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BARDSUMMERSCAPE

July 5 – August 18, 2013

OPERA • THEATER • DANCE • MUSIC • FILM • SPIEGELTENT and THE 24TH BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL Stravinsky and His World

“SummerScape at Bard College . . . ever a hotbed of intellectual and aesthetic adventure.” —new york times

above Emmanuel Chabrier’s The King in Spite of Himself, SummerScape 2012. Photo: ©Cory Weaver. cover A Good Tree Has Grown, Nicholas Roerich, 1914. ©Nicholas Roerich Museum, NY

Welcome to the 2013 Bard SummerScape and Bard Music Festival, “Stravinsky and His World.” The career of Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) encompassed the glorious era of Russian Romanticism, the explosion of modernism, and most of the significant musical developments of the 20th century. As a protean composer of music for the stage as well as the concert hall, and as a genius who straddled three worlds—his native Russia, the artistic crucible of Paris in the ’teens and ’20s, and finally America— he exerted a powerful influence on younger generations of composers. Stravinsky’s music, ideas, and the creative exchange between him and his contemporaries—the focal point of this year’s Bard Music Festival—inform the concerts, films, and theatrical presentations of SummerScape 2013. Now entering its 11th season, SummerScape has been acclaimed as “the most intellectually ambitious of America’s summer music festivals” (Times Literary Supplement) and “seven weeks of cultural delight” (International Herald Tribune). This season’s highlights include Sergey Taneyev’s magisterial Oresteia, an opera based on the tragic Greek trilogy of Aeschylus; a world premiere theatrical adaptation of Mikhail Bulgakov’s satirical fantasy The Master and Margarita; and a new dance work by the combined talents of Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company and SITI Company that celebrates the centennial of the “scandalous” debut performance of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring. This summer’s film festival, “Stravinsky’s Legacy and Russian Émigré Cinema,” will screen rare works produced by Russian filmmakers living in early 20th-century Paris, and films by Jean Cocteau, Jean Renoir, and Claude Chabrol, among others, who collaborated with Stravinsky, made use of his music, or engaged with his practice as an artist. The Spiegeltent offers a lively mix of intimate cabaret, music, and family performances and is the perfect place to enjoy food and drink in the company of festival artists while the house band plays on. The 24th annual Bard Music Festival traces the path of Stravinsky from St. Petersburg, where he studied with Rimsky-Korsakov, to his historic collaborations with Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in Paris, and on to his encounters with new trends in music and shifting cultural mores in the United States, where he settled in 1939. Through the rich and varied works of Stravinsky and such contemporaries as Debussy, Ravel, Bartók, and Schoenberg, the Bard Music Festival will engage with some of the greatest music of the last century. Programs take place in the acoustically superb Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, designed by Frank Gehry, and other venues on Bard’s beautiful Hudson River campus. We look forward to seeing you this summer.

The 2013 SummerScape season is made possible in part through the generous support of the Board of The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College, the Board of the Bard Music Festival, and the Friends of the Fisher Center, as well as grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts. Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

BARDSUMMERSCAPE 3

A Rite. Photo by Paul B. Goode

“A serious, intricate, multidirectional centennial tribute to a work of art whose spell it deepens.”—new york times

a summerscape co-commission

A Rite Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and SITI Company Conceived, directed, and choreographed by Anne Bogart ’74, Bill T. Jones, and Janet Wong Robert Wierzel, lighting designer James Schuette, costume designer The 1913 premiere of Stravinsky’s ballet The Rite of Spring created an uproar whose repercussions changed the course of dance and music in the 20th century. One hundred years later, two titans of the American performing arts have joined forces to create a thrilling new dance-theater performance that celebrates that legendary opening night. A Rite is a collaboration between choreographer Bill T. Jones (a resident artist at Bard) and director Anne Bogart (a Bard alumna). Their respective companies of dancers and actors have come together to develop a contemporary response to Stravinsky’s masterpiece. A Rite explores the revolutionary context of The Rite of Spring, which premiered shortly before the outbreak of the First World War, and at the dawn of Cubism, Einstein’s theory of relativity, and Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle. Bogart and Jones have woven a new libretto drawn from sources including the writings of physicist Brian Greene, the diaries of war veterans, and Stravinsky’s score. Visually stunning and exploding with life, A Rite is a meditation on aspects of time: the time of the cosmos, the time of a human life, time expressed in music and dance. A unique opportunity to see two legendary artists at work together. sosnoff theater July 6 at 8 pm; post-performance discussion with the artists July 7* at 3 pm; pre-performance conversation at 2 pm Tickets: $25, 40, 45, 55

* Round-trip transportation from Manhattan to Bard is available for this performance: $40. Reservations are required. A Rite was lead-commissioned by Carolina Performing Arts at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

DANCE/THEATER DANCE 5

“Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita is a soaring, dazzling novel; an extraordinary fusion of wildly disparate elements. It is a concerto played simultaneously on the organ, the bagpipes, and a pennywhistle, while someone sets off fireworks between the players’ feet.” —new york times Courtesy of Bulgakov House, Moscow, enhanced by Carol Zaloom

world premiere adaptation

The Master and Margarita After the novel by Mikhail Bulgakov

Adapted by János Szász and Gideon Lester Directed by János Szász Maruti Evans, set and lighting designer Oana Botez, costume designer One hot spring evening, a foreign professor appears in Moscow with a retinue that includes a beautiful naked witch and a giant talking cat with a taste for vodka. This elegant stranger is none other than the Devil, come to wreak havoc on the city and to demonstrate to a godless world the truth of good and evil. What follows is a story of unceasing verve and imagination, a joyous and sometimes terrifying journey that transports us from the alleyways and garrets of Moscow to the stage of a theater, from the deserts of biblical Judea to the glittering splendor of the Devil’s ballroom. And at the still center of this supernatural frenzy stands a pair of lovers: the Master, a writer, and Margarita, who must journey to hell to save him. A contemporary of Stravinsky, Mikhail Bulgakov wrote The Master and Margarita in the 1930s, but its satirical vision of the Soviet Union under Stalin was so acute that the novel was suppressed until 1967. The internationally renowned Hungarian film and theater director János Szász will apply his opulent theatrical vision to this new stage adaptation of Bulgakov’s beloved novel, now justly regarded as one of the great masterpieces of the 20th century. Suitable for audiences 15 and older (contains nudity). theater two previews July 11 and 12 at 7:30 pm Tickets: $30 performances July 13* and 18–20 at 7:30 pm July 14,* 17, 20, and 21* at 3 pm Tickets: $45

* Round-trip transportation from Manhattan to Bard is available for this performance: $40. Reservations are required. These performances have been underwritten by the Martin and Toni Sosnoff Foundation. This project has also received support from the Trust for Mutual Understanding. Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

THEATER 7

Six-Winged Seraph (detail), Mikhail Vrubel, 1905. ©Pushkin The Furies, Museum, John Singer Moscow/The Sargeant. Bridgeman ©Museum Artof Library Fine Arts

“Oresteia is a remarkable work by any standards . . . in the history of Russian music, it is unique.”—knut franke

Oresteia By Sergey Taneyev Russian libretto adapted by A. A. Venkstern after Aeschylus

American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director Directed by Thaddeus Strassberger Madeleine Boyd, set designer Mattie Ullrich, costume designer JAX Messenger, lighting designer Sergey Taneyev (1856–1915) defied tradition when he composed his musical trilogy Oresteia. Rather than calling upon Russian history or folk tales, as most Russian operas had to that point, Taneyev looked to Greek antiquity, basing the libretto on Aeschylus’ powerful trilogy—Agamemnon, Choephorae, and Eumenides—which chronicles the calamities that befell the accursed House of Atreus. This production at the Fisher Center is the first time this towering work will be staged in its entirety outside of Russia since its premiere at the Mariinsky Theatre in 1895. Sung in the original Russian, Oresteia is directed by Thaddeus Strassberger, who returns to SummerScape after his acclaimed productions in previous seasons of Giacomo Meyerbeer’s Les Huguenots, Franz Schreker’s Der ferne Klang, and Emmanuel Chabrier’s Le roi malgré lui. sosnoff theater July 26* and August 2 at 7 pm

opera talk with leon botstein sosnoff theater

July 28*, 31, and August 4* at 3 pm

July 28 at 1 pm

Tickets: $30, 60, 70, 90

Free and open to the public

Call 845-758-7948 or see page 28 for information about premium seating with special benefits.

