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The Paper of Record for Greenwich Village, East Village, Lower East Side, Soho, Union Square, Chinatown and Noho, Since 1933

April 3, 2014 • $1.00 Volume 83 • Number 44

Supremes brush off street-artist suit; Activist tries mayor BY ALBERT AMATEAU

R PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

An acrobat really flipped out Monday in the still-dry Washington Square Park fountain, as he went hurtling over a group of audience volunteers.

obert Lederman, founder and president of A.R.T.I.S.T. (Artists’ Response to Illegal State Tactics), is running out of options in his fight to overturn the Parks Department’s 2010 rules limiting where, in a few Manhattan park locations, street artists

Thinking ‘Beyond the Grid’ about disaster preparedness T

W

e’ve all lived, seen or heard the stories. After Hurricane Sandy struck, many people across Downtown Manhattan and other storm-damaged areas struggled without electricity or Internet service, as government agencies had difficulty reacting quickly to those in need. In many cases, it was volunteer community

groups that took the lead in providing food or charging stations, or reaching out to homebound seniors or disabled residents, as they recognized the vulnerabilities of the standard power grid and communication networks. “And when those disruptions caused delays for officials like police, firefighters and FEMA, we were the ones who had to take action,” said Paul Garrin, an activist, connectivity

guru and East Village resident. Garrin’s noncommercial WiFi-NY service brought the Internet back to his neighborhood several days before normal connections were restored following Sandy. His member-supported WiFi network, which has grown to serve the Lower East Side, East Village and western Brooklyn since he founded it

ARTISTS, continued on p. 5

Advocates pushing for middle school to open up earlier

BY BETSY KIM

BY SAM SPOKONY

may vend their work. The city says the rules, adopted nearly four years ago, are intended to balance the rights of vendors of First Amendment-protected artwork with the city’s duty to ensure the public’s right to safely enjoy crowded locations in Central Park, Union

he city Department of Education has slated the new school at 75 Morton St. to open in September 2017. However, citing overcrowding and the absence of a middle school in the Village, the 75 Morton Task Force is pushing for a

September 2016 opening. Meanwhile, the task force is looking toward the new school in the Foundling Hospital building in Chelsea, at 17th St. and Sixth Ave., scheduled to open this September, as a temporary backup plan. “What could happen and should happen is what’s called ‘incubat75 MORTON, continued on p. 7

MICRO-GRID, continued on p. 15

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BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

MORNINGS: 6-9AM

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April 3, 2014

rom a new seating area to expansive plazas, a lot is in store for the Village Alliance business improvement district’s coverage area, which stretches from Eighth St. and Sixth Ave. over to St. Mark’s Place and Second Ave. At the BID district’s western end, at the intersection of Sixth and Greenwich Aves. and W. 10th Sts., the alliance plans to spruce up Ruth Wittenberg Triangle, which Bill Kelley, the alliance’s executive director, said they are dubbing the “Village Gateway.” (In a historical aside, after the Sixth Ave. El was torn down in 1938, The Villager tried with all its might to redub that intersection “Village Square.” But the name never took.) The BID plans to add seven or eight small tables with two chairs each to the small traffic island named for the legendary Village activist who helped get the Jefferson Market Library and other buildings landmarked. They’ll also add a couple of new planters and an information kiosk. The $20,000 project is fully funded, and it’s expected the more user-friendly plaza will be ready to go by July 1. Zoning on Eighth St. and much of Sixth Ave. doesn’t allow sidewalk cafes, which is partly behind the idea of setting up tables and chairs here, Kelley explained. Community Board 2 approved the idea, but veteran board member Doris Diether did pointedly note, “That’s a pretty small triangle.” Meanwhile, a few blocks to the east, work is already underway on a $16 million, cityfunded, reconstruction of Astor Place and Cooper Square. A lot of work is currently being done underground to reposition utility lines and pipes to allow the aboveground changes. Among those, the subway-stop

triangle will be tripled in size and renamed “Astor Plaza,” while, to the south, a similar built-out area in front of Grace Church High School (which is just outside of the alliance’s district) will be dubbed “Cooper Plaza.” Also, Astor Place will be permanently closed between “The Cube” sculpture and the block downtown of it, creating yet another new plaza area. All the work is slated to be done by the end of 2015. One neighbor expressed concern that there are plans for lots of programming on Astor Plaza, too much, in his view. He was particularly worried about “Red Bull”type events. Kelley said he guessed there might be 50 events per year, mostly in the warmer months. “We don’t want it overprogrammed,” he said, adding that the BID would focus on things like kids’ activities or a lunchtime concert series there. So-called “Red Bull”type events would come from the city, not the alliance, he said. Jim Power, the “Mosaic Man,” called The Villager to say he is worried that the area’s reconstruction will jeopardize part of his famed “Mosaic Trail” of broken-tileencrusted lampposts. “Yes, the light poles throughout Astor Place will be replaced with a new style of energy-efficient LED light that requires new poles to be installed,” Kelley told us. “I have spoken with the Department of Transportation and Department of Design and Construction about the disposition of the old decorated poles, and we all agree that, although not officially sanctioned, they do contribute to the historic streetscape and character of Astor Place. “I believe that they will be salvaged and stored safely with the city until a process is determined for any future display or reuse,” Kelley said of the posts decorated by Power. “I am very optimistic that a good solution can be found to commemorate the Mosaic Trail through Astor Place.”

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two years during which subsurface utilities were moved around in connection with the Third City Water Tunnel project. “Yeah, finally,” Ianniello said. “Still another year of asphalt laying and rebuilding the curbs. It killed everyone. It was like putting gas on a fire. They would turn off the water, turn off the gas.” On top of that, throw in a brutal winter — plus a brutal spring, so far. “We’re hoping for a great April,” he said. They’re also retooling the Little Italy Restoration Association (which, Ianniello noted ironically, was formed back in the 1970s “because they felt Little Italy was dying”) as a local development corporation, to focus on installing new streetlights and sidewalks. “We avoid a BID here because it will give power to the landlords, not the businesses,” he said. “We’ll do it ourselves. … The real estate companies don’t want us here. They want the buildings. They want to put boutiques here. It’s all about greed.” He noted where his restaurant is, at 132 Mulberry St., the ground-floor storefronts, home to five restaurants, were bought as one commercial condo for $17.5 million. “I could buy a whole building across the street for $22 million,” he marveled. The restaurants have started to bounce back, though, but not all the way back yet. “It’s not 2005,” Ianniello said, “but it’s not 2008 or 2009. People are hanging on by a thread.”

SAUCY RETORT: “Rest in pizza,” an article about Little Italy facing extinction, was the New York Post’s page one story Sunday. Eight eateries have closed in the past year in the famous enclave, including seven along Mulberry St., the article reported, including the likes of S.P.Q.R., Positano Ristorante, La Bella Ferrara Cafe, Il Fornaio Ristorante and Giovanna’s. But Robert Ianniello, Jr., owner of Umberto’s Clam House and president of the Little Italy Merchants Association, said the article — in which he was quoted — was disappointing because it was so negative. “We survived the Depression, we survived the Great Recession. We’ll figure it out,” he told us. “It’s another article about the demise of Little Italy — they’ve been writing these for 30 years.” As for S.P.Q.R., he said, at 300 seats, it was simply too big for the area. “To operate that space, you have to fill the place every day,” he said. “Until the recession, there were parties in there.” A real nightmare has been the disruptive Grand St. reconstruction, which mercifully recently ended after

INTO THIN AIR: Everyone is riveted by the story of the missing Malaysian passenger jet — pilots, understandably, especially so. We had to ask commercial “goth pilot” Ian Dutton, formerly of Soho, now of Brooklyn, for his take on what happened. “A month ago I would have said it’s inconceivable for a plane to disappear and no one to have any idea what became of it,” he said. “There are so many datalinks, so many reporting systems and, except for oceanic areas, so much surveillance. The only thing that I feel certain about is that there is more information being hidden than being shared — and not just information that is reaching the public, but the sharing between nations. We pilots are all anxious because — unlike as is done with the car crashes that kill so many of our neighbors here in the city — we delve into each crash deeply to see what went wrong SCOOPY'S, continued on p. 27

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Despite some spots where materials are being stored in pens, such as at left, Grand St. in the Little Italy/Chinatown area is finally free of major street construction work. But resurfacing and curb replacement is up next, and eventually the bike lane markings will be painted in again, too.

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Former squatters fear bar next door will be a riot BY GERARD FLYNN

O

PHOTO BY GERARD FLYNN

f all the places in the world to hear noise complaints about nightlife, the once-anarchic C-Squat deep in the once-dangerous Alphabet City seems the unlikeliest. For decades the squat was an alternative outpost and transient kind of home to homeless punks, hippies — like Texan Jerry The Peddler — and heroin addicts, making all kinds of music — and mayhem. Today, however, said long-term dweller Brett “Pants” Lebowitz, the neighborhood has changed and so have the squatters. At 41 years old, so has he. “You can’t party all the time,” he said. And now he wants others, including rowdy frat boys at night, to follow suit and settle down, including those who use his front door as a latrine on nights out. You can’t spend your entire life in dank basements drinking beer, advised the musician, whose apartment overlooks the scene at Avenue C and Ninth St. In fact, the former squat is now an affordable co-op and the former squatters are now technically known as homesteaders. While Lebowitz understandably has “no objection to loud music,” he does feel there are “too many bars” around him, and news that nightclub Nublu is moving a few doors down only amplifies his anger. Nublu, which is currently located between Fourth and Fifth Sts., plans to move to its new and much larger location in September. Lebowitz said that the squat years ago listened to neighbors’ noise complaints about them and C-Squat cleaned up its act. The place now hosts less than a handful of parties annually, and inebriated patrons of Nublu should be considerate, he said. But Nublu’s clientele might be too young for that kind of fatherly advice. And, according to club owner Illhan Ersahin, a Swedish native with Turkish blood, the bargoers at his place will have a lot of fun times to look forward to when the construction is over. He said he expects a regular crowd of about 200 will fill the new venue, which will be open until 4 a.m. The nightlife operator said concern about noise at the soon-to-open location is news to him, and he looked quite perplexed that a quality-of-life complaint might be emanating from C-Squat. His bar will not be on the lookout for loud students and, in a nod to the pre-gentrifying pioneers, Ersahin eruditely observed that the East Village “has a tradition of cultivating culture...from Jack Kerouac to Talking Heads.” His club, he insisted, is just following that tradition. He said that the prior complaints have come from those

Two men working on the new Nublu space outside the site this week. Someone had written “NO MORE BARS” on the construction fence, which was later altered to read simply “NO MORE.”

who don’t even live close to the existing club and “are the same people that have been complaining about us pretty much since day one.” Nublu opened at 62 Avenue C in 2002, around the same time C-Squat was starting to undergo its conversion to an affordable co-op and market pressures from rising rents were being felt this far into Alphabet City, pushing gentrification eastward. Ersahin said the club has even remained on the good side of Community Board 3, which has “approved everything we have asked for,” he said, “because finally they know what we are doing.” He said he’s telling everyone “not to worry” and that the new place will have sound insulation. But Lebowitz isn’t reassured. Instead, he sees a “megabar, two stories high,” full of drunks, “who at closing time will pour onto our streets to fight and piss and make a mess.” Fights outside the 99-cent pizza joint below his window are common. More police response, anemic so far, is needed, he said. Shayne, another longtime C-Squat denizen, where the maintenance charge on units can run $600 per month, has taken a peep inside the project, which has a ceiling that he estimates rises 24 feet from the basement. He said the work has literally “shaken” the block, sending vibrations the likes of which the veteran construction and metal worker has never experienced before. For the more subdued Jerry The Peddler, who has lived

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there for 13 years, noise isn’t the issue. He’s less troubled by the bars than the “aging frat boys” who frequent them and who he feels somewhat sorry for. The graying 65-year-old, with a brush beard that a family of sparrows could squat in, went AWOL during the Vietnam War and to the stockade not long after. He advises the frat boys to grow up, mature even. In fact, Jerry The Peddler has lived within less than a half-block radius of C-Squat for 30 years, so he’s really seen the neighborhood’s transformation. He, too, cited the pizza place as a nighttime noise issue. Yet, as for mayhem and fights, he said it doesn’t depend on the bars or even the cheap pizzeria. “It’s Avenue C,” he said. “With or without bars, fights are going to happen.”

