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GARDEN TRIPOD

Issue 20 February/March 2014

Horticultural Science Technology & Art

Cover Image Barbed Wire by Hans Bax

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/ photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2014


GARDEN TRIPOD Horticultural Science Technology & Art

Issue

21 March/April 2014 Garden Tripod Web Site www.gardentripod.com

GARDEN TRIPOD Horticultural Science, Technology & Art Welcome to our 21th edition of the Garden Tripod. We are pleased to announce that the office refit is now compete along with new iMacs and hopefully a more reliable connection to the world wide web.

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Now quite a few of our photographers are enjoying the gardens owned by the NT (National Trust,) Quite a few of your fabulous photographs that have been taken on NT grounds have been taken down by your POD site. This is due to the images being offered for sale, the NT are looking around all print on demand sites and sending out take down notices. The Garden Tripod has been in touch with the English NT and they have informed us that if your images are for display only they are happy, however once you offer them for sale they will (when they find them) issue a take down notice. We have also been told that the NT is working hard to find a way of supporting the wonderful photographers that do visit their grounds. As soon as we get more news on this we will let you know, so do please keep displaying your amazing photographs, just don't have them marked up for sale.

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As always we are including real text, so grammatical errors and spelling mistakes are all included free of charge.

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I also has some very sad news from the Blue Horse Mukwa Equine Retirement and Rescue Centre. They have been a part of a large rescue of horses, all in very poor health. The Blue Horse Rescue took in a little Mare in foal, Sadly this foal was stillborn and now the mare named Noki is going need all the help she can get to rebuild her strength. A few months ago the Garden Tripod featured the Blue Horse Rescue and h e l p e d p ro d u c e a w o n d e r f u l publication showing a handful of their wonderful horses to help raise funds for the rescue. We are also planing to help produce a hard cover book later in the year. If you could click the cover below for the Blue Horse Rescue and view publication it will show your support. If you wish to purchase a hard copy then all the info you need is available in the link. editor

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Office News Hound

8 Exhibition of photography from Kevin Boldenow 24 Marilyn Cornwell, Working Greenhouses 40 Ramblings from the Office Temp - Macro Garden 42 A sideways look at Wire … Catalogue & Challenge Results 70 Spotlight, trueblvr 84 Spotlight, autumnwind 102 Katie Freeth, The Culture of Plants 110 Spotlight,  wolftinz 118 Calendar Feature, levee 126 Calendar Feature, Sandra Foster

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A little word from our

Office News Hound Hi Folks ..

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I am officially the office dog for the Garden Tripod Magazine. This time we have a amazing feature of B&W photography for you all to enjoy. So I have looked in wikipedia.org to read the © of film …. interesting :

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The first official photograph was taken by Joseph Nicephore Niepce in 1827. He used a camera obscura - initially used for drawings and viewing purposes – in order to produce the image. The exposure to light created an image that only lasted several hours before fading away. The other inventor of photographic film was Louis Daguerre. He used Niepce's idea to create the Daguerrotype process of photography. This process created an image that lasted even when exposed to light. Early photography in the form of Daguerreotypes did not use film at all. The light-sensitive chemicals were formed on the surface of a silver-plated copper sheet. The alternative calotype process produced paper negatives. Beginning in the 1850s, thin glass plates coated with photographic emulsion became the standard medium. Although fragile and heavy, the glass used for photographic plates was of better optical quality than early transparent plastics and was, at first, less expensive. Plates continued to be used long after the introduction of film, and are still manufactured for scientific use.This then led to the use of film in cameras. The first flexible photographic roll film was marketed by George Eastman in 1885, but this original "film" was actually a coating on a paper base. As part of the processing, the image-bearing layer was stripped from the paper and transferred to a hardened gelatin support. The first transparent plastic roll film followed in 1889. It was made from highly flammable nitrocellulose ("celluloid"), now usually called "nitrate film". Although cellulose acetate or "safety film" had been introduced by Kodak in 1908, at first it found only a few special applications as an alternative to the hazardous nitrate film, which had the advantages of being considerably tougher, slightly more transparent, and cheaper. The changeover was not completed for X-ray films until 1933, and although safety film was always used for 16  mm and 8  mm home movies, nitrate film remained standard for theatrical 35 mm motion pictures until it was finally discontinued in 1951.

