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The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

November 21, 2013 • $1.00 Volume 83 • Number 25

Monument to machine politics, Tammany Hall is landmarked BY ALBERT AMATEAU

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PHOTO BY SAM SPOKONY

A memorial to George Taliferro was placed at the site where he was fatally shot in Smith Houses.

A murder in public housing reveals both feuds and fears BY SAM SPOKONY

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t Smith Houses, statistics can be deceiving. The New York City Housing Authority development, which includes 12 buildings and houses more than 4,000 residents, seems like a pretty quiet place to most passersby. Its Lower East Side loca-

tion — bounded by St. James Place and Madison, Catherine and South Sts. — is just steps away from 1 Police Plaza, the headquarters of the New York Police Department. And according to figures put out by the N.Y.P.D., it might seem that relatively little violence — particularly gun violence — takes place at Smith Houses. The Fifth Precinct,

which covers the complex, lists a total of only three reported shooting incidents in the entire precinct so far in 2013, according to reports published online. But that’s not what some residents of the public housing development say. This past week, one L.E.S. MURDER, continued on p. 6

ew York City’s rich history as the center of populist politics and of the immigrant experience came into the spotlight this fall. The former Tammany Hall building on Union Square East received the

Landmark Preservation Commission’s unanimous designation on Oct. 29 as the city’s newest individual landmark. And on Sept. 24, the City Council approved the commission’s earlier landmark designation of the Seward Park Library on East Broadway in the heart TAMMANY, continued on p. 4

Light the Menurkey! Thanksgivukkah is rare holiday mash-up BY HEATHER DUBIN

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ut on your Pilgrim hat and light your menorah. For the first time in 125 years, Thanksgiving and Hannukah, otherwise known as “Thanksgivukkah,” will fall on the same day. Since this is not slated to occur again until 76,695, or

perhaps 2,070, according to other calculations, it might be a good idea to get your party on. Two Downtown locations are hosting events for families and the community on the Lower East Side this Sun., Nov. 24. The Museum at Eldridge HOLIDAYS, continued on p. 10

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PHOTOS BY ANTHONY ROBERTS

Maria Passannante-Derr — flanked by Village Care C.E.O. Emma DeVito, right, and restaurateur Rocio Sanz, Passannante-Derr’s good friend and C.B. 2 colleague — was honored with the Distinguished Service Award.

VillageCare’s legendary night VillageCare held its 15th Annual Legends of the Village gala affair on Nov. 4. More than 350 supporters gathered together for dinner and dancing at Tribeca Rooftop. The evening’s highlight was the awards ceremony honoring distinguished community members. Receiving the Village Business Legends Award was Michael Einstein, C.E.O. and President of Blueprint Technologies, Inc. Patricia Field, the famed designer and stylist, was honored with the William F. Passannante Award for her work and dedication to the advancement in careers for young fashion designers. The Distinguished Service Award went to Maria Passannante-Derr for her dedication to the community. Passannante-Derr, a former chairperson of Community Board 2, is the niece of former Assemblymember Bill Passannante.

LEFT Portrait of Maharani Krishna Kumari; photographer and painter unknown; Nepal; ca. 1900; gelatin silver print and oil paint; 11 1/2 x 9 3/8 in.; Alkazi Collection of Photography, New Delhi; D2003.13.0046 RIGHT Pema Rinzin (Tibetan, b. 1966); detail from The Four Great Guardian Kings, 2007; ground mineral pigments on wood; Rubin Museum of Art; photograph by Steven Williams RMA-0020-ChelseaNow_Nov20_4.85x11.4_v2.indd 1

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Special tribute was also paid to The Villager on its 80th anniversary. VillageCare honored current Publisher Jennifer Goodstein, as well as past publishers Elizabeth Butson, who is also a member of VillageCare’s board of directors, and John Sutter. VillageCare is a communitybased, nonprofit organization serving older adults, persons living with AIDS/H.I.V. and other chronic diseases, and individuals in need of medical and rehabilitation services. It operates the rehabilitation and nursing center at 214 West Houston St. “Tonight, we are honoring some really special people and recognizing an important business institution,” said Emma DeVito, VillageCare president and C.E.O. “Your generosity helps VillageCare serve the people who come to us, many of them at their time of greatest need,” she told the audience.

Villager publishers past and present accepted a special tribute award from VillageCare’s Emma De Vito, second from left, in honor of the newspaper’s 80th anniversary. From left, current Publisher Jennifer Goodstein and past publishers Elizabeth Butson and John W. Sutter.

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PHOTO BY SCOOPY

PHOTO BY SCOOPY

DELIVERED THE SAD NEWS: Although he wasn’t actually reporting the news 50 years ago when John F. Kennedy was killed, Don Mathisen was very closely in touch with it — since he was delivering it. He was a paperboy for Newsday, which was then an afternoon, primarily subscription newspaper, on Long Island. Mathisen was in school in Lindenhurst when he heard J.F.K. had been shot. School let out, he went home, dropped off his schoolbag, then delivered the regular paper on his bicycle, then went back out on another round to deliver the extra on the assassination. Mathisen, who lives on Grand St. and is a longtime video and radio journalist, brought this old copy of the extra edition, above right, to our office last Friday, Nov. 22, the five-decade anniversary of Kennedy’s death. “It might have been Newsday’s last extra, I’m not sure, but it was the last one I ever saw,” Mathisen said. “I didn’t keep a copy. I was 13 years old, I didn’t care. But one of my uncles kept it, it was in his attic — we found it when he died.” As for what Mathisen did after delivering the extra — not to us, but to the Long Island readers back in the day — he recalled, “There was a Boy Scout camping trip planned that day. There was some question as to whether the camping trip would be canceled, but we went, and then came back early. … I was very interested in the news then and John F. Kennedy,” he recalled. “He was young, he was new. Eisenhower was old. My dad liked Eisenhower — he was in Patton’s army. He hated Patton but he liked Eisenhower.”

HOLIDAY SPIRIT OF GIVING: Once again, Le Souk and BAMRA are teaming up to offer a delicious community dinner on Thanksgiving Day. A special invitation is being made to those who find themselves without close family or companionship to share the holiday. There will be two seatings, at 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., at Le Souk, 510 LaGuardia Place, just south of Bleecker St. It will be a traditional Thanksgiving dinner with all the fixin’s, compliments of Le Souk and the Bleecker Area Merchants’ and Residents’ Association. Morton Williams supermarket is providing the pies. The meal is free, but contributions will be gladly accepted, and Le Souk and BAMRA will match any contributions, with the proceeds donated to Visiting Neighbors. I’M DREAMING OF A WHITE DISPLAAAY…: Fabio Otalora painted display shelving, above right, during the first setup day for the Union Square Holiday Market on Tuesday. The annual outdoor vendors market opens Thurs., Nov. 21, and runs through Dec. 24. Otalora’s booth is in a primo spot, right by the subway entrance, for which he had to pay a bit more. His Insiders 1 leather goods include wallets, bags and gloves with urban photos artistically printed on them. The market is open till 8 p.m., extending to 9 p.m. closer to the holiday season. His wife works at an Insiders 1 location in Grand Central, but he prefers Union Square. “It’s wild down here,” he said. “I like it.”

THE CINCINNATI KID:  Josh Rogers, editor of The Villager’s sister paper Downtown Express, his wife Sarah Wolff, and their son Isaac, 3, drove to Cincinnati two weeks ago to meet the newest member of their family, Eleanor Kate, born Nov. 6 at 6 pounds, 4 ounces, 19 inches. The happy parents held their daughter on her birthday and the expanded family returned home last week. They expect to finalize Eleanor’s adoption in six months.

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November 21, 2013

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Machine politics monument, Tammany Hall landmarked TAMMANY, continued from p. 1

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November 21, 2013

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

of the Lower East Side. The two designations, which cited architectural distinction, as well as historical importance, were hailed by preservation advocates in the Union Square and Lower East Side neighborhoods. The Tammany Hall building, at 100 E. 17th St. at the corner of Union Square East, was commissioned in 1929 by the Democratic Party at the height of its power and influence in the city and the state since the 1790s. The three-and-a-half story headquarters of the Society of St. Tammany replaced a previous building, known as the Wigwam, at 141 E. 14th St., which had served as party headquarters since 1868, and included a music hall. (Tammany was named for a chieftain of the Lenape, Manhattan’s indigenous people.) Designed by Thompson, Homes & Converse and Charles B. Mayers, the 1929 building was inspired by the old New York City Hall where George Washington took the oath of office as president of the United States. The bricks were modeled after the ones that Thomas Jefferson used for Monticello. A rusticated stone base, a pediment over the portico, two-story-tall pilasters and relief sculptures depicting a medallion of Chief Tammany and a polychrome Revolutionary War cap, are features of the building. “The architecture is interesting, evocative and referential, but the history of Tammany makes the building stand out,” said Robert Tierney, chairperson of the Landmarks Preservation Commission. “Tammany means a lot of things to a lot of people but it’s certainly a touchstone of New York City, state and national politics.” When Tammany commissioned the building, the party machine was ascendant. Al Smith was the state’s former governor and had been a presidential candidate, and James J. Walker was the mayor and darling of the city. But by the time the party sold the building to Local 91 of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union in 1943, Walker had resigned amid accusations of corruption, Smith was out of politics and the New Deal had eroded Tammany’s power. The New York Film Academy and a theater are now among the building’s current tenants. The Tammany Hall landmark designation was hailed by preservation advocates, particularly Jack Taylor, who is active in Union Square issues and is a founder of The Drive to Protect the Ladies Mile District, on Sixth Ave. It infamously took 20 years and millions of extra dollars — embezzled by Tammany’s Boss Tweed — to complete the Tweed Courthouse, on Chambers St., named after the Tammany leader, in 1881. Yet, it took even longer for neighborhood preservationists and others to persuade L.P.C. to designate the political organization’s historic headquarters.

Kevin “The Kite Man” was doing his thing in Union Square’s northern plaza on a windy Tuesday morning, with the recently landmarked former Tammany Hall in the background.

“It’s taken 29 years to get Tammany Hall landmarked,” Taylor said. He noted that on June 25 of this year, in a key development, the building’s owner finally dropped her opposition to the designation. The advocacy of Councilmember Rosie Mendez was also significant, he added. “The Union Square Community Coalition remains committed to further landmark designations in our neighborhoods,” Taylor said, “to protect our architectural, cultural, social and historic heritage, and the quality of life such structures represent.” The Seward Park branch of the New York Public Library, at 192 East Broadway, one of 20 branch libraries in Manhattan and one of the 67 in the five boroughs funded by the steel magnate Andrew Carnegie, opened its doors to a teeming neighborhood of immigrants on Nov. 11, 1909. With holdings in Hebrew, Yiddish, German and Russian, as well as English, the library was a magnet for neighbors hungry for knowledge. And as the neighborhood demographics changed, with Latino and Asian residents replacing earlier immigrants, the library continues to serve the needs of its neighbors. The library has traditionally run joint programs with the Educational Alliance, located across the street, and other neighborhood institutions, including the Henry Street Settlement. The three-story brick building with limestone trim replaced a smaller Downtown branch of the Aguilar Library established in 1886. Refurbished in 2004 to include a new entrance and computer upgrades, the Seward Park library was designed by Babb, Cook and Welsh, one of the few firms of the time

chosen for the Carnegie branches. Built in the Italian Renaissance style, the building has a rusticated limestone base, arched window and door openings, molded window surrounds and rusticated quoins at the building’s corners. A limestone frieze with “New York Public Library” inscribed below the cornice and at the roofline, and a limestone balustrade with a copper railing between the piers are also design features. The railing anchored a canvas awning for an open-air rooftop reading room. It was one of only five such rooftop reading areas included in library branches of the early 1900s, and it is the only one to survive on a building still in active use as a library. At the Landmark Preservation Commission hearing earlier this year, Chairperson Tierney said the designation was “architecturally a slam dunk.” He added, “It’s quite moving that the library has played such a central role in the cultural life of the Lower East Side, constantly changing as new immigrant groups settled in the historic neighborhood.” City Councilmember Margaret Chin hailed the full Council’s approval of the designation in September. “This building is iconic, both architecturally and for the key role it played in New York City’s immigrant experience,” Chin said. “I am thrilled that its rich history in our community will be protected.” When it was built, the library fronted on Jefferson St. across from Seward Park. Passersby could see into the large ground-floor windows of the main reading room. With the development of the Seward Park Co-op apartment complex and the expansion of the park, the library has been enclosed within

the park fence. Preservation advocates, including Friends of the Lower East Side and the Seward Park Preservation and History Club, thanked the commission for the designation, which is intended to preserve the institution for future generations. The commission also designated three other Lower Manhattan landmarks last month. The three-and-a-half story 1833 Federalstyle building at 333 Grand St., between Ludlow and Orchard Sts., is the 18th Federal building that the commission has landmarked since 2002. The Grand St. building is one of a row of houses put up by John Jacob Astor on land he bought from a business associate, William Laight, in 1806. “This understated row house, by far the most intact of the five that are there now, is a significant reminder of the period after the Revolutionary War when New York City was developing into a major port and financial center,” said Tierney. Two five-story, cast-iron-fronted store and loft buildings at 39 and 41 Worth St., between West Broadway and Church Sts., in Tribeca were also designated. The building at 41 Worth St. was constructed in 1865 in the Italianate style for Philo Lao Mills, a dry goods merchant and founder of Mills & Gibb, which had branches throughout the U.S. and in Europe. The structure was converted in 1981 to a residential co-op. The building at 39 Worth St. was erected in 1866 as an investment for James Smith, a manufacturer of fire engines. Tenants over the years included textile merchants, a rug importer and a restaurant. It, too, became a residential co-op in 1981.

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Appeal to fight co-location at L.E.S. high school BY SAM SPOKONY

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pponents of a proposed co-location at a Lower East Side high school have filed an appeal with the city’s Board of Education to try to stop it. The Department of Education proposed in August to co-locate a new high school (designated 01M203) in 200 Monroe St., currently home to University Neighborhood High School. Although D.O.E.’s Panel for Education Policy voted in October to approve the colocation, the plan has faced strong opposition from U.N.H.S. staff and parents, as well as the District 1 Community Education Council and local politicians. Opponents say the U.N.H.S. building lacks the space and resources to support a co-location, especially since the new high school would be a Career and Technical Education, or C.T.E., school. C.T.E. schools combine typical academic study with workforce-skills programs, and generally require additional, specialized educational resources. “This is not a facility that lends itself to sharing space, and it just doesn’t have the infrastructure to support two schools,” said Lisa Donlan, District 1 C.E.C. president. “We’re not opposed to the existence of the new school, but we really just don’t think this is the right co-location.”

She noted U.N.H.S. currently has no real gym, auditorium or cafeteria space. U.N.H.S. students use the school’s lobby for all those purposes. Plus, U.N.H.S. currently enrolls around 250 students — which already crowds the building’s hallways — while the new public school would add roughly 500 students to the same space. Before a lawsuit is filed in State Supreme Court against the co-location, opponents must file an appeal with the Board of Education, D.O.E.’s governing body. If that appeal is denied, the lawsuit can proceed. Arthurt Schwartz, a local Democratic district leader and civil rights lawyer, filed an appeal with B.O.E. on Nov. 14, seeking to stop the U.N.H.S. co-location. He said, if the appeal is denied, he would proceed with a lawsuit. “The [U.N.H.S.] faculty, administrators and students are all united on this issue,” Schwartz said the day after filing the appeal. “It’s simply not a well-thought-out plan by D.O.E., and they clearly haven’t taken into account public opinion.” The appeal lists Councilmember Margaret Chin, plus a parent and a student from U.N.H.S. as the petitioners. “We filed this petition in solidarity with the students, parents and educators whose voices have been ignored by D.O.E. in its shortsighted plan to co-locate another school within U.N.H.S.,” Chin said. “This co-location would rob students of their right to an enriched and meaningful educational experience.”

