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est GLOBAL LIVING WITH AN AUSTRALIAN TWIST

Solitary

space

Modern living

working to feed your soul

ISSUE #2 2011

Regulars

4 Editors Letter

7 Cover Style

8 Contributors Choice

10 Trend Report

Est Magazine Issue 2

Solitary Space

Favourite things

Stars, Stripes and...

18 Shop

20 Atelier

22 Blog Love

24 Fashion

Acid Brights

Abbie McCulloch

Yellow, Blue & Fab

Colour Combinations

28 Look Book Look

30 Editors Choice

32 Get The Look

48 Real or Replica

Humanoid

Natural Charm

Hamptons Style

A Story to Tell

54 Designer Profile

98 Food

100 Travel

104 Global Creative

Will Dangar

Little Nippers

Island Luxe

Falling in Love

Features 34 A Balance of Beauty DENMARK One of Denmark’s most renowned jewellery designers, Charlotte Lynggaard, takes us inside her summer house, north of Copenhagen.

56 Seeking Solace HAMPTONS, UNITED STATES After a weekend with artist friends in East Hampton Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock purchased a home and property that was to become both their haven and their hell.

70 Finding Home MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA Kim and Peter De WInter and their three children relied upon family in Melbourne to give the seal of approval for the Toorak house that they now call home.

80 New Colonie Brooklyn, United States The first thing you notice about Tamer Hamawi is his smile and he has much to smile about: foremost is ‘Colonie,’ his brand new, already acclaimed restaurant in Brooklyn Heights.

92 The Midas Touch MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA Renowned Melbourne chef Andrew McConnell has recently opened his new restaurant, and not only the foodies are keen to experience the subtle delights of Golden Fields.

Editors Letter Welcome back to Est. We have been completely overwhelmed by the support you have all shown us... and thrilled that you are inspired by what you see. Working on a digital magazine has led us to dream about transportable offices - working in locations beyond the white walls of our office confines. The inspiration for the front cover is exactly this. Working from anywhere, whether it be lakeside, snow topped mountain, ocean front or bustling inner city cafe. Inspiration is all round us - once we leave the office behind! We found inspiration at Sydney Opera House last month at the X Media Lab where we worked with mentors and creatives from around the world in the field of digital media. The Sydney Opera House too knows the importance of collaborating with creatives to produce stunning inspiration. As a “love song to creativity”, The Sydney Opera House reworked Nick Cave’s ‘The Ship Song’ with artists over 12 months to produce the most stunning video and audio sound track I have seen in a long time. If this does not inspire you to create your very best - nothing will! Where is your ideal working location? We’d love you to share with us where you seek inspiration... Check out “The Ship Song” on the opposite page and amazing behind the scenes video on a dedicated YouTube Channel. If you love the song like we do you can buy in iTunes.

Sian Macpherson Editor in Chief

VIDEO © Sydney Opera House

est GLOBAL LIVING WITH AN AUSTRALIAN TWIST

Editor in Chief Sian MacPherson sian@estemag.com Creative Director Lynda Evans lynda@estemag.com

CoNTRIBUTORS Editorial Team AnoukB, Tamie Freier, Robyn Lea, Khaseem Warren PHOTOGRAPHY Peter Bennetts, Jacob Gils, Marjon Hoogervorst, Sarah Wood Words Susie Donald, Julie Ralphs, Chauntelle Roelandts, Toby Scott.

ENQUIRIES Editorial editorial@estemag.com Production production@estemag.com Advertising advertising@estemag.com

Copyright The contents and design of this publication are the property of Est Magazine, and are protected under copyright law and international treaty. All rights reserved. Except under the conditions described in the Copyright Act 1968 and subsequent amendments, no part of this publication may be reproduced or communicated by any process without prior permission in writing. An individual may download or print out a file for their personal use only. All other uses are subject to permission.

Cover Style

est

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ISSUE #2 2011

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GLOBAL LIVING WITH AN AUSTRALIAN TWIST

Solitary

space 4 3

Modern living

working to feed your soul

PhotoGRAPHy Toby Scott PRODUCITON LYNDA EVANS Location Secrets On The Lake 1. iPad2, Apple 2. Moleskine Weekly Diary, Notemaker 3. Collection of Popular Penguins, Rosetta Books 4. Lambs Wool Blanket, Kova Lifestyle 5. Mud Australia Ceramics, Kova Lifestyle 6. AJ Floor Lamp, Corporate Culture 7. Walter Knoll FK Bucket Chair, Living Edge.

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Whether your office be a corporate workstation, above your studio or in your own dining room, step outside and seek some inspiration. 6

ANOUK B Trend SPOTTER

CHAuNTELLE ROELANDTS WRITER

ROBYN LEA Photographer

What design purchase have you made lately? My beautiful big American walnut table “sweet 33” which is already stuffed with all kind of fashion and lifestyle magazines. What do you covet? Long legs (not to look at but to have them) and kids, especially my own daughter because she is so she. Favourite designer / design influence? Paola Navone Favourite blog / website? Vosgesparis, Ditte Isager & Bodie and Fou Favourite online shop? Smallable No. 1 design / styling tip? Even if you buy your style with a professional, keep your own style visible. Say goodbye to professionals who want to make your style invisible.