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Guess I am trying to say .. woof :)

Stay Safe Princess Summer

Garden Tripod welcomes an exhibition of images by photographer Kevin Boldenow Garden Tripod 21

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Kevin Boldenow! Owner at KRB Photo Imagery West Palm Beach, Florida AreaPhotography

www.krbphotoimagery.com

The magic of landscape

The magic of landscape photos lies in their ability to transport your mind to any place in the world. My name is Kevin Boldenow.  My business, based in Stuart, Florida, offers a variety of stunning landscape photography.   

Expansive Work

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My business is different from other photographers because I cater my photos and services to individuals, museums, interior designers, art collectors, and more.  I continue to use film for my black & white work, as well as converting digital images to black & white. My landscapes are surreal yet accurate images that highlight the natural beauty of the environment.

Fine Art Landscapes

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Choose from a myriad of fine art landscapes of “Old” Florida.  Landscapes of New Mexico and Arizona are also offered. These are predominantly done in black and white, but I also offer colour images.   My 35mm film work comes in 16" x 24" sizes. I also provide digital formats in 30" x 20" and medium film formats in 30" x 36". Custom sizes are available to meet your individual needs. All of my images are unframed and look great in any home or office area.

Please view my website at www.krbphotoimagery.com

Somber - 2010, Lake Russell in Kissimmee, Florida

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Lake Norris - 2013, Eustis, Florida

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Drought - 2011, Riverbend Park in Jupiter, Florida

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Remnants - 2010, The Intracoastal Waterway in Hobe Sound, Florida

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Broken - 2010, Dock on the Intracoastal Waterway in Jensen Beach, Florida

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Adams Ranch - 2005, Foggy Mist at the Adams Ranch in West St. Lucie County, Florida

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Artist Statement Garden Tripod 21

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At an early age, my Father pointed out the importance of nature.  I learned how ignoring Mother Nature’s wonders could only lead to certain disaster.  Growing up in the 1960’s, I realized how destructive a course we had taken – dumping pollutants in the Great Lakes, air quality, and the use of DDT and other pesticides without proper testing was upsetting the balance of our ecology.  My Junior High School class participated in the first Earth Day celebration at the University of Michigan.  It left a lasting impression.   I am not interested in coercing people to become die-hard environmentalists, but rather to look at my photography and recognize the beauty, vitality, and necessity of our natural resources.  By viewing my photography, I hope that people make a concerted effort to preserve the environment for the pleasure and responsible use for future generations.   Thematically, my photography is a look outside our surroundings.  I want people to feel as if they are a part of my picture.  We are a part of nature, and coexist with every living thing on this planet.  Harming nature inflicts damage on all of us, and does away with a piece of our soul.    I’m hoping my photography, no matter where taken, creates a better understanding of our environment.  I want my audience to recognize the beauty and power of nature, not just in Florida, but everywhere in the world.   My Father would be proud

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Kevin Boldenow

Marilyn Cornwell Sketchbook of photographs from Working Greenhouses

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Working Greenhouses by Marilyn Cornwell

ŠMarilyn Cornwell

Working Greenhouses

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Living so close to Niagara Falls, we visited the gardens and conservatory greenhouse many times in my childhood. The Niagara Falls greenhouse structures were built in the late 1800’s, growing plants for the floral displays throughout the Falls area. The conservatory that I have known since childhood was built in the late 1940’s following the construction of the tunnel for the power generation. The conservatory is more than 11,000 square feet, with growing houses, workrooms and a wonderful carved cherub fountain in the entrance - an enduring focal point for many photographers over the decades.

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A showcase greenhouse conservatory needs a lot of working greenhouses to grow the materials that will be on display during the next season. I’m interested in these working greenhouses, always peering in the windows and checking out what’s being grown. This image is one of those moments of trying to see what’s growing in Niagara Falls and spotting a worker amongst the plants.

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©Marilyn Cornwell

But there’s much more to Niagara than this. The region is one of the prime locations of the $3.9 billion greenhouse industry in Ontario, containing floral and vegetable greenhouse growing. In my immediate area, the Westbrook Group has 30 acres of greenhouse production. They are quite a sight to visitors in the area.

ŠMarilyn Cornwell

Sonnenberg Gardens is an example of being able to see both the showcase greenhouse and the working greenhouses. Here is its extensive display of working greenhouses located at this grand estate located in Canandaigua, south of Rochester, New York.

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The Greenhouse complex was built between 1903-1915. It is one of the few remaining intact Lord and Burnham Greenhouses in the United States. Five of the greenhouses are open to the public for touring.