Chin previously wrote to D.O.E. opposing the co-location. She also held a rally against the plan in August, and testified twice against the proposal before its approval. D.O.E. declined to comment on the appeal, since the legal action is pending. Schwartz also plans to file a federal lawsuit against D.O.E., on the grounds co-location would violate the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA. According to D.O.E. statistics, under IDEA, 28 percent of U.N.H.S.’s students require special education services. Also, U.N.H.S. currently enrolls seven disabled students requiring wheelchairs. The school only has one elevator for those students, and it can only hold one wheelchair at a time. “It’s clear the proposed co-location will make it impossible to provide the space and resources needed for disabled students,” Schwartz stated. D.O.E.’s proposed co-location at U.N.H.S. may have initially been planned to include a charter school, sources contend. “My understanding was that the new public high school was originally planned to be co-located with Murry Bergtraum [High School],” said Donlan. She added that she and many others familiar with the situation believe those original plans were to co-locate a Success Academy charter school with U.N.H.S. Yet, a current D.O.E. proposal calls for colocating a Success Academy charter school at Murry Bergtraum.

NYU and Lois Rakoff, Community Director of the Poe Room, Present:

Uncloaking Poe: An Evening Tribute

“Whatever happened between D.O.E. and Success Academy on that issue was not done transparently,” said Donlan, adding that D.O.E. officials have never fully answered her questions about that. Some believe Success Academy was unfairly allowed to choose where to co-locate, given that D.O.E. is supposed to assign colocations impartially. “Eva was told D.O.E. wanted to co-locate her at U.N.H.S., and then she looked at the building and said it was inadequate,” Schwartz claimed, referring to Eva Moskowitz, Success Academy’s founder and C.E.O. “So D.O.E. let her choose Murry Bergtraum instead,” he said, “just to make her happy.” Asked if Success Academy originally had the option to co-locate at U.N.H.S., a D.O.E. spokesperson did not deny that. Instead, the spokesperson declined comment, again citing the pending legal action against the U.N.H.S. co-location. A Success Academy spokesperson, asked the same question, at first denied the claim outright. But when the reporter informed her that D.O.E. had not officially denied it, the spokesperson acknowledged Success Academy may have had an opportunity to see U.N.H.S. and other possible co-location sites before D.O.E.’s formal proposal. Success Academy representatives were “shown spaces” to see what the facilities were like, and so reps could “see why one was good or better than the others,” she said.

Friday, December 6, 6:00 - 8:00 pm NYU School of Law, Furman Hall (216) 245 Sullivan St, at W 3rd St Image courtesy of Brandon Fischer: twistedsynapses.deviantart.com

Join local artists and members of the NYU community to celebrate the life and work of Edgar Allan Poe through music, painting, performance, and more.

A reception will follow in the Poe Room. This event is free and open to the public, and an RSVP is required. Visit www.nyu.edu/nyu-in-nyc or call 212-998-2400.

The Poe Room event is a partnership between NYU and the community. For information on other events, visit www.nyu.edu/nyu-in-nyc »

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November 21, 2013

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Murder at Smith Houses reveals both feuds and fears L.E.S. MURDER, continued from p. 1

Smith Houses resident claimed that she’s heard gunshots within the project around 10 times so far this year, and another said gunfire has happened around once a month. Early on Nov. 10, tensions at Smith Houses came to a head when George Taliferro, 30, was shot to death on a walkway between two of the development’s buildings at 7 and 15 St. James Place. Around 4 a.m., in the dark before that day’s dawn, police found Taliferro lying in the courtyard, bleeding out, with bullet wounds in his torso. He was pronounced dead shortly after being rushed to the hospital. The prime suspect in that fatal shooting, Christopher Delrosario, 19, was arrested several days later in the Upstate town of Port Jervis, according to police. He has been charged with second-degree murder and criminal possession of a weapon. Delrosario is a resident of 46 Madison St., in Smith Houses. Taliferro was raised in Smith Houses, and his family — both his older blood relatives and his three young children — still lived there at the time of his death. But according to those who knew him,

Taliferro actually lived in a NYCHA development in Brooklyn. He had gotten out of jail in August 2011, after serving more than three years in state prison for weapons possession. He still sold a little marijuana on the side, according to a 60-year-old Smith Houses resident who said she had remained friends with Taliferro after watching him grow up so many years ago, but that didn’t make him a bad person. “George was a good guy,” she said. Some at Smith Houses believe that Taliferro became the victim of a cross-borough turf war, one in which he’d never meant to get caught up. Others think that it was fiery disputes within the development that boiled over and led to his end. But it’s unclear exactly what happened on the morning of Sun., Nov. 10. A 24-year-old woman who lives at 15 St. James Place said she was walking into her building that morning, around 3:30 a.m., and saw Taliferro sitting outside the building with a group of five or six other men. “It looked like he was just hanging out with some friends,” she said. “It didn’t look like anything was wrong.” Half an hour later, four shots rang out. One missed; the other three struck Talifer-

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November 21, 2013

ro and laid him out. Even before Delrosario was arrested and charged with the murder, the woman said she and many of her neighbors were practically certain that the crime had been

Across the courtyard, two 25-year-old men — friends who both live in the development — were walking out of their building toward the street. When asked whether or not they felt unsafe because of drug or gang feuds that might spill over into the complex, they said they didn’t — but mainly because they’re rarely ever around the neighborhood at night. “There’s nothing here besides that stuff,” one of them said. “That’s why we don’t hang out here.” Yet another Smith Houses resident — a man who said he knew not only Taliferro but his parents and grandparents as well — explained that tensions within the development, compounded by the 30-year-old’s violent death, were apparently painful enough to actually push them out of the place they once called home. “The day George died, his whole family moved out,” the man said, shaking his head. On the walkway between the two buildings at 7 and 15 St. James Place, at the very site of the fatal shooting — and mere steps away from the home of the man alleged to have committed the crime — there sits a makeshift memorial to George Taliferro. It’s a large sheet of heavy paper, signed by friends, propped up against a railing. Taped above that is a photo of the deceased, with a simple line written across it: “R.I.P. George.” After conducting interviews around the courtyard of Smith Houses, the reporter stopped in front of the memorial, first just to look at the image, and then to take a photo of it for this article. A young man, probably around 18 years old, walked up to the reporter and asked him what he was doing there. But he didn’t think that writing a story about the murder, or taking a photo of Taliferro’s memorial, was acceptable. “Delete those f------ photos,” he said. “Delete those photos, or I’ll make a call, and then you’ll be f------ sorry.” As the reporter walked away, the young man followed close behind. “And don’t come around here anymore.”

‘They go back and forth, and they all look like friends, and all of a sudden it’s a shoot-out.’ Smith Houses resident

committed by a Smith Houses resident. “A lot of people around here don’t like each other,” she said. And although plenty of residents might even have thought that it was Delrosario that did it, most of them were too scared to talk about it, she added. The aforementioned 60-year-old Smith Houses resident, who said she knew Taliferro ever since he was a kid, was sure that it wasn’t just a random act of infighting. “It was definitely turf-related,” she said. She noted that, in her 35 years living at Smith Houses, she has seen various turf wars develop between Lower East Side NYCHA residents and those who live in public housing in Brooklyn, particularly around the East Flatbush area. “They go back and forth,” she said, “and they all look like friends, and all of a sudden it’s a shoot-out.” The woman explained that, regardless of how quiet the area might seem to visitors, the knowledge of drug- or gang-related violence keeps her and many other older Smith Houses residents in their homes after dark. “I only go out to the store late at night if it’s an emergency,” she said. “I’m really just worried about my safety.” Another older Smith Houses resident, an 82-year-old man who said he’s lived there for more than four decades, echoed that sentiment. He enjoys sitting outside in the courtyard on nice days, but never past 5 p.m. “Every time you worry, because you don’t know who’s good and who’s bad,” he said. “You just have to mind your business and go home, and that’s it. You can’t do anything about it. Even the police can’t do anything about it. I just go home early, and I stay home.”

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Divestment drive gains energy BY PASHA FARMANARA

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n the 1980s, American college students pressured their schools to divest from apartheid South Africa, helping hasten the fall of that country’s racist regime. Now, a new divestment movement is growing on campuses, demanding divestment from fossil fuel companies. On Thurs., Nov. 14, N.Y.U. Divest: Go Fossil Free held a panel forum on the issue at the university’s Brittany Hall residence. N.Y.U. Divest: Go Fossil Free’s main objective, as stated on its Web site, is for the university to “freeze any new investment in fossil fuel companies, [and] divest from the top 200 publicly traded and government owned fossil companies,” in an effort to protect the earth from global warming. More than 60 students attended. Speakers included Reverend Lennox Yearwood, president of the Hip Hop Caucus; Dr. Sean Sweeney, director of Cornell’s Global Labor Institute; Seth Yurdin, a Providence, Rhode Island, city councilmember; and Professor Bill Hewitt, from N.Y.U.’s Center for Global Affairs. The panelists made it clear divestment is imperative to fight climate change. There are currently 497 divestment campaigns in the U.S., most taking place at major universities. N.Y.U. Divest hopes to pioneer fossil fuel divestment, and lead all these campaigns by example. “It is critical for N.Y.U. Divest, Harvard and Brown to lead this movement, to be at the forefront, to be making decisions, and to be getting resources and infrastructure to lead this process,” Yearwood said. Each of the speakers made it clear that the threat of global warming is real and

dangerous. “If we don’t correct this, it will cause humanity to cease to exist how we know it now,” Yearwood stated. Sweeney noted the enormity of the targeted companies and all the violations they have committed on their path to profits. “The fossil fuel industry is responsible for systematically violating human and labor rights around the world in a way that oppresses the very communities that will be most affected by climate change,” Sweeney stressed. “Divestment is as much about protecting our own communities as it is about making a statement that we will not allow such injustices.” Sweeney debunked claims that there is no alternative to fossil fuels, noting that a clean energy society “looks a lot like Denmark or Germany today.” N.Y.U. Divest has met with the university’s vice president and C.F.O. to discuss their cause. However, the group has not yet been able to speak to President John Sexton on the topic, despite having written and published on their Web site two letters addressed to him. Also in the Village, The New School’s University Student Senate has already passed a divestment resolution, which, according to activists, may well be accepted by the school’s administration. New School spokespersons did not return calls for comment. Like The New School activists, N.Y.U. Divest is working within the university government framework to pass a resolution on the issue. The group recently presented its argument to N.Y.U.’s Student Senate Council, and will present to the Faculty Senate Council in December.

Worker in fatal fall at N.Y.U. BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

A

man doing facade work at a New York University building died last Friday after he fell from the sixth floor onto a third-floor roof. On Fri., Nov. 15, at 11:30 a.m., police responded to a report of an injured man at 19 University Place. They found a Hispanic man in his 40s on the rooftop of 269 Greene St. with body trauma. Emergency Medical Service medics transported him to Bellevue, where he was pronounced dead on arrival. According to Phil Lentz, a university spokesperson, the man had been doing brickwork on the facade. After the accident, N.Y.U. released the following statement: “An employee for D.P. Consulting Corp. working on a construction project at 19 University Place, N.Y.U.’s Languages and Literature Building, apparently fell and suffered fatal injuries this morning.

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N.Y.U. immediately shut down the construction site, where facade work was underway. The university has also shut down all facade work at the university to ensure that our contractors are in compliance with their safety plans. N.Y.U. prides itself on its excellent safety record and will cooperate with any government investigation of this tragic incident. Our deepest sympathies go out to the worker’s family.” Lentz said the work wasn’t related to Local Law 11, which requires the maintenance of building exteriors. Earlier this week, all N.Y.U. exterior work was still on hold. Lentz said, “We are hopeful this review will be completed this week and construction work will resume Friday for all exterior projects — except for those projects by D.P. Consulting Corp., the contractor at 19 University Place. There is no timetable for resuming projects by D.P. Consulting pending the investigations by OHSA and the Department of Buildings.”

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7

POLICE BLOTTER Grabbed for cops’ guns

Surveillance camera images of the alleged Westway robbery suspects.

Gunpoint club robbery

Police are searching for three men who allegedly robbed a West Village bar at gunpoint on Nov. 13. The suspects strode into the Westway bar, at 75 Clarkson St., around 4:20 a.m., and one of them pointed a gun at the place’s employees, police said. The perpetrators then demanded cash, and a bartender coughed up $400, after which the three men fled the scene before officers could arrive.

Police arrested Michael Glick, 29, after they say he blocked traffic and then attacked two officers on Nov. 17. Glick was spotted by cops at the intersection of Bleecker St. and Seventh Ave. South around  5:15 a.m., standing in the middle of the street and getting in the way of passing cars. When police approached him, Glick reportedly ran north on Bleecker St. up to Perry St., where he was eventually cornered. But when cops tried to cuff him, Glick allegedly punched one of them, then grabbed the officer and pulled him to the ground. Glick then reportedly tried to snatch both of the officers’ guns, while also kicking and flailing his arms until he could be subdued. He was charged with two counts of assaulting a police officer, two counts of attempted criminal possession of a weapon, resisting arrest, obstructing government administration and obstructing traffic.

Tenjune tag team

Hocine Ouldhmou, 26, and Mounir Jaaouani, 33, teamed up to steal two cell phones at a Meatpacking District nightclub on Sat., Nov. 16., according to police. Security guards at Tenjune, at 26 Little W. 12th St., were alerted of the criminal activity around 1:30 a.m., when a woman, 22, told them Ouldhmou had snatched her phone out of her purse. Moments later, a 39-year-old man reported he realized his phone was missing after someone had jostled him on the dance floor. The security guards stopped Ouldhmou and Jaaouani, who were together, and eventually found both stolen phones in Jaaouani’s pockets. Both men were held at the scene until police arrived. They were each charged with grand larceny and criminal possession of stolen property.

Knife ’n’ bite

Police arrested Preston Smith, 49, after he was caught carrying an illegal knife in a West Village subway station on Nov. 15. Responding officers said Smith was acting aggressively toward pedestrians and blocking their path on the Uptown side of the Christopher St./Sheridan Square 1 train station, around  4:45 p.m.  When the officers stopped him, they also found he was carrying a gravity knife. They arrested Smith and charged him with criminal possession of a weapon. Later that night, after he was brought to the Sixth Precinct, Smith reportedly asked to be released from his holding cell to use the bathroom. When officers opened the cell, Smith allegedly bit one of them on the hand. For that, Smith was also charged with attempted assault.

Cashing in on hot card

Police are searching for a man who they say used a stolen debit card to withdraw cash from an A.T.M. just north of the East Village. The man reportedly snatched a 22-yearold woman’s debit card on the Lower East Side early on Oct. 20, and then, around 4 a.m., walked uptown to a C.V.S. convenience store on First Ave., between E. 14th and 15th Sts. At the store, he reportedly used the card to withdraw around $1,500 from the woman’s checking account. The suspect is described as an Asian man in his mid-30s, around 5 foot 9 inches tall and weighing 180 pounds.

8

November 21, 2013

‘Hamburglar’ busted

Police said Trevon Pinder, 23, stole a man’s wallet inside a West Village McDonald’s on Nov. 13. The 56-year-old victim told officers he was waiting in line at the fast-food joint, at 136 W. Third St., around 2:30 a.m., when Pinder snatched the billfold out of his pocket and made to flee. Fortunately, there were several cops down the block, and after he alerted them, the officers were able to catch the alleged thief before he could get away. Pinder was charged with grand larceny.