What design purchase have you made lately? I bought an industrial floor lamp that’s last life was in a hotrod workshop. What do you covet? Overseas adventures and ongoing artistic expression. Favourite designer / design influence? Living in Melbourne there’s a passion for design all around me. Favourite blog / website? Hyperbole and a Half. It’s funny and odd. Favourite online shop? Etsy, but I’ve had to unsubscribe. If I don’t see it then I don’t know I want it. No. 1 design / styling tip? Love yourself and your work.

What design purchase have you made lately? Belgian Linen Bedsheets from Restoration Hardware in New York.

What do you covet? Anything from Federico de Vera in Soho New York. Favourite designer / design influence? Spazio Rossana Orlandi in Milan and Fornasetti. Favourite website? Great Aupair. Favourite online shop? Peck Number one design tip Draw on your walls and feel good about it. Number one styling tip? Antonio Marras for any occasion. Photography tip? There is only one sun (i.e. never use more than one light source).

TAMie FREIER STYLIST

Marjon Hoogervorst Photographer

What design purchase have you made lately? Pure Linen Stone colour throw for my bed from Merci in Paris. The next one will hopefully be the Lean Floor Light by Jenny Back. What do you covet? An old bakery / church or warehouse in Melbourne and designing our dream home. Favourite designer / design influence? Vincent Van Duysen and Paola Navone are inspiring designers and I always draw inspiration from fresh, contemporary and natural interiors with a mix of cultural elements. Favourite blog / website? I am a blog addict so this is tricky: I love waking up to The Design Files Daily, Follow Studio is a must for inspiring images, Emma’s

What design purchase have you made lately? A Ghost couch from Gervasoni. When I’m laying on it, it feels like the couch is hugging me ;) What do you covet? Love and happiness! In my home, the Philipscabinet from Piet Hein Eek.

Design Blogg for amazing Swedish designs, Daily Imprint, Design Sponge - arghhhh too many to name!! Oh, and having moved from Sydney to Melbourne to live I am addicted to the Broadsheet website!! Favourite blog / website? Bloesem Blogs, & Pompoon. Favourite online shop? I love Donna Wilson, Mengsel and Mini & Maximus. No. 1 photography tip? Listen to your heart, stay close to yourself, feel free to have your own opinion. Visit Gup for information about good photography in every discipline.

All photos are under the protection of the General Terms and Conditions of the Fotografen Federatie (Photographers Federation of the Netherlands).

REGULAR Style Counsel

Stars, Stripes & Acid Brights Stylist & TREND REPORTER Anouk B Photography Marjon Hoogervorst

From the streets into your home, pack a punch with stars, stripes and acid brights. Take your cues from fashion with colour blocking and bright acid pops of colour then inject your own fresh take with stars and stripes to the mix. Refuse to be a slave to fashion. Take your own interpretation of what’s hot and create a space and style that feels uniquely you. Bright pinks, indigo blues and acid yellows are not only on trend and ‘oh so now’ they can instantly lift a room and fill the void of gloom. Trends guide us on what is fresh and current and act as a reference to our own creations. Take a trend and make it your own by adding your own quirky twist - and in the end, in your own style, you will be the star!

REGULAR Style Counsel

REGULAR Style Counsel

REGULAR Style Counsel

REGULAR SHOP

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Acid BRIGHTS

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Edited by Khaseem Warren & Sian MacPherson

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1. Current/Elliott, Blue skinny jeans, Colette 2. Turquoise leather bag, Miu Miu 3. Skitsch Aka Chair Hub Fur fuchsia heel, Jimmy Choo, 7. iPad Cover, Claire Vivier 8. Coiled Bambu Salad Bowls Vincent2 9. Azzedine Radio, Vincent2 12. Adam Yellow skirt, Net-A-Porter 13. Resin bangles, Dinosaur Designs 14. Painted Beauty 17. Red Garnet Lupino patent leather pump, Stella McCartney 18. “Rosy” oil on canvas, Anastasia Pelias 19

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Add a little pop and fizz to your world with an acid bright!

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rniture 4. Nixon, 42-20 PU Chrono watch in yellow, Watchismo 5. Moroso Blur Sofa, Hub Furniture 6. Suede Alaia Orange iPad cover, Net-A-Porter 10. Bouchra Jarrar, Red layered crepe silk dress, Browns 11. Thyko y Glide on Nail Colour Holiday Collection, Mecca 15. Baggu Backpack Sea, Vincent2 16. Toobe Lamp Top3 9. Patricia Urquiola Frilly Chair, Kartell

REGULAR ATELIER

Abbey McCulloch Women, mothers, daughters, sisters and fashion magazines inspire Australian artist Abbey McCulloch. Her work is a delicious infusion of charcoal, wash, oils and vibrant colour. In 3 words describe your style. Personal, spontaneous and brave. What are you currently working on? A new piece for a Helen Gory Galerie pop-up show at MOP in Sydney. Where do you live and work right now? I live and work on the Gold Coast, ironic I know, but it can’t be compared to a big city, it has a rarified vitality in it’s own right and a simple lifestyle that few get to relate to. It’s like being on permanent holiday - or in the 60’s. What are you reading? Mostly magazines French, U.K and U.S Vogue - I don’t have the attention span for books at the moment. What are you listening to? Kitty, Daisy and Lewis, early Elvis and for some reason Bob Dylan’s sound track to Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid is really getting me through this winter. What are you watching? Guilty pleasure TV - Downton Abbey, Offspring, French Food Safari, Masterchef. I know, I know, I should be reading more books. What is the book that changed your life? ‘Will you please be quiet please?’ by Raymond Carver. What is your greatest extravagance? Champagne, magazines and oil paint.