Gulick fix fully funded After getting a $2.5 million state grant in January for its much-needed renovations, the Lower East Side’s Luther Gulick Park recently got some more good news, receiving a $1 million allocation from Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver. The announcement was made April 1 by the Friends of Gulick Park, a community group that has long advocated for an overhaul of the previously neglected parcel. With more than $6 million on hand, the little park along Delancey St., between Willett and Columbia Sts., now has all the necessary funding to move forward on its renovation plans — and the work could begin as early as next fall, according to the Friends. Aside from its importance to the community, the revitalization of Gulick Park has been a particularly special project for Silver, since he often fondly speaks of playing basketball there as a kid.

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U.S. Supreme Court brushes off street-artist lawsuit ARTISTS, continued from p. 1

Square Park and Battery Park and on the High Line. Lederman, who has won previous lawsuits against the city for arresting him and other artist vendors for selling their wares in streets and parks, said the rules went far beyond public safety and park enjoyment. The rules illegally limit the number of artists who can sell their works in locations where potential patrons may see them, Lederman contended. In July 2010, Lederman and his fellow artists went to Manhattan District Federal Court to overturn the new rules. But Judge Richard Sullivan agreed with the city and dismissed the case at the end of September 2012. Lederman’s attorney, Julie Milner, said at the time that she was surprised at the dismissal and filed an appeal with the U.S. Second Circuit Court. But in September 2013 the five-judge panel upheld Judge Sullivan’s decision. In December, Milner applied to the U.S. Supreme Court for a review, but this March 3 the high court refused to accept the case. Lederman, a New Jersey resident who has been arrested more than 40 times from 1994 to 2001 while vending his work in various Manhattan locations, is soldiering on. Two weeks ago, he sent a 12,000-word letter to Mayor de Blasio urging him to revoke the 2010 rules. A copy of the letter

also went to the new City Council speaker, Melissa Mark-Viverito. In 2010, Mark-Viverito, as a councilmember from East Harlem, testified against the park rules at public hearing before the measure was adopted, Lederman noted in the letter. Lederman is also collecting signatures via e-mail on a petition: “Please revoke the 2010 park rules that restrict the First Amendment rights of visual artists and performers.” Lederman’s federal court suit made the point that the 2010 rules did not specify musicians and other performers, and contended that the omission constituted unequal enforcement targeting visual artists. The Parks Department soon revised the vending rules for the four parks locations to include performers. Lederman told The Villager on Tuesday that the petition had 225 signatures of street artists. “I’ve not submitted the petition yet — hoping for a meeting with the mayor first,” Lederman said. Lederman said he could not accept losing the court case because he believed former Mayor Bloomberg, former Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe and city lawyers who worked on the case, “repeatedly committed perjury in sworn and affidavits and in oral testimony from day one to the very end of the lawsuit.” In upholding the dismissal, the Circuit

Court accepted that art sold in public had First Amendment protection but said the city had the right to “impose reasonable content-neutral restrictions on the time, place or manner of protected speech.” Lederman also charged that both the Bloomberg administration and the previous administration of Mayor Giuliani, as well as their Parks commissioners, were biased against street artists. But the Circuit Court denied Lederman’s application to depose Mayor Bloomberg and other city officials on the facts of the case. In his letter to Mayor de Blasio, Lederman recalled that the city justified the new rules by contending that artist vending was “commercializing the parks, causing congestion, obstructing the view of public monuments and denying the public full enjoyment of the parks.” Lederman went on to say that as soon as the artists were removed, the locations were then “bid out to corporations for the purpose of promoting their products and services.” He is especially incensed by the annual holiday-season vending market concessions at Union Square Park and Central Park at Columbus Circle, two locations where the 2010 rules restrict the number of street artist vendors. During the Giuliani administration, between 1994, when Lederman organized A.R.T.I.S.T., and 2001, the conflict between the city and the street artists escalated.

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Lederman’s art often featured portraits of Giuliani depicted as Hitler, Nero and other dictators of world history. Lederman also filed a series of lawsuits against the city regarding street artists. He won several, including one federal suit culminating in a 2001 U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding artists’ right to vend in front of the Metropolitan Museum of Art without a Parks Department permit. The ruling and a settlement also applied to all New York City parks, and the principles were included in the general vending rules. However, in 2009, Lederman was again arrested for vending without a permit on the newly opened High Line. He sued again and won again. But that victory prompted the city to propose the new rules adopted in 2010 governing vending in locations in Union Square, Battery Park and Central Park, plus on the High Line. By press time on Wednesday, neither the mayor nor the Council speaker had replied to inquiries regarding Lederman’s letter. The fallout from the dismissal of the case has impacted artist vendors in other cities, according to an online Newsweek article. Street artists fear the loss has already encouraged Venice Beach, near Los Angeles, to require permits for vending expressive material, the Newsweek article said, adding that in San Francisco and St. Augustine, Florida, street artists are also facing permit requirements.

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POLICE BLOTTER 3 shots, 28 years

Bungled burger burglary Police arrested Robert Johnson, 49, and Thomas Wilson, 28, on March 28 after they allegedly broke into the basement of a Meatpacking District restaurant. Officers in the area first spotted the two men outside Bill’s Bar & Burger, at 22 Ninth Ave., around 6 p.m., as they reportedly cased the scene. Minutes later, Johnson dashed down and snuck in through the basement entrance, while Wilson stayed up top as a lookout, police said. Before the two could flee with any loot, the officers quickly swarmed the establishment and cornered the two men, who couldn’t give any legitimate reasons for their shady actions. Johnson and Wilson were charged with burglary.

PHOTO BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

The man convicted of shooting at two police officers near a Lower East Side public housing complex in 2012 has been sentenced to 28 years to life in prison, Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance announced March 28. Prior to the sentencing, Luis Martinez, 27, was found guilty on Jan. 31 of two counts of first-degree attempted murder and two counts of second-degree criminal possession of a weapon. Around 1:40 a.m. on Feb. 27, 2012, Martinez — a former Baruch College student who was at that moment selling marijuana — was approached by the two patrolling officers near Baruch Houses, after which he pulled out a 9-millimeter handgun and fired three shots at them, according to court records. Two bullets missed entirely, and one glanced off an extra ammunition magazine on the waist of one of officers, leaving him miraculously unharmed. The officers then sent a barrage of 14 bullets back at Martinez as he turned and tried to flee, striking him in the buttocks and leading to his arrest at the scene. “Thirteen N.Y.P.D. officers were shot

and injured in 2012 alone,” said Vance, in a statement released with the sentencing announcement. “If not for the metal gun magazine and leather pouch that prevented the bullet from piercing Officer Thomas Richards’s abdomen, he might not be alive today. There is no clearer example of how New York’s Finest place their lives on the line every day to keep us safe. I thank the jury for their service and for seeing that justice was done in this case.” Posters are up all over Downtown and in the subways asking for information on Jay Ott. The fashion designer, 31, who lives in the McKibbin Lofts in Bushwick, has been missing more than a week.

Rude awakening Kareem Ousmane, 34, was arrested March 29 after he allegedly attacked a police officer inside the W. 14th St. PATH station. The officer said he noticed Ousmane sleeping on a platform bench inside the station around 2:40 p.m., and simply nudged him to wake him up. After opening his eyes, Ousmane reportedly began furiously swinging at the officer, landing several punches. Even once the handcuffs came

out, Ousmane kept fighting, forcing the officer to pepper-spray him to subdue him. After the action was over, the officer said he also found the attacker was carrying a small plastic bag of alleged cocaine. However, Ousmane was not charged with a felony for assaulting a police officer, but with misdemeanor attempted assault, resisting arrest and criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Drunk driver Police arrested Jeff Prevot, 31, early on March 27 after he allegedly drove drunk along Sixth Ave. Prevot, driving a 2001 Acura, was pulled over near the intersection with W. 11th St. around 4:30 a.m., moments after officers spotted him switching lanes without signaling. Approaching the car, the officers said they noticed Prevot’s breath smelled of alcohol, his eyes were watery and his speech slurred. They also found he was driving with a suspended license. Although he refused to take a breath test, Prevot was charged with driving while intoxicated — which he has been convicted of before, police said. He was also charged with driving with a suspended license.

