AM11AM daily, Lunch; 11AM-2PM daily, Dinner; 5PM-10PM daily. Serves up Asian and Italian inspired dishes using fresh American ingredients, in an ornately decorated dining room. They also have live piano playing most nights of the week. Price: $18-$40. ■Max’s Opera Cafe, 601 Van Ness Ave, Golden Gate Ave - in Opera Plaza, Phone: +1 415 771-7300, MaxsOperaSF@maxsworld.com, Fax: +1 415 474-9780, http://www.maxsworld. com/, Hours: Su-Tu 11:30AM-10PM, W 11:30AM-11PM, Th-Sa 11:30AM-11:30PM. The California version of a New York deli. Price: Dinner $15-$25. ■Millennium Restaurant, 580 Geary St, at Jones St, Phone: +1 415 345-3900, Fax: +1 415 345-3941, http://www.millenniumrestaurant.com/, Hours: M-Th 5:30PM-9:30PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-10PM, Su 5:30PM-9:30PM. This is an environmentally friendly vegetarian/vegan restaurant that does its best to source local, organic and non-genetically modified food. If you’re one of those people who think veggies can’t

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be tasty... you need to go here, the food is delicious — very pricey — but delicious! Price: $30-$75.

Drink

■Tenderloin nightlife These days the Tenderloin is on the “up-and-up,” and with this urban gentrification has come a surprisingly eclectic and artistic nightlife scene. It now has a decent selection of trendy lounges and hip clubs, as well the musical venues (many of which are listed under Performing arts above), strip-clubs, and “dive bars” that were the more traditional staples of the area. In fact, many of the modern “faux-dive” and “dive bars” used to be illegal speakeasies during the prohibition era of the 1920s. Given the areas long and storied association with the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender community (the “Polk Gulch” was the city’s first openly Gay neighborhood, before the emergence of the Castro in the 1970s), many of the bars, clubs, and entertainment are geared toward this crowd, although typically everyone is welcome.

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Bars ■21 Club, 98 Turk St, at Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 771-9655, Hours: 10AM-2AM daily. Old time dive bar that has been around since the time the neighborhood was full of sailors. They have a HUGE window that overlooks the Turk/Taylor intersection, and it probably delivers more entertainment than any TV you’ll ever buy, showing all kinds of Tenderloin action going down; like prostitutes milling about, ambulances flying around, and Vietnam Vets just looking for a break. They serve cheap drinks and the patrons range from surly full time alcoholics, to friendlier neighborhood personalities... but hey that’s the ‘Loin! ■Bambuddha Lounge, 601 Eddy St, at Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 885-5088, Fax: +1 415 885-5090, http://www.bambuddhalounge.com/, Hours: Tu-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM2AM. The first thing that draws your eye in this place is a 20 foot-long retractable Buddha atop the roof. The decor inside is pan-Asian, as is the menu and the exotic cocktails that they serve like “Thai-My” and “Temptation Island”. This Tenderloin locale has become one of the ultra-hip places to be seen at in the city — especially on the weekends. ■Blur, 1121 Polk St, at Hemlock St, Phone: +1 415 567-1918, info@blursf.com, http://www.blursf.com/, Hours: 4PM-2PM daily. Upscale, lush, candlelit bar in the Polk Gulch. It’s dark and romantic and they have a good selection of cocktails... try the strawberry margarita. They also have free pizza on Monday nights. ■Bourbon and Branch, 501 Jones St, O’Farrell St, Phone: +1 415 673-1921, http://www.bourbonandbranch.com/, Hours: M-Sa 6PM-2AM. This hard to find cocktail/spirit themed bar is a throwback to the prohibition days of the 1920s — this address used to be an thriving illegal “speakeasy” known as the “JJ Russell’s Cigar Shop.” Inside it’s ornately decorated with dark woods giving the place a real cozy feel. It being a prohibition themed bar, they also have some strange house rules posted on the walls like “no photography” and

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“Please speak easy” They have an exhaustive selection of spirits and cocktails. ■The Brown Jug, 496 Eddy St, at Hyde St, Phone: +1 415 4418404, Hours: 6AM-2AM daily. Another classic dive-bar in the ‘Loin. Again, a friendly atmosphere permeates throughout, and it’s got its own set of die-hard locals who come down for a bit of fun and some cheap booze. It has an internet juke box and a small pool table to liven things up. ■Deco Lounge, 510 Larkin St, at Turk St, Phone: +1 415 3462025, decolounge@covad.net, http://www.decosf.com/, Hours: Su-Th 10AM-2AM, F-Sa 10AM-4AM. Deco lounge is a gay bar in the Tenderloin that has three floors. It’s close to the Civic Center and a good place to go if you’re in town to see the Pride celebrations. ■Edinburgh Castle, 950 Geary St, at Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 885-4074, http://www.castlenews.com/, Hours: 5PM-2AM daily. Expatriates from the British Isles are often to be found at this Scottish pub, which on Thursdays through Saturdays becomes a hipster mecca. The interior is warm and shadowy, a comfortable place of dark wood and golden lantern light, and the beer selection is good; you can get pints of Belhaven or Newcastle as well as the ubiquitous Guinness, and it’s all available by the pitcher. The Edinburgh Castle also has a relationship with a local fish and chips fryer, so you can order from their menu and have it delivered to you at the pub. The jukebox is well stocked with punk rock, Irish folk/rock, and American roots music, and live bands also play regularly (which can unfortunately make it impossible to carry on a conversation). A trivia contest is held on Tuesday nights. And on Burns Night ( January 25th), the Edinburgh Castle is the place to be, with ribald poetry readings, music, and a public haggis. ■The Gangway, 841 Larkin St, at Geary Boulevard, Phone: +1 415 776-6828, Hours: 6AM-2PM daily. This nautically-themed dive bar is home to a group of chatty regulars, mostly gay middle-aged men, who are friendly to newcomers of any age, gender, or sexual orientation. Many of them have lived

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in San Francisco for decades, and they have great stories. Price: $2.50 domestic beer, $3.50 well drinks. ■Hanaro, 939 Geary St, at Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 928-4066, Hours: noon-2AM daily. Just across from the Edinburgh Castle is a shadowy hole-in-the-wall festooned with Korean lettering: Hanaro. Though the bar is wallpapered with “No Smoking” signs (as California law demands), you need only loiter outside the bar for a few minutes with a cigarette before you are beckoned inside and offered an ashtray. In fact, Hanaro’s great charm is it that it’s accommodating in every respect; stay for a bit and you will be offered various bar snacks, and there is usually a hostess on hand whose only job is to chat with the patrons. This is done, however, with taste and tact; if you wish to drink in silence, you won’t be disturbed. The jukebox is stocked with Asian pop singles. ■Ha-Ra Club, 875 Geary St, at Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 6733148, Fax: +1 415 564-0149, Hours: 9:30AM-2AM daily. Standard, but friendly dive-bar in the Tenderloin that serves cheap drinks. It was co-founded by pro-wrestler Hank Hanastead and boxer Ralph Figari. Great place if you into the ‘Loin’s no nonsense dive bars. ■Hemlock Tavern, 1131 Polk St, at Sutter St, Phone: +1 415 923-0923, tony@hemlocktavern.com, http://www.hemlocktavern.com/index.php, Hours: 4PM-2AM daily. Situated in the area known as the “Polk Gulch,” this ever entertaining little rocker bar has a music room in the back where rock-and-roll bands play. It’s nicely decorated wooden interior makes it feel cozy and inviting and they also have a heated smoking lounge. Price: Bar: Free, Music Room: Cover charge varies. ■The Lush Lounge, 1092 Post St, at Polk St, Phone: +1 415 7712022, info@thelushlounge.com, http://www.thelushlounge. com/, Hours: 4PM-2AM daily. This brightly appointed, fashionable cocktail lounge is adorned with witty quotations from the likes of Dorothy Parker, and sometimes features live piano music courtesy of Spencer Day Spencer Day. The clientele is diverse, but skews towards young, hip gay men, tourists, and girls from Pacific Heights who come down in the hill in groups to “slum” around the ‘Loin. The specials of the day are usually cheap, sweet, and highly alcoholic. Like

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many of the bars in the lower Polk Gulch it attracts a lot of transgender and gay people. ■The Nite Cap, 699 O’Farrell St, between Ada Ct and Hyde St, Phone: +1 415 931-9508, Hours: M-F 10:30AM-2:00AM, SaSu 6AM-2AM. If you are looking for an authentic Tenderloin dive bar experience with cheap drinks, questionable drinking partners, scarey looking bar snacks, in a “no-frills” environment — bingo, the Nite Cap is your thing! ■Olive SF, 743 Larkin St, between O’Farrell St and Ellis St, Phone: +1 415 776-9814, unwind@olive-sf.com, http://www. olive-sf.com/, Hours: M-Tu 5PM-10PM, W 5PM-11PM, Th 5PM-noon, F 5PM-2AM, Sa 6PM-2AM. Stylish cocktail bar in the Tenderloin. It has reasonably priced drinks and food (pizza,tapas and the like) in an informal yet trendy atmosphere. Not surprisingly they specialize in martinis, like the “Ultimate Olive Martini” ■The Owl Tree, 601 Post St, between Taylor St and Trader Vic Aly, Phone: +1 415 776-9344, http://www.theowltree.com, Hours: 5PM-2AM daily. A small, quiet upscale bar that’s great for conversation and relaxation after a long day of wandering around San Francisco. What used to be a dive bar with walls adorned with tacky owl memorabilia, is now another upscale watering hole in the ‘Loin, where cocktails have replaced draft beers as the drink of preference. There’s still a mosaic owl on the outside though, so don’t worry! ■Rickshaw Stop, 155 Fell St, at Van Ness Ave, Phone: +1 415 861-2011, keeptherubbersidedown@rickshawstop.com, http://rickshawstop.com/, Hours: W-Th 5PM-midnight, F-Sa 5PM-2AM. This funky little place has a few rickshaws lying about the place and invariably some couples are making out on them by the end of the night! They have some good regular DJs as well as featuring new underground ones. Downstairs they have a small stage where they feature live bands. ■Vertigo Bar, 1160 Polk St, at Sutter St, Phone: +1 415 6741278, Hours: Tu-F 5PM-2AM, Sa 7PM-2AM. Fun and trendy bar in the Polk Gulch. It’s exotically decorated and attracts mostly partying twentysomethings looking to get enebriated on strange cocktails. They have DJs, dancin, a smoking

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patio, and are known for their lengthy happy hour which runs until 9PM.

Entertainment and clubs ■222 Club, 222 Hyde St, at Turk St, Phone: +1 415 440-0222, http://www.222club.net/, Hours: Tu-Sa 6PM-2AM. In the 50s and 60s this used to be a famous jazz club called the Blackhawk. Today it is a cutting edge underground venue with DJs and live music. The Blackhawk was actually at 200 Hyde St, which is now a parking lot. ■Aunt Charlie’s Lounge, 133 Turk St, between Jones St and Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 441-2922, auntcharlies@artludesign.com, http://www.auntcharlieslounge.com, Hours: M-Th noon-midnight, F noon-2AM, Sa 10AM-2AM, Su and Holidays 10AM-midnight. If you haven’t already guessed from the name, “Aunt Charlie’s” is a transvestite dive bar. It hosts a wide variety of adult-themed entertainment shows and drag shows that are popular with gays, lesbians, transsexuals, and indeed straight patrons. Cheap, stiff drinks accompanied by endearing, harmless, and vocal co-drinkers, provides for fantastic people-watching. ■Divas, 1081 Post St, at Polk St, Phone: +1 415 474-3482, steve@divassf.com, http://www.divassf.com/, Hours: 6AM2AM daily. This colorful transexual nightclub/bar has three floors of bars, drag shows, and erotic dancing. It attracts a lot of transgender people and that is what the shows predominantly showcase, but everyone is welcome. It advertises itself as “the premiere transgender nightclub on the West Coast.” ■Element Lounge, 1028 Geary Blvd, between Polk St and Van Ness Ave, Phone: +1 415 440-1125, reservations@elementlounge.com, http://www.elementlounge.com/concept. htm, Hours: W-Su 9PM-2AM. Progressive, upscale Tendernob Hip-Hop and dance club with a modern earthy decor. It features live music and DJs, and executive table service if you can afford it. Price: $10 cover. ■Mitchell Brothers O’Farrell Theater, 895 O’Farrell St, at Polk St, Phone: +1 415 776-1016, http://www.ofarrell.com,

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Hours: M-Sa 11:30AM-1:30AM, Su 5:30PM-1:30AM. Tourists have flocked here for live, nude girls and dirty movies since 1971, when porn star Marilyn Chambers followed her performance in a Mitchell Brothers’ film by becoming an Ivory Snow model. The venue is large, clean, and the biggest rip-off in adult entertainment this side of Paris. If possible, avoid this over-priced, over-hyped tourist trap for the Crazy Horse on Market (next to the Warfield) or any of the clubs on Broadway in North Beach. Price: $20 before 6PM, $40 after 6PM, girls demand large tips for anything more. ■Ruby Skye, 420 Mason St, between Geary St and Post St, Phone: +1 415 693-0777, Fax: +1 415 693-0373, http://www. rubyskye.com/, Hours: Th-Sa 7PM-4AM. Ruby Skye is one of the premiere clubs in the area and has become a “place to be seen.” Some of the top DJs in the world have played here including Paul van Dyke, Pete Tong, and Sasha. It’s 15,000 square feet of Hip-Hop, House, and Techno over multiple floors; one of the floors at the top has a private smoking lounge and cigar bar. Price: Free - $25. ■Suite one8one, 181 Eddy St, at Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 3459900, adam@suite181.com, Fax: +1 415 345-9969, http:// www.suite181.com/, Hours: F-Sa 9:30PM-4AM. Another large (16,000 sq feet), swanky nightclub in the heart of the gritty ‘Loin. This modern club has resident DJs that spin hiphop and house music. It definitely attracts a more upscale crowd and there is a strict dress code in effect... so if you’ve got sportswear on you probably won’t get in! Price: $20.

Coffee ■Soluna Cafe and Lounge, 272 McAllister St, at Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 621 2200, info@solunasf.com, http://www. solunasf.com/, Hours: M-F 11:30AM-10PM, Sa 5PM-10PM. Just a stones throw from the performing arts buildings it’s a great place to grab a cappuccino just before the overture. ■Starbucks, 1390 Market St, at Fell St, Phone: +1 415 522-1438, http://www.starbucks.com/, Hours: M-F 5AM-8:30PM, SaSu 6AM-8:30PM. Ubiquitous Starbucks set just behind the

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Civic Center Plaza, so another convenient place to enjoy a coffee pre or post performance.

Sleep Many “hotels” in the Tenderloin do their major business as single-room occupancy (S.R.O.) lodgings for permanent residents, many of whom live from welfare check to welfare check. These hotels also rent rooms to frightened-looking tourists lured by bargain rates “just off Union Square.” Both the rates and the location are true: the management merely neglected to mention the urine-stained mattresses or the drunk lurching in the lobby. Use caution: if a rate seems too good to be true, it probably is. There are more normal hotels in the area as well, ranging from large chains (Hilton) to tiny boutique hotels with fashionable decor and chi-chi prices. If you plan to park a car, scrutinize the hotel listing for parking information. Free parking is not a given, and at peak times, even paid garages overflow onto the sidewalks. There are also several backpacker’s hostels in this area, particularly on Taylor St that attract both backpackers and those traveling on a budget.

Budget ■Adelaide Hostel, 5 Isadora Duncan Lane, between Geary St and Post St, Phone: +1 415 359-1915, info@adelaidehostel. com, Fax: +1 415 614-1940, http://www.adelaidehostel.com/, Check In: 1PM, Check Out: 11 AM. This is a popular backpacker hostel just two blocks from Union Square. Price: Dorms: $23 and up, Private rooms: $60 and up. ■Hostelling International-City Center, 685 Ellis St, at Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 474-5721, Fax: +1 415 776-0775, http://sfhostels.com/city-center/features/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 11AM. Clean, cheap, safe, fun. The hostel has 75 beds in total, some are 4 or 5 bed dorms and others private rooms. All rooms have their own private bathroom. They

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offer a free breakfast and free wi-fi. Price: Dorms: $23-$30, Private Rooms: $82-$100. ■The Opal San Francisco, 1050 Van Ness Ave, between O’Farrell St and Geary St, Phone: phone. An elegant 5 story hotel that was built after the 1906 earthquake, it has 164 guest rooms. They have a gym, laundry facilities, and all access to free wi-fi. ■Rodeway Inn Civic Center, 860 Eddy St, between Franklin St and Van Ness Ave, Phone: phone. This is a pretty standard but comfortable inn near Van Ness. They offer some free limited parking and a complimentary breakfast. ■Taylor Hotel, 615 Taylor St, at Post St, Phone: 1 877-7346835 or +1 415-775-0780, info@sanfrancisco-budgethotel. com, http://www.sanfrancisco-budgethotel.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 10AM. This is an older building and the rooms are in need of paint, but it’s relatively clean. There is a nice Indian couple who runs the place, they have wireless internet and community computer in the lobby and a continental breakfast each morning. It’s just 2 blocks from Union Square, great location. Price: $66-$90. ■USA Hostels San Francisco, 711 Post St, between Jones St and Leavenworth St, Phone: +1 415 440-5600, sanfrancisco@usahostels.com, Fax: +1 415 651-8802, http://www. usahostels.com/sanfrancisco/index.html?lang=10, Check In: Dormitory rooms: 10AM Private rooms: 2PM, Check Out: 10AM. Great hostel operating in two buildings just off Union Square. All rooms have their own bathrooms. Price: Dorms: $25-$30, Private rooms: $64-$81. ■Civic Center Hotel, 20 12th St, between Franklin St and Van Ness Ave, just one block west of the Van Ness MUNI station, Phone: +1 415 861-2373. Furnished rooms with a sink in each room (no televisions). Only metered street parking is available at the hotel. Price: Single occupancy with a shared bath: $150/week. Add 14% tax for the first 4 weeks and a one time $15 key deposit.

Mid-range

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■Air Travel Hotel, 655 Ellis St, between Larkin St and Hyde St, Phone: +1 415 771-3000, contact@airtravelhotel.com, Fax: +1 415 474-2871, http://www.airtravelhotel.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 11AM. From this hotel it’s just a short walk to Union Square and the Moscone Center in SoMa. It’s also close to public transit and has a free continental breakfast in the morning and free wi-fi. Price: $99-$119. ■Cathederal Hill Hotel, 1101 Van Ness Ave, at Geary St, Phone: +1 415 776-8200, sales@cathedralhillhotel.com, Fax: +1 415 441-2841, http://www.cathedralhillhotel.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Large hotel with almost 400 rooms. It’s conveniently located on Van Ness Ave and therefore has easy access to public transportation. It features a heated swimming pool and weight room. Downstairs is Jack’s Bar and Grill, which serves reasonably priced Californian cuisine. All dishes are expertly matched with the perfect wine or beer beverage by the so-called “Beer Chef.” Price: $109-$149. ■Cova Hotel, 655 Ellis St, between Hyde St and Larkin St, Phone: phone. This hotel has 96 well decorated rooms in the heart of downtown. All rooms have 300 thread count sheets, high definition TVs, complimentary breakfast, and free wi-fi. ■Hotel Metropolis, 25 Mason St, between Eddy St and Turk St. It’s on the eastern outskirts of the Tenderloin, but there can be people sleeping in stairways and panhandling right next to the hotel, so it’s authentic enough. Inside it is perfectly clean. ■Hotel Whitcomb, 1231 Market St, between 8th St and 9th St, Phone: +1 415 626-8000, info@hotelwhitcomb.com, Fax: +1 415 861-1460, http://www.HotelWhitcomb.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. This is a 460 room historic boutique hotel. An Elegant, opulent building, it was first used as a temporary city hall after the 1906 earthquake. Italian marble, Austrian chandeliers, and a walk to Symphony/Opera and Asian Art Museum. It also has a piano bar/wine bar. Price: $89-$109. ■Inn At The Opera, 333 Fulton St, between Gough St and Franklin St, Phone: +1 415 863-8400, karinmerzenich@aol. com, Fax: +1 415 861-0821, http://www.shellhospitality.com/

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hotels/inn_at_the_opera/index.html, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 11AM. This hotel has 29 well appointed guestrooms and 18 suites which were individually decorated. It is situated in an excellent location, just a stones throw away from the the finest cultural institutions in the city like the War Memorial Opera House. Price: $153 year round. ■The Phoenix Hotel, 601 Eddy St, at Larkin St, Phone: +1 415 738-7477, phoenixhotel@jdvhotels.com, Fax: +1 415 885-3109, http://www.jdvhospitality.com/hotels/hotel/12, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. A boutique hotel, favored by musicians of all stripes, with free parking and breakfast. Price: $119-$169. ■Renoir Hotel, 45 McAllister St, bordered by Market St, 7th St, and McAllister St, Phone: +1 415 626-5200, info@renoirhotel.com, Fax: +1 415 626-5200, http://www.renoirhotel.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: 11PM. This is a triangular shaped boutique hotel in the heart of downtown. It’s an older building, but quaint and well maintained. Within easy walking distance to the bars and clubs of SoMa. If you want to spend a weekend clubbing and don’t mind being surrounded by seedy porn stores and homeless people, this is great value. Price: $119-$179.

Splurge ■The Clift Hotel, 495 Geary St, at Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 775-4700, cliftreservations@morganshotelgroup.com, Fax: +1 415 441-4621, http://www.clifthotel.com, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Hotel features Jeffrey Chodorow’s Asia de Cuba restaurant, the Redwood Room, the Living Room, private apartments, penthouse suites and meeting facilities. Price: $275-$325. ■Hilton San Francisco, 333 O’Farrell St, between Taylor St and Mason St, Phone: +1 415 771-1400, Guest_Assistance@ hilton.com, Fax: +1 415 771-6807, http://www1.hilton.com/ en_US/hi/hotel/SFOFHHH-Hilton-San-Francisco-California/index.do, Check In: 2PM, Check Out: noon. At 46 stories tall, this hotel is the tallest hotel in the downtown area and has excellent views over the city. It also has a heated

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outdoor swimming pool and Jacuzzi, as well as high-speed internet in all rooms. Price: $149-$369. ■Hotel Adagio, 550 Geary St, between Taylor St and Jones St, Phone: +1 415 775-5000, info@jdvhospitality.com, Fax: +1 415 775-9388, http://www.jdvhotels.com/adagio/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Hotel Adagio, a luxury boutique hotel, features a fresh design that bridges its Spanish Colonial Revival architectural roots to a clean and contemporary design aesthetic. This elegant downtown San Francisco hotel is 2 ½ blocks away from the Powell St Cable Car line, 6 blocks from the Moscone Convention Center and is close to the Financial District, Chinatown, North Beach, Nob Hill, and SoMa. Price: $189-$289. ■Hotel Diva, 440 Geary St, between Taylor St and Mason St, Phone: +1 415 885-0200, Reservations@PersonalityHotels.com, http://www.hoteldiva.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. Sleek, modern boutique hotel — just off Union Square. This place is pretty hip! It’s also a non-smoking hotel. Price: $149-$226. ■The Hotel Monaco, 501 Geary St, at Taylor St, Phone: +1 415 292-0100, Fax: +1 415 292-0111, http://www.monaco-sf. com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. A fun and hip boutique hotel. This is part of Kimpton Hotels, a San Francisco based hotel and restaurant company. Price: $249-$299. ■Serrano Hotel, 405 Taylor St, at Taylor St and O’Farrell St, Phone: +1 415 885.2500, Fax: +1 415 474-4879, http://www. serranohotel.com/, Check In: 3PM, Check Out: noon. This is a deluxe boutique hotel in a 17-story Spanish Revival building. They have free high speed internet and a wine appreciation hour every evening. Price: $239-$329.

Contact Joey’s Laundry listed under the Eat section above has internet for a fee, and the Main Library listed under the Architecture section above has free internet facilities. Other places include:

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■24fps Cafe, 608 Geary St, Located next to the Adante Hotel lobby, Phone: +1 415 440-3437, www.adantehotel.com/24fps. htm, Hours: M-F 6:30AM-9PM, Sa-Su 7:30AM-9PM. Standard internet cafe, these guys have free wi-fi and desktops if you don’t have your own laptop. They also serve beer too and make a decent panini to go with your coffee. Price: Computer terminal rentals at $2 per 15 minutes. Wi-Fi is free.

Stay safe The Tenderloin is one of San Francisco’s lowest income neighborhoods and has all the socio-economic problems that stem from this including crime, homelessness, and drug addiction. In particular there is a lot of violent street crime like assault and theft. Parts of the Tenderloin are considered the most dangerous areas in San Francisco, with the exception of Hunter’s Point and possibly a few areas in the Mission (such as Mission between 16th and 17th Sts). Turk St and Taylor St might be considered the heart of the “true” Tenderloin; the sidewalks teem at all hours with the homeless, people openly selling crack or heroin, derelicts, hustlers, and the mentally ill. This area spills directly into Mission St on the other side of Market St; Mission St between 8th and 5th St may be considered part of this truly seedy “core Tenderloin” area. Travelers should be aware of their environment and take an appropriate amount of care. The area is lively and safe until about 2AM (when the bars close); after that, it does get sketchy, and is best avoided by travelers walking alone.

Get out Hayes Valley — If you are an art lover and liked the formal galleries in this area, then why not continue into neighboring Hayes Valley where you will find many smaller urban chic galleries.

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Union Square — There are also many other smaller and more exclusive art galleries in Union Square that focus on selling the artwork of high profile artists like Renoir and Chagall. Union Square also has a good selection of galleries that exhibit the work of local and up-and-coming artists.

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South of Market (SoMa)

â– SoMa skyscraper

SoMa, short for South of Market, is an area of downtown San Francisco south of Market Street and northeast of the Mission District. It is San Francisco’s urban renewal district, bordered roughly by Market Street on the northwest, the 101 Freeway (from Market Street to I-80) and 16th Street (from 101 to the San Francisco Bay) on the south, and the San Francisco Bay on the east.

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Understand Once home to warehouses and dilapidated Victorian houses, SoMa saw an artistic and club culture revival in the 1980s. By the time of the Internet boom of the 1990s, the “live-work” buildings of this area had become prime real estate, and the artists and musicians who had made it cool could no longer afford the sky-high rentals. With the burst of the dot.com bubble, SoMa has become somewhat more affordable, but has also lost many of the businesses that made the area attractive during the boom. Some of the best clubs are still in SoMa - a taxi is recommended. Parts of the area can be a bit dangerous after dark.

Get in Being at the San Francisco end of the Bay Bridge and the heart of San Francisco’s public transit network, there are extensive transit options to this district.

By rail Caltrain, a commuter rail line between San Jose and San Francisco, terminates at the Caltrain station at 4th & King Streets. Bordered by Market Street on its northwest side, SoMa is within easy walking distance of all MUNI Metro lines and the several BART lines which run under Market Street. Running on Market Street is the F-Line Streetcar which stops frequently on its route from the Castro to the Ferry Building, then north on the Embarcadero to Fisherman’s Wharf.

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Additionally, the MUNI Metro T-Third and N-Judah lines emerge from the Market Street subway and travel through the SoMa district, stopping at a few places along the Embarcadero south of Market, including AT&T Park. The N line stops at the Caltrain station, while the T line continues south down 3rd Street into Southeast San Francisco.

By bus MUNI offers extensive bus service through SoMa, with nearly every street having a bus line of some sort. Routes 10-Townsend, 20-Columbus, 30-Stockton, 45-Union/ Stockton and 47-Van Ness are the best bets for getting down from the neighborhoods to the north, like Chinatown and Fisherman’s Wharf. Routes 1-California, 5-Fulton, 6-Parnassus, 38-Geary and 71-Haight-Noriega are some of the best for getting in from eastern neighborhoods like The Avenues, while routes 9-San Bruno, 12-Folsom/Pacific, 14-Mission, 26-Valencia and 27-Bryant come up from Southern San Francisco through the Mission district. Nearly all intercity bus service into San Francisco runs into SoMa, and nearly all of it goes to the Transbay Terminal at First and Mission Streets. Greyhound, MUNI, and various other Bay Area transit services (AC Transit, samTrans, Golden Gate Transit, and WestCAT) all stop at the Transbay Terminal.

By car The San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, which is part of Interstate Highway 80, offer a direct connection from the cities of the East Bay area (such as Oakland) to SoMa. After getting into San Francisco, any of the first three exits (Fremont/Folsom, 5th Street, 8th Street) will lead you into SoMa before I-80 terminates at US-101. From the south, there are two freeways running into SoMa: I-280 dead ends near the Caltrain Station - stay in the

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right lanes to get onto 6th Street, or stay in the left lanes to get onto King Street and past the Caltrain Station and AT&T Park. US-101 comes up from the south to merge into I-80, where you can get off onto I-80 and take one of the two eastbound exits into SoMa, or stay on US-101 (stay in the left lanes) and exit at 9th Street or Mission Street before the freeway terminates at Market Street (US-101 continues north as Van Ness Avenue). SoMa is also well-connected to other San Francisco neighborhoods by surface streets. From the north, The Embarcadero is the best one for getting down from Fisherman’s Wharf, while Van Ness Avenue is the best for getting from the Golden Gate area. Between those two are a number of other major thoroughfares, such as Montgomery, Stockton and Hyde Streets, which will also do nicely. From the south and southwest, 3rd Street, Mission Street and Market Street all work well. Parking here, as anywhere else in San Francisco, can be a challenge, but there a number of parking garages in the district, including a large one at Mission between Fifth and Fourth streets for the Moscone Center. People driving to a Giants game are advised to park at the large parking lot along 3rd Street just south of AT&T Park, just across the canal.

By boat Two ferry companies offer special ferry service to Giants home games at AT&T Park: Golden Gate Ferry from Larkspur, and Alameda Oakland Ferry from Alameda and Oakland.