Fighting dirty

Police arrested Tavarius Graves, 28, after he allegedly smashed the front door of a West Village bar and then poked a bouncer in the eye. Witnesses told cops that a disgruntled Graves walked out of The Hangar bar, at 115 Christopher St., around midnight on Nov. 13, and shattered the bar’s glass door. And after the bar’s security guard repeatedly told him to leave, Graves refused, and then reportedly stuck his finger in the bouncer’s eye. Bar employees held Graves at the scene until police arrived to apprehend him. He was charged with assault, harassment and criminal mischief.

Smorgas thief

Police say that Mirko Dragas, 29, stole more than $4,000 from his boss, a West Village restaurant owner, over the course of more than a month. A manager of Smorgas Chef, at 283 W. 12th St., reported at the Sixth Precinct on Nov. 9 that Dragas, who had recently been fired, made numerous unauthorized purchases with the restaurant’s money. Between Sept. 26 and Nov. 4, Dragas reportedly charged $846 to the company credit card, took $2,770 from the petty cash fund and made a $730 wire transfer out of the restaurant’s bank account. A day after the theft was reported, cops tracked down Dragas, charging him with grand larceny.

Sam Spokony

TheVillager.com

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Challah back! Thanksgiving collides with Hannukah HOLIDAYS, continued from p. 1

Street will hold a Thanksgivukkah Extravaganzikah, at which children ages 4 to 10 can make Hannukah gelt in the form of turkeys and menorahs, bake turkey-shaped challah breads and participate in the “Great Dreidel Scavenger Hunt.” In a phone interview, Education Director Judy Greenspan spoke about the activities that will take place at the museum, on Eldridge St. near Canal and Division Sts., which is also home to the 1887 Eldridge Street Synagogue. “I love the name, ‘Thanksgivukkah,’ ” she said. “The whole concept of it is so quirky, and everyone is so amused by it. It’s fun to combine both traditions and doesn’t take much explanation.” Greenspan noticed last summer that the two holidays converge this year, and decided to run her Thanksgiving and Hannukah programs together. She did some research online and discovered Thanksgivukkah. “Now it turns out, everybody is doing something,” Greenspan said.  In addition to guessing how many dreidels are in a bowl to win a Thanksgiving prize, and taking part in the “Great Dreidel Scavenger Hunt” around the synagogue that leads to a turkey stuffed animal, kids can also create their very own “Menurkey,” which is modeled after 9-year-old Asher Weintraub’s invention, a ce-

Asher Weintraub, 9, with his invention, the Menurkey, a ceramic turkey menorah. For each of the eight nights of Hannukah, another candle is added to a feather.

ramic turkey menorah. “We’re not going to plagiarize, ours is just paper and toilet paper rolls — his sold in the Jewish Museum,” she said. In traditional Thanksgiving style, kids can write what they are grateful for on a poster of a turkey with feathers.

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“It’s the once-in-a-lifetime holiday we’ll never reliveakkah,” she said with a laugh.  Over at the Educational Alliance Preschool, on Henry St. by Jefferson and Clinton Sts., “Light Up the Neighborhood: A Thanksganuukah Party,” will take place in collaboration with The Manny Cantor Center, for children ages 10 and under.  Dr. Michelle Saran, director of the Educational Alliance Preschool, said that a grant from U.J.A.-Federation of New York to build family programming in the Lower East Side helped fund this free “spreading of light”themed celebration.  “Our vision is to incorporate values that are inspired by Jewish and seasonal holidays, and integrate arts and families to engage with a social-action component project,” she said. Youngsters will make a menorah together, listen to live music and produce a play based on the story of Hannukah, with elements of Thanksgiving sprinkled in. The menu will feature bagels and cream cheese, yogurt cups, jelly donuts and lots of dried cranberries and fruit. The menorah will be passed along and shared with other Educational Alliance programs — including ones for seniors, the mentally ill and drug rehabilitation centers — to take turns lighting the candles for the eight nights of Hannukah. “This menorah will be a symbol of building community, both by how it’s created and built, and how it’s used afterward,” Saran said.  Gratitude, which is an aspect of Thanksgiving, has been a focus at the preschool lately, as well as Hannukah’s ideals of bravery and courage. Saran has worked to connect her students with the values both holidays share, and has helped them to organize a canned food drive. Joanna Samuels, executive director of the Manny Cantor Center, also spoke about the intersection of the two holidays. “Both Thanksgiving and Hannukah are kind of based on myths,” she said. Samuels referred to the way the Native Americans welcomed the colonial settlers, and the feast that ensued. “Of course we know the relationship was much more fraught and complex than that — and somehow, it’s an aspiration,” she noted. “Wow, what would it mean if people from different backgrounds found each other in times of vulnerability and shared?” And then there is the miracle of Hannukah — though some might call it a myth — specifically, of the lamp oil that lasted for eight days, even though the Maccabees only had enough for one day. “Again, who knows?” Samuels said. “For some reason both of these stories have captivated us as modern-day people.” While she admitted neither of these historical narratives may stand up to fact-checking, Samuels feels there is significance to the Thanksgiving “myth” of gratitude and American pride, and the amazing Hannukah story of the miracle of light.  These stories’ staying power poses a chal-

lenge for people to reach out to others in need and share what they have, and to inspire the possibility of working toward “miracles,” despite limited options.  “It’s a reminder of a call to action,” Samuels said. “What could we do if people collectively came together, what sort of things could we do in the world?” For more information, as well as to make reservations visit  www.eldridgestreet.org/visit/ family or www.edalliance.org/preschool. Meanwhile, on the Lower East Side, traditional Jewish eating establishments are not going over the top for Thanksgivukkuh. Katz’s Delicatessen, which got its start in 1888 — coincidently, the last time Thanksgiving and Hannukah overlapped — is keeping it simple. Jake Dell, a fifth-generation owner of Katz’s, located at Houston and Ludlow Sts., was opposed to wild combinations. “There will be turkey dinner and pastrami,” he said. “And we’re throwing some latkes into the mix.” Expected Thanksgiving items such as mashed potatoes and apple pie will be alongside tsimmes (sweet carrot stew) and latkes (potato pancakes) for the two and a half hour all-you-can-eat and drink (beer only) dinner.  “It’s not that different for us, except for the latkes,” Dell added. After a good turnout last year for their first Thanksgiving dinner, Katz’s decided to do it again with the Hannukah bonus. “It’s good for people who might not have anywhere to go or are displaced,” Dell said. Tickets are available for 100 people on the deli’s Web site, and the rest of the place will remain open. “Hannukah and Thanksgiving are both separately our two busiest nights of the year,” he added. “Last year, we handmade 800 to 1,000 latkes for Hannukah’s first two nights.” A few blocks west on Houston St., at Russ & Daughters, which opened in 1914, Niki Russ Federman, a fourth-generation co-owner, described their Thanksgivukkah workload. “We’ll be making close to 6,000 latkes in the span of a very few days, and applesauce from scratch, too,” she said. She was concerned over how many latkes might need to be shipped nationwide. “Thanksgiving and Hannukah — this has never happened before,” Federman said. “It’s hard to even project what it’s going to be like.” A Menurkey sits in the store window. The turkey-menorah mash-up was created by a customer, Asher Weintraub, 9. “We catered his bris,” Federman noted. A new restaurant, Taquitoria, on Ludlow St. near Stanton St., is shaking up its menu the day before Thanksgiving, the first night of Hannukah. Co-owners Barry Firsch and Brad Hotzman plan to feature special taquitos — rolled, fried tacos — for Thanksgivukkah. One taquito option is a deep-fried turkey and Brussels sprouts topped with gravy and cranberry sauce. The other is a latke-stuffed taquito topped with sour cream, apple sauce and chopped chives. They will be offered until they run out.

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Is Village View eyeing going private via new rules? BY GERARD FLYNN

U

nder the New York City Charter, each city agency is allowed to make internal rule changes it deems necessary to carry out its function, without a vote before the City Council. This gives agencies like the Department of Housing Preservation and Development the authority to make sweeping changes with potentially broad implications, such as recent rule changes to an affordable housing program dating back to the 1950s. Before the rules can be implemented, however, the public must be given a chance to weigh in. And on Nov. 6 at H.P.D.’s offices, many individuals did, upset at proposed changes to the Mitchell-Lama program, enacted in 1955 to make housing affordable for low- and middle-income people. Some of the proposed rule changes are minor and have even drawn praise. But a number of them provoked the scorn of irate tenants, housing activists and even city politicians, who see the changes as facilitating the deregulation of thousands of affordable units currently protected under the program. Chief among their concerns is the rule governing succession rights. Specifically, the proposed modification

would eliminate succession rights for uncles, aunts, nephews and nieces. Also, H.P.D. would only authorize succession if the primary leaseholder has died or been transferred to a nursing home, leaving the next applicant with 90 days to apply, much too short, critics said, for a relative in mourning. Ambiguity about what exactly defines a “surviving” spouse has also left many L.G.B.T. activists demanding clarification, amid concern that the parameters may be discriminatory. Local City Councilmember Rosie Mendez submitted testimony at the hearing. She did praise changes that give preference to veterans. But she slammed the rest of the proposed rules because they “would have a disparate impact on heterosexual or L.G.B.T. couples who choose not to marry.” Mendez expressed grave concern about one of the provision’s proposals, which, many charge, would facilitate Mitchell-Lamas transforming into Housing Development Fund Corporations (H.D.F.C.’s). Allowing such a change would eventually end the MitchellLama program as we know it, she said. Because state tax subsidies also fund the Mitchell-Lama program, D.H.C.R. is charged with oversight of many these developments in the city. However, the new rules strictly affect buildings under the oversight of H.P.D. At Village View, an East Village Mitchell-La-

ma complex, tenants raised these fears, amid concern the rule changes would accelerate deregulation and result in a loss of their rights and, ultimately, eviction. Some tenants spoke approvingly of news that single occupants in two- and three-bedroom apartments would face a shift to smaller units. But deregulation for a fixed-income tenant could spell serious trouble, noted Sue Susman, a retired Brooklyn College law professor who lives in a former Mitchell-Lama that privatized. Tenants in a privatized buildings, for example, can make demands on management, such as for major capital improvements (M.C.I.’s), tacking substantial increases onto maintenance costs and creating serious problems for elderly tenants with only a pension and, thus, the inability to meet a substantial maintenance hike. At Village View, many tenants must pay around $20,000 to get an apartment, after spending time on the waiting list. That is substantially less than the kind of mortgage private shareholders would be forced to pay. However, rumors about impending privatization are unfounded, said Dr. Frank Gardner, the treasurer of the complex’s board of directors. Village View, which opened in 1964, today has just under 1,300 units. Gardner said that, if anything, complaints the board is getting from many tenants about the proposed rule changes

may drive them closer to privatization. “These rules are making people ask, ‘Why should we stay with H.P.D.?’” he said. He added that H.P.D. has too many rules as is, effectively making tenants “vassals” to the agency, and with less control as a consequence. Since news got around about the proposal, tenants have been getting increasingly irate and have been asking a lot more about privatization, he noted. Gardner added that, while he isn’t an expert on the issue, and while the board has no intentions, at this stage, of deregulating the complex, he is getting up to speed, because of increasing chatter from tenants. So, he said, he feels “a responsibility to know more” about privatization. In a letter to state Senator Brad Hoylman, Daisy Klein, an elderly resident, pleaded for his attendance at the hearing. She told Hoylman the new rules are “giving ammunition to those who want Village View to go private,” and that the changes would “greatly handicap” attempts to keep Village View in the Mitchell-Lama program. Hoylman and fellow state Senator Brian Kavanagh, whose districts include many buildings in the program, agreed with Klein. In a letter submitted at the hearing, they criticized the proposed changes in succession rights and the proposal’s provisions that undermine the affordable housing program.

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November 21, 2013

11

Named best weekly newspaper in New York State in 2001, 2004 and 2005 by New York Press Association PUBLISHER JENNIFER GOODSTEIN

EDITOR IN CHIEF LINCOLN ANDERSON

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SCOTT STIFFLER

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12

November 21, 2013

Answers are needed on park air rights sales EDITORIAL

O

ne mystery surrounding the amendment to the Hudson River Park Act that the Legislature approved way back in June was answered last Wed., Nov. 13, when Governor Cuomo finally signed the bill into law. However, many questions still remain about the modifications to the 1998 Park Act, specifically, regarding the provision allowing the Hudson River Park’s unused development rights to be sold across the highway one block inland from the park. For starters, no one seems to know exactly how many unused air rights the 5-mile-long park has. Madelyn Wils, the president of the Hudson River Park Trust, the park’s governing authority, is on record saying this summer that the park has about 1.6 million square feet of unused air rights potentially for sale. However, the Trust and Assemblymember Richard Gottfried — who sponsored the recent amendment along with

Assemblymember Deborah Glick — now say the exact number of air rights can’t be quantified until a formal ULURP is done, presumably, sometime soon. Also, no one seems to know where the air rights could be transferrable to. Would they have to go directly across the highway from the pier they are taken from? Or could they be stacked anywhere along the park’s length, from Chambers St. to W. 59th St.? Most importantly, will the city or will the state oversee these air rights transfers? If it’s the city, under city zoning, a seven-month-long ULURP (Uniform Land Use Review Procedure) public review process would be required. Admittedly, many local residents scoff that ULURP has not spared the community strongly opposed large-scale projects, such as the Rudin residential redevelopment of the St. Vincent’s site, the N.Y.U. 2031 superblocks expansion or the Chelsea Market vertical expansion. Yet, with a community-sensitive councilmember, ULURP can be an effective way to scale back oversized, noncontextual development

plans and add into them community “gets” — like affordable housing, a school or a health facility. Pier 40 is the focus of everyone’s attention right now. That’s mainly because the new amendment requires that any revenue from the sale of this massive, but crumbling West Houston St. pier’s air rights be funneled back into Pier 40 to fund sorely needed repairs. Plus, Pier 40 simply has a huge amount of air rights for sale — around 600,000 square feet — and potentially 740,000 more if its pier shed is razed. Meanwhile, the St. John’s Center building across the highway has been a long-coveted development site, only in need of a residential zoning change. We hear that, initially, at least, discussions among stakeholders were that a potential air rights transfer from Pier 40 to the St. John’s site would be handled under the state’s General Project Plan, or G.P.P., process. We’re told that, yes, a G.P.P. does involve an extensive public comment period. Yet, the decision on a G.P.P. is ultimately by the much-maligned mechanism of “three men in a room” — the governor and the heads of the Assembly

and state Senate. The new legislation would seem to indicate that city zoning would, in fact, govern the process — but again, we absolutely need concrete assurances. Yes, of course, the revenue from these air rights sales would be a godsend for currently cash-strapped Hudson River Park. Yet, at what cost? For years, activists and preservationists have battled to save the Lower West Side waterfront from overdevelopment. Now, will this new provision simply override and blot out all those hard-won gains? The tough work of figuring out next steps on this issue will fall on Mayor Bill de Blasio. There will also be some new Trust board members in place. Coincidentally, the East Midtown rezoning was just scrapped, showing that outgoing Mayor Bloomberg’s pending initiatives are not a shoo-in anymore, by any means. We hear Community Board 2 will be reviewing the air rights issue in January. We’re looking forward to the board’s helping clarify this murky, but very serious, provision that has the potential to radically reshape our communities.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Nice job, but more voices To The Editor: Re “Community confronts park air rights issue as Cuomo O.K.’s bill” (news article, Nov. 14): The on-deadline insert was nice. But what is missing from the article are the voices of the smart people who live in Greenwich Village and Chelsea who spoke up with serious questions at the town hall — people who felt left out of any discussion before the stealth bill was introduced by Assemblymembers Deborah Glick and Richard Gottfried, and passed in a rush on the last day of the legislative session at 5 a.m. No public hearing was held prior to Glick and Gottfried’s action. Both of them attended last Wednesday’s town hall on Hudson River Park air rights, with Glick bolting soon after the announcement was made that Governor Cuomo had signed the legislation into law at the end

of that day. Gottfried tried to spin “community involvement,” but Greenwich St. resident Sandy Russo was having none of his spin. Newly elected District Leader Arthur Schwartz had his nice face on (he has previously called for Glick’s resignation), and reminded people that with a new mayor and

borough president there would be changes at the Hudson River Park Trust. But he was silent on the ramifications for the local area if the air rights auction does take place. Jim Fouratt