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Advocates pushing for middle school to open earlier 75 MORTON, continued from p. 1

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PHOTO BY BETSY KIM

ing,’ ” said Keen Berger, the task force’s chairperson. “That’s when the school exists in another building until the actual building is ready. If we have to, we’ll incubate in Foundling because it’s a new building and it’s not yet full.” The group hopes the Morton St. building will hold a total of 600 students, from sixth through eighth grade, including a separate school for 60 to 100 special-needs students. This would allow space for a gym, full auditorium, dance studio and library, said Berger. However, D.O.E. says the structure can accommodate more students. Berger blasted this as a “sardine model — putting as many classrooms and kids as you can in the building.” She believes the number ultimately will fall somewhere between 600 and 900 students. School District 2, which includes Battery Park City, Tribeca, part of Chinatown, the Village, Hell’s Kitchen and part of the Upper East Side up to 98th St., has an extremely dense student population. Berger noted that P.S. 3, 41, 234, 11, 33 and 130 have been a part of the planning process for 75 Morton, so likely will send some students to the new school. The task force encourages admitting students from outside the Village to increase diversity. The project is still in the design process, and D.O.E. is assessing construction costs. The agency will meet with stakeholders before construction breaks ground. As the school’s opening approaches, the department will review demographic data and discuss admissions policies with elected officials and the community. This would also include the 75 Morton Community Alliance, a group of parents who worked to support the school. The School Construction Authority purchased the 177,000-square-foot building from New York State for $40 million, which guarantees money for construction. As for future costs, once the school opens — to keep it staffed and running — D.O.E. says it will fund them. “It is my understanding that once they

The former state-owned building at 75 Morton St., at Greenwich St., is finally set to become a new public middle school.

commit to a new school, they commit to operating it,” said Assemblymember Deborah Glick. Berger also expressed confidence in D.O.E. funding. “I really believe the commitment is there,” she said. “Money is not the issue.” Former City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, in the press, had linked the Bloomberg administration’s agreement to buy 75 Morton St. with the City Council’s approval in 2012 of the Rudin luxury housing development at the former St. Vincent’s Hospital site. But the Rudins never committed funds to the middle school. The developer

did agree to pay $1 million total to P.S. 41 and 3 and the Foundling school over a 10year period. “Under the prior administration and prior City Council leadership, it became standard operating procedure, as part of these enormous giveaways to real estate developers, that there were promises of these community benefits that often never materialized,” said Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greater Village Historic Preservation Society. “It’s sort of a fig leaf that is attached to these big, obscene real estate deals as a way of making them seem somewhat more palatable at the time

they are approved.” Yet, all parties agree that a middle school at 75 Morton St. is a positive addition to the Village. “New construction benefits students, educators and communities and this new school will do just that,” said Harry Hartfield, a D.O.E. spokesperson. “That is why we are excited to be beginning a process that will result in a new state-of-the-art building for students and families.” Added Glick, “You don’t always have an opportunity to celebrate and this is something where the community had a victory and we should celebrate.”

April 3, 2014

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Squadron touts ‘20 percent solution’ for needy parks BY LINCOLN ANDERSON

W

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April 3, 2014

PHOTO COURTESY NYC PARKS DEPARTMENT

hen Mayor de Blasio recently announced that he had appointed Mitchell Silver as the Parks Department’s new commissioner, he notably chose to do it at Seward Park on the Lower East Side, the country’s first municipally built public playground. Continuing his “tale of two cities” theme at the March 21 press conference, de Blasio said, “The goal is a more equitable approach to our parks.” “Fighting against inequality and creating opportunity is the job of every agency, certainly the Parks Department included,” the mayor said. “And this site is so important, because more than 100 years ago, settlement house workers here in the Lower East Side, led by one of the city’s true unsung progressive heroines, Lillian Wald, founded the Outdoor Recreation League. They confronted the reality of thousands and thousands of immigrant families, low-income families, that had no opportunity for recreation, that had no space, and were struggling. And they pushed and pushed until the city finally built a playground here.” Silver grew up in Brooklyn and attended Pratt and Hunter, where he received his master’s degree in urban planning. Since 2005, he has been the chief planning and

development officer for the city of Raleigh, N.C. “He has a passion for fairness and equality,” de Blasio said, “and understands that we have to ensure that parks and open spaces are available in every community, and are wellmaintained in every community in this city.” Silver, in his remarks, said, “Planning and parks is about place, but it’s also about people, and we have to work together to ensure we fulfill that vision for the entire city.” The two were asked what they thought of state Senator Daniel Squadron’s bill under which the city’s largest park conservancies would give 20 percent of their budgets to help less well-funded parks. “I think it is an important and Mayor de Blasio, right, with Mitchell Silver at Seward promising idea,” de Blasio said. Park on March 21 at the announcement of Silver’s “How you engineer something like appointment as Parks Department commissioner. that — it has to be worked on with different models about how to fund parks, the stakeholders involved. But I don’t like and so the status quo is not working, I agree the status quo. There’s a lot of parks in our with the mayor. But there are many examcity in less-advantaged neighborhoods that ples we’re going to explore, sitting down aren’t doing well.” with the conservancies.” Added Silver, “Well, the first step you Talks with the conservancies will definitewant to find out is that you have legal au- ly happen, de Blasio said, though stressing, thority to actually make a proposal like that “No one has said that we’re closed on this happen. I’m going to start with a conversa- matter.” tion, bring the conservancies to the table. Meanwhile, the New York Post on March Places across the country are trying to find 22 reported that Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito is “sitting on the park fence” on Squadron’s idea. “My initial reaction is not to be very supportive of that,” she was quoted saying. “I understand the intent and what it aims at, but I think that that’s something we need to discuss further.” Former Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe also took issue with Squadron’s proposal. “The objective data do not suggest that there’s some tremendous lack of equity [in parks] across the city,” Benepe told The New York Times. “If there’s a perceived lack of equity in how funding is spread around, that’s easy to fix. It can be done by the mayor talking to the Parks commissioner.” In addition, some conservancy members and park activists are concerned that Squadron’s idea, if approved, could discourage contributions from donors who want control over where their money goes and would regard it as an unwelcome “tax.” Yet, Squadron told The Villager he was very encouraged by the remarks of de Blasio and Silver regarding his idea. As for Benepe’s statement, Squadron said, “It’s shocking that anyone claims equity in our park system isn’t a problem that needs fixing. Commissioner Benepe has made a number of shocking, fairly extreme comments as part of the conversation my proposal has started. What we’re talking about is folks who want to help — very highly funded conservancies that have a contract with the city. It’s absolutely appropriate for the city to say, as part of that agreement, that we have to help parks most in need.” Asked for examples of local parks suf-

fering due to funding inequities, Squadron mentioned Seward Park and Sara Roosevelt Park, citing cracked pavement, peeling paint on benches and “ponding” — where puddles form because of poor drainage. Specifically, under Squadron’s bill, conservancies with budgets of more than $5 million would be required to give one-fifth of their funding to a “Neighborhood Parks Alliance” that would set up “grassroots conservancies” for specific, needy parks to accept it. These well-funded donor conservancies would include, among others, the Central Park Conservancy, Friends of the High Line, the Prospect Park Conservancy and the 34th St. Partnership, which runs Bryant Park. The bill hasn’t been voted on yet in the state Senate or the Assembly, where it’s being sponsored by Brian Kavanagh. However, Squadron said he believes the initiative could also be approved administratively by New York City as a local law. As for Mark-Viverito’s remarks, the state senator, putting a positive spin on things, offered, “I think she said that she’s open to discussion, and I look forward to that discussion.” For her part, Assemblymember Deborah Glick, in a phone interview, said there is the concern, with Squadron’s bill, that “people might not give as much if they felt their money was going elsewhere. The real issue,” she added, “is that the Parks Department budget has been slashed dramatically and inappropriately.” Indeed, Squadron, in his recent testimony before the Council’s Parks Committee on the city’s fiscal year 2015 preliminary budget, noted that Parks “receives a paltry .52 percent of the city’s $73.7 billion budget,” down from .86 percent in 1986. Up until the late 1950s, the figure was around 2 percent. In addition, at the March 21 press conference, De Blasio was asked about a thorny issue at Union Square Park, where local politicians and community activists want him to cancel the Bloomberg administration’s deal with Chef Driven Market to operate a seasonal restaurant in the restored pavilion. “I have to be straightforward, I don’t know all the details,” he said. “We are reviewing the situation and we’ll have more to say on that soon. … We have to create financial sustainability for our parks. And, again, sometimes there’ll be ways of working with private partners, but it has to be on the public’s terms.” Although de Blasio said he doesn’t know all the details about the pavilion issue, when he was public advocate, he wrote to the State Liquor Authority asking it to deny a liquor license for the private concession. More recently, he’s been deluged with letters from elected officials and activists asking him to cancel the Chef Driven Market contract. De Blasio also said his administration is moving forward on banning horse-drawn carriages in Central Park and replacing them with replica, old-fashioned, electric cars. The cars, de Blasio said, “are going to be a great solution, and can provide real employment opportunities, as a clean alternative, and a more humane alternative.”

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Kenneth Reisdorff, 92, owner of the Broome St. Bar OBITUARY

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PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

enneth Reisdorff, of New York City, owner of the Broome Street Bar, died Feb. 26 while on vacation in Florida, after having a margarita, a nice lunch and a swim in the hotel pool. He was 92. Kenn, as he was known, was a gentlemanly and beloved fixture in the Soho neighborhood, recognizable by his custom-made cowboy hats from a hatmaker in New Mexico, turquoise jewelry, cowboy boots and friendly demeanor. He was in on the original happening of Soho, during a time when the area was still mainly factories, and just beginning to be wildly creative, and the Broome Street Bar was the epicenter of the young art crowd. Robert Mapplethorpe was a regular, along with Robert Jacks, Ken Tisa, Robert Boyles, George Kokines and many other talents who formed an exciting, entertaining and encouraging clique of artists. Performing and visual artists rounded out the bar ’s artistic clientele, and that congeniality continues to this day, where as recently as last year, The Band Perry counted it among their favorite places in New York City and filmed a music video there. Kenn Reisdorff was born in Seattle, Washington, in 1921. Kenn joined the Marines and fought in the Philippines in World War II. Two brothers of his also served, one in the Navy and one in the Army. After the war, Kenn went to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London on the G.I. Bill. While at RADA he met a fellow student, Berenice Kruger, from Durban, South Africa, who became his

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Kenneth Reisdorff wearing one of his trademark cowboy hats while walking his dog on Thompson St. several months ago.

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wife in 1951. They traveled through Europe in a Morris Minor and eventually made their way back to the States, where together they would become a kind of host and hostess to the burgeoning creative types of Downtown New York. Berry worked as a model and Kenn was a cabinetmaker and woodworker good enough to have his work featured in Home & Garden in 1966. He built the bar and cabinetry of the Broome Street Bar, the entire interior of their house on Spring St., plus did custom work in some of the finer townhouses of Downtown, all out of a shop on West Broadway. Berry opened her own eponymous bar in Soho, at Spring and Thompson Sts., where writers, musicians and gallery owners would congregate. The combined effect of the closeness in location, management, workers and culture between the two bars was a boon to the neighborhood and helped promote Soho as the artists’ mecca it would become. Kenneth Reisdorff is survived by his daughter, Julie Reisdorff-Parker, and her husband, Curtis Parker, and daughter, Andree Reisdorff. Berry predeceased him in 2010. He is also survived by the Broome Street Bar, and the adoring friends, customers and employees he leaves behind, with stories and tales of a long-ago New York City.