See

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■Moscone Center, 747 Howard Street, Phone: +1 415 9744000, http://www.moscone.com. Stretching across two adjacent blocks between Mission, Folsom, 3rd and 4th Streets (with another building across the street at 4th and Howard), Moscone Center is a major entertainment complex with a variety of attractions. The Moscone Center itself is a convention center housing major exhibits and conventions, including a number of major (especially IDG) expos that occur each year, including Apple Computer-related expos such as Macworld and Apple’s WWDC, and LinuxWorld. ■Yerba Buena Gardens, Phone: +1 415 820-3550, http:// www.yerbabuenagardens.com, Hours: Daily 6AM-10PM. The Yerba Buena Gardens, above the Moscone Center, provide a nice urban oasis. A large grassy meadow, a memorial to Martin Luther King, Jr., play places for kids, fountains and gardens make this a great place to come, play and relax. Price: Free. ■Charles Looff Carousel, corner of 4th and Howard, Hours: Daily 10AM-6PM. A beautiful carousel dating back to 1906, now fully restored and open for rides. Price: $2 per ride. ■Yerba Buena Ice Skating Center, 750 Folsom Street, between 3rd and 4th, Phone: +1 415 820-3532, http://skatebowl.com/Ice_Center/Public/Public_Skating.htm. Indoor ice skating rink open year-round. Check the Ice Centre schedule online for public skating hours. Price: $8 adults, $6.25 children, $5.50 seniors. Skate rental extra. ■Yerba Buena Bowling Center, 750 Folsom Street, between 3rd and 4th, Phone: +1 415 820-3532, http://skatebowl.com/Bowling_Center/bowling.htm, Hours: Su-Th 10AM-10PM, F-Sa 10AM-Midnight. Bowling alley. Price: Walk-in game $4-$7, depending on time. ■Zeum, 221 4th Street, at Howard, Phone: +1 415 820-3320, http://www.zeum.org/, Hours: W-F 1PM-5PM, Sa-Su 11AM5PM. An arts and technology museum geared towards kids and families, with lots of interactive exhibits (some of them quite high-tech) giving you a change to produce animation, video, sound, performance or visual arts. Price: $8 adults,

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$7 students/seniors, $3 children/teens, free for children under age 3. ■Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, 701 Mission Street, at 3rd, Phone: +1 415 978-2700, http://www.ybca.org/, Hours: Tu-W, F-Su Noon–5PM, Th Noon–8PM. An interesting venue for local contemporary artists. Rotating exhibits, performances, and film screenings. Price: $7 adults, $5 seniors/ students, free on the first Tuesday of each month. ■Metreon, 101 4th Street, at Mission, Phone: +1 415 369-6000, http://www.westfield.com/metreon. This Sony Entertainment-sponsored mall/entertainment complex has some interesting shops (including an entire store devoted to the Sony Playstation), a 15-screen movie theater with an IMAX screen, and a video game parlor/arcade where you can drink and play virtual bowling.

■San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

■San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 151 3rd Street, across the street from the Yerba Buena Gardens, Phone: +1 415 357-4000, http://www.sfmoma.org/, Hours: F-Tu 11AM5:45PM, Th 11AM-8:45PM. An innovative art museum with

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five floors of galleries featuring changing exhibitions as well as permanent displays featuring the works of some very famous 20th century artists, including Georgia O’Keeffe, Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí, and many others. Be sure to see the unique glass bridge on the 5th floor, perched high above the main lobby. Price: $12.50 adults, $8 seniors, $7 students, free for children 12 and under. ■Museum of Craft and Folk Art, 51 Yerba Buena Lane, just off Market between 3rd and 4th Streets, Phone: +1 415 2274888, http://www.mocfa.org, Hours: Tu–F 11AM–6PM, Sa-Su 11AM–5PM. This is the only folk art museum in Northern California, known for a rich offering of focused and unique exhibitions of traditional and contemporary folk art and craft from around the world. Price: $5 adults, $4 seniors, free for under 18. ■Cartoon Art Museum, 655 Mission Street, between New Montgomery and 3rd, Phone: +1 415 227-8666, http://www. cartoonart.org/, Hours: Tu-Su 11AM-5PM. A unique museum dedicated to cartoon art in all its forms. Price: $6 adults, $4 students/seniors, $2 children, age 5 and under free. ■California Historical Society Museum, 678 Mission Street, between New Montgomery and 3rd, Phone: +1 415 357-1848, http://www.californiahistoricalsociety.org, Hours: W-Sa Noon-4:30PM. Changing exhibitions showing the history of the state. Price: $3 adults, $1 students/seniors, free for children under 5. ■Museum of the African Diaspora, 685 Mission Street, inside the St. Regis Hotel, Phone: +1 415 358-7200, http:// www.moadsf.org, Hours: W-Sa 11AM-6PM, Su 12PM-5PM. A museum dedicated to the diaspora of Africans. Price: $10 adults, $5 seniors/students, children 12 and under free. ■South Park, along Park Street between 2nd and 3rd Streets. This is a charming quiet park in the middle of the hustle and bustle of industrial SOMA. at at any of the small restaurants around the edges, they are all pretty good. Not very nice at night since homeless use the park to sleep. ■Treasure Island. An artificial island half-way between San Francisco and Oakland connected to Yerba Buena Island which the Bay Bridge passes through. The Island has excellent views of San Francisco & Oakland skylines and quirky

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structures from the international fairground-turned-navy base-turned neighborhood. Accessible by Muni bus line 108 from the Transbay Terminal downtown.

Do ■AT&T Park

■San Francisco Giants - AT&T Park, 24 Willie Mays Plaza, at Third and King Streets, Phone: +1 415 972-1800, http://www.sfgiants.com/. One of the building projects that revitalized this area, the stadium is an imposing brick edifice that has all the necessary modern amenities, such as beer and wifi. It looks out upon San Francisco Bay, which makes a fine backdrop for those Barry Bonds home runs. On days where there are no Giants home games, public tours of the ballpark are available at 10:30AM and 12:30PM. Price: Giants tickets range from $10 to over $100, depending on section and date of game. Ballpark tours $10 adults, $8 seniors, $6 children. ■CounterPULSE Theater, 1310 Mission Street, at 9th, Phone: +1 415 626-2060, http://www.CounterPULSE.org. This hybrid theater located at Mission and 9th Street is a hub for experimental art and activism. Online calendar boasts new and eclectic events year-round. ■Dore Alley. This street hosts the Up Your Alley Fair. It is the warm up event for the famous Folsom Street Fair. Held the last Sunday in July, this preview is smaller, wilder, more local, but no less crowded and just as fun. ■The Folsom Street Fair, http://www.folsomstreetfair.org. This annual event, held on the last Sunday in September, features Leather, Bondage, Rubber and other Fetish and BDSM activities. Stretching over a mile you will find wallto-wall dance clubs, bands, and booths where you can shop for a whip or learn about safe sex. It started out as an underground event to protest the gentrification of SoMa. It is organized by a non-profit to raise funds for many SF area

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charities. It’s a world class event, and the third largest outdoor event in California. With a suggested donation is $5, it’s quite a bargain today.

Buy ■Alexander Book Co., 50 2nd Street, between Stevenson and Jessie, Phone: +1 415 495-2992, http://alexanderbook. booksense.com/, Hours: M-F 9AM-6PM. A large independent bookstore with three floors of thousands of new books. ■Foto-Grafix Books, 655 Mission Street, between New Montgomery and 3rd, Phone: +1 415 495-7242, http://www. friendsofphotography.org/, Hours: Tu-Su 11AM-5:30PM. An extensive collection of photography books, along with a lot of Ansel Adams books, prints and posters. ■General Bead, 637 Minna Street, between 7th and 8th, Phone: +1 415 255-2323, http://www.genbead.com/, Hours: Tu-F 10AM-5PM, Sa 10AM-6PM, Su 12PM-5PM. Thousands of beads and bead-based products for any bead and jewelry lover. ■Metreon, 101 4th Street, at Mission, Phone: +1 415 369-6000, http://www.westfield.com/metreon. A Sony Entertainmentsponsored mall/entertainment complex has some interesting shops, such an an entire store devoted to the Sony Playstation, a book store, a toy store, and a couple of other electronics/entertainment related stores. ■Podesta Baldocchi, 410 Harriet Street, at Brannon, Phone: +1 415 346-1300, http://www.podestabaldocchi.com/, Hours: M-F 8AM-5PM, Sa 8AM-2PM, Su 9AM-1PM. A charming and long-standing floral shop. ■San Francisco Shopping Center, 865 Market Street, between 4th and 5th, Phone: +1 415 512 6776, http://westfield. com/sanfrancisco, Hours: M-Sa 9:30AM-9PM, Su 10AM-7PM. This massive nine-floor Westfield-owned complex contains around 400 shops and restaurants, including some upscale

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places. Anchors for the mall include a Bloomingdale’s, a Nordstorm, a Bristol Farms grocery, and a movie theater.

Eat Budget ■Brainwash, 1122 Folsom Street, at Langton between 7th and 8th Streets, Phone: +1 415 861-3663, http://www.brainwash. com, Hours: M-Th 8AM-12AM, Fr 8AM-1AM, Sa 7:30AM-1AM, Su 7:30AM-12AM. It’s a Laundromat! It’s a Cafe! It’s a pub! It’s all of the above. A fine place to do your laundry while grabbing a beer, some lunch, playing a little pinball, surfing the net, chatting with your friends, or watching a live show. ■Home Menu, 1565 Mission Street, at South Van Ness, Phone: +1 415 861-3173, Fax: +1 415 861-6788, Hours: M-F 10AM-10PM, Sa 10AM-9PM, Su 10AM-4PM. Chinese and Vietnamese cuisine (review is for Vietnamese). Stir-cooked dishes with barbecued meats and fresh vegetables. Chef may ignore your order if he thinks you’ll like something else better, and when he does the food is excellent for the price. Soups, rice porridge, pho available. Accessible, not vegetarian aware, no MSG, beer, Chinese pop instrumentals, bright lighting, free delivery. Price: $3.50-$6.75 apps/salads, $5.75-7.50 rice plates, $6.50-$8.50 entrees. ■Katz Bagels, 606 Mission Street, between New Montgomery and 2nd Street, Phone: +1 415 512-1570. One of very few places to get actual bagels in California. Yes they’re boiled, then baked. Open from the morning commute hours through lunchtime. Try the sandwiches. ■Reds Java House, Pier 30, on the Embarcadero near the Bay Bridge, Phone: +1 415 777-5626. Have the hamburger, fries and an Anchor Steam combo.

Mid-range ■21st Amendment, 563 2nd Street, between Bryant and Brannan, Phone: +1 415 369-0900, http://www.21st-amend-

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ment.com, Hours: Open at 11:30AM daily. Good “californiastyle microbrew” beers. Classic brewpub-grub - burgers, fish, some salsds. The Jerk Chicken is excellent. Full menu images are online. ■Delancey Street Restaurant, 600 Embarcadero Street, Phone: +1 415 512-5179, http://www.delanceystreetfoundation.org/enterrestaurant.php, Hours: Tu-F 11AM-11PM, SaSu 10AM-11PM. ■Gordon Biersch Brewery and Restaurant, 2 Harrison Street, between Spear and the Embarcadero, Phone: +1 415 243-8246, http://www.gordonbiersch.com/restaurants/ index.php?pg=location⊂=loc&location_id=18, Hours: Su-Th 11:30AM-Midnight, F-Sa 11:30AM-2AM. ■Hidive, Pier 28, on the Embarcadero near the Bay Bridge, Phone: +1 415 977-0170. This is where SoMa residents go for quick meetings and meals. You can also find decent food here to go along with the great waterfront views. ■Julie’s Supper Club, 1123 Folsom Street, at Langton between 7th and 8th, Phone: +1 415 864-1222, http://juliessupperclub.com. ■Manora’s Thai Cuisine, 1600 Folsom Street, at 12th, Phone: +1 415 861-6224, Fax: +1 415 861-1731, http://www. manorathai.com/, Hours: Lunch M-F 11:30AM-2:30PM, Dinner M-Sa 5:30PM-10:30PM, Su 5PM-10PM. ■South Park Cafe, 108 South Park Street, at Jack London Alley between 2nd and 3rd, Phone: +1 415 495-7275, southparkcafe@sbcglobal.net, http://www.southparkcafesf. com/, Hours: Lunch M-F 11:30AM-2:30PM, Dinner Tu-Sa 5:30PM-10PM. ■Thirsty Bear Brewing Company, 661 Howard Street, 1/2 block from Moscone Center, Phone: +1 415 974-0905, Fax: +1 415 974-0955, http://thirstybear.com/, Hours: M-Th 11:30AM-10PM, F 11:30AM-Midnight, Sa Noon-Midnight, Su 5PM-10PM. Brewpub meets tapas bar. Good beer brewed in-house, from very light lagers through a nice Kozlov Stout. One or two brews on nitrogen. Very good small-plate food with a mediterannean / spanish bent. Tuesday is cask-ale

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night - beer served from traditional wood cask instead of modern steel - while it lasts, which usually isn’t very long. ■Tres Agaves, 130 Townsend Street, between 2nd and 3rd, Phone: +1 415 227-0500, http://www.tresagaves.com. Best margaritas in the city, along with great Mexican food. The food comes with so many sides that one appetizer and one entree is easily enough for 2 people.

Splurge ■Fringale French Bistro, 570 4th Street, at Freelon between Bryant and Brannan, Phone: +1 415 543-0573, Fax: +1 415 905-0317, http://www.fringalesf.com, Hours: Lunch Tu-F 11:30AM-2:30PM, Dinner Su-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-11PM. ■Zuppa, 564 4th Street, between Bryant and Brannan, Phone: +1 415 777-5900, info@zuppa-sf.com, Fax: +1 415 777-5950, http://www.zuppa-sf.com, Hours: Lunch M-F 11:30AM-2:30PM, Dinner M-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM11PM, Su 5PM-9PM. Modern industrial decor and excellent italian food. Wood fired pizzas, great salumi. Go for salumi, pizza and a salad and split everything for 2.

Drink ■21st Amendment, Phone: +1 415 369-0900. See above under restaurants. ■Annie’s Social Club, 917 Folsom Street, at 5th, Phone: +1 415 974-1585, http://www.anniessocialclub.com/. ■Bacar, 448 Brannan Street, between 3rd and 4th, Phone: +1 415 904-4100, http://www.bacarsf.com. Over 100 wines by

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the glass. Sometimes have 50% off everything on the wine list in some category. ■District, 216 Townsend Street, between 3rd and 4th, Phone: +1 415 896-2120, http://www.districtsf.com. Old furniture store converted to the latest wine-bar in SoMa. ■Eagle’s Drift Inn, 527 Bryant Street, at Ritch between 3rd and 4th, Phone: +1 415 495-4527. ■Hotel Utah, 500 4th Street, at Bryant, Phone: +1 415 5466300, http://www.hotelutah.com/. ■Jillians, 101 4th Street, inside the Sony Metreon, Phone: +1 415 369-6100, http://www.jillians.com. This upscale sports bar has a huge video wall great for watching sports. There are also 8 well kept pool tables for something to do. This bar becomes a dance club on Friday and Saturday nights with a strict dress code -- nice shoes required. ■Thirsty Bear Brewing Company, 661 Howard Street, Phone: +1 415 974-0905, http://www.thirstybear.com. An upscale brewpub/restaurant and favorite expense-account spot for the trade show crowd from nearby Moscone Center. The cask-conditioned ale is satisfying, but the place can get crowded. ■Tres Agaves, Phone: +1 415 227-0500. See above under restaurants.

Clubs Many of San Francisco’s best dance clubs are in SoMa.

■1015, 1015 Folsom Street, at Harriet between 6th and 7th, Phone: +1 415 431-1200, http://www.1015.com/. Lines all night outside during the weekend. A 20 something meat market. ■The Cat Club, 1190 Folsom Street, at 8th, Phone: +1 415 7038964, http://www.catclubsf.com/. Thursday is 80’s night where you’re guaranteed to hear at least one Madonna song throughout the night. Price: $6 cover. ■DNA Lounge, 375 11th Street, near Folsom, Phone: +1 415 626-1409, http://www.dnalounge.com. The DNA Lounge is

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a 2-story club which often caters to the geekier “digerati” crowd. One of the founders is Jamie Zawinski, a former Netscape superstar and Internet nabob. Events feature themed electronica dance nights (Industrial, Techno, Trance, etc) and live bands. Price: There is usually a cover between $3 and $25 (for the bands). ■The End Up, 401 6th Street, at Harrison, Phone: +1 415 3570827, http://www.theendup.com. An SF institution. Essentially doesn’t close on the weekend, and thus where people ‘end up’. Great old school SF house music. Unexpected outdoor patio/waterfall space to chill. ■Mezzanine, 444 Jessie Street, at Mint, between 5th and 6th, Phone: +1 415 625-8880, http://www.mezzaninesf.com/. Where all the shirtless buff gay boys go. Great sound system. If you like cheesy techno and disco diva wailing music, this is the place. ■The Stud, 399 9th Street, at Harrison, Phone: +1 415 8636623, http://www.studsf.com. Fun semi-dingy club. Don’t miss Trannyshack, Tuesdays at midnight. Very worth the sleep deprivation at work the next day.

Sleep Budget ■Pontiac Hotel, 509 Minna Street, at 6th, Phone: +1 415 8637775 or +1 800 504-1005, pontiachtl@aol.com, Fax: +1 415 552-4491, http://www.pontiachotel.com/. Clean and comfortable hotel. Price: $35+.

Mid-range ■Best Western Americania, 121 7th Street, between Minna and Natoma, Phone: +1 415 626-0200 or +1 800 444-5816,

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Fax: +1 415 863-2529, http://www.americaniahotelsf.com. Price: $149-$169. ■Carriage Inn Best Western, 140 7th Street, at Minna, Phone: +1 415 552-8600, Fax: +1 415 626-3973, http://www. carriageinnsf.com/. Price: $169-$189. ■Mosser Hotel, 54 4th Street, between Stevenson and Jessie, Phone: +1 415 986-4400 or +1 800 227-3804, reservations@ themosser.com, Fax: +1 415 495-7653, http://www.themosser. com/. ■Pickwick Hotel, 85 5th Street, at Mission, Phone: +1 415 421-7500, http://www.thepickwickhotel.com/. 189 elegantly appointed guestrooms and suites and 3,000 square feet of flexible meeting space, located just a block from the Moscone Convention Center.

Splurge ■Courtyard Marriot, 299 2nd Street, at Folsom, Phone: +1 415 947-0700, http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/sfocd-courtyard-san-francisco-downtown. Price: $200-$250. ■Four Seasons Hotel, 757 Market Street, between 3rd and 4th, Phone: +1 415 633-3000, http://www.fourseasons.com/ sanfrancisco. Consistently rated #1 Hotel in San Francisco by a variety of sources and among the Top 100 Hotels in the World by 2007 Conde Nast Traveler. It features a museum quality art collection and guests enjoy free access to the amazing The Sports Club/LA, which offer 127,000 of fitness facilities and Splash Spa. ■Harbor Court Hotel, 165 Steuart Street, between Mission and Howard, Phone: +1 415 882-1300, http://www.harborcourthotel.com. A waterfront boutique hotel on the Embarcadero, across from the San Francisco Ferry Building, with views onto San Francisco Bay. This AAA four diamond hotel has 131 rooms. Price: $230-$280. ■Hotel Griffon, 155 Steuart Street, between Mission and Howard, Phone: +1 415 495-2100, http://www.hotelgriffon. com. Located on the newly enhanced Embarcadero with

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easy access to the Financial District, restaurants, and shopping. ■InterContinental Hotel, 888 Howard Street, at 5th, Phone: +1 415 616-6500, http://www.ichotelsgroup.com/intercontinental/en/gb/locations/sanfrancisco. ■Marriott San Francisco, 55 4th Street, between Stevenson and Mission, Phone: +1 415 896-1600, http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/sfodt-san-francisco-marriott. This San Francisco convention center hotel is situated across the street from the Moscone Center, and steps away from the city’s top attractions, including the historical Cable Cars, world class shopping on Union Square and Westfield’s San Francisco Centre featuring Bloomingdale’s. Walk to the Financial District for work, then to AT&T Park, home of Major League Baseball’s San Francisco Giants. ■St. Regis Hotel, 125 3rd Street, between Mission and Minna, Phone: +1 415 284-4000, http://www.starwoodhotels.com/ stregis/property/overview/index.html?propertyID=1511. The St. Regis is a new luxury hotel in the South of Market Area. It is on par with the Four Seasons, Mandarin Oriental and the Le Meridian (formerly the Park Hyatt at Embarcadero Center). It is near San Francisco MOMA, Yerba Buena Gardens and the Sony Metreon, as well as Union Square and the recently expanded Westfield San Francisco Shopping Center. ■W Hotel, 181 3rd Street, at Howard, Phone: +1 877 946-8357, http://www.starwoodhotels.com/whotels/explore/destination/index.html?destinationID=san_francisco. Where the cool kids go to play... and sleep, the W has an outstanding decor and vibe that will impress without being over the top.

Contact ■San Francisco Public Library - Mission Bay Branch, 960 4th Street, at Berry, Phone: +1 415 355-2838, http://sfpl. lib.ca.us/, Hours: Sun 1-5, M Closed, Tu 10-6, W 12-8, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sat 1-6.

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Western Addition Western Addition is a mostly residential area of San Francisco, stretching west from downtown’s Civic Center area to the Arguello Boulevard, north of the Panhandle parkway that extends east from the Golden Gate Park between Oak and Fell Streets, and south of California Street.

Understand Nihonmachi, also known as Japantown, the Japan Center, and Little Osaka is a neighborhood of the Western Addition neighborhoods that is roughly within the confines of Sutter Street to the north, Geary Street to the south, Fillmore to the west and Laguna to the east. It is one of only three Japantowns left in the continental United States — others are in Los Angeles and San Jose. Nihonmachi was formed after the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and fire. Most Japanese immigrants entered the United States through San Francisco and many settled either south of Market Street or in the Chinatown area. With the 1906 earthquake, Nihonmachi, for a time, became home to the largest Japanese-American community in the United States. When World War II broke out, U.S. government took Japanese Americans into custody and interned them in concentration camps. As many large sections of the neighborhood remained vacant, the void was quickly filled by thousands of African Americans who had left the South to find wartime industrial jobs in California. Following the war, some Japanese Americans returned, and the city made efforts to rejuvenate the neighborhood. Most former Japanese-American residents of San Francisco chose not to return after the World War II related relocation, and the largest JapaneseAmerican community in San Francisco today can be found in the Sunset neighborhood.

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Japantown was also negatively impacted by redevelopment in the 1950’s with the widening of Geary Boulevard resulting in the destruction of dozens of Victorians. During the massive redevelopment initiated by Justin Herman in the Western Addition in the 1960s through the 1980s, large numbers of African Americans were pushed west towards the Fillmore neighborhood, east towards the Tenderloin, or south towards Hunters Point where the majority of the city’s African American population resides today, while some Japanese returned, followed by new Japanese immigrants as well as investment from the Japanese Government and Japanese companies. Nihonmachi remains a social and shopping center for the city’s Japanese-American population. Hayes Valley is generally considered to be the area around Hayes Street from Fillmore Street on the west to Gough, Franklin, or Van Ness on the east. Northward and southward, it extends a few blocks away from Hayes Street in either direction. Hayes Valley is getting rapidly gentrified. It has a curious mix of boutiques, high end restaurants, hip stores, condominiums, and Victorians coupled with public housing and some mixed, probably one-time rough, neighborhoods. At one time the Central Freeway ran though the neighborhood, but it was closed and later demolished after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. In 2005, a section of the freeway branch from US 101 was rebuilt to exit at Market Street, with a boulevard running north from the exit at Market Street through the Hayes Valley along Octavia Boulevard to Hayes Street.

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Get in By Car This part of town is accessible by car and public parking lots are abundant compared to the surrounding neighborhoods. When coming by car from U.S. 101 towards the Golden Gate Bridge one gets on Octavia Boulevard after Market street. It is important to escape the main traffic flow by turning east or north. There are also taxis readily available at almost all hours on Fillmore and Geary Streets. Though street parking can be slightly easier to find than many other areas of the City, you should still allot 5 or more likely 10 minutes to your search for a space. There is abundant public paid parking at the Kintetsu Mall garage (discount with validation from mall and Japan Center merchants)- and limited street parking. To park your own car it may be wise to go a few blocks further to the Civic Center just to the north and east, where there some parking garages and lots. Most restaurants provide valet parking.

By Muni Several bus lines from downtown run through Western Addition, including the 2-Clement, 3-Jackson, 4-Sutter, 5-Fulton, 21-Hayes, 31-Balboa and 38-Geary (and the 38L Geary Limited) bus lines. Running north-south through the neighborhood are the 22-Fillmore, 24-Divisadero, and 43-Masonic lines.

See â– Alamo Square Park, between Steiner, Scott, Fulton and Hayes Streets. This park is best known for the famous Painted Ladies row of Victorian houses on its east side along Steiner Street, which is often the subject of many a San Francisco postcard. There are also many other pretty

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Victorians encircling the lovely park. The 21-Hayes bus route goes along its south side, the 5-Fulton bus passes by a block north of the park, or if you enjoy walking and don’t mind modest grades you can get there by walking west from Hayes Valley or north from the Haight. ■Japantown. Peace Plaza and shopping mall; Ruth Asawa’s incredible wrought and cast bronze origami fountains on the Nihonmachi Pedestrian Mall. At the center entrance to the Japan Center is a five-tiered Peace Pagoda, it was designed by world-famous Japanese architect Yoshiro Taniguchi. The Center opened in 1968. ■Sundance Kabuki 8 Theater, 1881 Post Street, between Fillmore and Webster, Phone: +1 415 346-3243, http://www. sundancecinemas.com/kabuki.html. Home to the annual San Francisco Asian American Film Festival, the theater is at the western most end of the Japan Center mall, and the Kabuki Springs and Spa is at the other end, just a block from the Filmore Auditorium on the other side of Geary Boulevard. The Miyako Hotel at Post and Laguna has a picturesque Japanese garden. ■Webster Bridge, on Webster Street over Geary Boulevard. The bridge’s design was inspired by traditional Japanese pedestrian walkways. In addition to providing a safe passage over the traffic on Geary Boulevard, the arched bridge has views of Japan Center and San Francisco’s Western Addition.

Do ■Fillmore Street Jazz Festival. The jazz festival happens in July, with several music stages and a street arts fair to Fillmore Street between Jackson and Eddy. ■Fillmore Auditorium, 1805 Geary Boulevard, at Fillmore, Phone: +1 415 346-6000, http://www.livenation.com/venue/ getVenue/venueId/1259. Hosts concerts and contemporary bands. ■Juneteenth Festival, in Kimball Park, at Geary and Steiner. San Francisco joins towns and cities across the US in

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celebrating the arrival of the news of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation on June 19, 1863. Juneteenth is a celebration of African-American culture as well as a celebration of freedom from slavery and remembrance of what it is to be free. ■Cherry Blossom Festival, http://www.nccbf.org. In Japantown in the spring (April) since 1967, includes a parade from the Civic Center to the Japantown mall area, a street fair, music and a lot to do. Great event to take kids to. ■Nihonmachi Street Fair, http://www.nihonmachistreetfair.org. This mid-August street fair has been celebrating San Francisco’s Asian cultures and raising funds for community organizations since 1973. ■Kabuki Hot Springs, http://www.kabukisprings.com. Traditional Japanese-style onzen with full spa services. Communal baths are co-ed only one day per week, see calendar for details. ■San Francisco Seals, Negoesco Stadium on the University of San Francisco campus, http://www.oursfseals.com. United Soccer Leagues Premier Development League team. ■University of San Francisco Dons, University of San Francisco campus, http://usfdons.cstv.com. Various college sports including baseball, basketball, soccer and volleyball.

Buy ■Soko Hardware, 1698 Post Street, at Buchanan, Phone: +1 415 931-5510, Hours: M-Sa 9AM-5:30PM. Has everything from copper rain chains and iron cabinetry findings, fine woodworking tools to bulk nails, porcelain to everyday kitchenware; just what you want in a longstanding hardware store. ■Kinokuniya Stationery, 1581 Webster Street, at Post, Phone: +1 415 567-8901, Hours: Daily 10:30AM-8PM. Has a huge collection of washii decorative papers that is only

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surpassed by their incredible collection of pens, stationery and gift items. ■Kinokuniya Bookstore, 1581 Webster Street, at Post, Phone: +1 415 567-7625, http://www.kinokuniya.com, Hours: Daily 10:30AM-8PM. If you’re into Japanese books, magazines, or comic books (otherwise known as manga), then this is your place to be. The only San Francisco branch of the famous Japanese chain, Kinokuniya carries thousands of titles, including dozens in English. So a crash course in Japanese is not essential to shopping here.

Eat There are many many noodle shops and restaurants to explore in Japantown. There’s also some fabulous BBQ along Fillmore Avenue south of Geary, in this traditionally multicultural part of town. The Japan Center is packed with restaurants, particularly in the Kintetsu Building. More Japanese restaurants can be found along Post St and in the Buchanan Mall, across Post Street.