Zoltar vs. 7-Eleven To The Editor: Re “Small shops already feeling the crunch from 7-Eleven” (news article, Nov. 14): The guys at Gem Spa told me they’ve been hurting since a LETTERS, continued on p. 28

EVAN FORSCH

TheVillager.com

Bring back tokens! Blasted MetroCard swiped my fare! TALKING POINT BY BILL WEINBERG

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TheVillager.com

this good deed. I say this demands a public investigation. How many other such cases have there been? How many thousands of dollars have been fleeced from commuters by the M.T.A. through this “please swipe again” scam? How many fares have been written off because commuters either didn’t notice they’d been ripped off or couldn’t be bothered writing the M.T.A.? If you notice, we never had this problem with tokens. O.K., now let’s address the rationale for this egregious scam and desecration of New York’s culture. The MetroCard was sold to us with a fare discount for multiple rides — but given the relentless fare hikes, this is easily cancelled out. In 2003, when tokens were phased out, a ride was $1.50. Now it’s a dollar more. (In the previous decade, by the way, the fare had only risen 60 cents.) How much further ahead of the game would we be if we had stuck with tokens and frozen the fare back then? Given how we have presumably been ripped off by the MetroCard for the past decade, we have more than earned an indefinite fare freeze — for at least the next 10 years. Then there is the pseudo-ecological argument for the disincentives to getting a new card — the extra dollar charged, and the mathematics that make it virtually impossible to get an exact number of rides on a single card. Under the justification of saving paper, we are giving Big Brother a complete electronic record of all our comings and goings — especially if you pay with a credit card. Tokens left no such electronic traces — and were 100 percent recycled. A win-win. How many other things are wrong with the MetroCard? The inevitable move toward fully automated subway stations devoid of human employees obviously creates a climate that breeds crime — as well as contributing to unemploy-

ment in lean economic times. The imposition of having to battle the controls of the MetroCard vending machines is simply discrimination against technically challenged people such as myself. The MetroCard also discriminates against folks like me who ride the subways only occasionally — having to keep track of that damn card between rare subway excursions. How much money has been essentially stolen from New Yorkers who have just misplaced or mangled their cards? I need to call out the Straphangers Campaign on this one. This group that ostensibly lobbies on behalf of subway riders actually advocated for this monstrosity. They must answer for having lubricated the way to this dystopia. Will they take any responsibility for the systematic rip-off of New York straphangers? I challenge them to respond. For myself, I’m a MetroCard abolitionist. I know I’ll be called reactionary, Luddite and primitivist for even broaching this. But it’s been said that when you’re poised at the brink of a cliff, the most progressive step you can take is backward. This issue goes way beyond the subway system. Look at what is going on in the world: nanotechnology, total surveillance, the patenting of human genes, eyewear computers (next stop actual implants) — all these “advances” against the backdrop of a collapsing biosphere, and a breakdown of human culture, manifesting in terrorism and spectacularly senseless violence. In the face of this “progress,” New York City has the opportunity to make a real statement to the world. Abolish the MetroCard! Bring back tokens! May this courageous return to a demonstrably superior and more rational system be a clarion call announcing the beginning of humanity’s retreat from the brink. Weinberg blogs at WorldWar4Report.com

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

f you use a MetroCard, please take heed. Did you ever have a sneaking suspicion that you are actually being charged an extra fare every time you are told by the turnstile’s little display screen “Please swipe again”? Everyone always told me it was just my paranoid imagination. But now I know for sure. I found out when I recently ventured back on the subway for the first time in months, for a family dinner in Queens. I’ll admit that I had a beef with the MetroCard before I uncovered the scam. Since the token was finally phased out in 2003, I have tried to get around on foot and bicycle as much as possible. Apart from the sneaking feeling that I was being ripped off, I’ve found the MetroCard generally odious. I’ve come to view the demise of the token as a final nail in the coffin of a once-great city. Ironically, the M.T.A. has been famously luring New Yorkers back to the subway — boasting a cleaner, safer system — during the very years I have been avoiding it. But I’d take dirt, panhandlers, faulty P.A. systems and even a degree of danger over the utterly alienating MetroCard any day. Not only have we lost a unique icon of New York City — willingly abandoned in favor of a sterile magnetic-strip card basically identical to those used in every other city with a mass transit system — but now my experience demonstrates that the MetroCard is a massive fraud being perpetrated against the commuting citizenry. I didn’t have it in me to bike all the way out to Queens. I viewed taking the train merely as a slightly odious compromise. I didn’t imagine that it would border on the Kafkaesque. At the station where I picked up the F train (it will remain nameless for reasons to become clear; suffice to say it was in Lower Manhattan), I debated whether to just get a single round-trip fare — but of course they provide every disincentive to this. Especially given that, starting this year, we are now charged a dollar just for the privilege of buying a card, I had to consider if I shouldn’t gamble on taking at least one more round trip in the near future. I decided to get a $10 card. But of course the modest discount means there would be an extra 50 cents on the card after my four rides — it is designed so that you can never get rid of a damn card. I had the ominous feeling of being sucked against my will back into the system. It didn’t take long before I wished I had opted for taking my bicycle over the 59th St. Bridge. A few admittedly all-too-quotidian details of my journey... . At the 34th St. station, the F train mysteriously halted — for five, 10, 20 minutes... . A moderately talented busker in my car made the wait slightly more palatable, but it was maddening to have to be repeatedly

told through that nice new clear P.A. system that “we are being held” (by what, pray tell?), and, worse yet, “thank you for your patience.” Finally I snapped. “Patience?” I said aloud. “What patience?” Passengers turned and looked at me. I found myself launching into a rant. “How much longer, fellow New Yorkers?” I exhorted. “How much longer are we going to take this arrogance? The fare goes up and up and up, and they still can’t even get the basics together!” I knew I was risking arrest, but at that moment I felt ready to face the consequences. “What would they do if we all jumped the turnstiles?” I urged. “They couldn’t arrest all of us! How much longer, New Yorkers?” I was saved from myself by a new announcement. We were told that another F train was arriving across the platform and would be pulling out first. There was a mass exodus from one train to the other, with much unpleasant shoving and scrambling. But as soon as we were all settled in the now uncomfortably crowded new train, a voice came though its P.A. system — telling us that the first train would be leaving first! There was immediately another scramble back across the platform into the first train — now bursting with the former passengers of both. With exasperated sighs and eye-rolling, we lurched forward through the tunnel uptown. But that was just the beginning. The real pièce de résistance — proof of the financially predatory nature of the MetroCard system — was saved for my return trip. On the way home, I swiped at the 74th St. station in Jackson Heights — and got that familiar “please swipe again” routine. I dutifully swiped again — and found that my fare had been reduced not by one but by two rides. The screen registered that I was down to $2 and change — a single ride, after I had purchased four and used only one. I had been charged for the first swipe. My longtime suspicion was vindicated! I was now faced with the dilemma of whether to fight it out with the clerk in the booth — which might mean forfeiting yet another fare if I lost the fight. I decided to complain back at the station where I’d bought the damn thing. I went through the turnstile just before my swipe timed out. Back at the first station in Lower Manhattan, I psyched myself up to assert my rights with a surly, overworked clerk in what I still anachronistically think of as the “token booth.” He was actually something of a mensch, thank goodness, and listened sympathetically to my story. But he told me I would have to write the M.T.A. for a refund. “Write the M.T.A. for a refund?!” I sputtered. “For a lousy two-fifty?! Are you kidding?!” And here is why I am constrained from revealing the identity of the station. When I persisted in arguing, the clerk finally cut me a break. He issued me a one-ride pass — while emphasizing that he was bending the rules and couldn’t do it again. I hope the M.T.A. will not be able to identify him and punish him for

No, this was not an M.T.A.-sponsored project at the Union Square subway stop, but a Cooper Union student’s thesis project. The goal was to observe how people moving through public space react to this — a white sheet wrapped around and suspended between four students’ heads.

November 21, 2013

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It’s time for final push to pass small business bill

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINKSY

The Back Fence on Bleecker St. recently closed after its owners were unable to pay a significant rent increase. The owners took a payout to leave a few months before their lease expired.

TALKING POINT BY SHARON WOOLUMS

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he Back Fence on Bleecker St. — a Village landmark for 68 years — faced with a 75 percent rent increase, closed its doors last month for good. The owners, wishing to retire, should have been able to negotiate a fair lease so that they could have sold their business, allowing it to be kept open, and none of the employees would have lost their jobs. Woulda, coulda, shoulda. We could have saved our small businesses if only one politician would have fought for a bill that long ago should have been enacted. Instead, nothing’s changed in City Hall, but our neighborhoods are changing faster than you can blink. All these years small businesses’ doors were slammed shut, they could have been saved if politicians had fought for a fair approach to curbing rampant unbridled greed. Some say it’s too late, that there are already too-big-to-fail banks and franchise drug stores on every corner. But the ongoing threat to small businesses is a threat to the distinctive quality of every neighborhood, all in danger of losing their spirit and charm — of becoming carbon copies, destroying a way of life cherished and expected of a great city.

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There’s only one real solution that will stop the threat. Only one bill will give rights to protect mom-and-pop shops from greedy, unscrupulous landlords’ take-it-or-leave-it lease renewals. That solution is the Small Business Jobs Survival Act. First introduced in 1986 by former Councilmember Ruth Messinger, the act’s intent was to empower business owners to fairly negotiate with landlords for new lease terms during the commercial lease renewal process. No longer could landlords rent gouge or throw out businesses when the lease expired, nor could lease terms be solely dictated by the landlord. But with help from other elected officials, the powerful real estate industry succeeded in stopping the City Council vote for more than 25 years. This bill’s a litmus test for candidates on jobs, small business and the economy. But Mom and Pop, hold off popping the champagne corks in celebration: This is New York where there are candidates who proclaim progressive values on Main St. but leave campaign pledges on the steps of City Hall. Once elected, they march into the halls of power, abdicating civic responsibilities to lobbyists and special interest groups.  In August 2009, Margaret Chin, then a candidate for City Council, proclaimed on the City Hall steps, “This is the time we got to get this bill passed. We are asking for an emergency vote. I agree with all the council-

members here: No excuses. Our small businesses are the heart and soul of our community. Every community needs the jobs created by our small businesses.” Elected to the City Council and placed on its Small Business Committee, Chin later was asked by advocates to become the prime sponsor of the bill. In October 2009, with every member of the Small Business Committee and 32 councilmembers as sponsors of the bill, the S.B.J.S.A. would have passed. Council Speaker Christine Quinn, however, didn’t allow the vote, claiming the bill had “legal concerns and would not stand up to a court challenge.” Steven Barrison, spokesperson for the New York City Small Business Congress, outraged by this roadblock, called it “a travesty of democracy, because at the bill’s public hearing no one from the real estate industry had testified of any legal concerns whatsoever.” In April 2010, the S.B.J.S.A. was reintroduced. The Council speaker’s legal department never recommended changes to address legal concerns, leaving in place the only excuse blocking the vote for more than three years. In November 2010, an impartial legal review panel, at a forum at Bronx Borough Hall on the bill’s legality, confirmed what advocates already knew: The S.B.J.S.A., as currently written, is fully constitutional and legally sound to withstand likely court challenges. No section of the S.B.J.S.A. was deemed “vulnerable” to being found unconstitutional in a court challenge. In June 2013, at a Queens conference on the future of the S.B.J.S.B., Councilmember Chin, the bill’s prime sponsor, stated, “Our city’s small businesses face a crisis and needed the bill to pass to save them from high rent increases.” Advocates fearing small shop extinction in the near future, called for an immediate hearing on the bill — but Chin didn’t do it. In August 2013, at a public event in the Village, I asked Chin about the bill’s progress. She said she was working to gain enough sponsors to override a mayoral veto. Later, when asked by The Villager’s editorial staff about the legislation’s status, Chin claimed it was stalled due to the “legality of the bill.” Advocates made a simple, routine request that she ask the City Council’s legal department to put in writing specific changes to satisfy legal concerns. To advocates’ chagrin, Chin, as prime sponsor, has never called for a hearing on the bill nor challenged Speaker Quinn’s claim of legal issues. During interviews with The Villager’s editorial staff prior to the mayoral primary, both Quinn and Bill de Blasio said they were

advised the bill was not legally enforceable. Councilmember Gale Brewer told The Villager she didn’t feel her colleague Robert Jackson marshaled sufficient support in the Council for the bill when he was leading the push for it. Candidates, like Quinn and de Blasio, expected voters to believe the only problems facing small business are fines and loans. “Nothing could be further from the truth,” said Sung Soo Kim, New York City’s leading small business advocate for more than 30 years. “Without the rights and protection of the S.B.J.S.A., mom-andpop businesses will soon become extinct in New York City — the American Dream will be dead.” To Chin’s excuse that the bill needed enough sponsors to override a mayoral veto, Kim responded, “The mayor is leaving office and all his threats to veto legislation are being ignored. The legislators are voting for bills he’s against and overwhelmingly over-

‘Councilmembers can now vote their conscience, without the speaker’s or mayor’s influence.’ Sung Soo Kim

riding his vetoes. The small business community just wants a vote on our bill to give us rights, and councilmembers can now vote their conscience, without the influence of either the speaker or the mayor.”  Quinn, Chin and other councilmembers who were accused during the election of being in the pocket of real estate lobbyists, now have a chance to prove this perception wrong. The S.B.J.S.A. now has 24 sponsors, including the majority of the Council’s Small Business Committee. Call your councilmember now for a much-needed emergency vote. Write them. E-mail, tweet, Facebook your friends so this becomes known citywide, because your councilmember’s vote is needed to pass this bill before it expires in December. Councilmembers leaving office this year have the chance to make the saving of momand-pop stores their legacy. Chin declined comment for this talking point. For more information, visit www.savenycjobs.org

TheVillager.com

Print shop is flying high

Explore. Imagine. Create.