* Round-trip transportation from Manhattan to Bard is available for this performance: $40. Reservations are required. Special support for this program is provided by Emily H. Fisher and John Alexander. Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

OPERA 9

Stravinsky, by Vera Stravinsky in Copenhagen, 1924. ŠHaags Gemeentemuseum, The Hague, Netherlands/The Bridgeman Art Library

“Music is given to us with the sole purpose of establishing an order in things, including, and particularly, the coordination between man and time.” —igor stravinsky

24 th

season

The Bard Music Festival

Stravinsky and His World When Igor Stravinsky died in 1971 at the age of almost 90, he was the world’s most famous composer and the most influential figure in 20th-century music—indeed the last classical music composer to make history of any kind. Who was this charismatic and complex composer? What is his legacy? How do we reconcile his compositions with the extensive body of commentary about music and culture he left behind, much of it written with Robert Craft, his long-time associate during his American years? Stravinsky began his career in his native Russia in the circle of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, but rapidly catapulted himself to international notoriety, inspired by the revival of interest in Russian folklore traditions, contact with new French music, and collaboration with key artists in Sergei Diaghilev’s circle. In the 1920s and 1930s, living in exile in Switzerland and France, Stravinsky pursued a self-consciously “classical” musical aesthetic that rejected late-Romantic premises regarding expressiveness and favored linearity and clarity, marked by great rhythmic invention and an uncanny ear for sonority. In 1939 Stravinsky came to the United States, where he remained until his death. He exerted a profound influence on American musical life, especially after delivering his Norton Lectures at Harvard, published as The Poetics of Music. But he also took another turn in his own work, ultimately adapting serial techniques pioneered by Arnold Schoenberg. In his American years, Stravinsky produced a wide array of masterpieces, from symphonies and ballet scores to religious works, including the Requiem Canticles, his last major composition. The 2013 Bard Music Festival, scheduled to coincide with the centenary of the scandal at the premiere of The Rite of Spring, will explore the full range of this great composer’s elusive and enigmatic personality and career. Through panels, lectures, and concerts, audiences will encounter works by Stravinsky—many of them rare—along with music by his Russian and French contemporaries; his fellow émigrés, including Schoenberg, Hindemith, Bartók, and Eisler; and by Americans he influenced, including Copland, Piston, and Carter.

This season is made possible in part through the generous support of the Board of the Bard Music Festival and the Friends of the Fisher Center, as well as grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts. Additional underwriting has been provided by Jeanne Donovan Fisher, James H. Ottaway Jr., Felicitas S. Thorne, Helen and Roger Alcaly, Bettina Baruch Foundation, Mrs. Mortimer Levitt, Michelle R. Clayman, Margo and Anthony Viscusi, and the Furthermore Foundation. Special support has also been provided by the Mrs. Mortimer Levitt Endowment Fund for the Performing Arts. Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

THE BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL 11

Evening Bells, Isaac Levitan, 1892. ©Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

weekend one

Becoming Stravinsky: From St. Petersburg to Paris Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) came of age in imperial St. Petersburg—a city where musical life was greatly influenced by his teacher, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, and which boasted a gloried Russian tradition arising out of the 19th century. Weekend One will trace Stravinsky’s path from his early Russian years to his first great successes in Paris writing for Sergei Diaghilev’s legendary Ballets Russes, most notably the scandalous premiere of The Rite of Spring. Alongside works by Stravinsky, such as his Symphonies of Wind Instruments, Concerto for Two Pianos, and Les noces, the concerts will present works by Maximilian Steinberg, Claude Debussy, Maurice Ravel, and Erik Satie, among many others.

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Friday, August 9

2013 Bard Music Festival Opening Night Dinner 5:30 pm Tickets include a pre-performance dinner in the Spiegeltent and a premium seat for the evening’s concert. To purchase opening night dinner tickets, contact the Box Office at 845-758-7900 or fishercenter@bard.edu. Please note: The Spiegeltent will be closed for regular dining on the evening of the dinner. program one

The 20th Century’s Most Celebrated Composer* sosnoff theater 7:30 pm preconcert talk: Leon Botstein 8 pm performance: Andrey Borisenko, bass; John Hancock, baritone; Kiera Duffy, soprano; Gustav Djupsjöbacka, piano; Melis Jaatinen, mezzo-soprano; Anna Polonsky, piano; Mikhail Vekua, tenor; Orion Weiss, piano; Bard Festival Chorale, James Bagwell, choral director; members of the American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Les noces (1914–17); Symphonies of Wind Instruments (1920, rev. 1947); Symphony of Psalms (1930); Concerto for Two Pianos (1935); Abraham and Isaac (1962–63); Songs Tickets: $25, 35, 50, 60

Saturday, August 10 panel one

Who Was Stravinsky? olin hall 10 am – noon: Christopher H. Gibbs, moderator; Leon Botstein; Marina Frolova-Walker; Stephen Walsh Free and open to the public program two

The Russian Context olin hall 1 pm preconcert talk: Marina Frolova-Walker 1:30 pm performance: Matthew Burns, bass-baritone; Dover Quartet; Gustav Djupsjöbacka, piano; Laura Flax, clarinet; Melis Jaatinen, mezzo-soprano; Piers Lane, piano; Orion Weiss, piano; and others Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Faun and Shepherdess, Op. 2 (1906–07); Four Studies, for piano, Op. 7 (1908); Three Movements from Petrushka, for piano solo (1921) Mikhail Glinka (1804–57) Trio Pathetique in D Minor (1832) Alexander Glazunov (1865–1936) Five Novelettes, for string quartet, Op. 15 (1886) Serge Rachmaninoff (1873–1943) Preludes Op. 23, Nos. 8 and 9 (1901–03) Songs and piano works by Modest Mussorgsky (1839–81), Pyotr Tchaikovsky (1840–93), Alexander Scriabin (1872– 1915), Nikolai Medtner (1880–1951), and Mikhail Gnesin (1883–1957) Tickets: $35 special event

Film: A Soldier’s Tale lászló z. bitó ’60 conservatory building 5 pm A film by R. O. Blechman, with live musical accompaniment Tickets: $12

* Round-trip transportation from Manhattan to Bard is available for this performance: $40. Reservations are required. Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

THE BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL 13

Saturday, August 10 (cont.) program three

1913: Breakthrough to Fame and Notoriety sosnoff theater 7 pm preconcert talk: Richard Taruskin 8 pm performance: American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Fireworks (1908); The Rite of Spring (1913) Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844–1908) Suite from The Invisible City of Kitezh (c. 1907) Anatoly Liadov (1855–1914) From the Apocalypse, Op. 66 (1910–12) Maximilian Steinberg (1883–1946) Metamorphosen, Op. 10 (1913) Tickets: $30, 50, 60, 75