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April 3, 2014

Ban the horse carriages; Keep the Citi Bikes EDITORIAL

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wo topics that have been getting a lot of heated discussion lately are horse carriages and Citi Bike. In a way, they’re related, since they’re both modes of transportation — if horse-drawn carriages in New York in this day and age can be called such — but in a lot of ways, they’re very different issues. During the mayoral campaign, Bill de Blasio pledged one of the first things he would do if elected would be to ban the horse carriages. It’s simply the humane thing to do, he said. True to his word, he’s moving ahead with a plan to end the horse carriages that ply Central Park and the Theater District — mainly ferrying around tourists — and replace them with electric vintage cars. Ideally, many, hopefully all of the 300 carriage horse drivers would get jobs driving the cars. It’s the right thing to do. Yes, there has been no shortage lately in the daily newspapers of paeans to the unique, wonderful relationship between humans and horses that has existed ever since the latter were domesticated thousands of years ago on the steppes of what is now Ukraine, no less, or about how the horse helped build the modern city and so on. But society evolves, the world moves forward. There’s no reason these majestic creatures must continue to be beasts of burden — much

less on New York City’s mean streets. The “nose-to-tailpipe” argument is very valid: Horses walk with their heads down, right at the level of car exhaust pipes. They are easily spooked by noises and sudden movements, and so wear blinders. Some say that it would be O.K. if the equines are merely limited to Central Park and kept off the main city grid. Well, what about Smoothie, a 12-year-old mare who was startled by loud drumming in Central Park, then bolted, got her harness stuck between two poles, and died as she struggled to keep running? Yes, it’s nice to think about what horses mean to us, and how quaint their clip-clop on the hard asphalt is. But what about the horses? They’re out there in all weather, in blistering heat or bitter cold. One look at them in their queue on Central Park South shows they’re miserable; they look dejected, listless, exhausted. New York has more tourist attractions than anyplace, Central Park itself being one of the biggest. We don’t need the horse carriages. More important, it’s simply abusive to these poor creatures. And, hey, a lot of us have animals we can commune with already, namely, dogs and cats. We agree with de Blasio, PETA and — despite conflicting polls — many city residents. It’s time to ban horse-drawn carriages in New York City. As for Citi Bike, the tabloids, again, seem

delighted that the new bike-sharing system is struggling financially. Let’s face it, it was a brutal winter and early spring, and that hasn’t helped daily ridership, which is how Citi Bike makes money, as opposed to the super-affordable annual memberships, which are only around $100, though there are murmurings that rates may rise. De Blasio announced he won’t “bail out” the privately financed Citi Bike with government funding, which was music to the ears of many of the “haters.” We’re not so sure that’s the right approach, however. Bike-share is now an integral part of the city’s transportation infrastructure. It’s nonpolluting, and we’re sure it’s far less expensive to operate than the M.T.A. subway or bus system. In other words, bikeshare is a bargain, and a healthy transportation option, for the city. To use the “P” word, it’s progressive, forward-thinking. Yes, at 45 pounds, the blue bikes are heavy, but they’re stable and slow, plus have excellent brakes — meaning they’re safer and less likely to be involved in accidents. Now that the warm weather is finally here, Citi Bike ridership will ratchet back up, and the program will have its first full summer of operation. Instead of rooting for this program’s demise, we’re hoping it becomes even more firmly established — and accepted — as part of the city’s transportation system. And, yes, we do support using public funding, if needed, to keep it running.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Leading the way To The Editor: Re “Nolita apartments illegally deregulated, building tenants say” (news article, March 27): The Villager is the only New York City paper doing this kind of reporting. The Fourth Estate should not be passively posting what has already happened, but leading the way. Thanks for pointing the right direction. Tom Cayler Cayler is a member, West Side Neighborhood Alliance Illegal Hotel Committee

The Airbnb effect To The Editor: Re “Nolita apartments illegally deregulated, building tenants say” (news article, March 27): Thank you for this article, Villager. New York is losing more

and more affordable housing stock, in no small part due to Airbnb. Last fall, curious, I searched Airbnb for whole apartments available in Little Italy, Nolita and Soho. I got more than 300 hits. I then started checking every tenth one to find out something about the hosts. To be honest, I got tired of this after the first 100, but found that more than 75 percent of the ones I looked at hosted more than one apartment. That means it is a business for them, not just extra pocket change while the host is temporarily away. Pini stood out because, at that time, he had 14 apartments listed rented out to tourists at $115 to $245 a night through Airbnb and brazenly wrote in his profile that, “We are a boutique extended-stay company, specializing in serviced apartments for short and long-term stay in New York City.” New York really needs to crack down. We are losing housing stock, real tenants are endangered and

their quality of life worsened, and the city (which means all of us) is losing 15 to 20 percent of the cost of each visitor’s stay due to various hotel-stay taxes not being levied. Lora Tenenbaum

Glick saw it first To The Editor: Re “State finally transfers 75 Morton St. to city for new middle school” (news article, March 27): Bravo to The Villager for its continued coverage on the long and hard-won fight to secure 75 Morton St. as a middle school. As reported in your last issue, the pivotal transfer of the property from New York State to the New York City Department of Education has at last happened and things can really get moving. I need to make one very important correction to this article. The site was originally identified by

Assemblymember Deborah Glick. Assemblymember Glick saw it on a list of buildings for sale by the state and brought it to the attention of me and Ann Kjellberg to put it on our list of places for the “Rooms to Learn” rally in 2008. Robert Ely, a parent at P.S. 3 had also noticed this building and was alerting people to it as well. The discovery of this site by Assemblymember Glick was a major game changer and provided what began as a small consortium of parent advocates from both P.S. 3 and P.S. 41, along with the community board and elected officials, a focal point that blossomed into full-out community activism. (The original core group from P.S. 3 and P.S. 41 were Tamara Rowe, Shino Tanikawa, Ann Kjellberg, Michael Markowitz, Robert Ely, Chris McGinnis and myself. It grew to include many other wonderful and dedicated people.) LETTERS, continued on p. 12

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E-mail banter is great assist to the beautiful game NOTEBOOK BY MICHELE HERMAN

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TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY TEQUILA MINSKY

wo years ago in these pages I published a story about my long-standing fandom/eavesdropping/spying on the entertaining e-mails of a group of guys who have been playing pickup soccer in East River Park for so long that when the group started there was no e-mail. My appreciation has little to do with soccer; I’m embarrassed to admit, I barely know the rules. But I have a soccer-loving husband who shares my home e-mail address, which has been on their routing list for more than a decade through a soccerplaying, former, next-door neighbor of ours. I never let on that I was writing about them — New York being a small world and The Villager being a widely read paper, I figured they would get wind of it on their own. Also, I was a little nervous about the fact that I was using their first names and quoting liberally from their e-mails. How would Blagoy, for instance, take it when he saw my citations from the game report of Oct. 30, 2011, the day of the freak slush storm: “Blagoy, in a moment of hypothermic madness, took off his shirt and had to be counseled by the remaining sane ones to put on something”? Two years went by, and they never found out. Then, recently, my husband asked if I would send them an invitation to a nutty soccer-related performance piece he was involved in at work, and I decided it was time to come clean. I sent the invitation followed by a link to my piece, with this note: “In case you’re wondering who the heck I am… .” Then I waited nervously. I needn’t have worried. The guys were delighted to have a moment in the sun, even if the moment was two years old. Eddie, the de facto leader and scribe, sent this around: “Omg! A woman in our midst!! What do we do?!?!?! Kenny — no more inappropriate posts and poses please!” And then this: “Just wanted to let you know that your coming out to us was definitely the event of the year (ok so we don’t get out much aside from soccer…).” Then Maurice ribbed Eddie and said he wished that I had supported the guys’ various charity athletic events over the years: “if you would have, I am sure the whole team would have come out full Monty if required.” Esteban added: “I am sure this was in the NSA leaks. I knew we should have read it all.” And so on. Once the teasing died down, I received a steady stream of moving thank you’s: “Thanks so much for outing yourself and for keeping silent for so long!” wrote one player. “I’ve been part of the game on and off for over 10 years and you’ve beautifully captured the essence of the friend-

ships and matches that occur within the group.” “I feel very lucky to be able to play with this guys pretty much every saturday,” wrote another. “Its one of my favorite things of the week.” Said another one of the weekend warriors, “Over the years I’ve come to enjoy the friendly email-banter almost as much as the beautiful game itself, it’s fun to read how you feel the same way without even playing… .” Yet another wrote, “Most of you don’t know me as I was a regular with the group till 2001 when I left the city and now only play once or twice a year when I am back visiting. Just like Michele, I too, twelve years later still open every single e-mail as if something important will be missed if I don’t. I guess it is ‘being part of the group’ that will be missed. Keep it up guys!” In solidarity with my own sex, here is my favorite, from the wife of one of the guys: “I felt that I just had to respond, since he dragged me over to the computer to read your article. I’ve known a number of the guys for years and what you wrote made me laugh OUT LOUD!!” One of the guys is going to interview me for his soccer blog. Meanwhile, they invited my husband and me to brunch. We met seven of them after the game at Grape and Grain, a warm, welcoming little place in Alphabet City where they are semiregulars. We shook hands and introduced ourselves by our first names. (My brain automatically filled in the long-familiar last names.) These guys, as I already knew, are not your run-of-the-mill jocks. I learned about Guillermo’s cutting-edge brain research, and the efforts of Stephen from Ireland to introduce a Japanese liquor called shochu (distilled from sweet potatoes, rice, barley and soba) to the U.S., and Blagoy’s triumph as a child actor in the Bulgarian theater. Soccer — what a great game.

The intriguing-looking bike had been spotted chained to a lamppost outside Arturo’s restaurant on Houston St. at Thompson St. Finally, later on, the cyclist was spotted in action, on Bleecker St., above. How he stops, though, is another mystery altogether.

SCENE

IRA BLUTREICH

Some New Yorkers love Citi Bike!