BY HEATHER DUBIN

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TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY HEATHER DUBIN

n a tiny space crammed with six pieces of office machinery and packed with supplies from Elmer’s Glue to rubber stamps, Santo and Margaret Mollica make it happen. The couple have run The Source Unltd print and copy shop on E. Ninth St. in the East Village since 1982. Together, they have provided the neighborhood, where they also live, with more than 30 years of service.  For their long staying power, and connection to the area, the two were recently honored with the 2013 Outstanding Pigeon Award from the East Village Community Coalition. A celebration was held at La Mama on Oct. 22 at E.V.C.C.’s annual gala, where the couple were presented with the small business award. Local restaurant Veselka, another business mainstay, catered the event. The Mollicas recently talked with The Villager about their shop, the neighborhood and their new elevation to “Pigeon” status. The two stood behind the counter of their small, 300-square-foot store as they spoke, while customers filtered in and out. With the Mollicas was Curtis, their 3-year-old pit bull, a rescue dog who is named for soul singer Curtis Mayfield. “It was the first one they ever gave out. We want the rat one next year,” Santo joked of the E.V.C.C. honor. Santo, who is also a musician, noted that the neighborhood has drastically changed from when they first opened shop during the height of the East Village’s drug scene. “Now it’s more commercial — there’s us, and two to three other storefronts,” he said. Margaret — who maintains the store’s Web site — recalled how art galleries popped up in the area in the mid-1980s, and a new group of people surfaced to patronize their shop.  The couple have had a few court battles with their landlord, in the 1990s and early 2000s, but they prevailed, allowing them to remain on E. Ninth. Affordable rent has also contributed to their longevity. Margaret estimated rent for new stores on the block at $6,000 to $7,000 per month. “It’s the survival award,” Santo deadpanned. “We’re here still after all that’s gone down. We’re still doing it.” Business blossomed after Santo started doing layouts and design for people. “As an industry, the business started growing, too,” he recalled. “There was no FedEx or Staples back then. It was a printing world, and more complicated.” Computers have been pivotal in reshaping the future of print and copy. While today a person can make a magazine at home, the Mollicas are still in business, partly because one cannot print while mo-

Santo Mollica, holding E.V.C.C. Outstanding Pigeon Award, and Margaret Mollica at their The Source Unltd store in the East Village.

bile. Additionally, out-of-control prices for print cartridges have also helped.  “To save time, we tell customers to email us their files, and we’ll do it for you,” Margaret said. “Now we reach more people, believe it or not.” The couple made labels for the current Dutch Masters painting exhibit at the Frick Collection, and a rubber office stamp for the American Museum of Natural History. “It’s stuff you wouldn’t expect,” Margaret noted. Other customers are international travelers, like the person from Australia who needed to print out “The Book of Mormon” theater tickets, or people in town for a business trip who need a presentation printed for a conference.  “It used to be neighborhood local jobs, but now the neighborhood is global,” Santo said. He was positive about this transformation, noting he has reaped business from Yelp, as well. “It opens things up,” he added. They get more than 100 walk-in customers daily, plus e-mails. There is a bulletin board outside the shop covered with fliers about shows, sales or neighborhood events, reminiscent of a time when the East Village was covered with such signs everywhere. Margaret tries to buy products locally when she can, and features greetings cards by local artists in the shop. Surprised by the award, the couple were humble about their role in the community. “We’ve been here all this time, doing our own thing,” Santo said. “We haven’t been part of any group.” “We still love it here, despite all the changes,” Margaret said. “It feels like home to me.”

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November 21, 2013

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Developer claims dorm on track for old CHARAS site BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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November 21, 2013

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

lthough all is quiet on the old P.S. 64 front, developer Gregg Singer assured The Villager that the vacant, landmarked building will soon enough be transformed into an in-demand, state-of-the-art student dormitory. “Just waiting for approvals,” he said calmly in a recent, rare phone interview. “You know — it just takes time.” Singer purchased the former city-owned building at auction for a mere $3.2 million in 1998, but his plans to develop the property with a high-rise dormitory tower were shot down by the city, and ultimately defeated when the Bloomberg administration landmarked the building in 2006. Until the end of 2001, the address was home to CHARAS / El Bohio Cultural and Community Center. A group of local Puerto Rican activists, CHARAS had cleared the run-down eyesore of junkies and hookers and transformed the place into a neighborhood activist and arts hub. This April, the determined developer pitched a downscaled dorm plan to house up to 530 students in the existing, “H”-style, turn-of-the century school building. It would house students from The Cooper Union and Joffrey Ballet School, he said. But in May, more than 150 community activists, joined by local politicians and CHARAS Executive Director Chino Garcia, marched from the old school building, at 605 E. Ninth St., to Cooper Union’s Foundation Building to warn Cooper, “Don’t get in bed with Singer!” At the time, the developer’s workers were busy gutting the building for its upcoming makeover into a high-tech dorm. But more recently, the work suddenly stopped. However, Singer maintained all is going right according to plan. “We’ve completed all interior demolition, and we’re waiting for approvals to renovate the building,” he said last week. “Now it’s all just open [inside], and it’s ready for the construction. We’re just waiting for permits.” The interior construction should start “sometime in 2014,” he said. He expects that by August 2015, the new dorm will be ready for occupancy for that upcoming school year. So far, Singer said, four floors of the sixstory building (counting the basement) are spoken for. Joffrey Ballet is slated to get the basement level and ground floor, and Cooper the second and third floors. The basement level will also have a game room, health center, fitness center and theater. The plan is to open up the E. 10th St. street wall by adding windows, which “will add life to the street,” he said. He’s still looking for a school to lease out the top two floors. Asked if the dorm would take random university students from various schools, he said, no, the tenant or tenants

Developer Gregg Singer said his plan is to open up this wall on the E. 10th St. side of the old P.S. 64 with windows, which would “add life to the street.”

for these floors “would have to be affiliated with an institution.” He was confident he’ll be able to fill the building. “We did a study,” he said. “There is a 57,000-bed shortage for students. New York has 112 colleges.” He said that — although he doesn’t need to do this — he will be restoring the building’s exterior details that he had lopped off in a failed effort to overturn the building’s landmarking seven years ago. (At the time, one of his lawyers bluntly stated they were “scalping” the building.) The new facsimiles will be made of glass-fiber reinforced concrete, or G.F.R.C. Singer still thinks his modified tower plan for the site — the second, slightly shorter version, a 19-story dorm that would have preserved the old school’s front — was a great idea. “The tower — it was really a clever idea,” he reflected. “It was set back from the street. It was the same height as the Christadora House, and it was going to give the community $2 million.” Singer’s scheme called for a nonprofit to own the dorm, and for $2 million of the facility’s annual profit to be funneled to local nonprofit groups. In fact, he said, he only chopped off the old school’s exterior ornaments “to keep the ability to go up” and “preserve the cash flow

for the community,” adding, “The city gave the permit to do that work. “But they didn’t want it, so…,” he said of the defeated dorm tower scheme. “If you’re not building up, you might as well put them back,” he said of the facade details. The current cost of fixing up the building for the new dorm is around $40 million, he said. “Yeah, terrible condition,” he noted of the former CHARAS’s state. “It’s a full, gut renovation.” Asked if there would be any community facility inside, or if the community would be able to hold meetings there, he answered, “It’s a college dormitory. No, it doesn’t make any sense. … We tried that for years. We tried to do it that way, to do space for the community, space for their meetings. The councilmember didn’t want it,” he said, referring to Rosie Mendez. Like the neighborhood activists who have fought Singer’s plans for 15 years, Mendez supports turning the facility back into a community center. Susan Howard was part of the group arrested at CHARAS on the frosty-cold morning of Dec. 27, 2001. One hundred, helmetwearing riot police had massed on E. Ninth St., ready to carry out an eviction of the activists. Any potential demonstration was nipped in the bud as the police quickly swooped in

and arrested the activists, whose arms were chained together inside PVC tubes. “Giuliani did not, on his last day in office, want a protest,” she said. Howard, now a leader of the group SOCCC64 (Save Our Community Center CHARAS 64), said she looked at photos of the gutted space on the Massey Knakal real estate brokerage Web site and fears that Singer has cleared out the interior so aggressively that the whole building could well collapse. In fact, she believes that’s exactly his intent. “He’s removed all the interior walls,” she said. “There are just some thin beams there now. I can’t tell if they’re existing support beams or ones he’s installed.” Singer didn’t respond to follow-up calls about whether he is, in fact, trying to demolish the building under the guise of renovating it. Howard accused the developer of still harboring his dream of erecting a towering dorm on the site. But what about the East Village / Lower East Side rezoning that caps building heights on side streets at around eight stories? she was asked. She countered that Singer could always go to the Board of Standards and Appeals for a waiver. “How long should the building sit there unused?” she said. “If he can’t develop it, he should just return the building to the community.”

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November 21, 2013

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Art and tech intersect in an East Village toy store BY BOB KRASNER

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PHOTOS BY BOB KRASNER

oys have changed. When this writer was a kid, we made some pretty cool stuff out of cardboard boxes. And we didn’t have cell phones — but we had two cans and a piece of string that stretched all the way over to my next-door neighbor’s house, making late-night conversations possible without the help of the phone company. Nowadays, though, all you need to make something really cool is a program like CAD or ZBrush that will produce an STL (Surface Tessellation) file that will be processed by GCode, so that the build file can be fed to an Additive Manufacturing device that will output in either ABS or PLA. Sorry if I lost you along the way. Although the technology has been around for 30 years, 3D printing is just now making its way into the culture. And thanks to the proprietors of the tiny East Village toy shop CUBO, at 521 E. 12th St., it has become accessible and even affordable. Proprietors Victor De Los Angeles and Julie Kim met when their previous occupations — hotel manager and floral designer, respectively — intersected. Between them they had various art, graphic design and computer science backgrounds, but they bonded over their love of what are known as plush and art toys. It didn’t take long for them to realize that they were not going to be happy unless their careers changed direction. The initial idea for their store was that it would be a something-for-everyone source for collectable art toys, with everything from a Happy Labbit Blind Box ($5) to oneof-a-kind works, such as the customized Munny (a blank form created by Kidrobot) creature that co-owner De Los Angeles is working on now (estimated price, $700). They realized, however, that selling plush toys and DIY (do it yourself) creatures was not going to sustain the business. Enter the 3D printer, which De Los Angeles, luckily, had an aptitude for.  The 3D printing process is not as simple as dropping an object into a slot and, a few minutes later, a bell chimes and a perfect reproduction comes out the other end. In fact, it’s a bit more complicated. First, a three-dimensional file — the aforementioned STL — must be created. If the artists can produce the files themselves, they are halfway there. If not, De Los Angeles is adept at taking a two-dimensional drawing and creating the necessary 3D file, and he charges exceptionally reasonable rates to do so. Once the file is ready, there’s plenty of time to catch up on your reading while the printer slowly puts layer after layer of plastic down to create the desired object. It took 13 hours to create the pair of 9-inch-high horns

Victor De Los Angeles checking the 3D-printed horns that he had just applied to his creation.

(which would retail for $45 each) that adorn De Los Angeles’s work in progress. DIY art toys are not the only use for the technology. Inventors instantly realized that the 3D printer would be an affordable way to create prototypes, and they have been doing so, avoiding the previously expensive costs of machining, injection molds and such. (Unfortunately, some are even using it to make plastic guns that fire real metal bullets.) De Los Angeles’s pricing makes it possible for just about anyone to produce a tangible facsimile of the idea in his or her head. Speaking of ideas, CUBO’s owners have plenty of them. Future plans for the store include having smaller printers running in the middle of the place, turning out CUBO souvenirs while you shop. Also in the works are book signings, art shows and new-release parties for limited-edition and unique pieces, in conjunction with the artists.  Ah, progress. Of course, I love the idea that I can produce a 3D file of myself and put a mini-me on the shelf. But I also think that it’s pretty cool that you can still make a phone out of two cans and some string.  CUBO, 521 E. 12th St., 646-370-3351, www.CuboNY.com. To join the mailing list, write to info@cubony.com.

Victor De Los Angeles and Julie Kim in their E. 12th St. shop CUBO. Kim is holding a “Worrible,” created by artist Andrew Bell.

TheVillager.com

De Blasio and transition team chiefs take tour of transition tent BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

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www.reddenfuneralhome.net

TheVillager.com

November 21, 2013

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PHOTOS BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

arl Weisbrod and Jennifer Jones Austin, the co-chairpersons of Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio’s transition team, toured the Talking Transition tent, at Canal St. and Sixth Ave., this past Sunday. In doing so, they joined several thousand New Yorkers who had already visited the two-week, interactive hub during its first week. Austin is C.E.O. and executive director of the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies. Weisbrod, a partner at HR&A, a real estate and economic development consultancy, has deep roots in city government and urban policy. Ten foundations, including George Soros’s Open Society Foundations, are spearheading the initiative. Talking Transition is designed to allow New Yorkers to weigh in on the issues and concerns that matter most to them. At the end of the two weeks, the data and ideas discussed will be collected and presented to Carl Weisbrod and Jennifer Jones Austin checked out the Talking Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio visited Talking Transition on Wednesday. Transition “soapbox” on Sunday. Mayor de Blasio. At the tour’s start, Austin and Weisbrod who he might pick for police being ferried around town in trucks, to survey pedestrians on stressed that Talking Transition is independent commissioner and other top sidewalks, and taken into E.S.L. rooms in public libraries. of the actual transition process they are co-chairThe Duarte Square tent also features a “soapbox” where posts. He only gave very gening. Nevertheless, they said, Talking Transition is eral answers, but said that, like people can record a video statement telling the new mayor “emblematic” of what de Blasio is hoping to do Talking Transition, he greatly what’s on their mind. as mayor because it is “inclusive.” Weisbrod and Austin were led around by Chris Stone, the values community input and Weisbrod called Talking Transition “a great believes in grassroots empow- president of the Open Society Foundations. step forward and a model of civic engagement “I think the seriousness of the conversation has impressed all erment. — to engage citizens in the era of modern De Blasio and Weisbrod of us,” Stone said afterward of Talking Transition. “The data are communication. … We obviously welcome first met 20 years ago when huge. The survey on the tablets is the most powerful thing.” what’s being done here.” He said they hope 50,000 people will ultimately take the both were in the Dinkins adWhen Weisbrod and Austin addressed the survey. ministration. press after the tour, The Villager asked WeisAnother tool the program is using is blank stickers that people In a recent article in The New brod about a particularly hot issue right now York Times about the transition write their concerns on, then paste on the plywood walls and on the Lower West Side: What does de Blasio effort, Weisbrod said, “We’re tables in the tent’s front area. On Sunday, a longtime West Village think about the Hudson River Park’s new abilgoing through a period of resident was filling out a sticker with some words on one of her ity — following Governor Cuomo’s approval of it last week change now in the city, and one change that’s really taking place beefs: that religious institutions should not be exempt from pay— to sell its unused air rights one block inland from the park? is a generational change. There’s really a need to bring in a new ing property tax. The question was probably too specific for the event. Weis- wave of people who I hope will spend a good long time in the brod answered that the transition team has their hands more government, and help it not only through the de Blasio adminthan full making appointments, dealing with financials and istration for the next eight years, but beyond and beyond and the like. beyond.” “There’s absolutely a whole lot that we have to absorb and diPeople can weigh in at the tent by taking a simple, undergest,” he said. “The city of New York is a big and complex place.” five-minute survey on computer tablets. Questions range from De Blasio himself visited the tent on Wednesday afternoon. whether police-community relations, as well as public schools, He praised the Talking Transition effort, then answered me- are improving or worsening, to whether affordable housing dia questions about his own transition process, regarding and jobs are getting easier or harder to find. The tablets are also

PHOTOS BY Q. SAKAMAKI

Through the eye of the iPhone Acclaimed photographer Q. Sakamaki is among the professionals now using iPhones to take high-quality photos. He likes to use Hipstergram to customize his pictures to resemble old Polaroids, as with these images of his from this past May Day in New York. Admittedly, when shooting a portrait, Sakamaki said he has to brace the iPhone against his body to stabilize it. The former East Villager is an elite “conflict zone” photographer, who has covered wars around the globe. Asked if he would use a cell phone to take photos on the front lines since it’s a bit tricky to focus and shoot quickly, he noted, often in conflict situations, photographers don’t have time to focus before they shoot, even when using traditional gear.

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November 21, 2013

TheVillager.com

Masterpieces of holiday simplicity Caruso’s musical ‘Nice’ list sure can swing BY JIM CARUSO

MICHAEL FEINSTEIN AT BIRDLAND JAZZ CLUB

(jim-caruso.com)

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love spending the holidays in New York City — but between the overblown seasonal spectaculars, the inclement weather and throngs of gaping tourists, a Manhattan Christmas can sometimes be overwhelming. In concocting this list of December must-sees, I’ve noticed that my choices are all masterpieces of simplicity — emphasizing clarity, sophisticated humor and good old-fashioned showbiz. Maybe those are the qualities I wish for myself, and should include in my letter to Santa. So, with all due respect to The Rockettes, the 76-foot tree in Rockefeller Center and the upcoming slush-fest, here is my grown-up Christmas list of musical, magical morsels.