From Top: Abbey in her Gold Coast studio, The Major, 2010, Oil on canvas, 100x150cm, Nancy and the Grey, 2010, Oil on canvas, 100x150cm OPPOSITE: Gloria, 2010, Oil on canvas, 100x100cm.

REGULAR BLOG LOVE

Yellow, Blue & Fab We love to look to these fabulous blogs for inspirationwhether they be in Sweden, Melbourne or sunny Sydney - these girls know what’s hot - and don’t bother with what’s not”

YELLOWTRACE Sharing her love of great design and clever people, Sydney sider, Dana at Yellowtrace makes it her mission to showcase the best in both emerging and established talent for the world of interiors, fashion, photography, travel, lifestyle and ‘anything else worth knowing about’. Yellowtrace takes us off the beaten path to discover the unexpected. A journey that fills us with continual wonder!

SIMPLE BLUEPRINT This blog gives readers an inside glimpse to the cool world of savvy Swedish stylist and design maven, Joanna Swanson. Crammed with inspirational images and a super friendly guide to the city of Stockholm to boot you would be hard pressed to find a more inspiring read to go with your morning cup of coffee.

BUSY BEING FABULOUS Est’s very own Melbourne based star stylist Deb McLean reigns supreme when it comes to ‘Busy Being Fabulous’. Not only is this title so relevant to everyone of our fabulous Est readers - the content also incites excitement, lust and inspiration at every turn. With her cool aesthetic and love of all things white black and a thousand shades of grey, Deb’s blog never fails to leave us wanting more.

PHOTO Ideat Magazine

PHOTO © Erin Hansen

PHOTO © CHANCE 2010

PHOTO Helt Enkelt Hos Mig

PHOTO © Restaurang Bar

Photo © Marinó Thorlacius

REGULAR FASHION

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Tangerine

DREAM Edited by Khaseem Warren Photography Sarah Wood

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1. Country Road, orange stripe kimono sleeve top, Country Road 2. 1000 Days Clutch, Sass & Bide 3. MARC leather pencil skirt, Moschino 6. Tan leather double ring hip belt, Country Road 7. Current/Elliot, leopard je Gorman 10. Shourouk, metal & semi precious stone neck piece, Belinda 11. Milly, brass & resin stretch bra

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Give yourself a sleek edge in metallics, tan & tangerine hues.

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C by Marc Jacobs, enamel flower ring, Bergdorf Goodman 4. Steven Alan Orange silk tank, Grace 5. Gold eans, Colette 8. Céline, leather colour block tote, Christine +61 (0)3 9654 2011 9. Gold sequin “Shirley” top, acelet, Bergdorf Goodman 12. Platform Sandals, Givenchy

REGULAR FASHION

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RED&WHITE

&BLUE Edited by Khaseem Warren PhotoGRAPHY Sarah Wood

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1. Red leather weave satchel, Country Road 2. Trelise Cooper, silver sequin jacket & Grey silk, ocelot print t Cotton rose necklace at Christine +61(0)396542011 5. ‘Molten’ print dress, Country Road 6. London Blue Top silk scarf at Manon Cie +61(0)398210760 9. Vaille, Cashmere knit, Grace 10. Anya Hindmarch, Valorie glitte

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With a palette that works in any season, you won’t put a foot wrong with red, white and blue.

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tunic top Grace 3. Goossens, Gunmetal & blue crystal cuff at Christine +61(0)396542011 4. Maria Calderara, paz Ring, Bergdorf Goodman 7. High waisted trouser, Country Road 8. Faliero Sarti, red & blue spot cotton/ er fabric multicolored clutch, Christine +61(0)396542011 11. Murmur patent leather & velvet flats Habbot

REGULAR Look Book Look

Humanoid “Known for their love of layering, inside out look details and quality fabrics that envelop the body, Humanoid’s AW 11-12 collection is a masterpiece in clothing that is suited to all elements of nature. Crumpled cashmere , loose dresses and soft buttery leathers would have us looking chic in any desert sandstorm or winter soiree at Palm Beach. Silk cashmere dresses combined with an over sized, chunky knit cardy keep’s you looking cool without trying too hard. We love the leather pants for merging the rock star edge with the uptown style. Humanoid masters the ‘thrown together look’ again.

REGULAR EDITORS PICKS

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natural

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This season we are inspired by the natural elements of timber, clay, leather, linen and silk.

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1. Vietnamese Bowls - TineK Home 2. Van Rycke Toujours Bracelet, It’s The New Black 3. Fulani leather & c Moller Photography 6. Giant Skinny Belt, Anthropologie 7. Ash Stacked Shelf System, JDS Architects for M Elk 11. Dip Dye Cushion, Aura Home 12. Dog beds with running Stitch, Canvas 13. Silk Oval Dress, Elk

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anvas jacket Jacket, Day Birger Mikkelsen 4. Emperor light, Moooi 5. “Long Way Home” Photo Print Anna Muuto 8. Box Tan Leather, Orson & Blake 9. Kekke Chaise Lounge, Piet Boon 10. Malmo Gathered Clutch,

REGULAR GET THIS LOOK

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Heart of the home

HAMPTONS STYLE Tamie Freier shows us how to recreate the signature style in this Hampton’s inspired kitchen using white - of course. EDITED BY Tamie Freier 5