Sunday, August 11 panel two

The Ballets Russes and Beyond: Stravinsky and Dance olin hall 10 am – noon: Kenneth Archer; Lynn Garafola; Millicent Hodson Free and open to the public program four

Modernist Conversations olin hall 1 pm preconcert talk: Byron Adams 1:30 pm performance: Alessio Bax, piano; Lucille Chung, piano; Gustav Djupsjöbacka, piano; Kiera Duffy, soprano; Benjamin Fingland, clarinet; Judith Gordon, piano; John Hancock, baritone; Melis Jaatinen, mezzo-soprano; Sharon Roffman, violin; Raman Ramakrishnan, cello; Lance Suzuki, flute; Bard Festival Chamber Players Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Three Japanese Lyrics (1912); Pribaoutki (1914) Claude Debussy (1862–1918) En blanc et noir (1915) Arnold Schoenberg (1874–1951) Pierrot lunaire (1912) Maurice Ravel (1875–1937) Trois poèmes de Stéphane Mallarmé (1913) Maurice Delage (1879–1961) Quatre poèmes hindous (1912–13) Works by Erik Satie (1866–1925); Manuel de Falla (1876–1946); and Béla Bartók (1881–1945) Tickets: $35 program five

Sight and Sound: From Abstraction to Surrealism* sosnoff theater 5 pm preconcert talk: Mary Davis 5:30 pm performance: Anne-Carolyn Bird, soprano; John Hancock, baritone; Melis Jaatinen, mezz0-soprano; Nicholas Phan, tenor; Ann McMahon Quintero, contralto; Anna Polonsky, piano; Orion Weiss, piano; members of the American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Ragtime (1918); Mavra (1921–22) Erik Satie (1866–1925) Parade (1916–17; arr. piano four-hand) Francis Poulenc (1899–1963) Le travail du peintre, song cycle for voice and piano (1956) Georges Auric (1899–1983), Arthur Honegger (1892–1955), Darius Milhaud (1892–1974), Francis Poulenc, and Germaine Tailleferre (1892–1983) Les mariés de la tour Eiffel (1921) André Souris (1899–1970) Choral, marche, et galop (1925) Tickets: $25, 35, 50, 60

* Round-trip transportation from Manhattan to Bard is available for this performance: $40. Reservations are required. 14

Sketch for Requiem Canticles, 1965. From Stravinsky in Pictures and Documents by Vera Stravinsky and Robert Craft (Simon and Schuster, 1978)

weekend two

Stravinsky Reinvented: From Paris to Los Angeles The second weekend will explore Stravinsky’s creative output during the interwar years and the music he composed in the United States, where he settled in 1939. This period was marked by an intense investigation of new trends in music and a shift in musical style from neoclassicism to serialism. The weekend will include a close look at music he encountered in this new environment, as well as at compositions that show Stravinsky’s powerful influence on his contemporaries and on a younger generation of composers.

Friday, August 16 special event

Filming Stravinsky: Preserving Posterity’s Image weis cinema 5 pm: Commentary by Charles M. Joseph During the 1950s and ’60s, Stravinsky became the most filmed composer of the 20th century. The subject of numerous European and North American documentaries, the composer’s notoriety was exploited widely by a television industry that embraced the arts as part of its cultural mission. This session will present clips from some of the more important film documentaries of the time. Free and open to the public

Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

THE BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL 15

Friday, August 16 (cont.) program six

Against Interpretation and Expression: The Aesthetics of Mechanization* sosnoff theater 7:30 pm preconcert talk: Christopher H. Gibbs 8 pm performance: Eric Beach, percussion; Judith Gordon, piano; Jonathan Greeney, percussion; Imani Winds; Piers Lane, piano; Peter Serkin, piano; Gilles Vonsattel, piano; Bard Festival Chamber Players and students of The Bard College Conservatory of Music, conducted by Leon Botstein Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Madrid (1950); Concerto for Piano and Winds (1923–24); Sonata for Two Pianos (1943–44) Béla Bartók (1881–1945) Sonata for Two Pianos and Percussion, Sz. 110 (1937) Edgard Varèse (1883–1965) Octandre (1923) Paul Hindemith (1895–1963) Kleine Kammermusik, Op. 24, No. 2 (1922) Olivier Messiaen (1908–92) from Quatre études de rythme (1949–50) Tickets: $25, 35, 50, 60

Saturday, August 17 panel three

Lenin, Hitler, Mussolini, and Stalin: Music, Ethics, and Politics olin hall 10 am – noon: Tamara Levitz, moderator; Tomi Mäkelä; Simon Morrison; Richard Taruskin Free and open to the public

program seven

Stravinsky in Paris olin hall 1 pm preconcert talk: Manuela Schwartz 1:30 pm performance: Xak Bjerken, piano; Randolph Bowman, flute; Sara Cutler, harp; Jordan Frazier, double bass; Marka Gustavsson, viola; Robert Martin, cello; Jesse Mills, violin; Harumi Rhodes, violin; Sharon Roffman, violin; Laurie Smukler, violin; Bard Festival Chamber Players Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Les cinq doigts, for piano (1921); Octet for Wind Instruments (1922–23); Duo Concertant (1931–32) Albert Roussel (1869–1937) Sérénade, for flute, harp, and string trio, Op. 30 (1925) Bohuslav Martinu° (1890–1959) String Quartet No. 4, H. 256 (1937) Sergey Prokofiev (1891–1953) Sonata for Two Violins, Op. 56 (1932) Arthur Lourié (1892–1966) Sonata for Violin and Double Bass (1924) Alexandre Tansman (1897–1986) Sonatina for Flute and Piano (1925) Tickets: $35

program eight

The Émigré in America sosnoff theater 7 pm preconcert talk: Leon Botstein 8 pm performance: John Relyea, bass-baritone; Rebecca Ringle, mezzo-soprano; Bard Festival Chorale, James Bagwell, choral director; American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Jeu de cartes (1936); Symphony in Three Movements (1942–45); Ode (1943); Requiem Canticles (1965–66) Arnold Schoenberg (1874–1951) Kol Nidre, Op. 39 (1938) Works by Hanns Eisler (1898–1962) Tickets: $30, 50, 60, 75 16

Sunday, August 18 program nine

Stravinsky, Spirituality, and the Choral Tradition olin hall 10 am performance: Commentary by Klára Móricz, with Bard Festival Chorale, James Bagwell, choral director; Frank Corliss, piano Works by Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971), Gesualdo da Venosa (1566–1613), Claudio Monteverdi (1567–1643), Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750), Serge Rachmaninoff (1873–1943), Francis Poulenc (1899–1963), Lili Boulanger (1893–1918), and Ernst Krenek (1900–91) Tickets: $30

program ten

The Poetics of Music and After olin hall 1 pm preconcert talk: Richard Wilson 1:30 pm performance: Rieko Aizawa, piano; Imani Winds; Alexandra Knoll, oboe; Piers Lane, piano; Jesse Mills, violin; Bard Festival Chamber Players Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Circus Polka, arranged for piano (1942, arr. 1944); Septet (1952–53) Anton Webern (1883–1945) Variations for Piano, Op. 27 (1936) Walter Piston (1894–1976) Suite, for oboe and piano (1931) Aaron Copland (1900–90) Nonet (1960) Elliott Carter (1908–2012) Woodwind Quintet (1948) Ellis Kohs (1916–2000) Sonatina for Violin and Piano (1948) Carlos Chávez (1899–1978) Fugas, for piano (1942) Tickets: $35

program eleven

The Classical Heritage* sosnoff theater 3:30 pm preconcert talk: Tamara Levitz 4:30 pm performance: Gordon Gietz, tenor; Jennifer Larmore, mezz0-soprano; Sean Panikkar, tenor; John Relyea, bass-baritone; Bard Festival Chorale, James Bagwell, choral director; American Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Leon Botstein, music director; and others Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) Perséphone (1933–34, rev. 1948); Oedipus Rex (1926–27, rev. 1948) Tickets: $30, 50, 60, 75