December 17-28 At Birdland Jazz Club 315 W. 44th St. (btw. 8th & 9th Aves.) $75-$200, plus $20 food or beverage minimum Call 212-581-3080 or birdlandjazz.com

PHOTO BY CAROL ROSEGG

CHRISTMAS EVE WITH CHRISTMAS EVE: A BENEFIT FOR BROADWAY CARES/ EQUITY FIGHTS AIDS

December 2, at 7pm At XL Nightclub 512 W. 42nd St. (btw. 10th & 11th Aves.) $20-$40 Call 212-840-0770 Visit broadwaycares.org/christmaseve2013

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Ann Harada steps out of her “Cinderella” role and back into her “Avenue Q” persona, for a Dec. 2 Broadway Cares benefit.

ON THE RECORD: A TRIBUTE TO THE GREAT VOCAL GROUPS OF THE 20th CENTURY

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

For one night only, beloved Broadway star (and current Cinderella step-sister) Ann Harada will morph into her outrageous, politically incorrect and heavily accented persona from “Avenue Q,” in the fourth edition of Christmas Eve with Christmas Eve. No Broadway duet will go unharmed, as Christmas Eve performs some of the great romantic theatrical duets with a bevy of spectacular leading men, including Santino Fontana (“Cinderella”), Howard McGillin (“The Phantom of the Opera”), Wesley Taylor (“Little Miss Sunshine”) and Max von Essen (“Evita”).

After 14 years headlining at the eponymously named Feinstein’s at The Regency, Michael Feinstein moves his smart, suave and sophisticated holiday show to Birdland, ‘the jazz corner of the world.’ The multi-platinum-selling, two-time Emmy and five-time Grammy-nominated entertainer has been a friend to the club for years, even highlighting Monday night’s weekly Cast Party on his PBS “American Songbook” series. Lucky audience members will be privy to ravishingly performed yuletide standards and insider stories celebrating the legacy of popular song — making this the nightclub event of the season.

Michael Feinstein’s headlining debut at Birdland Jazz Club happens Dec. 17-28.

Through December 15 Sat. at 3pm & Sun. at 6pm At Stage 72 158 W. 72nd St. (btw. Amsterdam & Columbus) $25 (half price for students/seniors) Call 800-838-3006 Visit brownpapertickets.com

As solo singers, Bill Daugherty, Paul Kropfl, Amanda Savan and Deborah HOLIDAY, continued on p.22

November 21, 2013

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Musical, magical morsels HOLIDAY, continued from p. 21

PHOTO BY GENEVIEVE RAFTER KEDDY

The powerhouse quartet of “On the Record” focuses their pipes on popular music’s last 100 years.

Tranelli are wonderful. As a quartet, they’re even better. Their show, “On The Record, A Tribute to the Great Vocal Groups of the 20th Century,” celebrates such disparate and influential ensembles as The Andrews Sisters, The Mills Brothers, The Beach Boys and The Beatles. This multi-media chronology showcases the sights and sounds of singers and arrangers who have shaped the popular music scene for the last 100 years.

A SWINGING BIRDLAND CHRISTMAS

December 21-25 At Birdland Jazz Club 315 W. 44th St. (btw. 8th & 9th Aves.) All shows 6pm, except Sat. at 5:30pm $30, plus $10 food or beverage minimum 212-581-3080 or birdlandjazz.com

PHOTO BY BILL WESTMORELAND

As the late, great Kay Thompson chirped, “It’s the holiday season! So whoop-de-doo, and dickery-dock!” That’s just one tune I’ll be singing with my musical cohorts Billy Stritch and Klea Blackhurst in our fourth year of “A Swinging Birdland Christmas.” If you miss the cozy, traditional Christmas TV specials of yore, this just might be the perfect show for you! Tight harmonies, superstar guests and all-round yuletide euphoria will abound at the iconic jazz room.

NOTHING TO HIDE

Through January 18 Wed.-Fri. at 7:30pm, Sat. at 2pm, 5pm & 8pm Sun. at 4pm & 7:30pm At Pershing Square Signature Center 480 W. 42nd St. (btw. 9th & 10th Aves.) $76.50-$149.50 Call 212-279-4200 Visit ticketcentral.com Also visit nothingtohidenyc.com

As a kid, I annoyed children of all ages as “Jimbo the Clown,” with magic, ventriloquism and mayhem, so I have a passing knowledge of card tricks. But this show, directed by TV and Broadway superstar Neil Patrick Harris and starring sleight-of-hand artists Derek DelGaudio and Helder Guimarães, had me slack-jawed and screaming, “How’d they DO that?” This show had a wildly successful theatrical run at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles, and now you can catch the fun Off-Broadway at the Pershing Square Signature Center until January 18. This isn’t your basic bunny-out-of-a-hat show, folks. The delicacy, wit and laser-beam precision is a thrilling thing to watch — and is, as they say, fun for the whole family! Jim Caruso’s “Cast Party” happens every Monday night at Birdland Jazz Club (315 W. 44th St., btw. 8th & 9th Aves.). Doors open at 9pm, show at 9:30pm. $25 cover, $10 food/ drink minimum. For info, call 212-581-3080 or visit jim-caruso.com and birdlandjazz.com.

These cats sure can swing: Klea Blackhurst, Billy Stritch and our own Jim Caruso (left) return to Birdland for their annual holiday show, Dec. 21-25.

PHOTO BY MICHAEL LAMONT

Something up their sleeves? Helder Guimarães and Derek DelGaudio claim they have “Nothing to Hide.”

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November 21, 2013

TheVillager.com

Father to Hope, Carson, Leno and Letterman Frank Fay was copied, but not liked BY TRAV S.D.

T

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that little Jew bastard out of the wings,” so (according to him) he grabbed a stage brace and busted open Fay’s nose with it. Lou Clayton also let him have it across the jaw for his smart mouth. Even when Fay meant to be nice, he was rotten. Introducing Edgar Bergen for his first Palace date, he said: “The next young man never played here before, so let’s be nice to him.” As any performer can tell you, such an introduction is patronizing at best, sabotage at worst. Bastard or not, Fay’s vaudeville success led to several Broadway shows during the years 1918-33. He even wrote and produced two starring vehicles for himself (a la Ed Wynn): “Frank Fay’s Fables” (1922) and “Tattle Tales” (1933). Through his friend Oscar Levant, Fay met and married Barbara Stanwyck, then a young chorus girl who’d just gotten her first Broad- Three years after this 1932 film, Fay would divorce Barbara way show (1927’s “Bur- Stanwyck. Their relationship may have been the basis for “A lesque”). In 1929, they did Star is Born.” a dramatic sketch at the Palace, as “Fay and Stanwyck.” Later that year, lane holding his own hand.” He passed they were called to Hollywood, so Frank away in 1961, a humbler, and, one hopes, could star in the film “Show of Shows.” a wiser man. Some say Fay and Stanwyck’s marriage and their experience in Hollywood later became the basis of a Hollywood movie: “A Trav S.D. has been producing the AmeriStar is Born.” The womanizing, alcoholic can Vaudeville Theatre since 1995, and periFay’s career floundered, while Stanwyck’s odically trots it out in new incarnations. Stay flourished for decades. In 1935, the two in the loop at travsd.wordpress.com, and also were divorced — and Fay continued his catch up with him at Twitter, Facebook, Youdownward spiral until 1944, when he was Tube, et al. His books include “No Applause, chosen to play Elwood P. Dowd in the origi- Just Throw Money: The Book That Made nal Broadway production of “Harvey.” Vaudeville Famous” and “Chain of Fools: SiFred Allen said, “The last time I saw lent Comedy and its Legacies from NickelodeFrank Fay he was walking down lover’s ons to YouTube.”

November 21, 2013

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IMAGE COURTESY OF FRANK FAY PRODUCTIONS

en years ago when my friend told me that I should listen to his podcast, I have to admit I was pretty skeptical about the entire medium. I remember saying, “So let me get this straight — you plugged a microphone into your computer and talked about what was on your mind for an hour? And you’ve put that out in the world for people to download and enjoy?” “Of all the great vaudevillians, I admired Frank the most.”—James Cagney Almost all of the great comedians spoke with reverence about Frank Fay (18911961). He originated the stand-up comedy style we associate with Bob Hope, Jack Benny, Johnny Carson, Jay Leno and David Letterman: the extremely polished “American Institution” style, an unspoken confidence that says “an army of people made me possible.” You might call such performers “comic laureates,” almost branches of the U.S. government. As opposed to the more burlesquey Milton Berle-Henny Youngman-Rodney Dangerfield approach, these are not men who take or deliver a pie in the face, cross their eyes or say “take my wife, please.” What they do is tell America the jokes they will repeat around the water cooler at work the next day. While there was no TV in Fay’s heyday, he was the king of the Palace — the flagship NYC theatre of the top vaudeville chain in the nation. There was much to set Fay apart. Unlike most vaudevillians, Fay was no populist. He cultivated the aloof arrogance of the aristocrat. His trademark was the barbed put-down delivered on the spot with dependable lethalness. That is what audiences prized him for. He was charming, dashing and impeccably dressed, with a broad handsome Irish face (something like the actor Ralph Fiennes’). He had a very distinctive, swishy style of walking that was almost effeminate — but it was so effective that both Bob Hope and Jack Benny emulated it to their dying day. He generally finished his act with a sardonic version of “Tea for Two,” wherein he would stop every few bars in order to tear the song apart: “Tea for two, and two for tea.” Then, spoken: “Ain’t that rich! Here’s a guy that has enough tea for two. So he’s going to have tea for two. I notice that he

doesn’t say a word about sugar!” Well, it ain’t exactly “Duck Soup.” But with his wavy hair, straight teeth and twinkling eyes, one gets the feeling that Fay sold his jokes through charm. Fay was born in San Francisco to vaudevillian parents. He played his first part at age three in a Chicago production of “Quo Vadis?” His first vaudeville act was the team of Dyer and Fay. But it must have been pretty awful, because Fay later downplayed his involvement with it. By 1918, he had established himself as a monologist. By 1919, he played the Palace. “The Great Faysie,” as he styled himself, was appallingly successful on the vaudeville stage. To play the Palace — at all — was the very highest aspiration of most vaudevillians. A select handful ran a week there. In 1925, Fay ran ten weeks. So he might be a little forgiven if it went to his head. But there is something to the old adage that what lives longest are not words but deeds. Today, Frank Fay lives on in the recorded memory as a notorious SOB and a mean drunk, with nary a kind anecdotal word from anyone who knew him. Milton Berle once said, “Fay’s friends could be counted on the missing arm of a one-armed man.” An early example of the arrogance that was to overshadow his reputation throughout his career occurred at this early stage. In the incident, which became notorious throughout theatrical circles, Fay let the audience wait several minutes while he struggled to tie his tie in the dressing room. “Let ’em wait!” he apparently snapped at the stage manager, establishing a tradition that would not be revived until rock and roll was invented forty years later. Fay didn’t go in for slapstick. He used to taunt Bert Lahr by saying, “Well, well, well, what’s the low comedian doing today?” Fay’s bag was verbal wit, and he pulled no punches, offtstage or on. To Berle’s challenge to a battle of wits on one occasion, Fay famously said, “I never attack an unarmed man.” Apparently, Fay had one of those smirking faces that’s just itching to be smacked. On one occasion, he attempted to humiliate Bert Wheeler by dragging him onto the stage unprepared, and firing off a bunch of unrehearsed lines at him to which he was supposed to attempt rejoinders. Tired of such treatment, Wheeler unnerved him by remaining silent the whole time. When Fay finally cracked and said, “What’s the matter? Why don’t you say something?” Wheeler said, “You call these laughs? I can top these titters without saying a word” and smacked him on the face — to howls from the audience. Some run-ins were far less light-hearted. Milton Berle recalled having watched Fay perform backstage from the wings, which is a real no-no with some performers. Berle heard him say, “Get

Just Do Art BY SCOTT STIFFLER

THIRD STREET MUSIC SCHOOL’S HOLIDAY CONCERT

PHOTO BY IVAN ANTONOV

Located on in the heart of the East Village, Third Street Music School Settlement’s early childhood programs are good for the soul — but not exactly inexpensive to maintain, or provide (more than 75% of students receive financial aid or participate in tuition-free instruction and low-cost enrichment programs). Founded in 1894, the school will be celebrating its 120th year throughout 2014 with a citywide program of special events. Their upcoming holiday concert, which officially kick-starts the anniversary observances, serves to raise funds for the worthy nonprofit while showcasing a variety of musical and dance groups whose high bar of excellence will inspire Third Street’s students and patrons alike. Graham Parker, General Manager and Vice President of WQXR, hosts the event. In addition to jazz, tap and piano ensembles, there will be performances from the Glee Choir, the Let’s All Sing Choir and the Chorale Choir as well as the Philharmonia, Con Spirito and Sinfonia Orchestras. Sat., Dec. 7, at 1-4pm. At the Skirball Center for the Performing Arts (566 LaGuardia Place, just south of Washington Square Park). Purchase tickets ($10) at the box office (Tues.Sat., noon-6pm) or by calling 866-811-4111 or visiting nyuskirball.org/calendar/thirdstreet. For all things Third Street, visit thirdstreetmusicschool.org.

Sure to inspire: A dance performance, from last year’s Third Street Music School holiday concert. This year’s Dec. 7 concert kicks off celebrations for the school’s 120th year.

JAN TICHY: POLITCS OF LIGHT

JUST DO ART, continued on p. 25

IMAGE COURTESY OF NO LONGER EMPTY & THE ARTIST

Richard Gray Gallery and No Longer Empty (the folks who fill unoccupied storefronts with art) are presenting this solo exhibition of Israeli artist Jan Tichy’s instillations. Featuring single-channel videos, digital light/sculpture installations and site-specific work, “Politics of Light” casts a social, political and visual ray of clarity on “the seen and the unseen” world. “Politics” also distinguishes itself as the inaugural exhibition of NLE Presents — No Longer Empty’s new series dedicated to in-depth presentations of solo artists. Free. Through Dec. 14, at Richard Gray Gallery (196 Stanton St., at Attorney St.). Hours: Wed.-Sat., 2-7pm (closed Thanksgiving weekend). For more info, visit richardgraygallery.com and nolongerempty.com.

Jan Tichy’s “Recess” (2009, High-definition digital video projection) is part of the “Politics of Light” solo exhibition, on view through Dec. 14 at Richard Gray Gallery.

THIS

THANKSGIVING...

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Famous Dylan Thomas Watering Hole

White horse Tavern 567 Hudson St. NYC * 243-9260

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November 21, 2013

WATCH MORE FOOTBALL, AND DRINK MORE BEER . . . BUT DON’T BE A TURKEY ABOUT IT!

Happy Thanksgiving! TheVillager.com

Just Do Art CHELSEA SYMPHONY: ANNUAL HOLIDAY CONCERT

JUST DO ART, continued from p. 24

PHOTO EXHIBIT: HISTORIC FIREHOUSES OF MANHATTAN What does it say about a man who spends his entire career on call to run towards danger, only to occupy his “golden

PHOTO BY WAI NG

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Another building saved by a fireman’s camera: This shot of Engine Co. No. 31’s former Lafayette St. quarters is part of the “Historic Firehouses of Manhattan” photo exhibit, on view through Dec. 8 at the NYC Fire Museum.