■Absinthe, 398 Hayes Street, at Gough, Phone: +1 415 5511590, http://www.absinthe.com/, Hours: Tu-Th 11:30AM12:30AM, F 11:30AM-2AM, Sa 11AM-2AM, Su 11AM-10PM. Restyles the rustic foods of southern France into sleek urban classics. Wonderful (expensive) cocktails based on 100-year old recipes. Not the cheapest place in town, but affordable and the quality of the food is an excellent value. A pretty, white-tablecloth setting and excellent service make this a lovely lunch spot. Avoid weekend evenings before 8PM, when crowds from the nearby theater district can mean a wait. No absinthe; have a pastis instead. ■Cafe Kati, 1963 Sutter Street, at Fillmore, Phone: +1 415 7757313, http://www.cafekati.com/, Hours: M-Sa 5:30PM-10PM, Su 11AM-2PM and 5:30PM-10PM. Asian Fusion was passing

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fad, but Cafe Kati has made it a trend with 15 years of service to local diners. ■Citizen Cake, 399 Grove Street, at Gough, Phone: +1 415 861-2228, http://www.citizencake.com, Hours: Tu-F 8AM10PM, Sa 10AM-10PM, Su 10AM-5PM. Reasonable light California style meals. Outside of dinner and weekend brunch times you may just want to indulge on their deserts. Mixed service reviews. ■Frjtz, 581 Hayes Street, at Laguna, Phone: +1 415 864-7654, http://www.frjtzfries.com/, Hours: M-Th 11AM-10PM, F 11AM-Midnight, Sa 11AM-Midnight, Su 11AM-9PM. A diminutive and funky Belgian fries place. ■Fuku-Sushi Restaurant, 1581 Webster Street, at Post, Phone: +1 415 346-3030, Hours: Open 11AM-11PM or later. While Fuku can be pricey, the quality of the sushi is excellent and well worth it. This is one of the best sushi restaurants in a city packed with hundreds. The atmosphere is low key and if you can sit at the bar, Nobu is wonderful to chat with. The service is exceptional and more in line with a traditional Japanese sushi house. ■Iroha Restaurant, 1728 Buchanan Street, between Post and Sutter, Phone: +1 415 922-0321, Hours: Su-Th 11:30AM9:30PM, F-Sa 11:30AM-10PM. Iroha serves a variety of familiar Japanese dishes such as ramen, tonkatsu, gyoza, etc. The interior is somewhat dim and starkly decorated with dark wooden partitions that divide sections. The restaurant is on the second floor, so a window seat is prime perch for people watching. ■Isobune, 1737 Post Street, between Buchanan and Webster, in the Kintetsu Mall, Phone: +1 415 563-1030, Hours: Daily 11:30AM-10PM. Wheelchair Accessible. As the floating sushi bars so popular in Japan, the sushi chefs at Isobune prepare food and place it on wooden boats that sail around the inner perimeter of an oval counter. Patrons seated at the counter simply lift the dishes they want off the bobbing boats. Your bill depends on the number of empty dishes you’re left with. It’s fun, cheap, and delicious ■Little Star Pizza, 846 Divisadero Street, between McAllister and Fulton, Phone: +1 415 441-1118, http://www.little-

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starpizza.com, Hours: Su-Th 5PM-10PM, F-Sa 5PM-11PM. The Chicago deep dish here is among the best in the city. ■On the Bridge, 1581 Webster Street, at Post, Phone: +1 415 922-7765, Hours: Daily 11:30AM-10PM. Wheelchair Accessible. This ultra-cute little eatery, on the bridge connecting the Kintetsu and Kinokuniya Buildings, specializes in an intriguing Euro-Japanese and Indo-Japanese hybrid cuisine called yoshoku, which has been popular in Japan for more than 100 years. Japanese ‘pastas’ and curried rice plates take on unexpected but delightful flavors. ■Mifune, 1737 Post Street, between Buchanan and Webster, in the Kintetsu Mall, Phone: +1 415 922-0337, http://www. mifune.com/, Hours: Su-Th 11AM-9:30pm, F-Sa 11AM-10PM. Wheelchair Accessible. Looking like a ‘60s movie-set depiction of a Japanese house, Mifune is one of San Francisco’s most popular noodle parlors. A mere $5 will set you up with a hearty bowl of udon or soba noodles, either in a bowl of hot broth or served cold with a dipping cup of sauce. Many delicious vegetarian selections are available. ■Sapporo-Ya Japanese Restaurant, 1581 Webster Street, at Post, in the Kinokuniya Building, Phone: +1 415 563-7400, Hours: Daily 11AM-2AM. Excellent Japanese noodles served dozens of ways. Open very late, and a good place to warm up on a cold foggy day. ■Suppenkueche, 525 Laguna Street, at Linden, Phone: +1 415 252-9289, http://www.suppenkuche.com/, Hours: M-Sa 5PM-10PM, Su 10AM-2:30PM and 5PM-10PM. For casual German food and service, beer -- of course -- served at shared tables. ■Thai Stick 2001, 2001 Fillmore Street, at Pine, Phone: +1 415 885-6100, http://www.thaisticksf.com/. Affordable and delicious traditional Thai food right at the corner of Fillmore and Pine.

Drink

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■Absinthe, (see above), Hayes and Gough. Has fine French wines, that can be tasted in its bar or on its sidewalk tables, and also can be purchased next door. ■Fritz, (see above), on Hayes between Franklin and Gough. Has a wide collection of Belgian Beers. ■Suppenkuche, (see above), Hayes and Laguna. Has a busy bar where German beers dominate.

Sleep ■San Francisco Days Inn, 465 Grove Street, between Gough and Octavia, Phone: +1 415 864-4040, http://www. daysinncalifornia.com/html/days-inn-hotels-unionsquare-san-francisco.asp. ■Hotel Tomo, 1800 Sutter Street, at Buchanan, Phone: +1 415 921-4000, Fax: +1 415 563-1278, http://www.jdvhotels.com/ tomo. The Hotel Tomo has 125 guestrooms in an eight-story building. Guestrooms are roomy, bright and comfortable; they are also J-pop works of art. Each room has its own identity through anime-style murals and views of the city. This hotel will appeal to younger people and families with children. Lots of fun touches like gaming suites, bean bag chairs and glow-in-the-dark desk blotters. ■Hayes Valley Inn, 417 Gough Street, between Ivy and Hayes, Phone: +1 415 431-9131, http://www.hayesvalleyinn. com/. European Style. Extremely cute, homey, and comfortable. ■Miyako Hotel, 1625 Post Street, between Laguna and Buchanan, Phone: +1 415 922-3200, Fax: +1 415 614-5498, http://www.jdvhotels.com/miyako. The hotel Miyako is a Japanese-style hotel in San Francisco with a western touch. With its prime Japantown location and unique blend of Eastern and Western influences, the Miyako Hotel has a calm and serene ambiance. ■Queen Anne Hotel, 1590 Sutter Street, at Octavia, Phone: +1 415 441-2828, http://www.queenanne.com/. The Queen Anne provides a real San Francisco experience, being an 1890 Vistorian Hotel between Pacific Heights and the Civic

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Center, and near Japan Town. Some rooms have fireplaces, and afternoon tea is served daily.

Contact â– San Francisco Public Library - Western Addition Branch, 1550 Scott Street, between Post and Geary, Phone: +1 415 355-5727, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Su 1-5, M 1-9, Tu 10-6, W 1-9, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sa 10-6.

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Haight

â– Haight Street

The Haight is a district of San Francisco, running along Haight Street. The district is bounded roughly by the Panhandle and Fell/Oak Streets on the north, Market Street on the east, Duboce Avenue and Buena Vista Park on the south, and Stanyan Street (and Golden Gate Park) on the west, with a small extension west to include the University of California, San Francisco Parnassus campus just to the west.

Understand The Haight is made up of two neighborhoods: HaightFillmore, usually called the Lower Haight, and HaightAshbury, also known as the Upper Haight. The two neighborhoods are separated by a large hill and are bisected by Divisadero Street. The neighborhoods have two separate histories whose cultures and identities merged in the 1960’s as poor, young white hippies moved into the Upper Haight

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and began to communicate and learn from poor, young black residents of the Lower Haight. Together, these “outcasts” forged the counter-culture movement the Haight is most well known for. Today, they remain similar, yet distinct. The Upper Haight is more of a tourist destination, more identified with its hippy roots, and is safer, especially since the 1990’s. The Lower Haight retains more of its black roots, has a more active night-life, but is unfortunately poorer, and therefore dirtier and less safe at night. The Haight-Ashbury neighborhood loosely spans northsouth from the Panhandle to 17th Street and east-west from Divisadero Street to Stanyan Street. A portion of the Fillmore District bounded by lower Haight Street evolved into the “Lower Haight” largely due to gentrification. Slightly more upscale areas of the rapidly gentrifying Haight-Ashbury essentially seceded, forming the “Upper Haight” and “Cole Valley” districts. In the 60’s large portions of the predominantly African American Fillmore District, once thriving with a large percentage of Black home- and business-ownership, including but not limited to several famous jazz clubs, were involuntarily relocated to the Haight-Ashbury due to “urban renewal.” Urban renewal was distrusted by many as merely a means to move, usually lower-income, people around at the whim of developers. A popular protest slogan in the 1960’s was “Urban Renewal Means Negro Removal.” The Haight’s abundant Victorian homes had undergone rampant subdivision in order to accommodate the influx of WWII soldiers. Subsequently, suburbia began to sprawl and attract urban middle class whites able to afford automobiles and real estate. This phenomenon is referred to as “white flight.” San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury, with its then-surplus of affordable Victorian homes, was among the many metropolitan areas ripe for housing the influx of often large families from the rural south. They sought urban factory and other employment as agri-business displaced them from their small

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family farms. The Haight-Ashbury relatively quietly integrated and took on a “live and let live� laidback ambiance. The Beats, similarly displaced from their warehouse digs due to Financial District sprawl, also gravitated toward the Haight. They were attracted not only to the abundance of affordable housing, but also to the budding diversity consisting of S.F. State’s intellectual and increasingly anti-establishment student population (enjoying cheap group housing), an emerging (pre-Castro District) gay and lesbian community, and the African American working class families righteously distrustful of a system that had taken away their farms, their homes and now their sons to the Vietnam War. White middle class college kids derailed by the draft now identified and allied with other oppressed peoples of the world, adopted ideologies and lifestyles of gentler, kinder and more sustainable cultures. Mostly teens, but people of all ages, ethnicities, religions and economic backgrounds, tuned in, turned on and dropped out of mainstream society at rates not seen before or since. They followed their hearts toward, what seemed to subscribers of the establishment to be impossibly utopian, alternative lifestyles. Many thrived, many were victims of COINTELPRO, other lives were ruined by destructive drugs such as speed, heroin and cocaine, and some remain committed today to ushering in a more inclusive, environmentally harmonious, more egalitarian, less stressful and more fun way of life -- basically these were the hippie values.

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Get In

â– Map of Haight

By car Fell and Oak Streets, parallel one-way streets running eastwest across the northern edge of the district, offer a relatively easy way to get into the district via car from Downtown to the east. A few major north-south streets which pass through Haight are Fillmore Street, Divisadero Street (which merges into Castro Street to the south) and Masonic Avenue. Parking in the area can be very limited, however.

By public transit MUNI operates several bus routes (7-Haight, 71-HaightNoriega, plus the 6-Parnassus east of Masonic) run the length of Haight Street, connecting the area to Downtown. Nearby streets parallel to Haight also serve the area, for example the #5 on Fulton and #21 Hayes north of the Haight district. Additionally, a few lines run north-south through the district: 22-Fillmore, 24-Divisadero, 33-Stanyan and 43-Masonic. The N-Judah Muni Metro line (partially underground) also runs parallel to Haight Street several blocks to the south. An easy way to access the western portion of the Haight

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district (near Cole Valley) from downtown is to take the NJudah outbound to Cole Stret, then go right. It runs under the hill. The N-Judah continues westward, stopping at SFSU before heading into the Sunset neighborhood.

Get around If you are walking really fast, it will take about 20 minutes to walk from the Lower Haight to the Upper Haight - and it will be good exercise going up a large hill.

See ■Buena Vista Park. Steep paths to the top of its 575’ elevation lead to some nice views through the trees, but easily circumnavigated by non-enthusiasts. ■Hippie Hill. Near the district’s western border is the entrance to Golden Gate Park. Walking into the park and through a small tunnel beneath the Alvord Lake Bridge, the first large field and adjacent hill are known as Hippie Hill. In dry weather, Hippie Hill is a popular destination for locals and offers a glimpse back at the Haight’s hippie culture. There visitors will find a large and popular drum circle, amateur performers of many types from jugglers to musicians, frisbee enthusiasts, picnickers, and psychedelic drug users, all mingling happily. Don’t be surpised to find locals lighting up a joint of marijuana at Hippie Hill. Though marijuana use is still illegal in the US, California has decriminalized medical marijuana. A note from your doctor suffices to obtain a card enabling one to reliably check quanity and quality and purchase in a civilized manner over a counter. Hippie Hill is a relatively safe place to purchase marijuana, but law enforcement patrols Haight Street at the urging of

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merchants in order to maintain a teen- and tourist-friendly environment. Famous Homes. (Please note- These are all PAST addresses, none of the people listed still live there and these are peoples’ homes and though they are used to and pretty tolerant of tourists taking pictures, their privacy should be respected and one should NOT go knocking on doors) ■710 Ashbury St.- The Grateful Dead; ■719 Ashbury St.- The Hell’s Angels; ■635 Ashbury St., 122 Lyon- Janis Joplin; ■612 Ashbury St.- Country Joe McDonald; ■1018 Page St.- Big Brother and the Holding Company; ■1550 Page St.- “Hippie Temptation” house (site of CBS documentary); ■1828 Page St.- Ron Donovan (psychedelic concert poster artist); ■879 Haight St.- Flipper (famous punk band); ■635 Cole St.- Charles Manson; ■731 Buena Vista West- Graham Nash (and several owners later) Bobby McFerrin; ■264 Downey St.- Michael McClure (Beat-era playwrite, poet); ■1235 Masonic Ave.- Patty Hearst hid in Symbionese Liberation Army safe-house here; ■32 Delmar St.- Sid Vicious (site of non-fatal overdose after last Sex Pistols show)

■Duboce Park. The N Judah streetcar travels along the perimeter of the park and stops at the intersection of Noe Street and Duboce Street. The park is not attractive and is overrun with dogs and dog waste. There is a well main-

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tained children’s playground that attracts children from the neighborhood.

Do ■Haight Ashbury Flower Power Walking Tour, http:// www.haightashburytour.com. By guides who experienced the 60’s --and can actually still remember it! 40% architecture/general neighborhood history and 60% counter-culture hippy history comprise this fabulously far-out, fun and informative 2.5 hour flashback through the neighborhood; includes a trip to the Psychedelic History Museum in a restored Victorian, open only in conjunction with the tour. Tour starts at the McDonalds parking lot at the corner of Stanyan and Waller every Tuesday and Saturday at 9:30AM, every Thursday at 2PM and every Friday at 11AM. Price: $20 per person. ■The Haunted Haight Walking Tour, Phone: +1 415 8631416, http://www.hauntedhaight.com. Shows the spooky and macabre history of the neighborhood in an evening walking tour. Tour starts in front of Coffee to the People at 7PM on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and Mondays. Price: $20 per person. ■Haight Ashbury Street Fair, http://www.haightashburystreetfair.org/drupal_hasf. On the second Sunday of June, people pack the Upper Haight for this event featuring local bands, food stalls and plenty of shopping. ■The Red Vic Movie House, http://www.redvicmoviehouse.com. Offers a rapidly changing selection of independent and second-run films its tiny auditorium. It is worker owned and run, and schedules many films about local culture, surfing, and eastern philosophy. Tickets are always cheaper than the chain theaters, film directors often visit to answer questions about their work, and the food and soda are non-corporate. One caveat: the seats can be a bit

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uncomfortable; however patrons have a choice of theaterstyle seats or couch-like cushioned benches. ■Sit in cafes, and watch people walk the streets over multiple cups of coffee.

Buy Haight-Ashbury has more shopping and variety of shops than Lower Haight, with great record stores, book stores, fabric stores, shoe stores, cafes with music and poetry, a free clinic, and head shops from the ‘60’s. There are several places worth checking out, including..

■Amoeba Music, 1855 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 831-1200, http://www.amoeba.com, Hours: M-Sa 10:30AM-10PM, Su 11AM-9PM. The best place in San Francisco to buy vinyl and cds, with an emphasis on indie music. It has one of the largest selections for an indie music store in the country. ■Booksmith, 1644 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 863-8688, http://www.booksmith.com, Hours: M-Sa 10AM-10PM, Su 10AM-8PM. An independent bookstore that’s been around since the 1970s, this bookstore is best known for its events program, with many book signings from famous and honored authors. ■Doe, 629a Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 558-8588, http:// www.doe-sf.com. Local designer clothing and small gifts, mags, small fridge with drinks. ■Giant Robot, 618 Shrader Street, Phone: +1 415 876-4773, http://www.giantrobot.com, Hours: M-Sa 11:30AM-8PM, Su 12AM-7PM. From the people behind Giant Robot magazine, which looks at cool Asian fashion / art / design / books / pop culture. The shop does the same, and sells cool T-shirts, some high-end manga and Asian graphic novels, art books and designer toys. ■Life, 604a Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 252-9312, http://www. lifesanfrancisco.com. Exotic perfumes and aromatherapy

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oils, incense, bath beads, jewelery, purses, cards, vaguely east indian themed goods, get some henna painted on your hands in the henna lounge. ■Positively Haight Street, 1400 Haight Street, southeast corner of Haight Street and Masonic Avenue, Phone: +1 415 252-8747, http://www.positivelyhaightstreet.com. Channel your inner hippie and peace out in this delightful hippie t-shirt shop. ■Roberts Hardware, 1629 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 431-3392, http://www.robertshardware.com. A non-chain hardware store with over 20,000 items in inventory and another 200,000 available by special order. The oldest family-owned store on Haight Street, celebrating 75 years in 2006. Staffed by knowledgeable, friendly workers who are willing to take the time to explain how to make your repairs without any of the condescension or attitude found in other stores. ■Villians, 1672 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 626-5939, http:// www.villainssf.com, Hours: Daily 11AM-7PM. A trendy clothing store that is mirrored across the street by its sister store Villians Vault. While clothing is expensive, it is on the cusp of indie fashion. ■Zuzu’s Petals, 678 Haight Street, off Steiner, Phone: +1 415 863-8199, Hours: Su, Tu-Th 10AM-7PM, F-Sa 10AM-9:30PM. Fresh cut & silk flowers, unusual, artistic gift wrap paper, cards and small gifts.

Eat ■SoMe, 1391 Haight, Corner of Haight and Masonic, Phone: +1 415 913-7770, Hours: Daily 11AM-7PM. The strange little mom and pop store in front of the bus stop. A definite stop on Haight if you are gift shopping. You’ll find men’s and women’s shoes and clothing as well as handmade jewelry and cool goodie boxes and trinkets designed by local artists.

Budget

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■Ali Baba’s Cave, 531 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 255-7820, Hours: F-Sa 11AM-2AM, Su-Th 11AM-12PM. Quick and friendly Mediterranean food. Shish-kabob will take some time, but you can walk out or dine in with a shawerma or falafel in under two minutes. Watch out for the platters -- the servings are huge. Price: $2-$8. ■All You Knead, 1466 Haight Street, between Ashbury and Masonic, Phone: +1 415 552-4550, Hours: Daily 8AM-11PM. A cavernous space filled with fishtanks and comfortable booths, All You Knead serves up huge and hearty brunches as well as casual diner-style dinner meals. Eggs benedicts are a specialty. Price: $5-15. ■Citrus Club, 1790 Haight Street, at Shrader, Phone: +1 415 387-6366, Hours: Su-Th 11:30AM-10PM, F-Sa 11:30AM-11PM. This is an excellent noodle house with dishes chosen from all Asian traditional cuisines. Portions are generous, with an emphasis on flavor over presentation. Decent prices and an unpretentious decor make for a pleasurable group meal. Price: $5-$8. ■Estela’s Fresh Sandwiches, 250 Fillmore Street, at Haight, Phone: +1 415 864-1850. The name speaks true. Also try Estela’s delicious fruit smoothies. Price: $5-$7. ■Kate’s Kitchen, 471 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 626-3984, Hours: M 9AM-2:45PM, Tu-F 8AM-2:45PM, Sa-Su 8:30AM3:45PM. Breakfast - Southern style. If you’re really hungry, try the French Toast Orgy. Expect a long wait for weekend brunch ( just like everywhere else in San Francisco). ■Katz’s Bagels, 663 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 621-5183. Bagels, pizza, and free wi fi. Dine in and enjoy the portrait gallery and a garden view. ■La Cafe du Soleil, 200 Fillmore Street, corner of Fillmore and Waller, Phone: +1 415 934-8637, Hours: Daily 7AM-10PM. Coffee, pastries, all day serves salads, sandwiches, pastries, soup of the day, beer & wine bar, live free jazz most Sundays 5-8PM, outdoor seating. Chic, casual, family friendly. Free wifi, but limited power outlets. ■Love ‘n Haight, 553 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 252-8190. Often overlooked, but a neighborhood favorite. A family-

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owned sandwich joint with an Asian flair. Meat and fake meat sandwiches made to order. Try the “veg” duck. ■Metro Caffe, 247 Fillmore Street, Fillmore at Haight, Phone: +1 415 621-9536, http://www.metrocaffe.com, Hours: M-Sa 11AM-10PM, Su 11AM-9PM. Burgers and cheesesteaks. Price: $6-$7. ■Rosamunde Sausage Grill, 545 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 437-6851, Hours: Daily 11:30AM-10PM. Delicious sausages and not much else. Now with a vegan choice! Get it for here, to go, or bring it next door to Toronado and have it with some beer.

Mid-range ■Asqew Grill, 1607 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 701-9301, http://www.asqewgrill.com. Serves an array of flame-grilled skewers prepared in unexpected ways. ■Axum Cafe, 698 Haight Street, at Pierce, Phone: +1 415 252-7912, http://www.axumcafe.com, Hours: Daily 5:30PM10:30PM. This Ethiopian restaurant is very affordable. Try the vegetarian sampler. If you are hungry, order for two. Wash it down with an Ethiopian beer (2 kinds). Price: $7$14. ■Cha-Cha-Cha, 1801 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 386-5758, http://www.cha3.com, Hours: Su-Th 5PM-11PM, F-Sa 5PM11:30PM. Popular Cuban tapas place. Good sangria. Typical wait is 1-2 hours on weekends, and they don’t take reservations. Great bar, always crowded with a fun ‘artsy’ crowd. Be warned, the sangria packs a punch! Price: $7-$15. ■The Grind, 783 Haight Street, Haight near Pierce, Phone: +1 415 864-0955, http://www.thegrindcafe.com, Hours: M-F 7AM-8PM, Sa 7AM-6PM, Su 8AM-6PM. Coffee shop with breakfast, lunch, and an amazing array of desserts, pastries, and munchies. Indoor and patio seating. Price: $6-$10. ■Hanabi, 509 Haight Street, at Fillmore next to Whole Foods, Phone: +1 415 621-1500. Decent sushi, good hot food. The excellent music is the biggest draw. ■Indian Oven, 233 Fillmore Street, Phone: +1 415 626-1628, http://indianovensf.com, Hours: Daily 5PM-11PM. This Indi-

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an restaurant is on the expensive side, although it is pretty good. Expect a wait any day of the week. Price: $8-$19. ■Memphis Minnie’s, 576 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 8647675, http://www.memphisminnies.com, Hours: Tu-Sa 11AM-10PM, Su 11AM-9PM. Great southern-style barbecue and (oddly enough) sake. Price: $8-$14. ■Mythic Pizza, 551 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 864-1999, Hours: Daily 12PM-2AM. Pizza by the slice. Price: $12-$20. ■Naan ‘n’ Chutney, 525 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 2551625. Indian and Pakistani. ■Pork Store Cafe, 1451 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 864-6981, Hours: M-W, Sa-Su 8AM-4PM, Th-F 7AM-4PM. Extremely popular breakfast spot. Always a line on the weekends. Very inexpensive, and friendly diner atmosphere and food. Price: $7-$16. ■Raja, 500 Haight Street, at Fillmore, Phone: +1 415 2556000, http://www.rajasf.com, Hours: Daily, lunch 11:30AM2:30PM, dinner 5PM-11PM. Decent food, but slow service. Price: $8-$20. ■Rotee, 400 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 552-8309, http:// www.roteesf.com, Hours: Lunch Sa-Su 12PM-3PM, Dinner Daily 5PM-10:30PM. A casual, inexpensive Indian restaurant with modern decor and excellent food. No alcohol license, but patrons can bring their own beer from the liquor store across the street. Price: $7-$15. ■Squat & Gobble, 237 Fillmore Street, between Haight and Waller, Phone: +1 415 487-0551, http://www.squatandgobble. com. Cafe and crepery, part of a small San Francisco chain. Popular for breakfast and lunch, crowded on weekends. Outdoor dining on the back patio when the weather is nice. The side potatoes are a favorite. Price: $6-$10. ■Squat & Gobble, 1428 Haight Street, between Ashbury and Masonic, Phone: +1 415 864-8484, http://www.squatandgobble.com. This is the chain’s other Haight location. Price: $6$10. ■Thep Phenom, 400 Waller Street, Phone: +1 415 4312526, http://www.thepphanom.com, Hours: Daily 5:30PM10:30PM. Sometimes called the best Thai in San Francisco, call ahead as this restaurant can be very busy. Or walk in

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with a small party and have a Singha in the back while you wait to be seated at a family-style table. Price: $8-$15.

Splurge ■Kan Zaman, 1793 Haight Street, at Shrader, Phone: +1 415 751-9656, Hours: M-Th 5PM-12AM, Sa 11:30AM-2AM, Su 11:30AM-12AM. A popular Middle Eastern restaurant, success has made Kan Zaman a difficult restaurant. Reservations are practically mandatory, with wait times up to 2 hours on weekends. The hazards come with a payoff: Kan Zaman has fine food at reasonable prices, of course, but the atmosphere is raucous and exciting. Belly dancers perform nightly, and a postprandial hookah pipe shared around a table is de rigueur. Definitely a night on the town. Price: $15-20. ■RNM, 598 Haight Street, Haight at Steiner, Phone: +1 415 551-7900, http://www.rnmrestaurant.com, Hours: Tu-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-11PM. The most upscale (and expensive) restaurant in the neighborhood. The small plates of comfort food will warm you up. Price: $10-$25.

Drink Bars ■The Alembic, 1725 Haight, next to the Red Vic Movie House, Phone: +1 415 666-0822. Styling itself a ‘Whiskey Bar’, the Alembic is a good place to have classic cocktails as well as original creations. Can be too busy on the weekends. ■Aub Zam-Zam, 1633 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 861-2545, Hours: M-F 3PM-2AM, Sa-Su 1PM-2AM. A 1930’s vintage cocktail bar with a beautifully restored arabesque art-deco decor. Written up in ‘W’ and ‘Newsweek’ magazines for the best martinis in the US back in the 80s. Drinks are moderately expensive but of exceptional quality, even from the well. An intimate and classy setting for a romantic evening with a juke box that leans toward swing and big band music.

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Named for the Well of Zamzam, one of the holiest places in Islam, a source of blessed beverages. ■Danny Coyle’s, 668 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 558-8375, Hours: M-Th 2PM-2AM, F 12PM-2AM, Sa-Su 7AM-2AM. Irish pub where the Guiness is served with a smile, and if you’re lucky, an Irish accent to match. ■Deluxe Club, 1511 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 552-6949. This small, stylish bar has been around for a long time. It’s more of a cocktail bar and has a limited selection of beer. Deluxe hosts free comedy on Monday nights and free music on Wednesday and other nights, always by local acts. The bar-tenders are friendly and the crowd is arty and hip. ■Gold Cane, 1569 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 626-1112. A great place for cheap, strong drinks, and friendly bar-tenders. Divey atmosphere, local’s crowd. Has a pool table and small outdoor patio for smokers of all types. ■Hobson’s Choice, 1601 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 6215859, http://www.hobsonschoice.com. Offers comfortable and beautiful Victorian decor as well as original alcoholic punch recipes served in large bowls (watch out, they’re stronger than you think!). A great juke-box makes it most popular with the local USF college crowd. This is great if you want to pick up well dressed college aged kids. Otherwise, you may be annoyed by the large crowds, meat-market atmosphere, and unfriendly bar-tenders. Less crowded and less college dominated on weekend afternoons. ■Mad Dog in the Fog, 530 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 6267279. This is an English pub where you can come to watch soccer on TV or go out back where you can smoke. Occasionally live music at night. The hotline for when matches are being played is 1-415-442-7994. Since they open for live

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matches from England as early as 6AM, its the best place to get a beer before noon in the area on the weekend. ■Magnolia, 1398 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 864-7468, http:// www.magnoliapub.com. Serves solid food and microbrews, including some excellent cask conditioned beers. ■Molotov’s, 582 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 558-8019. Leans towards rockabilly and mohawk crowd. Dog and food friendly. ■Nickie’s, 466 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 255-0300, http:// www.nickies.com, Hours: M-F 4PM-2AM, Sa-Su 10AM-2AM. Dance club and bar - Grateful Dead night every Monday, and popular dub and funk nights during the week as well. ■Noc-Noc, 557 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 861-5811, http:// www.nocnocs.com. A very artsy atmosphere. You can get many Trappist monk beers here. Live DJ nightly. Tarot readings Mondays 6-9PM. Beer, wine and sake (no hard liquor). Alas for smokers: Big Brother finally put down the rebellion and smoking is now relegated to the sidewalk in front. ■Toronado, 547 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 863-2276, http:// www.toronado.com, Hours: Daily 11:30AM-2AM. This bar has forty-six beers on tap and a bottled beer menu which covers two whole pages. They serve many microbrews and imports from Germany, Belgium, and Japan. Come through the dutch door and if there is no room in the front bar, there is a back room with tables. No food is served, but you may bring food in from any of the many restaurants nearby. ■Trax, 1437 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 864-4213. A gay bar for gay men and lesbians that is also very much straightfriendly. Small, divey, and a local’s scene. Drinks are cheap, and on Saturday nights it offers ridiculously cheap drink specials ($1 well cocktails before 10pm). ■Underground SF, 424 Haight Street, at Webster, Phone: +1 415 864-7386, http://www.undergroundsf.com. Dance club and bar, formerly called The Top, which features different theme nights, some of which are geared to queer folks and their friends.