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1. The Lonian bridge style tap, English Tapware 2. Preserved Hydrangeas, Alibaba 3. Daniel Barbera - Uccio Chair, Map International 4. Satin Knobs and Pulls, Mother of Pearl & Sons 5. Stretcher Base Dining Table Recycled Elm, Perfect Pieces 6. White Pichet Moyen Jug, Astier De Villatte 7. Porcelain plate Orient House 8. Croco 95 handwoven rattan pendant lamp, Gervesoni

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FEATURE DENMARK

A BALANCE OF BEAUTY Renowned Danish jewellery designer, Charlotte Lynggaard, takes us inside her summer house, north of Copenhagen. Photography Jacob Gils | Words Julie Ralphs

Nestled just north of Copenhagen, between the sea and the city, is the summer hideaway for one of Denmark’s most renowned jewellery designers, Charlotte Lynggaard. Carrying on the family business created by her father, Charlotte continues the legacy that saw Ole Lynggaard appointed as Purveyor to The Royal Danish Court. As a mother of three who is fascinated by the light from the sky and the reflection of the sea, Charlotte also gets much of her inspiration from the changing colours in the forests surrounding her home. “Space creates light and light is something of a luxury in Denmark, as the winters can be quite long and incredibly cold,” says Charlotte. To achieve this sense of light and space, Charlotte raised the ceilings in some rooms and created open spaces elsewhere in the house. “It’s all about opening up the interior in various ways, using light, tone-on-tone,

FEATURE DENMARK

FEATURE DENMARK

whites and soft, muted greys. I believe a home should be open as much as possible with lots of natural light. It’s very uplifting for the soul,� adds Charlotte. Working predominantly with colour in her designs at work, Charlotte was inspired to create a calm, neutral colour scheme at the summer house to delineate the two areas of her life, work and play. The result is a calming ambience that allows her the tranquillity and space to seek inspiration that is more conducive to her design process. Like her jewellery designs, where diamonds and other precious gems are exquisitely carved to capture the utmost light and colour, Charlotte is continuously seeking just the right balance of colour, contrast and continuity in her home. Amidst this peaceful palate of subdued hues and clean Scandinavian lines are occasional accents, from the richly textured fabrics, perfectly poised wicker baskets and other understated adornments. Here there is a balance of power and streamlined sensibility that creates an exclusive yet casual ambience, whilst allowing the impact of the natural surrounds to infuse her home with a sublime sense of the serene.

FEATURE DENMARK

This house on a hill boasts a breathtakingly beautiful panoramic view of the ocean that stretches beneath. Rebuilt beyond recognition, the renovations undertaken by Charlotte are twice the size of the original house, and remain in a continual state of transformation. After attending the design school at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, Charlotte worked in advertising in Paris and studied at the Rolf M端ller Goldsmith School in Switzerland. But it was her travels to Japan that predominantly inspired her design aesthetic the most. Every counter, cupboard and piece of furniture is tailor-made to her personal sense of aesthetics, adding an array of different materials as accents. Like the jewellery she designs. The summer home reflects both grace and subtlety and pays tribute to the beauty of the natural patina of timbers, fabrics and metals. The interior works in part due to the successful union of the Japanese influence of stark beauty with the contemporary Scandinavian furnishings, creating an harmonious environment in which one can escape a busy life. Drawing on the calm effect of the ocean waves and the wind blowing the leaves of the trees whilst anchored in the clean lines of her expansive interior, Charlotte Lynggaard has successfully created a physical manifestation of ying, juxtaposed against the yang of the energetic inner city just a short drive away.

FEATURE DENMARK

FEATURE DENMARK

FEATURE DENMARK

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CHARLOTTES style Take a cue from Charlotte Lynggaard an bring the outside in. Accessorise with natural elements both inside your home and on the street. EDITED BY Lynda Evans

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1. Ingo Maurer Zettel’z 5 Lamp, Space Furniture2. Black Leather Arne Jacobsen Egg Chair, Fritz Hansen 3. Mogens Lassen Kubus Candle Holder, By Lassen 4. Chunky Dining Table and Bench, Robert Plumb 5. Wire Basket and Bowl Antique Bronze, Orson & Blake 6. Chrome / Glossy White Bestlite Desk Lamp, Bestlite Gubi 7. Josef Hartwig Bauhaus chess set & board, Naef

Photo Helena Christensen, Ambassador for Charlotte Lynggaards Lotus and Dew Drops Collection Š Ole Lynggaard

REGULAR Real or Replica

Real or Replica ? The Hans J Wegner CH24 “Wishbone Chair”

A story to tell...

Photography Toby Scott PRODUCTION & STYLING Lynda Evans WORDS Sian MacPherson

REGULAR Real or Replica

If a picture can tell 1000 words then a chair can recount a thousand stories. Some long, some short and some oft repeated. Born from a desire to create a chair that lasts from generation to generation, the Wishbone chair was designed to become part of our lives and lay witness to our stories. In 1949, Carl Hansen & Son, the purveyors of the very finest in furniture design, released the Hans Wegner ‘Wishbone Chair’, or the CH24 for the design purists amongst us. Widely referred to as the ‘Chair Master’, Wegner is responsible for designing what is arguably one of the most iconic chairs of the modern era. The structural integrity of the CH24 relies on the use of good quality sustainable Danish timber combined with superior finishes and strong attention to ergonomic detail. Completely free of knots and using curved, tapered dowels that belie the chairs strength, the iconic masterpiece appears weightless, graceful and delicate all at once. Offering strong back support, the Y- back and the curved top rail give the chair its ‘Wishbone’ moniker. Simultaneously offering both magnificent form and seamless function, the design of the CH24 allows for the body’s changing position when sitting for extended periods of time. Woven from