* Round-trip transportation from Manhattan to Bard is available for this performance: $40. Reservations are required. Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

THE BARD MUSIC FESTIVAL 17

The Red Shoes, 1948. ŠEagle-Lion Films Inc./Photofest

film festival

Stravinsky’s Legacy and Russian Émigré Cinema No 20th-century composer has had a greater impact on cinema than the protean, perpetually adventurous Igor Stravinsky. To provide an appropriately multifaceted exploration of Stravinsky’s world and legacy, the SummerScape 2013 Film Festival will be broken into two overlapping parts: a retrospective of Russian émigré filmmaking and a series of films influenced by the composer’s work. The first two weekends will focus on the films produced by the Albatros studio, which combine elements of early 20th-century modernism with a classic sensibility rooted in both French and Russian traditions. The collaboration of Stravinsky and Sergei Diaghilev on The Firebird in 1910 created a vogue for Russian aesthetics that eased the transition of those who left after the 1917 Revolution. In its treatment of an impresario patterned after Diaghilev, its reinvigoration of fin-de-siècle creative models, and its haunting depiction of allconsuming artistic obsession, Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s The Red Shoes sets the tone for the festival. The silent films included here, some presented for the first time in the United States, make similarly synthetic use of then-contemporary developments in narrative form, performance, and design. Émigré studios like Films Albatros helped support French directors committed to pushing the boundaries of cinematic art, including Jean Epstein, Marcel L’Herbier, Jacques Feyder, and Jean Renoir. They also provided an opportunity for exiled filmmakers to make the most of their encounter with the new styles available in Paris, extending the achievements of the pre-Revolutionary Russian cinema in dynamic ways. The pivotal link between these two streams was Ivan Mozzhukhin, whose hypnotic screen presence made him immensely popular in both Russia and France. Mozzhukhin is the central figure of the festival’s second weekend, which also includes the most important sound film produced by Albatros. Weekend Three begins with one of the defining films of the 1920s, Marcel L’Herbier’s L’inhumaine, which includes a scene recreating the famous riot during the premiere of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring. Other films during the last two weekends make provocative use of particular Stravinsky pieces (The Truth); were created by artists who collaborated with Stravinsky on important works (Rapt, Orpheus); or meditate upon his practice—Jean-Luc Godard’s stylistic heterogeneity is in dialogue with that of Stravinsky, while Claude Chabrol admired the composer’s assiduous dryness. Jacques Rivette’s La belle noiseuse brings the series full circle, using sections of Stravinsky’s late ballet Agon to enrich a subtle and profound exploration of the relationship between painter and model, the nature of creativity, and the meaning of a work of art. Films are screened in the Jim Ottaway Jr. Film Center in the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Center. Admission to all films is $12, $30 weekend pass, $110 season pass.

Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

FILM FESTIVAL 19

Casanova | 7 pm Alexandre Volkoff, 1927, France, 132 minutes A visually lush superproduction starring Ivan Mozzhukhin and directed by one of the most important Russian émigré filmmakers, Casanova blends witty gags with epic scope and is as remarkable for its stylistic exuberance as its elaborate sets. The color-tinted print, with a score by George Delerue, was restored by La Cinémathèque française.

Sunday, July 14 Double Love | 3 pm Le double amour, Jean Epstein, 1925, France, 104 minutes, and

L’or des mers Jean Epstein, 1923, France, 72 minutes This special presentation of two rare films by the same director offers a chance to explore the options available to ambitious filmmakers in this period. Both prints were restored by La Cinémathèque française. The new color-tinted Desmet 35mm print of Double Love was restored with the collaboration of the Franco-American Cultural Fund–DGA MPA SACEM WGA. The Late Mathias Pascal, 1926. Original poster by Boris Bilinsky. ©2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

weekend two

Films Albatros weekend one

East to West: Russian E´migrés Abroad

Friday, July 19 The Burning Brazier | 7 pm Le brasier ardent, Ivan Mozzhukhin, 1923, France, 97 minutes, and

Passing Shadows Friday, July 12 The Red Shoes | 7 pm Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1948, UK, 132 minutes One of the great color films, The Red Shoes is adapted from a Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale and takes the Ballets Russes as a model for total commitment to art (Diaghilev’s pupil Léonide Massine helped to choreograph the central dance sequence). The newly restored 35mm print is screening courtesy of the UCLA Film and Television Archive.

Saturday, July 13 The Lion of the Moguls | 2 pm Le lion des Mogols, Jean Epstein, 1924, France, 93 minutes The most reflexive of the émigré films, The Lion of the Moguls is also one of the most fascinating—a comic gem demonstrating the wide-ranging talent of the Russian colony in Paris. The new, color-tinted Desmet 35mm print was restored by La Cinémathèque française with the collaboration of the Franco-American Cultural Fund–DGA MPA SACEM WGA. This screening will include live piano accompaniment and will be preceded by a lecture by series curator Richard Suchenski.

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Les ombres qui passent, Alexandre Volkoff, 1924, France, 60 minutes The film that allegedly convinced Jean Renoir to direct, The Burning Brazier demonstrates Ivan Mozzhukhin’s flamboyant eccentricity at its finest. Mozzhukhin also wrote Passing Shadows, a comic masterwork inspired by Chaplin and Keaton. This is the North American premiere screening of a new, color-tinted Desmet 35mm print restored by La Cinémathèque française with the collaboration of the Franco-American Cultural Fund–DGA MPA SACEM WGA. Both films will have live piano accompaniment.

Saturday, July 20 The Late Mathias Pascal | 2 pm Feu Mathias Pascal, Marcel L’Herbier, 1926, France, 175 minutes The Late Mathias Pascal is an utterly unique synthesis of Ivan Mozzhukhin’s mercurial acting, Marcel L’Herbier’s cool elegance, and the labyrinthine structure of Luigi Pirandello’s source novel about a man who pretends he is dead. This is the North American premiere screening of a new, colortinted Desmet 35mm print restored by La Cinémathèque française with the collaboration of the Franco-American Cultural Fund–DGA MPA SACEM WGA.

The Lower Depths | 7 pm

The Truth | 6:30 pm

Les bas-fonds, Jean Renoir, 1936, France, 90 minutes In the last major Albatros production and one of the key films of the Popular Front, Jean Renoir continues his reinvention of theatrical adaptation, using Maxim Gorky’s classic play and a charismatic performance by Jean Gabin to create “a realistic poem on the loss of human dignity.”

La vérité, Henri-Georges Clouzot, 1960, France/Italy, 130 minutes, and

Sunday, July 21 The Living Image | 2 pm Le vertige, Marcel L’Herbier, 1926, France, 118 minutes Marcel L’Herbier traces the journey of a Russian family from Petrograd to Nice, expressing the emotions of the story through sets and costumes designed in collaboration with Robert Mallet-Stevens and Robert and Sonia Delaunay. The 35mm print was restored by the Archives françaises du film du CNC, Bois d’Arcy.

Altair Lewis Klahr, 1994, USA, 8 minutes, 16mm In The Truth, Henri-Georges Clouzot’s response to the French New Wave, Brigitte Bardot’s relationship with a young composer is linked to Stravinsky’s The Firebird, the same piece used in Lewis Klahr’s experimental short Altair.