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ŠMarilyn Cornwell

The showcase greenhouse is arranged in the form of a hollow square with potting sheds in the centre. It has all the postVictorian features – Palm House, Peach and Nectarine House, Grapery, Melon Houses, Carnation House, and so on. Of course, the cellar has the boilers, coal pocket and storeroom for cut flowers.

ŠMarilyn Cornwell

Combination Greenhouses

More common for me are the combination greenhouses in Niagara, where both retail and wholesale plants are grown. This is one of my favourites. It is Sunshine Nurseries on Carlton Street in Niagara-onthe-Lake. Some of the many growing houses are in the background. In the foreground are chrysanthemum plants. Each plant has its own tiny black hose, providing it with water and nutrients so there’s no manual watering involved in commercial growing.

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While these plants are sizing up outside, the inside greenhouses are starting Cyclamen and Poinsettias.

ŠMarilyn Cornwell

It is common for bees to fall asleep amongst the lavender flowers

©Marilyn Cornwell

With such a diverse array of commercial growing in Niagara, there’s every imaginable crop. Beautiful to see and smell, lavender is the crop grown inside in poly houses and outside in the field.

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This is the Lavender grower Niagara Essential Oils and Blends (NEOB). They tell me that it is common for bees to fall asleep amongst the flowers, as lavender is an aid in sleeping. This might be the sweetest dreams possible for a bee. ©Marilyn Cornwell

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ŠMarilyn Cornwell

ŠMarilyn Cornwell

Langdon Hall, in Cambridge Ontario

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Langdon Hall, in Cambridge Ontario

Our final working greenhouse has the Romantic distinction. This is Langdon Hall, in Cambridge Ontario. This country house hotel and spa’s restaurant made the top 100 list in the world a few years ago. The more than 100-year-old estate was built as a grand home. ©Marilyn Cornwell

With the help of old landscape drawings, the gardens were restored in the 1990’s. There are extensive perennial beds, a large water pond, and the magnificent Kitchen Garden. It has a head gardener and grows fruits, vegetables, herbs and edible flowers for the chefs. I once took a bouquet of pineapple sage to the head chef.

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The working greenhouses are built onto the side of the beautiful stone wall. This lovely gate invites on in to see the kitchen garden.

©Marilyn Cornwell

©Marilyn Cornwell

On to Canada Blooms.

While the Ontario landscape was bleak north-east of To r o n t o , i n s i d e w a s a spectacle of blossoms

ŠMarilyn Cornwell Garden Tripod 21

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This is a one of a kind crop in the commercial greenhouse realm in Ontario. These are trees and plants being forced for the Canada Blooms show in Toronto Ontario. Canada Blooms is an annual world-class festival of everything gardens. This show is the ‘first breath of spring’ in midMarch each year. It is actually a jump on spring, as no trees or shrubs would typically be blooming until April.

Charlie Dobbin, pictured with the Rhododendrons, is the horticulturalist in charge of the plant materials for the show. She selects the trees and plants for a cohesive show experience. Then she monitors them throughout the winter so that the forcing synchronizes with the show. There is her director’s chair resting as she walked from greenhouse to greenhouse checking on the materials.

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While the Ontario landscape was bleak north-east of Toronto, inside was a spectacle of blossoms and leaves in perfect soft, diffuse light. This is a garden photographer’s paradise.

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I peek into working greenhouse windows regularly. Last month I stopped at a Gerbera grower in my area and found both window and greenhouse crop fascinating. Behind the cracked and shattered glass in the frame were thousands of blooming Gerberas. This is a standard crop in Niagara. The plants are productive for 2 to 3 years and are ever-blooming during that time so there is always a gorgeous show inside. So hard to see inside a working greenhouse!

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Marilyn Cornwell

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ŠMarilyn Cornwell

Bee on flower by Nicole W.