highly durable paper cord, the seat is guaranteed to last for generations. Taking a design reference from the Quan Yi ceremonial seat of the Ming and Qing dynasties of ancient China, Wegner sought to refine the historical design by creating a simple and lightweight chair devoid of the ornate carvings of its cousin. Fundamental to the design of the Wishbone chair is the users experience, the stories shared, the lives lived around it. Inspired by his Danish sensibilities, Wegner aspired to design a chair that would become an integral component of the fabric that makes up the owners life. A life in which the chair would have its own sense of identity. A fresh new take on the chair sees the introduction of colour to the story. Bright blues and vibrant yellows are recent additions to the CH24 family, and add an extra dimension to the well-considered story.

How to spot a fake Wishbone Joins Spot a fake instantly by looking at the curved top rail. Made from one solid piece of steam-bent timber the real Wishbone has no joins. Curved, tapered dowels support the seat in the real Wishbone. Seat Made from highly durable paper cord the real Wishbone seat has a tight uniform weave. The fake chairs are made from cheap synthetic cord.

Timber Made from good quality sustainable Danish timbers such as oak, ash and walnut, the real Wishbone has an even finish in colour with no knots. The fake chairs have knots and an uneven finish in the timber.

REGULAR REAL OR REPLICA

A fresh twist to the real wishbone The latest colour to hit the Wishbone palette is Petrol blue. Are you game enough to add this bold splash of colour to your home? Flynn Small Tables, Jardan | Petrol Blue Wishbone Chair, Corporate Culture | Assorted Ceramics, Mud Australia | Raffia Bag, Helen Kaminski | Teal Maroccan Star Kitchen Towel, Brilliant Trees Collective | White Zita Pendant Lamp, Lumen-8.

REGULAR DESIGNER SPOTLIGHT

Will Dangar With a passion for craftsmanship and pieces that stand the test of time, Will Dangar created the Robert Plumb range of outdoor furniture and architectural hardware products to compliment his residential and commercial garden designs. WORDS Sian MacPherson Armed with a healthy dose of laconic Australian humour, Dangar takes delight in the naming of his products with fire pits called Brad and Angelina (of course), letterbox ranges named after the infamous bushranger Ned Kelly and his gang and stools bearing bolts and metal through their heads named Frankenstein. Heavily influenced by materials sourced from nature, Robert Plumb successfully marries the natural with the man made resulting in a character and aesthetic that is both refined and honest. Dangar’s country origins and his love for motorbike riding are perhaps what lies behind the success of Robert Plumb. Enjoying the freedom and space that riding gives him when out in the bush or on the track, allows Dangar the headspace to collect his thoughts. ‘No one cares what you do or where you’re from. It’s unpretentious and inspiring which is how I see the Robert Plumb product - real’. With a new foray into smaller sized furniture inspired by his young children to be released this summer and a Bondi Beach holiday rental designed by Robert Plumb in the wings, it seems the motorbikes might have to sit idle until freedom to think is sought once again.

FEATURE UNITED STATES

seeking solace After a weekend with artist friends in East Hampton Lee Krasner and Jackson Pollock purchased a property that was to become both their haven and their hell. PHOtography & Words Robyn Lea

FEATURE United States

When Lee Krasner pleaded with Jackson Pollock to move away from the city in the heat of the Manhattan Summer of 1945, he refused. But after a weekend with artist friends in East Hampton he reconsidered, and they purchased a property that was to become both their haven and their hell for the eleven years before Jackson’s death in 1956. Just as winter’s teeth were beginning to bite, Jackson Pollock and Lee Krasner moved to 830 Springs Fireplace Road, East Hampton with no heating, plumbing or hot water - and with no car. But the sea-change precipitated a dry period for Pollock from 1948-1950, and the production of some of the most important paintings of the 20th Century. Shortly after their relocation Jackson threw himself into work fixing the house by opening

up the downstairs living areas, painting the walls ‘New York loft’ style with lashings of white and setting up his first studio in a bedroom upstairs. The studio has two windows, the larger looking across the trees to the north and the other with a view of Accabonac Creek. Jackson began work on the ‘The Accabonac Creek Series’ which was followed by the ‘Sounds in the Grass Series’ - interpreting his experience of the natural surrounds through an abstract lens. The muffled white moodiness of deep winter, coupled with the healing effect of long walks by the creek or along the beach to Louse Point promoted a new phase in Jackson’s painting while the physical limitations of his tiny workspace affected the size of his paintings, many of them under a metre in length. Soon after settling into their new home, Jackson began clearing out the barn and had it moved to the north edge of the property in order that the view down the hill was visible from the house. Jackson however, was adamant that he did not want the distraction of the outside view in his studio, and installed large panels of

FEATURE United States

FEATURE UNITED STATES

high windows on the eastern face, resulting in a diffused light upon the studio floor, where he preferred to paint. The studio floor reveals the colors and gestures of almost every painting he did from 1947 to 1952, the year ‘Blue Poles’ was created, his last monumental abstract painting, bought by the National Gallery of Australia for a record price of 1.3 million Australian dollars, amid much controversy. There are splats, blobs, footprints and smudges and walking on it (albeit in the requisite foam booties) feels sacrilegious. When they could finally afford to winterize the space in 1953 the floor was covered with masonite boards, thus inadvertently preserving in a single room evidence of hours, days and weeks of some of Jackson’s most important work. The original floor was unveiled in 1987-88, after an accidental discovery years after Lee’s death. The two-storey house, built in 1879, has three modest bedrooms, all upstairs. The interior of the