April 3, 2014

11

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from p. 10

Pursuit of 75 Morton grew and evolved, the Community Education Council for District 2 got involved and so did more and more parent groups. This is certainly the best example of “it takes a village” I have seen in a long time. Deborah Glick, Brad Hoylman and Keen Berger were our mentors at the beginning of all this. Great work was also done by Chrisitne Quinn, Scott Stringer and Tom Duane. They schooled us, supported us, came to the rallies. All in all, this could not have happened without these partnerships. The big job now is to make sure it opens sooner rather than later, and does not house a charter school. There is a 75 Morton St. Task force through Community Board 2 that continues to be a watchdog for this, and I am pretty sure they welcome interested parties to their meetings. At our rallies our slogan was “Just Imagine…” 75 Morton as a middle school. We all did, and here it comes! Irene Kaufman

Proactive approach To The Editor: Re “State finally transfers 75 Morton St. to city for new middle school” (news article, March 27): Thank you for featuring the long-awaited transfer of 75 Morton St. to the city. We owe this success to the truly remarkable partnership of all stakeholders and the dogged perseverance of a core group of advocates. I would like to add that the Community Education Council District 2 has been a partner in this effort from the very beginning. Indeed, it was the C.E.C. District 2 that suggested that we be proactive in envisioning this school so that it is included in the right capital plan. (How it is presented in the capital plan can have an impact on the school’s grade configuration.) We remain fully committed to continuing our involvement. Shino Tanikawa Tanikawa is president, Community Education Council District 2

Triangle’s legacy To The Editor: Re “Triangle tragedy not forgotten” (news brief, March 27): Thanks very much to The Villager for cov-

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April 3, 2014

ering the anniversary of the Triangle Fire, in which my great-aunt, Fannie Lansner, perished. “Chalking” was done by volunteers at the spots where many of the victims lived in 1911, including for my Aunt Fannie at 78 Forsyth St. We should also remember that the same difficult and dangerous conditions faced by my Aunt Fannie in 1911 are today common in garment factories around the world where workers — most of them women — are paid a pittance to produce clothing for export to America. Tom Lanser

Synagogue’s spin To The Editor: Re “Synagogue landmarking battle” (news article, March 27): This article misleadingly implies that landmark designation of the building would prevent its renovation, upgrading or expansion. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Landmark designation only requires the preservation of the structure’s facade, not the interior. Numerous similar institutions have undergone extensive renovations, alterations and even additions under the aegis of landmark designation. Additionally, the “hardship” provision of the landmarks law ensures that the synagogue or any other religious institution can be relieved of the requirements of landmark designation if they are overly burdensome and would prevent them from fulfilling their mission. It should also be noted that this 150-yearold structure was listed for sale, which is what sparked the push by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and a half dozen other East Village, preservation and Jewish history groups to have its landmark status finally decided after nearly 50 years in limbo. The leadership of the synagogue may say that they have “no plans” to demolish the building. But they have, in fact, told us that selling the building is a serious option they are considering and pursuing the possibility of, as evidenced by the building being listed for sale. Once sold, without landmark designation, there would be nothing to prevent the historic building from being demolished — which would be the most likely fate. Andrew Berman Berman is executive director, Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation LETTERS, continued on p. 18

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Thinking ‘Beyond the Grid’ on disaster preparedness MICRO-GRID, continued from p. 1

in 2003, was a step ahead of highly staffed and better-funded government agencies simply because it was able to function independently after the grid went down. Following that principle, Garrin and some expert collaborators are now seeking funding for a plan that would strengthen disaster resiliency by creating a community-based energy and communications network, allowing residents to keep their homes powered and maintain access to vital resources in the aftermath of another storm like Sandy. The concept would initially be focused within the Lower East Side and Chinatown neighborhoods, potentially serving around 20,000 residents and hundreds of local businesses, Garrin explained. But he believes a successful start could lead to the practices being duplicated across the city. “Beyond the Grid,” as the proposal is known, would serve energy needs through the installation of large alternative-power sources — solar panels, microturbines, diesel or hybrid generators — at a handful of buildings within the target communities. Those power primary hubs would then be linked to other residences and businesses throughout the area, creating a “micro-grid,” fully independent from the standard Con Edison grid, that could be activated if a disaster were to shut down Con Ed’s power. That emergency power wouldn’t be enough for relative luxuries like cranking up an air conditioner or taking a hot shower. But it could give the networked buildings three or four hours of energy each day, according to Alexander Nadolishny, principal technology expert at the Louis Berger Group, an engineering design firm that is one of the partners in Garrin’s effort. Besides residential use, the energy would also play an important role for supermarkets and smaller food stores that require large-scale refrigeration in order to prevent products from spoiling. “The lesson everyone learned from Sandy is that getting a portable generator for those purposes doesn’t do you any good once you run out of fuel,” said Nadolishny. “That’s why these sources need to be preinstalled and linked up in advance.” And his group has, to some degree, already proved the superior efficiency of those alternative generators they hope to install. In the days after the 2012 hurricane, Nadolishny’s outfit brought one of their hybrid generators to an Occupy Sandy command center in the Rockaways, close to where FEMA was powering its own emergency medical center with a traditional fuel generator. Although their load was basically the same — running around 20 kilowatts of power — the FEMA generator required $200 worth of fuel per day, while the Louis Berger Group’s hybrid source only needed four gallons of diesel (around $16 worth)

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An illustration showing key aspects of the Beyond the Grid plan: alternative power systems, independently operating telecommunications networks and community hubs.

for two weeks of use, according to Nadolishny. That kind of efficiency could provide financial benefits to the Beyond the Grid hub buildings, even during nonemergency situations, while also keeping costs down if the micro-grid were activated for extended periods of time. The engineer also touted the micro-grid plan for its ability to empower residents and shop owners, and strengthen community ties. “During Sandy, there were problems implementing the government response plans partially because they were coming all the way from the top, and local residents didn’t feel any ownership of those strategies,” said Nadolishny. “Beyond the Grid would be important because it’s not coming through government decree, and it’s not coming from some rich investor. It’s done as a community initiative, through a mechanism by which everyone can contribute and then benefit.” The communications element of Beyond the Grid proposal would then expand on Garrin’s WiFi-NY broadband technology in order to similarly connect the target neighborhoods via Internet. Currently, WiFi-NY service is broadcast through a single transmission tower atop the East Village’s Christodora House, at the

corner of E. Ninth St. and Avenue B. To create a stronger and more complete L.E.S./ Chinatown network that would serve both residents and businesses, Garrin hopes to build at least two more of those elevated transmission towers — one near the foot of the Manhattan Bridge, by the corner of Rutgers and Cherry Sts., and another on top of the Confucius Plaza housing complex, along Bowery just below Canal St. As with the energy micro-grid, that resulting local network would be able to operate independently of commercial Internet service, if those providers were to be knocked out after a storm. Residents and businesses could then simply tap into the service via their computers or smartphones, in order to communicate or get important updates from emergency personnel. Cell phones and computers would be recharged and powered through the micro-grid. “The key here is that our plan would effectively build a backbone over the air, rather than relying on the landlines [used by commercial Internet providers],” said Garrin. Under the Beyond the Grid proposal, those Internet connections would also get their own layer of resiliency, since the transmission towers would be powered by

independent solar, wind or hybrid power sources. A third element of the proposal would also incorporate aspects of an already-existing project — namely, an ongoing L.E.S. collaboration between the Two Bridges Neighborhood Council, a community advocacy group, and Urbane Development, a group focused on bringing innovative strategies to underserved communities. Since a vital Pathmark supermarket on Cherry St. closed in 2012, Two Bridges and Urbane have worked together to develop a neighborhood food guide for area residents — especially seniors with limited mobility — who needed to find alternative sources of fresh, affordable food. That NeighborFood guide, which was distributed to residents last December, lists around 80 such sources — including both large grocers and smaller shops for things like meat or fish — and was created based on visits to each of those locations, as well as conversations with their owners. Bringing both Two Bridges and Urbane in as partners in the Beyond the Grid plan, Garrin now hopes to utilize those connections to further increase the neighborhoodbased power of his proposed WiFi emergency network. Along with receiving upgrades for structural resiliency, some NeighborFood locations would receive digital kiosks, linked into the network, that could be used during a disaster to display or send emergency information. That additional connectivity would also allow those stores — aided by their important food stocks — to serve as safe, community meeting places during another storm like Sandy. And at all other times besides emergencies, those kiosks could also be used to promote local programs and even share recipes based on what’s offered in certain stores, said Lisandra Lamboy, of Urbane. Now, with his concept fully formed, Garrin is focused on securing some sizable funding in order to get it underway. Along with previously applying for money through the state’s post-Sandy New York Rising program, he recently submitted an application for nearly $7 million in seed funding through the RISE NYC competition, which is being run by the city’s Economic Development Corporation. RISE NYC is focused on small business resiliency with regard to preparing for future storms. So, the WiFi-NY founder said that winning an E.D.C. grant of that size would at least allow his team to install the proposed energy and communications networks for businesses within the target L.E.S. and Chinatown communities. He hopes that will allow him to display the feasibility and effectiveness of the plan, possibly aiding his attempts at receiving that additional New York Rising funding, which could be used to begin work on the residential component of Beyond the Grid. “First, we’ll have to prove it,” said Garrin. “We know it all can work. Now it’s just about doing what it takes to get it done.” April 3, 2014

15

Crack clears Angel Orensanz Center BY LINCOLN ANDERSON, SAM SPOKONY AND SARAH FERGUSON

PHOTO BY THE SHADOW

T Lisa “Spike” Julian, right, in Tompkins Square Park, was fatally struck by a car near St. Mark’s Place last week.

East Village punk killed by car East Village punk rocker Lisa “Spike” Julian was killed early on Thurs., March 27, after being hit by an S.U.V. while she was crossing the street near Cooper Square. Julian, 47, was crossing at St. Mark’s Place and Third Ave., around 6:30 a.m., when the Ford Explorer, driven by a newspaper deliveryman who’d just finished his rounds, slammed into her, police said. She was pronounced dead shortly after being taken to Beth Israel Hospital. The driver, Oliver Parris, 58, reportedly stayed at the scene, and told authorities that he had the green light while Julian was passing through the intersection, and

that he’d tried unsuccessfully to swerve away from her. Parris wasn’t charged with any crimes, police said. Julian, who lived at E. Seventh St. and Avenue D, was known to frequent Tompkins Square Park for rock concerts and for hanging out, and was friendly with many within the radical East Village crowd. “She did not deserve to go out this way,” wrote fellow East Villager Chris Flash, publisher of The SHADOW, in a Facebook post honoring Julian hours after her death. “She was definitely wild and over-the-top at times, but she was a good soul, lots of fun and a true L.E.S. character.”

he Lower East Side’s Angel Orensanz Center was evacuated the night of Mon., March 31, after wooden columns supporting the 19th-century building’s second-floor balcony gave a loud crack, causing the balcony to sag. The structural problems at the 172 Norfolk St. building — a former synagogue built in 1849 — became apparent during the annual spring gala of the Soho Repertory Theater, and around 500 people were evacuated, with no injuries, authorities said. A Department of Buildings inspection later revealed that vertical cracks had developed in the building’s columns, and the property was slapped with both a violation and a full vacate order, according to city records. The building was the first synagogue constructed on the Lower East Side, and served that purpose many years before being bought in 1986 by Spanish sculptor Angel Orensanz. His brother, Al Orensanz, now manages the building and is reportedly working to assess the situation and how it will affect the center’s future, and what needs to be done to repair the damage. Jenny Dembrow, associate director of the Lower Eastside Girls Club, was at the shindig with her father, Jon Dembrow, the repertory company’s board chairperson and the evening’s honoree. New York magazine’s Intelligencer re-

ported that among the boldface names on hand were Richard Lewis, Bobby Cannavale, Steve Earle and presenters Gretchen Mol and Tim Blake Nelson. It was the theater company’s main fundraising event. “I’m heartbroken,” Jon Dembrow was quoted saying. “This is very damaging to the organization.” Added Jenny Dembrow, “People had flown in for the event. It’s a total fiasco.” When L.E.S. documentarian Clayton Patterson heard what happened, he panicked. He said he’s known too many buildings on the Lower East Side where there was a rush to demolition after a fixable structural problem. “That’s the Carnegie Hall of Downtown,” he said. “To lose it would be like a death in the neighborhood. I did the Acker Awards there last year, and it was extraordinary. The Lower Eastside Girls Club, HOWL!, who hasn’t used that space? Al’s very community oriented. He’s done lots of things at no charge.” Patterson said it’s well maintained. “They put in new floor beams just a few months ago,” he noted. But before the Orensanzes took it over in 1986, he recalled, “It was a blight on the neighborhood. It was a big abandoned building, with people doing drugs in it.” Patterson said after speaking to Al Orensanz and hearing the updates, however, he felt relieved. “I think it’s under control,” he said.