Ramblings from the Office Temp

Macro garden

People that read my column in this fabulous magazine know that I’m full of ideas, and I love sharing them with fellow photographers. Well, here’s another one, I created a macro garden!
 What on earth is that? It’s a part of my garden where I have planted a large amount of plants and seeds, all dedicated to attract insects. Although macro surely doesn’t have to be about insects, or flowers, for me it mainly is, and according to the amount of daily additions to one of the groups that I host with two other fabulous hosts, Fabulous Flowers, I’m am not the only one. Many of you love to photograph macro flowers and insects. So…until now, I used to sit in fields for hours and hours, trying to shoot a decent picture while being tortured by wind, rain, and curious people, crawling after that one butterfly, that one damselfly, or away from that one ridiculously large spider. No more! I am lucky enough to have a large garden, and there was a piece of unused space that happened to be located between two sheds and a high fence. I don’t know why it took me so long to figure out what this piece of ground should be used for, but finally it came to me. Last fall I planted a good 1000 bulbs, and this spring Im rewarded with a sea of flowers. Knowing that bulbs will fade soon, I started to plant large bushes, small fruit trees and a fairly ridiculous amount of seeds of all kinds of insect-attracting flowers. And now we wait…. I carefully planted the high plants in the back, and the smaller ones in the front, creating hopefully some sort of paradise for insects. I also added some features, like a pile of rocks where I can burn a small amount of wood in, enough to boil a kettle of water for a nice cup of tea, a brick wall with an old rusted window in it and a few pots where flowers can choose to grow in or over. A very romantic set of chairs make this little garden not just for photographers to enjoy, but also a place for people to enjoy the silence, the sun and the buzzing of bees. On top of that I will add special hedgehog baskets and a special spot for mice. Both hedgehogs ad mice are living in my garden anyways so I’m just helping them. Because this piece of ground is so fenced in, the wind shouldn’t be as much as a bother. I created space between all the different species of plants to sit down and get up close with the flowers and the insects without doing any damage. The one thing that was in this garden before I started was a large

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cherry tree. It provides some shade and of course a pretty sight if it ever decides to grow actual cherries. It hasn’t so far, but I haven’t given up hope yet. The tree will support some climbing species of plants too. As with all of my ideas, this is a multipurpose garden. Not only will it be able to satisfy all of my macro needs, it will also help the insects with food and water, and provide a haven of pretty sights, it should also attract birds that eat the insects. From my former blogs you might know I help birds with food, all year long, and also built a bird-hide with a small pond for the birds to drink from and to bath in. Having a lot of insects close by will possibly attract species of birds that live on insects, and ones that live off fruit. I’m hoping to create a piece of manipulated nature where my husband and I benefit from, but is mainly beneficial for all kinds of small creatures.
 I’m just hoping some of you will get some inspiration from this because basically, you can do this on any scale. Even on your balcony, if you use a few pots with bushes or seeds. It might be harder for the hedgehogs to get to, but insects and birds are easily persuaded with food. April is the time for seeds to plant and grow, so get off your lazy chair and start helping the creatures that so need it, to benefit your artistic side! Nicole W

Nicole W.

The sweet pea and the wire. Climb
 Wrap your tendrils round me
 Coil your thoughts through me
 I will lend you strength
 Let you grow
 Become one with me
 And I with you.
 Fill the spaces
 In the mesh
 With green foliage and flowers
 Vacuum up the emptiness
 That fills my winter hours. I have softened your steel and wire
 With the lush warmth of green feathers
 Your nakedness I’ve caressed
 In a plume of color
 Perfumed your nights when you felt alone
 I’ve searched for your cold arm
 Reached out
 With a touch as light as mist
 Wound you in a life of green springs
 Assuring us both
 Of higher and greater things I’ve grow from pod to pea to plant
 Prised my roots deep and strong
 Stemmed the diamond of the upward climb
 Wrangled round your empty stare
 Covered you, stalked your strengths
 Made it mine.
 I’ve followed the sun
 Lent nectar to the bees
 But it was you who made me strong
 Pushed my reach beyond the pull
 That calls me down
 We have shared our weakness’
 Lent our strengths
 Yet as the season’s call
 You stayed and I went

by timbuckley

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A sideways look at ‌.

Wire

Catalogue Garden Tripod Supports Country Gardens come grow with us group challenge

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Yearning to break free by Celeste Mookherjee Something about the other side of the chain-link fence seemed to be calling to this morning glory, even though it was being nurtured within a community organic garden. (Olympus E-510 & Zuiko 35mm macro, f/7.1, 1/80 sec, ISO 100, overcast, handheld)

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Meet Me At The Corner by trueblvr Canon PowerShot SX40 HS

No access by Alexandra Lavizzari Knots of barbed wire and ribbons on the Coast Path near Hartland Quay, Devon, UK

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Down on the Farm by AnnDixon Taken in Cheshire England, it is very much Dairy Farming in this county, lots of sheep too,

Fence Post by WildestArt I loved this serene rural setting in Casscoe, Ark USA, on the Arkansas Grand Prairie. The fence isn’t serving much purpose, but there WERE cattle in the pasture. Taken 2012 with a SanyoVPC-E2100.