Coffee

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■Bean There, 201 Steiner Street, Steiner at Waller, Phone: +1 415 255-8855, Hours: M-F 6AM-8PM, Sa 7AM-8PM. Good coffees with a nice selection of pastries, bagels, and focaccia bread. Great place to hang out and read a book. Outdoor seating. Free ad-supported wi-fi. ■Cafe du Soleil, 200 Fillmore Street, at Waller Street, Phone: +1 415 934 8637. A mildly pretentious French cafe serving decent coffee and overpriced sandwiches. The locals cannot get enough of this place. Some outdoor seating for the rare pleasant day. Also serving homemade potato chips. ■Cafe International, 508 Haight Street, Haight at Fillmore, Phone: +1 415 552-7390, http://www.cafeinternational.com. Offers net access, live music, food, and a variety of beverages from coffee, tea, beer, wine to fresh squeezed juices. Good desserts. ■Coffee to the People, 1206 Masonic Avenue, just off of Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 626-2435, http://www.coffeetothepeople.com, Hours: Daily 6AM-8PM. A favorite community gathering spot, Coffee to the People serves giant sandwiches, hearty soups, and organic and fair trade coffee and tea. Their croissant breakfast sandwiches are especially popular with locals. The shop is laptop/work friend, with free wi fi and almost a dedicated section to people working around notepads and notebooks. The shop has an overtly political theme and decor and is a good spot for people watching.

Sleep ■Metro Hotel, 319 Divisadero Street, Phone: +1 415 861-5364, info@metrohotelsf.com, Fax: +1 415 863-1970, http://www. metrohotelsf.com/, Check In: 2PM-Midnight, Check Out: 12PM. A reasonably priced hotel at the corner of Page and Divisadero Streets, one block north of Haight Street. The rooms are quite basic, but functional, clean, and quite inexpensive for the central city. There is an excellent French restaurant downstairs, with outdoor dining and weekend

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brunch. Rooms directly over Divisadero Street can be quite loud on the weekends. Price: $76-$130. ■Red Victorian Bed & Breakfast, 1665 Haight Street, Phone: +1 415 864-1978, peacefulworldtravel@redvic.com, http://www.redvic.com/. A throwback to the Haight Ashbury’s glory days during the 1960s, this peace and love themed B&B has several eclectically themed rooms and suites, as well as a cafe downstairs. Price: $90-$200.

Contact ■Coffee to the People, 1206 Masonic Avenue, just off of Haight St, Phone: +1 415 626-2435, http://www.coffeetothepeople.com, Hours: Daily 6AM-8PM. Price: Free wireless internet. ■Rockin’ Java, 1821 Haight Street, Haight and Schrader, Phone: +1 415 831-8842. Price: Free wireless internet. Pay by the hour internet terminals.

Stay safe Lower Haight can be dangerous late at night after the bars close. As is wise in any urban area, travel smart when on foot at night. There are always other people walking up and down Haight Street so you won’t be alone.

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The Avenue

â– Clement Street, Inner Richmond

The Avenues is a popular nickname for western San Francisco, made up of Golden Gate Park and the neighborhoods of Richmond and Sunset. It is bounded by the Pacific Ocean on the west, Lake Street on the north, Arguello Blvd and Stanyan Street (from Lake to Frederick Street) and 7th Avenue (from Lincoln to around Golden Gate Heights Park, or about Quintara) and 19th Avenue (from Quintara to Sloat) on the east, and Sloat Blvd on the south.

Understand The Richmond is a neighborhood bordered on the north by Lincoln Park and the Presidio, Arguello Boulevard on the east, Golden Gate Park on the south, and the Pacific Ocean on the west. The Richmond is divided into the eastern Inner Richmond and western Outer Richmond by CA Highway 1 (Park Presidio/13th Avenue), which runs north-south. San Francisco’s Sunset District covers a large, mostly residential area on the west side of San Francisco. It is bordered on the west by Ocean Beach, on the north by Golden Gate Park, on the south by Sloat Boulevard, and on the east by a vague boundary roughly around 7th Avenue. It was built on a grid pattern and the vast majority of the housing

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in the area was constructed between 1920 and 1950. Sunset is divided into the eastern Inner Sunset and the western Outer Sunset by CA Highway 1 (19th Avenue). Sunset’s majority population is Asian-American, and this increases west of 19th Avenue in the Outer Sunset, where Chinese and Chinese-Americans make up a little bit less then 40% of residents. A sizeable Irish and Irish-American population also exists in Sunset. On clear days you will see many locals and tourists watching the sunset at Ocean Beach; still, the moniker “Sunset” is a bit of a misnomer as the area is often covered in fog due to its proximity to the cold Pacific Ocean. However, whether or not the sun is shining, it is a charming neighborhood to visit.

Get in

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■Map of The Avenues

By Muni Richmond’s central east-west artery is Geary Boulevard. Frequent bus service from downtown via Union Square is provided by the 38-Geary bus. Even though the district only spans eight blocks from north to south, there are also parallel bus lines 1-California, 2-Clement, and 4-Sutter north of Geary and lines 31-Balboa and 5-Fulton south of Geary Boulevard. Much of the Sunset neighborhood is accessible via the N-Judah and L-Taraval Muni Metro light rail lines. Eastwest bus lines through Sunset include the 23-Monterey, 48-Quintara/24th St, 66-Quintara and 71-Haight-Noreiga. North-south bus lines which connect Richmond and Sunset through Golden Gate Park include 18-46th Ave, 28-19th Ave and 29-Sunset. Additionally, the 44-O’Shaughnessy runs up from Twin Peaks to the southeast and through Golden Gate Park past the de Young Museum, continuing up 6th Avenue into the Richmond neighborhood.

By car Running north/south through the area and serving as the major traffic artery is Highway 1 (19th Avenue). In Sunset is another major road called Sunset Boulevard, located between 36th and 37th Avenues and running north/south from Lincoln Way to Sloat Boulevard. On the western edge of the district is The Great Highway, which runs north/ south along Ocean Beach. Geary Street is the central east/ west artery through Richmond. Fulton Street runs eastwest, marking the northern edge of Golden Gate Park while Lincoln Way runs east/west along the southern edge of

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Golden Gate Park. The southern border is marked by Sloat Boulevard which runs east/west.

See Grand View Park, surrounded by 14th and 15th Avenues along Noriega Street in the Sunset district. Worth visiting because of the stupendous views it offers over downtown San Francisco, Golden Gate Park, the Pacific Ocean, Marin headlands, and across to the Sutro Tower. ■Moraga Street Stairs, on a steep pedestrian only section of Moraga Street between 15th and 16th Avenue. Stair risers comprise a colorful mosaic added during a 2005 renovation of the stairs. Climb to the top then go left or right to find a way into Grand View Park. ■Mountain Lake Park, located just north of the intersection of Lake and Funston at the southern end of the Presidio park, http://www.fmlp.org. A small hiking trail winds around this scenic lake, noted for its historic importance in that it supplied water to the nearby colonial Spanish settlement of the Presidio. There is also a playground and a tennis court at the southern side of the lake. ■Sigmund Stern Grove, along Sloat Boulevard between 19th and 34th Avenues. Home to many concerts and performances during the summer months which are free to the public, including the Stern Grove Festival.

Movie Theaters ■4 Star Theatre, 2200 Clement Street, at 23rd, Phone: +1 415 666-3488, http://www.hkinsf.com/4star. Independently-

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owned theatre showing Hong Kong and alternative world cinema. ■Balboa Theater, 3630 Balboa Street, at 38th, Phone: +1 415 221-8184, http://www.balboamovies.com/. Catch a doublefeature for $8.50 at this historic independent movie house.

Golden Gate Park

■de Young Museum

Between Fulton Street on the north, Lincoln Way on the south, Stanyan Street on the east and Ocean Beach on the west. 5AM-Midnight. Free. Once an area of sand dunes, Golden Gate Park is a roughly 1/2 mile-by-four mile urban oasis, with windmills, bison, museums, lakes, and a carousel hidden among its charms. At 1,017 acres, it is 174 acres larger than New York’s Central Park, so unless you have a bike, you’ll want to plan which area you want to visit, especially along the east (Stanyan street) to west (the Ocean) axis. During the summer to October, a free shuttle bus circulates. On Sundays and holidays, JFK Drive between Transverse and Kezar is closed to vehicular traffic; this car-free zone is popular with walkers,

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cyclists, and runners. The number 5 trolleybus runs along the park’s north boundary (Fulton Street), and offers the most frequent service across the park and to downtown. The N streetcar runs two blocks south of the park’s southern boundary with similar service as the 5 bus.

■AIDS Memorial Grove, at the intersection of Bowling Green and Middle Drive East, Phone: +1 415 750-8340, http://www.aidsmemorial.org. A national memorial to AIDS victims. Price: Free.. ■Beach Chalet and Park Chalet, 1000 Great Hwy, at John F Kennedy Dr south of Fulton, Phone: +1 415 751-2766, http://www.beachchalet.com/. A beautiful 1930’s building, the Beach Chalet is open for lunch, drinks, or dinner overlooking Ocean Beach and its brave surfers. Inside the Park Chalet are some exhibits with artifacts related to the history of the Golden Gate Park and San Francisco. ■Buffalo Paddock, along John F Kennedy drive between 36th Avenue and Chain of Lakes Drive. An unusual attraction is this herd of buffalo which have been here for over a century. Price: Free. ■California Academy of Sciences, 55 Music Concourse Dr., Phone: +1 415 379-8000, info@calacademy.org, http:// www.calacademy.org, Hours: M-Sa 9:30AM-5PM; Su 11AM5PM. Recently re-opened in September of 2008 after extensive renovations. Contains numerous science exhibits, including a planetarium, an aquarium, and a natural history museum. Price: $24.95 adults, $19/95 seniors/teens, $14.95 children, free for ages 6 and under. ■Children’s Playground, just off Bowling Green Drive north of MLK Drive, Phone: +1 415 831-2700. A large and unique kid’s play area. Next door is a historic Carousel, which runs 10AM-4:30PM daily from Memorial Day-Labor Day and Saturdays and Sundays the rest of the year. Price: Carousel rides $1.50 adults, $0.50 children.. ■Conservatory of Flowers, 100 John F Kennedy Drive, Phone: +1 415 666-7001, http://www.conservatoryofflowers. org, Hours: Tu-Su 9AM-4:30PM. This antique palatial greenhouse, one of the first structures of its kind in the county, is

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filled with a huge variety of beautiful and exotic plant species. Price: $5 adults, $3 teens/seniors/students, $1.50 children, free for children 4 and under, free on the first Tuesday of each month. ■de Young Museum, 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, Phone: +1 415 750-3600, http://www.famsf.org/deyoung, Hours: TuTh, Sa-Su 9:30AM-5:15PM, F 9:30AM-8:45PM. A modern and ethnic art focused museum, with three levels of fascinating exhibits with contemporary and historical pieces from America as well as art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas in a uniquely-designed building with courtyards and sculpture gardens. One corner of the building has a large tower which offers a lovely 360-degree view of the park and surroundings. Price: $10 adults, $7 seniors, $6 teens/students, free for children 12 and under. Special exhibits may require extra admission; first Tuesday of each month free. ■Dutch Windmill, next to the Beach Chalet. Once used for park irrigation in the past, now a scenic oddity at the western end of the park. A lesser-known windmill, the Murphy Windmill, is located at the southwestern corner of the park, but is under restoration. Near the windmills is the lovely Queen Wilhelmina Tulip Garden. Price: Free. ■Japanese Tea Garden, on Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive just north of MLK Drive, Phone: +1 415 752-4227, Hours: March-October daily 8:30AM-6PM, November-February daily 8:30AM-5PM. The oldest public Japanese garden in the country, with beautiful plants, ponds, bridges, and Japanese-style structures including a tea house. Tours are

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available every Wednesday and Sunday at 1PM starting at the main gate. Price: $5 adults, $1.50 seniors/children. ■Rose Garden, between John F. Kennedy Drive and Park Presidio Drive, just west of the de Young Museum. A wide variety of roses on display. Price: Free.

■Sunrise at Stow Lake

■San Francisco Botanical Gardens, (formerly the Strybing Arboretum), main entrance on 9th Avenue just north of Lincoln Way, secondary entrance at the Friend Gate at MLK Drive and Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, Phone: +1 415 564-3239, http://www.sfbotanicalgarden.org, Hours: M-F 8AM-4:30PM, Sa-Su and Holidays 10AM-5PM. One of the largest botanical gardens on the west coast, the Botanical Gardens cover 55 acres with thousands of varieties of plants from around the world and multiple specialized gardens and miles of trails (seriously, the place is huge). One of the most unique attractions is the Redwood Trail, which runs through a naturalistic redwood forest reminiscent of the ones north of San Francisco along the Californian coast. There is also a bookstore and library on the premises, near the main entrance. Free guided tours of the gardens depart from the bookstore daily at 1:30PM with an extra tour on the weekends at 10:30AM. On Wednesdays, Fridays and

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Sundays another free tour departs from the Friend Gate at 2PM. Price: Free. ■Shakespeare Garden, at Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and Middle Drive East. With roses and other flowers mentioned in his plays. Price: Free. ■Spreckels Lake, on the northern side of the park near 36th Avenue. As the home of the San Francisco Model Yacht Club, one is likely to see model yachts sailing on the lake. ■Stow Lake, Phone: Boathouse: +1 415 752-0347. This pleasant lake surrounding Strawberry Hill, a scenic island with excellent views and great picnic spots, is an excellent place to relax. Boating (several types for rent) is available from a boathouse, which is open daily from 10AM-4PM. Price: Boat rentals $13-$17 per hour.

Lincoln Park Lincoln Park defines the extreme Northwestern corner of San Francisco. It provides majestic views of the Marin Headlands, the Golden Gate Bridge from the Ocean side, and the Pacific Ocean itself. A portion of the Coastal Trail runs through Lincoln Park from the Cliff House north to the Golden Gate Bridge. The #18 Muni bus goes from the Legion of Honor museum at the center of the park via the Cliff House to Golden Gate Park, while the very frequent #38 Geary buses terminate in between. Drivers will want to take the El Camino del Mar Drive through the small Seacliff area on the northwest side to view some fancy mansions between Lincoln Park and the Presidio.

■Legion of Honor Museum, 34th Avenue and El Camino del Mar, Phone: +1 415 750-3600, http://www.famsf.org/legion, Hours: Tu-Su 9:30AM–5:15PM. Inside this building, a model of the Palais de la Légion d’Honneur in Paris, is an incredible collection of mainly European art, with works of the Renaissance, Baroque, and Impressionist periods, with art from some of the fundamental artists of their times, as well as some works from the 20th century from the likes of Picasso. One of the highlights of the collection is a collec-

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tion of sculptures by Rodin, including The Thinker at the front entrance. Price: $10 adults, $7 seniors, $6 teens, children 12 and under free. ■Cliff House, 1090 Point Lobos Avenue, Phone: +1 415 3863330, http://www.nps.gov/goga/clho.htm. The Cliff House, a well known landmark at the extreme western end of the park, provides both semi-casual and a more formal eating and drinking place. Next door is the ruins of the Sutro Baths, a former swimming pool. Just off shore is Seal Rock, home to a population of sea lions.

Do ■Ocean Beach, along Great Highway between Point Lobos Avenue and Sloat Boulevard. A good place to walk, watch surfers, or just look at the ocean. Do not swim under any circumstances: the beach has an unusual riptide which claims several lives (usually tourists) each year. If you want to ocean swim, head to China Beach. Bonfires often line Ocean Beach on warmer days. Permits are legally required for bonfires (so be forewarned), but often spur of the moment bonfires happen on weekends. Local grocery stores usually sell cords of wood for this very purpose. Please remember to clean up after yourself, and don’t leave any broken glass on the beach! ■China Beach, at the end of Sea Cliff Avenue just off El Camino del Mar. A small, secluded beach at the bottom of a steep slope, with beautiful views to the north towards the Golden Gate Bridge. You can swim here, but the water is quite brisk.

Buy ■6th Avenue Aquarium, 425 Clement Street, at 6th Ave, Phone: +1 415 668-7190, http://www.6thaveaquarium.net, Hours: M-F 11AM-10PM, Sa-Su 10AM-10PM. Small store sell-

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ing aquarium supplies and fishes, but in a small scale beats many public exhibits for fun and colorful fish. ■Amazing Fantasy, 650 Irving Street, between 7th and 8th, Phone: +1 415 681-4344, http://www.amazingfantasy.com/. A comic book store, owned by guy named Frank. Friendly staff. They have a small collection of back issues, and will order anything for you by request. ■Black Oak Books, 630 Irving Street, between 7th Ave and 8th Ave, Phone: +1 415 564-0877, http://www.blackoakbooks.com, Hours: Daily 11AM-9PM. New and used book store. Feels a little like a library when you get in, but browsing is encouraged, and staff is knowledgeable. ■Citi Shoes, 751 Irving Street, between 8th Ave and 9th Ave, Phone: +1 415 665-6112, http://www.sanfranciscocityshoes. com, Hours: M-F 11AM-7PM, Sa 10AM-6PM, Su 11AM-5PM. Many styles from sneakers, to dress shoes, to stilettos. ■Green Apple Books & Music, 506 Clement Street, at 6th Ave, Phone: +1 415 387-2272, http://www.greenapplebooks. com, Hours: Su-Th 10AM-10:30PM, F-Sa 10AM-11:30PM. Renowned independent book and record store dating back to before the Beat Era. Both used and new books. ■Kamei Restaurant & Household Supply, 547 Clement Street, at 7th Ave, Phone: +1 415 666-3699, Hours: Daily 9AM7PM. Huge, affordable selection of kitchen supplies and household items. ■Super Tokio, 251 Clement Street, at 4th Ave, Phone: +1 415 668-1118. Tiny store packed with Japanese snacks, toys, and other goodies. ■Tutti Frutti, 718 Irving Street, between 8th Ave and 9th Ave, Phone: +1 415 661-8504, Hours: M-Sa 10:30AM-6:30PM, Su 11AM-6PM. A fun shop with great gift items that range from “Worst Case Scenario” guides, to dictators-of-the-world finger puppets, to knitting kits, to Seasame Street T-shirts, to

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“nerdspeak” flashcards. This store has the kitsch you are looking for. Kind staff will ask you if you need anything.

Eat A thriving restaurant area is to be found in the Inner Sunset around 9th Avenue and Irving Street. There is also a major Asian shopping district in the Outer Sunset on Irving from 19th to 27th Avenues with restaurants, supermarkets, a Taiwanese bakery, and tapioca drink places. Another small restaurant and shopping district in the Outer Sunset is located along Noreiga Street. In the Richmond district there is a major Asian shopping district on Clement Street from 2nd to 12th Avenues with restaurants, markets, a number of dim sum (Cantonese snacks, literally `touch-the-heart’) vendors, Hong Kong style bakeries, as well as Japanese, Thai, Burmese, and Korean restaurants, and tapioca drink places. Most other ethnic cuisines are represented as well. Not many tourists here.

Budget ■ABC Bakery Cafe, 2500 Noriega Street, between 32nd Ave and 33rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 681-8800, Hours: Daily 7AM3AM. Hong Kong style restaurant and bakery. Price: $4-$7. ■Arizmendi Bakery, 1331 9th Ave, between Irving St and Judah St, Phone: +1 415 566-3117, http://www.arizmendibakery.com, Hours: Tu-F 7AM-7PM, Sa 8AM-7PM, Su 8AM-4PM. Chocolate things!!! and yummy pizza. ■Art’s Cafe, 747 Irving Street, between 8th and 9th, Phone: +1 415 665-7440, http://www.artscafesf.com/, Hours: Tu-F 7AM-3PM, Sa 7AM-4PM, Su 7:30AM-3:30PM. Tiny traditional diner with some Korean specials. Price: $4-$7. ■Bashful Bull Too, 3600 Taraval Street, at 46th Ave, Phone: +1 415 759-8112. Chicken-fried steak with country gravy, and

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American breakfast standards: It’s the last full breakfast before the Pacific. Price: $5-$15. ■Chabaa Thai Cuisine, 2123 Irving Street, between 22nd Ave and 23rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 753-3347, Hours: Daily 11AM1AM. ■Cheung Hing Chinese Restaurant, 2339 Noriega Street, between 30th Ave and 31st Ave, Phone: +1 415 665-3271. Cantonese BBQ classics and the best roast duck in the city. Price: $4-$7. Gordo’s, http://www.gordotaqueria.com, Hours: Daily 10AM10PM. Cheap, reliable, rapid burritos and tacos. ■ 2252 Clement Street, between 23rd and 24th, Phone: +1 415 387-4484. ■ 5450 Geary Boulevard, between 18th and 19th, Phone: +1 415 668-8226. ■ 1239 9th Ave, between Lincoln and Irving near Golden Gate Park, Phone: +1 415 566-6011. ■Howard’s, 1309 9th Ave, between Irving St and Judah St, Phone: +1 415 564-4723, Hours: M-F 7AM-9PM, Sa 8AM-9PM, Su 8AM-3PM. Awesome breakfasts. ■Joe’s Ice Cream, 5351 Geary Blvd, at 18th Ave, Phone: +1 415 751-1950, http://www.joesicecream.com/, Hours: Su, Tu-Th 11AM-10PM, F-Sa 11AM-11PM, closed Mondays (grill closes at 9PM). A classic American ice cream parlor with an Asian twist. ■Johnny’s Hamburgers, 2305 Irving Street, between 24th Ave and 25th Ave, Phone: +1 415 681-7666, Hours: Daily 7AM10PM. Price: $3-$6. ■Khan Toke Thai House, 5937 Geary Blvd, between 23rd and 24th, Phone: +1 415 668-6654. An excellent and reasonably priced Thai restaurant with much better ambiance than your average Thai place. King of Thai Noodle House. Cheap and consistently good.

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■ 639 Clement Street, between 7th and 8th, Phone: +1 415 7525198. ■ 346 Clement Street, between 4th and 5th, Phone: +1 415 8319953. ■Le Soleil, 133 Clement Street, between 3rd and 4th Avenues, Phone: +1 415 668-4848, http://www.lesoleilusa.com, Hours: Su-M 11AM-10PM, F-Sa 11AM-10:30PM. Gourmet Vietnamese cuisine. Try the soft shell crabs and the appetizer platter - yum! ■Ming Tai Wun-Tun Noodle, 2455 Noriega Street, between 31st Ave and 32nd Ave, Phone: +1 415 681-0430. Huge shrimp wontons/shui gow/shrimp dumplings. ■Pho Hoa Clement, 239 Clement Street, at 4th Ave, Phone: +1 415 379-9008. Super-cheap Vietnamese pho and sandwiches. Price: Daily 10AM-10PM. ■Pho Phu Quoc (PPQ), 1816 Irving Street, between 19th and 20th Ave, Phone: +1 415 661-8869, Hours: M-Sa 10:30AM11PM, Su 10:30AM-10:30PM. Recently renovated neighborhood favorite. Savory and affordable Vietnamese dishes in a crowded, bustling atmosphere. Excellent rice and noodle dishes. ■Pho Quan Ngon, 2511 Noriega Street, between 32nd and 33rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 566-3275. Northern Vietnamese. ■Polly Ann Ice Cream, 3138 Noriega Street, between 38th Ave and 39th Ave, Phone: +1 415 664-2472, http://www.pollyann.com. Boasts a collection of over FIVE HUNDRED homemade flavors. Fifty-four flavors are available daily. ■Sunrise Deli and Cafe, 2115 Irving Street, between 22nd Ave and 23rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 664-8210, Hours: M-Sa 9AM7PM, Su 10AM-5PM. Awesome falafel. Price: $6-$10. ■Sweet Delite, 519 Clement Street, at 6th Ave, Phone: +1 415 386-8222. Excellent tapioca drinks and a large selection of Asian sweets. ■Taiwan Restaurant, 445 Clement Street, at 6th Ave, Phone: +1 415 387-1789. Famous for their dumplings. Price: Cheap. ■Tasty Curry, 1375 9th Ave, between Irving St and Judah St, Phone: +1 415 753-5122. Cheap, divey, tasty, and Halal. De-

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licious Indian/Pakistani food that will fill you up and not break the bank. The decor is... interesting. Both the food and personable waiters are an improvement over the staid Naan ‘n’ Curry. No reservations are necessary. Gumball machines provided. Price: $5-$10. ■Toasties, 836 Irving Street, between 9th and 10th Ave, Phone: +1 415 682-9980, http://toastiesf.com, Hours: Daily 10AM-8PM. Best Crab Melt in SF. Also try the Turkey/Avocado Sandwich. Crispy Garlic Fries and homemade Clam Chowder. ■Toy Boat Dessert Cafe, 401 Clement Street, at 5th, Phone: +1 415 751-7505, Hours: M-Th 7:30AM-11PM, F-Sa 8:30AM12AM, Su 8:30AM-11PM. Filled with vintage toys and a lively atmosphere, this fun restaurant serves ice cream, cakes, tortes, muffins and more. You can grab a breakfast or lunch there, but really just come for the treats. ■Underdog, 1634 Irving Street, between 17th Ave and 18th Ave, Phone: +1 415 665-8881, Hours: Daily 11:30AM-9PM. Great menu with several varieties of both meat- and veggiebased hot dogs, with an emphasis on local, organic ingredients. Super-friendly staff and a great atmosphere. In a very tiny space, with only a couple tables.

