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DECEMBER 27, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 52

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > NEWS&VIEWS > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL > > > > > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < 50 < < Newsmakers < < < < < < < < <of<the < < <Year < < < < < < < < < < < < 17 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > The > > >good, > > > the > > >bad, > > the > > >virtuous, > > > > >the > >notorious: > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITOR > > > > KEVIN > > > >ALLMAN >>> MANAGING EDITOR KANDACE POWER GRAVES 50 people who hit the headlines in New Orleans

Commentary

7

Blake Pontchartrain

8

The year in review

The New Orleans know-it-all

News 9 Clancy DuBos’ Top 10 political stories of the year

17

9

C’est What?

9

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Scuttlebutt

9

SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO

Sugar Bowl

25

Green Matters

33

From their lips to your ears A preview of this year’s matchup



The year in sustainable living

STYLE&SHOPPING Shoptalk

Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT The Year in Arts 2011

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 27 > 2011

57

Gambit Picks Cuisine

5 in Five: Five spots for crepes Wine of the Week Scuttlebites: Food news in brief

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The Puzzle Page

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MUSIC LISTINGS

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POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITERS ALEX WOODWARD, CHARLES MALDONADO EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, MEG FARRIS, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER

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Mayor Mitch Landrieu responds to our recent cover story, “Broken Record-Keeping”

co m p l ime ntary 1 d e s i gn co n s u ltat i on 1



Response

PREVIEW: New Year’s Eve

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COVER PHOTOS BY JONATHAN BACHMAN (DREW BREES) ,

CHERYL GERBER (MARY L ANDRIEU, EDWIN & TRINA EDWARDS) COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> DORA SISON

WEB & CLASSIFIEDS DESIGNER MARIA BOUÉ GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT, MARK WAGUESPACK PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR GEORGIA DODGE DISPLAY ADVERTISING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 ········christinj@gambitweekly.com SALES & MARKETING COORDINATOR BRANDIN DUBOS 483-3152 ········brandind@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com AMY WENDEL 483-3146········amyw@gambitweekly.com MEGAN MICALE 483-3144········meganm@gambitweekly.com STACY GAUTREAU 483-3143 ········stacyg@gambitweekly.com MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MARKETING DIRECTOR

JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 483-3100

CLASSIFIEDS FAX: 483-3153 | classadv@gambitweekly.com

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SHERRY SNYDER 483-3122 ········sherrys@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CARRIE MICKEY 483-3121 ·········carriem@gambitweekly.com BUSINESS >>>>> billing inquiries: (504) 483-3135

CLASSIFIEDS Market Place New Year, New Home Mind / Body / Spirit Weekly Tails Employment Real Estate / Rentals Automotive

INTERN ALEXANDRA PENCE

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The Mayor Responds ambit’s recent article, “Broken Record-Keeping” (Cover story, Nov. 15) was off base and riddled with inaccuracies. This story was out of tone and out of context, given the sweeping reforms we have instituted, specifically those related to the contracting process and open government. To put this issue in context, shortly after taking office I signed Executive Order MJL 10-05 to completely overhaul and reform professional services procurement. It removes the mayor from the contracting process and helps ensure that contracts are awarded based on “what you know, not who you know.” Selection committee meetings are open to the public, with local press, government watchdog organizations and residents often in attendance. Contracts for important projects from the Lafitte Greenway to the Six Flags redevelopment have been and will be awarded through this process. It was a major reform in our efforts to make New Orleans a better place to do business. Once contracts are executed, we post them to our website, www. nola.gov. And now, because of work we’ve done in recent months, the database of contracts and amendments signed since 2009 are posted in a searchable format. While we post all contracts signed by me online, the crux of the article seemed to be that the city has not posted online all contracts signed by previous mayors, specifically those signed before 2009, and that these contracts are not available in a searchable database. Unfortunately, we did not inherit a list of all active contracts or a document management system capable of producing one. As a point of fact — when we took office, the city did not even have a basic inventory of assets, including an accurate accounting of the number of cars or computers. We are changing all of that. While we have a long way to go, we have made vast improvements across the board. Our long-term solution is moving finance, payroll and procurement systems into a coordinated Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system.

G

“While we have a long way to go, we have made vast improvements across the board.” We did not stop improving transparency and accountability at the contracting process. We opened up the budget process and have engaged citizens at community meetings using a process called Budgeting for Outcomes. We are also measuring our results and holding ourselves accountable. City Hall is a much more open place for citizens to interact, from quarterly ResultsNOLA reports that document our successes and failures across departments to our many public Stat meetings, such as BlightStat, which open up often-messy government processes for vital services. It is clear that we have a long way to go to be a model city government, but we are making significant progress as we deliver a better level of service for the residents of our great city. Mitch L andrieu Mayor of New orleaNs

Letters should not exceed 400 words and may be edited for space. Include home address and daytime phone number for verification. e-mail (preferred):

response@gambitweekly.com

mail:

3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119

fax: (504) 483-3116

commenTary

thinking out loud

Looking Back at 2011

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Paul to the L.A. Clippers. The Hornets picked up three solid players and a first-round draft pick, but fans will miss the beloved CP3. It probably was the best deal the team could get for Paul, who otherwise would become a free agent after this season. Federal investigators posted another banner year, winning a string of convictions in high-profile political corruption cases and bringing indictments against several more local politicos. As busy as U.S. Attorney Jim Letten was this year, 2012 is shaping up to be even busier. The local arts and culture scene continues to lead the city’s post-Katrina recovery. Preservation Hall turned 50 and proved that some things just get better with age. Meanwhile, local artists and musicians keep the beat going strong here in New Orleans and on the road.

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As we celebrate what went right in 2011, we know what we have to fix in 2012. Now for the bad news. In the wake of the BP oil disaster, lawsuits mounted as locals complained that the Gulf Coast Claims Facility dragged its feet paying claims. Meanwhile, the feds have reopened deep-water drilling in the Gulf. Oil companies say the feds are imposing too many regulations; environmentalists warn that drilling is not regulated enough. Violent crime spiraled out of control this year, thwarting what would otherwise be a great year for New Orleans. Mayor Mitch Landrieu launched Saving Our Sons, his anticrime initiative, but much remains to be done to change the city’s culture of violence. Finally, the city and the feds continue to negotiate a consent decree for federal oversight of much-needed, top-to-bottom reforms at NOPD. As we celebrate what went right in 2011, we know what we have to fix in 2012.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

his is the time of year we look back and reflect on the past 12 months in New Orleans. In many ways, our city continues to enjoy blessings amid tragedies. The post-Katrina recovery continues unabated. The Saints and LSU continue their winning ways. And the city’s artistic and cultural sectors continue to grow and inspire. But not all the news of 2011 was good. The city’s murder rate remains a national disgrace — and the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) remains one of the nation’s most troubled cop shops. Meanwhile, the local seafood industry struggles to recoup losses inflicted by the BP oil disaster. Let’s start with the good news. The Saints got off to a hit-and-miss start, but the team is peaking at just the right time as playoffs approach. The Black-and-Gold are 11-3 going into this week’s divisional showdown against Atlanta on Monday Night Football, at home in the Dome. Drew Brees is having a record-setting year, while new running back Darren Sproles and young tight end Jimmy Graham have delighted Saints fans — and confounded opponents — all season long. With two more wins at home to close out the season — and a little help from the San Francisco 49ers — the Saints can earn a No. 2 seed and a bye for the playoffs. The LSU Tigers are headed for their third BCS championship appearance (and hopefully third championship) in eight years on Jan. 9. LSU has won each of its BCS championships in the Superdome, and Tiger fans hope the home-field advantage will work in LSU’s favor once again as the team plays No. 2 Alabama in a much-anticipated rematch of their grueling regular-season game. The post-Katrina recovery gained more traction in 2011. Local public schools were awarded $1.8 billion from FEMA to build new campuses in 2010, and this year officials agreed on a plan to split the money between the Orleans Parish School Board and the Recovery School District. The new facilities will complement a new “can-do” atmosphere in local public schools, where a growing percentage of students are posting improved test scores. Meanwhile, the Hyatt Regency Hotel reopened after being shuttered for more than six years, part of Armstrong Park reopened to rave reviews, and Mercedes-Benz bought naming rights to the newly illuminated Superdome. Also on the recovery front, area flood protection continues to improve as levees are raised and buttressed. And, in a case of “no news is good news,” no major storms hit the Louisiana coast this year. The NBA Hornets sold a league-high number of season tickets in the second half of 2011, but earlier this month the leagueowned team traded star point guard Chris

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HEY BLAKE, I JUST READ IN A TOURIST MAGAZINE THAT FRENCHMEN STREET WAS NAMED TO COMMEMORATE FRENCH NEW ORLEANIANS WHO DIED REBELLING AGAINST SPAIN. I CAN TRACE MY GENEALOGY BACK TO KARL FREDERICK VON ARENSBOURG ON MY MOTHER’S SIDE. HE WAS BORN IN 1693 AND CAME TO LOUISIANA IN 1721, WHEN HE WAS 28 YEARS OLD. HE WAS CHOSEN TO HEAD UP THE GERMAN COLONISTS IN LOUISIANA, AND THE FIRST GERM AN V ILL AGE BECA ME K NOW N A S KARLSTEIN. IN 1765, HE BECAME A CHEVALIER (KNIGHT) OF THE FRENCH MILITARY ORDER OF ST. LOUIS AND WAS THE COMMANDANT OF THE GERMAN COAST. I KNOW ARENSBOURG HAD SOMETHING TO DO WITH OVERTHROWING THE SPANISH IN NEW ORLEANS. DOES FRENCHMEN STREET HAVE ANYTHING TO DO WITH HIM? AND DO YOU KNOW WHERE HE MAY BE BURIED? LANCE LEVESQUE

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

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DEAR LANCE, Your ancestor played a significant role in the Revolution of 1768. But it was not he that Frenchman Bernard Marigny was thinking of when, 36 years later, he named a street in his faubourg Rue des Francais after the brave Frenchmen who defied Spanish rule. The beginning of Frenchmen Street is near the place where his countrymen were executed. It all began when France gave New Orleans to Spain in 1763 in the secret treaty of Fontainebleau. Three years later, the first Spanish governor, Don Antonio de Ulloa, arrived, and the French were not pleased to see him. On Oct. 27, 1768, hundreds of New Orleans residents and settlers from the German Coast (a settlement upriver near LaPlace) assembled and took over the city. Ulloa didn’t have sufficient troops to put down the revolt and was forced to flee by ship. As commandant of the German Coast, your ancestor — also known as Charles D’Arensbourg — was concerned about the commercial policies of the Spanish. He also was a close family friend of Nicholas Chauvin de Lafreniere, attorney general of the colony and leader of the revolution. Days before the insurrection, Ulloa sent an emissary to D’Arensbourg with money to pay for grain that had been appropriated. D’Arensbourg refused the money — and any other gesture of good will from the Spanish — and arrested the emissary.

D’Arensbourg ordered Capt. Joseph Villere, head of the German Coast militia, to send 400 men to New Orleans to join the revolution. Unwilling to tolerate such behavior, Spain sent Alejandro O’Reilly as Ulloa’s replacement, accompanied by a huge force to crush the rebellion. They arrived in August 1769 and restored order, punished the rebels and organized a Spanish government. With the absolute power of the Spanish king

Fort St. Charles

Several Frenchmen who plotted the Revolution of 1768 against Spanish rule in New Orleans were executed at Fort St. Charles, near where the old U.S. Mint stands today and near where Frenchmen Street starts. (The fort is marked with an X on the sketch, which was published in 1796.) MAP COURTESY OF CARTOGRAPHY ASSOCIATES

behind him, O’Reilly arrested many of the citizens who had opposed Ulloa. The principal conspirators were Lafreniere, Denis-Nicolas Foucault, Balthasar de Masan, Pierre Marquis, Jean Baptiste de Noyan, Bienville Noyan, Julien Doucet, Jean and Joseph Milhet, Pierre Caresse, Joseph Petit, Pierre Poupet, Pierre Hardi de Boisblanc and Villere. After a trial for treason and rebellion, Lafreniere and four others were shot on Oct. 25, 1769, in the Champs de Mars, or parade ground, in front of Fort St. Charles, near the point where Chartres Street and Esplanade Avenue intersect today. Six others were imprisoned in Morro Castle in Havana. “Bloody O’Reilly,” as he came to be known, granted amnesty or pardoned some who had signed a petition to have Ulloa expelled, as well as others who were involved in the uprising. The story goes that O’Reilly intended to have D’Arensbourg executed, but the commandant was spared. D’Arensbourg lived in St. Charles Parish until he died Nov. 18, 1777.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > QUOTES OF THE WEEK <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < < < < < < < > >“Somehow > > > > > > > >or > >another, > > > > > > with > > > >the > > >drive-through > > > > > > > > > >window > of justice on Broad and Tulane, they’re right back out on >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < the streets here. … We have a 2-year-old child, lost her life

scuttle Butt

because of these types of people not being held accountable. … It is reprehensible that the courts continue to send these men to the streets of New Orleans to be murderers or be murdered.” — NOPD Chief Ronal Serpas, following a bloody weekend in New Orleans in which 24-month-old Keira Holmes was killed in a hail of gunfire Sunday, Dec. 18. “I am formally requesting that you direct the Louisiana National Guard to immediately return to the city of New Orleans. … The city is besieged by gun-toting criminals who have no regard for innocent citizens or law enforcement.” — State Rep. Austin Badon, D-New Orleans, in a letter to Gov. Bobby Jindal Dec. 19. Badon also asked for “uniformed law enforcement to be proactive in this fight against crime.”

OIG RECORDS ACCESS DELAYED … AGAIN

Top 10 Political Stories of 2011

U.S. Attorney Jim Letten’s public corruption investigations led to a year rich with indictments and convictions — and hints of more to come.

PAGE 13

c'est what?

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

HOW MUCH WILL A CHRIS PAUL DEPARTURE AFFECT YOUR INTEREST IN THE HORNETS?

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his past year the feds continued to cast a wide net in their ever-expanding investigations into political corruption in southeast Louisiana. The GOP captured both houses of the Louisiana Legislature. Gov. Bobby Jindal coasted to re-election while helping to orchestrate a purge on the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education. Lawmakers struggled with redistricting and a tight budget. And those were just the headlines. The stories behind those headlines made this another year to remember.

T

BoUQuets Chef Duke LoCicero

Herewith our Top 10 Political Stories of 2011. 1. Federal Corruption Investigations — The indictments and convictions can’t come fast enough for citizens who are sick and tired of corrupt politicians, but the feds move at their own deliberate pace. Given the track record of U.S. Attorney Jim Letten & Co., you can’t fault the feds for taking their time. This year saw the convictions of some major political kingpins and the indictments of several more: • Plaquemines Parish Sheriff Jiff Hingle and post-

21%

22%

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SOME

57%

COULDN'T CARE LESS

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PAGE 10

Do you agree with state Rep. Austin Badon Jr. that the National Guard should be called in to help quell violent crime in New Orleans?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

raised $10,000 for gifts to send to children at Children’s Hospital via his Chef Duke’s Foundation for Kids. The Cafe Giovanni chef founded the organization in 1992 and since then has distributed more than $190,000 worth of toys to children. The foundation also focuses on funding children’s health and education programs.

The Louisiana SPCA’s Community Clinic surpassed its goal of 7,000 spay and neuter surgeries this year. The clinic performed 7,645 surgeries by mid-December (compared to its 2010 total of 5,127). The clinic also offers low-cost spay and neuter operations, microchipping and other veterinary services. Opened last year, the clinic increased the number of spay and neuter surgeries by more than 47 percent from its 2009 services.

The Winn-Dixie Foundation

awarded grants to 11 New Orleans charities as part of the organization’s $1.4 million investment in 116 groups throughout the southeast. Area charities receiving funds include Boys Hope Girls Hope, the Community Center of St. Bernard, Ladies Leukemia League, the Metropolitan Center for Women and Children, Second Harvest Food Bank and the St. Tammany Cancer Fund.

Hillcrest Baptist Church

and Operation People for Peace donated 14,000 pounds of food to underserved Gulf Coast communities affected by the BP oil disaster. The Florida congregation donated 200 care packages to families and last week delivered food to three Louisiana churches: New Mount Pilgrim Baptist in Houma, Moses Baptist in Thibodaux and Kenner Calvary Baptist in Kenner.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

THERE’S NEVER A RECESSION IN LOUISIANA POLITICS — THERE ARE ONLY ODD YEARS AND REALLY ODD YEARS. 2011 WAS NO EXCEPTION.

For a third month, the New Orleans Civil Service Commission has delayed a vote on a major change to city employment policies. The proposed change is an agreement between the Civil Service Department and the Office of Inspector General (OIG) and would provide the OIG, as well the Independent Police Monitor (an autonomous office within the OIG), unfettered access to now-confidential personnel records. The policy — opposed in its original form by the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) and the Concerned Classified City Employees group — is scheduled for a vote during the commission’s January 2012 meeting. City employees have been bracing for significant rules

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in defeating a large field of nobodies. Team Jindal’s post-election spin failed to snuff out the glaring truth that the governor’s 65 percent “landslide” reflected a collective political yawn by Louisiana voters. The bigger story was the anemic turnout of just 31 percent. In hard numbers, Gov. Talking Points actually got only 23 percent of the total electorate to go to the polls and vote for him. His 673,000-vote total on Oct. 22 was less than the 676,000-plus he got in his losing effort against Kathleen Blanco in the 2003 runoff — and less than the 699,000 he got in his 2007 open primary victory. And Team Talking Points calls that a man date? 8. Arnie Fielkow Resigns — The most likeable politician in town called it quits when offered the chance to get back into the sports arena. Fielkow, who previously worked for the New Orleans Saints, now heads up the National Basketball Retired Players Association. His resignation sets up a March 24 special election — and renews an ongoing examination of racial and cross-racial voting patterns in New Orleans. 9. The State Budget “Cliff” — OK, it turned out to be just a speed bump, but it was still news. The fact that a projected $1.6 billion shortfall wound up being covered so easily was largely a tribute to state Sen. John Alario’s working knowledge of the state budget (and his mastery of the legislative process). Alario’s central role in reducing the fear factor associated with the budget shortfall probably made him a lock to become Jindal’s choice as Senate President. 10. UNO’s Move — The year began with Jindal proposing to merge the University of New Orleans with Southern University at New Orleans. It was uncharacteristically bold of the governor, and in the end the merger died on the vine without so much as a floor vote. But the merger talks put enough of a spotlight on UNO’s historic troubles in the LSU System that the idea of shifting the lakefront campus to the friendlier University of Louisiana System sailed through both legislative chambers. The move became official earlier this month — on the same day that Dr. Peter Fos, a UNO alumnus, was named UNO’s new president. In Other News — Other big stories vied for attention, including the Occupy NOLA movement, Jindal’s withering national ambitions (picking Rick Perry for president was almost as big a gaffe as his dreadful speech on national TV in 2009), and former Gov. Edwin Edwards’ release from jail. There’s never a recession in Louisiana politics.

LL TO UR TS IR, A C AY YO EN HA S! D E M Y E TOAK INT DA TO M PO LI S & P O R A R H GE FO FIN

of course, there was the Danziger Bridge case, which saw five former officers convicted in connection with the shooting of unarmed civilians in the days after Katrina (and conspiring to cover up the shootings afterward). The feds continued to investigate a number of cops while negotiating a potential consent decree with Mayor Mitch Landrieu. The decree, which is still being hammered out, is expected to set the stage of a sweeping set of reforms at NOPD. It can’t come soon enough. 4. The 2011 Elections — Incumbents fared very well in the October primary, but most of those who remained on the ballot for the November runoffs (especially in St. Bernard and St. Tammany parishes) got doused. The exceptions: legislative Democrats. While the Party of Jefferson (Thomas, not Bill) failed to field a viable candidate for any statewide office, Democratic incumbents in the Louisiana Legislature fended off multimillion dollar assaults from Gov. Bobby Jindal and U.S. Sen. David Vitter. In fact, every Democratic legislative incumbent that the GOP targeted won re-election, even though each was outspent threeto-one or more. Speaking of Vitter, his bid to build a statewide right-wing base for a possible governor’s race in 2015 fizzled as nearly every candidate he supported lost. Meanwhile, the local elections in St. Bernard Parish provided enough fireworks to light up the sky for a year. HBO could mine several seasons’ worth of material for a hit series on just the races for sheriff and parish president. 5. Big Changes at BESE — While Vitter focused on legislative races, Jindal looked ahead to the big push of his second term — education reform — and helped shake up the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE). In past years, BESE races were largely ignored, which allowed teacher unions to stack the state’s education board. No longer. Jindal and Baton Rouge contractor Lane Grigsby teamed up to sweep all but one of the contested BESE seats. Now the governor has 10 of the 11 BESE members in his corner (he appoints three of them) — a big change from the 6-5 majority he previously enjoyed. 6. Legislative Redistricting — It’s always a bloody, ugly process, and this year saw its share of cross-parish fighting, especially between Orleans and Jefferson. Metro New Orleans lost at least six legislative seats to reapportionment in the last vestige of Hurricane Katrina’s huge impact on local and state politics. 7. Jindal Re-elected in Yawn-slide — Normally, a governor’s re-election would automatically make the top 3, but Jindal didn’t make much of a splash

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changes for nearly a year, but so far, little has come. One proposal, backed by Deputy Mayor/Chief Administrative Officer Andy Kopplin, would alter a longstanding layoff procedure known as “bumping.” That measure was deferred twice last summer and has not since come up for a vote. The commission originally was scheduled to vote on OIG records access in October but opted to delay when FOP attorneys objected that they had not been given time to read the proposal and prepare a response. The commission delayed a vote again in November to give the employee groups and OIG staff an opportunity to negotiate a compromise. Last week, OIG acting general counsel Suzanne Lacey Wisdom requested the vote be deferred again until the first meeting of the new year. “We were unable to reach a consensus,” says FOP Secretary-Treasurer Jim Gallagher. Wisdom could not be reached for comment. The confidential records in question include job counseling and evaluation reports and reports of internal investigations “on the character, personality and history of employees” covered by civil

service. According to an October letter from Lacey requesting the change, the OIG is mandated by city ordinance to investigate employee conduct, which, Wisdom argues, necessitates access to the records. “The OIG will have its hands tied if it is unable to have full access to employee files in order to perform its investigations,” she wrote. But Commissioner Joseph Clark, who in November said he would vote against the proposal, argues that OIG staff is given access to the records if a court decides it’s necessary. “If it’s cumbersome, that’s because there are safeguards (protecting employee privacy),” Clark said during the commission’s November meeting. “If it’s really cumbersome and you really need it, you’ll be motivated enough to get it.” — Charles Maldonado

Occupy prOtesters turn Over cOmplaints tO pOlice mOnitOr

The Occupy New Orleans legal team last week submitted more than 100 affidavits regarding New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) actions to Susan Hutson in the Office of the Independent Police Monitor (IPM). In response to the complaints, Hutson,

Deputy Police Monitor Simone Levine and IPM spokeswoman Ursula Price attended the group’s Dec. 20 general assembly in Duncan Plaza, where protesters continue to convene for meetings even though their round-the-clock encampment was cleared from the park on Dec. 13. Hutson’s staff set up a table in the park, speaking to the group as a whole as well as to individual members. “We have affidavits, I think, from a bunch of you guys,” Levine said to a group of about 30 protesters gathered in the park. She said the IPM’s office would record and assess each complaint before handing them over to NOPD’s Public Integrity Bureau (PIB), which is responsible for internal investigations of alleged police misconduct. The IPM office was designed, in part, to oversee PIB-initiated investigations, but Hutson says it’s not uncommon for members of the public to go directly to IPM rather than PIB itself. “Some people may not be as comfortable (complaining to NOPD),” Hutson says. “We project that IPM will have received between 250 and 275 complaints this year.” The affidavits include allegations of harassment by two NOPD officers on Dec. 13, hours before the group was evicted.

According to some protesters, two police officers came into the park at 5:30 a.m. and told occupiers they must leave or they would be arrested. At the time, the city was prohibited by a federal court-issued temporary restraining order from evicting the group. City officials acknowledge police entered the park and spoke to members of the group but deny officers told them to leave. Other affidavits concern allegations of lost property from the first city-enforced eviction of the camp on the morning of Dec. 6, Levine says. Police gave protesters 30 minutes to leave the park that morning. If they were unable to gather their belongings in that time, the city carted off their possessions. Mayor Mitch Landrieu and administration officials have defended the action repeatedly, arguing that it was peaceful and well-coordinated, with only one arrest. Levine says she is not aware of any reports of police violence during the eviction. In an email, mayoral spokesman Ryan Berni noted that police officers handed out hundreds of written warnings over the course of four days before proceeding with the initial eviction. — Maldonado

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

13

sHTo P aLK

BY LEE CUTRONE

SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Latin Class aribbean influenced, Creole inspired” is the tag Bruce and Carla Coury use to describe the sights, sounds and flavors at Mojitos Rum Bar & Grill (437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800, www.mojitosnola.com). It’s a concept the Courys, who left the Midwest and careers in publishing and academia to move to New Orleans, have worked hard to perfect. The Latin-meets-Louisiana attitude is evident in the tropical decor, lush courtyard, full bar stocked with more than 50 kinds of rum, the menu and chef Luis Marin, from Spain. “We didn’t want to be just another touristy place,” Carla says. “It was also our intention to cater to the local crowd. So we created a concept with Caribbean, Cuban and Creole cuisine that helped differentiate us from other places in the French Quarter and in the city.” As a live music club offering everything from jazz to salsa, Mojitos also has the distinction of being located at the intersection of Esplanade Avenue and Frenchmen Street, home to some of the city’s renowned music venues. Passersby heading from the Quarter to the Marigny are regularly drawn in by the inviting view of the courtyard, an oasis of palm trees, ivy and umbrella-shaded wrought-iron tables that also serves as a dance floor. “Frenchmen Street starts here, and we fit right in with the music scene,” Carla says. On Friday and Sunday nights, the Latin sounds of Fredy Omar’s and Javier Olondo’s bands lure dance enthusiasts. A New Year’s Eve dinner and dance party will feature an early dinner seating ($40) at 6 p.m. with Eudora & Deep Soul, and a celebration dinner seating ($50) at 9 p.m. with Fredy Omar and his band. Nearly a year after opening Mojitos, the Courys say their efforts to make the restaurant a consistent music and food “experience” that attracts both visitors and locals are working. With a name like Mojitos and an owner (Bruce) who’s a rum connoisseur, it’s fitting that freshly made mojitos are the signature drink. The

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bar offers 11 flavors, Chef Luis Marin, a native of Spain, brings a Latin twist to Mojitos’ including cucumber, Creole fare. orange and watermelon. There’s also a rum dinner Photo by Cheryl Gerber tour and tasting that includes a trip to Old New Orleans Rum Distillery on Frenchmen Street. The menu features small plates like Aruba scallops: seared scallops with white chocolate-chipotle sauce served with jalapeno cheese grits and seasonal vegetables. The NOLA Benedict — poached eggs, fried green tomato, alligator sausage and crawfish sauce on an English muffin — is a jazz brunch specialty. “Our chef has been able to add quite a Latin flair to our menu,” Carla says. “Everything has a little kick to it.”

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g YEAR IN REVIEW

50

NEWSMAKERS OF THE YEAR

T

he famous, the infamous, the people of substance and the flashes in the pan: this year brought them all. These are 2011’s persistent headline-makers in New Orleans and south Louisiana, the people who at times seemed as ubiquitous as honey badgers, pop-up restaurants and pumped-up kicks.