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Fence Post

I loved this serene rural setting in Casscoe, Ark USA, on the Arkansas Grand Prairie. The fence isn’t serving much purpose, but there WERE cattle in the by WildestArt pasture. Taken 2012 with a SanyoVPC-E2100.

The Mill House by Nadya Johnson This used to be a mill but it’s now a private home.

Mt. Carroll, Illinois (USA)
 Canon Rebel XTi

This Is Country by AbigailJoy Barbed wire fence along a country field.

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Tropical Pewee on Wire by hummingbirds Photographed in Costa Rica.

The Old Barn by Sandra Foster Image taken near Fort St John, British Columbia, Canada 


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Beach Wire by Alexandra Lavizzari A bundle of wire found on the beach of Blue Anchor, Somerset, 
 Walking on the beaches of Somerset without my camera has become impossible; I know now that I will always stumble upon improbable things. Most often they are natural – seeweed, strange pebbles, etc – but sometimes they are man-made, which I find even more interesting because you can image all sorts of stories about how these things ended up on the beach. It’s great stuff for pictures, but it sometimes even gives me ideas for story plots.

Wirenetting filled with snow by Arie Koene

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Live Wires by Carol Barona Took a walk around the harbor in Great Exuma, Bahamas and found these cables under the water with so much sea life attached to them. The water so crisp and clear I was able to get this capture just hanging over the rail a bit – don’t know why people get so nervous when I do what I have to to get a good shot!
 Nikon d80
 lens 50-200mm

Rusted Country by Heather Crough Owen Sound Ontario

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Still Life with Barbed Wire by Ludwig Wagner photograph of old & new barbed wire in a field in Oxfordshire, England by Ludwig Wagner. Finepix HS30EXR

Sky Wire by TonyCrehan View up to the sky from inside the wire fencing covering the chicken coop.

Taken with Panasonic Lumix DMC-FH1 point & shoot.

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Riddells Creek ---- How Lucky Were We..! by Larry Lingard/Davis

This was the scene as you drive into Riddells Creek Victoria on Monday Feb.10. 2014. …….Black as far as the eye can see……All the way over to Gisborne.
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 Today ( Mon Feb.10. 2014 ) I am sitting here thinking how lucky we were, and of how our whole town could have been lost..
 Most of the surrounding countryside is now a blackened earth, which you can see from within this image..

taken with a panasonic Lumix G2 using a 14 – 48mm Four Thirds lens with a touch of HDR in Dynamic PhotoHDR (x2 )

Bougainvillea growing up wire over a wall by PhotosByG Bougainvillea growing in a big cement container, climbing up tightened wire on a wall in the Roma St Parklands, Brisbane, Australia. As is.

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Autumn in the Country by Hans Bax A little bit hair of a sheep with dew at an early morning at sunrise near Wijk bij Duurstede, Holland

"Let's hang on to what we've got" by Paul Pasco An old Four Seasons song. Grape vine tendrils left on the wires after the vines have been pruned. Southern France Canon 550d 1/400 sec f5.6 110mm

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fenced in by metriognome Detail of rectangle of wire fence with raindrops and green grass background. My place, Gardiner Rd, Cowaramup (near Margaret River), Western Australia. Nikon D700, 300 mm f4D.

Gateway - Doreen, Melbourne by Joy Watson Photo taken in Doreen, Melbourne on the 3rd April, 2010

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Ice Web Close Up by relayer51 Another Spider web on our gate this time close up .
 Nikon D60 18-55mm Vr lens +4 mag filter fitted ,tripod .
 Hampshire UK.

Hang in there~ by Filly

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De-Fence............ of............... Flowers............. by WhiteDove Studio kj gordon Maui Hawaii………….
 acrylic on fabric
 Original Sold


A sideways look at wire

Top Ten Results

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6

Tropical Pewee on Wire by hummingbirds

Autumn in the Country by Hans Bax

4

4

Ice Web Close Up by relayer51

Hang in there~ by Filly

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4 No access by Alexandra Lavizzari

Yearning to break free by Celeste Mookherjee

4

4 This Is Country by AbigailJoy

fenced in by metriognome

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Wirenetting filled with snow by Arie Koene

Rusted Country by Heather Crough

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Wining Entry Autumn in the Country by Hans Bax

I spy with my little eye ....