Victor Garber narrates “The Night Before Christmas,” at The Chelsea Symphony’s annual holiday concert.

years” by preserving buildings in a manner that flames can’t touch? New York’s Bravest never punch the clock, apparently. They just find a new outlet for that drive to save things. When gold watch time came for FDNY Lieutenant Stephen Healy, he shifted his focus to capturing the architectural beauty of Manhattan firehouses built from the 1800s to the early 1900s. Healy’s “Historic Firehouses of Manhattan” is a photo series on exhibit through early December, at the New York City Fire Museum — an appropriate host venue on many levels, given that

the museum occupies a renovated 1904 Beaux-Arts building that was once home to Engine Company No. 30, and now houses a renowned collection of firerelated artifacts from the 18th century to the present (including hand-pumped fire engines, horse-drawn vehicles and all manner of tools and equipment). Nov. 22-Dec. 8. At the New York City Fire Museum (278 Spring St., btw. Hudson & Varick Sts.). Open daily, 10am-5pm. Admission: $8.00 ($5.00 for children 12 and under, seniors & students). Call 212-6911303 or visit nycfiremuseum.org.

The Chelsea Symphony has been expanding its geographic reach lately, with performances at Bargemusic, Symphony Space and Lincoln Center. But in early December, the vibrant, self-governing, 50-piece non-profit ensemble will be putting their own spin on that “home for the holidays” tradition, by setting their peripatetic sleigh down at St. Paul’s, for the group’s eighth annual holiday concert. Conducted by co-founder Yaniv Segal and co-Artistic Director Mark Seto, the seasonal offerings include Tchaikovsky’s “Nutcracker Suite” and Leroy Anderson’s “Sleigh Ride.” The brass section takes center stage, with a performance of Schubert’s “Magnificat” arranged by (and featuring) trumpeter Warren Wernick. Following in the footsteps of marquee names including David Hyde Pierce, Charles Busch and Andrea Martin, special guest Victor Garber (the complex man from “Argo” and “Alias”) will do the narration duties for resident composer Aaron Dai’s “The Night Before Christmas.” Fri., Dec. 6 at 8pm. At St. Paul’s Church (315 W. 22nd St., btw. Eighth & Ninth Aves.). Free, with a suggested donation of $20 at the door. A reception and a silent auction, to benefit the orchestra, will follow the performance.

Lettuce Give Cabbage Self-portrait sale will benefit charity BY SCOTT STIFFLER

IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Dozens on the wall, but only one on the floor: Hedda Lettuce unveils 100 self-portraits, at a Dec. 6 Chelsea Eye Art Gallery event.

TheVillager.com

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s it possible that our favorite good time gal in green has entered her Blue Period? If so, there’s no need for mood-stabilizing meds, dispensed by a shirtless bartender pouring from a spoutless bottle. Not, at least, during the early evening hours of the first Friday in December. That’s when even the most sober among us will be seeing double — and then some — in the form of 100 self-portraits painted Hedda Lettuce, each on sale for un-

der $100. Part of the proceeds from this Chelsea Eye Art Gallery event will go to CHABHA — an organization that supports children affected by HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa. Nail her iconic hair and sly smile, and you may walk home with your own original Hedda painting (valued at $500), the adoration of Miss Lettuce and the LookA-Like contest crown (actual crown not included). Elsewhere around Chelsea, every Thursday at 7pm, the celluloid work of everybody from Joan Crawford to Lindsay Lohan provides fodder for Hedda’s

pithy dressing downs — when her “Chelsea Classics” gig screens at Bow Tie Cinemas Chelsea (23rd St. near Eighth Ave.). Right next door and down a few stairs, the East of Eighth bistro is hosting “The Women Art Show” — another exhibition of paintings by our budding Picasso in pumps. Hedda’s legendary loose mouth elicits laughs, but lands her on Santa’s naughty (and trashy?) list — when the annual “Lettuce Rejoice” holiday spectacular barrels into the Metropolitan Room (34 W. 22nd St., btw. Fifth & Sixth Aves.) on Dec. 14, 15, 20, 21 & 22. For info on these events, visit heddalettuce.com. “Night of a Hundred Heddas” is free. Fri., Dec. 6, from 5:30-9pm. At Chelsea Eye Art Gallery (157 W. 19th St., btw. Sixth & Seventh Aves.). November 21, 2013

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by 159 Huntington Holdings Inc. d/b/a Shebeen Chic to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment with one additional bar. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 159 East Houston St. New York NY 10002. Vil: 11/21 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a restaurant wine license, #TBA has been applied for by French Diner LLC d/b/a French Diner to sell beer and wine at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 188 Orchard Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 11/21 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license # PENDING for beer and wine has been applied for by the undersigned * to sell beer and wine at retail in a Restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 1271 Broadway NewYork,NY 10001 New York County for on premises consumption * DNC FOOD SERVICE CORP. DBA SPEEDY’S Vil: 11/21 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ARC FDCCSNY001, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 05/23/13. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Jenkintown, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o CSC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ARC DBPORBR001, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/12/13. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Jenkintown, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o CSC, 80 State St., 6th Fl., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOP ONE NORTH END LANDLORD LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/19/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 11/05/2013. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE: The name of the foreign Limited Liability Company is AHR ENTERPRISES LLC. Applic. for Auth. filed with NYS Dept of State on 9/30/13. Jurisdiction: Delaware & date of organization is 8/15/13. Office location in NY State: NY County; street address - 255 Hudson Street, Apt. PHB, New York, NY 10013. NY Sec. of State (SOS) is designated as agent of the LLC for service of process. SOS to mail a copy of any process against LLC to c/o Anthony Heifara Rutgers, 255 Hudson Street, Apt. PHB, NewYork, NY 10013 within or without NY State. Address maintained in its jurisdiction is: Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg, 401 Federal St. – Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity which limited liability companies may be organized. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE: The name of the foreign Limited Liability Company is AZTECH MOUNTAIN LLC. Applic. for Auth. filed with NYS Dept of State on 10/1/13. Jurisdiction: Delaware & date of organization is 8/15/13. Office location in NY State: NY County; street address - 255 Hudson Street, Apt. PHB, New York, NY 10013. NY Sec. of State (SOS) is designated as agent of the LLC for service of process. SOS to mail a copy of any process against LLC to c/o Anthony Heifara Rutgers, 255 Hudson Street, Apt. PHB, NewYork, NY 10013 within or without NY State. Address maintained in its jurisdiction is: Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg, 401 Federal St. – Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity which limited liability companies may be organized. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 136 GREENE LLC App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 11/1/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/27/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Thor Equities, LLC, 25 W. 39th St., NY, NY 10018. DE address of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Drive, Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BOURNE & ZAKHEIM, LLP Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/06/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLP may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLP is to: Bourne & Zakheim LLP, 733 THIRD AVENUE, New York, NY 10017. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF TWO SIGMA LUNA, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/6/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 5/3/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Matthew Siano, Esq., 100 Ave of the Americas, NY, NY 10013. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF TWO SIGMA HOLDINGS VC ACQUISITION FUND, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/6/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 5/3/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Matthew Siano, Esq., 100 Ave of the Americas, NY, NY 10013. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013

NOTICE OF QUAL. OF VALINOR CAPITAL PARTNERS SPV XIII, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/17/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 5/16/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: David Angstreich, 510 Madison Ave., 25th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF VALINOR CAPITAL PARTNERS SPV XIV, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/17/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 5/16/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: David Angstreich, 510 Madison Ave., 25th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF VALINOR CAPITAL PARTNERS SPV XV, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/17/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 5/16/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: David Angstreich, 510 Madison Ave., 25th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF VALINOR CAPITAL PARTNERS SPV XVI, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/17/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 5/16/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: David Angstreich, 510 Madison Ave., 25th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF FARMMAVEN LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/7/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANTTO LAW, that the NYC Dept. of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday December 04, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition for VESELKA ENTERPRISES LTD to continue to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 144 SECOND AVENUE in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUEST FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 11/21 - 11/28/2013

26

November 21, 2013

NOTICE OF REGISTRATION OF BUTLER SNOW LLP Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/4/13. Office location: NY County. LLP registered in ­­­Delaware on 10/10/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Thomas E. Williams, 1020 Highland Colony Parkway, Ste. 1400, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Principal office of LLP: 1700 Broadway, 41st Fl., New York, NY 10019. Purpose: practice the profession of law. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SDF64 MERMAID AVENUE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/4/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 825 3rd Ave., Fl 37, NY, NY 10022. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PILLAR CAPITAL FINANCE LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/4/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 330 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10017. LLC formed in DE on 4/1/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 11/21 - 12/26/2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN a license, number 1274722 for on-premises Liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to sell liquor at retail in a Hotel under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 36 Park Avenue South a/k/a 33 West 58th Street, New York, NY 10019 for on premises consumption. Highgate Hotels, L.P. D/B/A Park Lane Hotel; Harry’s New York Bar;The Park Room Restaurant; Garden Cafe Vil: 11/14 - 11/21/2013 NOTICE OF CERTIFICATE OF AUTHORITY OF FOREXLIVE MEDIA LLC Certificate of Authority filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/8/2013. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: c/o Delaware Intercorp Inc., 113 Barksdale Professional Ctr., Newark, DE, 19113. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 11/14 - 12/19/2013

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MANDER JEWELRY, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/15/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Mander Jewelry LLC, 400 Convent Avenue #52, New York, NY 10031. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 11/14 - 12/19/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 200 CAPTAINS NECK LANE LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/05/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 09/23/13. Princ. office of LLC: 681 5th Ave., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Apex Bulk Carriers LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 11/14 - 12/19/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 613 WEST 46, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/02/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Sanders Ortoli VaughnFlam Rosenstadt LLP, 501 Madison Ave., 14th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Sanders Ortoli Vaugh-Flam Rosenstadt LLP, 501 Madison Ave., 14th Fl., NY, NY 10022. As amended by Cert. of Correction filed with SSNY on 10/16/13, the process addr. is: c/o Sanders Ortoli Vaughn-Flam Rosenstadt LLP. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 11/14 - 12/19/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HUDSON TECH RESIDENTIAL LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/01/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 826 Broadway, 11th Fl., NY, NY 10003. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Hudson Companies at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 11/14 - 12/19/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 175 W 137 ST LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/31/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Gerald Migdol, Esq., 223 W. 138th St., Ground Fl., NY, NY 10030. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 11/14 - 12/19/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF KAPLAN INTERNATIONAL NORTH AMERICA, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/5/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in CA on 12/31/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Principal office address: 1015 Windward Ridge Pkwy., Alpharetta, GA 30005. Cert. of Org. filed with CA Sec. of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 11/14 - 12/19/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF KLEOS MANAGED SERVICES, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/12/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: One Liberty Plaza, 49th Fl., NY, NY 10006. LP formed in DE on 3/31/04. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 11/14 - 12/19/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MIV BLUE LLC Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/22/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 333 E 91st St APT 14C NY, NY 10128. Purpose: any lawful act. 2174399 w.o Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013 SCEC MANAGEMENT LLC Art. of org. filed with SSNY on 10/03/2013. office location: New York county. SSNY is designated agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail the process to: The LLC, ℅ Edmond Cho CALAMO SILK INC 55 West 39th Street New York NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF TOMS RE MANAGEMENT LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/11/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 9/6/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to c/o TOMS Capital, 450 W. 14th St., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10014. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013

NOTICE OF QUAL. OF VALINOR CAPITAL PARTNERS SPV XI, LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/4/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 2/28/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: David Angstreich, 510 Madison Ave., 25th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013 NOTICE OF CERTIFICATE OF AUTHORITY OF FXDD BULLION LLC Certificate of Authority filed with Secretary of State of NewYork (SSNY) on 10/28/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Delaware Intercorp Inc., 113 Barksdale Professional Ctr., Newark, DE, 19113. Purpose:To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013 LEVER AND BEAM MUSIC, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 08/22/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, C/O Alexander Kadvan, 325 West 38Th St., Ste 1101, New York, NY 10018. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013 THE VAGABOND TAPAS CAFE LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 07/29/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 7 Cornelia Street, New York, NY 10014. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF VIRGO PENN BUSINESS CENTERS LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/27/12. Princ. office of LLC: 225 W. 34th St., 9th Fl., NY, NY 10122. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 575 Lexington Ave., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10022. DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, State of DE, Dept. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. As amended by Cert. of Correction filed with SSNY on 10/22/13, name changed to VIRGO PENN BUSINESS CENTERS, LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013

TheVillager.com

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CPVT GROUP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/7/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 381 Lenox Avenue, 1st Fl., NY, NY 10027. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DENT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/18/13. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 184 Thompson St., 5A, NY, NY 10012. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013 NAME OF LP: BLACK BEAN CAPITAL L.P. Cert. filed with NY Dept. of State: 8/28/2013. Office loc.: NY Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205. Name/ addr. of genl. ptr. available from Sec. of State.Term: until 12/31/2053. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013 VIJAYA REALTY LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/20/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Vamsi Bollu, 80 Riverside Blvd., Unit 9K, NY, NY 10069. General Purpose. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF QUEENS BOULEVARD APARTMENTS, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/19/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: c/o A&E Real Estate Holdings, LLC, 1065 Ave. of the Americas, 31st Fl., NY, NY 10018. LLC formed in DE on 9/3/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: organized for any lawful act or activity permitted by limited liability companies organized under the laws of the State of Delaware that are related or incidental to and necessary, convenient or advisable to owning real property. Vil: 11/07 - 12/12/2013