50

New OrleaNs airlift The AvAnT-GArde

49

reNee Gill Pratt The rACKeTeer

    The  former  District  B  rep  on  the  New  Orleans  City  Council  went  on  trial  in  February  on  one  charge  of  racketeering,  but  a  lone  holdout  juror  forced  a  mistrial.  At  a  July  retrial,  a  federal  jury  found  Pratt  guilty,  and  in  November,  she  was  sentenced  to  87  months  in  prison. On Dec. 15, though, U.S. District Judge Ivan  Lemelle  ruled  Pratt  could  remain  free  on  bond  while she appeals. Pratt was the girlfriend of the  late  Mose  Jefferson  (brother  of  former  Rep.  Bill  Jefferson), who was convicted of bribery in 2009  and died in April. Pratt’s conviction was another  blow to the crumbled Jefferson political empire.

48

Varla JeaN MerMaN The enTerTAiner

    The drag alter ego of local actor Jeffery  Roberson  began  the  year  with  a  Gambit  cover,  went  on  to  star  in  an  off-Broadway  musical  (which  closed  quickly),  toured  the  U.S.  all  year  with  his  one-man  show  and  saw  the  film  festival  premiere  of  his  first  starring  movie,  Varla Jean and the Mushroomheads.  Varla  is  ringing  in  the  new  year  back  in  New  Orleans  with frequent co-star Ricky Graham at a show at MidCity Theatre.

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PreserVatiON Hall Jazz BaNd

46

The Confounder

    Fayard got the attention of state  Democrats when she ran an exceptionally strong  race  for  lieutenant  governor  in  2010  against  Jay  Dardenne. She was one of the party’s few bright  rising stars — until an infamous appearance at a  Washington  Parish  Democratic  meeting  where  she declared, “I hate Republicans. They are cruel  and destructive. They eat their young. They don’t  think.  They  don’t  allow  people  to  think.  They  are bullies.” Despite the negative fallout, in May  Fayard announced she’d run for secretary of state.  She dropped the bid in September.

The STAndArd-BeArerS

    Band director Ben Jaffe, the son of Preservation Hall  founders  Allan  and  Sandra  Jaffe,  has  demonstrated  how the band can grow while still staying rooted in the  hall’s famed jazz tradition, one Louis Armstrong once  triumphed. With seemingly endless tours, music festival gigs, a starring role in Danny Clinch’s documentary  Louisiana Fairytale  and  performances  alongside  Pres  Hall  superfans  My  Morning  Jacket,  last  year  also  saw  the release of the album Preservation, the band’s bestseller,  showcasing  its  inimitable  chops  alongside  the  likes of Tom Waits and Pete Seeger. But 2011 wasn’t the  band’s  biggest  year:  the  group  enters  2012  celebrating its 50th anniversary at an all-star gig at Carnegie  Hall with another roster of music stars — performers  bowing  to  Pres  Hall’s  evolving  legend.  In  June,  Jaffe  told Gambit, “The only moment you get to go into this  creative  cocoon  is  when  you  perform,  and  I  want  to  amplify that. I want to make it bigger.”

CarOliNe fayard

45

Harry sHearer The doCumenTAriAn

    The  actor/writer/radio  host/multihyphenate  New  Orleanian  continued  to  travel  and  promote  The Big Uneasy,  his  2010  documentary about the federal levee failures after Hurricane  Katrina  and  the  faults  of  the  U.S.  Army  Corps  of  Engineers. In May, he appeared in the musical adaptation of Dan Baum’s book Nine Lives.

44

CedriC riCHMONd The repreSenTATive

    Having  defeated  Anh  “Joseph”  Cao in November 2010, the former member of the  Louisiana House of Representatives moved up to  Washington,  D.C.  in  January.  A  past  controversy  about  the  suspension  of  his  law  license  seemed  behind  him  —  and  in  a  truly  surprising  display  of  bipartisanship,  Richmond  forged  a  professional  and  personal  friendship  with  Rep.  Steve  Scalise,  his  political  polar  opposite.  Both  men  saw  the  sense  of  working  together  for  the  benefit  of  the  metro  New  Orleans  area and were a rare  breath  of  cooperation in an increasingly bitter Congress.  pAge 19

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

    In  October,  the  remains  of  a  collapsed  Bywater  cottage  made  some  of  the  biggest  noise  in  New  Orleans,  literally  —  a  host  of  international  musicians  and  artists  brought  the  scraps  back  to  life  in  the  form  of  musical  structures,  from  shacks  to  treehouses, each holding homemade instruments  amid  a  playground  of  artful  reconstruction.  Jay  Pennington (aka DJ Rusty Lazer) of the New Orleans  Airlift kickstarted the installation with street artist  Swoon,  and  orchestras  (with  maestro  Quintron)  performed  a  series  of  performances  to  overflow  crowds. Guest musicians ranged from Hamid Drake  to Andrew W.K. to Mannie Fresh, and the installation  caught  the  attention  of  The  New York Times  and  the  imagination  of  its  guests,  who  also  were  invited to play the houses for themselves.

By Kevin AllmAn & Alex WoodWArd

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

g YEAR IN REVIEW

page 17

43

Kenneth Feinberg The AccounTAnT

    Mounds  of  lawsuits  have  piled  up  against BP for damages following the Gulf oil disaster.  Managing  BP’s  Gulf  Coast  Claims  Facility  is  Feinberg,  whose  firm  Feinberg  Rozen  holds  the  purse:  BP’s  $20  billion escrow account set up for victims of the disaster.  In June, claims offices started closing and consolidating  along the coast. Two months later, Feinberg announced  that BP paid out $5 billion in claims and, “Overall, we’ve  largely  succeeded  in  getting  money  out  to  eligible  claimants.”  Meanwhile,  hundreds  of  plaintiffs  in  lawsuits  across  the  Gulf  Coast  accuse  Feinberg  of  losing  paperwork, having slow processing times, inconsistent  or low-balling payments and more. By December, more  than $1 billion of the fund has been paid to Louisiana  fishermen,  and  Feinberg  said  he  would  double  payments to affected fishing communities.

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Anh “Joseph” cAo The one-And-done

    The congressman from eastern New  Orleans who was vaulted into office after the resignation  of  Bill  Jefferson  did  not  survive  re-election.  While  in  Washington,  Cao  stressed  his  closeness  with  President  Barack  Obama,  but  back  in  Obamaunfriendly  Louisiana,  Cao  tried  to  put  plenty  of  air  between himself and the president. Cao flirted with  running  for  state  attorney  general,  then  showed  interest in running the state’s department of education,  but  neither  panned  out.  Today,  his  Facebook  page says he’d like to be a judge on Iron Chef: America.

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Arnie FielKow The Goodbye Guy

    Fielkow surprised the local political establishment in  August  when  he  announced  he  would return  to  the  private  sector  and  the  sports  world  as  CEO  of  the  National  Basketball  Retired  Players  Association.  He  had  served on the City Council since 2006, when he’d left his  job in the New Orleans Saints’ front office to try his hand at  politics, where he often championed youth causes.

39

curtis MAtthews The SlAin

    The  brother  of  Telly  Hankton  prosecution  witness  John  Matthews  was  shot  to  death  in  October,  three  weeks  after  Hankton  was  found  guilty  of  murder.  Mayor Mitch Landrieu, NOPD chief Ronal Serpas and DA Leon  Cannizzaro  wasted  no  time  condemning  the  murder  and  expressing  their  belief  it  was  a  hit  carried  out  by  Hankton  associates.  “I’m  sending  a  message  loud  and  clear  to  Telly  Hankton  and  his  family  and  anyone  else  associated  with  this,” Landrieu said at a press conference. “We’re coming to  get you.” Matthews, 61, was a retired postal carrier who had  relocated from North Carolina to New Orleans.

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ZAcK Kopplin The GiAnT-Killer

37

The MoveMenT

    The local Occupy movement  pitched  its  tents  in  Duncan  Plaza  and  lived  there for two months with the passive blessing of Mayor Mitch Landrieu and NOPD Chief  Ronal  Serpas.  In  early  December,  Landrieu  announced  the  city  would  begin  enforcing  the  park’s  curfew  law;  the  protestors  got  an  injunction, but the administration busted up  the  camp  the  morning  before  a  hearing  on  the  matter  in  Judge  Jay  Zainey’s  courtroom.  Zainey  issued  a  temporary  restraining  order  against  the  city,  and  by  that  night,  Occupy  was  once  again  occupying  the  plaza  across  from  City  Hall.  Judge  Lance  Africk  rescinded  the restraining order Dec. 13, and the city gave  protesters  until  midnight  to  leave  the  park.  Most did, but David D’Antonio and Mike Raso  refused  and  were  handcuffed  and  led  from  the park. They also were cited for minor city  code violations.

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MAry lAndrieu The STudied ModerATe

    With  the  defection  of  many  top Democrats to the GOP in early 2011, and  some disastrous elections for the Dems, U.S.  Sen. Mary Landrieu became the most powerful  Democrat  in  the  state,  even  as  she  positioned  herself  as  more  centrist  than  leftist.  She  locked  horns  with  both  fellow  U.S.  Sen.  David  Vitter  and  Gov.  Bobby  Jindal  this  year  — including a major condemnation of Jindal  after his administration rejected an $80 million federal grant to bring broadband Internet  to northern Louisiana. Landrieu finished 2011  by  securing  $566  million  in federal  Medicaid  reimbursements  for  the  2013  fiscal  year  —  and, at last, starting a Twitter account.

JAcKie clArKson The veTerAn Pol

    Clarkson entered her third decade of public  service  and  became  the  president  of  the  New  Orleans  City  Council in May, a comeback of sorts for the veteran councilwoman who lost her bid for an at-large seat in 2006 to Arnie  Fielkow.  But  three  months  later,  she  found  herself  defending remarks she’d made about the 1940s and 1950s in New  Orleans  being  a  “golden  age”  —  which  didn’t  sit  well  with  some  of  her  African-American  constituents.  Clarkson  pronounced herself baffled by the whole controversy.

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dAn cAMeron The ArT MAn

    The  art  curator  who  brought  Prospect.1  and  Prospect.1.5  to  New  Orleans  didn’t  get  his  contract  renewed  by  the  Contemporary Arts Center in 2010, but he went  on  to  curate  Prospect.2  this  fall.  In  October,  Cameron announced he would take a curatorial  position at California’s Orange County Museum  of  Art;  the  next  month,  we  learned  Franklin  Sirmans of the Los  Angeles  County  Museum  of  Art  would  coordinate  The buzz bAnd Prospect.3  in  2013.  With  his  two-and    Having met while students at the University of New Orleans, the members  a-half  biennials,  of GIVERS moved back to Lafayette and made a name for themselves there before signing  Cameron  helped  with  Glassnote  Records  and  getting  a  national  push  for  their  June  album  In Light  and  its  established  New  sunshiney  single  “Up  Up  Up.”  The  song  landed  them  a  performance  on  Late Night With Orleans  as  an  Jimmy Kimmel and is No. 17 on Amazon.com’s list of Best Songs of 2011. In Light is No. 29 on  American center of  Amazon’s list of 2011’s Best Albums. GIVERS will play at the 2012 Jazz & Heritage Festival. contemporary art.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

    The  Baton  Rouge  high  school  senior  took  on the Louisiana public school textbook committee on the  question  of  including  “intelligent  design”  in  state  schoolbooks  —  and  won,  becoming  a  young  leader  in  the  fight  against creationism. He didn’t fare as well when he attempted  to  convince  the  Louisiana  Legislature  to  repeal  the  prointelligent  design  Louisiana  Science  Education  Act.  In  a  December email to Gambit, Kopplin said he’s now a freshman  at  Rice  University,  but  will  return  to  Louisiana  on  his  school breaks to organize high school students for his cause.

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AAron BroussArd The IndIcTed

    The  former  Jefferson  Parish  president  was  indicted  by  the  feds  on  payroll  fraud  charges  Dec.  2.  Also  named:  Broussard’s  former  wife  Karen  Parker  and  former  parish  attorney  Tom  Wilkinson, who employed Parker as a “paralegal supervisor.” The indictment alleged Parker  “was  not  trained  or  certified  as  a  paralegal,  was  hired  and  was  paid  a  salary  above  and  beyond  the  range  authorized  for  civil  service  employees.” The three are each charged in all  33 counts of the indictment and have pleaded  not guilty.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

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mr. Ghetto The vIrAL SenSATIon

Gambit’s  Alex  Woodward  wrote  about  Mr.  Ghetto  and  his  paean  to  the  Tchoupitoulas Street Walmart on May 18. Fortyeight  hours  later,  the  song  had  become  the  subject  of  nearly  3  million  Google  searches,  gossip  blogger  Perez  Hilton  had  proclaimed  it  “the smash hit of summer 2011” and the world  at large had tripped into New Orleans’ bounce  culture,  learning  terms  like  “twerking”  and  “p-popping.”  What  created  such  a  sensation?  The  sight  of  booty-shaking  dancers  making  their way down the aisles of “Wally Wally Wally  Wally  Wally  Wally  Wally  Wally  Wally  Wally  Wally  Wally  World”  while  Mr.  Ghetto  rapped  about how the discount chain store was a great  place  to  pick  up  women  —  while  dropping  props to both the Louisiana Purchase card and  feminine hygiene products along the way. (The  video became so viral it showed up on Comedy  Central’s  Tosh.0,  even  as  local  TV  newsrooms  struggled with how to cover it.) One group that  wasn’t  so  amused:  African-American  women,  who  condemned  it  on  sites  like  Bossip  with  terms ranging from “tomfoolery” to “coonery.”  Mr. Ghetto quickly cut several other videos on  topics from the New Orleans Saints to the joys  of being in da club, but none took off with the  velocity of his tribute to the Tchoupitoulas (and  Harahan) Wally Wally Wally World.

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John lABruzzo The cAMpAIgner

    The  ever-controversial  state  rep  found  himself  in  a  tough  fight  against  Nick Lorusso after the 2010 state redistricting  changed  the  borders  of  his  traditional  district  and  kneecapped  LaBruzzo’s  re-election  chances.  With  both  men  being  conservative  Republicans, holding nearly identical positions  on  traditional  issues,  the  race  came  down  to  personalities  and  some  of  LaBruzzo’s  more  controversial  ideas  (supporting  the  drug-testing of public aid recipients; introducing legislation to declare a fertilized egg to be a person).  LaBruzzo,  a  tireless  door-knocker  and  dogged  campaigner, got his signs all over Metairie and  Lakeview, but Lorusso ended up the victor.

30

Buddy roemer The ATTenTIon-Seeker

    The  former  governor  and  congressman  launched  a  presidential  campaign  vowing to take only small donations, then fought  to be included in the GOP debates, to no avail.  Later in the year, Roemer got some press when  he  allied  himself  with  the  Occupy  Wall  Street  movement, put forward Sen. Joe Lieberman as a  running mate (Lieberman demurred) and made  several  amusing  appearances  with  Stephen  Colbert on The Colbert Report.

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irvin mAyfield The IMpreSArIo

    The jazz trumpeter and artistic  director  of  the  New  Orleans  Jazz  Orchestra  (NOJO)  received  an  honorary  doctorate  from  Dillard University in May. He also opened the I  Club in the JW Marriott Hotel on Canal Street,  making  it  his  second  jazz  club  in  the  city.  In  late  December,  Mayfield,  NOJO  and  the  New  Orleans  Hornets  announced  an  Irving  Mayfield’s  I  Club  Stage  would  host  a  band  of  local  musicians  to  play  throughout  Hornets  games,  starting  Dec.  21.  In  August,  Mayfield  and Kermit Ruffins raised tens of thousands of  dollars for local nonprofits during their 11-night  “Love Sessions” performances.

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mArlon defillo The vAnIShIng AcT

    The  New  Orleans  Police  Department’s  No.  2  man  —  a  three-decade  veteran of the force and a familiar face to New  Orleanians  —  came  under  fire  for  his  lack  of  responsiveness  in  the  case  of  Henry  Glover,  who  was  found  to  have  been  shot  and  his  body burned by NOPD officers. But in July, just  before  NOPD  chief  Ronal  Serpas  was  to  open  an investigation into Defillo’s role in the matter, the assistant superintendent abruptly and  surprisingly retired from the force. 

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dAvid vitter

The WouLd-Be kIngMAker

    Louisiana’s junior U.S. senator  spent 2011 solidifying his position as The AntiObama and currying favor with the Tea Party  back  home  with  positions  like  capping  funding for federal food stamps. Back in Louisiana,  however,  he  was  unable  to  deliver  victories  for  Billy  Nungesser  and  Jim  Tucker,  the  candidates he endorsed for lieutenant governor and  secretary  of  state,  respectively.  Vitter’s  “very  serious  sin”  bubbled  up  again  in  June  during  Rep.  Anthony  Weiner’s  sex  scandal,  when  the family-values group Family Policy Network  issued a statement that Republicans would be  hypocrites  if  they  called  for  Weiner’s  resignation  while  Vitter  remained  in  office.  Vitter  didn’t go anywhere.

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mArk st. Pierre The WheeLer-deALer

    At  his  May  trial,  the  Imagine  Software  chief  and  former  City  Hall  tech  vendor  was  found  guilty  on  all  53  felony  counts against him. It took a federal jury less than a day to render  its verdict. Despite emotional appeals from St. Pierre’s family and  friends, in September U.S. District Judge Eldon Fallon sentenced the  erstwhile tech whiz to 17-and-a-half years in the pen.

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GArlAnd roBinette The MouTh

    The WWL-AM radio host’s reputation took a body  blow  in  September  when  it  was  revealed  he  had  received  a  $250,000 personal interest-free loan from River Birch landfill magnate  Fred  Heebe  —  a  topic  he  had  discussed  on  his  radio  show  without disclosing their relationship. Robinette denied all wrongdoing, and WWL kept him on the air, but much of the public remained  skeptical.  In  November,  Robinette  turned  over  possession  of  a  vacant lot he owned on the Northshore to pay the debt to Heebe.

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dArren sProles The neW FAvorITe

    The running back was a fan favorite during his years with the San Diego Chargers, and he proved  himself  one  of  the  most  popular  members  of  the  2011  Saints freshman class, dependably moving the ball down  the  field  week  after  week  and  inadvertently  coining  a  new adjective among fans: “Sprolesworthy.”

g YEAR IN REVIEW

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Tara Hollis The Challenger

    The Louisiana Democratic Party  couldn’t  even  muster  the  strength  to  put  up  a  seasoned  opponent  against  Gov.  Bobby  Jindal,  so a young teacher from Haynesville stepped up.  Jindal had millions in his re-election fund; Hollis  only had a few thousand. Nevertheless, she got  more  than  180,000  votes,  nearly  18  percent  of  the  vote.  Regardless  of  one’s  political  position,  people all over the state should be grateful Hollis  provided voters with a choice.

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Marlin GusMan The Sheriff

    Unlike  Mayor  Mitch  Landrieu  and  NOPD  chief  Ronal  Serpas,  Orleans  Parish  Sheriff  Marlin  Gusman  isn’t  the  sort  of  official  who thrives in front of the public, and the ongoing debate over the rebuilt Orleans Parish Prison  took  place  without  much  public  scrutiny.  At  issue: the number of beds in the facility, which  is  still  in  question  though  rebuilding  of  the  complex is underway, and the ongoing per-diem  compensation  law,  which  allows  the  sheriff’s  office  to  collect  money  for  each  prisoner  held,  a  practice  jail-reform  advocates  say  introduces  a  profit  motive  into  incarceration.  The  sheriff  also  had  several  high-profile  embarrassments  this year, including several deputies arrested on  various charges. But he ended the year much as  he began it: implacable as ever.

The free man

    New  Orleans’  most  successful  hip-hop  star  spent  2011  (unlike  2010)  out  of  Rikers  Island  Prison,  but he’s still on probation. In August, he released his longdelayed album Tha Carter IV, which most critics thought  fell  short  of  his  acclaimed  Tha Carter III.  Nonetheless,  IV  hit double platinum, reaching No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot 200,  R&B and Rap charts. 

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rafael DelGaDillo The Survivor

    Delgadillo,  a  community  organizer  with  the  Hispanic  organization  Puentes  New  Orleans,  spends  his life preaching peace — so it was sadly ironic when he  was  shot  in  an  attempted  robbery  in  Mid-City.  Friends,  politicos  and  supporters  organized  and  attended  a  benefit for him in November. He continues to recover.

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Telly HankTon The ConviCTed

    Hankton  went  on  trial  in  July  for  the  2008 second-degree murder of Darnell Stewart, but the  jury  was  declared  hung  after  just  three  hours  of  deliberation.  Not  so  during  his  September  retrial,  when  alibi  witnesses did not show up and the jury found him guilty  —  an  automatic  life  sentence  for  the  man  cops  and  prosecutors had portrayed as one of the most dangerous  criminals in New Orleans.

GranT sTorMs The hypoCriTe

    The tawdriest sex scandal of 2011  also  echoed  one  of  a  generation  ago:  that  of  preacher Jimmy Swaggart and his “I have sinned”  downfall in an Airline Highway motel. In February,  Jefferson Parish deputies arrested a man in a van  at  Lafreniere  Park  in  Metairie  after  two  women  claimed they saw him masturbating while looking  into a playground area. The man turned out to be  the Rev. Grant Storms, who had garnered national  headlines  a  decade  earlier  during  his  annual  Labor  Day  bullhorn  tirades  against  the  Southern  Decadence  celebration  in  the  French  Quarter.  Storms  told  deputies  he  had  been  urinating  in  a  bottle,  not  masturbating,  but  he  was  booked  on  obscenity charges.     A  day  later,  Storms  held  a  bizarre  press  conference in the parking lot of a Metairie motel, where  he  said  “I’m  confessing  to  having  my  hand  in  my  pants”  and  admitted  he  had  been  looking  at  pornography before going to the park — but did  not admit to masturbating. “I’m familiar with sex  addiction, being a pastor … I’ll just say: Do I have a  problem? Yes,” Storms said, but insisted he was not  a  pedophile  or  child  molester.  Storms  characterized his condemnation of the Southern Decadence  crowds  as  “hateful”  and  said  he’d  been  “prideful  and  arrogant.”  Storms  added,  weeping,  “I  have  deeply hurt my family, and I pray they can find it  in  their  hearts  to  forgive  me,”  before  leaving  the  motel parking lot with a man he called his pastor.

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eDwin & Trina eDwarDs The overexpoSed

    The former governor left prison for a halfway house  in  January,  and  everything  he  did  from  that  point  seemed to make news — especially his July marriage to  Trina Scott at the Hotel Monteleone. The bride was 32;  the groom 51 years her senior. Trina Edwards has spoken  openly of wanting to get a part-time home in the French  Quarter,  and  there  was  talk  of  the  couple  starring  on  a  reality  TV  show,  but  neither  development  had  come  to  pass  by  year’s  end.  The  thoroughly  modern  Edwin,  however, has been active on Facebook, and he and Trina  had a one-night  shift as  husband-and-wife  bartenders  at Molly’s at the Market in the French Quarter. The bar  was thronged.

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Troy “TroMbone sHorTy” anDrews The Jazzman

    Andrews  followed  up  his critically  acclaimed  2010  Backatown  in  September  with  For True,  which  topped  Billboard’s Contemporary Jazz Chart for weeks. He playedthe  New Orleans House of Blues on Christmas Eve — and will be  headlining at San Francisco’s prestigious Fillmore Theater for  a two-night stand, concluding on New Year’s Eve. 

15

DaviD siMon The produCer

    It was a clash of alpha males, one  who  prides  himself  on  promoting  New  Orleans’  cultural economy and the other who has become a  major part of the cultural economy. In April, Treme  impresario David Simon clashed with Mayor Mitch  Landrieu  over  a  misunderstanding  regarding  a  preservation group and some blighted houses — a  misunderstanding that blew up in the local media,  much  to  the  chagrin  of  both  men.  The  mayor  and  the  producer  were  polite  two  weeks  later  at  Gambit’s  Big  Easy  Awards  (Landrieu  already  had  been scheduled to honor Simon), but at the Rising  Tide  bloggers’  conference  four  months  later,  the  TV  producer  made  it  clear  he  hadn’t  forgotten.  After  rehashing  the  incident  in  detail,  he  told  the  crowd,  “When  the  cameras  hit  him,  your  new  mayor would have thrown anyone under the bus.”  Wherever  the  tension  stands  right  now,  Simon  began  filming  the  third  season  of  Treme  in  late  2011, providing another major injection of cash into  the city’s cultural economy and giving New Orleans  musicians much-appreciated paychecks.

14

ray naGin The enigma

    The “author, public speaker, recovery  expert,  green  advocate”  (as  he  describes  himself on his website) began to use Twitter this year  (which  he  used  to  twit  Mayor  Mitch  Landrieu’s  administration). But Nagin’s big news was the June  publication  of  Katrina’s Secrets,  his  self-published  memoir,  which  surprised  many  by  its  billing  as 

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lil wayne

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g YEAR IN REVIEW “Volume 1” (Nagin said Volume 2 would likely follow in 2012). For those who’ve wondered how can we miss Nagin when he won’t go away, you soon may find out: In November, the former mayor put his Park Island house up for sale for $729,000.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

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22

Chris Paul The Trade

After a rocky ride on a roller coaster of deals made and rejected, All-Star point guard Chris Paul finally moved to Los Angeles Dec. 15 to join the Clippers. It was a negotiation process that upset everyone involved (except perhaps the Clippers) and illustrated why the NBA shouldn’t be a franchise owner. Paul made no secret he wanted to be traded to a better team — and definitely would leave the Hornets when he became a free agent after the current season, so the Hornets began working out the best deal they could. The first proposal would have sent Paul to the L.A. Lakers (where he wanted to go) and given the Hornets some good players on which to rebuild a flagging team. NBA commissioner David Stern nixed the deal, however, after owners of smaller teams complained it was unfair to them to amass too much star power in one team. Stern denied he was swayed by those owners, but he shot down a second trade proposal the same week. The third deal, which sent Paul to the L.A. Clippers and gave the Hornets a couple of solid players and a first-round draft pick next year, leaves New Orleans with a half-dozen returning players and several new ones, but no big standouts. As for Paul, he was a gentleman through it all, even spending more time talking about his six years in New Orleans and his love for the city than he did about his excitement to be in L.A. during a news conference the day he joined his new team. Paul also was a winner off the court, with his CP3 Foundation and CP3 Afterschool Zone benefiting the city’s children and their families. Whether Paul’s departure hurts or helps the Hornets, New Orleans has been blessed to have been home to CP3.

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tyrann mathieu The honey badger

The St. Aug grad and LSU football standout nicknamed the “Honey Badger” tended to take what he wanted all season — everything, that is, except the Heisman Trophy. But the cornerback with the dyed blond hair and flair for off-field fashion became a favorite of LSU fans — and a national celebrity for his punishing play on the field.

10

CoCo roBiCheaux The SpiriT

On Nov. 25, the blues musician and Frenchmen Street regular had a heart attack and died at one of his regular haunts — the Apple Barrel Bar. Two second lines were organized in his honor, as well as a tribute concert at the House of Blues in December.

9

leon Cannizzaro The d.a.