Spotlight Feature Joint Challenge Winner trueblvr CALDWELL, IDAHO, UNITED STATES

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I have always been interested in photography, but never-seemed to do anything about it until May of 2007, when I confiscated my husband Georges Kodak EasyShare. I now have a Canon PowerShot SX10 IS. and am thoroughly enjoying it. I am one of those people that see’s something worth remembering ( to me anyway) in just about everything I see, and that is what I take pictures of.I hope you enjoy them, thank you so much for stopping by. Any opinions are welcome, I know I have a lot to learn.

Double Hollyhock by trueblvr

In My Front Yard.. Copinus Atramentarus… by trueblvr

Water Lily Pads by trueblvr

Just a touch of Light by trueblvr

Climbing Roses by trueblvr

And The Ladybug Whispered A Secret To The Rose Your scent intoxicates me.
 Your velvet touch to my feet tickles.
 Your variences of colors
 mesmerizes me,
 blinding me,
 making me move so slowly.
 Your stems take me up to heaven
 Your leaves encase me with
 protection should I fall.
 And if I do?
 I will return.
 I am in Love with you-
 Dear Rose by trueblvr

Stems by trueblvr

I spy with my little eye ....

Spotlight Feature Joint Challenge Winner autumnwind Garden Tripod 21

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Purple Hollyhock by autumnwind

dream of the slumbering rose a flutter of silver butterflies 
 shimmering 
 brimming in unfrozen beauty 
 ice dancers 
 upon the edge of dreams 
 in a frosted world behold the shine 
 of too much allure 
 a kaleidoscope reflection 
 of perfection in mortal view revel in satiny rivers 
 lakes of gleaming mirrors 
 to skate upon 
 as silver sings 
 to soar upon 
 with dazzling wings clouded breath that dissipates 
 of life I have inhaled 
 sweet chilled air that gently bites 
 ignites my silver tears oh lustrous gleaming 
 of a January dawn 
 born from a Wolf Moon 
 crying icicle stars your silver waves of rippling wonder 
 resonate the resplendent awe 
 of winter’s 
 glistening 
 silver soul

by autumnwind Garden Tripod 21

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Poetry Rose by autumnwind

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by autumnwind

Ethereal Pink

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by autumnwind

Orchids

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Orchids in Bloom by autumnwind

by autumnwind

Orchids Make me Happy

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Laughing Orchids by autumnwind

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by autumnwind

Amazing Blooming Orchids

Triplets by autumnwind

autumnwind

! Original image Autumn Wind by Carol and Mike Werner

red cap gum ŠKatie Freeth,

The Culture of Plants ~ Autumn of False Spring?

Autumn is upon us in South Australia – think October in the Northern Hemisphere. The vintage is in and the grapevines are slowly fading into winter rest, shedding their dying leaves.

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But here in the garden and natural world, all is not death and decay; we experience the phenomenon of “second spring”.

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Native plants that have, for their survival, lain quiescent, if not completely dormant, through the scorching summer months, have, in response to cooling temperatures and the lightest sprinkles of rain, burst into flower and new growth. Vibrant pinks, reds and yellows colour the trees and bushes; the Illyarrie Red Cap Gum (Eucalyptus erythrocorys) shows a glorious display of yellow flower clusters on which bees swarm, sucking up every drop of nectar. Alongside these yellow inflorescences are the vibrant red caps of the name, from which the inflorescences emerge; the red and the yellow hanging side by side afford astonishing and beautiful contrast. The red and white pin cushions of Hakea laurina amuse the eye, and, too, those hard-working bees. The flowers of the red flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia) and its cultivars brighten suburban streets. In fact, the gums reveal themselves in many hues at this time of year, from pale pink through to vibrant orange. Grevilleas show their floral charms and the bottle brushes (Callistemon spp.) show promise of vibrancy to come. The air has a gentle hint of perfume as an early wattle breaks into bloom, giving a foretaste of the explosion of wattles that will take place in the true spring, (NH September) epitomised by the stunning Golden Wattle, Acacia pycnantha, South Australia’s floral emblem.

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Of course, the exotics favoured for gardens do indeed show their autumn hues, but to see the real vibrancy of deciduous leaf death one must head to the Adelaide Hills, where cooler nights prompt the death of chlorophyll which allows, for example, the stunning reds and purples of the anthocyanins to show through.