Mid-range ■Beach Chalet Brewery & Restaurant, 1000 Great Highway, on the western side of Golden Gate Park south of Fulton Street, Phone: +1 415 386-8439, http://www.beachchalet. com, Hours: Su-Th 9AM-10PM, F-Sa 9AM-11PM. Brewery and restaurant featuring live music, American bistro cuisine, hand crafted ales, and a panoramic view of the ocean. ■Burma Superstar, 309 Clement Street, at 4th Ave, Phone: +1 415 387-2147, http://www.burmasuperstar.com, Hours: Su-Th 11AM-3:30PM, 5PM-9:30PM, F-Sa 11AM-3:30PM, 5PM10PM. Outstanding Burmese restaurant that draws people from all over the city. Get there early; it will be crowded. ■Cafe Gratitude, 1336 9th Ave, between Irving St and Judah St, Phone: +1 415 824-4652, http://www.cafegratitude.com,

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Hours: Daily 10AM-10PM. A delicious raw vegan restaurant with a wide selection of incredible desserts. ■Clement Street Bar & Grill, 708 Clement Street, at 8th Ave, Phone: +1 415 386-2200, Hours: Tu-Th 4:30PM-9:30PM, F-Sa 4:30PM-10PM, Su 10AM-3PM, 4:30PM-9PM. Traditional American food in a casual environment. A popular spot for weekend brunch. Price: $8-$25. ■Crepevine, 624 Irving Street, between 9th Ave and 10th Ave, Phone: +1 415 681-5858, http://www.crepevine.com/, Hours: M-Sa 7:30AM-11PM, Su 7:30AM-10PM. A laid back California-style eatery with a largely Brazilian staff. Scrambles, omelettes, sandwiches, soups, and, of course, crêpes, fill the chalkboard menu. The chicken vegetable soup is a favorite. Free refills on coffee. No reservations necessary. ■Ebisu, 1283 9th Ave, between Irving St and Lincoln Way, Phone: +1 415 566-1770, http://www.ebisusushi.com, Hours: M-Th 11:30AM-2PM, 5PM-10PM, F 11:30AM-2PM, 5PM-11PM, Sa 11:30AM-11PM. Often cited as the best sushi on the West Coast of the United States. Price: $10-$16. ■Giorgio’s Pizza and Italian Dining, 151 Clement Street, at 3rd, Phone: +1 415 668-1266, http://www.giorgiospizza. com/, Hours: Su-Th 11AM-10PM, F-Sa 11AM-11PM. Fun Family style pizza and italian restaurant. Great authentic italian pizza and pasta dishes in a warm and cozy environment. Can get busy during peak dinner hours, also has pizza by the slice for fast take-out. ■Golden Gate Pizza, 1388 46th Ave, at Judah St, Phone: +1 415 564-5514, http://goldengateindian.com, Hours: Daily 11:30AM-11PM. Italian and Indian favorites, delivery available. ■Hong Kong Seafood Restaurant, 2578 Noriega Street, between 32nd Ave and 33rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 665-8338. Sit-down dim sum. Price: $6-$16. ■Mandalay Restaurant, 4348 California Street, at 6th Ave one block north of Clement, Phone: +1 415 386-3895, http:// www.mandalaysf.com, Hours: M-Th 11:30AM-9:30PM (closed 3:30PM-5PM), F 11:30AM-10PM (closed 3:30PM-

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5PM), Sa-Su 11:30AM-10PM. Burmese/Chinese, a friendly, local favorite. Price: $9-$12. Marnee Thai, http://www.marneethaisf.com/, Hours: Daily 11:30AM-10PM. $6-$12 ■ 1243 9th Avenue, between Irving St and Lincoln Way, Phone: +1 415 731-9999. ■ 2225 Irving Street, between 23rd Ave and 24th Ave, Phone: +1 415 665-9500. ■Miyoshi Sushi & Grill, 914 Clement Street, at 10th, Phone: +1 415 668-1638. Although the name has changed over the years, the quality of the food hasn’t. This humble family owned establishment serves up some of the best and cheapest sushi and Japanese food! It is a MUST stop for those staying in the Richmond area. ■New Eritrea, 907 Irving Street, between 9th Ave and 10th Ave, Phone: +1 415 681-1288, Hours: Tu-Th 5PM-10:30PM, F-Sa 5PM-11PM, Su 5PM-10PM. Huge platters of Eritrean (Ethiopian) food are served up here, along with native beers and lots of Injera bread. Portions are not for the timid. The staff is very friendly. Don’t miss the sauteed mushrooms. Price: $7-$10. ■Nizario’s Pizza, 3840 Geary Blvd, at 3rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 752-7777, http://www.nizarios.com, Hours: Sa-Th 11AM-2AM, F 3PM-2AM. Pizza by the slice. ■Park Chow, 1238 9th Ave, between Irving St and Lincoln Way, Phone: +1 415 665-9912, http://www.chowrestaurant. com, Hours: Su-Th 8AM-10PM, F-Sa 8AM-11PM. Eclectic menu, all delicious; busy on any given night. Whether in the mood for a hamburger, thai noodles, or a portobello sandwich, this place has it, which is good for when friends cannot decide on what to eat. Heated outdoor seating when it’s not raining. Bar seating also. Has a sister restaurant in the Castro District. ■Pho Tudo, 1000 Clement Street, at 11th Avenue, Phone: +1 415 221-7111, http://www.photudo.com. Completely remodeled - Vietnamese restaurant with some of the best pho that

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you’ll find in SF. Huge portions. Bizarre state of the art toilet in the ladies room. ■Q, 225 Clement Street, at 3rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 752-2298, http://www.qrestaurant.com, Hours: M-F 11AM-3PM, 5-11PM, Sa 10AM-11PM, Su 10AM-10PM. Modern American comfort food. Good wine list and several local beers on tap. A fun place to eat and almost always busy. ■RoHan Lounge, 3809 Geary Blvd, at 2nd Ave, Phone: +1 415 221-5095, http://www.rohanlounge.com, Hours: M-Th 6AM12AM, F-Sa 6AM-2AM, Su 6PM-11PM. Cozy lounge featuring soju, a traditional Korean liquor distilled from rice, barley and sweet potato. ■S&E Cafe, 2406 19th Ave, between Taraval St and Ulloa St, Phone: +1 415 665-7868, Hours: Daily 11:00AM-2AM. Midwestern American food as seen through Hong Kong eyes: complete meals include soup, roll, coffee or HK milk tea, entree, rice or spaghetti, Jello or Chinese bean soup dessert. Extensive list of unusual beverages from Ovaltine to Ginger Coke to green tea milk shakes; Chinese food available after 10PM only. Coffee shop ambiance with TVs at low volume usually tuned to a Chinese station. Price: $7-14 for complete dinners; $3-7 apps and other dishes; $2-4 for beverages. ■San Tung, 1031 Irving Street, between 11th Ave and 12th Ave, Phone: +1 415 242-0828, Hours: Th-Tu 11AM-9:30PM. Lines form down the block to eat at this dumpling house. ■Schubert’s Bakery, 521 Clement Street, at 7th Ave, Phone: +1 415 752-1580, http://www.schubertsbakery.com, Hours: M-Sa 7AM-6PM, Su 9AM-5PM. Cakes, pastries, cookies, and more; first opened in 1911 by a German immigrant. ■Spices!, 294 Clement Street, at 8th Ave, Phone: +1 415 7528884, http://www.eatspices.com, Hours: Daily 11AM-9:45PM. One of the best and most popular Chinese restaurants in the neighborhood. Try one of the many varieties of “stinky

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tofu”, a popular street food in Taiwan. The name identifies the dominant flavor. ■Tay Giang Restaurant, 2543 Noriega Street, between 32nd Ave and 33rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 682-8886. A great Vietnamese restaurant with an extensive menu. Price: $5-$15. ■Ton Kiang, 5821 Geary Blvd, at 22nd Ave, Phone: +1 415 7524440, http://www.tonkiang.net, Hours: M-Th 10AM-9PM, F 10AM-9:30PM, Sa 9:30AM-9:30PM, Su 9AM-9PM. Arguably the best Dim Sum outside of Chinatown, this restaurant serves moderately priced Hakka cuisine, but make sure to go there between the hours of 10am and 4pm where they serve a traditional Dim Sum with servers that walk around and proffer dishes and tea. Make sure to come early on the weekends, as many locals and tourists line up to have a dim sum lunch. Price: $10-$24. ■Troya, 349 Clement Street, at 5th Ave, Phone: +1 415 3796000, http://www.troyasf.com, Hours: M-Th 5PM-9:30PM, F-Sa Noon-10PM, Su Noon-9PM. Turkish/Mediterranean cafe with occasional live music and some outdoor seating. ■Yum Yum Fish, 2181 Irving Street, between 22nd Ave and 23rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 566-8433, Hours: Daily 10:30AM7:30PM. Eat high-quality sushi for low prices in this eclectic combination French fish market/Japanese sushi bar. The atmosphere ain’t much, but the fish is definitely yummy and plentiful.

Splurge ■Aziza, 5800 Geary Blvd, at 22nd Ave, Phone: +1 415 752-2222, http://www.aziza-sf.com, Hours: W-M 5:30PM-10:30PM. Unique Moroccan cuisine made with local organic ingredients. Named one of San Francisco’s 50 Best Restaurants by San Francisco Magazine. Reservations recommended. Price: $15-$25. ■Chapeau!, 1408 Clement Street, at 15th Ave, Phone: +1 415 750-9787, http://bistrochapeau.ypguides.net, Hours: TuTh 5PM-10PM, F-Sa 5PM-10:30PM, Su 5PM-10PM. Classic

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French bistro offering prix fixe dinners. Small, intimate dining room. Reservation usually needed. Price: $15-$33. ■Clementine, 126 Clement Street, at 3rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 387-0408, Hours: M-Th 5:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 5:30PM10:30PM. Traditional French cuisine in an elegant, romantic environment. $20-$28. ■Cliff House, 1090 Point Lobos, Phone: +1 415 386-3330, http://www.cliffhouse.com, Hours: Daily 11:30AM-3:30PM, 5PM-9:30PM (bistro open daily 9AM-9:30PM). At the far end of the Outer Richmond, overlooking the ocean, with a great restaurant (Sutro’s) and a more informal bistro. Ideal to watch a sunset or a fogbank over the Pacific Ocean. Reservations strongly recommended for Sutro’s. Price: $20$40 (bistro: $15-$28). ■Thanh Long, 4101 Judah Street, between 46th Ave and 47th Ave, Phone: +1 415 665-1146, http://www.anfamily.com/Restaurants/thanhlong_restaurant/displaypages/homepage. html, Hours: Su, Tu-Th 4:30PM-10PM, F-Sa 4:30PM-11PM. Vietnamese restaurant featuring roasted crab. Dinner only. Price: $10-$25.

Food Markets ■4th and Geary Farmer’s Market, 3931 Geary Blvd, at 4th, Phone: +1 415 831-1067. Inexpensive fresh fruits and vegetables, and a decent selection of your basic grocery needs which might not be covered as well by the local Asian groceries. Only takes cash and check. ■New May Wah Supermarket, 707-719 Clement Street, at 8th, Phone: +1 415 221-9826, Hours: Daily 7:30AM-7:30PM. Huge (compared to others in the area) authentic Chinese supermarket. They have just about everything. Safeway. A large chain grocery store with a decent selection. The one of Noriega Street has a parking lot on top. The one on La Playa Street is one of the largest Safeway stores in San Francisco proper -- Don’t go there on a Sunday evening, as they only get deliveries on weekdays, and often the beach crowds will deplete inventory until restocking on Monday morning. A nice tip is to get to Ocean Beach, and get a picnic

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of your choice at the Safeway, then go enjoy it at the beach. ■ 735 7th Avenue, between Cabrillo and Fulton, Phone: +1 415 752-4073. ■ 2350 Noriega Street, between 30th Ave and 31st Ave, Phone: +1 415 665-4565. ■ 850 La Playa Street, right by Ocean Beach, Phone: +1 415 3874664. ■ 730 Taraval Street, between 18th Ave and 17th Ave, Phone: +1 415 665-4136. ■Village Market, 4555 California Street, at 8th, Phone: +1 415 221-0445. Small, inviting food market featuring organic produce, wine, beer, and coffee to-go.

Drink Bars ■540 Club, 540 Clement Street, at 7th Ave, Phone: +1 415 7527276, http://www.540-club.com, Hours: Daily 10AM-2AM. Friendly bar with cool art, above-average beer selection, free wi-fi, and a great Sunday trivia night. ■The Bitter End, 441 Clement Street, at 6th Ave, Phone: +1 415 221-9538, http://www.travelnotes.org/BitterEnd, Hours: M-F 3PM-2AM, Sa-Su 10AM-2AM. Two-level Irish bar with billiards, darts, pub food, and Tuesday night trivia. ■Durty Nelly’s, 2328 Irving Street, between 24th Ave and 25th Ave, Phone: +1 415 664-2555, Hours: Daily 11AM-2AM. Irish pub and restaurant. ■Eagle’s Drift In Lounge, 1232 Noriega Street, between 19th Ave and 20th Ave, Phone: +1 415 661-0166. A real dive bar. Stiff drinks and dartboards, one pool table. ■The Little Shamrock, 807 Lincoln Way, between 9th Ave and 10th Ave, Phone: +1 415 661-0060, Hours: M-Th 3PM2AM, F 2PM-2AM, Sa-Su 1PM-2AM. The oldest Irish pub in San Francisco. Here you will find free popcorn for patrons, a few TVs tuned into all manner of sports, eclectic but cozy

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furniture, a shelf full of games at the back, and a fireplace. With very kind bartenders (and regulars), the Little Shamrock feels like a safe cozy den on any weeknight. ■The Plough & Stars, 116 Clement Street, at 2nd Ave, Phone: +1 415 751-1122, http://www.theploughandstars.com, Hours: M-Th 3PM-2AM, F-Sa 2PM-2AM. One of the best Irish bars in San Francisco. Traditional live music almost every night. ■Tommy’s Mexican Restaurant, 5929 Geary Blvd, at 23rd Ave, Phone: +1 415 387-4747, http://www.tommystequila. com, Hours: W-M Noon-11PM. Self-proclaimed “Premier Tequila Bar on Earth”. A must-visit for tequila and margarita enthusiasts. Arrive early to avoid the (drunken) crowd. ■Trad’r Sam, 6150 Geary Blvd, at 26th Ave, Phone: +1 415 2210773. Popular tiki bar featuring specialty blender drinks. Gets loud and crowded on weekends. ■Yancy’s Saloon, 734 Irving Street, between 8th Ave and 9th Ave, Phone: +1 415 665-6551. Lots of seating (wooden tables & chairs), with darts at the back, and also several large screen TVs. They have a nice happy hour (which many grad students from UCSF take advantage of ).

Coffee ■Blue Danube, 306 Clement Street, at 4th Ave, Phone: +1 415 221-9041, Hours: M-Th, Su 7AM-10PM, F-Sa 7AM-11PM. Small coffee shop with good sandwiches and a few sidewalk tables. Computers and paid WiFi available. Cash only. ■Henry’s House of Coffee, 1618 Noriega Street, between 23rd Ave and 24th Ave, Phone: +1 415 681-9363, http://www. coffeesf.com. A good local coffee shop. ■Java Beach Cafe, 1396 La Playa Street, at Judah St, Phone: +1 415 665-5282, http://www.javabeachcafe.com, Hours: M-F 5:30AM-10PM, Sa-Su 6AM-10PM. Offers coffee, beer and wine, pastries, sandwiches, and the like. Outdoor seating, as well as tables, chairs and couches inside. You will find both locals and tourists filling the chairs on any given night. ■Java Source, 343 Clement Street, at 5th Ave, Phone: +1 415 386-1618. Excellent coffee. Large front patio is usually

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buzzing with locals playing games and drinking coffee, and smoking. Sometimes is open until 1am. Royal Ground Coffee. Local chain serves good coffee and sandwiches. ■ 5301 Geary Blvd, at 17th Ave, Phone: +1 415 751-5282. ■ 2342 Clement Street, between 24th and 25th, Phone: +1 415 387-5282. ■Sea Biscuit Cafe, 3815 Noriega Street, between 45th and 46th Ave, Phone: +1 415 661-3784, Hours: M-Sa 7AM-10PM, Su 7AM-8PM. Coffee, sandwiches, and pastries. Pitchers of beer for $11. ■Simple Pleasures, 3434 Balboa Street, at 36th Ave, Phone: +1 415 387-4022. Small, crowded cafe with very rich coffee and decent snacks, but the reason to go here are the plethora of San Francisco locals who come to hang out and chat. It’s a great place to strike up a conversation with someone who you just met, and on weekend evenings they have free live jazz to boot, call them for dates/times. ■Zephyr Cafe, 3643 Balboa Street, between 37th Ave & 38th Ave, Phone: +1 415 221-6063. Quiet cafe that skimps a bit on the food and coffee, but has great atmosphere if you’re looking for a nice hideaway to study, do work, or people watch. Th’s right across the street from the Balboa Theater.

Sleep ■Days Inn at the Beach, 2600 Sloat Blvd, at 44th, Phone: +1 415 665-9000, http://www.daysinncalifornia.com/html/

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days-inn-hotel-california-sanfrancisco.asp. $160.

Price:

$125-

■The Moffatt House, 1401 7th Ave, at Judah, Phone: +1 415 661-6210, moffattbb@cs.com, http://www.moffatthouse. com. Reasonably inexpensive B&B lodging. Price: $73+. ■Great Highway Inn, 1234 Great Highway, right next to Ocean Beach and the N-Judah line, Phone: +1 415 731-6644, http://www.greathwy.com. Price: $125-$155. ■Geary Parkway Motel, 4750 Geary Blvd, at 12th Ave, Phone: +1 415 752-4406. This former dive has been completely remodeled with clean rooms, nice televisions, microwaves, blowdryers, irons, and mini fridges. Reasonable prices, safe and neat - the owners have put a lot of effort into making this motel quiet and nice. ■Ocean Park Motel, 2690 46th Ave, at Wawona, Phone: +1 415 566-7020, http://oceanparkmotel.ypguides.net. Price: $90-$175. ■Seal Rock Inn, 545 Point Lobos Avenue, between 47th and 48th, Phone: +1 415 752-8000, http://www.sealrockinn. com/, Check In: 1PM, Check Out: 11AM. Front Desk hours: 7:30AM-11PM. Nestled at the westernmost edge of the city overlooking The Cliff House and The Sutro Baths ruins, this hotel has a small pool, volleyball court, and restaurant. You’re a bit out of the way from downtown (about a 30 minute drive/bus), but a great location for someone who enjoys San Francisco’s nature, or who will be heading to Marin or down to the peninsula, as you are on the other side of most of the clogged commuting routes. Price: $114-$152 Summer, $99-$137 Winter.

Contact ■San Francisco Public Library - Sunset Branch, 1305 18th Avenue, at Irving, Phone: +1 415 355-2808, http://sfpl.

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lib.ca.us/, Hours: Su 1-5, M 1-9, Tu 10-9, W 10-9, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sa 10-6. ■San Francisco Public Library - Richmond Branch, 351 9th Avenue, between Clement and Geary, Phone: +1 415 3555600, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Temporariliy Closed. ■San Francisco Public Library - Anza Branch, 550 37th Avenue, between Geary and Anza, Phone: +1 415 355-5717, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Su 1-5, M 10-6, Tu 10-9, W 10-9, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sa 10-6. ■San Francisco Public Library - Ortega Branch, 3223 Ortega St., at 39th, Phone: +1 415 355-5700, http://sfpl.lib. ca.us/, Hours: Su Closed, M 10-6, Tu 10-6, W 1-9, Th 1-9, F 1-6, Sa 10-6. ■San Francisco Public Library - Parkside Branch, 1200 Taraval St., at 22nd, Phone: +1 415 355-5770, http://sfpl.lib. ca.us/, Hours: Su Closed, M 1-6, Tu 10-9, W 1-9, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sa 10-6.

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Twin Peaks/Lake Merced

â– Twin Peaks

Twin Peaks-Lake Merced is an area consisting of most of Southwestern San Francisco. It runs from the Twin Peaks to Merced Park at the very southwestern corner of the city, and includes the Twin Peaks neighborhoods, West Portal, and Miraloma Park before stretching west to SFSU and Lake Merced. It is bordered by the Sunset neighborhood on the northwest, the Castro-Noe Valley district to the northeast, and the neighborhood of Ingleside to the southeast.

Understand The name Twin Peaks stems from the fact that it consists of two almost identical peaks. It is practically at the geographical center of the City, and at an elevation of over 900 feet - it offers spectacular 360 degree panoramic views of the City and the Bay. Although the peaks remain undevel-

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oped, the foot of the hillside is peppered with residential houses, taking advantage of the spectacular vistas. Miraloma Park is a residential district of single-family homes. Homes were first built in the neighborhood in the late 1920s. Construction continued in waves through the 1950s. The neighborhood therefore offers a variety of architectural styles: from 1920s classic to mid-century modern. The Miraloma Park Improvement Club (MPIC) is a voluntary neighborhood association that works to maintain the charm of the area, and hosts occasional get-togethers at the MPIC Club House located at 350 O’Shaughnessy (at Del Vale Ave). Miraloma’s easy proximity to all that San Francisco has to offer while maintaining a comfortable distance from the hustle and bustle, caused San Francisco Magazine to declare it the “City without the gritty” in 2004.

Get in MUNI Metro K, L and M lines serve the area. From downtown, all three lines travel underground, stopping at the Forest Hill and West Portal stations. After West Portal, the lines run on the surface. The L-line runs west through the Sunset neighborhood to the San Francisco Zoo. The K and M lines split up as they head toward Ingelside, with the Mline stopping at the San Francisco State University. Muni bus lines which serve the area include the 36-Teresita, 37-Corbett, 43-Masonic, 44-O’Shaughnessy and the 48-Quintara/24th Street lines in the Twin Peaks area, and the 17-Parkmerced, 18-46th Avenue, 23-Monterey, 28-19th Avenue and 29-Sunset lines in the Lake Merced and SFSU area.

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■San Francisco Zoo, on Sloat Boulevard at 47th Avenue, http://www.sfzoo.org/. Price: Adults $11 ($9 for SF residents), Youths/Seniors $8 ($4.50 for SF residents), Children $5 ($2.50 for SF residents), Children 2 and under are free. ■Twin Peaks, accessible by car or on foot via Twin Peaks Boulevard, north of Portola Drive, just east of Laguna Honda. The small parking area at the northern tip of Twin Peaks Boulevard (875’ above sea level) is near the physical center of the city, and one of its highest points, providing spectacular views in all directions. Tour buses can get backed up here during the day, but it’s a great place to really appreciate the city from above, especially at and after sunset. Temperatures up there can be quite a bit lower than in the rest of the city, so bring a jacket. Muni bus #37, a scenic ride from the Haight-Ashbury or Castro and Market streets, gets you close, so you only have to climb the last 120’ up. ■Mt. Davidson Park. Though primarily a residential neighborhood of single family homes, Miraloma does lay claim to one of San Francisco’s great parks. Mt. Davidson Park (which boasts the highest point in San Francisco) offers great hiking trails. Mt. Davidson’s most distinguishing feature is a 6-story cross nestled among the many eucalyptus trees, which can be seen from various spots in The City depending on which angle your looking from. It was constructed as part of the WPA program of the 1930s, and is the site of a sunrise mass every Easter. At the peak, you’re rewarded with great views of downtown and the bay. ■Lake Merced. Freshwater lake in the southwest corner of San Francisco. ■Fort Funston. Scenic section of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area is a favorite for hikers, bikers and beachgoers.

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■San Francisco State University Gators, SF State campus, http://usfdons.cstv.com. Various college sports including baseball, basketball and soccer.

Buy ■Mollie Stones Tower Market, 635 Portola Drive, at Teresita, Phone: +1 415 664-1600, http://www.molliestones.com, Hours: Daily 8AM-9PM. Boutique market with butcher and deli departments ■Miraloma Market, 755 Portola Drive, between Fowler and Evelyn, Phone: +1 415 681-2474. Neighborhood convenience store that also sells lottery tickets; Its also home to the Miraloma Tacqueria. ■Stonestown Galleria Shopping Center, 3251 20th Ave. Shopping mall next to SFSU. ■Walgreens, 685 Portola Drive, at Fowler. Smallish store with a pharmacy.

Eat ■Tower Burger, 729 Portola Drive, at Fowler, Phone: +1 415 504-6340. Burgers made from Niman Ranch beef. ■Round Table Pizza, 737 Portola Drive, at Fowler, Phone: +1 415 681-9595, http://www.roundtablepizza.com. ■Creightons, 673 Portola Drive, between Teresita and Fowler. ■Miraloma Tacqueria, 755 Portola Drive, between Fowler and Evelyn, Phone: +1 415 681-2471, Hours: Daily 9AM9:30PM.

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■Starbucks, 675 Portola Drive, between Teresita and Fowler, Phone: +1 415 682-9477. Ubiquitous coffee shop offering wi fi internet access. ■Miraloma Club, 749 Portola Drive, between Fowler and Evelyn, Phone: +1 415 564-1131. Neighborhood watering hole with a pool table.

Sleep ■Sunset Motel, 821 Taraval Street, at 18th Ave, Phone: +1 415 681-3306. ■Ocean Park Motel, 2690 46th Ave, at Wawona, Phone: +1 415 566-7020, ocnprk36@aol.com, Fax: + 1 415 665-8959, http://oceanparkmotel.ypguides.net/. 1930’s ‘Art Deco’ motel. Just a short stroll to the beach and San Francisco Zoo. Price: Under $100. ■Robert’s-at-the-Beach-Motel, 2828 Sloat Blvd, at 46th Ave, Phone: + 1 415 564-2610, Fax: + 1 415 681-1376, robertsatthebeach.com‎. Has restaurants and shopping nearby as well as the beach and San Franciso Zoo. Price: $65 & up.

Contact ■San Francisco Public Library - Merced Branch, 155 Winston Dr, Phone: +1 415 355-2825, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Su Closed, M 10-6, Tu 10-9, W 1-9, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sa 10-6. ■San Francisco Public Library - West Portal Branch, 190 Lenox Way, Phone: +1 415 355-2886, http://sfpl.lib. ca.us/, Hours: Su 1-5, M 1-9, Tu 10-9, W 10-9, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sa 10-6.

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Castro/Noe Valley Castro-Noe Valley is an area of San Francisco made up the two neighborhoods Castro and Noe Valley. The area is bounded roughly by the Twin Peaks on the west, Dolores Street on the east, Duboce Avenue on the north and San Jose Avenue on the south.

Understand Originally an Irish working class neighborhood of San Francisco, the Castro for the past 35 years, has been transformed and recognized by many as the gay mecca of the world. Filled with bookstores, clothing outlets, video stores, and bars (and practically anything else you can think of ) that cater towards the GLBT community, the Castro is a REQUIRED VISIT for anyone even slightly interested in gay lifestyle and culture, and is truly a local authentic gem of San Francisco. Noe Valley is a long gentrified neighborhood in San Francisco with many hip and trendy restaurants and boutique shops. The main commercial corridor is on 24th Street between Guerrero Street and Diamond Street. Walking along 24th Street during the day you will see well-attended coffee shops, chic boutiques, and several baby strollers. You can learn more about the goings-on in Noe Valley by reading either the print or online edition of the Noe Valley Voice.

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Get in By Muni This is the best way to get to the Castro. The K, L, or M MUNI Metro underground lines at the Church Street station at Market and Church and the Castro Street station at Market and Castro. The J Church line can also get you to the Castro, although it comes above ground and turns south on Church Street, which runs along the eastern edge of the district. For a more scenic ride, take the historic F Market streetcar line from Fisherman’s Wharf, the Embarcadero and Downtown down Market to Castro Street. MUNI bus lines which serve the area include 24-Divisadero, which runs along Castro Street through most of the district, heading north to Pacific Heights and southeast to BayviewHunters Point, the 33-Stanyan, which runs east-west along 18th Street, the 48-Quintara/24th Street, which runs eastwest along 24th Street, continuing east to Potrero Hill and west past Twin Peaks, West Portal and into Sunset, and the 35 and 37 neighborhood lines. The BART system runs through the nearby Mission neighborhood, where you can either get off at the 16th Street station and transfer to the #33 bus line, or get off at the 24th Street station and transfer to the #48 bus line.

By car Don’t drive into the area. Use public transit instead. There is a public parking garage on Noe just north of Market, but it is small. Street parking is very hard to find, especially on the weekends. If you park at the Safeway on Market and you don’t go exclusively there, you will be towed. There are some metered spots along 18th between Sanchez and Eureka, but these are hard to come by. On weekends, parking is better as the 2-hour neighborhood permits don’t apply. Noe Valley has one small public lot, but you will likely need

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to find street parking, and this can be particularly scarce on weekends during brunch and dinner times.

See ■The Castro Theatre, 429 Castro Street, between 17th and 18th Streets, Phone: +1 415 621-6120, http://www.thecastrotheatre.com. A lovingly restored Art Deco jewelbox of an independent movie theatre, with a Wurlitzer organ and splendid organist, special sing-along showings, and more. A “rep house” or repertory theater, it tends to screen a wide variety of classic or obscure but worthwhile films, and be a venue of choice of local film festivals.. ■LGBT Community Center, 1800 Market Street, at Octavia, http://www.sfcenter.org. The Center houses the offices of various community organizations, and has space for public events and meetings. The ground floor features a cafe space, and on the third floor there is a cyber center which offers an hour of free computer time.

Do There are several major cultural festivals and events in the Castro annually.

■Pink Saturday, Castro Street from Market St downhill, Hours: Saturday night before the LGBT Pride Parade, last weekend in June. A street party, organised by the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. Price: Free, donations encouraged. ■Castro Street Fair, On Castro Street, Phone: +1-415 8411824, http://www.castrostreetfair.org/, Hours: 7 October

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2007 (first Sunday in October) 11-18h. Vendors, dancing, fundraising for community groups.

Buy ■Cliff ’s Variety, 479 Castro Street, between Market and 18th Street, Phone: +1 415 431-5365, Fax: +1 415 431-0803, Hours: M-Sa 9:30AM-8PM. Toys, gifts, kitchenware, hardware, and the newly remodeled annex next door is where to shop for do it yourself home decor items and is THE place to get rhinestones. ■A Different Light, 489 Castro Street, Phone: +1 415 4310891, http://www.adlbooks.com. This is the place to find GLBT books; especially ones too “controversial” for more mainstream bookstores. Its also still possible to pick up community newspapers from outside the area; when there’s still some left. ■Under One Roof, 549 Castro Street, Phone: +1 415 5032300, http://www.underoneroof.org, Hours: M-Sa 10AM8PM, Su 11AM-7PM. Supports 33 AIDS Service Organizations throughout the Bay Area. “The mission of Under One Roof is to generate unrestricted funds for agencies that provide HIV/AIDS education and support services.” ■ImagiKnit, 3897 18th Street, at Sanchez, Phone: +1 415 621-6642, http://www.imagiknit.com, Hours: M-Sa 11AM6:30PM, Su 11AM-4PM. These women opened up the yarn shop that they’d like to hang out in and the whole neighborhood concurs that they’re doing it right. ■Noe Valley Farmers Market, in the parking lot between Sanchez/Vicksburg, Hours: Sa 8AM-Noon, year-round. ■Just For Fun / Scribbledoodles, 3982 24th Street, Phone: +1 415 285-4068, Hours: M-F 9AM-9PM, Sa 9AM-8PM, Su 10AM-6PM. Stationery and gifts; custom color printing and calligraphy for announcements. They have also opened an art supply store across the street. ■Church Street Flowers, 212 Church Street, Phone: 4155537762, www.churchstreetflowers.com, Hours: M-F 9AM-7PM, Sat 10AM-7PM. Rated ‘Best of the Bay’ #1 Florist

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for the past six years, this adorable flower shop has the most beautiful and unique blooms from all over the world.

Eat ■24th Street Cheese Company, 3893 24th Street, between Sanchez and Vicksburg, Phone: +1 415 821-6658. Carries hundreds of cheeses where you can taste before you buy. ■Chow, 215 Church St (Castro), between 15th St & Market St, Phone: +1 415 552-2469, http://www.chowfoodbar.com, Hours: M-Th 8AM-11PM, F-Sa 8AM-12AM, Su 8AM-11PM. Serves Traditional American style food. Try their DELICIOUS breakfast made with fresh ingredients. They have reasonable prices, a casual atmosphere, good for kids and large groups, and good waiter service. Price: $11-$30. ■Eric’s, 1500 Church Street, at 27th, Phone: +1 415 282-0919, Fax: +1 415 282-9989, Hours: Mo-Th 11AM-9:15PM, F-Sa 11AM10PM, Su 12PM-9:15PM. California Chinese cuisine (e.g.: many vegs are fresh, white or brown rice, mu shu comes with grilled flour tortillas). Tasty food in a bustling place. Accessible, vegetarian friendly, beer and wine, moderately loud. Price: $2-6 apps, $6-$11 entrees ($7 minimum). ■Firefly, 4288 24th Street, between Diamond and Douglass, Phone: +1 415 821-7652, http://www.fireflyrestaurant. com, Hours: Daily 5:30PM-10PM. A favorite neighborhood restaurant among locals with creative home cooking and friendly service. ■Hahn’s Hibachi, 1305 Castro Street, at 24th Street, Phone: +1 415 642-8151, http://www.hahnshibachi.com/. The place to go for cheap, fast, and tasty food. Choose from the grilled chicken, mountain of meat, or saute chicken. Price: $8.50$15. ■Haystack Pizza, 3881 24th Street #606, at Sanchez, Phone: +1 415 647-1929, Hours: Su-Th 11:30AM-11PM, F-Sa 11:30AMMidnight. A neighborhood favorite with a full menu with many choices for various diets. ■Lovejoy’s Tea Room, 1351 Church Street, at Clipper, Phone: +1 415 648-5895, Hours: Tu-Su 11AM-6PM, F 11AM-

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7PM. Combination antique store and one of the best places to have a cosy High Tea in the city. ■Noe Valley Bakery, 4073 24th Street, at Castro, Phone: +1 415 550-1405, contact@noevalleybakery.com, Fax: +1 415 550-1485, http://www.noevalleybakery.com/, Hours: M-F 7AM-7PM, Sa-Su 7AM-6PM. Considered one of the best local bakeries in the area. They supply some of the better SF restaurants as well as neighborhood demand for baked goods. ■Sausage Factory Italian, 517 Castro Street, between 18th Street and 19th Street, Phone: +1 415 626-1250, Hours: Daily 11:30AM-12:30AM. It’s larger than it looks from the outside, extending back into the middle of the block. Delivery. ■Savor, 3913 24th Street, at Sanchez, Phone: +1 415 282-0344, Hours: Su-Th 8AM-10PM, F-Sa 8AM-11PM. A popular brunch spot. ■Sparky’s 24-Hour Diner, 242 Church Street, between Market and 15th, Phone: +1 415 626-8666, Hours: 24/7 daily. Delivery. Full-on diner fare, good salads and baked items. ■Swatdee Thai Cuisine, 4166 24th Street, between Casto and Diamond, Phone: +1 415 824-8070, Hours: Lunch M-F 11:30AM-3:30PM, Dinner daily 4:30PM-10PM. ■Thai House Express, 599 Castro Street, at 19th, Phone: +1 415 864-5000, Hours: M-F 11:30AM-10:30PM Sa-Su 11:30AM1AM. Excellent Thai food in a gay atmosphere, with some dishes that are not on the menu of most American Thai restaurants, such as Kao Soy, chicken with soft and crispy noodles in mustard sauce. ■Yokoso Nippon Sushi, 314 Church Street, at 15th. Looking for good cheap sushi? This is the place for you. Known to locals as “No Name Sushi,” this hole-in-the-wall restaurant offers sushi at unbelievably cheap prices. But remember to bring your own beer cause they don’t serve alcohol (get it

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in a brown paper bag to look inconspicuous). They don’t accept credit cards either, so come with cash.