The Orleans Parish District Attorney had a rough year, culminating in a pillorying of his office by the U.S. Supreme Court in November. For decades, the D.A.’s office has been bedeviled by a lack of adherence to “Brady rules,” which require prosecutors to turn over any possibly exculpatory evidence to defense attorneys. The high court has yet to rule in the case of Juan Smith, who was convicted of murder in a 1995 home invasion but is now seeking a new trial on Brady grounds. Cannizzaro’s job is to restore confidence in the office among both the public and jurists.

charter versus anti-charter, traditional Democrat versus Republican big money, New Orleans natives versus outsiders — but the truth was more granular. Both women were African-American Democrats, though Jones had backing from some conservative groups and had received donations from, among others, Baton Rouge businessman Lane Grigsby and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. For her part, Givens insisted she wasn’t a kneejerk detractor of charter schools (indeed, she was the sole BESE vote for not revoking the charter of the troubled Abramson Science & Technology School in eastern New Orleans). Then there was the mud, flung early and often: At the start of the race, word surfaced of a drunk-driving arrest and an IRS tax lien against Givens. As Jones climbed in the polls, attorney Tracie Washington filed a lawsuit demanding Jones stop claiming she voted for President Barack Obama in her campaign ads … and Jones’ voting record was indeed confusing. Givens ducked the press in the early part of the campaign, but toward the end it was Jones who was canceling appearances and not going in front of groups like the Urban League of New Orleans. Jones swept to easy victory in November with 57 percent of the vote, reflecting the popularity of New Orleans charter schools — and Gov. Bobby Jindal, who was known to support Jones but had kept his distance during the campaign, sent his congratulations from Baton Rouge.

7

the danziger defendants The diSgrace

On Aug. 5, Kenneth Bowen, Robert Faulcon, Robert Gisevius and Anthony Villavaso — four former NOPD officers — were found guilty in federal court of shooting and killing Ronald Madison and James Brissette on the Danziger bridge in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, and then covering up the crime. A fifth cop, Arthur Kaufman, was found complicit in the coverup. An attempt to try the officers on the same charges in 2008 under local jurisdiction produced memorable news footage of hundreds of NOPD officers lining the streets to show support for the men as they surrendered on state charges. This time, there was no such display.

Jim letten The UnToUchable

The mustachioed U.S. Attorney for Louisiana’s eastern district had a busy year of indictments and convictions. Among the most high-profile of them: obtaining a guilty verdict of racketeering against former City Councilwoman Renee Gill Pratt and indicting former Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard, his former wife Karen Parker and former parish attorney Tom Wilkinson. But the major accomplishment of Letten’s office in 2011 was the August conviction of five former NOPD officers in the Danziger Bridge shooting case. The jury found the men guilty on all 25 counts brought against them.

6 8

Kira orange Jones The lighTning rod

With no major races on the November ballot, most of the attention was on the contest for the District 2 seat on the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) — and the race became a stand-in for a referendum on the future of Louisiana education. Eight-year incumbent Louella Givens was challenged by Kira Orange Jones, a former Teach for America official and proponent of the charter schools movement. The race was quickly shorthanded in the press and in public perception — pro-

BoBBy Jindal The Second-Termer

The man who was America’s youngest governor when he took office in 2007 cruised to easy reelection this year, thanks in part to a feckless and adrift Democratic Party. Jindal spent much of the year denying he had an eye on the 2012 GOP vicepresidential nomination, while simultaneously traveling around the country, raising millions and promoting his 2010 book Leadership and Crisis. One of his few missteps: When Jindal endorsed Texas Gov. Rick Perry for president, Perry flubbed his first major debate the same evening and kept flubbing until his poll numbers cratered. Bobby backed the wrong horse.

g YEAR IN REVIEW

5

Ronal SeRpaS The Chief

    It was a bumpy year for the head  of  the  NOPD,  starting  last  spring  when  the  now-infamous  traffic  camera  paid  detail  scheme  came  to  light.  But  Serpas  had  the  public  backing  of  Mayor  Mitch  Landrieu,  and New Orleans Inspector General  Ed Quatrevaux announced his office  found no wrongdoing by Serpas —  even before the IG’s office had completed  its  probe  of  the  brouhaha.  Quatrevaux also came to the chief’s  defense later in the year over a question about the paperwork signed on  the  chief’s  hiring  date.  Serpas  has  been one of the most approachable  police  superintendents  in  recent  memory,  and  has  chalked  up  some  successes in knocking down various  crime  rates,  but  under  his  watch  the New Orleans murder rate hasn’t  gone  down  or  even  held  steady:  It’s  gone  up.  So  far,  the  public  has  shown less patience with him than  it has with Landrieu.

4

dRew bReeS

The Dearly DeparTeD

    When  Philip  Hannan  died  Sept.  29 at the age of 98, it was not just  a  long  life  but  a  life  well-lived  —  from  his  time  as  a  paratrooper  during  World  War  II  to  delivering  the  homily  at  the  Requiem  Mass  for  President  John  F.  Kennedy.  Hannan  served  as  Archbishop  of  New Orleans for 23 years. He was  buried  beneath  the  floor  of  St.  Louis Cathedral.

1

Mitch landRieu The Mayor

    Landrieu  ended  his  first  full  year  in  office with some good news: an October  poll  showed  his  favorability  ratings  among  New  Orleans  voters  to  be  a  whopping  88  percent,  with  little  difference  in  his  popularity  between  white  and black citizens. (One major exception:  the  New  Orleans  NAACP  and  several  other largely African-American organizations.)  Ambitious  and  energetic  —  and,  sometimes, pugnacious — Landrieu ran  his office crisply in 2011: steady clip, tight  ship.  In  the  last  third  of  the  year  alone,  he  launched  a  sprawling  anti-crime  initiative,  Save  Our  Sons,  at  a  September  crime  summit;  reopened  Armstrong  Park; steered his second municipal budget through the City Council vetting process  with  a  minimum  of  drama;  and  ran  the  26.2-mile  New  York  marathon.  National press for the mayor was largely  positive as well; a May profile of Landrieu  on 60 Minutes was more a wet kiss than  a  grilling.  Landrieu’s  big  challenges  for  2012:  guiding  the  city  through  a  flurry  of  high-profile  tourism  events  and  getting  the  murder  rate  down;  there  were  more killings in New Orleans in 2011 than  there were in 2010. If anything could end  his  extended  honeymoon  with  voters,  it  would  be  the  city’s  inability  to  turn  around the stubborn homicide rate.  

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

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The inspiraTion

“The challenges that I face are real. This is no game. Physically, things have not gone my way, I’ve made mistakes in life and the experts tell me the clock is ticking. It’s scary to walk out on the field in front of 75,000 people when you’re half the man you used to be. “I wanted to unravel, drop my poise and close up the playbook. “But in the end, I think the formula is the same. I am staying close to the ones that I love, I am relying on support from my team and I am looking my fear in the eye and laying bare my chest. “I’m fortunate because I am loved by my wife and family; boys like Will Smith and Drew Brees are powerful support, and the 75,000 in the crowd are on my team. “I am not here to predict the outcome of my life, but deep within my soul, I have a calming sense of certainty.”  —Steve  Gleason, Sept. 27, 2011     Gleason is a retired New Orleans Saint  whose  acts  on  and  off  the  field  have  made  him  a  favorite  among  fans.  In  the  fall  he  publicly  acknowledged  he  has  ALS,  or  Lou  Gehrig’s  Disease,  a  terminal  illness  that  damages  nerves  and  destroys muscle control.

The QB

    Is Breesus the most popular guy in  New  Orleans?  Probably  —  as  much  for his off-field reputation as his fearsome passing record. He began 2011  by  being  honored  by  his  fellow  NFL  players  with  the  Athletes  in  Action/ Bart  Starr  Award  for  outstanding  character  and  leadership,  becoming  the first New Orleans Saint to win the  award. His Brees Dream Foundation  has  raised  more  than  $7  million  to  date, but despite his prowess on the  gridiron and his largesse off it, what  endears Brees to the city is his relatability. How many other Super Bowl  QBs  were  photographed  this  year  dressed in a centurion outfit, taking  his son trick-or-treating?

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    The Sugar Bowl still has  the potential to be one of  the more exciting matchups  in college football, however.  Both teams sport defenses  ranked in the top 20 of college football, and both have  dynamic playmakers on both  sides of the ball. Here are five  reasons to not overlook this  year’s Sugar Bowl:

FitzgeralD toussaint  —Michigan’s red-shirt  sophomore running  back isn’t related to New  Orleans-born composer  Allen Toussaint. But that’s  no reason for locals to  ignore him. Toussaint, who  was hampered by injuries  last year, is the primary  reason Robinson hasn’t  piled up gaudy rushing  stats for the second consecutive year.     Toussaint started out  slow this year, but rushed  for 120 or more yards in  four of his last five games,  including a career-best  192 yards rushing against  Illinois on Nov. 12. Not bad  for a player who wasn’t  even the first-string running back at the start of  the season because of knee  and shoulder injuries. The  biggest threat Toussaint  poses is in his complementary role to Robinson in  Michigan’s option offense.  Whereas last year Robinson 

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

DenarD robinson  — The 6-foot junior quarterback for Michigan is the most  dynamic player on both sides  of the ball. He burst onto  the scene last year when he  threw for more than 2,500  yards and ran for more than  1,700 yards — though those  numbers weren’t enough to  keep Michigan from finishing 7-6 — all while being  pictured in a full Heisman  Trophy pose during a game  against Notre Dame where  he amassed 502 total yards.      Robinson, who also garnered attention for how  he doesn’t tie his shoes,  followed last year’s performance with slightly reduced  numbers — just over 2,000  yards passing and 1,100 yards  rushing — but managed to  lead his team to 10 wins.  Despite the slight drop in  stats, Robinson remains one  of the most dangerous dual  threats in college football.  He’s got large hands to control the football on pump  fakes and elite speed to blow  past defenders when he  decides to tuck and run.     As dynamic as he can be, 

however, Robinson is prone  to turnovers. He threw  interceptions in all but  three games this season  and lost a key fumble in a  loss to Iowa in mid-November. But while Michigan  fans probably pulll at their  hair every time Robinson  has the ball, neutral observers will be comforted  knowing that more often  than not, something exciting is about to happen. 

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swEET drEams had to carry the load pretty much by himself, Toussaint provides a credible and dangerous option, and also is a threat in the traditional running game. It’s not surprising, then, that the RobinsonToussaint combo is the first pair of Michigan players in more than three decades to amass more than 1,000 yards rushing in a season.

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Tariq Edwards — The Hokies will have their hands full trying to contain the Michigan running attack, but luckily for Virginia Tech, it has one of the best sophomore linebackers in the country in Tariq Edwards. Although Virginia Tech’s defense is among the best in the country, it was humiliated during a 38-10 loss to Clemson in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Championship game. In that contest, the Hokies gave up 217 rushing yards, not a good way to end the regular season before facing off against two 1,000-yard rushers. This kind of performance has been more the rule than the exception for the Hokies. The Virginia Tech defense gave up an average of 188 rushing yards per

game, hardly the numbers you’d expect from a BCS Bowl team. Look more closely, though, and you’ll see Virginia Tech is a classic bend-but-don’t-break defense that gives up big numbers in yards but has only allowed 17 points per game this season (good for eighth in the country). For Edwards & Co., the chances of keeping Robinson and Toussaint from running wild are not as important as making sure they’re tackled before reaching the end zone. With his speed and strength, expect Edwards to run down Wolverines all game long. Virginia TEch’s fans (or lack thereof) — As mentioned earlier, the Sugar Bowl selected Virginia Tech and Michigan over higher-ranked schools because of their traveling fan bases. But while Michigan has had no problem selling its allotment of tickets, Virginia Tech officials have

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Sweet DReamS had to make public appeals to fans urging them to come to New Orleans to support their team. With less than two weeks left until the game, Virginia Tech officials have said they’ll give unsold tickets to local charities. The number of Virginia Tech tickets sold (or not sold) has not become one of the more compelling storylines of the Sugar Bowl. After all, if the Sugar Bowl committee selected the Hokies because their fans travel in big numbers, what does it say about the fans who don’t show up? It could lend credence to the argument that a team like Baylor or Boise State was more deserving of a selection. With mid-major schools like Utah and Cincinnati managing to bring fans out in droves in years past, who’s to say Baylor and Boise State fans wouldn’t have migrated en masse to see their teams play in a major bowl game? BCS RepeRCuSSionS — For fans of college football,

divisive games like this year’s Sugar Bowl only add to the growing drumbeat against the structure of the sport, the BCS and the NCAA. While the bowl season provided some of the most compelling and exciting games in college football history, much of it often is lost in the flood of bowl games that stretch from mid-December to early January. That makes the outcome of the Sugar Bowl that much more important. If the game is a boring defensive struggle or a lopsided win for either team, it won’t help the status quo at a time when many people are pushing for changes in the current system. A close, exciting, back-and-forth game also won’t exonerate the BCS system, but it will give the Sugar Bowl committee something to hang its hat on when people say it doesn’t know how to pick good teams. Unfortunately for the status quo, recent trends haven’t been favorable for the Sugar Bowl: Four of the last six games have been blowouts.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

reen matters

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Streetcar Funding derailed

    The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) this  month released a list of projects that will receive a total  of $511 million in round three of the Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grants.  Among the 46 nationwide grant recipients is the Port of  New Orleans, which got $16.7 million to help pay for rail  yard improvements.      Not on the list of approved TIGER III projects, however,  was the New Orleans Regional Transit Authority’s (RTA)  bid to extend its planned Rampart/St. Claude streetcar  project from Canal Street to Poland Avenue. The grant  would have covered nearly $80 million of the projected  $98 million to extend the line.      Last year the RTA received $45 million in the first  round of TIGER grants to pay for the new Loyola Avenue  streetcar line now under construction. As The Lens reported in September, that earlier award likely made the  second one, for the St. Claude extension, something of  a long shot.     The Rampart/St. Claude streetcar project already has  been cut back significantly from plans first conceived in  2009. When the Rampart/St. Claude streetcar was first  proposed, RTA planned to extend rail service to Press  Street. Last year, the agency issued $79 million in bonds  to pay for that plan, but in November RTA officials scaled  back the length of the line to Elysian Fields — a distance  of just over 1 mile —  citing insufficient funding. — Charles Maldonado

council approveS Ô complete StreetSÕ

a year oF green living A look At the greener highlights of new orleAns in 2011. By Alex woodwArd

t

Photo courtesy of Global Green usa

Building Block space.     More news for the green economy: Global Green  USA announced NOLA Wise, its low-interest loan program for owners to make their houses more energy efficient, and Louisiana Green Corps graduated 32 young  adults in its program that trains 18- to 24-year-olds to  build energy-efficient buildings and use sustainable  construction practices.     The inaugural Eat Local Challenge tasked participants  to stick to a “locavore” diet, one consisting of foods  sourced from within a 200-mile radius, for one month  (beginning June 1) — but everything had to be local (for  the die-hard participants, which included Mike Strain,  the state’s agriculture and forestry commissioner). But  organizers stressed how good Louisiana has it — down  to the salt, which is harvested on Avery Island — when  it comes to eating locally. There are local berries in  spring and hardy citrus in winter, and diverse fruits,  vegetables and grains thrive in the Gulf climate. The  state also enjoys organic poultry farms and a bounty of  fresh seafood. The challenge (www.nolalocavore.org)  will return in 2012.     An increase in farmers markets and neighborhood  gardens also has improved access to healthy food —  the 9th Ward’s Sankofa Farmers Market expanded  its offerings and moved to a larger space at the Holy  Angels Complex (3500 St. Claude Ave.).     In 2010, Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s Sustainable Energy  and Environmental Task Force transition team announced its agenda for the administration, and at  the top of its list was resurrecting the city’s recycling  program. Landrieu reached deals with two of the city’s  garbage contractors, Metro Disposal and Richard’s  Disposal, for weekly recycling pickup service. Only a  quarter of residents have enrolled, but that diversion  pAge 34

    The New Orleans City Council this month voted  unanimously in favor of a so-called “Complete Streets”  ordinance, which creates within the city code new policies requiring all roadways to be compatible for all users  — not just cars and buses. That means all future road  work and resurfacing projects must include bike lanes,  curb ramps and safe passage for people at bus stops and  on sidewalks. New Orleans joins a growing list of more  than 300 U.S. cities that have adopted the policy, and it’s  the first municipal policy of its kind in Louisiana.     At November’s council transportation committee  meeting, the Sustainable Transportation Advisory  Committee (STAC), which helped draft the ordinance  with District C Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer,  urged the council to approve the policy, which the state  adopted last year for all state-backed and federally  funded projects.     University of New Orleans transportation institute  director John Renne hailed the ordinance as a positive  step in the city’s “sustainable future,” which includes  alternative transportation and healthy, livable communities. — Alex Woodward

recycling coming to JeFF pariSh in 2012

    Another unanimous council vote, this time in Jefferson  Parish, secured a budget line to reinstitute a parishwide  recycling program, a first for the parish since Hurricane  Katrina. Parish officials admitted they aren’t sure whether the budget can accommodate funding the service,  which has a price tag of more than $1 million, designated  for IESI Corp. (at about $1.50 per household). Parish President John Young and councilmembers, however, agreed  to cover the cost by halting some projects and collecting  revenue from tax renewals and landfill fees.     Parish residents will receive 18-gallon recycling bins —  smaller than the 64-gallon rolling bins used in neighboring Orleans Parish. (The Jefferson bins are similar to  the pre-Katrina “blue” bins, which don’t have wheels.)  Service is expected to begin in July 2012. Meanwhile,  the parish will hold regular recycling drop-off days on  both sides of the river, typically from 9 a.m. to noon on  designated Saturdays. — Woodward

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

his being New Orleans, much of the city’s  environmental and sustainable efforts  start and end with food, including the New  Orleans Food Co-Op, which opened its doors this year  after almost a decade in the making. The grocery had a  benefactor in developer Pres Kabacoff, who helped pay  for the group’s space inside his New Orleans Healing  Center. Co-op membership reached more than 1,000  in April, and the 4,800-square-foot store opened in  October with more than 2,000 members.     The idea of the co-op was introduced in 2002, but  founders went through several planning stages before  finally agreeing on a space on Elysian Fields Avenue in  2005, before Hurricane Katrina scrapped its progress.  The intersection of St. Claude and St. Roch avenues,  where the Healing Center sits, has been a go-to example of the city’s struggle to provide dense communities with access to fresh, healthy food following the rise  of “food deserts” in post-Katrina New Orleans.     In 2007, the co-op introduced a mobile market  with help from Crescent City Farmers Market. It also  introduced a buyer’s club inside what later became the  Healing Center (the former Universal Furniture building). In 2009, the co-op reached 500 members,���while  the neighboring St. Roch Market, a proposed site for  another fresh foods grocery, was a blighted spot on the  avenue. On its limited shelf space, the co-op, which was  open on a weekly basis, offered foods from local farms,  some bulk grains and other goods. Now the store is  open daily, and each member can own a stake in the  co-op, though the store is open to the public.     The Building Block, the co-op’s upstairs neighbor,  opened its Healing Center location this year. The incubator focuses on developing and connecting sustainable businesses and entrepreneurs with other likeminded businesses. More than a dozen green-focused  or environmentally friendly small businesses share The 

Global Green USA volunteers help plant rain gardens in Holy Cross.

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reen light

+++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++++

The DirT NOLA GreeN rOOts’ cOmpOst prOGrAm sAves LANdfiLL wAste ANd turNs restAurANt ANd hOusehOLd trAsh iNtO rich fertiLizer. B y A L e x w O O d wA r d

ambit has kept you apprised of just how busy Joseph Brock has been the past couple of years. When we first met Brock in 2010, he was laying soil at his first large-scale community garden, the Wise Words Community Garden near Tulane and Carrollton avenues. Over the last two years, he’s orchestrated urban renewal campaigns by building more community gardens and making his customers understand how easy, affordable and accessible fresh food can be. Now he’s giving them the dirt — literally, with a composting program he says is the city’s best. From his office above an auto repair shop on Tulane Avenue, Brock enters a few more keystrokes into his gardening database (software he designed himself) before he sprints out the door and into the NOLA Green Roots store. Chrome racks display jars of pickles and sauces, boxes of onions and packages of fertilizer, “homemade” from Brock’s acrossthe-street garden, the first of several urban gardens in the NOLA Green Roots assembly. The neighboring garden’s massive, wood-lined composting boxes house several months’ worth of compost — pre-consumer food waste like orange peels, coffee grounds, potato skins and other organic material that otherwise would end up in a landfill, where their nutrients are wasted in bags of garbage. Brock’s program picks up compost bins from participants and brings them to the garden, where the contents are weighed on a scale. That information is entered into a database, which can summarize how much each restaurant or household is saving from the landfill. “I don’t think anyone knows what it means, ‘What’s composting?’” Brock says. “We’re thinking about waste, a new way of doing things.” Brock waves and honks the horn of his Dodge Ram 1500 truck on his route from Mid-City to the CBD at rush hour. A parade on Canal Street is slowing down Brock’s otherwise perfected, block-byblock efficiency in this compost pickup. He started the day at 4 a.m., when he typically does his pickups. “It’s like a paper route,” he says. Shadowing Brock is Loyola University student Wolfgang Klein, a member of the university’s community action program (LUCAP), which is partnering with NOLA Green Roots. At each stop, full bins are loaded into the truck bed and replaced with fresh empty ones. Brock explains to Klein a very specific method of loading and unloading. “You want it to look like you never knew it was there,” he says. One restaurant’s bin,

G

For more information on NOLA Green Roots, visit www.nolagreenroots.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

a 64-gallon container on wheels, is full to its top. “That was landfill,” Brock says with a smile. Restaurant bins are picked up three times a week. On this ride, after bin pickups at five restaurants, Brock collects more than 1,000 pounds of compostable material. Since the program started earlier this year, Brock says he has picked up nearly 20,000 pounds of compostable waste. Over a three-month process, that waste gradually is broken down and converted to compost (“It’s like making wine,” he says. “The longer it sits, the better”) and put back into the soil. Some is used in NOLA Green Roots gardens and the rest is packaged in 18-pound bags and sold at the store. “I’m a nerd,” Brock says back at his office. Brock, who graduated from Loyola with a degree in forensic science, shows how rainwater collection barrels packed with compost are aerated to “get all the molecules working” to promote cell and bacteria growth. According to the LSU AgCenter, 20 percent to 30 percent of landfill waste is made up of organic materials. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates only 2.8 percent of organic materials were turned over for compost in 2010. There currently are a dozen restaurants, ranging from fine dining establishments to neighborhood diners, enrolled in Brock’s service. Restaurants pay a monthly $50 fee to participate. Loyola University implemented the program for its campus, but Brock would like to see a citywide composting effort. “We need to do this jointly,” he says, adding that households composting individually would benefit from joining with others — and that’s where NOLA Green Roots steps in, he says. “We can do a lot more. … I’d love for City Hall to take a closer look at what we’re doing.” The NOLA Green Roots store opens to the public Jan. 3, but a members-only soft opening is Dec. 30. The store will stock fresh fruits and vegetables, eggs, mushrooms and other goods from the gardens. Customers will have to line up at the door, and the shelves will stock only what’s fresh that day. “Our motto is, ‘Our shelves are empty,’” Brock says.

35

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

36

STAGE: THE YEAR IN REVIEW PAGE 53 EVENTS: NEW YEAR’S EVE HIGHLIGHTS PAGE 57 CUISINE: THE YEAR IN DINING PAGE 61

JAMS

IN TO

2012

PAGE

GALACTIC 39

>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 41 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

FILM

46

ART

49

STAGE

53

EVENTS

55

CUISINE

61

DEC

Irma Thomas with Lance Ellis 29 PHOTO BY RICK OLIVIER

Irma Thomas flipped the switch for the Joy Theater marquee last Tuesday. The soul queen lights up the stage on Thursday, opening the renovated Canal Street venue with saxophonist Lance Ellis. Tickets $47.20 (includes fees). 8 p.m. Thursday. Joy Theater, 1200 Canal St., 528-9569; www.thejoytheater.com

Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews had a breakout year at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival and on tour. PHOTO BY SCOTT SALTZMAN

A Marquee Year A YEAR OF ART AND ENTERTAINMENT BY WILL COVIELLO

I

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30 -31

Galactic closes out Tipitina’s 2011 calendar with a crystal New Year’s ball: a group residency with guests from forthcoming Anti- release Carnivale Electricos (Mannie Fresh, Rebirth’s Corey Henry) and assorted friends (Anders Osborne, Eric Lindell Trio, Living Colour’s Corey Glover) making a two-day trailer of Mardi Gras, two months in advance. 10 p.m. FridaySaturday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

DEC

New Year’s Eve PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

31

Ring in the New Year at Jackson Square. Festivities begin at 9 p.m. with music by Shamarr Allen and the Underdawgs, MyNameIsJohnMichael and others. At midnight, a fleur-de-lis descends and then there are fireworks over the Mississippi River. Free admission. 9 p.m. Saturday. Jackson Square, 700 block of Decatur Street

Dinerral Shavers Education Fund New Year’s Blowout

JAN

1

A brass band extravaganza raises funds for the Dinerral Shavers Education Fund. The former Hot 8 Brass Band drummer was killed in 2006. The Hot 8 (pictured), Free Agents, Stooges, TBC and Pinettes brass bands are joined by 5th Ward Weebie, Magnolia Keedy Black, Tonya Boyd Cannon, DJ Captain Charles and others in honoring Shavers’ life and legacy. Admission $20. 9 p.m. Sunday. The Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

n 2011, an array of local performers and institutions marked milestones, but often arts and entertainment news was about location, location, location. As the year draws to a close, the Joy Theater opens, bringing headlining entertainment back to the big marquees on Canal Street. New music clubs opened and other young ones blossomed. Several institutions had landmark anniversaries, and the international art biennial Prospect.2 and related exhibitions opened around the city. On Thursday, Irma Thomas headlines an opening night concert heralding the reopening of the Joy Theater. Its reopening restores some of the boulevard’s activity absent since Hurricane Katrina, when downtown lost the use of the Orpheum, Saenger Theatre, Municipal Auditorium and Mahalia Jackson Theater (which reopened in 2009). The much anticipated reopening of the Saenger has been pushed back to 2013. The landmark Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre struggled with financial woes and differences between its board of directors and supporters’ guild. The board opted to sell part of the theater’s space to the Dickie Brennan Restaurant Group, and the theater is expected to stage productions in fall 2012. Proprietor Barbara Motley closed her cabaret Le Chat Noir and put the building up for sale. Shows that might have run at Le Chat in the past were presented at the New Orleans Center for the Creative Arts (NOCCA), the new MidCity Theatre and in spaces in the burgeoning St. Claude arts district.

New music clubs opening downtown included Irvin Mayfield’s IClub in the JW Marriott, and the array of entertainment available in the CBD expanded with the reopening of the Hyatt Regency New Orleans, a property including new restaurants, a music venue and sports bar. Champions Square opened outside the renamed Mercedes-Benz Superdome, and it’s right on time for the city to host a BCS bowl game and college football’s national championship between LSU and the University of Alabama. A handful of local institutions marked major anniversaries. The New Orleans Museum of Art turned its first century on Dec. 16. The anniversary weekend featured a full schedule of arts events and concerts. With weekly events like Where Y’Art, the museum launched a much busier regular schedule, and some of the highlights included a trio of theatrical productions by the NOLA Project, including a spirited couple of runs of A Midsummer Night’s Dream in the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden. Following up on a show and residency at NOMA, Quintron and Miss Pussycat released Sucre du Sauvage, an album recorded at the museum. The Contemporary Arts Center marked its 35th anniversary, and it celebrated with programming that featured juxtapositions of recent and old works by contemporary artists who were active at the space in its first year. Preservation Hall marked its 50th anniversary, and it continues to grow. Plans are underway for a Preservation Hall West in San Francisco. Meanwhile, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band continues to explore new types of collaborations. One such endeavor resulted in a performance with the modern dance company Trey McIntyre Project, featuring works commissioned by the New Orleans Ballet Association. The groups went on a short tour with the pair of pieces and reprised them at the Voodoo Music Experience.