MAX

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April 3, 2014

TheVillager.com

Home sharing for seniors offers a host of benefits BY SAM SPOKONY

A

TheVillager.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF N.Y.F.S.C.

s many seniors struggle with fixed incomes and an affordable housing shortage, one service has long offered individuals a way to cut down on costs while also gaining valuable companionship. The Home Sharing Program, a free service provided since 1981 by the nonprofit New York Foundation for Senior Citizens, allows adults in all five boroughs to either “host” a roommate — if they have the extra space — or become a “guest” in the home of a compatible match. Since one, but not both, of the program’s matchmates must be 60 years or older, the service gives seniors the ability not only to pair with a roommate of similar age, but also the opportunity to live with a younger adult who can provide much-needed help with errands and household tasks. “I’ve always felt really rewarded after the work we put in to start this program, because it’s really become the heart of our foundation,” said Linda Hoffman, president of N.Y.F.S.C., which was founded in 1968. “We just want to help as many people as possible.” After initially being funded by a $30,000 grant from a New York state legislator, the program has expanded to become funded jointly by discretionary funding from state legislators, city councilmembers and borough presidents, as well as the state’s Office for the Aging and the city’s Department for the Aging. Hoffman explained that there are currently 200 homes involved in the program citywide, with some of the matches having been together for the past 20 years or more. Hosts and guests are able to benefit by splitting the cost of rent, while also bonding through their time shared together. “When we first started the program, people were kind of afraid because they weren’t sure about living with strangers,” she recalled. But concerns about roommate-related friction or unsafe conditions are allayed by N.Y.F.S.C.’s staff of trained social workers, who thoroughly screen all host and guest applicants. In addition, N.Y.F.S.C. uses its own “QUICK-MATCH” database, which uses a computer algorithm that is, in fact, not unlike those used for online dating sites. Applicants are asked to answer 31 questions about “lifestyle objectives” — such as their like or dislike of pets or frequent visitors — and are matched based on their compatibility as shown through those choices. Then, before moving in, potential roommates become acquainted through “match meetings” scheduled and staffed by N.Y.F.S.C. social workers. Finally, both host and guest are required to sign a written agreement to allow the pair to feel confident and secure in their new living

arrangement. As well as linking up seniors or younger people coming from their own homes, the program now also helps to place adults living at N.Y.F.S.C.’s transitional homeless shelter — located in the East Village — into new shared residences, Hoffman said. Another aspect of the program also allows prospective hosts, aged 55 and older, to share their home with a developmentally disabled adult who is capable of independent living. Hoffman said that, in terms of the program’s future expansion, she hopes one day to be able to give whole families the opportunity to enter a home-sharing arrangement. In particular, she explained that she’s been in talks with the Mayor’s Office about the possibility of setting up a pilot project that would help to give new homes to families displaced after the recent building explosion and collapse in East Harlem. To learn more about the Home Sharing Program, call 212-962-7559. N.Y.F.S.C. also offers a number of other programs that provide valuable services to seniors in need of additional help with their daily lives. The Respite Care Program offers shortterm home care by certified attendants at affordable rates — $8 per hour — for frail, elderly residents when their regular caregivers need time off, or when they require temporary aid following hospitalization. Potential applicants can also learn more about this program by calling 212-9627559. The Enriched Housing Program provides apartment-based living and supportive services — in seven locations throughout Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens — for those aged 65 and over who can no longer function independently. The program provides one hot meal daily, assistance with other meals, shopping, housekeeping, laundry, medications and personal care to enable residents to continue living on their own. Potential applicants can learn more about this program by calling 212-369-5523. The Home Repair And Safety Audit Program offers free minor home maintenance and repair services for low- to moderate-income homeowners aged 60 and over. Services include carpentry, plumbing, masonry, electrical, caulking and home safety checks, as well as helping seniors identify and correct home safety hazards. To learn more about this program, call 212-962-7559. Project Cart provides free van services — from Lower Manhattan to as far as E. 96th St. and W. 110th St. — for seniors aged 60 and over who have difficulty using public transportation. CART’s five vans, equipped with wheelchair lifts, can take seniors to and from medical appointments, hospitals and senior center activities. This service requires reservations in advance, which can be scheduled by calling 212-956-0855.

Host Enid Holt-Harper, right, and her guest, Ammahnda Adolphson, are part of the Home Sharing Program.

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17

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from p. 12

Global Tribes To The Editor: Re “Tribes, exuberant East Village arts space, faces eviction” (news article, March 27): Buddha bless Steve Cannon and the Tribes with a new abode. This is a global matter. Thousands of people, of whom I’m only one, have enjoyed the place and the cultural company of Steve Cannon — a person so open to the world of art and poetry. We should all implore the lord mayor of New York to kindly take cultural action. From a friend of Steven Cannon and a keen visitor from Denmark to the world’s most influential and vital city — love from Copenhagen. Ole Lillelund

Spirit of the Beats To The Editor:

Re “Tribes, exuberant East Village arts space, faces eviction” (news article, March 27): I was Steve’s neighbor for 15 years back in the ’80s and ’90s. Living a couple blocks away on Third and First, no one could have imagined an East Village without “outsider” poetry and art. Ginsberg and Kerouac changed the world and Steve grandfathers their legacy where they worked, lived and created. Creativity is not dead on the L.E.S. if we care enough.

Summer Reese is standing strong in her struggle against the faction that wants to sell WBAI. To set the record straight, yes, I had a part-time job at WBAI that ended 12 years ago; it has less than nothing to do with events today. If anyone wants to see my work and judge it for themselves the archives of “Let Them Talk” are available at http://youtube.com/letemtak. Mr. White is welcome to appear with me at his leisure to discuss these issues further.

George Weinbarg

Paul DeRienzo

Let’s talk it out

Try party fundraisers

To The Editor: Re “Lies and distortions” (letter, by Bernard White, March 27): The quote Bernard White refers to in his letter contains the following, “It’s not really a bad idea — WBAI could sell for $350 million… .” ’Nuf said. As for Mr. White’s personal slander against me, that’s par for the course with some at Pacifica, as we’re seeing played out in Berkeley, where the courageous

To The Editor: Re “After director’s firing, WBAI sale is now rumored” (talking point, by Paul DeRienzo, March 20): WBAI should look at the operation of all-volunteer WFMU, which holds a huge record party fundraiser every year, which is really like a party. Listeners aren’t turned off by being subjected to constant pitches for money and there are no factional infighting or other agendas. FMU

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April 3, 2014

staffers and D.J.’s are on the same page: bringing the listening public good radio. I would hate to think that WBAI has been infiltrated with COINTELPRO’ers. But while those methods are at play here, it is more likely the classic situation in which an opposing group would rather fight another group rather than plug the hole in a sinking ship. From my experience, fighting the other group is what an opposing group exists for — not to save the ship, but to let it sink so that the other side can’t have it or use it. Once they’ve accomplished their goal, they simply move on, usually looking to find another organization to join and dismantle from within. We have more on this in the current issue of The SHADOW. Chris Flash E-mail letters, not longer than 250 words in length, to news@thevillager.com or fax to 212229-2790 or mail to The Villager, Letters to the Editor, 515 Canal St., Suite 1C, NY, NY 10013. Please include phone number for confirmation purposes. The Villager reserves the right to edit letters for space, grammar, clarity and libel. The Villager does not publish anonymous letters.

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Band expands horizons, and lung capacity Senior musicians in tune, on the same page BY MICHAEL LYDON

O

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PHOTO BY MICHAEL LYDON

n a grey and snowy Tuesday morning in the East Village, a trickle of seniors citizens, bundled up in puffy winter coats, hats pulled over their ears, scarves wrapped around their necks and instrument cases large and small in their gloved hands, made their way to the Third Street Music School (actually on 11th Street, near Second Avenue), stomped the slush off their boots on the door mat then made two left turns into the school’s brightly lit auditorium. Waving hello to friends already there, they doffed their wooly outerwear, sat down in the forest of music stands and got out their instruments, joking and gossiping as they inserted their mouthpieces and blew a few trial bleats and blaats. Then Brandon Tesh, the neat and youthful musical director, tapped gently but firmly on his stand with his baton. “Good morning, everyone!” said Tesh. “We’ve got a lot of work to do, so let’s warm up your breath first. We’ll breathe in for four beats, hold for four beats, then out for four beats. Ready? Let’s open up our lungs!” Tesh’s manner was informal and friendly, and with his jet-black hair he could have been the grandson of many of his players — but all the seniors instantly knew that chat time was over and work time had begun. This wintry Tuesday was a gathering of Third Street’s New Horizons Band — a program founded in 1991 at Rochester’s Eastman School of Music to bring seniors, who had played an instrument as kids, back to music. Local New Horizons groups, like Third Street’s, create their own program to suit their neighborhood and needs. Some are for seniors only, some are for adults of all ages — but all can get band arrangements both simple and sophisticated, as well as guidance

Brandon Tesh, standing, directs the New Horizons band.

and a sense of community, from the New Horizons International Music Association: newhorizonsmusic.org. “Many adults have had music teachers who told them, ‘Move your lips in chorus, but don’t make a sound,’ ” declares a New Horizons mission statement, “but we believe every person has musical potential that can become personally rewarding. New Horizons programs are for adults who haven’t played for years, even for those who have no musical experience.” Third Street offers interested seniors three New Horizons bands: a Beginner’s Group that meets Tuesday evenings at the School, an Advanced Beginner’s Group that meets Monday and Wednesday mornings at Hamilton-Madison House (50 Madison Avenue) and the Advanced Big Band that meets Tuesday and Thursday mornings. At every level, band mem-