FEATURE United States

house is decorated as it was left, with personal items, the original furniture and evidence of the minutiae of domestic life. Jackson and Lee loved beachcombing along the white windswept dunes of East Hampton, returning with shells and special objects, which are arranged with great care on shelving throughout the home. Downstairs in the living room hangs one of their favorite finds - a skinny, corroded anchor, which in some ways has come to symbolise their desire to put down new roots, to find stability and peace. Next to Jackson’s studio is the main bedroom, which remains essentially intact. Initialed suitcases sit side-by-side along a wall to the right on which hangs a black and white portrait of Jackson crouching and serious with cigarette in hand. Above a large brown wicker rocking chair is a portrait of a young Lee painted by her former lover, Russian artist Igor Pantuhoff. The silver sequined dress that Krasner wore on

FEATURE United States

FEATURE UNITED STATES

the opening night of Pollock’s retrospective at MoMA in 1967 hangs from a yellowed foam coathanger and her silk dressing gown is splayed on the bed as though waiting. The downstairs living areas are punctuated by Spider Plants that just refuse to die, and Jackson’s record player and jazz record collection is wedged beside their library of books, including ‘Bloomsbury Artists at Charleton’, Hans Christian Anderson’s ‘Fairy Tales’, and ‘Cecil Beaton’s Scrapbook’ amongst others. Walking through Jackson Pollock’s and Lee Krasner’s house and studio is like walking through a visual diary - intimate, personal and revealing. Soon after Lee left Jackson in 1956 to travel abroad, he died in an accident in his green Oldsmobile, just a mile up Springs Fireplace Road. Lee returned to an empty house, a house that would never truly feel like home to her again.

FEATURE AUSTRALIA

Finding

Home Photography Toby Scott Words & Styling Sian MacPherson

Buying a house that you have never seen, in another hemisphere, during the middle of the night is not how you would expect to find your family home. Living in London’s Regent Park at the time, Kim and Peter De Winter and their three children relied upon family in Melbourne to give the seal of approval for the Toorak house that they now call home some 5 years later. Living in the home for 18 months after their return to Melbourne helped to ‘get a feel’ for how they wanted to use the space before enlisting the help of designer Shareen Joel with the renovations. Charged with the brief of opening the home up and tying in the modern renovation with the old Georgian style building, Joel took her design cues from the streets of Milan.

FEATURE AUSTRALIA

FEATURE AUSTRALIA

PHOTOGRAPH Peter Bennetts

Arguably the most stunning aspect to Joel’s design is the installation of the full height arch steel framed window that immediately draws the eye upon entering the home. Opening on a centre pivot and leading out to the back garden, the window effectively creates a feeling of light, space and modernity to the interior. Joel designed a space that hides all the machinations of a working kitchen behind floor to ceiling cupboards whilst the 4 metre long island bench made of black steel with a granite insert, successfully anchors the room and mimics the dark tiled pool that lies beyond the glass walls. Avid art collectors, the De Winters have built an extensive collection of works and European furniture that have travelled the world and have

PHOTOGRAPH Peter Bennetts

Referencing the older style buildings with their smaller windows and rendered walls on the upper levels and the contemporary steel framed large panels of glass on street level, Joel successfully melded the old with the new.

FEATURE AUSTRALIA

PHOTOGRAPH Peter Bennetts

their own stories to share. The red Nelson Coconut chair and Abby McCulloch artwork pack a colourful punch to the kitchen and living area’s bright interior. In stark contrast to this bright space, the formal living room with charcoal painted walls and silver curtains coupled with a black velvet Edra sofa and Patricia Urquiola Fat Fat tables creates a warm, smouldering space that welcomes intimate conversation. As an interior designer Kim knew how she wanted the home to look and feel and has successfully created a home that caters to the needs of a busy family. A successful combination of modern Italian designer pieces with antiques, modern art and a mix of textures and patterns ensures that this home is the sum of its owners unique experiences of the world.

FEATURE AUSTRALIA

FEATURE AUSTRALIA

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PIVOTAL

3

style

6

Mix mid century classics with contemporary designer statement pieces.

4

5

1. Stainless Steel Raimond pendant lamp, Moooi 2. Patricia Urquiol Fat Fat Tables, Space Furniture 3. Missoni Rose Balbianello Cushions, Safari Living 4. Le Klint 102 Pendant Lamp, Le Klint 5. Quinze & Milan Camping Table, Corporate Culture 6. Abbey McCulloch Painting, Helen Gory Gallerie 7. Red Nelson Coconut Chair, Living Edge

FEATURE United States

new colonie A Melbourne nightclub owner flees one colony for another. Now he’s making it big in Brooklyn. PHOTOGRAPHY & WORDS Robyn Lea

FEATURE United States

The first thing you notice about Tamer Hamawi is his smile and he has much to smile about: foremost is ‘Colonie’ his brand new, already acclaimed restaurant in Brooklyn Heights. After selling his share in the highly successful Melbourne nightclub ‘Honkytonks’ he escaped to South America to bask for a time in a nomadic life of anonymity and resurfaced in New York where the lack of quality restaurants in Brooklyn Heights became quickly apparent. Working with business partners Emelie Kihlstrom and Elise Rosenberg, alongside architect Alex Meyers from MADesign, Tamer helped create a recycled, reclaimed, local, seasonal and sustainable restaurant. The space is a ‘modern barn’ with a refreshingly ‘real’ feel, free of gimmicks, and with a story behind every material and design choice.