DEC

Galactic

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PAGE 39

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

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Voodoo altered its configuration, downsizing from dueling mainstages to a single main stage, which hosted Soundgarden and Snoop Dogg. Some of the major acts were booked for more “intimate” shows on smaller stages, and fans of X, Ray Davies and Gordon Gano and the Lost Bayou Ramblers were rewarded with great live shows. On the digital side, Girl Talk packed the festival’s increasingly popular dance and electronica stage. The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival continues to book ever-bigger acts while maintaining a strong lineup from top to bottom. Some of the more legendary musicians on the bill included Tom Jones, Robert Plant and Sonny Rollins. Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews and Orleans Avenue played the Gentilly Stage, but few local musicians had as big a year as Andrews, who put in guest appearances during the sets of Kid Rock, Jeff Beck, 5th Ward Weebie and many others. The city’s wealth of festivals and concert events included a visit by Kanye West at the Essence Music Festival and a return appearance with Jay-Z in December. Nicki Minaj also came through twice, once with Lil Wayne and then with Katy Perry. Other visiting headliners included Bob Dylan, Leon Russell, Blondie, Sade and Brazilian jazz virtuoso Carlos Malta. On a smaller scale, the local club Siberia blossomed in its first full year, hosting a gritty slate of predominantly punk and metal bands. On a sad note, the city lost Frenchmen Street’s beloved spiritual leader Coco Robicheaux, and legendary composer/arranger Wardell Quezergue died in September. The city also lost renowned bar owner Yvonne “Miss Dixie” Fasnacht. After a year postponement, the art biennial Prospect.2 opened at venues around town (open through Jan. 29, 2012), and along with satellite shows it demonstrated continued development in the city’s contemporary art scene. One of the year’s best surprises was the creation of New Orleans Airlift’s Music Box, or Dithyrambalina project. Uniting the talents of visual artists and musicians, the remains of a blighted home were salvaged and recycled into a whimsical and bohemian array of musically equipped cottages and structures. It was a uniquely inspired celebration of the city’s old charms and new creative energies.

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

MUSIC

DEAD NATION PRESENTS

oN SALe NoW!

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles Holiday Show, noon WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Kirk Branch, 6 YUKI IZAKAYA — Sombras Brilhantes, 8

Tuesday 27

Wednesday 28

BANKS STREET BAR — David Bode Jazz Quartet, 9

12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 9

BLUE NILE — Simon Lott’s Context Killer, 10 BMC — Mikey B3 Organ Combo, 5; H.G. Breland Band, 8; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11 BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 7:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Osborne, Fohl & Sansone, 8 CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Bart Ramsey, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin, 8 CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 D.B.A. — Treme Brass Band, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8 THE MAISON — Magnitude, 6; Gregory Agid Quartet, 9 MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Smoking Time Jazz Club, 6; Mojo Combo, 9:30 OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Boogie Men, 8:30 SIBERIA — Thomas Johnson, Micah Mckee, Sarah Quintana, Denton Hatcher, Andrew Duhon, Dave Jordan & Carson Thielen, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Stanton Moore, 8 & 10

BIG AL’S DECKBAR SEAFOOD & BLUES — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 8 BLUE NILE — Upp, 8; Gravity A, 11 BMC — Bryce Eastwood, 5; Blues4sale, 8; Deja Vu Brass Band, midnight BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 7:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Rosita Kess & Richard Julian, 8 CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — George Keys, 6:30

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Jim Hession, noon OLD POINT BAR — Kim Cantwell, 6:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Dee-1, Rantz Davis, 11 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Vince Vance, 8:30 SIBERIA — Bills, Vignettes, William Stull One Man Band, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SOUTHPORT HALL — Models, Sexdog, The Ditty, Broken Heart Pharaohs, 6

ST. ROCH TAVERN — JD Hill & the Jammers, 7:30

COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8 CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

THREE MUSES — Monty Banks, 4:30; Jayna Morgan, 7

D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

VASO — Rebirth Brass Band, 9

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Anxious Sound’s Holiday Ho-Down feat. James Singleton, Helen Gillet, Shane Theriot’s Dirty Power Trio, Rob Cambre and others, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Mia Borders, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Kipori Woods, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8 THE MAISON — Pepper Jelly Jazz Band, 6; Upstarts, 9; Mario Abney Quartet (upstairs), 10

907 South peterS St • 18+ • 9pm

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles Holiday Show, noon

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30

JANUARY 11

VICTORY — Sombras Brilhantes, 7:30 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

KYLE TURLEY BAND

Fri January 13

Thursday 29

advance tickets @ticketweb.com or 1-866-468-7630 907 South peterS St • 18+ • 9pm

12 BAR — 3rd Measure with Marc Belloni interview and performance feat. Tony Italiano, Ron Hotstream, Joel Escimila & Randy Jackson, 7; Randy Jackson, 10

Attiki

BABYLON LOUNGE — Swinging Jewels feat. Charlie Cuccia, Thomas McDonald & Joey Cat, 9

bar & grill experience the mediterranean

BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & Friends, 10

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6

BMC — Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 5; Chapter: SOUL, 8; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues (patio), 8; Eric Gordon & the Lazy Boys, 11

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Flow Tribe, 10

BOMBAY CLUB — Matt Lemmler Duo, 7:30

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Blues Frenzy, 6; Chris Polacek & the Hubcap Kings, 9:30

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Tom McDermott & Aurora Nealand, 8 PAGE 43

BELLY DANCER

Every Fri & Sat Night

The Gambit’s

– Top 50 Bars – 2008, 2009, 2010 & 2011 mimisinthemarigny.net

BAR:

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Micah Mckee’s Songwriters’ Showcase, 9; Major Bacon, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Among Giants, 9

HOURS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

504-587-3756 www.attikineworleans.com

41

menu

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W R O FO ! N N ER PE N O DIN

SPECIALTY PIZZA PROSCIUTTO/ARUGULA Arugula, olive oil, mozzarella, thin sliced prosciutto

Gambit > menu guide > december 2011

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER and WEEKEND BRUNCH

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PROSCIUTTO & ASPARAGUS SALAD

FRESH CRAB & BRIE OMELET

A Fluffy Three-Egg Omelet folded over Lump Crabmeat, St. Andre Tripe-Crème Brie & Fresh Asparagus, Topped with a Velvety Lobster - Cognac Crème & Grilled Asparagus Spears

HAM & BRIE EGGS BENEDICT

Two English Muffin Halves topped with our Chisesi-Dr. Pepper Shaved Ham, Melted Brie, Basted Eggs & Green Onion Hollandaise. Served with Grilled Asparagus & Roasted Tomatoes

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3100 MAGAZINE ST. • 504-373-6579 • WWW.GOTTGOURMETCAFE.COM

served w/ french fries & salad. eggplant medallions stacked w/ fried shrimp and topped w/ crawfish sauce.

· Shrimp Magazine large butterfly shrimp lightly floured & pan fried, then sauteed in olive oil, garlic, artichoke hearts, ham & green onions served over pasta.

DAILY SPECIALS FOR LUNCH OR DINNER

· Trout Tchoupitoulas seasonal fish lightly floured &pan fried, topped w/shrimp & crabmeat, served with mixed vegetables & new potatoes. · Fried Soft Shell Crab served with mixed vegetables & new potatoes.

· Grilled Salmon served with mixed vegetables & new potatoes.

PO-BOY · SALADS · PASTAS · GUMBO

RED BEANS & RICE EVERYDAY

GAMBIT > MENU GUIDE > DECEMBER 2011

WARM UP WITH NEW DAILY SOUP SPECIALS.

891-0997 Y

SOUP DAYS ARE HER E!

3001 MAGAZINE ST.

3

SPECIAL

New Year’s Eve

2106 Chartres St. (corner of Frenchmen / Chartres)

Mélange is a 1920's themed restaurant and bar. Classic New Orleans French creole cuisine is served nightly by Executive Chef Brady Broussard. Chef Broussard formerly served as executive chef at Camelot Club and chef at Broussard's. The Mélange Speakeasy Bar features 20 craft beers, a wide selection of wines and classic, old-school cocktails prepared by a skilled team of mixologists. $7.50 rooms Spinach and Mush ke iita Sh s, ion Baby Spinach, Red On ans, and Craisins 5.50 Mushrooms, Spiced Pec $1 essing ie Dr c Fo mi n lsa me Ba ch y en Fr in a Cream Liver, Herbed $6.25 Seared Grade A Duck Chutney, Sherry to Classic Caesar Crostini, Green Toma d maine Tosse Chopped Hearts of Ro Gastrique , Grated House Caesar Dressing ade r .00 $7 Ou h wit rs me de Ho Sli e, et ees BBQ Brisk Parmesan Reggiano Ch Q Brisket with Fried s Tender Raspberry BB ts cui French Bread Crouton Bis ar edd ary Ch $8.75 Onion Straws on Rosem $8.00 Grand Isle Okra r esa Ca in d sse Abita Beer Battered To Hearts of Romaine Tri-Pepper Ragout Roma Tomatoes On A Creole Tomato Dressing, Avocado and .75 mp Crab Sweet $9 Lu bo Jum h las wit dil esa Topped Smoked Duck Qu Corn Salsa with Goat and House Smoked Duck mato Mango Provolone Cheeses, To Chutney $25/$31 $10.50 Faubourg Filet Scallop Beef gus Pan Seared Diver An 8oz or 4oz o Vegetable Hash, Hand Carved Petite Market ke, On Spicy Sweet Potat Ca rn Co o tat Po , Tenderloin aze, Fried Sweet percorn Sauce Mandarin Orange Gl Vegetable, Brandy Pep rls Cu o tat Po $19.50 $11.50 Pork Orleans rk Po Ahi Tuna Tartar nch Ra n ma , Ni ame Shoyu Dressing 14oz Grilled Bone-In d Red Cabbage, Sushi Grade Tuna, Ses ise Bra ls, nti Le d Re ips , o Ch Chop Mango Puree, Fried Tar Demi Glace Shiitake Mushroom $12.75 ni $21.00 Seafood Marti Lapin au Vin p, Grilled Diver ne, Wi e Pepper Crusted Shrim hit W h wit li it Crab in Chipotle Aio Braised Leg of Rabb Scallop, Jumbo Lump ta, Potato Melange cet Pan ts, allo Sh ed Roast on Israeli Cous Cous $22.50 $9.50 Duck Duet lar ho , Sc age se bb ee Ch d Napa Ca Duck Confit on Braise yenne Lavender d and Local Cheeses, Ca Selection of Importe , ast Roasted Duck Bre ron Pecans y Fried Shallots Seasonal Fruit, Berge Balsamic Hoisin, Crisp $19.00 Mahi Mahi d ise 1 d On Bra le Gumbo $5.50/$1 Grilled Mahi Nestle Crab Duck and Andouil ed with Jumbo Lump ish ple Fin , Ma nel ux, Fen Ro y gan ho Ma rk Da al ion dit Tra Herbsaint Cream Louisiana Andouille $25.00 Leaf Farms Duck and s Tuna Tchoupitoula Sausage d ille Gr na, Tu i $5/$10 Black Pepper Crusted Ah Lemon sa, Sal ple Soup du Jour eap Pin p, Gulf Shrim A Daily Creation Beurre Blanc Drizzle .50 $6 $18.75 lad Sa e us Me’lange Ho Shrimp & Grits Red Onions, s, Crisp toe its, ma Gr To ar s, edd een Ch Gr d Fresh Gulf Shrimp, Smoke ad Croutons, Crushed ms, Grilled Green oo shr Mu ini im Cr Homeade French Bre , Bacon bita Butter Sauce Vinaigrette, Grated Onions and Red Chili-A Garlic Black Pepper Romano Cheese

Small Plates

Gambit > menu guide > december 2011

Entrees

4

Soups and Salads

$85

• 4 course dinner • bottomless champagne

1

6pm - am • 504 - 309 - 7335

MELANGE

speak5 easy bar pm - until

20 Craft Beers • Magic Hat #9

• Fancy Lawnmower

• Stone Smoked Porter • Nola Hopitoulas • Saison Dupont

• Buckle, Bury the Hatchet • Blonde Bombshell

• Samuel Smith Organic

Old Timey Cocktails • Hammer Crusta

• Blood & Sand

• The Capsize

• Old Fashioned

• Platinum Fizz • SS Triangle

• Hanky Panky • Side Car

Extensive Wine List 12 by the glass

Restaurant Open Nightly 5pm-11pm Brunch Saturday/ Sunday from 10am to 2pm

504-309-7335 • 504-239-0204 www.melangenola.com

n o w s e rv i n g d i n n e r o n

MonDay night • S TA R T E R S • STEAMED MUSSELS WHITE WINE, SHALLOTS, CHORIZO, CHARRED CHILIES, GARLIC, PARMESAN POMMES FRITES 9

GUMBO

• ENTRÉES • D I V E R S C A L LO P S PAN SEARED DIVER SCALLOPS, SOUR CREAM WHIPPED POTATOES, ROASTED FENNEL, OYSTER MUSHROOMS, ORANGE EMULSION 25

DOUBLE CUT PORK CHOP

DUCK CONFIT, ROASTED TURKEY, SPICY ANDOUILLE, HORSERADISH POTATO SALAD 9

C AU L I F LOW E R R I S OTTO CAULIFLOWER AND PARMESAN RISOTTO, CRISPY FLORETS, CAPERS, EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL 8

BUTTER LETTUCE SALAD BIBB LETTUCE, CANDIED PECANS, RICOTTA SALATA, DIJON VINAIGRETTE, FRESHHERBS 7

CHARGRILLED PORK CHOP, JACK DANIELS AND ROASTED CORN COUSH COUSH, ROASTED PEPPER JUS, CRISPY ONIONS 23

DUCK BREAST ROASTED FINGERLINGS, TURNIPS, PISTACHIOS, CORIANDER & BRANDY CHERRIES 24

CRISPY SALMON

PANKO BREADCRUMBS, DIJON, HERBS, ROASTED VEGETABLE COUSCOUS, LEMON BUTTER 20

127 NORTH CARROLLTON AVE. • NEW ORLEANS • 504-483-1571

Lunch: T uESdAy -F RidAy 11:30-2 • Dinner: M ON -T HuRS 5:30-10, F Ri -S AT 5:30-10:30 view full menu at www.rue127.com

STARTERS & TACOS

ENTREES

Smoked Pork Cakes (3) $8.95 Modeled after the New Orleans-style crab cake, seasoned pulled pork, lightly breaded and topped with chili sour cream & homemade salsa.

St. Louis Ribs; Four Bones $14.95 Half Rack $18.95 / Full Rack $27.95 Our thick cut ribs are dry rubbed, hickory smoked for 8 1/2 hrs & served glazed in our signature bbq sauce. Served w/ 2 sides. (Half Rack serves 1-2 / Full serves 2-3)

Black-Eyed Pea Egg Rolls $5.95 Crispy egg rolls stuffed with black-eyed peas, bacon & andouille sausage. Served with a spicy ranch dipping sauce. Gumbo sm $5.95; lg $9.95 New Orleans classic style, made with duck, chicken, & andouille.

Hickory Smoked Meats; 1 Meat $11.95 / 2 Meat $13.95 Pulled Pork, Brisket, Smoked Chicken or Green Onion Sausage. Served with 2 sides.

New Orleans' Best Bar-B-Q!

Squeal Nachos Full-$12.95; Half-$9.95 A large portion of fresh tortilla chips topped with pulled pork, black beans, jalapeños, and chedder cheese. Served with salsa and sour cream.

FEATURED ON

Havanero-Ginger BBQ Duck $9.95 Super-smoked barbeque duck with habanero-ginger sauce and habanero-ginger slaw.

Pork Grillades Over Grits $11.95 A local favorite, our creamy roasted corn cheese grits topped w/ a generous portion of barbeque pulled pork.

BBQ Pork Tacos $5.95 Pulled pork, topped with our horseradish coleslaw & finished with homemade chipotle sauce.

Black Beans & Rice with Half Jerk Chicken $15.95; Vegetarian Style $8.95 Cuban-style black beans over cilantro rice with a half jerk marinated chicken

SQUEAL is the result of our love for cooking and food in general. We use only the freshest ingredients available, smoke our meats in-house and cook up our delicious Squeal Sauce daily.

THE COOKIN CHANNEL'S "UNIQUE EATS" TLC'S "THE FOOD BUDDHA" 3NET'S "BLOODY GOOD" NEW YORK MAGAZINE'S "BIG CITY BARBECUE - 101 PLACES TO SATISFY YOUR URBAN 'CUE CRAVING" WALL STREET JOURNAL'S "BBQ BLISS BEYOND THE KANSAS CITY LIMITS"

INDOOR & OUTDOOR DINING, FULL BAR FEATURING SPECIALTY COCKTAILS & OVER 30 AMERICAN CRAFT BEERS, 4 BIG SCREEN TVS, PRIVATE ROOM & CATERING AVAILABLE

Open Daily for Lunch & Dinner 8400 OAK ST (504) 302-7370 www.squeal-nola.com

"DBLT" Tacos $8.95 Chipotle-glazed duck with bacon, lettuce & sweet shrub tomatoes and finished with wasabi mayo.

Squeal Pie $11.95 Layers of pulled pork, corn maque choux, andouille mashed potatoes and topped with cheddar cheese.

Fresh Fish and Preparation of the Day - Market PriceSee our Daily Specials and/or ask your server about today’s.

SANDWICHES Served on freshly baked bread, delivered daily Pulled Pork Sandwich $10.95 Pulled pork po'boy topped with our signature barbeque sauce and cole slaw. Served with 2 sides.

Beef Brisket Sandwich $10.95 Green Onion Sausage Sandwich $9.95 Tender beef brisket po’ boy topped with Green onion sausage po’ boy style sandwich our signature barbeque sauce. Served topped with our signature barbeque sauce & cole with 2 sides. slaw. Served with 2 sides.

VIEW FULL MENU AT WWW.SQUEAL-NOLA.COM Please Note: All of our food is made to order. Certain dishes need extra time to prepare. We appreciate your patience.

Gambit > menu guide > december 2011

Marinated Grilled Pork Chop $15.95 10oz. pork chop over candied sweet potatoes, topped with collard greens.

5

Gambit > menu guide > december 2011

6

OPEN NEW YEAR'S EVE AND NEW YEAR'S DAY Join Us New Year's Eve Special 5 Course Dinner $40 per person â&#x20AC;˘ Optional Wine Pairing for an additional $20 + tax & gratuity AMUSE: Sweet Potato Croquette with Fuji Apple Puree and Cider Gastrique FIRST: Tuna Tartar with Sweet Soy Glaze, Wasabi Caviar & Wonton Crisps SECOND: Baked Diver Scallop Wellington with Shitake MushroomAsparagas Relish, Parsnip Puree and Grilled Green Onion Oil THIRD: Choice of Seared Beef Tenderloin with Spice Cured Foie Gras,

Bacon Wrapped Gulf Shrimp, Green Peppercorn Reduction & Shaved Black Truffles OR Pan Bronzed Striped Bass with Blue Crab Gratin, Tempranillo Butter Sauce and Crispy Truffled Leeks FINAL: White Chocolate-Orange Truffles with Toasted Cashews, Raspberry Chutney & Godiva Syrup

3226 magazine st 371.5809 www.salurestaurant.com

THE ONLY GOLDEN DRAGON IN NEW ORLEANS

WE DO TAKE OUT, DELIVERY, CATERING AND ACCEPT PRIVATE PARTIES SERVING HEALTHY, LOW CALORIE, NO MSG & MICROBIOTIC COOKING

We have

Juicy Butts & FULL Racks ...and our Briskets are really nice too!

• Dry Rub Ribs • Juicy n' Tender Pulled Pork • Slooow Smoked Brisket • Nachos & Quesadillas

GAMBIT 2011 TOP 3 CHINESE RESTAURANTS CHINESE NEW YEAR MENU IN JANUARY

3244 Severn Ave

2012 CHINA TRIP NOW ACCEPTING DEPOSITS

The NEW Face of BBQ in New Orleans

@17th St, Metairie (504) 322-2544

3009 Magazine St. Uptown • 891.8280 WWW.JUNGSGOLDENDRAGON2.COM

• Baked Macaroni • Spicy Cole Slaw • Homemade Potato Salad

Cold Draft Fishbowls &Bottled Beer HAPPY HOUR

Monday-Thursday 11-8 Friday-Saturday 11-9

SUN - THURS 11 AM - 10 PM • FRI & SAT - 11 AM - 11 PM

• Smoked Beans

Monday- Friday 3pm-7pm

www.saucysbbqgrill.com enT

ev exT

n our er Y

39 3De6li4verY 7 3 04 For T S CA

leT u

More than just great food...

5All uS C

B r e A k FA ST, l u n C H , D i n n e r & l AT e - n i g H T

Gambit > menu guide > december 2011

StarterS

8

6

book your DINNERor COCKTAIL private event now dining areas corporate parties rehearsal dinners business meetings

Call Our Special Events Planner Gift Certificates Available

mon-fri 9am-5pm 504.581.1103 or 504.525.4790

tommysneworleans.com

Sacred Fingers Hand cut marinated chicken breast strips served with our homemade honey mustard Piggy Strips Lighting battered pork loin fried and served with our sausage gravy The Works “The Bourbon Street Hangover Cure” House cut fries smothered in cheddar & Swiss cheese topped w/ our homemade chili. Served w/ sour cream & green onions Alligator Corn Dog an original take on the corn dog served over a bed of fries and our secret sauce

SaladS THe ToWer Layered vine-ripe tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, basil, garlic oil, & balsamic vinaigrette WArm SPinACH Spinach tosses in our warm bacon vinaigrette, served with grapes, cranraisins, candied pecans, julienne apples, & bleu cheese crumbles

SandwicheS YArD BirD Grilled marinated chicken breast, pepper jack cheese, apple-wood bacon, lettuce, tomato and honey mustard SomeTHin elSe CHeeSeBurger Our juicy burger with a mound of cheddar cheese, smoked bacon, & carmelized onions HeArT SToPPer Two 8 oz patties with chicken fried bacon, choice of cheese, and fried truffle egg THe SHrimP Burger Shrimp patty, pepperjack cheese, avocado, bacon, Somethin Else Secret Sauce CoCHon De lAiT Slow roasted pulled pork served with our coleslaw and honey mustard

homemade SideS mac-n-cheese / Coleslaw / Hand cut French fries / Truffle fries / Potato salad/Fruit Bowl

Sunday - wedneSday 7am-10pm | thurSday - Saturday 7am-late

6 2 0 C o n T i S T. •

neW orleAnS, lA 70130

Welcome Sugar Bowl and BCS Championship Fans!

Feel like a BITE?

Now Serving

Tuna Tataki & Escolar Carpaccio • DINE IN • CA RR Y

A U T H E N T I C J A PA N E S E C U I S I N E W W W. M I K I M O T O S U S H I . CO M S un

330 1 S. C 11:0 18801pm a 8 r 0am 8 r 4 o l • l t o n -10:3 -11:0 0pm :00pm

2011 New Orleans Top Food award by ZAGAT

OU T

Special Hours SUSHI BAR

O

N PE

AYS 7D

We will be open 11:30-3:30pm Tuesday, January 3rd and Monday, January 9th

-Th u

· Fri 11:00a m-11:00pm · Sat 4

The Locals Favorite

WE DELIVER!

Reservations Recommended

430 RUE DaUphinE • 504.525.4455

THE ALIgNMENT

1 of ! T W O C U L I N A R y S TA R S .

AWARd-WINNINg CHEfS SLAdE RUSHINg ANd ALLISON VINES-RUSHINg PUT A MOdERN SPIN ON SOUTHERN RECIPES.

MID-CITY

MAGAZINE

4024 CANAL ST. • 302-1133

4218 MAGAZINE • 894-8554

817 COMMON ST IN THE RENAISSANCE PERE MARQUETTE HOTEL 504.412.2580 | MILANEWORLEANS.COM

Gambit > menu guide > december 2011

CHECK OUT OUR MENU AT THEOSPIZZA.COM

9

3127 Esplanade Avenue • 504-945-5635 Café Degas Presents New Year’s Eve 2011 ✧ AMUSE✧

Duck foie gras w/ black truffles on toasted brioche Consommé of lobster w/ crispy parsnips and lobster quenelle

LUNCH

Seafood papillote of scallop & shrimp served w/ fried oysters in a satsuma & vanilla beurre blanc

11:30AM - 2:30PM

DINNER

5:30PM - 10:30PM

9 2 3 M E TA I R I E R D . 8 3 6 - 6 8 5 9

✧ SOUPE ✧

Lunch Buffet Daily

CLOSED TUES.

✧ POISSON ✧

✧ VIANDE ✧

Beef tenderloin Wellington w/ mushroom duxelle, bouquetiere of vegetables and a Perigourdine sauce ✧ SALADE ✧

Tango of bibb lettuce w/ a goat cheese purse, red bartlett pear and a Black pepper vinaigrette

RING OUT THE OLD • RING IN THE NEW

Live music by Tony Green Gypsy Jazz Duo

Reservations required

First seating (6:00pm) $71 Second seating (9:00pm) $78 w/ a glass of sparkling at midnight

LA OF ON SA A KINE G D NA

OPEN FOR LUNCH & DINNER NEW YEAR’S EVE & NEW YEAR’S DAY

✧ DESSERT ✧

Croquembouche and petits fours

RING IN THE

NEW YEAR

GAMBIT > MENU GUIDE > DECEMBER 2011

ITALIAN STYLE

10

BOILed CRAWFISH, SHRIMP & Crabs fresh louisiana softshell crabs call about oysters on the half shell & charbroiled 12 entree salads SEAFOOD DINNERS boiled, fried & blackened

JOIN US

NEW YEAR’S EVE 5-10PM NEW YEAR’S DAY NOON-9PM

SUPERB daily specials Roast Beef, Hot Sausage, Hamburger and Seafood Poboys Red and White Beans Daily Prime Angus Beef Filet Dinner Creole & Italian Cuisine

2535 METAIRIE ROAD 832-0955

wed–sun > lunch + dinner • sat > dinner only • • dine in • carry out • • closed mon + tue •

488.7991 ENJOY N.O. SEAFOOD, COLD BEER & WATCH ALL YOUR FAVORITE GAMES

Our hours are: Tuesday-Friday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday 12 noon to 8:30p.m.

134 N. CARROLLTON

Celebrating 55 years in the same location.

After 18 years of delighting diners at Bistro Maison de Ville in the French Quarter, Executive Chef Greg Picolo brings his culinary expertise to Redemption Restaurant in Mid-City. EST 1994

COME HANG OUT WITH OUR AWARD WINNING BARTENDER

Our mixes are always made fresh!

Come experience New Orleans’ time-honored culinary traditions with a contemporary flair at Redemption Restaurant.

Margaritas • Mojitos & Sangria by the glass or pitcher Hand Crafted Cocktails • Fresh Fuit Cellos's and Bellini's

OPEN NEW YEAR'S EVE & NEW YEAR'S DAY LIVE BELLY DANCING ON THURSDAY NIGHTS (Magazine St. location only) 3218 MAGAZINE ST. 894.1233

1501 METAIRIE RD 834.9773

2020 VETERANS BLVD 837.9777

LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER 830.7333

CHEF’S SpECialtiES Sizzling jumbo Shrimp

jumbo SCallop with aSparaguS & baby Corn Stuffed ChineSe eggplant– Chinese eggplant

– plump gulf shrimp sautéed with fresh mushroom, baby corn, and snow peas.

stuffed with grounded shrimp and pork with brown sauce.