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Surprisingly though some of our exotic friends demonstrate their adaptation to another clime by putting on new growth and flowers, just as though it were spring. The irrepressible Photinia and Hebe are vigorous reminders of this adaptability of plants. Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Blue Lagoon’ in my own garden has assumed its mantle of blue in the last 10 days or so. Some of the vines are trying again, too!

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Even stranger, one finds last season’s fruits hanging beside bright new leaves and new flowers in some of the Hakea species – but this is not confined to the Hakea and other natives only. The (false) Pepper Tree, Schinus molle, although native to the Peruvian Andes is a common sight in many parts of the Mediterranean and the climate zones that bear that name, shows its red “peppercorns” with its new season creamy flowers. These are an absolute bee magnate! All this fecundity does not make the gardener’s task an easy one. Weeds exhibit the same joy of more moderate temperatures and a little water; and any gardener knows the carpe diem philosophy of a weed! I am sure that if I sit quietly on my verandah I can hear them growing, smirking behind their leaves, as I contemplate and plan all the exciting garden things that I shall achieve now the cooler weather is here!

Katie Freeth,

Hakea laurina ©Katie Freeth,

Hakea new foliage flowers & fruit ©Katie Freeth,

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Emerging Hakea laurina ŠKatie Freeth,

ŠKatie Freeth,

The flowers of the red flowering gum (Corymbia ficifolia) and its cultivars brighten suburban streets

ŠKatie Freeth,

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Bottlebrush ŠKatie Freeth,

Wattle (Acacia spp.) ©Katie Freeth,

Hebe flowers

©Katie Freeth,

Rosemary blue lagoon ©Katie Freeth,

©Katie Freeth,

©Katie Freeth, Garden Tripod 21

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schinus molle ŠKatie Freeth,

The Book Group Books, Book Images, Book Art, Magazines www.redbubble.com/groups/the-book-group

Challenge Feature Winner 

wolftinz Garden Tripod 21

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Waiting for Spring-read description by wolftinz Dedicated to Gardeners everywhere – Now Get your hands Dirty

The Calendar says Spring.. Mother Nature hasn’t got the message yet.
 For a little inside joke … read the To Do List ( Lower right)

A composite of 5 images all with a Nikon D800 w/ 24-70mm f2.8 
 1. Wall and window
 2. View outside
 3. Book w/ glasses
 4. Stack of Books
 5. Seed packets and note
 Counter top and shadows created in PhotoShop CS 5.1

Oh, That's why it's Called a tulip tree by wolftinz

Liriodendron Tulipfra by wolftinz

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Early morning frost by wolftinz

Apr by wolftinz

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New Hampshire Country Living by wolftinz FOLLOW

Toronto at Night by wolftinz The CN Tower and the Rogers Centre as seen from the Fashion District.
 Nikon D200 w/ 14mm f3.5 Sigma WA

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www.gardentripod.com

lezvee As a child I had a little instamatic camera and experimented with unusual shots which didn’t always work!
 I now live in the south west area of the UK in close proximity to Dartmoor and am especially interested in photos with reflections although I like all scenes with water. 
 Other interests are flowers and animals, both wild and domesticated, and also ancient ruins Since then my interest in photography has increased and I am enjoying sharing my pictures with other photographers around the world.
 In 2013 I finally realised my dream of visiting Australia and New Zealand. Whilst there I purchased a Pentax camera so have been able to expand my portfolio of flower macros among other new and exciting subjects.

lezvee

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Snake's Head Fritillary (Fritillaria meleagris) by lezvee

The Way Through The Woods by lezvee

Along the Templer Way in Stover Country Park in Devon (UK) in early December. The Templer Way is now a route for walkers which links Haytor on Dartmoor to the mouth of the River Teign. The walk follows, as much as possible, the route of the Granite Tramway, the Stover Canal and the Teign Estuary. This is the route by which granite and clay were transported to the port of Teignmouth before being shipped out. The route is named after the Templer family who built the tramway and canal and also a Palladian style mansion house which was constructed in 1777, the grounds of which now largely form Stover Country Park. Stover House has been a school since 1932.