‘I had to retire as a firefighter becaue of lung damage, but my wife said this could be good for me, and you know what? My lung scans keep getting better. All the breathing helps.’ tenor sax player Neal King

bership gives seniors challenging mental activity, the mission statement goes on, a group of like-minded friends and a way to experience and express “serious thoughts and joyful moments.” One New Horizons member put the benefits in practical terms: “Being old, retired and

widowed, I joined the band to have something to do. Now I don’t know what I’d do without it.” “Okay,” said Tesh after the seniors had huffed and puffed through the breathing BAND, continued on p. 20

April 3, 2014

19

Music keeps them young BAND, continued from p. 19

20

April 3, 2014

PHOTO BY MICHAEL LYDON

exercises, “Now let’s see if we are in tune. Everybody play a nice strong A. One, two, three, go!” A mighty but muddy boom of sound arose from the nine flutes, three saxophones, three clarinets, three trumpets, two trombones, two tubas, two bassoons and one French horn. Tesh winced. “We can do better than that. Big breath this time, and make that tone good and strong. Go!” This time the huge boom had a crisp and satisfying clarity, and Tesh grinned widely. “That’s more like it!” For the next fifteen minutes, as the orchestra played long legato tones, short staccato tones, high tones and low tones, Tesh keeping up a flow of helpful suggestions: “Sit up straighter…bigger breath…keep your tone strong all the way to the end.” He focused first on each instrumental section, asking the others to sit silent, then he brought the whole orchestra back together to play a monster chord, the tubas plunging to the depths, the bassoons and trombones rumbling just above them, then the saxes, clarinets, flutes and trumpets climbing in ascending order to the very top of their ranges. The walls of the auditorium vibrated with the band’s tuneful roar. “Yeah!” said Tesh. “Now we’re ready to play some music! Please open your books to Chorale #5.” From shoulder bags slumped on the floor beside them, the players — half-and-half men and women, and every color of the American rainbow — pulled out their bold red and white Third Street folders and arranged their sheet music on their stands. The first run-through of the chorale ended weakly. “Oh, listen to that,” Tesh cried with mock annoyance. “You must give your closing notes full value, even when we slow down for the last few measures. Look, let’s sing the ending.” He counted off, and the players hummed the notes they had been playing. “Lovely,” said Tesh, “now let’s play it from the top.” This time, as if by magic, the harmony of the ensemble had become sweet and clear. First the saxes carried the melody, the flutes flying above, then the trumpets took over — and through their darting counterpoint came the bell-like tinkle of percussionist Linda Brown’s glockenspiel. “Here comes the crescendo!” called Tesh, and his orchestra responded with a sudden blaring push. “No, no,” said Tesh, waving his baton until the players stopped. “We’ve got to reach the climax little by little, poco a poco, as it says on your scores.”

Alan Yashin in the background, with tenor sax player Neal King flanked by Judy Bosco (in scarf) and Betty Rounds.

“Easy for you to say,” the French horn player muttered to the trombonist beside him. The players sitting nearby chuckled. Tesh wisely acted as if he hadn’t heard, but announced it was time to take five, and the players got up, stretched, sipped from their water bottles and chatted with this visiting reporter. “Oh, I love being in this band,” said tenor sax player Neal King, as he adjusted his horn’s reed. “Joined five years ago, had never played an instrument in my life, and would have bet I’d never learn to read music, but here I am! I had to retire as a firefighter because of lung damage, but my wife said this could be good for me, and you know what? My lung scans keep getting better. All the breathing helps.” “I played clarinet in high school,” said bass clarinetist Judy Bosco, “but until I heard about the New Horizons

band, I hadn’t played for years. What I love is: we’re all trying to improve, but there’s no pressure. It’s music for the fun of it.” Pam Pier, who owns the Dinosaur Hill toyshop on East Ninth agreed. “My flute had been in the closet for decades,” she said, “but when someone told me about a senior band that met only two blocks away, I said, ‘That’s for me!’ Like the toy shop, music keeps me young.” Tesh tapped his stand again; time to get back to work. All the warm up exercises now paid off, and the band romped through a half dozen tunes, including the lyrical “Air for Band,” a stomping blues, “Basin Street Barbeque” and the mellow “Samba for Flutes.” The samba had some tricky Brazilian syncopations, but backed up by Linda Brown’s steady beat on snare drum and cymbal, the ensemble kept up a sexy, swaying groove, the flutes leading the way through the playful melody, the two tubas poot-pooting down in the sub-basement. When the bells of St. Mark’s church rang noon, it was time to stop for the day. “That was a good session, everybody,” said Tesh, then asked for comments and questions. “What do we do if we screw up in a concert like we do when we practice?” someone called out. “Oh, don’t worry about it,” replied Tesh with a grin, “audiences are always kind.” “You know, Brandon, you’re always telling us to count out the tempo,” said one trombonist, “but really we keep on time by watching your body language.” “That’s fine,” said Tesh, then asking a question he’d asked many times before: “What’s the most important thing about tempo?” “Don’t slow down!” the orchestra answered in unison. “And who’s responsible for keeping a steady tempo?” “Everybody!” said everybody. Billy Lyles, a gray-haired flutist, raised his hand. “Yes, Billy?” said Tesh. “Even more important than tempo,” said Billy, “is for us to say a big ‘Thank you’ for all you’ve given us.” The whole orchestra clapped and cheered. Tesh blushed, and the orchestra, chuckling, began putting their instruments back into their cases, pulling their scarves and hats out of their coat sleeves, then headed back out into the cold. For more information, visit thirdstreetmusicschool.org, call 212-777-3240 or stop by 235 East 11th Street and pick up a brochure.

TheVillager.com

Cross-Culturalism at the core of Meridian 23’s sounds and tastes New venue reflects the many interests of its multi-ethnic founders BY SAM SPOKONY

PHOTO BY HEDWIG MARIA

Y

ou won’t need a plane ticket to experience sounds and tastes from across the globe, as a uniquely cross-cultural nightclub and live music venue will soon open its doors in Chelsea. Meridian 23, located at 161 West 23rd St. (btw. Sixth and Seventh Aves.), aims to bring a genre-blending mix of world music and DJ/ electronica vibes to the neighborhood, while drawing on years of planning by its multiethnic co-founders. Collaborating ever since they became friends while attending the United Nations International School on East 25th Street, club owner Ferdinand Galvis (whose roots come from Colombia, Germany and East Africa) and creative director Stefan Andemicael (who’s half Eritrean and half Austrian) explained that their idea for the new club developed in response to a changing NYC atmosphere that — amid so many individual “scene” hotspots — often seeks a fresh, eclectic voice. That means going beyond just dance beats or acoustic jams, while also bringing modern jazz, funk and other alternative music under one roof. “For me, seeking that feeling comes from my experience as a DJ,” said Andemicael. “When I’m on the decks, I span the globe, and that used to meet some resistance...[some] people tended to seek specific genres. Now an eclectic mix is more appreciated. The audience has caught up. Cross-culturalism is a genre onto itself. Cross-culturalism is the core concept for Meridian 23.” The two-level, 2,500-square-foot club — which will have a soft opening on April 5 — was constructed as a versatile space, which will cater to those diverse musical acts by featuring both a stage area for bands and an expansive floor for DJ parties. In addition, bar stations (four upstairs and one downstairs) will offer a cocktail menu that “playfully cir-

cles the globe,” according to the co-founders. Also important to the club’s vibe will be an equally interesting array of food choices — served until 1 a.m. — featuring tapas by Pierre Thiam, a Senegal-born chef who’s already brought zesty African culinary traditions to several New York restaurants. But in the end, it’s all about the sound — and the co-founders stressed that they’ve put in years of work to painstakingly fine-tune the sonic aspects of the space, electronically and physically, with tips from the same DJs and instrumentalists who will soon form the club’s broad community of performers. “We thought of Meridian 23 as a performance space first,” said Galvis. “With that in mind, I paid a lot of attention to what would make the room sound good. If the sound isn’t great, it doesn’t matter how great the band is.” Listeners will soon get a chance to test out those new acoustics at the club’s April 11 grand opening event, which will be highlighted by a free 9 p.m. concert by Meta and the Cornerstones — a perfectly eclectic choice to kick things off. Led by West African-born singer Meta Dia, the six-piece group brings together instrumentalists from three other continents while deftly fusing the danceable rhythms and harmonies of Afro-pop, hip-hop, rock and soul. Their second album, “Ancient Power,” released last April, also drew irresistibly headbobbing strains of reggae into the mix — and aside from actually being recorded in Jamaica, it featured contributions from Damian Marley and top artists from the genre. And the next night, also at 9 p.m., Meridian 23 will host a second grand opening concert — tickets cost $10 — this time featuring another group with roots in Africa, albeit with a very different vibe. The Feedel Band, a seven-piece group whose founders hail from Ethiopia, bring their engaging brand of jazz to the table, with both a drum set and percussionist combining with electric bass to lay a powerful rhyth-

Meta and the Cornerstones are a perfectly eclectic choice to play Meridian 23’s grand opening event (free, April 11 at 9 p.m.).

mic foundation for the group’s improvisers, which include sax, trombone, guitar and keyboards. Also inspired by the music of their home country, the band prefers to call their mix of musical languages “EthioJazz,” leaving plenty of room for great interplay and group dynamics. Looking to the future, the club hopes to follow those performances up with many more forays into the city’s myriad of live music scenes, while also staying true to its nightclub roots and drawing in those who just want to drink and dance. Part of that artistically diverse experience, according to Galvis and Andemicael, will also

Bartender’s

COCKTAILS ANYONE???

N D E ER’S T R A B CORNER Y

HOSTED B Theater for the New City • 155 1st Avenue at E. 10th St. Reservations & Info (212) 254-1109 For more info, please visit www.theaterforthenewcity.net

WORSHIP The World Premiere of a New Play written by EDUARDO MACHADO Directed by MICHAEL DOMITROVICH

Set Design by Mark Marcante Lighting Design by Alexander Bartenieff Sound Design by Elizabeth Rhodes Costume Design by Michael Bevins

Featuring: Crystal Field*, Quinlan Corbett*, Lori Fischer*, Sharon Ullrick*, Hugh Sinclair*, Heather Velazquez & Tatyana Yassukovich* *Appears Courtesy Actors’ Equity Association

Performances March 27 - April 13

Thursday - Saturday at 8pm, Sunday at 3pm All Seats $15/Students & Seniors $10/tdf

involve creating a community for the artists themselves. So along with providing a stage for their sounds, Meridian 23 will set aside one night every few months just to hold a party for its musicians, seeking to foster new ties and collaborations that could help spark new crossovers between their various genres. “The idea is that a sense of community blossoms when artists feel a sense of belonging in the place, and the place belonging to them,” said Andemicael. “That’s why the bar will throw a party for the talent. People who haven't met each other, but who are part of something here, will get a chance to hang out.”