FEATURE United States

Handcrafted objects and unexpected treasures punctuate the space, and a ‘living garden wall’ divides the bar from the restaurant. When they found an iron beam on the rooftop they remodeled it into a chandelier to light the communal ‘Public Table’. Banquettes, tabletops and window frames were made from old church pews and the ceiling was covered in wood reclaimed from an old barn siding. There is a sense of community around Colonie that started at the outset, with much-needed funding coming from friends, family and locals. Not only were supporters donating their spare cash, they were giving an unspoken promise of moral support with Tamer ensuring a sense of local loyalty and local ownership.

FEATURE United States

The man himself is warm and hospitable. His enthusiasm for ‘sharing happiness’ came from early life, growing up in the bosom of an Egyptian immigrant family. His mother entertained at home, often for 30 people or more, her pride entwined in offering home cooked delicacies to friends and extended family. A great appreciator of good food creators, Tamer was thrilled to welcome Colonie’s new chef Brad McDonald to the mix. He started out as a diner until the unpretentious dedication to ‘real’ food and enthusiastic management drew him in. He has reinvented the humble donut, now the popular ‘Salty Caramel Custard Donut’ on the dessert menu. And then there his Agnolotti with pea shoots, Duck Orecchiette with pickled orange rind and Beets Salad with orange, crystallized hazelnuts, ricotta salata and mint.

FEATURE United States

Colonie’s beverage offerings are just as appealing. They are one of the only NY venues to offer ‘wine on tap’, a selection of five locally produced wines, and make a selection of signature cocktails based on fresh fruit and vegetable juices such as the ‘Rhubarb Ginger Daiquiri’ and ‘Cool Hand Cuke’ with cucumber vodka, elderflower liqueur, fresh cucumber juice, mint syrup and lime. Whether visiting Colonie for the food, the wine, the open-kitchen proximity to the chef, or just to soak in the atmosphere and feel looked after and cared for, it is a place to return to again and again. Tamer and the team’s passion and hunger for excellence are the perfect ingredients to ensure the restaurant a long and happy life.

FEATURE AUSTRALIA

The Midas Touch Renowned Melbourne chef Andrew McConnell has recently opened his new restaurant, and not only the foodies are keen to experience the subtle delights of Golden Fields. Photography Toby Scott | WORDS Chauntelle Roelandts

Having already crafted popular establishments Cumulus Inc. and Cutler & Co. it is evident that McConnell takes interior design as seriously as his menu. Recruiting the team at Projects of Imagination, he gave them a simple brief: light, bright and timeless. And architect Dion Hall certainly delivered, turning a deep, dark cave into a natural and accessible space perfect for a quick coffee, cheeky wine, or long, leisurely lunch or dinner. Golden Fields has a hint of magic; the light that runs across the glazed tiles - individually handmade by stonemason Shane Kent creates an organic movement right along one wall of the restaurant.

FEATURE AUSTRALIA

FEATURE AUSTRALIA

“People are very vocal about how they feel mesmerized by the tile work. It really is quite beautiful,” says McConnell. The materials, the space, and the movement within Golden Fields towards McConnell’s main strength: the menu. Primarily of Southeast Asian influence, there are subtle references to Asia throughout the space in no way comparable to the clichéd Asian themed restaurant. “I think in design, as with cooking, you need to know when to stop; when to stop adding to it. It’s take me years to build up that confidence,” he said. McConnell’s restraint may just be the secret ingredient to Golden Fields - the perfect combination of peaceful surrounds and subtle flavours right in the heart of St Kilda.

REGULAR FOOD

Little nippers Yabbies, or Cherax destructor, are a type of freshwater crayfish whose quirkily-named family members include koonacs, koura, gilgies, marron, crawfish and crawdads. PhotographY Toby Scott | Words Susie Donald

Yabbies are easy to catch. All you need is a piece of meat on a string, a net, and a bucket. Failing that, you can buy them live from your fish monger. Currently at Melbourne’s Jacques Reymond, our native Australian marron is delicately poached in an aromatic broth to it’s succulent perfection. Nestled on a bed of bitter chicory, orange, lightly pickled cuttlefish and tiny squares of silky tofu draped with a sauternes veil, it is then drizzled with a shallot and Szechwan pepper dressing. Sommelier Natalie Reymond suggests pairing the dish with a 2007 Bourgogne Blanc by Remi Jobard. Its complex aromatics incorporate those of the marron dish, merging all the flavors with its elegance and long mineral acidity.

YABBIE STEW 750 ml fish stock 2 cloves garlic, peeled 6 baby chats pinch saffron (optional) 10cm celery stalk, finely sliced 1 small fennel bulb, finely sliced 1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds 1/2 cup white wine 1 Spanish onion, finely sliced 2 leaves Cavolo Nero handful freshly shelled peas 8 cherry tomatoes 1 Red emperor approx 250g 10-12 yabbies, shells removed 12 coriander, basil or mint leaves, for garnish a dash of Pernod (optional) Rouille I small red capsicum, quartered and seeds removed 1 slice bread crumbed 2-3 garlic cloves, peeled 2 tablespoons warm water 75 ml extra virgin olive oil In the food processor, blend the bread crumbs, capsicum, cayenne, salt and garlic gloves until smooth. With the engine running, gradually add the olive oil.