CriSpy ginger Shrimp –

ChiCken almond CruSt with lemon SauCe – lemon

sauce over chicken breast with crusted almond slices.

fiSh filet with Chef’S SpeCial SauCe – light

battered Tilapia with fresh vegetables top with chef’s own blend of ginger, garlic and scallion sauce. aSparaguS Sautéed with Shrimp/ChiCken. CriSpy beef with blaCk pepper and onion – crispy

beef in seasoned black pepper and onion.

we er deliv

Salt and pepper fried Calamari (appetizer) CoConut Shrimp with Sweet and Sour honey muStard SauCe (appetizer)

banquetS &

private partieS 3605 South Carrollton ave. Mon-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri & Sat 11am-11pm Sun 11am-10pm reServationS / take-out 482-3935 w w w.f i v eh a ppi n e SS.Com

To pay homage to great New Orleans restaurants of the past, Redemption Restaurant will offer weekly specials featuring recipes from the book “Lost Restaurants of New Orleans.”

HAPPY HOUR 5-7PM

1/2 price drinks & select appetizers [at bar only]

3835 Iberville St. in Mid-City Lunch Tuesday-Friday 11am-3pm Dinner Tuesday-Saturday 5-10pm Sunday Brunch 10am-3pm call for reservations or special events (504) 309-3570 visit www.redemption-nola.com for menu updates

Gambit > menu guide > december 2011

chef’s own sweet ginger sauce over light battered plump gulf shrimps.

11

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

MUSIC

PAGE 41

preview

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29 AT 8PM

IRMA THOMAS & LANCE ELLIS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30 AT 9PM

THE SOUL REBELS & CYRIL NEVILLE’S TRIBE 13 Black Lips with Jean-Eric

DEC

31

Black Lips with Jean-Eric 10 p.m. Saturday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31 AT 9PM

KERMIT RUFFINS & THE BARBECUE SWINGERS

PLUS SPECIAL GUEST BIG SAM’S FUNKY NATION

UPCOMING SHOWS

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 30 AT 9PM THE SOUL REBELS & CYRIL NEVILLE’S TRIBE 13 CARROLLTON STATION — Boondoggles, Refried Confuzion, 9:30 CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — George Keys, 6:30 CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 D.B.A. — World be Freeman, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Rick Trolsen, 9:30

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren

JOY THEATER — Irma Thomas, Lance Ellis, 8

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels, 11

Murphy & Big Soul, 3

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Zoso, 9

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Karikatura, 11 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Mem Shannon, 8

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Peter Novelli, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 10:30

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; James Andrews, 8

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles Holiday Show, noon

SATURDAY, JANUARY 7 AT 9PM GLITZ: THE ART OF FEMALE IMPERSONATION FRIDAY, JANUARY 13 AT 8PM JOINT’S JUMPIN’ PLUS SPECIAL GUEST JODI BORRELLO SATURDAY, JANUARY 14 AT 8PM COWBOY MOUTH THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 AT 8PM LITTLE RIVER BAND FRIDAY, JANUARY 28 AT 8PM PERCY SLEDGE

TICKETS AVAIL ABLE THROUGH AT 1- 800 -745 - 3000 OR AT THE BOX OFFICE. 1200 Canal Street • N ew Orleans, L A 70112 504.528.9569 • w w w.TheJoyTheater.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

It’s either divine intervention or dumb luck that Black Lips’ tour van is passing through New Orleans on New Year’s Eve. There’s evidence on both sides: The Atlanta quartet did write a holy testament of hands-in-the-air gospel rock as the Almighty Defenders (in 2009, with Memphis mental cases King Khan and BBQ Show); they’re also known as much for their hedonistic, heathenistic swamp meets as for the regular setpiece of loosing their one-eyed jacks midsong. (For bouncers and managers, the lack of a merch-table fire and urinary extinguishers should be considered a moral victory.) The peaks on the new Arabia Mountain, Black Lips’ third studio album for Vice Records and sixth overall, excuse most misdemeanors and maybe a few felonies. Produced by Mark Ronson (Amy Winehouse, Duran Duran) and Lockett Pundt (Deerhunter), the LP gleams like a beater with a fresh coat of wax: “Modern Art” surfs, “Mad Dog” skates and back-to-back bangers “Go Out and Get It” and “Raw Meat” twist and shout. Should auld acquaintance be forgot, here’s your eraser. Jean-Eric and KG Accidental open. Tickets $25. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

43

MUSIC

LISTINGS

OAK — Cristina Perez, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Big Al & the Heavyweights, 9

PRESERVATION HALL — New Birth Brass Band feat. Tanio Hingle, 8

TUE COMEDY NIGHT 8:30PM

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Tom Worrell, 5

12/27 WITH JACKIE JENKINS

RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 9PM

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Big Easy Bounce Band feat. Big Freedia, DJ Jubilee, Katey Red, Ricky B & Rusty Lazer, 11

12/28 BECOMING A NEW ORLEANS TRADITION

3RD MEASURE W/

THU

12/29

MARC BELLONI 7PM

A UNIQUE MUSICIAN INTERVIEW & PERFORMANCE

TONY ITALIANO, RON HOTSTREAM, JOEL ESCIMILA AND RANDY JACKSON OF ZEBRA FOLLOWED BY: RANDY JACKSON 10PM FEATURING:

1/1

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

BAYOU

44

BEER GARDEN BEST PLACE TO WATCH A BOWL GAME GET HERE EARLY! GREAT FOOD BUCKET SPECIALS PLENTY OF TVS INDOORS & OUT

504.302.9357

326 N. JEFFERSON DAVIS PKWY

Friday 30 Showcasing Local Music MON 12/26

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 12/27

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 12/28

Flow Tribe

THU The Trio featuring 12/29 Johnny V, George Porter Jr & Special Guests FRI 12/30 SAT 12/31

Chris Thomas King Khris Royal & Dark Matter

12 BAR — Chase McCloud, Heartbreak Therapy, United Seas, 10:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Lynn Drury, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE LOUNGE — Frank Williams Jr. & Friends feat. Bobby Love, 8 BLUE NILE — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7; Soul Project (upstairs), 9; Big Sam’s Funky Nation, 11

BMC — El DeOrazio & Friends, 3; Peter Novelli, 6; Dana Abbot Band, 9; Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 11; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Luther Kent, 9:30 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Shotgun Jazz Band, 8

Trio featuring SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN Russell batiste Trio & Walter 1/1 feat. Russell Batiste & Walter Washington 3/13 “Wolfman” Wolfman Washington

CARROLLTON STATION — Hons, 9:30

New Orleans Best Every Night!

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30

8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

HARRAH’S CASINO (HARRAH’S THEATRE) — Better Than Ezra

THREE MUSES — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Raphael Bas, 7:30

608 FULTON STREET

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Wendell Brunious, 10

SIBERIA — Split Lips, Indian Givers, Hairy Lamb, Fat Stupid Ugly People, Dummy Dumpster, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 10

W/ JOHN FOURCADE & MITCH GIBBS 3-6PM

D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Eric Lindell & Colin Lake Band, 10

GALVEZ RESTAURANT — Campbell Perkins, 6:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — John Ellis Band, 8 & 10

SUN IN THE REDZONE

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Brent & George, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Geno Delafose, 8:30

BROWN IMPROV COMEDY 8:30PM FRI 12/30 CHASE MC CLOUD 10:30PM HEARTBREAK THERAPY & UNITED SEAS

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Deacon John & the Ivories, 9 & 10

COLUMNS HOTEL — Kristina Morales, 5

GREEN ROOM — Night Came Quickly, Dromes, Haploid, 10

HERMES BAR — Panorama Jazz Band, 9:30 & 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — Zydepunks, Debauche, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Dr. John & the Lower 911, John Sansone, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Rebirth Brass Band, New Orleans Suspects, 10 HYATT REGENCY NEW ORLEANS — Anais St. John, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Joe Krown, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5 JOY THEATER — Soul Rebels, Cyril Neville’s Tribe 13, 9

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Dave Reis, 7; Mike Dillon, Johnny Vidocovich & James Singleton, 11 THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; John Doby, 7; Chapter: SOUL, 10; Kings of the Fauborg, midnight

& the People, 9:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Skiipping Rocks, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Bucktown Allstars, 9:30

RUSTY NAIL — Jenn Howard & Crazy McGee, 10 SHAMROCK BAR — Epic, 9

SIBERIA — Big Freedia, Nicky Da B, Chilldren, Rusty Lazer, Boi Toi, Johnny 5ive, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Herlin Riley, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles Holiday Show, noon THREE MUSES — Moonshiners Trio, 4; Debbie Davis, 6:30; Glen David Andrews, 10 TIPITINA’S — Galactic feat. Corey Glover & Corey Henry, Mannie Fresh, 10 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

Saturday 31 BANKS STREET BAR — Egg Yolk Jubilee, 9 BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Rites of Passage, 9 BLUE NILE — Kristina Morales, 7; Zena Moses (upstairs), 9; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 10 BMC — Sweet Jones (patio), 3; Andre Bouvier, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Jazz Band, 6; Blues4sale, 9; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, midnight BOMBAY CLUB — Matt Lemmler Band, 9 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 8 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jon Cleary’s Philthy Phew, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Chris Thomas King, 10

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Bryce Eastwood, 4; Jayna Morgan, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

MELVIN’S — Blue Max, Billy Outlaw, 9

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Richard Bienvenu & Christopher Gretchen, 8 OAK — Andrew Duhon, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Rick Trolsen, 5; Thomas Johnson

COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari, 9:30

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Dirty Dozen Brass Band, 11 DRAGON’S DEN — Silver Apples, Os Ovni, Xander Harris, DJ Suzy Q, 9

The

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

GREEN ROOM

MUSIC

Music Club

HI-HO LOUNGE — Big History, Big Rock Candy Mountain, Spooky Folk, 10

ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — Luke Winslow-King, 11 a.m.

HOUSE OF BLUES — Dr. John & the Lower 911, BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Scorseses, Luke Starkiller, xDefinition, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Rebirth Brass Band, Papa Grows Funk, 10 HYATT REGENCY NEW ORLEANS — Anais St. John, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — New Year’s Extravaganza, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Irvin Mayfield & the Jazz Playhouse Revue and others, 7:30 JOY THEATER — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, Big Sam’s Funky Nation, 9 THE MAISON — Ramblin’ Letters, 5; Magnitude, 7; Brass-A-Holics, 10; Dj Jubilee (upstairs), 10; Revivalists, 12 a.m.; Lagniappe Brass Band, 2 a.m.

BMC — Soula Billy Swamp Boogie Band, 3; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 6; Chapter: SOUL, 9 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Ted Hefko Band, 8

CAFE RANI — Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m. CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m.

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Tin Men, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Rick Trolsen, 9:30

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Glen David Andrews, 7 THE MAISON — Ashton Hines & the Big Easy Brawlers, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Mumbles, 1; Kristina Morales, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7:30; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 11:30

PRESERVATION HALL — New Life Jazz Band feat. Lucien Barbarin, 8

OAK — Billy Iuso, 9 OLD POINT BAR — Dana Abbott, 9:30 OLD U.S. MINT — Tony Green & Gypsy Jazz, 2 ONE EYED JACKS — Black Lips, Jean-Eric, KG Accidental, 9 PRESERVATION HALL — A Creole Christmas feat. Lars Edegran’s St. Peter Street All-Stars & Big Al Carson, 2&4 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Lil Red & Big Bad, 10 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Tab Benoit, 9 SIBERIA — DJ Don Bolles, 2 a.m. SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Astral Project, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Shotgun Jazz Band, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 THREE MUSES — Mario Abney, 6:30; Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Craig Paddock, 3:30

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 11:30 a.m. ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Kermit Ruffins, 9

ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Phillip Manuel Holiday Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales & the Bayou Shufflers, 6; Pat Casey, 10; In & Out, 2 a.m.

Monday 2 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 10

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10 BMC — Lil Red & Big Bad, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Word

DEC

COLUMNS HOTEL — David Doucet, 8

D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews, 9

VOTED

Live Music Nightly -No Cover

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30

Zagat Rated

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 GREEN ROOM — Todd Lemoine, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8

THE MAISON — Royal Roses, 6:30; New Orleans Super Jam, 9:30 MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10

MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT — Courtyard Kings, 7

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Meghan Stewart & the Reboppers, 6; Eric Gordon & the Lazy Boys, 9:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Jay P. Dufour, 9; Mark Fernandez, 10

Free Champagne at Midnight

FRI

06 Dash Rip Rock

SAT

First Fracture

07

+ Nod

Jayroc

FRI

13

HONKY TONK TUESDAYS w/JASON BISHOP! 9PM

+ Trevelyan + DJ Scrim

WED 12/28 BETH PATTERSON THUR 12/29 MICHAEL BROWN FRI 12/30 DAMIEN LOUVIERE FOOT & FRIENDS

9PM 9PM 5PM 9PM

Happy New Year!! SAT 12/31 RITES OF PASSAGE LYNN DRURY BAND

4PM 9PM

SAT

Battle of the Bands

14

W E E K LY S C H E D U L E

MON todd lemoine

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service industry free red beans night

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THU

open mic

ladies night with dj trix

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SUN 1/1

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OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Players feat. Maynard Chatters, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Team Robot, The Flamez, Chad, Marty Mard, Ghazi Gamali, Sk David, 9

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7 SIBERIA — DJ Q, NOLA Fam, Solid Fuzz, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; Kristina Morales & the Bayou Shufflers, 10

THREE MUSES — Kristin Diable’s Songwriters Series, 7; Jayna Morgan, 7 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Kirk Branch, 6

classical/ concerts TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 5220276; www.trinitynola. com — Organ & Labyrinth Organ Recital feat. Albinas Prizgintas, Tuesdays, 6; Jo “Cool” Davis & James “Sugar Boy” Crawford, Sun., 5

neW Year’S

eVe pa r t Y 12/31 • 8pm-all night long

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S H a M R O C K Pa R T Y. C O M

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom Mcdermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Ricardo Crespo, 3:30; Roberto Tammeta y su Grupo, 7

31

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Steve Monroe, 6:30

JAN

Sunday 1

New Year’s Eve-ish Cathercist

SAT

JAN

HERMES BAR — Mia Borders, 9:30 & 11

Connections showcase & open mic, 8

JAN

GREEN ROOM — Cathercist, -ish, 10

TIPITINA’S — Galactic feat. Anders Osborne, Corey Glover & Corey Henry, Eric Lindell Trio, 10

JAN

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

45

FILM

oNE of t�E bESt

FilMS oF THE YEAR

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

spotlight

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING ADVENTURES OF TINTIN (PG) — Steven Spielberg’s adapta-

tion of the classic comic book series is a vivid animated adventure. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED (G) — The trio

‘‘ LISBETH IS A MARVELOUS

POP-CULTURE CHARACTEr, STRANGER AND MORE COMPLEX THAN THE AVERAGE SUPERHERO

aNd MORE INTRIGUING THAN THE USUAL BOY WIZARDS AND VAMPIRE BRIDES.

SHE IS AN OUTLAW FEMINIST FANTASY-HEROINE.’’ λ . o .

s c o  

finds itself marooned in a tropical paradise. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

ARTHUR CHRISTMAS (PG) —

The 3-D computer animated film follows Santa Claus’ son Arthur, who must deliver an important present before Christmas morning. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

46

THE DESCENDANTS (R) — In Alexander Payne’s (Sideways) movie, a recently widowed father (George Clooney) tries to reconnect with his daughters while in Hawaii. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R) — David Fincher

A DAVID FINCHER FILM

(The Social Network) directs the English-language adaptation of the wildly successful film and book series about a troubled computer hacker. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 HAPPY FEET 2 (PG) — The dancing CGI penguins are back for a sequel. AMC Palace 20, Entergy IMAX, Hollywood 9 HUGO (PG) — Martin

COLUMBIA PICTURES AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES PRESENT A SCOTT RUDIN/YELLOW BIRD PRODUCTION DANIEL CRAIG ROONEY MARA “THEMUSICGIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO” CHRISEXECUTIVE TOPHER PLUMMER STELLAN SKARSGÅRD STEVEN BERKOFF ROBIN WRIBASED GHT ONYORITHECK VAN WAGENINGENORIGINALLY JOELY RICHARDSON BOOK BY STIEG LARSSON PUBLISHED BY NORSTEDTS BY TRENT REZNOR & ATTICUS ROSS PRODUCERS STEVEN ZAILLIAN MIKAEL WALLEN ANNI FAURBYE FERNANDEZ SCREENPLAY PRODUCED BY STEVEN ZAILLIAN BY SCOTT RUDIN OLE SØNDBERG SØREN STÆRMOSE CEÁN CHAFFIN DIRECTED BY DAVID FINCHER CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Scorsese’s family-friendly film is a fantasy/adventure about an orphan who lives inside the walls of a magical train station in 1930s Paris. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — The film tells the story

of Hurricane Katrina and the impact that Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands has on hurricane protection. Entergy IMAX

J. EDGAR (PG) — Clint Eastwood directs Leonardo

Young Adult (R) (C) 2011 PARAMOUNT PICTURES

Teen lit author Mavis Gary (Charlize Theron) returns to high school to try to rekindle a relationship with a former boyfriend and gets caught up with another old classmate instead.

DiCaprio in a candid look at the life of the FBI director, who harbored many of his own secrets. AMC Palace 20

AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: GHOST PROTOCOL (PG-13) — Tom

SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS (PG-13) — Robert

Cruise returns — and stars alongside Jeremy Renner — in the latest installment of the thriller series, in which the IMF is implicated in the bombing of the Kremlin. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE MUPPETS (PG) — Some fans (Amy Adams and Jason Segel) team up with the Muppets to save their old theater from a greedy oil tycoon (Chris Cooper). AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14 MY WEEK WITH MARILYN (R) — A portrait of Marilyn

Monroe (Michelle Williams) at the peak of her fame is framed through the account of a 23-year-old’s weeklong romance with the star. AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies

NEW YEAR’S EVE (PG-13) — The romantic comedy’s star-studded cast includes Michelle Pfeiffer, Sarah Jessica Parker, Hilary Swank, Ashton Kutcher, Lea Michele and many others.

Downey Jr. reprises the title role in the sequel, where the detective must try and stop a cunning criminal mastermind. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE SITTER (R) — Jonah Hill is a reluctant babysitter who doesn’t know what he’s getting into when he takes on three challenging charges. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 1 (PG13) — The mythical creature

romance series nears its end with the first part of the conclusion. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX WAR HORSE (PG-13) — Steven

Spielberg adapts the Tony

FILM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Join us for the

spotlight

COLLEGE

BOWL GAMES

& TITLE GAME THE NATIONAL

LARGE SCREEN TVS

drink specials

SPECIAL GAME-DAY MENU Dinner & Entertainment Nightly

Fri., Dec. 30. • Luther Kent 9:30pm Sat., Dec. 31 • New Year’s Eve Party w/late night cocktails 830 Conti St. (in the Prince Conti Hotel) 504.586.0972 • 800.699.7711

www.thebombayclub.com

Hugo (PG) (C) 2011 PARAMOUNT PICTURES

Award-winning stage play that follows a boy looking for his horse during World War I. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place WE BOUGHT A ZOO (PG) —

Cameron Crowe directs Matt Damon and Scarlett Johansson in the true story of a family that purchases and moves into a dilapidated zoo and works to get it reopened. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 YOUNG ADULT (R) — Diablo Cody and Jason Reitman — the duo behind Juno — return for the comedy starring Charlize Theron as a divorced fiction writer who hopes to rekindle a romance with a married ex. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies

every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS (PG) — Jim Carrey

is the grouchy title character in Ron Howard’s big-screen adaptation of the Dr. Seuss story. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com MARY POPPINS (NR)— Julie

Andrews plays a magical nanny who comes to work for a banker’s unhappy family. Tickets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and Jan. 4, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

(Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (R) — Tim Curry stars in

the rock movie-musical that lends itself to audience participation. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

Martin Scorsese directs a family-friendly 3-D adventure based on Brian Selznick’s The Invention of Hugo Cabret, about an orphaned boy who lives in a Paris train station in the 1930s. He tends the building’s clock and tinkers with a machine left to him by his father, which he seeks to animate with the help of friends he meets.

Scan for movie times.

47

FEATURE

ART

New Installations LOOKING BACK ON A BANNER YEAR BY D. ERIC BOOKHARDT

I

third floor to rekindle some of the rugged allure of the warehouse it was prior to its late 1980s renovation. Like New York’s PS1, which it resembles right down to its 1976 origins, the CAC is one of America’s oldest institutions devoted to contemporary art, and Mackie believes the city’s bountiful crop of emerging artists provides an opportunity to explore “new work from a new creative class.” The Ogden Museum of Southern Art, which opened in its current form in 2003,

Prospect.1 biennial that opened in 2008. Prospect.1 got great reviews but ran up a $1 million deficit, and plans for Prospect.2, originally slated for 2010, were put on hold after several financial backers withdrew. The Prospect.2 that premiered in October was a much more modest affair, but even this was more than many thought possible for a new biennial with no city or state sponsorship in a time of global recession. Then on P.2’s opening night festivities, Cameron stunned those present

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SUN: Happy Hour ALL DAY

HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

N N E J Howard & weathered recent financial turbulence. Last month the Ogden named current University of Mississippi Museum director William Pittman Andrews to take over in January 2012. In his two-year tenure at Ole Miss, Andrews oversaw a 35 percent increase in attendance, a feat the Ogden hopes he can replicate here. The situation was less hopeful at Louisiana ArtWorks, which was shuttered last January when the board realized there wasn’t enough money to cover the cost of insuring the deluxe $25 million structure with its maze of artists studios and state-of-the-art facilities. While its problems partly can be blamed on an inadequate business plan, catastrophic flooding followed by a severe global recession obviously hurt. After closing up shop, the ArtWorks board dissolved itself, and while the Louisiana Artists Guild still officially owns the building, its future now rests with City Hall. When it comes to making news, there are probably no local arts institutions that can match the wild ups and downs of Prospect New Orleans, the organization founded by former New Museum curator Dan Cameron in 2007 to launch the

Crazy MCgEE

In 2011, Swoon installed work at the New Orleans Museum of Art and spaces in Bywater. by announcing he was stepping down as artistic director to accept a new post as chief curator at the Orange County Museum of Art in Los Angeles, and that the artistic director for the Prospect.3 expo in 2013 will be Franklin Sirmans, a curator at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Cameron remains on the board, and his influence is expected to continue even as local observers try to make sense of the bizarre sequence of events. No stranger to controversy, Cameron has his critics, but few would deny that the Prospect biennials galvanized the visual arts community while putting New Orleans on the global art map for the first time since the 19th century. As independent curator John Otte remarked recently, “So much of what we see around us here in the St. Claude arts district never would have come as far as it has if the Prospect biennials hadn’t motivated artists to go the extra mile.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

t’s been a hell of a year. That can be taken in a number of ways, but what stands out is that more changes have occurred in this city’s art scene over the past 12 months than typically would take place over many years in more normal times. While local galleries maintained their predictably stable status, 2011 was a mixed bag for arts institutions as directors and curators came and went. Champagne corks popped at some as others bled red ink. In this the city was hardly unique — arts institutions all over the world are still reeling from the global financial meltdown — and while some crises lead to unexpected opportunities, not everyone saw a silver lining. The New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) appears to be thriving on new energy and interest as it celebrates its 100th anniversary with an eclectic expo of new acquisitions ranging from bluechip golden oldies to iconic contemporary works by art stars like Matthew Barney and Anish Kapoor. Popular programs including performances by musicians such as Quintron and Irvin Mayfield also abounded in the first year under the directorship of Susan Taylor. A former Princeton University Art Museum director, Taylor has overseen incremental yet pervasive changes across the board, right down to the bold redesign of NOMA’s website. A new emphasis on recent art has been under way since Miranda Lash was appointed contemporary art curator in 2008, and this too seems to mesh with Taylor’s flair for, as she puts it, “engaging more completely in the cultural life of the city.” That was evident when New York-based street artist Swoon’s 20-foottall cut-paper sculpture Thalassa was suspended over the museum’s Great Hall last summer. Its presence suggested a new relationship with the edgy St. Claude Avenue arts district where Swoon’s work is more often found, and while the vibe may seem new, longtime NOMA watchers say Taylor is doing her version of the base broadening that former director John Bullard undertook so successfully during his 38-year tenure, only now the local avant garde is part of the mix. Although New Orleans has long been considered America’s last bohemia, much of the youthful ferment that now characterizes its art community is a post-Hurricane Katrina phenomenon. Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) visual arts director Amy Mackie, now wrapping up her first year on the job, sees this new energy as reminiscent of the adventuresome spirit of the CAC’s freewheeling early days. She’s now using the building’s rough and rarely open

49

ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

ART EVENTS

RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS

Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL WORLD TOUR by Cirque du Soleil

PROSPECT.2. Dan Cameron’s art biennial features works by 27 local, national and international artists on display in traditional and alternative venues. Visit www.prospectneworleans.org for details. Through Jan. 29.

GALLERIES

UPCOMING EVENTS Harlem Globetrotters ........................................................................................... January 20 @ 7:00 PM Jeff Dunham ........................................................................................................... January 26 @ 7:30 PM Red Hot Chili Peppers........................................................................................... February 4 @ 8:00 PM Michael Jackson THE IMMORTAL WORLD TOUR by Cirque du Soleil ..... February 15-16 SEC Men’s Men Basketball Tournament .................................................................... March 8-11 2011-2012 New Orleans Hornets Schedule announced! Visit www.neworleansarena.com to see the complete home game schedule!

Tickets can be purchased at www.ticketmaster.com, all Ticketmaster Outlets, the New Orleans Arena Box Office, select Wal-Mart locations or charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000.

1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — “Urban Appeal: The Art of Graffiti”; “The Velvet Underground Railroad: A Psychedelic Slave Trade,” mixed media by the Bourghog Guild; both through Jan. 14. 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — “@

Phonography: Dialogue in the Wireless Age,” a group exhibition of phone camera photographs for PhotoNOLA, through Saturday. 811 HOWARD GALLERY. 811 Howard Ave., 524-3872; www. francoalessandrini.net — “ID,

Picture Identification,” portraits by Franco Alessandrini, through Saturday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

9TH STREET STUDIO. 1029 9th St., 899-6686; www.9thstreet-studio.com — “One: A

50

Collaboration Between Paint & Metal,” works by Alexis Walter and Rachael Adamiak, through Friday.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com —

Photogravures by Josephine Sacabo, through Saturday. “Oyeme Con Los Ojos,” photographs by Josephine Sacabo for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 11.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www. angelakinggallery.com — Paint-

ings by Terri Hallman, through Saturday.

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. press-street.com — “There Was

a Forest: Jewish Life in Eastern Europe Today,” photographs by Loli Kantor for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 8.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings

by Myra Williamson Wirtz; jewelry by Erica Walker; photographic collages by Stirling Barrett; all through Friday. ART HOUSE ON THE LEVEE. 4725 Dauphine St., 247-8894 — “Art By Committee,” an interactive exhibit by Robert Tannen for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Vagi-

nas,” mixed-media sculpture by Clifton Webb, through Jan. 4.

BIG BUNNY FINE ART. 332 Exchange Alley, 309-2444; www. lineartgallery.com — “New Orleans Walls,” photographs by Marie-Dominique Verdier for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 3. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422A St. Claude Ave., www. byrdiesgallery.com — “Frozen

Moments,” glass sculpture installation by Josh Cohen, through Jan. 10.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — Christmas group exhibition featuring Christina Goodman, Jere Allen, David Goodman, Mary Hardy, Beverly Dennis, Sandra Bershell and gallery artists, through Saturday. COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — Ab-

stract mixed-media paintings by Randy Asprodites; “The Sugar Mill Sessions,” photography of New Iberia sugar mills by David Armentor; all through Saturday.

COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — Mixed media by

Avish Khebrehzadeh, through Jan. 29. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Babel,”

photographs by Miriam Waterman for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 7.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 5243936 — “The Bull and the

Dream,” figurative stone and wood sculptures by Thomas Glover W. and Marianne Lerbs, through Feb. 3.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Faded/Fated

Fairytales,” photographs by Laura D’Alessandro for PhotoNOLA; “Vestiges,” mixed-media by Don Feis; “Sugarplum,” paintings by Amy Glisan; all through Jan. 7. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “I

vs. I,” works by Alex Podesta; mixed-media photomurals by Morgana King and Jonathan Traviesa; “In Search of the Cajun Prairie,” drawings and paintings by Megan Roniger; “Special Ellipse,” projectable works by Francoise Gamma and Rollin Leonard; all through Jan. 8. GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale.com — Mixed media

on canvas and metal by Mike Klung, through Saturday.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “Moving in

Colors,” sculpture by Key-Sook Geum, through Jan. 26. GALLERY VERIDITAS. 3822 Magazine St., 267-5991; www. gvnola.com — “In the Spirit of Shozo,” a retrospective exhibition of paintings by Shozo Nagano, through Saturday. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com — A group exhibi-

tion featuring Kim Bernadas, Jacques Soulas, Jean Cassels and others, through Jan. 29.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — Photo-based abstractions by Rodolfo Choperena for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 15. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by

David Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www. heriardcimino.com — “Washed (To the Sea and Other Waters),” paintings by Anastasia Pelias, through Saturday. HOMESPACE GALLERY. 1128 St. Roch Ave., (917) 584-9867 — “Tintype,” photographs by Euphus Ruth, Jenny Sampson, S. Gayle Stevens and Bruce Schultz for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 8. ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 361-6620 — “Below Sea Level,”

a panoramic video installation by Pawel Wojtasik for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JACK GALLERY. 900 Royal St., 588-1777 — Paintings, litho-

graphs and other works by Tom Everhart, Gordon Parks, Al Hirschfeld, Stanley Mouse, Anja, Patrick McDonnell and other artists, ongoing.

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www. jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg. com — “Sites and Sights

Scene,” oil paintings by Leslie Dudley, through Saturday. “The Painter on An Extended Voyage,” paintings by Bernard Beneito, through Jan. 29.

JIMMY MAC POP-UP GALLERY. 802 Elysian Fields Ave. — “Mud-

colors,” mixed media on canvas by Jimmy Mac, through Sunday.

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery. com — “P.2 Projects,” a group

exhibition curated in conjunction with Prospect.2, through Jan. 21.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Louisiana’s

Landscape and Grass Roots,” works by Philip Gould, through Saturday.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “Sunflowers,”

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page,

ongoing.

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com —

“Stamina in the Dream House,” oil paintings and sculpture by Elizabeth Fox, through Jan. 28.

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www. michelleywilliams.com — Works

by Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS GLASSWORKS & PRINTMAKING STUDIO. 727 Magazine St., 529-7277; www.

NEW ORLEANS HEALING CENTER. 2372 St. Claude Ave., 9489961; www.neworleanshealingcenter.org — Works by Keith

Duncan for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

NEW ORLEANS PHOTO ALLIANCE. 1111 St. Mary St., 610-4899; www.neworleansphotoalliance. blogspot.com — “Silenced Suf-

fering: The Comfort Women Project,” photographs by Jungeun Lee for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 29.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — Works by Nick Cave and Joyce J. Scott for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. NOUVELLE LUNE. 938 Royal St., 908-1016 — Works using reclaimed, re-purposed or salvaged materials by Linda Berman, Georgette Fortino, David Bergeron, Kelly Guidry and Tress Turner, ongoing. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “For the Love of Flowers,” photographs by Elizabeth Kleinveld for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 14. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PETER O’NEILL STUDIOS. 721 Royal St., 527-0703; www. oneillgallery.com — Works by

Peter O’Neill, ongoing.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER. 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-7032; www.prcno.org — “Penn Station: A Distant

View,” large-scale photographs by Becca Fitzpatrick for Prospect.2, through January.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by gallery members

Maria Fromich, Betsy MeyersGreen, Linda Rosamano, Sharad Mulchand, Jen Chenevert and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719

Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 5660588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries.net — Multimedia works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George

Rodrigue, ongoing.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — Works by Ivan Vezzoli for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown glass

UPTOWN POPUP ART GALLERY. 7835 Maple St. — Photographs by Scott Domanski, Emily Ardoin, Anthony Schoenecker, Annie Peyton and Ishita Sharma, through Friday.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

works, ongoing.

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing. SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by

Will Smith, ongoing.

SCOTT EDWARDS PHOTOGRAPHY GALLERY. 2109 Decatur St., 610-0581 — “Burlesque Ex-

A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by

ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — “A Child’s View

posed,” a group photography exhibition, through Saturday.

Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Home & Away,” photographs by Jack Kotz for PhotoNOLA, through Friday. STAPLE GOODS. 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — “Fresh Produce,” works by Thomasine Bartlett, Aaron Collier, Robyn Denny, William DePauw, Daniel Kelly, Anne Nelson, Laura Richens and Cynthia Scott, through Jan. 8. “Fresh Produce,” works by gallery members in conjunction with Prospect.2 St. Claude Satellites, through Jan. 8. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Maha-

lia: Queen of Gospel Music,” a group exhibition of works inspired by Mahalia Jackson, through Jan. 6.

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

From Gaza,” art by children from Palestine for the New Orleans Middle East Film Festival, through Friday.

CALL FOR ARTISTS A NEW LANDSCAPE. Artists

are sought for the April juried exhibition in Grand Isle. Submissions deadline is Feb. 1. Visit www.gicdt.org for details. NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FOUNDATION ARCHIVE. The

foundation seeks student, amateur and professional photographers to document various aspects of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Applicants must be at least 18 years old. Call 558-6138 or email archive@jazzandheritage.org for details. Application deadline is December 31.

MUSEUMS

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

1850 HOUSE. 523 St. Ann St., 5686968 — Works by Sophie Calle for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YAYA artists, ongoing.

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

T-LOT. 1940 St. Claude Ave., (865) 567-9766; www.t-lot.tumblr. com — “Parallel Play,” a group

exhibition featuring works on paper, architectural installations, sculpture and performance, through January.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org —

“Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org — Permanent

exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian

suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “NOLA Now Part I: Swagger for a Lost Magnificence”; Prospect.2 show featuring Jonas Dahlberg, George Dunbar, Karl Haendel and others; both through Jan. 29. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — “African Wisdom in Image

and Proverb,” photographs by Betty Press for PhotoNOLA; “Becoming Home,” photographs by Mariana Sheppard and Nakeya Brown for PhotoNOLA, through Jan. 21.

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The 18th Star:

Treasures From 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood,” through Jan. 29. “Goddess Fortuna and Her Dunces in an Effort to Make Sense of it All,” outdoor installation by Dawn Dedeaux for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

JEAN LAFITTE NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK AND PRESERVE. French Quarter Visitor Center, 419 Decatur St., 589-2636 — “Out of the

Muck,” masks inspired by local wetlands by members of the Contemporary Arts Center Teen Board, through Jan. 1.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Audu-

bon’s Absence,” ecological artworks by Brandon Ballengee, through January. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “The Louisiana Planta-

tion Photos of Robert Tebbs,” 60 gelatin silver prints by the architecture photographer, through Nov. 30, 2012. “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond”; “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and other items; both ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years.

MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History:

Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing.

MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org —

“Absinthe Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Infamy: December 1941,” oral

histories, artifacts and images focusing on the attack on Pearl Harbor, through Feb. 19.

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com —

Works by Lorraine O’Grady for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “NOMA 100: Gifts for the

Second Century,” an exhibition with works by Anish Kapoor, Keith Sonnier, Matthew Barney, Jasper Johns, Sol LeWitt, Kathe Kollwitz and Gabrielle MUnter, through Jan. 22. Works by Bruce Davenport Jr., Nicole Eisenman and Jennifer Steinkamp for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. “Light to Dark/Dark to Light,” paintings by Wayne Gonzales, through Feb. 26.

NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits about 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Pho-

tographs from the museum’s permanent collection; works by George Valentine Dureau; both through Jan. 3. “Ersy: Architect of Dreams”; “Oyeme Con Los Ojos,” photographs by Josephine Sacabo, through Jan. 8. Works by Ashton Ramsay for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — Works by William Eggleston, An-My Le and Ragnar Kjartansson for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “The

Boudin Trail,” a travelling exhibit from the Southern Foodways Alliance, through Jan. 9. “Acadian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing.

WILLIAMS RESEARCH CENTER. Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — “In Katrina’s Wake:

Restoring a Sense of Place,” photographs by Stephen Wilkes for PhotoNOLA, through March 3. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

hand-painted silk wall hangings by Ray Cole; watercolors by Sean Friloux; “A 30-Year Retrospective of Photography,” photographs by Eliot Kamenitz; “Delta Dogs,” clay sculpture by Larone Hudson; all through Jan. 4.

neworleansglassworks.com — Sandblasted photographs by Drake Fuller; kiln-fired sculpture by Michele McManus; glass jewelry by Jane Block; all through Friday.

ART

51

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

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FEATURE

STAGE

Curtain Call THE YEAR IN THEATER B Y D A LT W O N K

R

tions and concerts. The 2011 Fringe Festival brought an array of exciting alternative theater productions to those venues and many more unconventional performance spaces around town. In the CBD, Elm Theatre offered grim delights like Orange Flower Water. The Mid-City Theatre opened in the fall. Fred Nuccio launched the 80-seat auditorium in a former Doerr Furniture warehouse on Toulouse Street, just off Bayou St. John. It’s already hosted several shows that likely would have played at Le Chat

Bob Edes Jr. starred as painter Mark Rothko in Red at Southern Rep. PHOTO BY RIDE HAMILTON

in previous years, including Santaland Diaries, Theatre 13’s Play Dates and musical variety shows by Ricky Graham and friends. Also of note are productions at the New Orleans Museum of Art in City Park. The NOLA Project just completed a run of Romeo and Juliet in the museum atrium, and it mounted two popular runs of A Midsummer Night’s Dream in the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden. The group also presented Yasmina Reza’s Art in Stern Auditorium. The Contemporary Arts Center hosted an array of intriguing puppet shows, including All Weather Ballads by Vermont’s Sandglass Theater and the satirical found-object puppetry of Paul Zaloom. The imaginative production Darwin the Dinosaur by the local company CORBiAN Visual Arts and Dance was a total delight for both adults and children. Here’s hoping Darwin is a harbinger of the future for both the company and the underused space at CAC.

Then there were the tried-and-true standbys. The New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane deserves a tip of the hat for its production of Julius Caesar set as a modern political thriller. Southern Rep maintained its high standards with challenging fare like the 2010 Tony Awardwinner Red, about abstract painter Mark Rothko, and a hilarious whirl through Alan Ayckbourn’s The Norman Conquests. Yasmina Reza’s God of Carnage explored contemporary civilities. Southern Rep also provided a venue for shows by other companies, like Ricky Graham’s original holiday family musical The Pecan Cracker. A second comic, Norman, entertained audiences at The Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans in Norman, Is That You? The Anthony Bean Community Theater presented The Good Negro, as well as August Wilson’s Jitney, but its most memorable production was Reflections: A Man and His Time, which starred former City Council President Oliver Thomas and was about his career and time in jail. Local audiences were treated to classic musicals including Man of La Mancha and Into the Woods at Tulane Summer Lyric Theatre and touring Broadway shows included Shrek the Musical and Rock of Ages at the Mahalia Jackson Theater. The Jefferson Performing Arts Society experienced repeated delays in construction of its new center on Airline Highway, but shows at the Westwego Performing Arts Theatre included The Drowsy Chaperone and Jim Fitzmorris’ new work From a Long Way Off, which deals with local politics and culture. The city is still an exciting incubator for new works. The 6x6 series is an ongoing monthly showcase of short pieces at Southern Rep. Before Le Chat closed, Carl Walker directed another installment of Native Tongues, this chapter dedicated to food. An easily overlooked auditorium that has offered consistently entertaining shows is the Stage Door Canteen at the National World War II Museum. While it’s disappointing that a couple of the city’s established theaters closed, it’s encouraging to see productions staged just about everywhere else. There’s so much, it’s hard to keep up with it all. Here’s looking forward to a dramatically busy 2012 on local stages.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

ing out the old, ring in the new. In 2011, there was quite a bit of ringing, and some of the ringing out was disappointing. New Orleans lost one venerable institution and part of another. Owner Barbara Motley closed her chic cabaret theater Le Chat Noir, which had provided a unique venue for cabaret shows and had hosted a variety of original drama, comedies and musicals since it opened in 1999. Le Chat went out in grand style, hosting local and national cabaret acts in a final flurry of showcases. Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre found a solution to its financial woes, but 60 percent of its space will become a restaurant run by Dickie Brennan. It’s comforting to know the jewel-like main auditorium will return to activity, but the second stage (not part of the original theater) — which hosted more adventurous pieces and children’s plays — will be no more. How this division will affect the courtyard and lobby remains to be seen. The theater is scheduled to present plays again in 2012, but the distinction of being one of the nation’s oldest continuously operating theaters gets a footnote because the end of the 2010-2011 season was canceled, and the theater was dark in the fall. Those closures aside, theater is flourishing in many venues, including relatively newer ones. Small theaters are cropping up around the Marigny and Bywater. The AllWays Lounge’s theater space is a popular spot for independent productions. Cripple Creek Theatre finished a residency with the original coproduction The Future is a Fancyland Place. The AllWays also hosted Harry Mayronne’s restaurant musical Waiting Around and more exotic literary and theatrical events such as Esoterotica, a series of original erotic readings by local writers. The Shadowbox Theatre recently hosted Four Humours’ outdoor production of Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days. Skin Horse Theater pumped punk-rock energy into its production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch at the Backyard Ballroom. Inside the New Orleans Healing Center, Cafe Istanbul is open. A deconsecrated church on St. Ferdinand Street has served as a venue for the New Orleans Fringe Festival for several years and is now the Marigny Opera House. It is expected to host more theatrical produc-

53

STAGE

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

GET IN ON THE ACT

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Tom and Brandy Whisnant and the staff of

THEATER

Wellington & Co. Fine Jewelry thank you for your support in 2011.

merry chrtistmas & Happy Holidays from Our Family to Yours

BIG BOSOM BUDDIES. MidCity Arts Theater, 3540 Toulouse St., 488-1460; www. midcitytheatre.com — Ricky Graham and Varla Jean Merman perform duets, cabaret favorites and pay tribute to Joan Crawford and Bette Davis in the original comedy revue. Tickets $25 general admission, $40 New Year’s Eve show. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday through Jan. 7. MYSTERIOUS RABBIT PUPPET ARMY. Mudlark Theatre, 1200

Port St. — The group performs two shows, one using shadow puppets to outline the history of the prisonindustrial complex, and then a modern take on Hansel and Gretel. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

RAZORBLADE WALTZ REVUE.

HHH

Early sEating

Dragon’s Den, 435 Esplanade Ave.; www.myspace.com/ dragonsdennola — The troupe presents its “Red XMas” show with burlesque, weapon play, live music by Kitty Lazereyes and the Bills, and more. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

HHH

A special three course menu by Chef John Besh with complimentary wine service and a glass of bubbly, plus Lullaby of Broadway starring The Victory Belles live on stage — the magical music of Rodgers & Hammerstein, Irving Berlin, Lerner & Loewe, and more!

$110 per person [$100 Museum members] Dinner Seating: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:00-5:30pm Showtime: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:30-7:30pm HHH

latE sEating

HHH

The ultimate New Year’s experience! Dine and Dance to the swinging sounds of our 17-piece Victory Big Band and guest vocalists, along with Chef John Besh’s fabulous Celebration menu and an Open Bar throughout the evening. Dancing until 1:00am!

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 944-0099; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX.

$180 per person [$170 Museum members] Dinner Seating: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00-9:30pm Showtime: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:30pm-1:00am

Reservations Required: 504-528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org

54 WW2-14702_NYE_Holiday_Qtrpg_GambitAd_Week3.indd 3

COMEDY

12/20/11 10:24 AM

Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday. GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039

Big Bosom Buddies Varla Jean Merman (pictured) is joined by Ricky Graham in a cabaret show including a tribute to starlets Joan Crawford and Bette Davis. The show runs Thursday, Friday and Saturday through Jan. 7, 2012, at the Mid-City Theatre.

Freret St.; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts the long-form improv comedy show. Tickets $10. 8:30 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT.

Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www. therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. JACKIE JENKINS. 12 Bar,

608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola.com — The stand-up comedian performs. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. MEGAPHONE OPEN MIC.

A Shotgun Near You, 2827 Chippewa St.; www.facebook.com/ashotgunnearyou — The New Movement presents the open mic showcase hosted by Drew Platt and Dane Faucheux. Visit www.tnmcomedy.com for details. Free admission. 9 p.m. Monday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill,

727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday. OPEN MIC STAND-UP. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St.; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts the free open mic. 11 p.m. Friday.

PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets

Sports Bar, 2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday. SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria

Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts 9 p.m. Thursday.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts 9 p.m. Wednesday.

BE THERE DO THAT

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 27 TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 29 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 27 CREOLE CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY HOME TOUR . 1850 House, 523

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. HOLIDAY TEA & TOUR . Longue

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 456-5000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

WWII PUB QUIZ . Stage Door

Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www. stagedoorcanteen.org — The quiz tests knowledge of general trivia as well as WWII questions. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Thursday 29 FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE .

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 30

Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Longue Vue hosts special tours and tea services for the holidays, when the house is decorated with lights and festive greenery. Reservations are required. Call 293-4701 or email ajones@longuevue. com for details. Admission $30 members, $35 nonmembers. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Wednesday 28

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 —

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, N.

Saturday 31 Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8

a.m. to noon. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS SPRING FIESTA ASSOCIATION WINTER HOME TOUR . New Orleans Spring

Fiesta Association, 826 St. Ann St., 581-1367; www.springfiesta.com — Costumed docents lead tours of the historic Spring Fiesta home for the Victorian-themed event. Admission $8. Tours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday- Sunday.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Holy Angels Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www. sankofafarmersmarket.org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock

$ We Buy Any $ GOLD, SILVER, or PLATINUM • Broken or Unwanted Jewelry • Sterling Silverware & Plates

• Gold & Silver Bars • Gold & Silver Coins • Diamonds • Rolex

MOBILE GOLD BUYERS Call

504-858-GOLD

(4653) 1517 St. Charles Mon-Fri 10 to 6 • Sat 11 to 4 www.TheMobileGoldBuyers.com

3613 Magazine Street 504.899.8055

www.glam504.com · info@glam504.com

Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 355-4442 or visit www. visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS SCHOOL LEADERSHIP CENTER FELLOWS PROGRAM. The

group seeks area principals and assistant school leaders for its intensive professional and leadership development program. Visit www.slc-gno. org or email jbrown@slc-gno. org for details. Application deadline is Jan. 31.

Come to Emmett’s for Steaks, Ground Ribeye, and Sausages. Party sandwiches and dip for your party or tailgate available! GEAUX TIGERS! GEAUX BLACK AND GOLD! 5618 JEFFERSON HWY · HARAHAN, LA 70123 Located near Jefferson and Edwards

Monday - Saturday 9am-6pm [504] 733-0901 • w w w.emmettsmeats.com

Isabella’s Gallery Available at both Isabella’s Gallery locations:

3331 Severn in Metairie ~ 504-779-3202 1901 Manhattan on the Westbank ~ 504-304-4861 www.isabellasgallery.com www.facebook.com/isabellasgallery

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. PAGE 55

OPEN FOR ALL BLACK & GOLD GAMES

488-PAL’S

949 N. Rendon

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

St. Ann St., 568-6968 — The Friends of the Cabildo hosts the tour of five historic French Quarter homes. Fr. Jerome LeDoux also signs his book War of the Pews: A Personal Account of St. Augustine Church from noon to 3 p.m. Visit www.friendsofthecabildo.org for details. Admission $20 FOC members, $25 nonmembers. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

Ursulines Ave.

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

EVENTS

St. Phillip

LISTINGS

55

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

geaux tigers !

spotlight

NEW YEAR'S EVE EVENTS BOURBON VIEUX NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY. Bourbon Vieux, 501

WESTIN NEW YEAR’S EVE EXPERIENCE . Westin New Orleans Canal

CRESCENT CITY COUNTDOWN CLUB NEW YEAR’S EVE. The celebration

ZOO YEAR’S EVE . Audubon Zoo, 6500 Magazine St., 581-4629; www.auduboninstitute.org — The family-friendly celebration features a countdown to noon with a soft drink toast, games, contests and a dance party. Free with zoo admission. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday.

Bourbon St., 586-1155; www.bourbonvieux.com — The event space with a balcony overlooking Bourbon Street hosts a party with an open bar, a buffet, a DJ, party favors and more. Admission $155. 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday. includes a midnight fireworks display above the Mississippi River and a concert in front of Jackson Square with Lagniappe Brass Band, MyNameisJohnMichael and Shamarr Allen and the Underdawgs. Visit www.crescentcitycountdown.com for details. 9 p.m. Saturday.

Place, 100 Iberville St., 566-7006; www.starwoodhotels.com — The party includes music by Amanda Shaw and the Cute Guys, DJ Aaron and Uncle Wayne Daigrepont, an open bar, dinner and a midnight Champagne toast. Admission $175. 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday.

HAPPY HOUR

GEAUX ENTERTAINMENT NOLA NEW YEAR’S PARTY. Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — The annual party features music by 17th Floor and DJ Drew Ryan, an open bar, hors d’oeuvres, photo booths, party favors and more. A portion of event proceeds benefits the American Cancer Society. Admission starts at $145. Visit www.geauxentertainment.com/nola-yearseve-2012 for details. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday.

TUES-SAT 3-6PM COME TRY OUR BLACKBERRY JALAPENO SMOKED RIBS

OPEN AT 9AM FOR BRUNCH

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH . Irvin Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta.com — Irvin Mayfield and the Jazz Playhouse Revue, as well as other guests, perform at the party that includes an open bar, hors d’oeuvres, a dinner with wine pairings, and a midnight Champagne toast. Admission $500 (all-inclusive). 7:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Saturday.

on gamedays

KREWE OF KOLOSSOS PARADE & APOCALYPSE BALL . The new krewe

has its inaugural street parade through the Bywater, Marigny and St. Claude arts district that culminates in a fundraiser ball at Siberia (2227 St. Claude Ave.). Call 905-2830 or visit www.kolossos.org for details. Ball admission $25. 8 p.m. parade, 10 p.m. ball. Saturday.

3701 IBERVILLE STREET • NOLA 70119 504.488.6582 • KATIESINMIDCITY.COM

NEW YEAR’S EVE AT THE COUNTRY CLUB. The Country Club, 634

MON.11AM-3PM • TUES-THURS.11AM-9PM FRI-SAT.11AM-10PM • SUN BRUNCH. 9AM-3PM

Louisa St., 945-0742; www.thecountryclubneworleans.com — The Dapper Dandies featuring Caroline Fourmy perform during the restaurant’s four-course dinner service with Champagne. 5 p.m. to midnight. Saturday.

PARTY LIKE IT’S 1945. Stage Door Canteen at The National World

War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org — The museum’s 1940s-themed party features a threecourse menu with complimentary wine service and a performance by the Victory Belles at the early seating (5 p.m.) and the Victory Big Band at the late seating (9 p.m.). Reservations are required. Call 5281943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org for details. Saturday.

PAGE 55 ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 543-3480, anotherlifefoundation@hotmail. com or visit www.anotherlifefoundation.org. AUDUBON AQUARIUM OF THE AMERICAS. The aquarium accepts

applications for the volunteer naturalists, education, husbandry and volunteer diver programs. Visit www.auduboninstitute.org/volunteers/aquarium for details. BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS ANNIVERSARY. Chalmette

Battlefield of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, 8606 W. St. Bernard Hwy., Chalmette, 589-3882; www.nps.gov/jela — Volunteers are needed for the 197th

anniversary of the battle (Jan. 4-7) to set up and take down tents, distribute supplies, direct traffic and assist National Park Service staff. Call 589-3882 ext. 228 for details. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth seeks

volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 309-7304 or (877) 500-7304; www.bbbssela. org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The orga-

nization seeks volunteer courtappointed special advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@ casaneworleans.org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET.

CCFM and marketumbrella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella.org for details. EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION . The

nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER . The

center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation

and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@gnofairhousing.org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email volunteer@handsonneworleans.org or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details. HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS. Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 8328111 for details. PAGE 59

New Years Eve MARIO ABNEY 6:30P.M.- 9:30P.M.

FRENCHMEN ST JUG BAND 10:00P.M.- 2:00A.M.

536 Frenchmen St.

504-298-TRIO

www.thethreemuses.com

4:00-Till for Dinner

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

PALM COURT NEW YEAR’S EVE GALA . Palm Court Jazz Cafe, 1204 Decatur St., 525-0200; www.palmcourtcafe.com — Lionel Ferbos performs with the Palm Court All-Stars and Topsy Chapman during the four-course dinner with Champagne and party favors. $120 includes meal, tax and tip. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday.

Closed Tuesdays Happy Hour: Wed-Fri 4-6:30 57

If you’re making a Bloody Mary, you need Tabasco Spicy Beans. And if you need Tabasco Spicy Beans, you should visit Dorignac’s cause we got dat and all your favorite grocery items.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

710 Veterans Blvd., Metairie

58

COME SHOP THE

DIFFERENCE

& BRING FITNESS HOME Find the exercise machine that fits you best! Not all machines are created equal.

Come visit us to try machines that you will not find anywhere else! Quicker Results • Largest Selection Anywhere!

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4124 Veterans Blvd. • Metairie, LA • 504-887-0880

2639 N. Causeway Blvd. • Mandeville, LA • 985-624-9990

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS PAGE 57 JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum

seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 837-0175 or email daveharrell@yahoo.com for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL . The charter school

that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/ SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org.

LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS.

Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.lowernine.org or email lauren@lowernine.org for details.

MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details.

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/summercamp for details.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM . National World War

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine.alpert@ nationalww2museum.org for details.

OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS. Operation

REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www.operationreach.org. PEOPLE PROGRAM. The nonprofit seeks volunteers to teach active seniors at its

PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach.org or call 654-1060 for information.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program

holds regular volunteer training sessions to work oneon-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES. Touro Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www. touro.com/content/careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, patient information desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call volunteer services at 8978107 for information. VOLUNTEERS CAN LEAD PROGRAM . The program

allows residents to assist the New Orleans Police Department at its district stations. Email vocal@nola.gov for details.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 5962625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spokenword, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. THE WELL: A WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal

Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola. org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@ gmail.com for details.

CALL FOR WRITERS BOB KAUFMAN BOOK PRIZE IN POETRY. Trembling Pillow

Press presents the contest. The winner will be published in 2012. Visit www.tremblingpillowpress.com/bobkaufmanbookprize.html for details. Submissions deadline is Jan. 31.

LETTERS ABOUT LITERATURE.

WORDS BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes

& Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at

the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

For the national contest, the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress seeks letters from 4th to 12th grade students to authors — living or dead, from any genre — explaining how those authors’ work changed the students’ way of thinking. Visit www. lettersaboutliterature.org for details. Submission deadline is Jan. 6.

SWAMP LILY REVIEW. Editors

seek fiction, poetry, nonfiction and creative nonfiction for the spring 2012 issue of the online publication. Editors are also open to some book reviews, interviews, photographs and artwork. Email swamplilyreview@gmail.com or visit www.swamplily.com for details.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

campuses in Metairie, New Orleans and the West Bank. Call 284-7678 for details.