TheVillager.com

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF CLARE V., THE SHOP, NEW YORK, LLC. Authority filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/4/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 9/30/13. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to: Clare V., LLC, 3249 Casitas Ave, #210A, Los Angeles, CA, 90039. Principal business address: 239 Elizabeth St, NY, NY, 10012. DE address: National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr, Ste 101, Dover, DE, 19904. Cert. of LLC filed with Secy of State of DE: 401 Federal St, Ste 4, Dover, DE, 19901. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 10/31 - 12/05/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY NAME: 2 WEST 45TH STREET LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/18/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Wohl Loewe Stettner Fabricant & Deitz, P.C., 9 East 40th Street, 7th Floor, New York, New York 10016. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 10/31 - 12/05/2013 BTED GROUP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 06/28/2013. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 347 W. 57th St. Apt 11E, NY, NY 10019. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 10/31 - 12/05/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF FLAT BOX RECORDINGS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/4/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/2/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1875 Century Park East, Ste. 800, Los Angeles, CA 90067, Attn: Mark Robbin, Esq. Address to be maintained in DE: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/31 - 12/05/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF CRUNCH RICHMOND HILL, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/30/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/28/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 22 West 19th St., 3rd Fl., NY, NY 10011. Address to be maintained in DE: National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 10/31 - 12/05/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF VIRGO 575 BUSINESS CENTERS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/18/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 06/11/10. Princ. office of LLC: 575 Lexington Ave., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: Corporation Service Co., 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, State of DE, Dept. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/31 - 12/05/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NYMT RESIDENTIAL TAX 2013-RP2, LLC App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/15/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/16/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc. (CSI), 1218 Central Ave., Ste. 100, Albany, NY 12205. DE address of LLC: CSI, 1675 South State St., Ste. B, Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 10/31 - 12/05/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NYMT RESIDENTIAL TAX 2013-RP3, LLC App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/15/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/16/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc. (CSI), 1218 Central Ave., Ste. 100, Albany, NY 12205. DE address of LLC: CSI, 1675 South State St., Ste. B, Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 10/31 - 12/05/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 57TH ST. PARTNERS, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/15/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 9/19/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 1700 Broadway, 41st Fl., NY, NY 10019. DE address of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/31 - 12/05/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SHIEL HOLDINGS, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/10/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 920 Winter St., Waltham, MA 02451. LLC formed in DE on 9/30/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/31 - 12/05/2013 APP FOR AUTH FOR EASY ICE, LLC App for Auth filed with SSNY 03/15/2013 LLC. Registered in Delaware on 04/15/2008 Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eight Ave, NewYork, NY 10011. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 PER LEI LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 01/28/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process toThe LLC, C/O John Sanil Manavalan, 515 East 85 St, Apt 5F, New York, NY 10028. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BLUECURRENT PUBLIC RELATIONS LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 07/09/03. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 33 HENRY STREET LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/15/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 2121 Roundpoint Dr., Haverstraw, NY 10927. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF AUDUBON TP4 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/11/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 666 Fifth Ave., NY, NY 10103. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Phillips Nizer LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PROMENADE GLOBAL LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/26/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/22/13. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Nelson Management Group Ltd., 118-35 Queens Blvd., 14th Fl., Forest Hills, NY 11375. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Jeffrey W. Bullock, Secy. of State of the State of DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HALLE’S JEWELS Arts of Org filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/13/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: 10 W 47 St NUM M110, NY NY 10036. Purpose: any lawful act. 2169796 w.o Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 2061 JERICHO LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/04/2013. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 250 W. 26th St., NY, NY 10001. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF MCCOURT GLOBAL LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/17/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 888 7th Ave., 43rd Fl., NY, NY 10106. LLC formed in DE on 12/20/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 155 BLEECKER TREVI LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/3/12. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: c/o Trevi Retail LLC, 130 E. 59th St., Ste. 14A, NY, NY 10022. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Goldfarb & Fleece LLP, 345 Park Ave., NY, NY 10154, Attn: Marc J. Becker, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ISR MARINE INSURANCE SERVICES LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/23/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 299 Ballardvale St., Wilmington, MA 01887. LLC formed in DE on 9/4/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CLEARVUE RC LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/8/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 405 E. 63rd St., Ste. 10K, NY, NY 10065. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF MCCOURT PARTNERS LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/17/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 888 7th Ave., 43rd Fl., NY, NY 10106. LLC formed in DE on 4/27/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 NAME OF LLC: HNL VENTURES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 10/7/13. Office loc.: NY Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 10/24 - 11/28/2013 ELISABETH CROS CONSULTING, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 9/24/13. Office in NY Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Herve N. Linder Ernst & Linder LLC 17 Battery Place Ste. 1307 NewYork, NY 10004. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 WEBSTER FUNDING LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 09/05/2013. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, C/O JVG MANAGEMENT, 20 West 20th Street, New York, NY 10011. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013

BIG SISTER HOLDING LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/23/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: GGMC, 1651 Third Ave., NY, NY 10128. General Purposes. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 WHITTMAN PROPERTY HOLDINGS, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/24/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 200 Park Ave. S., Ste. 1518, NY, NY 10003. General Purpose Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 DECORATORSBEST TRADE, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/25/13. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 767 Lexington Ave., Ste. 505, NY, NY 10065. General Purposes. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 65 FOURTH, LLC a domestic LLC, currently known as IPPUDO NY, LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/29/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: R.O.S.E., 420 Lexington Ave., Ste. 2160, NY, NY 10170. General Purposes. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ESRT 250 WEST 57TH ST., L.L.C. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/10/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 09/05/13. Princ. office of LLC: One Grand Central Pl., 60 E. 42nd St., NY, NY 10165. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY NAME: MedSpa 44, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/04/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 144 E. 44th Street, 2nd Floor, New York, New York 10017. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BLONDIT LLC App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/1/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/30/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Lori Hope Shabtai, 1 Central Park West, Apt. 41C, NY, NY 10023. DE address of LLC: 2711 Centerville Road, Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF UNE CONSULTING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/4/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Gleason & Koatz, LLP, 122 E. 42nd St., Ste. 518, NY, NY 10168. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ST. URBAN, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/2/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Lenore Davis, 285 Central Park West, Apt. 8S, NY, NY 10024-3006. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF CAVALIER TELEPHONE, L.L.C. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/27/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in VA on 10/6/98. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Principal office addr.: 4001 Rodney Parham Rd., Little Rock, AR 72212. Cert. of Org. filed with VA Clerk of the Commission, 1300 E. Main St., Richmond, VA 23219. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF EEGO 123 WILLIAM OWNER, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/17/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 6/8/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE address of LLC:The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 10/17 - 11/21/2013

November 21, 2013

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from p. 12

7-Eleven opened across the street from them. I hope the ever-wise Zoltar brings more people into Gem Spa — they can never leave the ’hood! Kimberly Kenney

Charter article too one-sided

November 21, 2013

A ‘Banksy’ beside an East Villager box? Could this have been yet another “lost Banksy”? East Villager Laura Zelasnic spotted this handiwork left near the curb at the corner of E. 13th St. and Fourth Ave. last month. It was likely a spoof — but, hey, you never know.

A sad and unforgettable time To The Editor: Re “What I was doing the day John F. Kennedy was shot” (talking point, by Carol Greitzer, Nov. 14): I was 16 years old in high school. I was in the hall when a student was shouting, “Somebody shot President Kennedy!” I went to the office and saw all the adults crying. I asked them if it was true, and they said yes. Later they sent us all home from school. I walked to the Catholic church to say a prayer for the president and our country. The church was full and we said prayers. It was so sad. For days there was absolutely nothing on TV or radio but the death and the funeral. I will never, ever forget it.

PHOTO BY ANNA SAWARYN

28

PHOTO BY LAURA ZELASNIC

To The Editor: Re “Charter school is settling in at Washington Irving home” (news article, Nov. 14): I am very disappointed in The Villager for running such a puff piece on the Success Academy Union Square charter school. There was and remains huge opposition to this charter school among parents in the community.  The Community Education Council, elected by parents, that represents the district voted overwhelmingly against Success Academy’s co-location in the Washington Irving Campus building. Yet not one of the members of the C.E.C. or any of the parent leaders who opposed this co-location and the practices of this charter were interviewed.  News articles have also pointed out the high student and teacher attrition rate at Success Academy charters, their high suspension rate, and the schools’ practice of pushing out struggling and special-needs students. Also, as the Union Square charter expands enrollment, it will eat up classroom space needed to reduce class size in the building’s existing schools, or to provide adequate space for art, music or other necessary programs. Moreover, there are factual errors about the finances of the Union Square and other co-located charters. The article quotes a Success Academy official saying that the charter school gets less public funding per student than public schools. Yet, a wellknown study by the Independent Budget Office shows that co-located charters, such as those in the Success Academy chain, get more public funding per student, if the cost of the space and services they receive for free from the Department of Education are taken into account.  Not even counted in the I.B.O. estimate are the substantial capital expenditures made by D.O.E. to accommodate the preferences of Success Academy, including building separate cafeterias for their students, as occurred in the case of

Union Square. A similar move at Success Academy Upper West required $2 million in city capital funds, since the charter law requires matching funds for every other school in the building. One wonders if another $2 million in taxpayer funds was spent in this instance, to create a separate cafeteria for the charter school in the Washington Irving building. Finally, articles have also been published showing how, as of a couple of years ago, Success Academy charters had accumulated surpluses of more than $23.5 million.  The charter operators now get a “management fee” similar to what for-profit charters receive, and Eva Moskowitz, the chain’s C.E.O., receives a salary far above that of the New York City schools chancellor. Surely, Success Academy could afford to pay rent and / or find its own space. In short, this reporting reads as though it could have been written by the expensive P.R. firms on retainer from Success Academy charters. You owe your readers a more balanced account.   Leonie Haimson Haimson is executive director, Class Size Matters

Diana Kelley A work from Anna Sawaryn’s show of Coney Island photos.

E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.

Some post-Thanksgiving sunshine If you’re looking to burn off some of those Thanksgiving meal calories — and feel some summer warmth, or at least look at images of them — walk or bicycle over to Anna Sawaryn’s show of her pinhole-camera color photos of Coney Island on Fri., Nov. 29, at Elsewhere Espresso, at 355 E. Sixth St., between First and Second Aves., from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. These images have never been shown before publicly.

TheVillager.com

Free Will Astrology Week of November 21 - 27 BY ROB BREZSNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): The poet Charles Baudelaire prayed for help, but not to God — rather he prayed to the writer Edgar Allan Poe. Novelist Malcolm Lowry sometimes pleaded with God for insight, but he also prayed to the writer Franz Kafka. Which hero, dead or alive, could you call on to uplift you? Be brazen and imaginative. The spirits could be of more help than you imagine. Magic is afoot. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): U.S. Confederate General Richard S. Ewell (1817-72) sometimes experienced episodes in which he thought he was a bird. Princess Alexandria of Bavaria (1826-1875) believed that when she was young, she had eaten a glass piano. Sad and funny and crazy, right? And yet I believe all of us have fixed delusions. What are yours, Taurus? Do you secretly believe a certain turning point in your past scarred you forever? Now is an excellent time to shed your fixed delusions. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Philosopher Eckhart Tolle suggests that “there may be one person who reflects your love back to you more clearly and more intensely than others.” For some of us, this numinous reflection comes from a special animal. Whatever the case is for you, Gemini, I urge you to devote extra time to your relationship with this creature in the next 14 days. Brainstorm about the possibility of deepening your connection. What practical actions could you take to boost your loved one’s fortunes? CANCER (June 21-July 22): The Cancerian soprano Kirsten Flagstad was one of the 20th century’s great opera singers. She specialized in the operas of German composer Richard Wagner, whose master work, “The Ring of the Nibelung,” runs 15 hours. Asked what she most needed to perform Wagner’s music with the excellence it demanded, she answered: Comfortable shoes. That’s good advice for your own life, Cancerian — both literally and metaphorically. It’s time to get really well-grounded. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Have you ever been in a social situation where you really didn’t care what anyone thought of you and therefore felt absolutely free to act on your inner promptings? When was the last time you lost all your inhibitions while making love? Can you truly say that sometime recently you have been totally responsive to your festive impulses? If you have experienced any blockages in expressing this type of energy, now is a perfect moment to fix that. You have a date with robust, innocent selfexpression. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Norwegian public television is experimenting with Slow TV. In one program, patient viewers watched for five days as a cruise ship wended along the Norwegian coast. Another show featured a woman knitting a sweater from start to finish. I wish you would get hooked on slow-motion activities like those, Virgo. Maybe it would help you lower your thoughts-per-minute rate and influence you to remember that relaxation is an art you can cultivate. And then you would be in righteous alignment with the cosmic rhythms.

TheVillager.com

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You’re smarter than you think, and soon will be even smarter. Previously inaccessible wisdom is seeping up from the depths of your subconscious mind. Your eyes are noticing more than usual. Your memory is working at peak levels. And your enhanced ability to entertain paradoxical ideas is giving you special insight into the nature of reality. I suggest you focus this higher intelligence on one of your knottiest problems. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The Paris Review interviewed Mexican poet Octavio Paz. “Just how much revising do you do?” the interviewer asked. “I revise incessantly,” Paz replied. “Some critics say, ‘too much,’ and they may be right. But if there’s a danger in revising, there is much more danger in not revising. I believe in inspiration, but I also believe that we’ve got to help inspiration, restrain it, and even contradict it.” Inspiration has visited you a lot lately, Scorpio, but now it will subside for a while so you can wrangle all your raw material into graceful, resilient, enduring shapes. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Costa Rica will close its zoos in 2014. What will happen to the 400-plus animals housed there? They will have to be rehabilitated at animal rescue centers, then released into the wild. I suspect there will be a metaphorically similar process for you in the coming months. Parts of your instinctual nature will be freed. You’ll need to retrain your animal intelligence how to function outside of the tame conditions it got used to. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Fate may well kick your sweet ass sometime soon. You may be compelled to face up to the consequences of your unloving actions or unconscious decisions. However, you might be able to dramatically minimize or neutralize the butt-thumping. Go over the last 11 months’ events, and identify times when you weren’t your very best self or didn’t live up to your highest ideals. Express your desire to correct wrong turns. Give gifts that will heal damaged dynamics. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Grammywinning singer Bill Withers was a star in the 1970s with hits like “Ain’t No Sunshine” and “Lean on Me.” But he hasn’t recorded a new album or toured since 1985. In “Still Bill,” the documentary film about his life, Withers says, “I watch other people show off and I say, man, I used to want to show off. … I need a little injection in my showin’-off gland.” Aquarius, I’d like to see you show off more. Not in an overthe-top, Lady Gaga-esque way. Rather, get more aggressive in showing people who you are, what you can do, and what your talents are. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I sense your value will rise in the coming weeks. An attractive person you thought was out of your league may express curiosity about you. You could get an offer to do an interesting job you previously thought unavailable. I bet your reputation will be growing, mostly for the better. Have confidence in your power to attract bigger rewards and more appreciation. November 21, 2013

29

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November 21, 2013

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11/19/13 11:44 AM

TheVillager.com

Pier 40 is a field of dreams for young soccer players.

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DUSC program kicks youth soccer movement up a notch SPORTS BY PASHA FARMANARA

T

he Village has been experiencing an ongoing boom in youth soccer. Both Pier 40 and James J. Walker Park have been taken over by soccer players, partly due to the growth of the Downtown United Soccer Club youth league. The club features programs for kids ranging from age 4 to 18. DUSC also offers travel teams for the more experienced players, and interleague teams that only participate in games against other DUSC teams. The growth of DUSC has been attributed to the growing presence of professional soccer around the nation, as well as the New York area. “I think the growth of Major League Soccer has certainly made a difference,” said Tom Frambach, DUSC’s general manager of staff. “Also, the U.S. national team is starting to see success. The U.S. team won the Gold Cup, and their success breeds popularity.” With all the success the American women’s team has recently had, including reaching the Women’s World Cup Championship, the league is working on expanding their programs for girls to get involved in the sport. Frambach feels that the U.S. soccer team’s recent success is partly due to an improvement in the sport’s coaching sector. “Soccer has been a relatively new sport,” he said. “The last generations had a lot of participation, but didn’t have a lot of good coaches to drive the sport. This generation has grown up playing and knowing the game. So now you see the leaders and coaches driving the soccer environment.” The most impressive part of DUSC’s growth

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in the city is the club’s ability to compensate for the lack of fields in the area. Gaining permits to use public fields has become a struggle, as more soccer programs have sprouted up in the area. “Resources are scarce, so we try to do the best we can with all the fields that are available to us,” said Frambach. “We are very fortunate to have been allocated permit time at Pier 40. We also utilize Chelsea Waterside Park, James J. Walker Park, Randall’s Island on the weekends for games, and Roosevelt Island, too, which is small, but we need to.” These space constraints have helped define the style of the boys travel team. Since there can be up to 100 kids practicing on one field at a time, players put more emphasis on finesse skills, such as dribbling and passing. “We as a club are very technically oriented,” Frambach noted. “I think the environment creates that. The opposite of that is when we play teams from New Jersey or Long Island who have all this space; they are a little bit bigger, stronger, faster. It builds around the environment.” In addition to help kids learn the game of soccer, DUSC puts a big emphasis on helping them grow off the field as well. After ticking off a long list of qualities that soccer can help a player gain, Frambach concluded, “Any life skill you can imagine can be learned on a soccer field.” There is one quality soccer provides — real teamwork — which separates it from other sports. “In soccer you need all 11 players working together to succeed,” Frambach noted. “In basketball you can have one player who can take over the game.” Going forward, DUSC hopes to continue to introduce youths to soccer, and help them grow through the game. DUSC is also hoping to gain permits to use a new field in Brooklyn Bridge Park.

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November 21, 2013

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Nov. 21, 2013 The Villager