Pierrot le fou | 9 pm Jean-Luc Godard, 1965, France/Italy, 110 minutes Jean-Luc Godard’s classic exploration of love on the run— starring Jean-Paul Belmondo and Anna Karina—can be compared, in both its formal ingenuity and emotional range, to Stravinsky’s treatment of mythological themes.

weekend four

The New Gentlemen | 5:30 pm Les nouveaux messieurs, Jacques Feyder, 1929, France, 123 minutes Jacques Feyder’s satirical treatment of Third Republic politics is distinguished for its location footage in Paris as well as its comic verve. This is the North American premiere screening of a new restoration by La Cinémathèque française.

weekend three

The Cinematic Legacy of Stravinsky, Part One Friday, July 26 L’inhumaine | 7 pm Marcel L’Herbier, 1924, France, 132 minutes One of the signature films of the silent era, L’inhumaine restages the riotous premiere of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring and connects Symbolist aestheticism to Art Deco design. The 35mm print was restored by the Archives françaises du film du CNC, Bois d’Arcy. With live piano accompaniment.

Saturday, July 27 Rapt | 2 pm Dimitri Kirsanoff, 1934, France/Switzerland, 86 minutes, and

Autumn Mists Brumes d’automne, Dimitri Kirsanoff, 1928, France, 12 minutes, and

Chanson d’Armor Jean Epstein, 1934, France, 38 minutes The first adaptation of a novel by Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz, who wrote the libretto for Stravinsky’s Histoire du soldat, Rapt features a nuanced performance by Dita Parlo, mountain landscapes, contrapuntal sound, and an original score by Arthur Honegger. The 35mm prints are courtesy La Cinémathèque française and La Cinémathèque suisse, with kind support from the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York. Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

The Cinematic Legacy of Stravinsky, Part Two Friday, August 2 Les bonnes femmes | 7 pm Claude Chabrol, 1960, France/Italy, 100 minutes Claude Chabrol’s characteristic mixture of black humor, sophisticated mise-en-scène, and behavioral naturalism is abundantly evident in this nuanced depiction of the lives of four Parisian women (two of them played by New Wave icons Bernadette Lafont and Stéphane Audran).

La cérémonie | 9 pm Claude Chabrol, 1995, France/Germany, 112 minutes Sandrine Bonnaire and Chabrol veteran Isabelle Huppert develop an unusual friendship in this enigmatic and eerily ritualistic critique of complacency and hypocrisy.

Saturday, August 3 Orpheus | 2 pm Orphée, Jean Cocteau, 1950, France, 95 minutes Jean Cocteau, who collaborated with Stravinsky on the opera Oedipus Rex in 1927, made this oneiric film about one of the most important Greek myths two years after Orpheus, the ballet Stravinsky developed with George Balanchine, premiered.

La belle noiseuse | 7 pm Jacques Rivette, 1991, France/Switzerland, 238 minutes, and

Three Homerics Stan Brakhage, 1993, USA, 6 minutes, 16mm Michel Piccoli, Emmanuelle Béart, and Jane Birkin star in Rivette’s masterpiece about the mysteries of art, which makes insightful use of excerpts from two Stravinsky ballets (Petrushka and Agon).

FILM FESTIVAL 21

The Bard Spiegeltent: A World of Delight Bindlestiff Family Cirkus. Photo by Karl Rabe

July 5 – August 18 Step inside the Spiegeltent and enter a different world. This authentic Belgian “mirror tent” will transport you to an age of elegance and allure where nothing is quite as it seems. Spice up your midsummer nights in the company of great live music, the hottest cabaret artists, and spectacular circus acts, with plenty of good food and drink. This season’s lineup includes many old favorites and a host of surprises, including our brilliant new house band, The Mayday Kingdom. Join us all summer long for a season of mystery, glamor, and fun.

Dining at the Spiegeltent

After Hours at the Spiegeltent

The Spiegeltent is the festival’s oasis, where you can enjoy food and drink from the Hudson Valley before and after performances. Our new house band will serenade you as you dine on Friday and Saturday evenings, and the lovely garden is the perfect spot to relax in the company of friends and festival artists long after the curtain comes down.

Thursday, July 11 and 18 Fridays and Saturdays, July 5 to August 17 (except July 20)

Dinner reservations are recommended, and may be made by calling the box office at 845-758-7900, or at opentable.com.

Drinks and after-hours dining available

Thursdays Dinner from 5:30 to 7:30 pm, open to all. After Hours Menu continues at 8 pm for patrons of the 8:30 pm Thursday Night Live show. Fridays and Saturdays Dinner with live music from 5:30 to 7:30 pm, open to all. Dinner service continues at 8 pm for patrons of the 8:30 pm Cabaret show. After Hours Menu available from 10 pm until midnight. Saturday and Sunday Lunch from 12:30 pm to 2:30 pm (except July 6)

10 pm to 12:30 am $10 cover, free with same-day ticket to any performance All-summer access with the $50 After Hours Pass

Late nights at the Spiegeltent are an all-live music affair with our new house band, an elegant and alluring gang of misfits called The Mayday Kingdom. Host Michael McQuilken (of Amanda Palmer & the Grand Theft Orchestra) welcomes you to a celebration of summer sundown with timeless music from the 1940s to the present. Come rattle your dancing bones to songs made famous by Louis Prima, Nina Simone, The Kinks, Bob Dylan, Talking Heads, and many others. Raise a glass in the company of friends, festival artists, and friendly spirits After Hours. The After Hours Pass is your ticket to season-long access to After Hours with The Mayday Kingdom. Pass holders pay no cover charge and receive a 20 percent discount on Spiegeltent ice cream.

Artist fees are supported in part by the Thendara Foundation and New Albion Records, Inc. 22

Spiegeltent Cabaret New this year: reserved seating for all performances and dinner can be ordered during the show. All shows begin at 8:30 pm. Tickets: $20 (standing room), $25 (booths), $30 (outer ring tables), $35 (inner ring tables) Special pricing for opening night with Sandra Bernhard: $30, 40, 50, 60

Sandra Bernhard* Friday, July 5 The utterly original comic, singer, and writer Sandra Bernhard opens the 2013 Spiegeltent season with her raucous mix of political satire, pop culture commentary, and cabaret. Backed by her live band, Bernhard’s performances are a thrilling hybrid of stand-up comedy and rock ’n’ roll. “Give the dame her due,” writes the New York Times. “It’s invigorating to be in the presence of a true original.”

Sandra Bernhard. Photo by Kevin Thomas Garcia

Justin Vivian Bond Is Mx America* Saturday, July 6 Tony-nominated cabaret star Justin Vivian Bond returns to the Spiegeltent to offer a unique take on the American experience through the lens of a Miss America pageant. This new show includes original music plus reinterpretations of songs by Tracy Chapman, Kate Bush, and Brecht/Weill. As the singular finalist in a highly unusual contest, Mx Bond expects to be judged in such categories as presentation, economic status, mental health, family values, and talent, all while creating an elegantly formidable evening of beauty and delight.

The Hot Sardines Jazz of 1920s Paris Friday, July 12 The Wall Street Journal calls the Hot Sardines “high-energy traditional jazz with a Parisian accent.” The collective, including a blustery brass lineup and a just-one-of-the-boys front-woman, creates music reminiscent of wartime Paris via New Orleans: a sound steeped in hot jazz, salty stride piano, and the kind of music Louis Armstrong used to make. This is straight-up, foot-stomping jazz from a near-century ago that stays resolutely in step with the current age.