1. Place potatoes in a saucepan with the stock and add garlic, bay leaf, wine, fennel seeds and saffron and bring to the boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes; season well with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Make the rouille. 2. Add celery, Spanish onion and fennel to stock; simmer for 5 minutes. 3. Remove the potatoes with a slotted spoon and cut into halves or thirds and return then to the soup. Add the fish, peas and tomatoes, cook for one minute making sure the fish is covered with liquid. 4. Add the yabbies to warm through, about 2 minutes, then add Pernod, if using. Ladle the soup into serving bowls. Top each bowl with coriander leaves and a drizzle of rouille. PARING Wine Tim Adams 2010 Pinot Grigio from the Clare Valley, $19 Stefano Labiana 2010 Primavera Chardonnay, Tasmania, $39 Zind Humbrecht 2005 Gewwurz Wintzenheim, Alsace, $85

These biotic foragers, known for their habit of burrowing holes in dams and irrigation canals, play an important part in the ecosystems in our river and dams. Australia’s recent ‘big wet’ floods, have brought about an abundance of this freshwater delicacy and backwaters and streams near the Darling and Murray rivers have yielded the highest quantities of yabbies in 15 years. Now is the time to take advantage of the surplus.

REGULAR TRAVEL

Island Luxe Est Magazine’s regular Style Setter Tamie Freier lists her favourite places to stay and hang out when hopping between Mykonos and Santorini in the Greek Islands. EDITED BY Tamie Freier

Mykonos MUST SEE Alemagou, A hot new restaurant located on a small secluded Mykonos beach. Cycladic architectural elements blend beautifully into the scrubby landscape. Whitewashed, smooth-edged exteriors, stone walls, cement floors and reed-thatched ceilings are the familiar textures applied to contemporary organic forms to create its unique character. Eat Nammos Beach Club is located down a dusty, windy road on the edge of Psarou Beach, Nammos is the new place to be in Mykonos. Divided between a formal dining area, lounge with bar, and beach club, this chic beach hangout is a must!! Drink Cavo Tagoo The place to meet is at the infinity pool. Looking over uninterrupted views of Mykonos town, the 18 metre aquarium bar is the place to be both night and day for a mix of all sorts of familiar faces, inspiring personalities and interesting celebrities. Sleep BELLEVEDERE HOTEL This charming boutique hotel demonstrates the understated elegance of the ‘islands’ design and houses the infamous Matsuhisa Mykonos Restaurant, which is run by well known chef Nobu Matsuhisa. CAVO TAGOO This unique luxury hotel is a place where a barefoot-chic aesthetic flows throughout the hotel which stands elegantly as a natural extension of its surrounding. With Gervisoni furniture featured throughout the hotel - need I say more!!

Santorini Where Mykonos is all about vibey hotels, restaurants, bars and shopping, Santorini is an island all about its incredible sunsets. The stunning cliff-side bars, restaurants and hotels appear effortlessly chic and provide breathtaking views of the sunset which never fails to impress. Eat BELVEDERE SUITES Great food, simple, delicious, straight from the source. Drink Grace SANTORINI BOUTIQUE HOTEL The view from this cliff side hotel is a must see. We love it for a pre-dinner drink at the amazing pool bar where you can gaze wistfully at the sun setting over the sea. Sleep Rocabella This stunning hotel is located in Imerovigli, perched on the edge of Santorini’s volcanic cliffs one thousand feet above the deep cobalt - blue bay waters that guard the secrets of the lost city of Atlantis. It provides the location for one of the best hotels in Santorini; the Rocabella Resort & Spa.

REGULAR GLOBAL CREATIVE

Falling in Love Remember your first big crush? Seeing them set off butterflies in your tummy; you’d hang off their every word at daylight and dream of them at night. This month Est fell for the Manifesto of Kinfolk magazine in a big way.   WORDS Chauntelle Roelandts A guide for small gatherings, Kinfolk is all about community, good company and strengthening friendships through simple, natural, unpretentious entertaining. It’s hard to tell you where Kinfolk came from - like Est, the mag is a global collaboration with over 40 artists contributing from all over the world but we would guess it started around a dinner table, with good food, great surroundings and even better conversation. Surprisingly they didn’t know one another before Kinfolk. Editor Nathan Williams said, “ The inaugural first issue felt like a climactic reunion of friends across the globe, all mingling on the same bound pages.” “It really is something special.” Nathan studied Peace Building at school, there’s the recurring community sensibility, and hopes the experience of reading Kinfolk reflects the way you feel during an evening meal with friends: relaxed, welcome, accepted and worry free. The mag achieves this. Stunning photography reveals an organic, earthy quality to every scene.   Words are personal, emotional and witty. And then there is that sense of community: recipes from a foodie friend, decorations from a crafty mate, and the perfect playlist from the muso in the group. “We’ve succeeded if you’re planning a simple dinner party in your head by the time you’ve finished reading,” says Nathan.

Kinfolk will start shipping internationally next month. Until then enjoy the digital manifesto, watch the manifesto on repeat (like we do) and start making plans to catch up with your kinfolk, because your simple gatherings are about to get lovelier.

VIDEO Š Kinfolk Magazine

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