59

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< DINER OPTIONS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Jason Doyle, who once ran a small network of bars and < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <restaurants in New Orleans, has reopened one of his earlier concepts, Huey’s 24/7 Diner (620 Decatur St., 535-4839; www. hueysneworleans.com). The original Huey’s folded after Katrina. This new rendition is in Jax Brewery and is open 24-hours. The menu includes diner fare, breakfast all day and New Orleans standards.

am

B

JUICE ON MAPLE

A former fitness center near the Uptown universities has been converted into Aux Folies Riverluna (7901 Maple St., 461-3244). The cafe serves breakfast and lunch and is furnished with various perches for studying or eating. Coffee drinks are joined by orange juice squeezed to order. Egg dishes and breakfast sandwiches are served until 1:30 p.m., and the lunch menu includes nachos, salads and sandwiches.

five 5 IN

Top Five Spots for Crepes

MERCHANT

THE MARITIME, 800 COMMON ST., 571-9580

Try the duck confit crepe with apple and blue cheese.

CREPES A LA CART

Now Serving NEW RESTAURANTS HIGHLIGHT A BUSY YEAR IN DINING. BY IAN MCNULTY

I

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

DIY dining, Bacchanal Wine, ran into trouble this year when City Hall temporarily shut down its popular, but inadequately licensed, outdoor food and music events. The flap drew more attention to an ongoing complaint by some over confusing or heavy-handed regulation of food ventures, and that issue was the underlying theme of September’s inaugural Street Food Derby. The event gathered mobile food vendors from around the region at the Fair Grounds Race Course and drew a huge crowd to sample them all in one place. Some familiar names returned to the restaurant scene, with chef Rene Bajeux now at the Rib Room and Guillermo Peters bringing his upscale Mexican cooking to the Canal Street Bistro (formerly Eco Cafe). The doors closed at Feast, after not quite a year, and Bacco, after nearly 20 years. But other ventures opened, including Root in the former Feast space, Ste. Marie in the CBD, Tomas Bistro in the Warehouse District, Vacherie in the French Quarter, Irish House in Uptown, Metairie’s Cafe B and Heritage Grill, both from the former Bacco’s team, and, late in the year, Apolline, a revamp of the former Dominique’s on Magazine, and Tamarind by Dominique, a new restaurant from Dominique’s former chef and namesake, Dominique Macquet. The year also offered many examples of the heart and generosity running through the cooking scene. The local restaurant industry stepped up to help people in need — in events like Liuzza Palooza, benefitting Michael Bordelon, Beasts & Brass for chef Nathanial Zimet and road trips to bring Louisiana hospitality to tornado-stricken towns in Alabama and Missouri. Restaurants across the spectrum proved that in our community it’s more than just what’s on the plate that counts.

This Uptown crepe stand offers sweet and savory crepes during late hours.

LA CREPE NANOU

1410 ROBERT ST., 899-2670 www.lacrepenanou.com

The namesake crepes remain this bistro’s primary specialty.

MONDO

900 HARRISON AVE., 224-2633 www.mondoneworleans.com

Mocha crepes are a brunch dessert at chef Susan Spicer’s family restaurant.

TOMAS BISTRO

755 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 527-0942

Goat cheese crepes are topped with shrimp and wine cream sauce.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

Anna de Codorniu Brut Cava PENEDES, SPAIN / $13-$15 RETAIL

A particularly well-crafted Spanish sparkling wine, this cava — made from 70 percent Chardonnay and 30 percent Parellada — was produced in the traditional method and bottle-aged a minimum of nine months before release. In the glass, delicate floral, grapefruit and lime-zest aromas are followed by biscuit, citrus and apple notes. Enjoy on its own or with tapas, seafood, light meats and soft cheeses such as Pont l’Eveque, Camembert and Robiola. Buy it at: W.I.N.O. and Dorignac’s. Drink it at: Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar & Bistro, Bridge Lounge, Santa Fe and Sante Fe Tapas. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

f you couldn’t find someplace new and different to eat in New Orleans in 2011 it was your own fault. Local chefs and restaurateurs did their part to bring new options, new flavors and new concepts to the scene, and if you had a very specific craving in mind when setting out to sample them it was all the better. For instance, whether your ideal pizza follows the thin-crust style of New York, the deep-dish style of Chicago or the artisanal standards of Naples, Italy, new pies from Pizzicare, Midway Pizza and Ancora Pizzeria & Salumeria have you covered, respectively. If you like your burgers thin, old-school and meticulously crafted, Tru Burger and the Company Burger emerged to sate your palate, and they were joined by stuffed burgers from Juicy Lucy’s and still more burgers from Cheeseburger Eddie’s in Metairie. If your hankering was more toward hot dogs, you had plenty of company at Dat Dog, a new wiener stand that’s proved so popular it’s already planning to move into larger digs across the street. That street would be Freret Street, and it’s no coincidence that half of the new restaurants mentioned above opened along this resurgent, eight-block commercial corridor. After years of steadily building momentum, Freret Street broke out as the hot new restaurant row in 2011, with seven new eateries opening this year and more planned in 2012. While Freret has centralized a lot of interesting new eats, another trend this year spread them all over town, often in unexpected venues. From just a few examples a year ago, pop-ups have exploded across New Orleans, and these unorthodox eateries were joined by more food trucks making the rounds too. One of the longest-running local examples of such

High Hat Cafe is one of the new restaurants on a blossoming stretch of Freret Street.

1039 BROADWAY ST., 866-2362 www.crepesalacarts.com

61

Your Fever Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Know Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Saturday Morning!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

Extended Hours and Weekends For Your Convenience!

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The Family Doctors Oakwood Clinic can get you back to your routine without disturbing your schedule. Our primar y care physicians are available to treat ailments in our after-hours clinic from 4:30 to 8pm & Saturdays from 8am to Noon. 175 Hector Ave., Gretna, LA 70056

504.349.6925

CUISINE

Scuttlebites ALL THE NEWS THAT’S FIT TO EAT. B Y I A N M CN U LT Y

UPTOWN FIREHOUSE TO BECOME RESTAURANT (AGAIN)

THE NEW NORMA’S

Norma’s Sweets Bakery (3221 Georgia Ave., Kenner, 467-4309) has long been a favorite backstreet Kenner find for Mexican pastries, Cuban sandwiches and an occasional guava-filled king cake. The same family owners now have a second location in Mid-City. This new Norma’s Sweets Bakery

RABASA SWITCHES KITCHENS

Chef Baruch Rabasa has left Meson 923 (923 S. Peters St., 523-9200) and will begin next week as the new chef at Atchafalaya (901 Louisiana Ave., 8919626; www.cafeatchafalaya.com). He’s the second chef to depart Meson 923 since it opened in March 2010. Its original chef, Emeril’s alum Chris Lynch, left in October 2010 and Rabasa, who had been his sous chef, then took the reins. Meson 923 has been closed for the past two weeks. A spokesperson for Meson 923 says the restaurant is working on plans for a new chef. Tony Tocco, owner of Atchafalaya, says his former chef Mark Springfloat left to join the local company Pigeon Caterers. Rabasa’s international, modern cuisine at Meson 923 was markedly different from the upscale Creole neighborhood style at Atchafalaya. Tocco says that while Rabasa will bring a new influence Atchafalaya will still retain its current style and some of its more popular dishes. “Baruch is bringing more sophistication to the menu here, but really we have to hang on to the things that brought us to the dance in the first place,” Tocco says. He says Atchafalaya’s New Year’s Eve menu will showcase some of what is in store.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

Chef Chris Cody had a promising but too-brief run at Pellicano Ristorante, a fine-dining spot in Kenner that opened in 2008 and closed a year later. Now the chef has a new restaurant in the works for a historic property in the Lower Garden District. Cody and an investor plan to open Dijon (1377 Annunciation St., phone n.a.) in a former firehouse in the next few months. He describes his culinary plans for Dijon as contemporary American/ Louisiana and says it “will be similar to Pellicano but with more of a local twist.” David Oser, who also worked at Pellicano, will be sous chef. One special feature of Dijon will be a chef’s table complete with its own small kitchen so guests can watch and interact with the chef as their meals are prepared. Cody most recently offered upscale bar food at the Roosevelt Hotel Bar (116 University Place, 566-9444), a watering hole next to (but unrelated to) the Roosevelt Hotel. He left that gig earlier this year as he searched for a new finedining project. Dijon’s future home has some history to it. The building dates to 1914 and was originally used by the New Orleans Fire Department. It sat empty from 1991 until 2003, when renovations began to turn the vintage space with its soaring, 30-foot ceilings into a tavern. It later became a California-inspired eatery called Fire! a Restaurant, though after Hurricane Katrina that business moved to Florida, where it is still in operation. Next, the old firehouse housed Big Al’s Seafood, an offshoot of the Houma restaurant of the same name. The building has a large hearth oven in the dining room, a remnant from its Fire! format, and Cody plans to use it to bake bread. Dijon will have a bar, a courtyard and off-street parking and it will serve Sunday brunch.

(2925 Bienville St., 309-5401) is a larger store with a full range of Latin American groceries, including a butcher section with bins of hot chicharones (or Latin American cracklin’s). Norma Castillo opened the original Norma’s in 2003, and it has since grown into a supplier of baked goods for a network of small Latin groceries and restaurants around the area. Her son Jose Castillo says customer demand prompted the family to open this second location. Like the original, the new Norma’s bakes bread, pies, cakes and pastries on premises. In addition to the sweets, there are Cuban sandwiches and graband-go savory options, like pasteles filled with beef or chicken and a selection of tamales. The Mid-City location also has a much larger kitchen for more hot food, including plate lunches. As Carnival season gears up, look for Norma’s king cakes filled with sweet guava and cream cheese.

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>

<<<< <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

7716 Maple St. • 504.304.6025 swapboutique.com

AMERICAN O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634

Ave., Metairie, 322-2544; www. saucysbbqgrill.com — Saucy’s serves slow-smoked St. Louisstyle pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled or jerk chicken. Side items include smoked beans, mac and cheese, coleslaw and Caribbean rice. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

in the riverside market

BAR & GRILL

BREWPUB

504.895.2911

BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N.

Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

www.hairloftnola.com

30 years in business now carrying kérastase

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

The best kept secret in New Orleans Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

SAUCY’S BBQ GRILL — 3244 Severn

S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

5300 TCHOUPITOULAS Suite F4

64

Sat. Cash only. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133

S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

HAPPY HOLIDAYS! 1135 PRESS ST. @ NEW ORLEANS

2900 ST. CLAUDE

(504) 947-7554

TRAFFIC TICKETS ALCOHOL-RELATED OFFENSES EXPUNGEMENTS

ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jeffer-

MARK’S

MUFFLER SHOP since 1984

ANN R. BAEHR ATTORNEY AT LAW

(504) 835-9248 3231 N. I-10 Service Rd • Metairie, LA 70002 I can help to Prevent Increased Insurance Premiums, Protect Your Driving & Criminal Record, Affordable Fees. (EXCLUDING

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AUTHORIZED FLOWMASTER DEALER 5229 St. Claude Ave. New Orleans 504-944-7733 w ww.mar k smu f f ler sh op .com

son Hwy., Jefferson, 832-0830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers, alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. Thursday’s steak night special features a filet mignon, butter-garlic potatoes, salad, grilled French bread and a soft drink for $15. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks

St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq. com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Crabmeat-stuffed jumbo shrimp, grilled baby back ribs, overstuffed po-boys and seafood gumbo are popular dishes. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL —

4905 Canal St., 488-7357; www. beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www.

budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-7890; www.cafefreret. com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ CANAL STREET BISTRO & ECO CAFE — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.

ecocafeno.com — This cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach

and baby pickles. There are fresh squeezed juices, and Friday and Saturday evenings feature tapas dining. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$

GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. The cochon de lait panini includes slow-braised pork, baked ham, pickles, Swiss, ancho-honey slaw, honey mustard and chili mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 5811112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes.

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

• Paddleboard Sales • Lessons / Rentals • Club Membership • Liquid Vitality Classes

SPECIAL: $30 Paddleboard Lessons (exp. 2/29/12)

4721 mAgAziNe st. 504 wAter st. New OrLeANs, LA mAdisONviLLe, LA

www.NOLAPAddLebOArds.cOm

504.717.8847

Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metai-

rie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4648884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 2673328; www.thekupcakefactory. com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485;

www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf

2801 Marais St., NOLA 70117 504.947.0038 • www.rtno.org Monday-Saturday, 9 to 4:30

St. James Cheese Company (5004 Prytania St., 899-4737; www.stjamescheese.com) offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the globe.

PHOTO By CHERyL GERBER shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No respage 67

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

A RCHITECTURAL S ALVAGE FOR S ALE, D ECONSTRUCTION S ERVICES A VAILABLE

65

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

S MA LL

PORTIONS

ARE FOR

SUPERMODELS

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66 11TBMZ012 Small Portions_Ribs_GambitWeekly.indd 2

9/29/11 11:20 AM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com page 65 ervations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Aruba scallops are seared and served with white chocolate chipotle sauce with jalapeno grits and seasonal vegetables. Warm walnut goat cheese is served with yuca chips. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sat.-Sun., dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168;

www.therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave.,

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 El-

meer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. The Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia

St., 895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge

Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE —

923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W.,

Westwego, 436-8950; www. moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$

RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., 5618844; www.redgravycafe.com —

The cafe serves breakfast items including pancakes, waffles and pastries. At lunch, try meatballs, lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. Open Sundays before New Orleans Saints home games. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like vealand spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

@ Eco cafE

now serving world cuisine by chef guillermo peters 3903 canal St

(cornEr of n. Scott)

Mid-city, nEw orlEanS

482.1225

in algiers point

www.vine-Dine.com 504.361.1402

EcocafEno.coM

««2012»»

Year of the Gator

MOSCA’S EST. 1946

Open Tuesday - Saturday 5:30 pm –9:30 pm

504.436.8950 4137 Hwy 90

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

141 DelaronDe st.

deckomeals.com

WestWego

www.moscasrestaurant.com WE ACCEPT RESERVATIONS

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton

Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St.,

581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ page 69

serving new orleans'

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$$

canal street bistro

67

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Join Us for LUNCH Specializing in

page 67

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas

St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola. com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900

City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR —

MEDITERRANEAN/

MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ BABYLON CAFE

— 7724 Maple

St., 314-0010; www.babyloncafe.biz —The Babylon platter includes stuffed grape leaves, hummus, kibbeh, rice and one choice of meat: lamb, chicken or beef kebabs, chicken or beef shawarma, gyro or kufta. Chicken shawarma salad is a salad topped with olives, feta and chicken breast cooked on a rotisserie. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

265-8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville

St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LUCY’S RETIRED SURFERS’ BAR & RESTAURANT — 701 Tchoupitoulas

St., 523-8995; www.lucysretiredsurders.com — This surf shack serves California-Mexican cuisine and the bar has a menu of tropical cocktails. Todo Santos fish tacos feature grilled or fried mahi mahi in corn or flour tortillas topped with shredded cabbage and shrimp sauce, and are served with rice and beans. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late night Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave.,

948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave.,

of equal or lesser value.

G

A Sweet, Healthy, Chocolate-filled Year

Dine in only. Up to $6.95 Value. Expires 1/31/12

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

“Best New York Deli

in New Orleans”

3519 SEVERN

Mon-Thur 10am-7pm Fri.& Sun. 10am-3pm www.koshercajun.com

888-2010

5707 Magazine St. 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St.,

309-7557; www.artzbagelz.com — Artz bakes its bagels in house and options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamonraisin, salt and others. Get one with a schmear or as a sandwich. Salads also are available. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636

Franklin St., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iber-

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

ville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Bara-

taria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

Buy 1 Sandwich & Get 1 FREE

G

HAPPY NEW YEAR

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NEW YORK PIZZA — 4418 Magazine St., 891-2376; www.newyorkpizzanola.com — Choose from pizza by the slice or whole pie, calzones, pasta, sandwiches, salads and more. The Big Apple pie is loaded with pepperoni, Canadian bacon, onions, mushrooms, black olives, green peppers, Ital-

Oils and Vinegars Wines, Spirits and Liqueurs

5725 Magazine Street (corner of Nashville)

504.302.1455

AMPLE PARKING ON THE CORNER & IN REAR OF STORE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

TOMAS BISTRO — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomas serves dishes like semi-boneless Louisiana quail stuffed with applewood-smoked bacon dirty popcorn rice, Swiss chard and Madeira sauce. The duck cassoulet combines duck confit and Creole Country andouille in a white bean casserole. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOT PASTRAMI & CORNED BEEF • FALAFEL CHOPPED LIVER • MATZOH BALL SOUP

69

21 $ 5

CHEESE PIZZAS

for

OUT2EAT

w/ad. 12” & 14” only. Dine in only. Additional toppings extra.

ian sausage and minced garlic and anchovies and jalapenos are optional. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

GAME DAY SPECIALS!

PINT& SLICE DAILY

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

(bar & restaurant) 504-891-2376

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

service industry liquor + pizza specials 12-2am HAPPY HOUR • M-F • 5-7PM 4416 magazine st.

BRONX BAR

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

newyorkpizzanola.com

OPEN

11AM-TIL

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

HAPPY HOUR MON - FRI 4 - 6PM

TUESDAYS

HOUSE $2 MARTINI

575 Convention Center Blvd.

4920 Prytania St.

Fulton St. at Lafayette

891-3644 • closed sundays

504.520.8530 | grandislerestaurant.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 27 > 2011

70

- getta bo

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS

ut i

t

P

HO

delicious house specialties free delivery* 5pm–9:30pm *($15

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

minimum)

catering available

DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-

7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

865-1428 · 704 s. carrollton mon–sat 11am–10pm · sun noon–10pm www.chinaorchidneworleans.com

113 C Westbank Expwy • Gretna, LA 70053

(504) 368-9846 • Open Daily 9am-9pm (Kitchen Closes at 8:30PM) • Closed Sun & Thurs

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

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UPTOWN KENNER

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8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy. com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and

Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $ THE STORE — 814 Gravier St., 322-

2446; www.thestoreneworleans. com — The Store serves sandwiches, salads and hot plates, and there is a taco bar where patrons can choose their own toppings. Red beans and rice comes with grilled andouille and a corn bread muffin. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 5208530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried softshell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd.,

241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in

sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322

Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy.com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a selection of supersized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001

N. Broad St., 821-3271; www. crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH BARCELONA TAPAS — 720 Dub-

lin St., 861-9696 — This Spanish restaurant serves paella and more than 50 tapas dishes with selections including patatas bravas, garlic shrimp, tomato with mozzarella and avocado shrimp tropical. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY —

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles

Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

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lakeviewcleaningllc@yahoo.com

A yoga and personal training studio

GROUP TRAINING, YOGA, AND NIA CLASSES.

Uptown• 504-896-1500 Metairie • 504-896-1550

Professional

Beautiful & Romantic Gifts • Costumes & Club Wear • Leather, Vinyl & Accessories • Bras (32B to 42H) • Corsets (32-52) • Bachelorette, Bridal & Party Goodies • Sassy Footwear & Accessories • Lingerie, Lotions, Lubes, Toys • Sexy & Naughty but Nice Gifts & Much More!

4636 W. Esplanade Metairie • (504) 888-7722 • Mon-Sat 11a-7p suzette@suzettes.com

• • •

References

Free estimates

Call Pat 228-5688 or 464-7627

To place your ad in

Nola Market Place Call your Classifed Rep today or call 504-483-3100 or

email

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

SOUTHERN REFINISHING LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician

Insured & Priced-Right

GULF STATES AIR 504-304-0443

DON’T REPLACE YOUR TUB,

348-1770

• Small JobS • RepaiRS • inStall • CaRpentRy • painting And More!

DUCT G IN CLEAN BLE AVAILA

CLASSES BEGIN JAN 9 - END MAY 28

One of New Orleans’ Best Cookbooks. Unique, Playful, Provocative Recipes seasoned with Empowerment!

CLEANING SERVICE

13 SEER

Study French in New Orleans

classadv@gambitweekly.com

71

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

Loving New Orleans in 2012!

72

Contact deMontluzin Investments to Own or Lease a Place in Our Charming City SALES

4834 St. Charles Ave. ................... $1,250,000 1019 St. Ann St. ............................... $875,000 Ann de Montluzin 1100 Royal St. #8 ............................... $588,000 Farmer 1218 St. Mary St. ............................... $415,000 Historic House and Luxury 1016 Napoleon Ave. ........................ $340,000 Home Specialist 80 Fontainbleau Dr. ............................. $270,000 708 Marengo St. .................................... $200,000

LEASES Residential / Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com

4911 St. Charles Ave. .......................... $4000 2100 Jefferson Ave. ............................. $3,750 1100 Royal St. #6 ...................................... $3,000 1402 Jefferson Ave. ............................... $1,950 7 Spinnaker Ln. ..................................... $1,700 1000 Bourbon - Commercial ................ $12,000

Building on a real estate heritage since 1905

www.demontluzinrealtors.com

LoVe LIFe WHere YoU LIVe New Waterfront Homes. Deep Water Access

WAterfroNt Lots from $90’s LAKeSHore MArInA TWO & THREE BEDROOMS FROM $899 PER MONTH

• New full Service Marina • Wet Slips & Dry Storage • Opening Spring 2012

LAKeSHore VILLAGeS • New Waterfront Homes • $200,000 • Spring-fed lakes • Levee Protected

Now Leasing

Live Green

Live Healthy

LAKeSHore MoTorCoACH reSorT WATerFronT

Live Inspired

• 100 unit Luxury Class A • Home Port Resort Community

LIVE IN THE CENTER OF IT ALL Restaurants, Bars, Live Music, Quiet Cafes, Vintage Shops, Modern Boutiques

For More InFo

One & Two Bedrooms from $880 per month

Nancy Collier 985-641-0089

C O M E V I S I T U S T O D AY A N D RESERVE YOUR NEW HOME

1 RIVER PLACE $1,149,000

Joy North Gardner realtors

Breathtaking view of the River & Bridge. Wall of windows allows natural light to flow through. 2BR/2BA condo. Amazing floorplan! 1918 sq ft w/elegant designer details.

K

504-400-0274 cocohocke@aol.com Million Dollar Club Gold Award Winner

K

Cecelia S. Buras Realtor GRIM, ABR, SRS, SRES

burasc@bellsouth.net

GEAUX BOYS!

Elegant Country Living minutes from Downtown Covington! One of a kind European country estate on the Bogue Falaya River. Custom built & appointed with fine finishes including antique heart pine, cypress, and Old Chicago brick giving this property an old world charm. Featuring a floor plan and outdoor spaces ideal for entertaining, the Main House has 3500 sq ft of living area (3 bedrooms/3.5 baths) and the separate guest house has 1000 sq. ft (2 bedrooms/1 bath). Nestled on 4.66 private acres, this idyllic setting affords complete peace and privacy yet still close to the Causeway Bridge and I-12.

Offered at $1,050,000 - CovingtonRiverEstate.com By Appt. Only - (985) 502-2882

985-641-0089

www.LakeshoreLouisiana.com

Jamie Amdal Hughes Multi-Million Dollar Producer Specializing in Historic New Orleans Neighborhoods

504-913-0597 cell

504-862-0100 office jamie@historicneworleansrealtor.com www.historicneworleansrealtor.com 8601 Leake Ave. New Orleans, LA 70118 Each office is independently owned and operated.

Margarita Bergen Call 495-9181 for all your Real Estate Needs

Hablo Español margaritabergen@hotmail.com

Large comfortable homes – 4 bd – Convenient Harahan

3725 MacArthur Blvd.

Karen Breaux Mosca 504-455-0100

New Orleans, LA 70114-6825

Office: 504.366.4511 • Cell: 504.583.2902 An independently owned and operated member of the Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.

8601 Leake Ave • New Orleans, La 70118 Each Office Independently Owned & Operated

Each office independently owned and operated

kmosca@kw.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

I-10 exit 261 At oak Harbor - Lakeshore

1740 BARONNE STREET, NEW ORLEANS, LA 70113 | PHONE: 504-522-2888 WWW.THEMUSESAPARTMENTS.COM

73

New Year, New Home

Your Guide to Real Estate in New Orleans and Beyond

STEVE R RICHARDS 8309-11 BELFAST

French Quarter Sales & Leasing Specialist! Cell: 504-258-1800

Cool Carrollton Double Only $69,000

Email: SRichards@LatterBlum.com Website: Latter-Blum.com/SteveRichards

Historic District Office 840 Elysian Fields Avenue @ Burgundy New Orleans, LA 70117 - 504 948 3011 French Quarter Office 712 Orleans @ Royal New Orleans, LA 70116 - 504 529 8141

GOOD LOCATION CLOSE TO STREETCAR, 2 BR/side, off st.pkng,NEW ROOF, PARTIALLY RENOVATED! Should rent for $1800/mo. Great for investor or owner occupant. GARDNER REALTORS. CALL LOUIS@ 874-3195

To Advertise in

GARDEN DISTRICT OFFICES

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

Starting at just $495 Including Utilities

CALL 899-RENT Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

Jay Realtor® Susslin

74

2600 Belle Chasse Hwy, Suite G Gretna, Louisiana 70056 Office: 504-207-2007 Direct: 504-723-5403 Fax: 504-324-0301

For Jay Susslin, keeping it simple is the key to success. By applying this philosophy to his real estate career, Jay has earned a solid reputation as one of the Westbank's leading real estate professionals. Using his business expertise, lifelong knowledge of the area and no-pressure approach, Jay makes your next move the best - and easiest - one yet. If you're thinking about buying or selling a home, call on Jay Susslin because he's KEEPING IT SIMPLE. Contact him today.

Properties For Lease and For Sale

Full Service Property Management Over 30 years of selling properties & filling vacancies!

504-736-0544

www . mauriceguillot . com Todd Taylor, Realtor, (504) 232-0362 • RE/MAX Real Estate Partners, (504) 888-9900 Each office individually owned and operated

toddtaylorrealtor@yahoo.com • www.toddtaylorrealestate.com RE/MAX & NOMAR Award Winning Agent

Direct: 504-723-5403 Email:

Jay@JaySusslin.com Website:

www.JaySusslin.com

738 Orion Avenue - $225K 3 BR/2 BA w/huge tree-cvrd bkyd in Met. - below Causeway. Mins from Lakeside Mall/CBD in NOLA. Oak flrs, tons of closet space, chef's kit. w/pro grade Viking stove/range hd, 2 drvwys.

939 Jefferson Avenue - $540K Steps from Mag./St. Charles Ave., 3-4 bd/3.5 ba, & @2800 sf. w/stately Oak flrs., open flr plan kit./den. Mstr. bdrm on the 1st flr., all brdms are suites. Quiet bckyd patio w/hot tub. Walk to Whole Foods/Audubon/JCC.

For Sale 4707 Baccich Street - $140K U/C 1 Belleville Court - $75K 2956 A/B Camellia Drive, Slidell - $119K 5946 Jamison Street - $40K U/C

2524 - 6 Jena Street - $185K SOLD 2682 Law Street - $40K 3205 Pansy Ct. - $96.1K 5600 Red Maple Drive - $140K 6640 Rue Louis Phillippe - $97K

7721 LaFourche Street - $80K A 2 bd/1 ba main home w/a 1/1 mother in law in rear. Main house has lots of original charm, gorgeous wood flooring, & generous rooms. Includes a large lot (75'x157') with fruit trees, a boat cover, and a garage. 528 Tupelo Street - $99K 2253 Urquhart Street - $49K 107 West Park Court - $50K For Rent

2956A Camellia Dr., Slidell - $875/mo.