Drink ■Cafe Flore, 2298 Market Street, at Noe, Phone: +1 415 6218579, http://cafeflore.com/, Hours: Su-Th 7AM-11PM, F-Sa 7AM-Midnight. Go for the good tea or latte and the prime people watching, not necessarily the food. ■Samovar Tea Lounge, 498 Sanchez Street, at 18th Street, Phone: +1 415 626-4700, http://www.samovartea.com, Hours: M-F 7AM-10PM, Sa-Su 8AM-10PM. Live jazz on Fridays, a Stitch-and-Bitch knitting aficionado gathering on Sunday afternoons, over 100 kinds of tea. Comfortable hangout. ■Noe Valley also has the nickname “coffee gulch”. While Starbucks is popular, the locals prefer Martha’s (24th Street between Church and Sanchez), Tully’s (24th between Noe and Sanchez) or Last Laugh Coffee House (1551 Dolores Street at the corner of Dolores and Valley).

Sleep ■Inn on Castro, 321 Castro Street, at 16th, Phone: +1 415 8610321, Innkeeper@innoncastro.com, http://www.innoncastro.com/. Price: $95-$190. ■Parker House, 520 Church Street, at 17th, Phone: +1 415 621-3222, info@parkerguesthouse.com, Fax: +1 415 621-4139, http://www.parkerguesthouse.com/. Price: $139-$249. ■Twin Peaks Hotel, 2160 Market Street, between 14th and 15th, Phone: +1 415 863-2909. Not the Ritz but a cheap budget hotel option

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■San Francisco Public Library - Noe Valley Branch, 451 Jersey St., between Diamond and Castro, Phone: +1 415 355-5707, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Su Closed, M Closed, Tu 10-9, W 1-9, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sa 10-6. ■San Francisco Public Library - Glen Park Branch, 2825 Diamond St., at Wilder, north of Bosworth, Phone: +1 415 355-2858, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Su Closed, M Closed, Tu 10-6, W 12-8, Th 1-7, F 1-6, Sa 1-6.

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The Mission/Bernal Heights Mission-Bernal Heights is a district of San Francisco, composed of the historic Mission and Bernal Heights neighborhoods. It is bounded roughly by the 101 freeway on the east and north, Dolores Street on the west, and I-280 on the south.

Understand The Mission District surrounds the oldest building in San Francisco, Mission Dolores. The area was the site of the Spanish mission that was the kernel of the city San Francisco is today. The mission itself was secularized in the 1820s, and the lands were given to the Native Americans who lived there. Many sold or lost the land in later years. During the 19th century, the Mission District was physically separated from San Francisco proper, which mostly clustered around the seaport on the San Francisco Bay. The district’s area was a pleasant country day trip for San Franciscans, and soon grew into a small village. By the end of the 1800s, the area had been assimilated into the rest of the City. By the early 20th century, after the 1906 earthquake that destroyed several blue-collar neighborhoods, Irish and Italians relocated to the quickly expanding Mission District. From the 1940’s the district gradually became more populated with Mexican/Latin-American immigrants creating a strong counterculture in the arts and politics during the civil rights movement. Following this era, the Mission remaining strongly a Chicano and Latin-American neighborhood, but also with a great contingency of African-American, Asian-

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American and European-American driven by the relatively cheap rents in the neighborhood. In the 1980s and early 1990s, it attracted an influx of new artists, musicians, and other counterculture types. By the turn of the 21st century, the district experienced an increased gentrification. Expensive restaurants and the construction of “live-work� spaces were moving in to the area, displacing hundreds of residents. However, as the post-Internet boom recedes, the wave of affluence is partly diminishing and the Mission is continuing to be a place for multicultural encounters, where long term residents, immigrants, hipsters and yuppies are living side-by-side. Bernal Heights, just south of the Mission District, is a cute, eclectic neighborhood that was once very working class, but is becoming quickly gentrified. Sister to the Castro, this neighborhood is very popular with the lesbian community. The main commercial drag of the neighborhood is located along Cortland Avenue.

Get in From other parts of San Francisco and the Bay Area, BART serves the Mission neighborhood with stations at 16th Street and Mission (served by the MUNI 14, 22, 33, 49 and 53 bus lines) and 24th Street and Mission (served by the MUNI 14, 48, 49 and 67 bus lines). The MUNI Metro J-Church line runs along the western boundary of the area from downtown through the nearby Castro and Noe Valley neighborhoods, and passes a block or two from the Mission Dolores that gives the Mission neighborhood its name. From the J line you can just walk into the area or easily transfer to one of the following MUNI bus lines:

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■22-Fillmore from the Church Street Metro station. From the station, the #22 will travel down Church Street, then turn left onto 16th Street and travel across the Mission neighborhood to Potrero Hill on the other side. ■33-Stanyan from the Church and 18th Metro station. From the station the #33 will head east on 18th Street before turning left on Mission, then turning right onto 16th Street. Then it will turn right again onto Potrero Avenue and head south to 25th Street before turning around again. ■48-Quintara/24th Street from the Church and 24th Metro station. Through the area, the #48 travels east-west along 24th Street. ■24-Divisadero from the Church and 30th Metro station. From the station, you can take the #24 east down 30th Street and Cortland Avenue through Bernal Heights before continuing onto San Francisco/Bayview-Hunters Point|Bayview-Hunters Point]]. ■23-Monterey from the Glen Park station. From the station, the #23 heads up Bosworth and Mission Streets before turning right onto Crescent Avenue, running along the southern end of the district and into Bayview-Hunters Point. Other bus routes which serve the area include the 14-Mission bus, which runs right down Mission Street from the north and south, the 49-Van Ness, which comes down Mission Street from Van Ness near Fisherman’s Wharf, the 26 Valencia eases down Valencia Avenue from downtown, the 9-San Bruno which runs along Potrero Avenue through the Mission neighborhood, the 67-Bernal Heights which runs through much of Bernal Heights from the 24th Street BART station, the 12-Folsom/Pacific which heads down Folsom through Mission to Cesar Chavez, and the 27-Bryant which runs along Bryant Street through Mission to Cesar Chavez. Both the #12 and #27 terminate around Cesar Chavez and Mission Street. For cars, the Cesar Chavez Street exit from highway 101 comes right into the Mission, and the San Jose Avenue exit from Highway 280 North brings you past Bernal Heights and onto Guerrero Avenue.

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Get around The Inner Mission “The Mission” is only about 20 blocks by 10 blocks, and is easily navigated by foot. The Mission is generally safe for walking (even though 16th and Mission remains a major drug dealing corner). It’s not dangerous, but one should expect a certain amount of urban grittiness at night up and down Mission street near 16th. Valencia Street, just one block over, is much more gentrified and is filled with bars and eateries. By car. You will find that people attending religious ceremonies at one of the churches dotting the mission will park down the center lane of Valencia. This is not a common practice at any other time and not advised as SFPD will not hesitate to have you towed. A popular dinner destination neighborhood, street parking is difficult to find in the early evenings. There are two cheap parking garages, one at 21st Street and Bartlett between Valencia and Mission and another on 16th and Hoff St also between Valencia and Mission. By bicycle. You’ll see many people using the dedicated bike lanes on Valencia Street, but the entire neighborhood with the exception of the Dolores Park area, is flat and easy to navigate.

See ■Mission Dolores, 3321 16th Street, at Dolores, Phone: +1 415 621-8203, parish@missiondolores.org, http://www.missiondolores.org. ■The Women’s Building (and MaestraPeace Mural), 3543 18th Street, #8, between Valencia and Guerrero, Phone: +1 415 431-1180, Fax: +1 415 861-8969, http://www.wo-

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mensbuilding.org. Houses women’s nonprofits groups and celebrated its 25th Anniversary in 2004. ■Precita Eyes Murals, http://www.precitaeyes.org. Can be found all around the Mission neighborhood, especially on 24th street, east of Mission Street. ■Balmy Alley. An alley full of murals between 24th and 25th Street ■The Hill. There is really only one “attraction” in Bernal Heights, and that’s the hill itself. The top is more than 40 acres of grassy open space, with views of the San Francisco Bay and Mt. Diablo to the east, downtown San Francisco, the Golden Gate Bridge and Marin to the north, Twin Peaks and Noe Valley to the west and a rise of hills leading up to San Bruno Mountain in the south. People come and run their dogs here and watch eclipses, sunrises, sunsets, the Blue Angels and wildlife. There’s a red-tailed hawk. There’s been a celebrated coyote since 2003; recent sightings confirm it’s still there. There are nooks and crannies and stairs and weeds and it’s a big, big, well-loved back yard. ■The Bernal Neighborhood. Take a wander around losing yourself amongst the pretty houses and the charm, it’s a fine way to spend an afternoon.

Theatres ■Roxie Cinema, 3125 16th Street, at Valencia, Phone: +1 415 863-1087, http://www.roxie.com. An independent art-film theatre, with some of the best features shown in the country. If it’s showing here, it’s usually worth seeing. ■The Marsh Theatre, 1062 Valencia Street, at 22nd Street, Phone: +1 415 826-5750, http://www.themarsh.org. A breeding ground for new performance, playwriting workshops, performances, a youth program, and classes. Some excellent one-person shows have been hatched out in the Marsh. ■Intersection for the Arts, 446 Valencia Street, between 15th and 16th Streets, Phone: +1 415 626-3311, http://www. theintersection.org. San Francisco’s oldest alternative art space, This tiny space has premiered works by noted au-

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thors such as Dave Eggers and world-class playwrights such as Denis Johnson. The resident theater group, Campo Santo, is very good. The space also has an upstairs art gallery. ■Artists’ Television Access, 992 Valencia Street, near 21st, Phone: +1 415 824-3890, http://www.atasite.org. Artists’ Television Access (ATA). A nonprofit educational group and screening venue for independent film and video. This center often shows genuinely strange art films and videos, particularly during their frequent “open screenings” (you bring it, they’ll show it). Don’t miss the intriguing window displays.

Do ■Unique outdoor open mike poetry/music/spoken word/etc., 16th and Mission. Every Thursday starting sometime between 9PM and 10PM and ending around midnight on the southwest streetcorner at 16th and Mission. No mike (so you have to shout...), and no sign-up. Completely free to all. Open to poets, MCs, musicians, comedians and all manner of performers, the open mic has been happening for the past five years and has recently spawned a lit magazine, the 16th & Mission Review, and a website: 16thmission.com - newcomers are encouraged to perform. Bag your beer and see what the fuss is about! ■Bernal Yoga, 461 Cortland Avenue, between Andover and Wool, Phone: +1 415 643-9007, http://www.bernalyoga.com. If what you want in a yoga studio is a lot of hot, tight young bodies bending away in spandex, well, Bernal Yoga has that. But it’s also got a lot of older practioners, less fit practitioners, moms-to-be and moms-returning-to-shape, and a set of instructors that really know the meaning of “all levels classes.” The soulful, welcoming, peaceful community is run by sister-and-brother team Savonn and Bill Wyland, who keep things varied with frequent guest instructors and

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quarterly literary events, which attract nationally-known poets and fiction writers.

Buy ■Alemany Farmers Market, 100 Alemany Blvd, at Bayshore, Phone: +1 415 647-9423, http://www.sfgov.org/site/ alemany_index.asp?id=86. Forget the farmers market at the Ferry Building, unless you just can’t live without the high prices and the most fashionable vegetables. San Francisco’s original 1943 farmer’s market is where it’s at. It was founded by the Victory Garden Council as a WWII ag-surplus depot! Rock-bottom cheap, we-picked-it-at-3AM fresh, it’s where elderly Asian ladies swarm piles of fresh peanuts and carefully pick out the live chicken to bring home. It has flowers at unbelievable prices and a really stellar selection of basic fruits, nuts, tubers and vegetables, and exotic Asian produce. There aren’t that many organic farmers, but there are some. Get there early for salad greens and Euro-American vegetables, as these go fast. The fish market is mixed but sometimes has good local catches. ■Aquarius Records, 1055 Valencia Street, between 21st and 22nd Street, Phone: +1 415 647-2272, https://www.aquariusrecords.org, Hours: M-W 10AM-9PM, Th-Su 10AM-10PM. An eclectic music store specializing in the best of many obscure genres, including drone, prog, psychedelic, indie rock, experimental, electronic, noise, black metal as well as many other international/cultural styles. While it has been a San Francisco icon since 1970 and has been located in different neighborhoods in the past, it is truly a Mission mainstay, and the staff is very knowledgeable and passionate about what they stock. ■Good Life Grocery, 448 Cortland Avenue, between Andover and Bennington, Phone: +1 415 648-3221. People tend to have a love-hate relationship with this grocery store on the busy Cortland/Andover corner. One one hand, it’s a fine, managably-sized market with all the quality brands of pasta, meat, dairy, condiments, juices, vegetarian staples, etc. that you would hope for in a neighborhood with a significant

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upscale, foodie population. On the other hand, the prices are high, and it would be really nice to be able to purchase a woman’s razor blade or non-natural hair conditioner. Great wine selection and recommendations, though. ■Valencia Interiors, 974 Valencia Street, between 20th and 21st Street, Phone: +1 415 647-9500, http://valenciainteriors.com/, Hours: M-Tu 10AM-6:30PM, W 10AM-5PM, Th-Sa 10AM-6:30PM, Su Noon-5PM. This store sells new furniture from all over the world. The friendly staff will help you choose a new bedroom set, kitchen table, bookshelves or whatever your home needs.

Eat ■Arinell’s Pizza, 509 Valencia Street, just south of 16th Street, Phone: +1 415 255-1303, Hours: M-W 11:30AM-10PM, Th-Sa 11:30AM-Midnight, Su 1:30PM-10PM. Pizza by the slice. Loved and worshipped by East Coast transplants for being some of the closest to real NY pizza available in the Bay Area. Unfortunately unlike NYC, they close at midnight. ■Baku de Thai, 400 Valencia Street, at 15th Street, Phone: +1 415 437-4788, http://www.bakudethai.com, Hours: Daily 11AM-1AM. Very nice atmosphere, excellent Thai-French fusion cuisine. Also has Thai tapas, with many dishes not usually on the menu of American Thai restaurants. ■Boogaloo’s, 3296 22nd Street, at Valencia, Phone: +1 415 8244088, Fax: +1 415 824-3211, http://www.boogaloossf.com/, Hours: Daily 8AM-3PM. Hipster-ed up diner, only open for lunch & breakfast. Long lines on the weekends, but surprisingly it moves quickly. Much better vegan breakfast option than Herbivore. Try the plaintain cake & the mimosas. ■Café Argüello, 2832 Mission Street, near 24th BART station, Phone: +1 415 643-3160, cafearguellosf@yahoo.com, http://www.cafearguellosf.com/, Hours: Su, Tu-Th 5PM10PM, F-Sa 5PM-11PM. Finest Basque & Spanish tapas comfort foods in the city! ■El Castillito, 2092 Mission Street, at 17th Street, Phone: +1 415 621-6971, Hours: Daily 10AM-2AM. While everyone has

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their favorite Mission taqueria, this one may legitimately have a claim to the ‘best salsa verde’ throne, which is filled with serious avocado chunks. Also, they grill (rather than steam) their tortillas, a key burrito preparation issue. ■Foreign Cinema, 2534 Mission Street, at 21st Street, Phone: +1 415 648-7600, http://www.foreigncinema.com/, Hours: M-F 6PM-2AM, Sa-Su 11AM-2AM. Dinner and a movie. The Laszlo Bar. A little splurgey and quite fine. Reservations recommended. ■Herbivore, 983 Valencia Street, between 20th and 21st Streets, Phone: +1 415 826-5657, http://www.herbivorerestaurant.com, Hours: Su-Th 9AM-10PM, F-Sa 9AM-11PM. All-Vegan Restaurant. Mediocre entries, but delicious sandwiches, soups & salads. If it sounds too complicated, don’t order it. Only all vegan brunch in the area. ■Hunan Chef, 519 Cortland Avenue, at Andover, Phone: +1 415 648-3636. A great local and simple Chinese place. Hunan Chef has been servicing Bernal Heights for many years. The usual American-Chinese fare, along with a pretty extensive vegetarian offering. The vegetarian General’s chicken is a favorite among some Bernal Heights locals. The hot and sour Soup is perfect for any cold and rainy day. Service is great. Most of the food prepared is wrapped up for takeout. Beer/Wine available. Good Value. ■Jay’s Cheesesteak, 3285 21st Street, between Valencia and Mission, Phone: +1 415 285-5200, Hours: Daily 11AM-10PM. Niman Ranch beef, or seitan veggie/vegan sandwich options. Garlic fries! ■Liberty Cafe, 410 Cortland Avenue, between Bennington and Wool, Phone: +1 415 695-8777, http://www.thelibertycafe.com/, Hours: Cafe: Tu-Th 11:30AM-3PM and 5:30PM9:30PM, F 11:30AM-3PM and 5:30PM-10PM, Sa 10AM-2PM and 5:30PM-10PM, Su 10AM-2PM and 5:30PM-9:30PM. Bakery: Tu-Su 7:30AM-2PM. This is one of those places that would be perfect for a business lunch, a dinner with visiting family or any other time you want relaxed elegance. The reviews about its pot pies are quite true. They’re better than your mother used to make. There’s a tiny narrow walkway to a back courtyard and cottage that’s a bakery for your baguettes, cafe au lait, warm raspberry bran muffins

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and brioches by day, and a wine bar by night. The post-yoga crowd goes there for their coffee, as opposed to Progressive Grounds and Martha & Bros. ■Little Star Pizza, 400 Valencia Street, at 14th Street, Phone: +1 415 551-7827, http://www.littlestarpizza.com/, Hours: Su, Tu-Th 5PM-10PM, F-Sa 5PM-11PM. For a deep dish that can’t be beat. ■Luna Park, 694 Valencia Street, at 18th Street, Phone: +1 415 553-8584, hello@lunaparksf.com, Fax: +1 415 553-8660, http://www.lunaparksf.com, Hours: M-Th 5:30PM-10:30PM, F 5:30PM-11:30PM, Sa 11:30AM-11:30PM, Su 11:30AM-10PM. Upscale American comfort food menu. Small, slightly swanky. Always packed, with the accompanying noise level. Decent grub. And their signature drink is the mojito. ■Mariachis, 508 Valencia Street, at 16th Street, Phone: +1 415 621-4358, http://www.myspace.com/mariachisrestaurant, Hours: Daily 11AM-11PM. A taco bar with good food, excellent prices, and an interesting atmosphere. The menu has a slight upscale slant (a specific item may come off as healthy, yuppie, or hippie) compared to El Castillito or Cancun, but they’re still delicious. ■Martha & Bros, 745 Cortland Avenue, between Anderson and Ellsworth, Phone: +1 415 642-7585, http://www.marthabros.com/, Hours: M-F 5:30AM-8PM, Sa-Su 6AM-7PM. Hands down, the strongest coffee on the strip. Martha & Bros. is part of a six-shop San Francisco chain. The smiling, mostly Hispanic female staff, crack-of-dawn hours (it opens at 5:30AM), big pastries and reasonable prices make the place a favorite of newspaper readers, working men and the California Highway Patrol. ■Moki’s Sushi & Pacific Grill, 615 Cortland Avenue, between Anderson and Moultrie, Phone: +1 415 970-9336, http://www.mokisushi.com/, Hours: Su-Th 5:30PM-9:30PM, F-Sa 5:30PM-10:30PM. This peach-walled fish chop shop serves fun maki rolls, including a variety with tempura’d ingredients. Its also got killer barbeque spare ribs with wasabi mashed potatoes and steamed greens on its small-plates menu. A good time, often packed, so get there early. ■Moonlight Cafe, 634 Cortland Avenue, between Anderson and Moultrie, Phone: +1 415 647-6448, Hours: M-F 6:30AM-

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6PM, Sa-Su 7AM-5PM. A creperie with some great taste sensations. If you’re hungry, the Mediterranean platter will fill you up. The toasted bagels with cream cheese, sun-dried tomato and cucumber are perfect, as is the lavender or ginger lemonade. It’s not the best coffee on the block, but it’s good enough not to turn you away if you’re craving their food. ■Picaro, 3120 16th Street, at Valencia Street, Phone: +1 415 431-4089, http://www.picarotapasrestaurant.com, Hours: M-Th 5PM-10PM, F 5PM-11PM, Sa 9:30AM-11PM, Su 9:30AM10PM. If you like authentic tapas, the way they were before “small plates” were all the rage, then you’ll definitely love the reasonably priced, authentic and generously portioned Spanish dishes here. Don’t forget to try their Sangria. ■Progressive Grounds, 400 Cortland Avenue, at Bennington, Phone: +1 415 282-6233. A perfect Bernal Heights cafe. Serves up some great coffee drinks and a good selection of salads and lavash wrapped sandwiches. The hummus will make anyone think twice about buying hummus from a grocery store again. Great service. A great place for all types and ages. Kids have their fun with Enzo and his assorted instruments every Sunday. PG also has a nice garden space in the back. ■Puerto Alegre, 546 Valencia Street, at 16th Street, Phone: +1 415 255-8201, Hours: M 11AM-10PM, Tu 5PM-10PM, W-Su 11AM-11PM. Local favorite, Puerto Alegre churns out inexpensive, delicious Mexican food & margaritas in a fun, festive environment. Divey atmosphere, but that’s what you come to the Mission for. Very long wait on the weekends, but absolutely worth it. Host rules the restaurant with an iron fist, so don’t try to sneak in! ■Serrano’s Pizza, 3274 21st Street, between Valencia and Mission Streets, Phone: +1 415 695-1615, http://www.serranospizza.com, Hours: Su-Th 11AM-Midnight, F-Sa 11AM-1AM. By “slice” for under $3 or add toppings for a few cents more, they make a fresh-to-your order triangular slice-shaped pizza that overlaps a dinner plate at three points. Free delivery. Cash or credit, no checks. ■Taqueria Cancun, 2288 Mission Street, at 19th Street, Phone: +1 415 252-9560, Hours: M-Th 10AM-11:30PM, F-Sat

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10AM-1AM. Commonly touted as having the best vegetarian burrito in SF. ■Taqueria El Farolito, 2779 Mission Street, at 24th, Phone: +1 415 824-7877. Gigantor super burritos. Grilled chicken and steak both are really great. Super steak quesadilla is the highlight of the menu. Open till 3AM on Friday and Saturday, 1AM the rest of the week. ■Tartine, 600 Guerrero Street, at 18th Street, Phone: +1 415 487-2600, http://www.tartinebakery.com/, Hours: M 8AM7PM, Tu-W 7:30AM-7PM, Th-F 7:30AM-8PM, Sa 8AM-8PM, Su 9AM-8PM. One of the Bay Area’s best bakeries; rich, decadent, and pricey. ■Ti Couz, 3108 16th Street, at Valencia Street, Phone: +1 415 252-7373, Hours: M-W 11AM-11PM, Th-F 11AM-Midnight, Sa 10AM-Midnight, Su 10AM-11PM. Excellent Breton creperie. ■Valencia Pizza & Pasta, 801 Valencia Street, at 19th Street, Phone: +1 415 642-1882. There is better pizza to be had in the ‘hood, but for Midwestern sized portions & prices of pasta & no frills American food (try the excellent pork chops), it can’t be beat. Extremely cheap beer & wine ($2 Peroni!). Service can be sloppy, but it adds to the charm. Fantastic, inexpensive, All-American breakfast. One of the neighborhood’s best kept secrets. ■Valentina Restorante, 419 Cortland Avenue, between and Bennington and Wool, Phone: +1 415 285-6000. Bernal Height’s romantic Italian restaurant, where at times every single table is a land of mingling glances. The food is delicious, if not that exciting. The staff knows that when you order a primi and a secundi, that they should bring the pasta first and the meat second and let you share both. ■VinoRosso, 629 Cortland Avenue, at Anderson Street, Phone: +1 415 647-1268, http://www.vinorossosf.com, Hours: M-Th 4PM-11PM, F-Sa 11AM-11PM, Su 11AM-10PM. A great little wine bar with emphasis on Italian varieties. ■We Be Sushi, 538 Valencia Street, between 16th and 17th, Phone: +1 415 565-0749, http://www.webesushi.com. The

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best of a handful of locations of this restaurant, truly “sushi like mom used to make”. Try the early bird special.

Markets ■Bi-Rite Grocery, 3639 18th Street, bewteen Guarrero and Dolores Park, Phone: +1 415 241-9760, http://www.biritemarket.com, Hours: M-F 9AM-9PM, Sa-Su 9AM-8PM. How do they get that much good produce and that incredible deli counter into that storefront? Essential neighborhood and picnic-in-the-park resource. Dolores Park is handily enough a block away, and you’re likely to find festivals, rallies, or the SF Mime Troupe at the start and close of their summer touring season, there along with kids, dogs and tennis players. ■Lucca Ravioli Company, 1100 Valencia Street, at 22nd Street, Phone: +1 415 647-5581, http://www.luccaravioli. com, Hours: M-Sa 9AM-6PM. An old-world style Italian deli/ dry goods grocery who, bless them, sell ingredients. Check out the Ferlenghetti poem over the door while getting your sheet-pan pizza, sliced turkey, good wine and tiramisu. ■Valencia Whole Foods, 999 Valencia Street, at 21st Street, Phone: +1 415 285-0231, Hours: Daily 8:30AM-9PM. Organic produce and groceries, good bulk foods, and a deli with organic salads, Middle Eastern foods, and sandwiches to order. A neighborhood essential.