EVIYAN Iva Bittová, Evan Ziporyn, Gyan Riley Saturday, July 13 EVIYAN is a new trio that joins three world-class musicians in an intimate, acoustic blend of world root, jazz, rock, and cabaret. Vocalist/violinist Iva Bittová draws on the sounds of her native Moravia and the rich traditions of the Roma people; clarinetist and composer Evan Ziporyn, a founder of the Bang on a Can All-Stars, studied with Balinese gamelan masters and collaborated with virtuoso musicians from around the world; and guitarist Gyan Riley combines the virtuosity of classical guitar and Hindustani music with the deftness of jazz and the grit of rock ’n’ roll. These eclectic, genre-crossing musicians together create a soundtrack for the 21st-century global village.

John Kelly & Dargelos Friday, July 19 Spiegeltent aficionados will remember the legendary cabaret artist John Kelly from his Joni Mitchell tribute Paved Paradise, and for his astonishing three-octave vocal range. John now returns in his own form, with a new evening that includes songs by Kurt Weill, Charles Aznavour, Holcombe Waller, Richard Einhorn, The Incredible String Band, Carol Lipnik, and Richard Thompson, among others. He will perform with his alter-ego Dargelos (brother of Dagmar Onassis), a genre-traipsing punk altar boy survivor, who returns in rageful, orphaned middle age to stretch, violate, and besottedly embrace the song form as a weathered sage. “When he sings, he brings the taste, attitude and high style of a great art-song interpreter to the stage along with a self-mocking sense of humor.”—New York Times

* 18 and up unless accompanied by a parent or guardian. The Hot Sardines. Photo by Harry Fellows

Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

SPIEGELTENT 23

world premiere

Taylor Mac Sings the American Songbook (1920s)* Friday, July 26 Obie-winning playwright, actor, and singer-songwriter Taylor Mac returns to the Spiegeltent with a chapter of his most ambitious performance yet. Over the next two years Taylor will sing 24 concerts, each celebrating a decade of popular music, ultimately stitching all 24 concerts together in a marathon extravaganza. For this show, Taylor and his band will premiere his concert of the glorious music and culture of the 1920s—a mash-up of surrealism, Ulysses, flappers, and women’s suffrage. “Taylor Mac seduces you, breaks your heart, patches it back up again and sews sequins along the scars.” —Irish Times

Theo Bleckmann Hello Earth! The Music of Kate Bush Saturday, July 27 Grammy-nominated vocalist Theo Bleckmann makes his Spiegeltent debut with Hello Earth!, a journey into the mysterious songbook of British pop recluse and cult hero Kate Bush, who first won acclaim at age 18 with her 1978 hit “Wuthering Heights.” Far more than simply re-creating Bush’s music, Bleckmann transports it to other realms with his astonishingly agile voice and distinctive vision. He creates a new interpretation that is accessibly sophisticated, unsentimentally emotional, and seriously playful. “[A] beautifully careful, creative, empathetic reinterpretation of the great Kate’s music.”—NPR

Maya Beiser. Photo by Merri Cyr

Maya Beiser The Music of Astor Piazzolla and Beyond Friday, August 9 Dubbed a “cello goddess” by the New Yorker and “the postmodern diva of the cello” by the Boston Globe, Maya Beiser will perform her unique take on the music of Astor Piazzolla and the early style of tango: a raw, provocative, and sensual sound that developed on the streets of Buenos Aires in the 1920s and ’30s. The evening also includes new works developed in residence at the Spiegeltent.

A Tribute to Julie London with Jazz Vocalist Marianne Solivan Saturday, August 10 One of the most buzzed-about jazz singers on the New York scene, Marianne Solivan mesmerizes audiences with her beautiful, smoke-filled voice and sensuous stage presence. In this romantic evening, Solivan channels the glamor and star power of legendary American singer and actress Julie London. Interpreting London’s sultry and languid sound, Solivan will sing standards as well as a few lesser-known gems in an evening that honors London’s great contributions to jazz.  world premiere

Bindlestiff Family Cirkus* Theo Bleckmann. Photo by Jörg Grosse-Geldermann

Weimar New York* Friday, August 2 and Saturday, August 3 Justin Vivian Bond returns to host the fourth season of Weimar New York at the Spiegeltent, a theatrical cabaret that uses Weimar-era Germany as inspiration for a fabulous gathering of burlesque, cabaret, comedy, drag, and East Village–scene performance artists. Curated by Earl Dax, this community of artists invites everyone to sing, dance, strip, and reflect on opposition, identity, dependence, and independence. May contain nudity. “Keeping the Weimar-era spirit of cultural resistance alive.”—Village Voice

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Friday, August 16 and Saturday, August 17 The Bindlestiffs as you’ve never seen them before! The Hudson Valley’s favorite circus family presents a brand new show developed especially for you, in residence at the Spiegeltent. For seven years, the Cirkus has sold out the tent with performances that weave together the rich heritage of European one-ring spectacle and the best of American vaudeville and sideshow acts. Jugglers, clowns, acrobats, and trapeze artists share the stage with musicians, magicians, dancers, and daredevils. Witness circus feats, sideshow marvels, and world-class entertainers in a most spectacular setting. “Old-fashioned variety entertainment of the sort Ed Sullivan so astutely scooped up, but with twists.”—New York Times

* 18 and up unless accompanied by a parent or guardian.

Thursday Night Live Thursday nights in the Spiegeltent are dedicated to great live music by an eclectic mix of local and international stars. The perfect start to a long summer weekend! All concerts begin at 8:30 pm Tickets: $20

Buke and Gase with special guest Sarah Neufeld from Arcade Fire New Sounds in Indie Rock Thursday, July 11 This Hudson- and Brooklyn-based duo creates gorgeous electric rock anthems with their homemade instruments, including the “buke” (an electrified six-string baritone ukulele) and the “gase” (a guitar-bass hybrid). Joined in this special concert by Arcade Fire’s violinist Sarah Neufeld.

Hungry March Band Anarchist Brass Band Thursday, July 18 Hungry March Band blares forth with a totally original sound that digests music from wherever brass bands are heard—the Balkans, India, New Orleans, Latin America—and combines it with big band, free jazz, and punk rock. Put on your dancing shoes, because they’ve got a party going on!

Ikebe Shakedown Soul, Afro-funk, and deep disco Thursday, July 25 Ikebe Shakedown delivers a driving set of tunes featuring signature Afrobeat elements. The band’s mighty horn section is anchored by tight, deep-pocketed grooves. Okayplayer called their debut album “an adventurous trip through time” and “one of the best releases of the year.”

Festival in Exile: Imharhan and Mamadou Kelly Music of Mali Thursday, August 1 Two singular voices from a troubled region share their music. Guitar genius and vocal stylist Mamadou Kelly has been an integral part of the most well-known groups in Malian music, offering a captivating combination of traditional and contemporary West African sounds. The rumble and grit of Imharhan, Saharan nomads with electric guitars, has captured ears and imaginations worldwide.

What Cheer? Brigade Street Brass Revelry Thursday, August 15 A 19-piece brass band mixing Bollywood, the Balkans, New Orleans, samba, and hip-hop, played with unequalled intensity. A raucous live experience, the Brigade defies categorization, appealing equally to punks and farmers, old and young.

Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu

Bindlestiff Family Cirkus Presents Kinder Spiegel The Spiegeltent’s resident circus family presents a series of special performances for the young and the young at heart. All shows at 11 am Tickets: $10 kids / 2-for-1 adults $15 Saturday, August 3 and Sunday, August 4 The Bindlestiff Family Cirkus performs Saturday, August 10 and Sunday, August 11 Saturday, August 17 and Sunday, August 18 Performances by some of the Bindlestiff’s favorite circus artistes

Midsummer Dancing Back by popular demand—on three Sunday evenings the Spiegeltent is transformed into a dance floor, complete with live music and instruction. Anyone can dance—come join us! Doors open at 5 pm Dance instruction at 5:30 pm Live band from 6:30 to 9 pm Venue closes at 10 pm Tickets: $20

Salsa Sunday, July 28 Diane Lachtrupp and Johnny Martinez from Albany’s Tango Fusion with Latin band Sensemaya

Tango Sunday, August 4 Ilene Marder of Woodstock Tango with the JP Jofre Hard Tango Trio and DJ La Rubia del Norte

Swing Sunday, August 11 Linda and Chester Freeman of Got2Lindy Dance with swing band Eight to the Bar

SummerScape Closing Party Sunday, August 18, from 7 to 11 pm $10 cover, free with same-day performance ticket and included in the After Hours Pass The Mayday Kingdom rocks a live music dance party with festival artists and staff. Join us to celebrate a summer of artistic adventure and give the Spiegeltent a proper send-off in the waning days of summer.

SPIEGELTENT 25

26 5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7 pm Oresteia (Sosnoff) 7 pm L’inhumaine (Ottaway Film Center) 8:30 pm Taylor Mac (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

25

5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 8:30 pm Ikebe Shakedown (Spiegeltent)

3 pm Oresteia (Sosnoff)

31

5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7 pm The Burning Brazier and Passing Shadows (Ottaway Film Center) 7:30 pm The Master and Margarita (Theater Two) 8:30 pm John Kelly & Dargelos (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7:30 pm The Master and Margarita (Theater Two) 8:30 pm Hungry March Band (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

3 pm The Master and Margarita (Theater Two)

*

19

18

17

*

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 2 pm Rapt with Autumn Mists and Chanson d’Armor (Ottaway Film Center) 5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 6:30 pm The Truth and Altair (Ottaway Film Center) 8:30 pm Theo Bleckmann (Spiegeltent) 9 pm Pierrot le fou (Ottaway Film Center) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

27

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 2 pm The Late Mathias Pascal (Ottaway Film Center) 3 pm The Master and Margarita (Theater Two) 5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) 7 pm The Lower Depths (Ottaway Film Center) 7:30 pm The Master and Margarita (Theater Two)

20

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 2 pm The Lion of the Moguls (Ottaway Film Center) 5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7 pm Casanova (Ottaway Film Center) 7:30 pm The Master and Margarita (Theater Two) 8:30 pm EVIYAN (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

13

5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 8 pm A Rite (Sosnoff) with post-show discussion 8:30 pm Justin Vivian Bond (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 8:30 pm Sandra Bernhard (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7 pm The Red Shoes (Ottaway Film Center) 7:30 pm The Master and Margarita (Theater Two) 8:30 pm The Hot Sardines (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

6

5

12

saturday

friday

5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7:30 pm The Master and Margarita (Theater Two) 8:30 pm Buke and Gase with Sarah Neufeld (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

thursday

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wednesday

JULY *

*

*

*

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 1 pm Opera Talk (Sosnoff) 3 pm Oresteia (Sosnoff) 5:30 pm Midsummer Dancing: Salsa (Spiegeltent)

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12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 2 pm The Living Image (Ottaway Film Center) 3 pm The Master and Margarita (Theater Two) 5:30 pm The New Gentlemen (Ottaway Film Center)

21

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 3 pm The Master and Margarita (Theater Two) 3 pm Double Love and L’or des mers (Ottaway Film Center)

14

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 2 pm Pre-show discussion (Sosnoff) 3 pm A Rite (Sosnoff)

7

sunday

*

Tickets and latest program updates at fishercenter.bard.edu Round-trip transportation from Manhattan to Bard is available for this performance: $40. Reservations are required. + For details on Spiegeltent dinners, see page 22.

wednesday

AUGUST

10 10 am BMF Panel One (Olin) 11 am Bindlestiff’s Kinder Spiegel (Spiegeltent) 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 1 pm Preconcert Talk (Olin) 1:30 pm BMF Program Two (Olin) 5 pm BMF Film: A Soldier’s Tale (Bitó Conservatory Building) 5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7 pm Preconcert Talk (Sosnoff) 8 pm BMF Program Three (Sosnoff) 8:30 pm Marianne Solivan (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

9 5:30 pm BMF Opening Night Dinner (Spiegeltent) 7:30 pm Preconcert Talk (Sosnoff) 8 pm BMF Program One (Sosnoff) 8:30 pm Maya Beiser (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

5 pm Stravinsky on Film (Weis Cinema) 5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7:30 pm Preconcert Talk (Sosnoff) 8 pm BMF Program Six (Sosnoff) 8:30 pm Bindlestiff Family Cirkus (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 8:30 pm What Cheer? Brigade (Spiegeltent)

*

16

15

*

11 am Bindlestiff’s Kinder Spiegel (Spiegeltent) 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 2 pm Orpheus (Ottaway Film Center) 5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7 pm La belle noiseuse and Three Homerics (Ottaway Film Center) 8:30 pm Weimar New York (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7 pm Oresteia (Sosnoff) 7 pm Les bonnes femmes (Ottaway Film Center) 8:30 pm Weimar New York (Spiegeltent) 9 pm La cérémonie (Ottaway Film Center) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 8:30 pm Festival in Exile: Imharhan and Mamadou Kelly (Spiegeltent)

10 am BMF Panel Three (Olin) 11 am Bindlestiff’s Kinder Spiegel (Spiegeltent) 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 1 pm Preconcert Talk (Olin) 1:30 pm BMF Program Seven (Olin) 5:30 pm Dinner (Spiegeltent) + 7 pm Preconcert Talk (Sosnoff) 8 pm BMF Program Eight (Sosnoff) 8:30 pm Bindlestiff Family Cirkus (Spiegeltent) 10 pm – 12:30 am After Hours (Spiegeltent)

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3

2

1

saturday

friday

thursday

*

*

*

10 am BMF Program Nine (Olin) 11 am Bindlestiff’s Kinder Spiegel (Spiegeltent) 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 1 pm Preconcert Talk (Olin) 1:30 pm BMF Program Ten (Olin) 3:30 pm Preconcert Talk (Sosnoff) 4:30 pm BMF Program Eleven (Sosnoff) 7 pm SummerScape Closing Night: Dance Party! (Spiegeltent)

18

10 am BMF Panel Two (Olin) 11 am Bindlestiff’s Kinder Spiegel (Spiegeltent) 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 1 pm Preconcert Talk (Olin) 1:30 pm BMF Program Four (Olin) 5 pm Preconcert Talk (Sosnoff) 5:30 pm BMF Program Five (Sosnoff) 5:30 pm Midsummer Dancing: Swing (Spiegeltent)

11

11 am Bindlestiff’s Kinder Spiegel (Spiegeltent) 12:30 pm – 2:30 pm Lunch (Spiegeltent) 3 pm Oresteia (Sosnoff) 5:30 pm Midsummer Dancing: Tango (Spiegeltent)

4

sunday

2013 Season Opera Premium Seating Program Every year, Bard’s SummerScape festival expands the boundaries of opera by producing an unjustly neglected masterpiece, such as The Distant Sound in 2010, Die Liebe der Danae in 2011, and The King in Spite of Himself in 2012, and Oresteia this coming summer. These ambitious productions are a cornerstone of the Fisher Center’s mission, giving audiences the opportunity to experience operas that are rarely performed by most major American companies. They are also expensive to produce—they require large casts, choruses, and orchestras, and have complex scenery and costumes. We invite you to become our partner in making possible this adventurous exploration of the operatic repertory through our new Premium Seating program, which offers a limited number of the very best seats for each performance, with special benefits available to purchasers at each price level. Ticket Price

Premium Benefit

$1,000

Reserved VIP parking for all your SummerScape and Bard Music Festival performances in the Sosnoff Theater and Theater Two, plus everything below

$500

An invitation to attend a staging rehearsal for the opera, plus everything below

$375

VIP seating for Oresteia, plus a production poster, signed by the cast

$200

VIP seating for Oresteia, plus a production poster

For more information and to order your Premium Seats, call the Fisher Center Box Office Manager at 845-758-7948.