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Calda House stands on the opposite bank of Loch Assynt in Sutherland, north west Highland, Scotland to Ardvreck Castle. It was constructed by the Clan MacKenzie in 1726 and takes its name from the Calda burn beside which it stands. The house burned down under mysterious circumstances one night in 1737. The legend says that the Mackenzie family organised a family gathering there one Saturday and that the celebrations continued past midnight into the Sabbath day. At some point a fire broke out, possibly caused by a lightning strike, and all the inhabitants perished as the house burned to the ground. The causes of the fire are uncertain, but inhabitants of the Assynt area state that it was a manifestation of divine wrath as the family had been merrymaking on the Lord’s Sabbath day. However – at the site of the ruin there is an information plaque which states ( p a r a p h r a s e d ) : Kennet h McKenzie II commissioned the building of Calda House because his wife Frances did not care for the austerity of Ardvreck Castle. The family’s growing debts incurred through supporting the Royalist cause meant that this house was an ill-afforded luxury and after only 10 years the family faced financial ruin. The earl of Sutherland vied with MacKenzie of Seaforth to purchase Assynt and won. Then, on 12th May 1737, the house was looted and burned by MacKenzie supporters who vowed that no Sutherland should live there. So – two stories – take your pick.

End Wall, Calda House by lezvee

Mull Head, Orkney (Scotland)

The Edge of the Cliff by lezvee

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Chaenomeles (Japanese flowering quince) – growing in Lawn Park, Dawlish beside the brook.

Blossom in the Park by lezvee

lezvee

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On the road from Ullapool by lezvee

Sandra Foster BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA

I am finding photography as another way to express my creativity. I enjoy capturing time and beauty in a photo and creatively editing it if necessary with Photoshop. I think and play outside the box. I welcome you to view my Portfolio to see my photo’s and artwork.

Sandra Foster

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Fragrant Blossoms by Sandra Foster

Jealous is the birdling - band/hat box. by Sandra Foster

Made this band/hat box from scratch by adhering vintage sheet music to poster board then shaping it. Stamped the bird on top. Created the ribbon by using the image transfer technique on sheet music. The beaded cluster is an old earring someone had given to me for my craft projects. The inside is finished with sheet music also – making it today’s heirloom.
 Minolta DiMAGE S414


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Love's Sweet Sake - Posy by Sandra Foster

Collage Delight by Sandra Foster

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Happy Adventure by Sandra Foster

Used my own fern image which I scanned with HP Scanjet G3110.
 Sheet music from a music magazine dated 1914 titled “Happy Adventure”.
 Background texture also from my own designed collection. 
 Processed all layers in Adobe CS5.

Sandra Foster

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Some Stand - Some Fall - Digital Gouache by Sandra Foster

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Angel On Call Dog Rescue, Inc!

The mission of the Rescue, Rehab and re-home, In the Northwest Ohio area. http://angeloncalldogrescue.org twitter @aocdogrescue http://angeloncalldogrescue.org

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Angel On Call Dog Rescue, Inc! !

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Blue!Horse!Mukwa! Equine!Retirement!! and!Rescue!Centers! Available!From:! www.gardentripod.com!

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Flowers!in!Art:! Contemporary! International!Artists! By!Cindy!Ann!Coldiron! ISBN:! 978;0;7643;4239;4!

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www.exhibitionswithoutwalls.com

Contributors: Founder & Editor C Mclenahan

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Treasurer V Gore

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News Hound Film PhotograpExhibition

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Cover image Barbed Wire by Hans Bax  

! Written Features by Nicole W. Katie Freeh Marilyn Cornwell

Spotlight features Kevin Boldenow trueblvr autumnwind wolftinz levee Sandra Foster

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Catalogue

A sideways look at Wire

Yearning to break free by Celeste Mookherjee Meet Me At The Corner by trueblvr No access by Alexandra Lavizzari Down on the Farm by AnnDixon Fence Post by WildestArt The Mill House by Nadya Johnson This Is Country by AbigailJoy Tropical Pewee on Wire by hummingbirds The Old Barn by Sandra Foster Beach Wire by Alexandra Lavizzari Wirenetting filled with snow by Arie Koene Live Wires by Carol Barona Rusted Country by Heather Crough Still Life with Barbed Wire by Ludwig Wagner Sky Wire by TonyCrehan Riddells Creek ---- How Lucky Were We..! by Larry Lingard/Davis Bougainvillea growing up wire over a wall by PhotosByG Autumn in the Country by Hans Bax "Let's hang on to what we've got” by Paul Pasco fenced in by metronome Gateway - Doreen, Melbourne by Joy Watson Ice Web Close Up by relayer51 Hang in there~by Filly De-Fence............ of............... Flowers............. by WhiteDove Studio kj gordon

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/ photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2014


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