Drink ■12 Galaxies, 2565 Mission Street, between 21st and 22nd, Phone: +1 415 970-9777, http://www.12galaxies.com/. Various indie and alternative bands play live here. ■The 500 Club, 500 Guerrero Street, at 17th, Phone: +1 415 861-2500, Hours: M-F 3PM-2AM, Sa-Su Noon-2AM. Great neighborhood alterna-hipster bar, but in a good way. For-

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merly an old man dive bar that’s been taken over by the thick black rimmed glasses youngster. ■Amnesia, 853 Valencia Street, between 19th and 20th, Phone: +1 415 970-0012, http://www.amnesiathebar.com, Hours: Daily 6PM-2AM. Small bar with eclectic live music every weeknight. Wine & beer only. ■The Attic, 3336 24th Street, between Bartlett and Osage, Phone: +1 415 643-3376, http://www.myspace.com/atticbar, Hours: Daily 5PM-2AM. Can be good for hipster watching unless a crew of drunken out-of-town frat boys appear for weird robot dancing. ■Blondies, 540 Valencia Street, between 16th and 17th, Phone: +1 415 864-2419, http://www.blondiesbar.com, Hours: Daily 2PM-2AM. Yuppie martini bar. Where the Marina set goes when they wanna go slumming in the Mission. Truly good martinis though. ■Chaise Lounge, 309 Cortland Avenue, at Bocana. Formely known as “Charlie’s”, this bar had a reputation as a very rough dive until a major renovation in 2002. The clientele instantly changed to reflect the increasingly affluent, middle-class demographic of the neighborhood. After another change in ownership in 2005, another subtle shift in clientele now favored a younger lesbian crowd, although the bar is welcoming to both straight and gay patrons. One notable feature is a cozy secret room in the back area. Chaise Lounge features a wide array of hard liquor and a diverse but small selection of draft beer. ■Dalva, 3121 16th Street, between Albion and Valencia, Phone: +1 415 252-7740, Hours: Daily 4PM-2AM. It’s very dimly lit but cool decor. Excellent jukebox, though after 9PM they tend to turn it up just a touch too loud. Check out the VIP room in the back. Excellent happy hour! ■Delirium, 3139 16th Street, at Albion, Phone: +1 415 5525525, Hours: Daily 2PM-2AM. The Albion was truly a vaguely scary dive bar. Delirium was another great neighborhood bar, but it’s shockingly turned into a bit of a bridge and tunnel 20-something meatmarket these days. They have a

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place to dance in the back, with good 60’s rock and soul on Wednesdays. ■Elixir, 3200 16th Street, at Guerrero, Phone: +1 415 552-1633, http://www.elixirsf.com, Hours: M-F 3PM-2AM, Sa Noon2AM, Su 11AM-2AM. Pub quiz, charity events, great drink specials and a warm vibe. ■Esta Noche, 3079 16th Street, at Rondel between Valencia and Mission, Phone: +1 415 861-5757, http://www.estanocheclub.com, Hours: M-F 1PM-2AM, Sa-Su Noon-2AM. Latino drag queens and papis who love them. Fun dance floor and eclectic crowd. ■Homestead, 2301 Folsom Street, at 19th, Phone: +1 415 2824663. Beautifully reincarnated back into it’s historical self in 2005, this cool neighborhood space is a true local’s hangout. The building has been a bar since 1907. ■Kilowatt, 3160 16th Street, at Albion, Phone: +1 415 861-2595, http://www.barbell.com/kilowatt, Hours: M-F 4:30PM-2PM, Sa-Su 1PM-2AM. Fun yet intimate bar. Great music on the jukebox and a decent place to play pool. ■Latin American Cub, 3286 22nd Street, (between Valencia and Bartlett), Phone: (415) 647-2732, Hours: Mon-Thu 6:00 p.m.-2:00 a.m. Fri-Sat 5:00 p.m.-2:00 a.m. Sun 6:00 p.m.-2:00 a.m.. Decorated in dusty kitsch, the LAC also has large paintings for sale by local artists. They can offer up some of the best, strongest margaritas in town. Just one, that’s all it takes. Price: $. ■The Lexington Club, 3464 19th Street, at Lexington between Valencia and Mission, Phone: +1 415 863-2052, http:// www.lexingtonclub.com, Hours: Daily 3PM-2AM. Fun inviting rowdy lesbian crowd. ■The Liberties, 998 Guerrero Street, at 22nd, Phone: +1 415 282-6789, http://www.theliberties.com, Hours: M-F 11AM2AM, Sa-Su 9:30AM-2AM. Irish Pub. Excellent late weekend brunch no one knows about. ■Pink, (Formerly Liquid), 2925 16th Street, between Capp and Van Ness, Phone: +1 415 431-8889, http://www.pinksf. com, Hours: Tu-Th 10PM-2AM, F-Sa 9:30PM-3AM. Fun little club with a packed, sweaty dancefloor. Just beware of the

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bartenders. At least in the past, they’ll try to shortchange you if they think you’re too tipsy to notice. ■Phoenix, 811 Valencia Street, at 19th, Phone: +1 415 695-1811, http://www.phoenixirishbar.com, Hours: M-F 11AM-2AM, Sa-Su 9:30AM-2AM. Generic Irish pub with surprisingly good food. ■Phone Booth, 1398 S Van Ness Avenue, between 24th St & 25th St, Phone: +1 415 648-4683. Another competitor for the *definitive dive bar*. Appropriately named given its size. ■Shotwell 59, 3349 20th Street, at Shotwell, Phone: +1 415 647-1141. The definition of a neighborhood bar. Still smoky despite the smoking ban. ■Skip’s Tavern, 453 Cortland Avenue, at Wool, Phone: +1 415 282-3456, http://www.skipstavern.com. Live blues music spills from this dive located in the heart of Bernal Heights. Good gor a game of pool or darts. ■Skylark, 3089 16th Street, at Valencia, Phone: +1 415 6219294, http://www.skylarkbar.com, Hours: Tu-Th 7PM-2AM, F 5PM-2AM, Sa-Su 7PM-2AM. A bit of a meatmarket ‘club’ scene. ■Uptown, 200 Capp Street, at 17th, Phone: +1 415 861-8231. Small neighborhood bar with artsy aging punk rockers and a relaxed attitude. Dogs and bicycles welcome. ■VinoRosso, 629 Cortland Avenue, at Anderson Street, Phone: +1 415 647-1268, http://www.vinorossosf.com, Hours: M-Th 4PM-11PM, F-Sa 11AM-11PM, Su 11AM-10PM. A great little wine bar with emphasis on Italian varieties. ■Wild Side West, 424 Cortland Avenue, at Wool, Phone: +1 415 647-3099, Hours: Daily 1PM-2AM. Although technically a lesbian bar, this neighborhood watering hole welcomes all. Inexpensive beer flows from the taps. In the winter time, a fire burns in the main room, which includes a small pool table. But the most interesting aspect to this bar is the outside garden in the back, best enjoyed on warmer days and nights. The garden is heavily decorated with sculptures and lights. Find a nook to cuddle up with a loved one while sipping a drink. ■Zeitgeist, 199 Valencia Street, at Duboce, Phone: +1 415 2557505, Hours: Daily 9AM-2AM. Cool motorcycle/bike cou-

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rier punk rock-ish alterna-crowd. The bartenders can (and almost always do) often drip with attitude. They, and the regulars, can be fiercely protective of their little hideaway. Awesome and huge backyard (dare I say ‘beer garden’. There, just said it). Rowdy on weekend nights and they bbq too.

Sleep ■Elements Hostel, 2516 Mission Street, between 21st and 22nd, Phone: +1 415 647-4100, http://www.elementshotel. com. Dormitory and private accommodations, 24 hour check-in. Price: $23 (dorms) or $29pp (twin-share). ■The Inn San Francisco, 943 South Van Ness Avenue, between 20th and 21st, Phone: +1 415 641-0188, innkeeper@ innsf.com, Fax: +1 415 641-1701, http://www.innsf.com, Check In: 2PM, Check Out: Noon. A charming, San Francisco boutique bed and breakfast captures the romantic spirit of the Victorian era and welcomes you with hospitality and warmth that is distinctly San Franciscan. Price: $120+.

Contact ■San Francisco Public Library - Bernal Heights Branch, 500 Cortland Avenue, at Andover, Phone: +1 415 355-2810, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Temporarily closed TBC. ■San Francisco Public Library - Mission Branch, 300 Bartlett Street, at 24th, Phone: +1 415 355-2800, http://sfpl. lib.ca.us/, Hours: Su 1PM-5PM, M 1PM-9PM, Tu,W 10AM9PM, Th,Sa 10AM-6PM, F 1PM-6PM.

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Southeast San Francisco Southeast San Francisco is made up of several mostly residential neighborhoods of San Francisco bounded on the north and west by I-280, the 101 highway, and 16th Street, the east by the San Francisco Bay, and on the south by the city limits.

Understand Bayview-Hunter’s Point is bounded roughly by Cesar Chavez to the north, the 101 freeway to the west, and the San Francisco Bay to the east. When the Navy closed the Naval Shipyard (the site of the first dry-dock on the West Coast and a major population draw), it also cut the jobs that the Shipyard provided. As jobs left, crime rose, and Hunters Point is now one of the worst neighborhoods of the city. It is however turning around slowly, and people who live there say it’s not as bad as it was 10 years ago. New apartments are being built and the Muni Metro (public transit) has been extended. The Excelsior is part of the area known as the Outer Mission. The district is a mostly residential working class neighborhood. Ingleside is a mostly residential neighborhood tucked between San Francisco State University on the west and City College of San Francisco on the east. Directly south is Daly City. Ocean Ave is the main commercial corridor of this neighborhood. A new shopping district on Alemany Boulevard across the highway from the Daly City BART stop in the south section of this neighborhood promises several restaurants as well as shopping.

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Portolรก is a district bounded by 101, 280, University Ave and Mansell St. Potrero Hill is a district located east of the Mission District and south of SoMa. It is bordered on the north by 16th Street, on the west by Potrero Avenue (U.S. Route 101), and on the south by Cesar Chavez Street. Visitacion Valley is a district bordered by roughly John McLaren Park to the west, Mansell Boulevard to the north, Bayview Hill and Candlestick Cove to the east, and the San Francisco/San Mateo County line to the South.

Get in The MUNI Metro serves several neighborhoods of Southeast San Francisco. The T-Third line light rail runs the length of 3rd Street from Downtown through Potrero Hill and Bayview-Hunters Point to its southern terminus at Bay Shore Blvd and Sunnydale Avenue in Visitacion Valley. On the other side of Southeast San Francisco, the J, K and M lines meet up at the Balboa Park station near Ingleside. The M and K lines actually run through Ingleside, while the J line runs north through Noe Valley and the Castro. BART, the regional metro system, stops at the Balboa Park MUNI Metro station as well as the Glen Park station (also serviced by MUNI Metro J line) just to the north, before continuing on through the Mission district to Downtown and across the bay. Caltrain, a commuter rail running south from Downtown to San Jose, has two stops in Southeast San Francisco: the 22nd Street station on Pennsylvania and 22nd Streets, and the Bayshore station on Tunnel Avenue south of Bayshore Blvd, near the end of the MUNI Metro T line.

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The area is also serviced by the 9-San Bruno, 14-Mission, 19Polk, 22-Fillmore, 23-Monterey, 24-Divisadero, 29-Sunset, 43-Masonic, 44-O’Shaughnessy, 48-Quintara/24th Street, 49-Van Ness-Mission, 52-Excelsior and 54-Felton MUNI bus lines. By car, I-280 and the 101 Highway provide easy freeway access to the area.

See ■Anchor Steam Brewery, 1705 Mariposa Street, at De Haro, Phone: +1 415 863-8350, http://www.anchorbrewing. com/. Tours by reservation only. ■Vermont Street, between 20th and 22nd Street. The (nearly) twistiest street in America, a less known version of Lombard Street between Leavenworth and Hyde in Russian Hill. ■Bayview Opera House Ruth Williams Memorial Theater, 4705 Third Street, between Newcomb and Oakdale, Phone: +1 415 824 0386, http://www.bayviewoperahouse. org/. San Franciso Historic Landmark #8 A wooden structure built in 1888 and now used as a community meeting center. ■Hunter’s Point Springs-Albion Brewery, 881 Innes Avenue, at India Basin Shoreline Park, Phone: +1 415, http:// www.noehill.com/sf/landmarks/sf060.asp. San Francisco Historical Landmark #60, built in 1870. ■San Francisco Naval Shipyard. If you are feeling adventurous, try visiting the abandoned shipyard at Hunter’s Point. ■San Francisco State University, http://www.sfsu.edu. Check out the Art Gallery at SF State. ■City College of San Francisco, http://www.ccsf.edu. See Murals by Diego Rivera at the City College Campus on Ocean Avenue. Also visit the Southeast Campus at 1800 Oakdale Avenue - built as a mitigation measure in 1987 in

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return for the Bayview Hunters Point (BVHP) community’s acceptance of the Southeast Water Treatment Plant in the midst of their neighborhood.

Do ■Palega Playground, Felton and Holyoke, http://ggmg. org/Playgrounds/portola.html. Senior and afterschool programs. ■Martin Luther King Jr. Pool, 3rd Avenue and Carroll Street, Phone: +1 415 822-2807, http://www.sfgov.org/site/ recpark_page.asp?id=1867#king. Two indoor pools in a nice new facility. Larger one is 75’ square. $3 for adults. ■Bayview/Hunter’s Point YMCA, 1601 Lane Street, at Quesada, one block east of 3rd, Phone: +1 415 822-7728, http://www.ymcasf.org/Bayview/index.html. Opened in 2006 at the site of the former All Hallows Parish elementary school. ■Candlestick Point State Recreation Area, 1150 Carroll Avenue, east of Ingalls, Phone: +1 415 671-0145, http://www. parks.ca.gov/?page_id=519. Right on the Bay is this actually very nice and undervisited park. It’s very green, actually has functioning benches and BBQ pits, and a small fishing pier. You are also likely to spot windsurfers who come to this windy spot on the Bay. ■San Francisco 49ers, Phone: +1 415 656-4900, http://www. sf49ers.com. The local NFL team plays at Monster Park which overlooks Candlestick Cove. Go cheer them on! ■Bayview Park. Overlooking Monster Park, this park has great panoramic views of the bay. Not one of San Francisco’s better maintained parks. ■Heron’s Head Park, Pier 98, http://www.lejyouth.org/ prog_hhp.php4. A 24-acre restored wetland at the base of the Hunters Point Power Plant. ■John McLaren Park, http://www.jennalex.com/projects/ fomp/homepage. At 317 acres, this is the second largest park in San Francisco, and is located smack dab in Visitacion Val-

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ley. Recently cleaned up, this park is still under used. With rolling hills and views galore, this is the best place in the city to get away from it. If you have a dog, bring it to the reservoir on Shelley Drive where there is a large off-leash area where your pet can romp in the fields or swim in the water. There is an amphitheater, a duck pond, multiple playgrounds, some great hiking trails, and a few tennis courts. ■COW Palace, 2600 Geneva Avenue, Phone: +1 415 4044111, http://www.cowpalace.com. Concerts, ice shows & the Grand National Rodeo (Owned by the City and County of San Francisco, but on the Daly City side of Geneva Avenue).

Buy ■G. Mazzei & Son Hardware, 5166 3rd Street, between Shafter and Thomas, Phone: +1 415 822-2655. Family owned and operated hardware store since the 1920’s. ■Caldwell’s Building Materials for Less, 195 Bayshore Blvd, between Jerrold and Oakdale, Phone: +1 415 550-6777, helpdesk@caldwells.com, Fax: +1 415 550-0349, http:// www.caldwells.com, Hours: M-F 8AM-5PM, Sa 9AM-5PM. Reclaimed lumber & building materials. ■Bayshore Farmers Market, 300 Bayshore Blvd, at Oakdale, Phone: +1 415 647-1806. ■Stonestown Galleria Mall, along 19th Ave, north of SFSU, http://www.shopstonestown.com/. ■San Bruno Avenue. The commercial center of the Portolá.

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■Old Clam House, 299 Bayshore Blvd, at Oakdale, Phone: +1 415 826-4880. Established in 1861. Start your meal with clam broth and sourdough bread. ■Roadhouse Coffee Company, 5191 3rd Street, between Shafter Ave & Thomas Ave. Coffee, and a variety of sandwiches. ■Olivia’s, 4712 3rd Street, at Newcomb, Phone: +1 415 6473663. The best soul food in town (must try her catfish and banana pudding!). ■Joe’s Cable Car Restaurant, 4320 Mission Street, near Silver Ave, Phone: +1 415 334-6699, Fax: +1 415 334-4280, http:// www.joescablecar.com, Hours: Daily 11AM-11PM. Great fries and burgers. ■Sorrento Delicatessen, 4763 Mission Street, between Leo and Russia, Phone: +1 415 587-2277. Local Italian-American business with great salami. ■Java on Ocean Cafe, 1700 Ocean Ave, at Faxon, Phone: +1 415 333-6075. A locally owned coffee shop with sandwiches and Middle Eastern fare. Get a quick bite to eat or stay and have a cappuccino while surfing the internet. They provide paid terminals or paid wireless access through the ZRNet subscription service. The owners have outfitted this joint with Salvation Army sofas and chairs and play eclectic music on the stereo. ■Hard Knox Cafe, 2526 3rd Street, at 22nd, Phone: +1 415 648-3770, http://www.hardknoxcafe.com. Casual soul food; oxtail, ribs, fried chicken, etc. ■Kelly’s Mission Rock, 817 Terry Francois St, east of Illinois, on the waterfront, Phone: +1 415 626-5355, info@kellysmissionrock.com, Fax: +1 415 863-6445, http://www.kellysmissionrock.com. Restaurant and bar with outside dining that even comes with boat docking too! ■7-Mile House, 2800 Bayshore Blvd, at Geneva, Phone: +1 415 467-2343, http://www.historic7milehouse.com, Hours: M-Th 11:30-10PM, F-Sa 10:30AM-2AM. The 7-Mile House is a historic landmark and a great place to get some food. During the days of the gold rush, the 7-mile house served as a resting post for horse coaches travelling from San Francisco (Embarcadero) to San Jose. This was a place to rest your

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horses, get some beer and share stories of finding gold. Today, the place boasts an authentic gold rush decor, great beer and burgers and live music most days of the week. ■Russia House, 2011 Bayshore Blvd, On the outer edge of the neighborhood, just off of 101. ■ There are several coffee shops, restaurants and bakeries on San Bruno Avenue.

Drink ■Bottom of the Hill, 1233 17th Street, at Missouri, Phone: +1 415 621-4455, http://www.bottomofthehill.com. Chosen by Rolling Stone magazine (RS 813) as “the best place to hear live music in San Francisco”, the Bottom of the Hill presents some of the finest original artists, seven nights a week. It has a full bar and a kitchen and also features a nice patio area to escape the crowd and have a smoke. ■Farley’s Coffee and Newsstand, 1315 18th Street, at Texas, Phone: +1 415 648-1545, info@farleyscoffee.com, http://www.farleyscoffee.com, Hours: M-F 6:30AM-10PM, Sa 7:30AM-10PM, Su 8AM-10PM. A 15+ year institution in Potrero Hill. Roger (the owner) is a conscientious-objector to cafe wi fi, so don’t expect any. But do expect sociable strangers, shelves-full of community sketchbooks, a pile of tattered old board-games, the best newsstand outside of Civic Center, old Hell’s Angels guys socializing with Armani clad architects, delicious coffee drinks, a toy bin for the kids, dog-friendly folks outside to pet your dog while you’re inside, and so much more! ■Blooms Tavern, 1318 18th Street, between Missouri and Texas, Phone: +1 415 552-6707. One of the few remaining true blue-collar watering holes around. A great place to go to watch baseball and football games. No around-theshoulder cuffed-sweaters, khaki pants, or tassle-loafer wearin’ folks in this joint. But lots of friendly folks, always a “hi, how you doin’?” from the smokers outside, and during Giants or 49ers games, cheers and boos can be heard from a good block away. Very much a “neighborhood” bar. One

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of the best views in the city from out the back porch, which regrettably is now only open during the day. Not a quiet bar, but the back seating area is a good place to meet friends for a ‘mellow’ beer and catch-up chit-chat after dinner or work. All of the sports watching and neighborhood-folks to-do’in’ happents up towards the front. Friendly staff, no airheads allowed.

Sleep ■Travellodge at Bayshore, 2011 Bay Shore Blvd, at Hester, near the 101, Phone: +1 415 467-8811.

Contact ■San Francisco Public Library - Excelsior Branch, 4400 Mission St., at Cotter, Phone: +1 415 355-2868, http:// sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Sun 1-5, M 1-9, Tu 10-9, W 10-9, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sat 10-6. ■San Francisco Public Library - Portola Branch, 2450 San Bruno Ave., at Silliman, one block south of Silver, Phone: +1 415 355-5660, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Sun 1-5, M closed, Tu 10-6, W 12-8, Th 1-7, F 1-6, Sat 1-6. ■San Francisco Public Library - Potrero Branch, 1616 20th Street, at Connecticut, Phone: +1 415 355-2822, http:// sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Sun Closed, M Closed, Tu 10-8, W 12-8, Th 10-6, F 1-6, Sat 1-6. ■San Francisco Public Library - Visitacion Valley Branch, 45 Leland Avenue, at Desmond, one block west of Bay Shore, Phone: +1 415 355-2848, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Sun Closed, M 10-6, Tu 10-6, W 12-7, Th 1-7, F 1-6, Sat 1-6. ■San Francisco Public Library - Ocean View Branch, 345 Randolph St., between Ramsell and Victoria, Phone: +1

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415 355-5615, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Sun Closed, M 106, Tu 10-6, W 10-7, Th 1-7, F 1-6, Sat 1-6. â– San Francisco Public Library - Bayview/Anna E. Waden Branch, 5075 3rd Street, between Quesada and Revere, Phone: +1 415 355-5757, http://sfpl.lib.ca.us/, Hours: Sun Closed, M 10-6, Tu 10-6, W 1-8, Th 10-8, F 1-6, Sat 10-6.

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History The history of San Francisco, California, has been greatly influenced by its coastal location, which has made it a natural center for maritime trade and military activity. Since its incorporation into the United States, where it is now the fourteenth largest city (2004 census), it has been characterized by rapid economic change and cultural diversity.

Precolonial history European visitors to the Bay Area were preceded 10,000 to 20,000 years earlier by Native Americans. When Europeans arrived, they found the area inhabited by the Yelamu tribe, which belongs to a linguistic grouping later called the Ohlone, living in the coastal and bay areas between Big Sur and the San Francisco Bay. San Francisco’s characteristic foggy weather and geography led early European explorers, including Juan Cabrillo and Sir Francis Drake (who would instead land somewhere to the north), to bypass the Golden Gate and miss sighting San Francisco Bay.

Arrival of Europeans and early

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settlement

■A view of the restored Mission Dolores (1791) with the basilica (1918) to the right

A Spanish exploration party, led by Don Gaspar de Portolà, arriving on November 2, 1769, was the first documented European visit to San Francisco Bay, claiming it for Spain as part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Seven years later a Spanish mission, Mission San Francisco de Asís (Mission Dolores), was established with a small settlement, and an associated military fort was built in what is now the Presidio. In 1786 French explorer, the Comte de la Pérouse visited San Francisco and left a detailed account of it. Six years later, in 1792 British explorer George Vancouver also stopped in San Francisco, in part, according to his journal, to spy on the Spanish settlements in the area. In addition to Western European sailors, Russian colonists also visited the Bay area. From 1770, lasting through 1841, Russia colonized an area that ranged from Alaska south to Fort Ross in Sonoma County, California. The naming of San Francisco’s Russian

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Hill neighborhood is attributed to the remains of Russian fur-traders and sailors found there. Upon independence from Spain in 1821, the area became part of Mexico. In 1835, Englishman William Richardson erected the first significant homestead outside the immediate vicinity of the Mission Dolores, near a boat anchorage around what is today Portsmouth Square. Together with Mission Alcalde Francisco de Haro, he laid out a street plan for the expanded settlement, and the town, named Yerba Buena after the herb, which was named by the missionaries that found it abundant nearby, began to attract American settlers. In 1838, Richardson petitioned and received a large land grant in Marin County and, in 1841, he moved there to take up residence at Rancho Sauselito. Richardson Bay to the north bears his name. The British Empire briefly entertained the idea of purchasing the bay from Mexico in 1841, claiming it would “Secure to Great Britain all the advantages of the finest port in the Pacific for her commercial speculations in time of peace, and in war for more easily securing her maritime ascendency�. However little came of this, and San Francisco would become a prize of the United States rather than that of British naval power. On July 31 1846, Yerba Buena doubled in population when about 240 Mormon migrants from the East coast arrived on the ship Brooklyn, led by Sam Brannan. Brannan, also a member of the Mormon Church, would later become well known for being the first publicist of the California Gold Rush of 1849 and the first millionaire resulting from it.

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■Portsmouth Square, 1851.

US Navy Commodore John D. Sloat claimed California for the United States on July 7, 1846, during the Mexican-American War, and US Navy Captain John Berrien Montgomery and US Marine Second Lieutenant Henry Bulls Watson of the USS Portsmouth arrived to claim Yerba Buena two days later by raising the flag over the town plaza, which is now Portsmouth Square in honor of the ship. Henry Bulls Watson was placed in command of the garrison there. In August 1846, Lt. Washington A. Bartlett was named alcalde of Yerba Buena. On January 30, 1847, Lt. Bartlett’s proclamation changing the name Yerba Buena to San Francisco took effect. The city and the rest of California officially became American in 1848 by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which ended the Mexican-American War. California was admitted to the U.S. as a state on September 9, 1850 -- the State of California soon chartered San Francisco as both a City and a County. Situated at the tip of a windswept peninsula without water or firewood, San Francisco lacked most of the basic facilities for a nineteenth century settlement. These natural disadvantages forced the town’s residents to bring water, fuel and food to the site. The first of many environmental transformations was the city’s reliance on filled marshlands for real estate. Much of the present downtown is built over the former Yerba Buena Cove, granted to the city by military governor Stephen Watts Kearny in 1847.

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1848 gold rush

â– San Francisco harbor in 1850 or 1851. During this time, the harbor would become so crowded that ships often had to wait days before unloading their passengers and goods.

The California gold rush starting in 1848 led to a large boom in population, including considerable immigration. Between January 1848 and December 1849, the population of San Francisco increased from 1,000 to 25,000. The rapid growth continued through the 1850s and under the influence of the 1859 Comstock Lode silver discovery. This rapid growth complicated city planning efforts, leaving a legacy of narrow streets that continues to cause unique traffic problems today. San Francisco became America’s largest city west of the Mississippi River, until it lost that title to Los Angeles in 1920. The population boom included many workers from China who came to work in the gold mines and later on the Transcontinental Railroad. The Chinatown district of the city became and is still one of the largest in the country; the city as a whole is roughly one-fifth Chinese, one of the largest concentrations outside of China. Many businesses founded to service the growing population exist today, notably Levi Strauss & Co. clothing, Ghirardelli chocolate, and Wells Fargo bank. Many famous railroad, banking, and mining

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tycoons or “robber barons” such as Charles Crocker, Mark Hopkins, Collis P. Huntington, and Leland Stanford settled in the city in its Nob Hill neighborhood. The sites of their mansions are now famous and expensive San Francisco hotels (Mark Hopkins Hotel and the Huntington Hotel). As in many mining towns, the social climate in early San Francisco was chaotic. Committees of Vigilance were formed in 1851, and again in 1856, in response to crime and government corruption, but also had a strong element of anti-immigrant violence, and arguably created more lawlessness than they eliminated. This popular militia movement lynched 12 people, kidnapped hundreds of Irishmen and government militia members, and forced several elected officials to resign. The Committee of Vigilance relinquished power both times after it decided the city had been “cleaned up.” This mob activity later focused on Chinese immigrants, creating many race riots. These riots culminated in the creation of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 that aimed to reduce Chinese immigration to the United States by limiting immigration to males and reducing numbers of immigrants allowed in the city. The law was not repealed until 1943.

■Market Street, early 20th century The City of San Francisco was the seat of the County of San

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Francisco from 1849 to 1856. In response to the lawlessness and vigilantism that escalated rapidly between 1855 and 1856, the State of California decided to divide the County; and carved out the city core from the rest of the County. A straight line was drawn across the tip of the San Francisco Peninsula just north of San Bruno Mountain. Everything south of the line became the new County of San Mateo, while everything north of the line became part of the new consolidated City-County of San Francisco -- California’s first and, to date, only metropolitan municipality. In autumn of 1855, a ship bearing refugees from an ongoing cholera epidemic in the Far East (authorities disagree as to whether this was the S.S. Sam or the S.S. Carolina but primary documents indicate that the Caroline was involved in the epidemic of 1850 and the SS Uncle Sam in the epidemic of 1855) docked in San Francisco. As the city’s rapid Gold Rush area population growth had significantly outstripped the development of infrastructure, including sanitation, a serious cholera epidemic quickly broke out. The responsibility for caring for the indigent sick had previously rested on the state, but faced with the San Francisco cholera epidemic, the state legislature devolved this responsibility to the counties, setting the precedent for California’s system of county hospitals for the poor still in effect today. The Sisters of Mercy were contracted to run San Francisco’s first county hospital, the State Marine and County Hospital, due to their efficiency in handling the cholera epidemic of 1855. By 1857, the order opened St. Mary’s Hospital on Stockton Street, the first Catholic hospital west of the Rocky Mountains. In 1905, The Sisters of Mercy purchased a lot at Fulton and Stanyan Streets, the current location of St. Mary’s Medical Center, the oldest continually operating hospital in San Francisco.

Labor For labor history of San Francisco, see: History of California to 1899 and History of California 1900 to present

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Paris of the West By the 1890s, San Francisco was suffering from machine politics and corruption, and was ripe for political reform. Adolph Sutro ran for mayor in 1894 under the auspices of the Populist Party and won handily without campaigning. Unfortunately, except for the Sutro Baths, Mayor Sutro substantially failed in his efforts to improve the city. The next mayor, James D. Phelan elected in 1896, was more successful, pushing through a new city charter that allowed for the ability to raise funds through bond issues. He was able to get bonds passed to construct a new sewer system, seventeen new schools, two parks, a hospital, and a main library. After leaving office in 1901, Phelan became interested in remaking San Francisco into a grand and modern Paris of the West. When the San Francisco Art Association asked him to draft a plan for the beautification of the city, he hired famed architect Daniel Burnham. Burnham and Phelan’s plan was ambitious, envisioning a 50-year effort to transform the city with wide diagonal boulevards creating open spaces and squares as they crossed the orthogonal grid of existing streets. Some parts of the plan were eventually implemented, including an Opera house to the north of City Hall, a subway under Market Street, and a waterfront boulevard (The Embarcadero) circling the city.

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â– Ross Alley in Chinatown 1898, (Photo by Arnold Genthe) In 1900, a ship brought with it rats infected with bubonic plague. Mistakenly believing that interred corpses contributed to the transmission of plague, and possibly also motivated by the opportunity for profitable land speculation, city leaders banned all burials within the city. Cemeteries moved to the undeveloped area just south of the city limit, now the town of Colma, California. A fifteen-block section of Chinatown was quarantined while city leaders squabbled over the proper course to take, but the outbreak was finally eradicated by 1905. However, the problem of existing cemeteries and the shortage of land in the city remained. In 1912 (with fights extending until 1942), all remaining cemeteries in the city were evicted to Colma, where the dead now outnumber the living by more than a thousand to one. The above-ground Columbarium of San Francisco was allowed to remain, as well as the historic cemetery at Mission Dolores, the grave of Thomas Starr King at the Unitarian Church, and the San Francisco National Cemetery at the Presidio of San Francisco.

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1906 Earthquake and Fire On April 18 1906, a devastating earthquake resulted from the rupture of over 270 miles of the San Andreas Fault, from San Juan Bautista to Eureka, centered immediately offshore of San Francisco. The quake is estimated by the USGS to have had a magnitude of 7.8 on the Richter scale. Water mains ruptured throughout San Francisco, and the fires that followed burned out of control for days, destroying approximately 80% of the city, including almost all of the downtown core. Many residents were trapped between the water on three sides and the approaching fire, and a mass evacuation across the Bay saved thousands. Refugee camps were also set up in Golden Gate Park, Ocean Beach, and other undeveloped sections of the city. The official death toll at the time was 478, although it was officially revised in 2005 to 3,000+. The initial low death toll was concocted by civic, state, and federal officials who felt that reporting the actual numbers would hurt rebuilding and redevelopment efforts, as well as city and national morale.