Support The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College friends of the fisher center Since its opening in 2003, the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts has transformed cultural life in the Hudson Valley with world-class programming. Our continued success depends on individuals such as you. Become a Friend of the Fisher Center today.

Individual Giving Friends of the Fisher Center membership is designed to give individual donors the opportunity to support their favorite programs through the Fisher Center Council or Bard Music Festival Council. As a Friend of the Fisher Center, you will enjoy a behind-the-scenes look at Center presentations as well as exclusive special events and services throughout the year.

Corporate Giving Many opportunities exist for corporate sponsorship and patronage of the Fisher Center and its programs. By joining the Corporate Council, your company and its employees not only show their support for the Hudson Valley cultural community, but also receive a wide range of marketing opportunities and membership benefits. The Fisher Center will work closely with Council members to create the benefits package best suited to their needs. As a Friend of the Fisher Center or Corporate Council member, you will gain access to a number of exclusive special events and services created for supporters. Membership levels vary, and based on your gift amount, benefits may include: • Advance notice of programming • Free tours of the Fisher Center • Invitations for you and a guest to a season preview event • Invitations for you and a guest to a backstage technical demonstration • A copy of the Bard Music Festival book • Access to an exclusive telephone line for Patron Priority handling of ticket orders • Invitations for you and a guest to a reception with the artists For more information on how to become a Friend of the Fisher Center, contact Linda Baldwin at 845-758-7414 or visit fishercenter.bard.edu/support.

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Major support for the Fisher Center’s programs has been provided by: Helen and Roger Alcaly The Ann & Gordon Getty Foundation Bettina Baruch Foundation Carolyn Marks Blackwood Michelle R. Clayman Stefano Ferrari and Lilo Zinglersen Catherine C. Fisher and Gregory A. Murphy Emily H. Fisher and John Alexander Jeanne Donovan Fisher Jane W. Nuhn Charitable Trust Dr. Barbara Kenner Edna and Gary Lachmund Mrs. Mortimer Levitt Amy and Thomas O. Maggs The Marks Family Foundation Martin and Toni Sosnoff Foundation Millbrook Tribute Garden, Inc. The Mortimer Levitt Foundation Inc. National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Peter Kenner Family Fund of the JCF Denise S. Simon and Paulo Vieiradacunha Martin T. and Toni Sosnoff New York State Council on the Arts Thendara Foundation Felicitas S. Thorne True Love Productions Trust for Mutual Understanding Margo and Anthony Viscusi Millie and Robert Wise The Wise Family Charitable Foundation

NYSCA

New York State Council on the Arts

Sosnoff Theater Seating C

Seating for all events in the Sosnoff Theater, Theater Two, Olin Hall, and Spiegeltent Cabaret is reserved. Seating for other Spiegeltent events and Ottaway Film Center is general admission.

C

B

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A

Box 207

Box 208

second balcony

Box 206

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Box 106

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Box 102

Box 107

first balcony

Box 105

Box 103

Box 101

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U

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R

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P

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orchestra and parterre

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Price Level 1 Price Level 2 Price Level 3 Price Level 4 Wheelchair-accessible seating Seats not available for all performances

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Ticket Prices Make your own subscription! Save 25 percent when you order four or more different events with each subscription. Our senior citizen discount is now 20 percent on single tickets! Take your discount on the order form. Please refer to website, fishercenter.bard.edu, for complete ticket policies. event

price 4

sosnoff theater A Rite Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and SITI Company

full price / subscription price

$25/18.75

price 3

$40/30

price 2

price 1

$45/33.75

$55/41.25

Oresteia $30/22.50 $60/45 $70/52.50 $90/67.50 (For information about premium seating with special benefits for this event, call 845-758-7948 or see p. 28.) theater two The Master and Margarita

$45/33.75 ($30/22.50 for preview)

event

standing room

spiegeltent Sandra Bernhard

booth

outer ring table

inner ring table

full price / subscription price $30/22.50 40/30

50/37.50

60/45

Cabaret

$20/15

30/22.50

35/26.25

Thursday Night Live

$20/15

Bindlestiff Family Cirkus presents Kinder Spiegel 2-for-1 Adults Child

$15 $10

Midsummer Dancing

$20

After Hours

$50 season pass ($10 at the door)

event

full price / subscription price

weekend pass

season pass

ottaway film center Film

$12/9

30

110

event

price 4

price 2

price 1

bard music festival Program 1 Program 2 Program 3 Program 4 Program 5 Program 6 Program 7 Program 8 Program 9 Program 10 Program 11 Tickets to all 11 programs Film: A Soldier’s Tale

full price / subscription price $25/18.75 $35/26.25 $35/26.25 $30/22.50 $50/37.50 $35/26.25 $25/18.75 $35/26.25 $25/18.75 $35/26.25 $35/26.25 $30/22.50 $50/37.50 $30/22.50 $35/26.25 $30/22.50 $50/37.50 $251.25 $318.75 $12/9

$50/37.50

$60/45

$60/45

$75/56.25

$50/37.50 $50/37.50

$60/45 $60/45

$60/45

$75/56.25

$60/45 $375

$75/56.25 $431.25

25/18.75

price 3

Order Form

Buy tickets and get the latest program and schedule updates at fishercenter.bard.edu Please call the Box Office at 845-758-7900 with questions or for help in placing your order. Mail completed form to Fisher Center Box Office, PO Box 5000, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY 12504.

Name Street address City

State

Phone (day)

Zip

Phone (evening)

E-mail

Please include your phone number so that we may reach you if there is a problem with your order. ❑ Check here if the above information is different from the mailing address label so that we may update our records. ❑ Check here if wheelchair seating is required, or call 845-758-7900 if you require special accommodation. Make your own subscription Save 25 percent when you order four or more different events with each subscription. Event

Date/Time

Subscription Price

1.

$

2.

$

3.

$

4.

$

5.

$

6.

$

7. Complete Bard Music Festival package: Tickets to all 11 programs

$251.25/318.75/375/431.25 Subtotal

$

Number of Subscriptions

x

Subscription Total

$

Single Tickets Event

Date/Time

Quantity x Price

Total

1.

$

2.

$

3.

$ Subtotal

$

Take your senior citizen (62 and over) discount on single tickets: subtract 20 percent

$

I would like to become a Friend of the Fisher Center with a tax-deductible contribution of: Total

$100/350/750/1500 $

Payment Information ❑ Check enclosed (payable to Bard College)

Cut here

❑ Charge my credit card (circle one)

Name (as it appears on card)

American Express

Discover

MasterCard

Visa

Signature of cardholder

Billing address (if different from above) City

State

Account number

Expiration date

Zip

31

The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College. Photo: ©Peter Aaron ’68/Esto

Saturday, July 20, 2013

10TH ANNIVERSARY GALA CELEBRATION

Save the Date

Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage Paid Bard College

845-758-7900 | fishercenter.bard.edu

PO Box 5000 Annandale-0n-Hudson, NY 12504-5000

Bard College


2013 SummerScape and Bard Music Festival Brochure