CLASSIFIEDS AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com

DOMESTIC AUTOS ‘09 PT CRUISER $8,900 504-368-5640

‘10 CHEVY COBALT LT $10,995 Several To Choose From! 504-368-5640

2002 CROWN VICTORIA

CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Car has roomy leather interior, powerful engine, showroom quality paint job & keyless entry. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

Online: When you place an ad in

2003 CHEVY IMPALA

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

Sleek black paint job! Comfortable, clean interior, fantastic sound system. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

2007 PT CRUISER

Low miles, flawless exterior, roomy interior with cd payer. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

IMPORTED AUTOS Low miles $18,900 504-368-5640

‘09 ACURA TSX $21,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$15,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

‘10 KIA OPTIMA $11,995 504-368-5640

‘10 VOLVO S40 $18,995 504-368-5640

2001 TOYOTA CAMRY

Real Estate Rentals &

Employment

Reliable vehicle with new wheels & tires, interior & interior in great condition, clean engine. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

‘94 LEXUS

Features showroom paint job, leather interior & custom rims. Perfect condiition For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

NOLA

MARKETPLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

MISCELLANEOUS 1996 FREIGHTLINER SEMI

Low miles for commercial vehicle, chromed stacks on cab, double bedded interior cab, new front tires, 500hp motor, 10 speed Detroit engine. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT COUNSELING/THERAPY ALTERNATE CHOICES

Suffering from Alcohol/Substance Abuse, Anxiety or Depression that may be related to the upcoming holidays? Contact us about our programs/ services that may begin a New path for you & your family. 504-888-8600 www.newfreedom.info

DANCE NEW ORLEANS DANCE ACADEMY

Classical Ballet for children & adults. Home of Ballet Hysell, Koenka, Fiesta Flamengo, D’project. 5956 Magazine St. 504-891-0038 nodanceacademy@ aol.com

HEALING ARTS BODY & FOOT MASSAGE Open 7 days - 10am-10pm Jasmine Health Spa 614 Causeway, Metairie 504-273-7676 Chnese Health Spa 2424 Williams Blvd Suite S Kenner - 504-305-5177

HEALTH/FITNESS

MASSAGE EXTRAORDINAIRE

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

STRESS? PAIN?

AUDUBON YOGA STUDIO Ivengar Yoga, Level 1 - 3 Free classes for new students Jan 7-13 - 511 Octavia St. 504-821-9885 www.audubonyoga.com

BLDG. MATERIALS 1 HUGE PORTABLE BUILDING

& Weight Management Program Enroll now for January Classes Bonnebal Boat Launch & Park 994-3822 - www.trainertogonola.com

Stick shift trans, V8 engine, sturdy XL cab, leather interior. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

2006 SILVERADO

New 20” wheels, new tires, wonderful interior & low miles. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

‘06 HONDA PILOT 4WD, with Navigation $18,900 504-368-5640

‘07 VOLVO XC 90 7 Passenger $19,900 504-368-5640

‘08 VW TOURAG V8 $22,995 Call 504-368-5640

PETS

LOST/FOUND PETS (Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

REWARD!

LOST TEACUP CHIHUAHUA from Stall Dr in Harvey, Sat, Dec, 17. She is mostly black, with brown & white patches. She is very small (2-3 lbs) but chubby. VERY friendly. Answers to “Etta”. Call Ray 504-261-0364

INSTRUCTION

LEARN TO PLAY PIANO BY EAR

Gideon is a 2-year-old, neutered,

Retriever mix who is a staff & volunteer FAVORITE! Gideon has eye/vision issues, so his new family will need to be prepared to take care of his special needs. To meet Gideon or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

Piano Lessons for Adults $60/Lesson www.ReekaRules.com

(504) 214-0698

GIDEON Kennel #A14469713

LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

SPORTS EQUIPMENT

Weekly Tails

TRUCKS

2001 F-150

HUGE SAVINGS! Call (504) 888-6152

REWARD- LOST

MERCHANDISE

Call 504-888-6152

SPA EQUIPMENT 1- 5 PERSON DEMO SPA

Size 8. Great Looking! Paid over $600. Sell for $100. Call 504-833-2478

YOGA/MEDITATION/PILATES

$49/MO BOOTCAMPS

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

SKI JUMPSUIT - NLS

Relax with a massage. Amazing Hands by Patrick. LMT Lic 4005. 504-717-2577 www.amazinghands.us

1991 NAVSTAR INTERNATIONAL

Strong flatbed truck, international commercial vehicle. Showroom paint job on front cab. For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

Advertise in

Size 8. Great Looking! Paid over $600. Sell for $100. Call 504-833-2478

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

TYSON Kennel # A14454066

Alana is a 7-month-old, neutered, DSH, with gray tabby markings who likes to cuddle and cuddle and cuddle some more. Tyson has never met a stranger and thoroughly enjoys all people. To meet Tyson or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

Comfortable leather interior, cd player with amazing sound system, auto transmission & a great low price! For more info call Lawrence @ (504) 737-1558

CLOTHING SKI JUMPSUIT, NILS

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

‘06 BMW 325 Ci

2000 ACURA 3.2 TL

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

WANTED TO PURCHASE CASH FOR CARS

75

EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS Looking for Benji

My neighbors found this dog in Luling Wednesday night (11/2) & brought him to Old Metairie because they thought he was lost. My neighbor put him in their shed, but he apparently got out overnight (on Aris between Canal Street & Metairie Road). The rightful owner in Luling was located Thursday morning. The dog is 16 years old! Tan & white; red collar & cataracts in each eye. Please call (504) 256-6553 if you have seen him. This is so heartbreaking!!! Thank you. P.S. Two current photos can be seen at the link below.

SMALL TERRIER MIX

Mario loves walks. Loyal & loving friend, dedicated to his owners & loves toys! Should be the #1 baby in the house & enjoys them thoroughly. tbkestler@cox.net

SOCO - URGENT!

Very sweet Stafford, home or foster. Very, very sweet boy, help asap to get him out of small confinement. tbkestler@cox.net

SERVICES

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

AIR COND/HEATING

PET ADOPTIONS ADOPTIONS

m all med. done & house broken sweet & good w/ other dogs Loves to play w/ toys. Best in home w/no small kids. contact cindy foxcfox@cox.net 504-451-9335

NIKOLAI - SWEET CAT

Domestic short hair tabby. He is super sweet & deserves better than what he was given & despite being treated like trash, would be a gift in any home. tbkestler@cox.net

ADOPT

Adoring couple longs to adopt newborn. secure, endless love awaits. Christine & Paul, 1-800-774-0854. Expenses paid. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

CAREER PREPARATION EARN $75-$200 HOUR

(Now 25% Off), Media Makeup & Airbrush Training. For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. 1 wk class & Portfolio. AwardMakeUpSchool.com, 310-364-0665

DRIVERS/DELIVERY LOCAL DRIVERS NEEDED

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Buddy boy Catahoula mix

EMPLOYMENT

SUPERIOR AIRE

Trane 3 Ton Replacement System $3790 Installed Expires 12/30/11 504-465-0688 Air Conditioning Heating

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

The Cracked Pot Garden Center

2 mi west of Airport on Airline Hwy 504-466-8813 Fall Landscaping Clean Up Special Free Estimates

PEST CONTROL DELUXE PEST CONTROL

Commercial & Residential Celebrating 50 yrs in New Orleans Great Rates & Service. 504-837-5800 www.deluxepestcontrol.com

CDL- Class A, 1 Yr. TT Exp. (Must be able to verify) Hazmat, Tank End. and TWIC Card (a must to qualify) Free Medical and Dental 1-888-380-5516

FARM LABOR

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

LEGAL NOTICES

76

ORDER OF PUBLICATION No. CH-11-2000-1 IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF SHELBY COUNTY, TENNESSEE IN THE MATTER OF: JALIYAA JADYN DECAY (DOB: July 24, 2011), A Minor, LIFE CHOICES OF MEMPHIS, INC., Petitioner, vs. CHARLES PARKER and ANY UNKNOWN FATHER, Respondents. It appearing from the sworn petition for termination of parental rights filed in this cause, that the whereabouts of the Respondents, Charles Parker and Any Unknown Father, are unknown and cannot be ascertained upon diligent inquiry. It further appearing that Respondent Charles Parker is a 36-year-old African American man with black hair and brown eyes. It further appearing that conception occurred in New Orleans, Louisiana. It is therefore ordered that Respondents, Charles Parker and Any Unknown Father, make their appearance herein at the Chancery Court of Shelby County, Tennessee, 140 Adams Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee on Friday, the 17th day of February, 2012, at 9:00 a.m. and answer petitioner’s petition for termination of parental rights or the same will be taken for confessed as to Respondents and this cause proceeded with ex parte, and that a copy of this order be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in the Gambit of New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana.

This 8th day of December, 2011.

ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. Kenner-Jefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-652-0084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

PROFESSIONAL

VOLUNTEER

in Riverwalk looking for someone who is personable and enjoys workilng with the public! This job requires you to make samples of our recipe and interact with customers in front of store. Must work weekends. We will pay for parking. Email us if yio are interested in an application or for further detils: crescentcitycooks@att.net

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

WE ARE GROWING!

Culinary Store/Cooking School in the Riverwalk looking for enthusiastic retail sales person who has basic knowledge about New Orleans cooking. Must be able to work Saturday and Sunday. We will pay for parking. Email us if you are interested in an application or for further details: crescentcitycooks@ att.net

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Ag, Inc., Brickeys, AR, has 3 positions for grain; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed: must able to obtain clean U.S. driver license in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $8.97/hr depending on location; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 1/20/12 - 11/20/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 292776.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Vieth Management, Amarillo, TX has 2 positions for grain; 3 mos. experience required for job duties listed: must able to obtain clean U.S. driver license in 30 days following hire; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $10.00/hr depending on location; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 1/16/12 - 5/1/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX4853452.

NOW HIRING! Sauté Cooks for all Shifts

At la Madeleine we are passionate. Passionate about our concept, our products, our associates & our guests.

APPLY IN PERSON

601 S Carrollton Avenue New Orleans LA, 70118 EOE

PROFESSIONAL Web Applications Analyst II

PLUMBING

RETAIL CULINARY STORE/COOKING SCHOOL

(Tulane University - New Orleans, LA): Writes specifications, coordinates testing, supervises coding, and analyzes problems for university’s web applications. Requires bachelor Degree in Comp. Sci. or related field & 3 yrs. exp. in related computer systems support. Mail: Genean Mathieu, Attention Job ID#XC508, 300 Gibson Hall, 6823 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70118.

NEED HELP?

Consider the alternative ...

gambit EMPLOYMENT SECTION

®

Call 483-3100 or fax at 483-3153

COST ANALYST

Sought by Unistar Plastics, LLC. in Harahan. Mail cover & resume to HR, P.O. Box 11322, New Orleans, LA 70181

EDITING WORLD’S BEST WRITING HELP

RESEARCH PAPERS - FICTION ESSAYS 452-3697 or ROBERBRIDE@LIVE.COM

LEGAL SERVICES NEED A NOTARY NOW?

SCHOENFELD LAW CORPORATION 24-hr mobile notary services. Successions, Wills, Power of Attorney, etc, We’ll come to you! 504-416-2489

To Advertise in

readers need

CHANCERY COURT OF SHELBY COUNTY By:

s/ Amy Mitchell

Kevin W. Weaver WEAVER & CRAIG, P.C. Attorneys for Petitioner 51 Germantown Court, Suite 112 Cordova, Tennessee 38018 Publish: 12/13/11, 12/20/11, 12/27/11, and 1/3/12. (901) 757-1700

REAL ESTATE Call 483-3100

You can help them find one.

A NEW JOB

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Employment” Section call 504.483.3100.

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe FRENCH QUARTER

922-24 Dauphine St. $875K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $215K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

617 Duphine St. $268K Spacious light filled condo. Great floor plan. Fabulous pool and courtyard. Being sold furnished. In the heart of the quarter.

835 Royal St. $349.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 2231 N. RAMPART- MARIGNY Free standing cottage w/2 charming porches. Bright open fl plan, hdwd flrs throughout, ss appl, ceramic cntrr & bath. Huge bdrm w/skylights. Secure offst. pkng. $159,000. Robert Armstrong 504-616-3615

Best Value in French Qtr

1020 ESPLANADE #103. Lovely 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil in den, sparkling pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. Private attached alley could be dog run. $339K. Lana Sackett, Gardner Realtors, 504352-4934. www.lanasackett.com

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

HISTORIC VICTORIAN

Renovated, 2 blocks from the Fr. Quarter. 4 bedrooms/4baths, 2 story with courtyard - FANTASTIC! Call Aimee with DEMAND REALTY at 319-0443 or 837-3000.

MID-CITY 3924 B CLEVELAND $160K

Off Canal & Carrollton. 2br/1ba, CA&H, hdwd flrs, crown molding, ss appliances. Washer/Dryer/Fridge included. (504) 559-1993

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

PRICED TO SELL NOW

427 ARABELLA Unique sgl. architectually designed interior, 2-3 BR, 2 BA, 2000+ sq ft. Only $385K. 917 RACE Historical 1850’s gem. Beautiful stairway, orig pocket doors, L shaped yd, much more. Call for info. $350K 3655-57 TCHOUPITOULAS Ready to rent, nice dble, lg yd, new roof. $110K. Lois Landry Realty, 504-586-1019

NEED HELP? Advertise in

1323 Esplanade A&D $149,999$169,999

The gauntlet has fallen! Seller & Lender want to sell! Quality & detail throughout this historic restoration. A :1BD/1BA grnd flr condo. D: 2BD/2BA 2nd lvl condo. Hi ceil & orig wd flrs. Granite counters & stainless appl in kitch. Whirlpool tub. The pool is cool! In trendy Treme. Bank must approve short sale.

421 Burgundy Units 1 -5 $105k - $235k

Make this your Vieux Carre getaway! 5 charming condos for sale! Common courtyard, common Washer/Dryer, Balcony overlooking Burgundy St. 3 guest quarter condos and 3 condos in the main house. Ask agent about financing options. Owner/Agent.

Call (504) 483-3100

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

504.319.6226 sam@fqr.com

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com 8309 Sycamore Street & 2214 Dante Street

Large executive sized home (5000 sq. ft.) on double lot with gourmet kitchen, chic master bath, huge den, 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, sutdio/game room/2nd den and an office plus a six (6) car garage and 3 bedroom/2 bath rental (great tenant at $1575 per month) on an adjacent property. Package Price $ 699,000 Sycamore house may be sold separately for $ 529,000

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

504.949.5400

sampochesells.com

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist

Motivated Sellers: Wondering what your property is worth? Call me for a FREE CMA (Comparative Market Analysis).

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

farmeran@gmail.com

www.demontluzinrealtors.com

Building on a real estate heritage since 1905

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

This is a commercial ground floor condo presently outfitted for a commercial occupant but can be used residentially. Quaint street near Jackson Square in the heart of the French Quarter zoned VCC2. 1,680 sq. ft.

RENTALS 622 St Roch • $1,000 • 2BR/1BA Single family shotgun style house in the heart of the Marigny. Spacious home w HUGE backyard!!! • 421 Burgundy #1• $750 1BR/1BA Ground floor just off of the courtyard. Central AC. Nice place! Also for sale. • 5224 Coliseum Upper • $1125 2BR/1BA Uptown apt with large back patio. Nice storage.

Samara D. Poché

2123-25 LAUREL ST $270K

Restored 2 unit Creole cottage in Lwr Gard Dist. Walk to Magazine St. Nr CBD. 6BR/2BA, all elec, cen a/h, 2900 sf liv area, porch. 30x158 lot. John, 508-5799.

512 Wilkinson Row $465,000

77

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS WESTBANK

R/E SERVICES

BUYING OR SELLING - CALL ME

HISTORIC HOME RECYCLERS

Barataria Waterfront Property Vacant Lot in English Turn Westbank Dwellings Call Cecelia, 583-2902, Gardner Realtors

ST. BERNARD PARISH 523 Angela, Old Arabi

3 blocks from Marigny. 10 Min from The Quarter. 110 year old home, fully restored, 1200 sq ft, 12’ ceil, orig hdwd flrs, 2 firepl, 2 BR, 2 BA, granite in kit $145K. 504-554-4800

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

Find historic homes & facilitate purchase. Move historic homes whole or in pieces. Renovate historic homes, Demolish historic homes & resell lumber. www.hhrno.com Home Recyclers or New Orleans, LLC. Robert (504) 236-8069

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O.

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504491-1591.

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2, 3 & 4 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $495 INCLUDING UTILITIES

CALL 899-RENT NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT

2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furn, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Minimum 1 month. $3000/mo. Also 3 BR Penthouse $3800/mo. 781-608-6115.

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE ELMWOOD CONDO

2/2, Appl inc. w&d, walk-in closets, pkng, priv. patio, pool, tennis crts. Earhart - 1 mile. No smokers. $1050, Glenn, 504-450-5634

FABULOUS RENOV 4BR/2BA

Quiet cul-de-sac, walk to levee, new hdwd/ceramic floors, surround snd, recess lighting, sec sys, great backyd & deck for entertaining. Pets OK. Lse. $1600/mo Sylvia 504-415-6501

JEFFERSON NEAR OCHSNER

Beautiful 2 BR, 2 BA, large jacuzzi in master bath, high end appliances incl washer & dryer, pool. $1200/mo. 504-835-1577

Just pennies a day.

METAIRIE

Did you know your landlord’s insurance only covers the building? Protect your stuff. There’s no reason to take a chance. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.®

ALL NEW - HIDDEN GEM

Renov’t - all new! - near Heart of Metairie. 1 bdrm + bonus room, from $795. Wtr pd., Rsvd pkg,1 car. No smoking/ pets 504-780-1706 orrislaneapts.com

COMMERCIAL RENTALS LOW PRICED OFFICE

Central Met 2909 Division St. Approx 1385sf. $9/sf per yr + electric. Emily Kramer, Corporate Realty, 504-5815005. ekramer@corp-realty.com

CALL ME TODAY.

FOR RENT OR SALE

2511 Metairie Lawn. 2BR/2BA, w/d, pool, security. Rent $950/mo. Sale $149,000. Call 427-1087

MARRERO - WESTBANK

2273 Barataria Blvd. 900 sq ft office + half bath. 2 rms, prof’l mgmt. Easy free parking. Desks avail. $800/month. 781-608-6115

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

Carl Mixon, Agent

4716 Canal Street New Orleans, LA 70119 504-482-7897 carl.mixon.gxo3@statefarm.com

statefarm.com

State Farm Fire and Casualty Company, State Farm General Insurance Company, Bloomington, IL

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

Classifieds

78

We have everything y ou need in Classifieds. Find your Happy Place ! in print & online

Rentals Real Estate Jobs Services Autos Mind, Body, Spirit Events Specials & More classadv@gambitweekly.com

504-483-3100

www.bestofneworleans.com

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE METAIRIE TOWERS

1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable included, parking. 24 hr Concierge Service, Reduced to $880/mo 914882-1212.

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 3324 DESOTO

Living room, large bedroom, tile bath, furnished kitchen. No pets. $850/ month + deposit. 504-283-7569

DOWNTOWN 1930 PAINTERS

Real nice 2 bdrms, carport, w/d hkkups, Sect. 8 OK. $800/month. Utilities pd. Nice patio. Call Eddie, (504) 481-1204

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1050 mo. 432-7955.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

1508 CARONDELET ST2 APTS

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter • Kaysie • Billy

504-949-5400 602 Dumaine

1/1 600sqft, pvt ctyd, offstreet pkg $1100

1201 Chartres 13

3/2.5 Hdwd Flrs, Renov Kit/Baths, Prkng $3500

838 Chartres

1/1 Balc over Chartres, Nice Arch Feat $1495

718 Barracks #5

1/1 lots storage, gated ent, com crtyrd $875

835 St Louis “F”

studio 3rd Flr. Cent AC, Hi Ceil Wd Flr Balc $900

1005 Josephine B 931 Bienville

3/2 newly renov, rftp deck, gated ent $1500 parking remote entry, well lit

$175

622 St. Roch

2/1 Shotgun in the heart of Marigny $1000

1722 Second Street

1/1 arge apt near streetcar line

421 Burgundy #5

1/1 cozy. granite counters. nice tile bath $700

1305 Decatur #3

1/1 Fullyrenov,balcony,prvtsundeck,w/d$1850

1434 N Johnson

3/2 Gorgeoussinglefamhousew/parking $1500

$850

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 830 St. Philip - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $2300 713 Camp - 1 bd/ 1ba Furn ............. $2200 1301 N. Rampart - 1 bd/ 1.5ba ............. $1500 822 Touro - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $900 5446 Dauphine - 3 bd/ 2 ba .................. $900

3222 Napoleon Rooms For Rent

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

4130 PRYTANIA

2340 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605 FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

CONDOS FOR SALE 421 Burgundy 1-6

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688 dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com

6 units. Ctyd & Balc. $105k - $235k

1014 Esplanade #4

1/1 Ground floor. 2 courtyards! $249k

512 Wilkinson Row

CommercialcondoonquaintstinFQ.$465k

919 St philip #6

1/1 spacious, nice floorplan, crtyd

$224k

1323 Esplanade A

1/1 grnd fl, hi ceil., pool. SHORT SALE $149,999

We have qualified tenants for your rentals. Call us!

Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $750 mo. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1100 Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-239-6566. mballier@yahoo.com

929A ST. PETER

1BR, 1BA, Furn Kit, Heat/Cool Unit, Ceiling Fan. Shared Ctyd. Non-Smoking. Lse. $875/mo; $875 dep. Owner Occupied Bldg. Seek neat, resp, long term tenant. (504) 296-7126 for appt

OFF STREET PARKING

1713 BURGUNDY, 1 bd/1 ba, furn kit, all elec, ac, carpet, wtr pd. 1 yr lse. No pets. $750 + dep. 949-5518

GENTILLY Beautiful New Renovation

3838 Havana Place. 2 BR, quiet neighborhood, cent air & heat, alarm. granite counters in kit, fenced yd. $1025/mo. Call 504-430-1164

LAKEFRONT LARGE ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beautiful courtyard setting w/swimming pool, quiet neighborhood. $850/mo. 504-4956044 or 504-756-7347

MID CITY SMALL OFFICE SPACE

MID CITY - Offstreet parking for one vehicle. Separate entrance. Available Now. Contact Jane, (504) 482-5292

UNIVERSITY AREA 5512 Cucullu. Newly renov 2 br 1 ba, lr, din rm, kit w appl w\/d hkups, cent a/h, offst pking, hdwd flors. $1000/ mo. 504-874-4330

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Avail 2/1. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

1 BR, 2nd flr apt, walk-in closet, hi ceil, a/c, ceil fans, w/d, hdwd flrs. $800/ mo. No pets. MUST SEE! 908-9350, Remax RE Partners 504-888-9900

ST. CHARLES AVE & 6TH

Remodeled, on street car line in Garden District. 1 br, 1 ba, liv rm, kit w/ appl, offst pkg, coin operated w/d. $675/mo. 504-874-4330

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT Furnished 1 Bedroom—1 Bath

Furnished Condo in Warehouse District. Secure building, top floor, end unit. Rent includes utilities, pool, gym, cable, internet. Apt has W/D, stainless steel appliances, central heat/air. Central to to French Quarter, West Bank, Uptown, parade route, streetcar. Loft with desk. Available 11/1. Call Bonnie at Soniat Realty, 504-488-8988. $1600, negotiable.

PENTHOUSE LOFT

Gorgeous penthouse condo on top floor, unbeateable spot in the Arts and Warehouse dist. 2b-2b, Exquisitely furnished, located in a luxurious building, with amenities including : Gym, inground pool, events room, covered garage and 24 security/surveillance. Walk to world class shops,restaurants, night life. Breathtaking views of New Orleans from huge outdoor terrace... a must live in! $4500.00/month Corporative leases are welcome. manageronellc@gmail.com 504-275-7772

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

readers need

You can help them find one.

A NEW HOME

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Real Estate” Section call 504.483.3100.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

4 BLKS FROM TULANE

Spacious house, 4 large private bedrooms. Large equipped kitchen, 3 baths, dining room, front porch. Central heat & air $625 each includes all utilities & internet, cable & laundry facilities. No Pets + Deposit 504-376-4676. Grad students welcome.

79

CLASSIFIEDS PUZZLE PAGE

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles

TOO LATE! ........................$2,495,000 Grand Mansion.................$2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) ......$1,579,000 TOO LATE! ........................$1,300,000 TOO LATE! .......................... $429,000 Commercial........................ $349,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) .......... $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) ........... $239,000 TOO LATE! .......................... $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ...................... $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ...................... $149,000 (Only 4 Left!) .........$79,000-$159,000 TOO LATE! .......................... $169,000

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > december 27 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 77

82

Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays v Wishing You A Prosperous & Healthy 2012

John Schaffcrs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663 (504) 895-4663

a utomotive ADVERTORIAL

Carmakers TaCkle susTaInabIlITy Recycling pRocess gaining attention fRom automakeRs B y J I L MCI N TO SH

I

t’s no longer enough for automakers to simply build cars that are stylish or have all the latest options. Sustainability is now a driving force, as auto companies tackle such issues as fuel efficiency, alternative powertrains and how to recycle vehicles and components at the end of their lives. “It’s about providing transportation to future generations without having it negatively impacting the environment,” says John Viera, director of sustainability for Ford Motor Company. He adds that it’s also about educating consumers on the new choices they face. “We’re talking about different fuels, different batteries, and consumers are overwhelmed by the amount of information they need to know.” Cost is a major issue, whether it’s the batteries in electric vehicles or extra engine components on vehicles that burn compressed natural gas. There also needs to be infrastructure to supply these fuels. This was always left to gas companies in the past, which refined the fuel and transported it to the stations; for possibly the first time, automakers are now involved in the process. “The good news is that everyone has electricity at their house or work, so we’ve decided to work on how we provide charging equipment that is easily installable at home or at work,” Viera says. “We don’t try to set up utility stations like gas companies putting in gas pumps, but we are working directly in getting people involved in home charging. These vehicles are parked there for long periods and that’s where our focus has been. We think the majority of charging will happen at home or work, not at a public station.”

the ford transit connect electric is a good example of a sustainable vehicle. Photo courtesy of ford Motor coMPany

The batteries themselves present issues. Those that use lithium-ion are now becoming the electric vehicle standard. The easiest lithium to mine is in Bolivia, Chile and China. Recycling batteries for their lithium isn’t cost-effective yet, and Viera says automakers will have to work on this. “We’re not there yet, but we need to get together as an industry to address that issue,” he says, referringto a protocol for safely dealing with used batteries. “This is not a competitive advantage; this is something we’re all going to need.” Jil McIntosh is a freelance writer who reports about cars for publications and on her website www.womanonwheels.ca.

2 YEAR/24,000 Mile Maintenance Agreement for NO EXTRA CHARGE!

Happy Honda Days

1.9 APR For 60 Mos.

25

HWY MPG *

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LEASE A NEW 2012 HONDA

PILOT LX 2WD

289

or 1.9% for 60 mos.

All Power, 7-Passenger

LEASE FOR 36 MONTHS* Seating and More!

34

HWY MPG *

LEASE A NEW 2012 HONDA

ACCORD LX 4DR

$

199

or 1.9% for 60 mos. Auto, All Power,

LEASE FOR 36 MONTHS* and More!

39

HWY MPG *

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LEASE A NEW 2012 HONDA

CIVIC LX 4DR

179

or 1.9% for 60 mos. Auto, all Power,

LEASE FOR 36 MONTHS* and More!

1845 WESTBANK EXPWY | MANHATTAN EXIT HARVEY, LA

504-368-5640 • www.SuperiorHonda.net *See dealer for details. 36 mo. lease 12k/yr. WAC thru AHFC. All offers end 12/31/11. *MPG based on 2011 EPA mileage estimates. Use for comparison purposes only. Do not compare to models before 2008. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you drive & maintain your vehicle. All leases w/$1,999 due at inception plus TT&L.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > DECEMBER 27 > 2011

SUPERIOR HONDA EXCLUSIVE

83


Gambit 2011 Year In Review