Reconstruction Almost immediately after the quake re-planning and reconstruction plans were hatched to quickly rebuild the city. One of the more famous and ambitious plans, proposed before the fire, came from famed urban planner, Daniel Burnham. His bold plan called for Haussmann style avenues, boulevards, and arterial thoroughfares that radiated across the city, a massive civic center complex with classical structures, what would have been the largest urban park in the world, stretching from Twin Peaks to Lake Merced with a large athenaeum at its peak, and various other proposals. This plan was dismissed at the time and by critics now, as impractical and unrealistic to municipal supply and demand. Property owners and the Real Estate industry were against the idea as well due to the amounts of their land the city would have to purchase to realize such proposals. While the original street grid was restored, many of Burn-

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ham’s proposals inadvertently saw the light of day such as a neo-classical civic center complex, wider streets, a preference of arterial thoroughfares, a subway under Market Street, a more people friendly Fisherman’s Wharf, and a monument to the city on Telegraph Hill, Coit Tower. In 1907 and 08, the city was rocked by graft investigations and trials involving bribery of the Board of Supervisors from so-called public service corporations that put mayor Eugene Schmitz and Abe Ruef in jail.

■The Palace of Fine Arts is the only building that remains from the Panama-Pacific Exposition

In 1915, the city hosted the Panama-Pacific Exposition, officially to celebrate the opening of the Panama Canal, but also as a showcase of the vibrant completely rebuilt city less than a decade after the Earthquake. After the exposition ended, all of its grand buildings were demolished except for the Palace of Fine Arts which survives today in an abbreviated form.

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After rebuilding The San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge was opened in 1936 and the Golden Gate Bridge in 1937. The 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition was held on Treasure Island. During World War II, San Francisco was the major mainland supply point and port of embarkation for the war in the Pacific. The War Memorial Opera House which opened in 1932, was the site of some significant post World War II history. In 1945, the conference that formed the United Nations was held there, with the UN Charter being signed nearby in the Herbst Theatre on June 26. Additionally the Treaty of San Francisco which formally ended war with Japan and established peaceful relations, was drafted and signed here six years later in 1951.

Period after World War II After World War II, many American military personnel who fell in love with the city during leaving to or returning from the Pacific, settled in the city prompting the creation of the Sunset District and Visitacion Valley. During this period, Caltrans commenced an aggressive freeway construction program in the Bay Area. However, Caltrans soon encountered strong resistance in San Francisco, for the city’s high population density meant that virtually any right-of-way would displace a large number of people. Caltrans tried to minimize displacement (and its land acquisition costs) by building double-decker freeways, but the crude state of civil engineering at that time resulted in construction of some embarrassingly ugly freeways which ultimately turned out to be seismically unsafe. In 1959, the Board of Supervisors voted to halt construction of any more freeways in the city, an event known as the Freeway Revolt. Although some minor modifications have been allowed to the ends of exist-

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ing freeways, the city’s anti-freeway policy has remained in place ever since. In 1989, the Loma Prieta earthquake destroyed the Embarcadero Freeway and portions of the so-called Central Freeway. Over the course of several referendums, San Francisco’s residents elected not to rebuild either structure. The neighborhoods once covered by these freeways have been rebuilt, and the restoration of the Embarcadero, San Francisco’s historic bay waterfront, as a public space has been especially successful.

Urban renewal In the 1950s San Francisco mayor George Christopher hired Harvard graduate Justin Herman to head the redevelopment agency for the city and county. Justin Herman began an aggressive campaign to tear down so-called blighted areas of the city that were really working class, non-white neighborhoods. Enacting eminent domain whenever necessary, he set upon a plan to tear down huge areas of the city and replace them with modern construction. Critics accused Herman of racism for what was perceived as attempts to create segregation and displacement of blacks. Many black residents were forced to move from their homes near the Fillmore jazz district to newly constructed projects such as the near the naval base Hunter’s Point or even to cities such as Oakland. He began leveling entire areas in San Francisco’s Western Addition and Japantown neighborhoods. Herman also completed the final removal of the produce district below Telegraph Hill, moving the produce merchants to the Alemany boulevard site. His planning led to the creation of Embarcadero Center, the Embarcadero Freeway, Japantown, the Geary Street superblocks, and eventually Yerba Buena Gardens.

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Counterculture San Francisco has often been a magnet for America’s counterculture. During the 1950s, City Lights Bookstore in the North Beach neighborhood was an important publisher of Beat Generation literature. Some of the story of the evolving arts scene of the 1950s is told in the article San Francisco Renaissance. During the latter half of the following decade, the 1960s, San Francisco was the center of hippie and other alternative culture. In 1967 thousands of young people poured into the HaightAshbury district during what became known as the Summer of Love. At this time, the San Francisco Sound emerged as an influential force in rock music, with such acts as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead achieving international prominence. These groups blurred the boundaries between folk, rock and jazz traditions and further developed rock’s lyrical content. During the 1980s and 1990s San Francisco became a major focal point in the North American--and international-- punk, thrash metal, and rave scenes. In 2004, the city hosted its first Love Parade, which originated in Berlin, Germany, ten years earlier. It was also a hot spot during the 1980s for comedians like Ellen DeGeneres and Robin Williams who got major career boosts thanks to the presence of the city’s popular comedy clubs. San Francisco’s frontier spirit and wild and ribald character started its reputation as a gay mecca in the first half of the twentieth century. World War II saw a jump in the gay population when the US military actively sought out and dishonorably discharged homosexuals. From 1941 to 1945, more than 9000 gay servicemen and women were discharged, and many were processed out in San Francisco. The late 1960s also brought in a new wave of lesbians and gays who were more radical and less mainstream and who had flocked to San Francisco not only for its gay-friendly

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reputation, but for its reputation as a radical, left-wing center. These new residents were the prime movers of Gay Liberation and often lived communally, buying decrepit Victorians in the Haight and fixing them up. When drugs and violence began to become a serious problem in the Haight, many lesbians and gays simply moved “over the hill”, to the Castro replacing Irish-Americans who had moved to the more affluent and culturally homogenous suburbs. The Castro became known as a Gay Mecca, and its gay population swelled as significant numbers of gay people moved to San Francisco in the 1970s and 1980s. The growth of the gay population caused tensions with some of the established ethnic groups in the western part of the city. On November 27, 1978 Dan White, a former member of the Board of Supervisors and former police officer, assassinated the city’s mayor George Moscone and San Francisco’s first openly gay elected official, Supervisor Harvey Milk. The murders and the subsequent trial were marked both by candlelight vigils and riots within the gay community. In the 1980s, the AIDS virus wreaked havoc on the gay male community there. Today, the gay population of the city is estimated to be approximately 15%, and gays remain an important force in the city’s life. San Francisco has a higher percentage of gays and lesbians than any other major US city.

1980s: “Manhattanization” and Homelessness During the administration of Mayor Dianne Feinstein (19781988), San Francisco saw a development boom referred to as “Manhattanization.” Many large skyscrapers were built — primarily in the Financial District — but the boom also included high-rise condominiums in some residential neighborhoods. An opposition movement gained traction among those who felt the skyscrapers ruined views and destroyed San Francisco’s unique character. Similar to the freeway revolt in the city decades earlier, a “skyscraper revolt” forced the city to embed height restrictions in the planning code. For many years, the limits slowed construction of new sky-

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scrapers, but recent (2000-2007) housing pressures have led to master plan changes which will allow new construction of high-rise structures like One Rincon Hill along The Embarcadero, Rincon Hill and in the South of Market district. This second wave of towers has met little opposition unlike the first wave. For more information see List of tallest buildings in San Francisco.

â– A homeless person takes refuge in front of a construction site on Church St.

During the 1980s, homeless people began appearing in large numbers in the city, the result of multiple factors including the closing of state institutions for the mentally ill, and social changes which increased the availability of addictive drugs. Combined with San Francisco’s attractive environment and generous welfare policies the problem soon became endemic. Mayor Art Agnos (1988-92) was the first to attack the problem, and not the last; it is a top issue for San Franciscans even today. Agnos allowed the homeless

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to camp in the Civic Center park, which led to its title of “Camp Agnos.” The failure of this policy led to his losing the election to Frank Jordan in 1991. Jordan launched the “MATRIX” program the next year, which aimed to displace the homeless through aggressive police action. And it did displace them - to the rest of the city. His successor, Willie Lewis Brown, Jr., was able to largely ignore the problem, riding on the strong economy into a second term. Present mayor Gavin Newsom’s policy on the homeless is the controversial “Care Not Cash” program, which calls for ending the city’s generous welfare policies towards the homeless and instead placing them in affordable housing and requiring them to attend city funded drug rehabilitation and job training programs.

1989 Loma Prieta earthquake On October 17, 1989, an earthquake measuring 6.9 on the Richter magnitude scale struck on the San Andreas Fault near Loma Prieta Peak in the Santa Cruz mountains, approximately 70 miles (113 km) south of San Francisco, a few minutes before game 3 of the 1989 World Series. The quake severely damaged many of the city’s freeways including the Embarcadero Freeway and the Central Freeway. The damage to these freeways was so extensive that they were eventually demolished. The quake also caused extensive damage in the Marina District and the South of Market. Known in most of the United States as the “World Series Quake,” but in California and by seismologists as the Loma Prieta earthquake, it caused significant destruction throughout the greater Bay Area, yet is to blame for only 67 deaths.

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1990s dot-com boom During the dot-com boom of the 1990s, large numbers of entrepreneurs and computer software professionals moved into the city, followed by marketing and sales professionals, and changed the social landscape as once poorer neighborhoods became gentrified. The rising rents forced many people, families, and businesses to leave. San Francisco has the smallest share of children of any major U.S. city, with city’s 18 and under population at just 14.5 percent. By 2001, the boom was over, and many people left San Francisco. South of Market, where many dot-com companies were located, had been bustling and crowded with few vacancies, but by 2002 was a virtual wasteland of empty offices and for-rent signs. Much of the boom was blamed for the city’s “fastest shrinking population”, reducing the city’s population by 30,000 in just a few years. While the bust has helped put an ease on the city’s apartment rents, the city remains expensive.

Post boom By 2003, the city’s economy had recovered from the dotcom crash thanks to a resurgent international tourist industry. Residential demand as well as rents are on the rise again and as a result of such demand, city officials have relaxed building height restrictions and zoning codes to allow another wave of Manhattanization in the city in the form of very tall residential condominiums in SOMA such as One Rincon Hill, 300 Spear Street, and Millennium Tower. In addition to this, a major transformation of the neighborhood is planned with the Transbay Terminal Replacement Project, which if funded, is planned to be open by 2013 along with what will be the tallest skyscraper on the West Coast with a cluster of other supertall skyscrapers next to it. .

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Historic Populations ■1852-34,776 ■1860-56,802 ■1870-149,473 ■1880-233,959 ■1890-298,997 ■1900-342,782 ■1910-416,912 ■1920-506,676 ■1930-634,394 ■1940-634,536

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Culture

■A San Francisco cable car

San Francisco, California is a major and diverse international center of culture in terms of arts, music, festivals, museums, architecture and much more. San Francisco’s diversity of cultures along with its eccentricities are so great that they have greatly influenced the country and the world at large over the years. This was parodied in the South Park episode “Smug Alert”, which criticised various aspects of San Francisco culture, such as the environmentalist movement reaching a quasi-religion status, the perception of the South Park creators that the inhabitants have a disdain for anyone not as progressive as them, the tendency to aspire to a European lifestyle (as evidenced by the high use of public transport, the relatively large proportion of houses to apartments in comparison to other American cities, the café culture, the prominence of wine and cheese stores) etc.

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Museums The Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) contains 20th Century and contemporary pieces. It moved to its iconic building in South of Market in 1995 and attracts 600,000 visitors annually. The Palace of the Legion of Honor contains primarily European works. The De Young Museum and the Asian Art Museum have significant anthropological and non-European holdings. The Palace of Fine Arts, a remnant of the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition, today houses the Exploratorium, a popular science museum dedicated to teaching through hands-on interaction. The California Academy of Sciences is a natural history museum and hosts the Morrison Planetarium and Steinhart Aquarium. The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco has one of the most comprehensive collections of Asian art in the world. From 1958 until 2003 the collection was housed in a wing of at the original de Young in Golden Gate Park. When the de Young closed while constructing a new building, the Asian Art Museum moved to the former San Francisco City Library building, which was renovated for the purpose under the direction of Italian architect Gae Aulenti who had previously overseen the conversion of the Musée d’Orsay in Paris. The San Francisco Zoo cares for a total of about 250 animal species, 39 of which have been deemed endangered or threatened. Other museums include the International Museum of Women, the Museum of the African Diaspora, the Contemporary Jewish Museum, the Museum of Craft & Folk Art, the Cartoon Art Museum, and the Mexican Museum. San Francisco’s eccentric nature has also created some “offbeat” museums dealing in unconventional topics. Such museums and galleries include the Antique Vibrator Museum, the Musée Mécanique (dedicated to penny arcade machines), Museum of Ophthalmology, Ripley’s Believe it or Not Museum,

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the Stamp Francisco/Stamp Art Gallery (rubber stamps not postal stamps), the Tattoo Art Museum (old tattoo machines and instruments), the UFO, Bigfoot and Loch Ness Monster Museum, and the Wax Museum at Fisherman’s Wharf. The Haas-Lilienthal House (2007 Franklin Street) is the only intact private Victorian-era home in San Francisco that is open to the public year-round and available for private functions. Three generations of the Haas and Lilienthal descendants lived in this house after which the house was donated to The Foundation for San Francisco’s Architectural Heritage (later renamed San Francisco Architectural Heritage). It was open to the public for tours in 1972.

Performing arts

■War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco

Classical and Opera venues in San Francisco include the San Francisco Symphony, the San Francisco Opera and the San Francisco Ballet. They all perform at the San Francisco War Memorial and Performing Arts Center. San Francisco’s Ballet and Opera are some of the oldest continuing performing arts companies in the United States. San Francisco is the birthplace and home city of the renowned vocal ensemble Chanticleer. The city is also home to the American Conser-

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vatory Theater, also known as A.C.T., which has been a leading force in Bay Area performing arts since its arrival in San Francisco in 1967, routinely staging original productions. Additionally, the New Conservatory Theatre Center (NCTC) is known for being an intimate theater that routinely stages original productions by the local, national, and international LGBT community in addition to its family-oriented ones. Hundreds of smaller, alternative theatres also attract a significant portion of the audience given their historical role in the San Francisco performing arts culture. The oldest of these are Intersection for the Arts, founded in 1965, and the Magic Theatre, founded in 1967. to A major player in the promotion of theater in the Bay Area is Theatre Bay Area (or TBA). A non profit organization, Theatre Bay Area has members from more than 365 Bay Area theatre and dance companies, is the publisher of Callboard Magazine, and runs San Francisco’s Half-Priced Ticket Booth. Additionally, San Francisco is home to the 200-member San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus, the world’s first openly gay chorus, as well as the San Francisco Lesbian/Gay Freedom Band, the world’s first openly gay musical organization. Two additional gay choruses, the Lesbian/Gay Chorus of San Francisco and Golden Gate Men’s Chorus, also perform throughout the year. San Francisco has had a thriving improv theatre community, with a distinctly different style of improv than much of the rest of the country. Unlike Chicago where one venue will host three 30-45 minute shows in one evening, most San Francisco improv shows are 2 hours long, complete with their own intermission. And while Chicago and New York are full of improv companies who perform formats based on the Harold (with multiple storylines going on at the same time), San Francisco is full of improv shows with single-story formats. Often referred to as play-length improv shows, these improv shows are rooted in the idea that if someone can perform something scripted (like a play, movie, or musical) then it can also be improvised just as well. Some groups that define the improvisation scene in

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San Francisco are: BATS Improv, The Un-Scripted Theater Company, and The San Francisco Improv Alliance.

Festivals and street fairs San Francisco is home to many different and unique street festivals, parties and parades. Most famous are its Gay pride parade, the world’s largest, held every June, the Folsom Street Fair held every September, Chinese New Year Parade held in February, Carnaval held during the spring, Litquake and Hardly Strictly Bluegrass in October, and the North American home of the Loveparade (now known as the “Lovefest”) held in the late summer/early fall. San Francisco is also home to running races such as the Bay to Breakers and the San Francisco Marathon. During Labor Day weekend in 2008, the city also played host to the first Slow Food Nation, the first major public event for Slow Food USA and one of the largest food events in the nation. Many neighborhoods in San Francisco have annual street festivals featuring live music, arts and crafts vendors, and community organizations. Among the largest of these are Castro Street Fair, Union Street Art Festival, North Beach Festival, and Haight-Ashbury Street Fair. The San Francisco Opera company puts on an annual free Opera in the Park performance in Golden Gate Park. The San Francisco Symphony does likewise on several dates in July, including one as part of the Stern Grove Festival. On the Fourth of July holiday, there are fireworks shows over Fisherman’s Wharf and Marina Green. Another fireworks show is held every May as part of the KFOG: Kaboom!.

Architecture and tourist

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attractions Despite its limited geographical space, San Francisco contains a plethora of unique architecture that also serve as tourist attractions in their own right. They include its Civic Center, Coit Tower atop Telegraph Hill, the Ferry Building on its waterfront, the world renowned Golden Gate Bridge, the twisty and windy Lombard Street in Russian Hill, “Painted Ladies”, terraced victorian houses that can be found city wide, the San Francisco cable car system, the abstract San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge, the ruins of the once great Sutro Baths, and the Transamerica Pyramid.

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Weather Historical Weather September High: 79° F Low: 55° F Average: 63° F Precipitation: 0.37 IN

Weather Forecast Day of Wednesday, January 28 Mostly sunny. High: 60° F, feels like 57° F Wind: 10 MPH, NW Sunrise: 7:16 AM UV: 3 Night of Wednesday, January 28 Clear and seasonably cool. Low: 45° F, feels like 40° F Wind: 9 MPH, WNW Sunset: 5:29 PM Day of Thursday, January 29 Bright sunshine. High: 62° F, feels like 61° F Wind: 8 MPH, NE Sunrise: 7:15 AM UV: 3

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Night of Thursday, January 29 Clear. Low: 46° F, feels like 46° F Wind: 5 MPH, NNE Sunset: 5:31 PM Day of Friday, January 30 A full day of sunshine. High: 62° F, feels like 62° F Wind: 7 MPH, NW Sunrise: 7:14 AM UV: 3 Night of Friday, January 30 Clear. Low: 46° F, feels like 38° F Wind: 14 MPH, NNW Sunset: 5:32 PM Day of Saturday, January 31 Sunny most of the day. High: 61° F, feels like 58° F Wind: 14 MPH, NNW Sunrise: 7:14 AM UV: 3 Night of Saturday, January 31 Breezy in the evening; otherwise, clear. Low: 46° F, feels like 41° F Wind: 15 MPH, N Sunset: 5:33 PM

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Day of Sunday, February 1 Sunshine. High: 62° F, feels like 61° F Wind: 8 MPH, N Sunrise: 7:13 AM UV: 3 Night of Sunday, February 1 Clear. Low: 46° F, feels like 43° F Wind: 10 MPH, NNE Precipitation: 1% chance Sunset: 5:34 PM Day of Monday, February 2 Plenty of sunshine. High: 62° F, feels like 64° F Wind: 6 MPH, SE Precipitation: 1% chance Sunrise: 7:12 AM UV: 3 Night of Monday, February 2 Mainly clear. Low: 46° F, feels like 42° F Wind: 8 MPH, SSE Precipitation: 1% chance Sunset: 5:35 PM

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Day of Tuesday, February 3 Mostly sunny. High: 61° F, feels like 60° F Wind: 7 MPH, SSE Precipitation: 1% chance Sunrise: 7:11 AM UV: 3 Night of Tuesday, February 3 Cloudy. Low: 47° F, feels like 42° F Wind: 9 MPH, S Precipitation: 1% chance Sunset: 5:36 PM Day of Wednesday, February 4 Cloudy. High: 60° F, feels like 62° F Wind: 2 MPH, N Sunrise: 7:10 AM UV: 2 Night of Wednesday, February 4 Cloudy. Low: 48° F, feels like 47° F Wind: 3 MPH, NNW Sunset: 5:37 PM Day of Thursday, February 5 Intervals of clouds and sunshine. High: 62° F, feels like 58° F Wind: 10 MPH, NW Sunrise: 7:09 AM UV: 3

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Night of Thursday, February 5 Partly cloudy. Low: 46° F, feels like 38° F Wind: 12 MPH, NW Sunset: 5:38 PM Day of Friday, February 6 Partial sunshine. High: 57° F, feels like 51° F Wind: 13 MPH, NW Sunrise: 7:08 AM UV: 3 Night of Friday, February 6 Patchy clouds. Low: 47° F, feels like 41° F Wind: 11 MPH, NW Sunset: 5:40 PM

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Events Wednesday, September 17 Concert by Maroon 5 at Shoreline Amphitheatre at Mountain View Augustana Rock/Alternative

Counting Crows Rock / Pop / Alternative

Maroon Hardcore / Metalcore / Metal

Maroon 5 Pop / Rock / Alternative

The Mountain View Indie/Rock Artist

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DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 12:00am

VENUE:

Shoreline Ampitheatre

ADDRESS:

One Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, California 94043

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/mountainview/events/concert-maroon-5-shoreline-amphitheatre-/E0-001-015021747-0 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

Live Bluegrass Concert at the Winery Presented by the California Bluegrass Association, join Guglielmo Winery in welcoming the nationally acclaimed band “Third Time Out” as they bring their picking and strumming to the winery. DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 12:00am — 12:00am

VENUE:

Guglielmo Winery

ADDRESS:

1480 Main Street, Morgan Hill, California 95037

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/ morganhill/events/livebluegrass-concert-winery-/ E0-001-012040942-7 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

Oakland Athletics Vs. Los Angeles Angels Of Anaheim Oakland Athletics Major League Baseball

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DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 7:00pm

VENUE:

McAfee Coliseum

ADDRESS:

7000 Coliseum Way, Oakland, California 94621

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/ oakland/events/oakland-athletics-vs-losangeles-angels-anaheim-/ E0-001-012452870-2 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

Rock N Roll DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 8:00pm

VENUE:

American Conservatory Theater (A.C.T.)

ADDRESS:

415 Geary Street, San Francisco, California 94102

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/ sanfrancisco/events/ rock-n-roll-/E0-001014889303-7@2008091720 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

Concert Tee Times, Foreigner Foreigner Foreigner DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 11:00am

VENUE:

Wente Vineyards Estate Winery

ADDRESS:

5565 Tesla Road, Livermore, California

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WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/ livermore/events/concerttee-times-foreigner-/ E0-001-010718930-2 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

The Formaldebrides, Church For Sinners, Gruesome Boys Church For Sinners Horror Rock from Everett, WA. DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 12:00am

VENUE:

Henflings Tavern

ADDRESS:

9450 Highway 9, Ben Lomond, California

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/ benlomond/events/theformaldebrides-churchsinners-gruesome-boys-/ E0-001-015384182-5 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

Cycloptopus, Gutwrench, Lucabrazzi, Grito Callejero Gutwrench Gutwrench The Unslayable Dragon DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 12:00am

VENUE:

The Stork Club

ADDRESS:

2330 Telegraph Avenue, Oakland, California 94612

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WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/ oakland/events/ cycloptopus-gutwrenchlucabrazzi-grito-callejero-/ E0-001-015384186-1 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

The Foreigner Presented By: San Jose Repertory Theatre Ages: 13+ DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 12:00am

VENUE:

San Jose Repertory Theatre

ADDRESS:

101 Paseo de San Antonio, San Jose, California 95113

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/sanjose/events/the-foreigner-/ E0-001-015492636-3 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

Anthony B, Rootz Underground, Young Fyah, Empire Isis, 808 Band Empire Isis hip hop, reggae, pop blend

Rootz Underground reggae

young fyah

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dancehall artist DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 12:00am

VENUE:

DNA Lounge

ADDRESS:

375 Eleventh street, San Francisco, California 94103

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/sanfrancisco/events/anthonyb-rootz-undergroundyoung-fyah-empire-/ E0-001-015349331-8 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

Fiestas Patrias This free event features live mariachi music, ballet folklorico dancing, hands-on art for the kids, great authentic Mexican food, a flag ceremony, and fun for the entire family. Presented by Redwood City International and the Redwood City Civic Cultural Commission. DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 6:00pm

VENUE:

San Mateo County History Museum

ADDRESS:

2200 Broadway Street, Redwood City, California 94063

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/redwoodcity/events/fiestas-patrias-/E0-001-015420998-3 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

Chris Clobber and Friends This show is 17 and older with a TWO item minimum. ALL RESERVED SEATS MUST ARRIVE 30 MINUTES PRIOR TO SHOWTIME.

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DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 7:30pm

VENUE:

Tommy T’s

ADDRESS:

San Francisco, California

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/ sanfrancisco/events/chrisclobber-and-friends-/ E0-001-015403042-6 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

John Heffron, Sabrina Matthews & Arthur Gaus John Heffron, Sabrina Matthews, Arthur Gaus 9/17/2008 9/18/2008 Wed, Thu 8:00 p.m. 9/19/2008 - 9/20/2008 Fri, Sat 8:00 p.m., 10:00 p.m. $18.50-$25 Punch Line 444 Battery St. San Francisco, CA 94111 (415) 397-4337 DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 8:00pm — 9:45pm

VENUE:

Punch Line

ADDRESS:

444 Battery Street, San Francisco, California 94111

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/sanfrancisco/events/john-heffronsabrina-matthews-arthurgaus-/E0-001-015250180-5 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

Joseph Isreal and Lafa Joseph Isreal and Lafa DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 9:00pm

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VENUE:

19 Broadway

ADDRESS:

19 Broadway, Fairfax, California 94930

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/fairfax_ ca/events/joseph-isreal-andlafa-/E0-001-015402622-9 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

Joan As Police Woman plus Greg Laswell This event is 18 & over

DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 9:00pm — 8:30pm

VENUE:

Cafe du Nord

ADDRESS:

2170 Market Street, San Francisco, California 94114

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/sanfrancisco/events/joan-policewoman-plus-greg-laswell-/ E0-001-014163939-7 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

KFJC presents Chrome w/Helios Creed Adv. tix. now on sale!!

KFJC presents Chrome w/Helios Creed “Lauded by critics and fans as one of the pioneers of industrial rock, the San Francisco outfit coupled psych-punk and

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electrodub with lyrical themes of alienation, paranoia, and ‘50s sci-fi cinema.” - SF Bay Guardian

“In the late 1970’s, under the innocuous name of Chrome, two San Franciscans — Damon Edge (vocals, synths, etc.) and Helios Creed (vocals, guitar, etc.), with part-time rhythm-section assistance by the Stench brothers of Pearl Harbor’s band — created an often awesome series of preindustrial LPs that explore a dark state of mind only hinted at by ‘60s psychedelia. Taking cues from Suicide, Can, Pink Floyd, Jimi Hendrix, the Residents and anyone who ever made home tapes in their bedroom, the pair’s dense, chaotic science-fiction epics are vivid vinyl nightmares — a thick blend of mechanical noises, filtered, twisted voices and fantastic, bizarre lyrics — that flesh out a frightening world both absorbing and repellent.” - Trouser Press

“A mighty industrial metal scraping noize devolves into a 1973 Stooges riff that sounds like it was recorded in a tin shack in 1957, cheapo drums start crashing away like The Trashmen. The only lyric you can make out is the sneered “I dunno whyyy!” at the end of every line. After 90 seconds a Faust-like dissolve through grinding, chattering zounds, creepy moog organ, analog tapes running backwards and flipping off the spindles.... the noise slowly fades as a chugging metal riff builds and BUILDS -- with acid lead guitar flourishes and a tambourine accompaniment! The jam that follows exists somewhere between NEU! and Judas Priest. Another abrubt edit, bells & scraping, then a new trashcan beat with hyper-distorted barely audible vocals buzzing like a bee and whining like a dog. An occasional spiral circus guitar riff, miscellaneous clanking and feedback. The beat changes again into yet another funky robot trashcan groove, with new squelchy guitar interjections, still many miscellaneous strands of noise burbling in & out of the

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brew whenever it feels right. So the vibe created is definitely very Sci-Fi, but no gleaming clean surfaces from Beyond The Year 2000 here. It’s a bit like in the original “Alien” movie (also from 1979 coincidentally), where the technology is “advanced” but the space ships are dank & dirty and all the equipment keeps breaking down. Science will not only bring forth smiling nuclear families with robot maids flying around in hover cars, but also ever-more-crowded metropolitan slums and squalor and new designer chemicals to help stave off (or feed?) dread and paranoia. One of my personal Top 25 albums of all time.” - Julian Cope

DATE:

Wednesday, September 17, 9:00pm

VENUE:

The Hemlock Tavern

ADDRESS:

1131 Polk Street, San Francisco, California 94109

WEBSITE:

http://eventful.com/sanfrancisco/events/kfjc-presentschrome-whelios-creed-/ E0-001-015424924-6 Listing courtesy of Eventful, http://eventful.com

NASA @ the Brickhouse #12: NASA’s High-Impact Return to the Moon The twelfth Luna Philosophie will feature Brian Day, Educational Technology Technical Lead at NASA Ames Research Center. He will discuss the current mission to the moon to find water and what it means for building an antarctic station there for people to occupy long-term. NASA’S HIGH-IMPACT RETURN TO THE MOON In 2009, NASA will return to the Moon with the combined launch of two robotic probes, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS). These robotic missions are precursors to the planned establishment of a human outpost on the Moon. The LCROSS mis-

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Travel Notes

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Travel Notes


Personalized San Francisco Travel Guide