Hey, Mateys!

Colin Gregory!

SIGNATURE DRINKS!

FEATURED GUESTS!

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CHECK OUT VIDEOS OF BARTENDERS CREATING YOUR FAVORITE DRINKS AT...

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LET US MIX YOU A VIDEO FOR BARTENDER’S CORNER! Contact Colin for a feature at: colin@thevillagercom

TNC’s Programs are funded in part by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York State Council on the Arts

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April 3, 2014

21

Just Do Art

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST & CARTER BURDEN GALLERY

Thomas McAnulty’s “On the Wall” (public art installation, 180" wide x 50" tall, charcoal drawing). On view through April 10, at Carter Burden Gallery, which features emerging older artists.

BY SCOTT STIFFLER

THE CARTER BURDEN GALLERY COURTESY OF THE ARTIST & CARTER BURDEN GALLERY

Katherine D. Crone’s “Overflow” (16" tall x 5" x5", acrylic plastic, pigment print on Usuyo Gampi, nylon microfilament) is part of the “Looking Beyond” group photography show (through April 10, at Carter Burden Gallery).

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April 3, 2014

The Carter Burden Center for the Aging promotes the well-being of individuals 60 and older through direct social services, advocacy and volunteer programs oriented to individual, family and community needs. A few years back, they broadened the scope of their mission statement by helping to promote the work of NYC’s reemerging older professional artists. Today, The Carter Burden Gallery (formerly Gallery 307) has staked its claim as a unique presence in the Chelsea gallery district. Currently on display in the East Gallery, “Drawings & Sculpture” is the first Carter Burden solo show from Charles Ramsburg. Created in response to the artist’s woodland walks in the Adirondacks, the charcoal reductionist drawings “explores

his interest in the complexities of dimensionality and spatial contradictions”— while the sculptures (a collection of “Pathing Sticks”) examine the walking staff’s esoteric and functional history. In the West Gallery, Sara Petitt has curated “Looking Beyond” — a show of six photographers whose “recognizable and esoteric” works explore transformations, creations and elusive realities. Also in the gallery, Thomas McAnulty’s “On the Wall,” is a large-scale charcoal drawing that questions the “subtle and complex” relationship we form with often overlooked things to which we are deeply connected. Through April 10, at 548 W. 28th St. (#534, btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). Gallery Hours: Tues.Fri., 11am-5pm and Sat., 11am-6pm. Call 21256-8405 or visit carterburdengallery.com. JUST DO ART, continued on p. 23

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Just Do Art JUST DO ART, continued from p. 22

THEATER: LADY FROM LIMERICK

After last year’s well-attended and wordy (in a good way) inaugural event, McNally Jackson Books and Housing Works Bookstore Cafe are once again collaborating on the Downtown Literary Festival — a daylong celebration showcasing the literature and writers of New York City (with a focus on Downtown diversity and creativity). This year, the fes-

TheVillager.com

PHOTO BY BEOWULF SHEEHAN

THE SECOND ANNUAL DOWNTOWN LITERARY FESTIVAL

PHOTO BY BOB GIGLIONE

Like so many others, she left Ireland to reinvent herself in New York City. But Kathleen Kelly Cregan was no turn-of-thecentury immigrant determined to escape a hardscrabble existence. The 2005 visitor to our shores was lured (recruited, really) by a doctor who’d been sued by numerous unsatisfied clients. A victim of botched plastic surgery, Cregan was removed from life support on St. Patrick’s Day. Journalist Claude Solnik — a 1990s contributor to The Villager and its sister publication, Downtown Express — was compelled to write this fictionalized account “because I was moved and because I wanted to try to prevent her tragedy from being forgotten.” The play’s co-producers also have a personal stake in raising awareness about the impact of medical errors on both victims and family members: Michael DeLuise only found out about his doctor’s many problems after cataract surgery gone bad, while Ilene Corina lost her son after he went in for a tonsillectomy (which prompted her to found PULSE of NY, a patient advocacy group). To further advance public debate on the play’s subject matter, five Talkback sessions will be held, immediately following certain performances. On April 10, William Liss-Levinson, Chief Strategy & Operations Officer of Castle Connolly (a website that helps in the search for top doctors), leads the discussion. April 12’s conversation features Randi Redmond Oster. The author of “Questioning Protocol,” she founded the group “Empowered Patients. Improved Outcomes” after caring for her elderly parents and a son with Crohn’s disease. For the full schedule: theaterforthenewcity.net. “The Lady from Limerick” is performed Thurs.-Sat., April 10-12 & 17-19 at 8pm. Sun., April 13 & 20 at 3pm. At Theater for the New City (155 First Ave. btw. 9th & 10th Sts.). For tickets ($15, $10 for students/seniors), call 212-254-1109 or visit theaterforthenewcity.net.

The cast of “Lady From Limerick” — at Theater for the New City, through April 20.

The Downtown Literary Festival has more books than you can shake a Noon at.

tival has expanded to three locations and has added children’s programming. The opening party (6-8pm) happens on Fri., April 10, at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe (HWBC). Ryan Chapman and Jason Diamond will DJ, and there will be free drinks (while they last). On Sunday, festival events at Bowery Poetry Club (BPC) and HWBC begin on the hour and last 45 minutes — allowing attendees just enough time to book it to the next nearby venue. At 11am, at BPC, “Natives and Newcomers: How Open Is New York City?” brings together Teju Cole, Hari Kunzru and Katie Kitamura for a discussion about the extent to which non-native New Yorkers can ever truly call the city their home. At noon, HWBC is the setting for “The Greatest 3-Minute Bad Apartment Stories” — a rapid-fire collection of horrible experiences with bad roommates, bed bugs, broker fees and slumlords. Maggie Serota, Sari Botton, Bob Powers, Jen Doll and Tyler Coates are among the intense and concise storytellers. Volume 1 Brooklyn’s Tobias Carroll hosts. Other events include visual presentations from Gabrielle Bell, MK Reed and Julia Wertz on the role NY’s cityscape has played in graphic stories (“Graphically New York: The City as Character,” 1pm at HWBC. At 2pm’s “Slaughterhouse 90210: Downtown Movies Edition” (also at HWBC), Maris Kreizman — creator of the blog and book-to-be “Slaughterhouse 90210” — talks about the intersection of New York City movies and literature. She’s joined by storytellers including Ka-

tie Heaney and Teddy Wayne. At BPC, at 2pm, the festival follows up 2013’s Frank O’Hara-themed installment of “The City Drifting” by focusing on the work of Alice Notley — this year’s choice for a featured poet who epitomizes Downtown literary culture. Timothy Donnelly, Lynne Melnick, John Godfrey, Stacy Szymaszek, Erika Caufmanmand Patricia Spears Jones are among those who will read a cherished poem by Notley. At 3pm, HWBC hosts “Closing Time: Stories of Shuttered New York City Venues.” Writers and musicians including Stacey D’Erasmo, Nelson George, Porochista Khakpour and Marc Spitz will revisit some of our ever-changing town’s fondly remembered DIY spaces, concert halls and arenas. Concurrent with that event, BPC takes a different approach to assessing the human cost of progress. “The Tale of Two Cities: Richard Price and Francine Prose in Conversation” has these born-andbred New Yorkers assessing the collateral damage of turning dirty and dangerous old Downtown into a zone that “no longer resembles the affordable, inclusive and diverse enclave it used to be.” At 4pm, at HWBC, what will become a perennial festival event — “NYC Through the Decades” — launches with a focus on the 1950s. The panelists are David Gilbert (on Hitchcock’s “Rear Window”), Amor Towles (on Robert Franks’ “The Americans” photographs) and David Goodwillie (on Delmore Schwartz). Beginning at 10:30am, McNally Jackson Books will host four events custom-made

for the juice box set. First up: “Baby and Kids Storytime and Singalong” (ages 0–4) has Amy Virginia Buchanan and Jo Firestone bringing a distinctly Downtown flair to their Storytime event (see amyvirginia.com updates on their weekly Wednesday gig, 10:30am, at HWBC). At 11am, “The Joshua Show” features Joshua Holden and his cast of puppet friends. Kids ages 4-8 will get a fast-paced primer on the genres of urban funk, blues, honky tonk and calypso genres — when Amelia Robinson plays interactive songs from the Mil’s Trills debut album “Everyone Together Now.” Village resident Greg Foley (the author/illustrator of “Willoughby & the Lion” and “Willoughby & the Moon”) is the guest for “Storytime With Rafael Jefferson” (at noon, perfect for ages 5-8). Also throughout the day at McNally Jackson, adults can get literary advice from Charles Bock, Fiona Maazel, Katie Roiphe and Adam Wilson—while Rosie Schapp pairs your reading list with thematically appropriate drinks. Then, rebel against the brave new age of the selfie, by popping into the Photo Booth to pose with your favorite book. Sun., April 13, from 10am-5pm at three venues: Bowery Poetry Club (308 Bowery, btw. Bleecker & Houston Sts.), Housing Works Bookstore Cafe (126 Crosby St., btw. Prince & Houston Sts.) and McNally Jackson Books (52 Prince St., btw. Lafayette & Mulberry Sts.). The after party (5pm) happens at Von Bar (3 Bleecker St., btw. Bowery & Elizabeth Sts.). For event info, visit downtownliteraryfestival.org. Also visit mcnallyjackson. com and housingworks.org/events. April 3, 2014

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that license #1277168 has been applied by the undersigned to sell liquor at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at 321-323 West 51st Street, New York, NY 10019 for on-premises consumption. IPPUDO WESTSIDE LLC Vil: 04/03 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by JMDR 127 Ludlow LLC d/b/a Set BBQ Bistro to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 127 Ludlow Street New York NY 10002. Vil: 04/03 - 04/10/2014 MERCURIAL, LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 03/17/2014. Off. Loc.: New York Co. Ira Nesenoff designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 363 7Th Avenue, 5Th Floor, New York, NY 10001. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an on-premise license, #TBA has been applied for by New York Shakespeare Festival, Its for Love Limited Liability Company and Joe’s Public LLC as manager to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in an on premises establishment. For on premises consumption under the ABC law at 425 Lafayette Street New York NY 10003. Vil: 04/03 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license number #1276789 for On Premises liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to sell liquor, beer and wine at retail in a restaurant under the alcoholic beverage control law at ROJAS FOOD SERVICES LLC, DBA: INTI N.Y.C. located at 820 10th AVE, New York, NY 10019 for on premises consumption. Vil: 04/03 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THE LITTLE RED ROCKET PROGRAMS LLC a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State on3/21/2014. NY Office Location: New York County. Secretary of State is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to: 4862 Broadway, NY, NY 10034. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BROADWAY 4D PRODUCTIONS, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/20/14. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 5/5/11. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 9300 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 200, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. Address to be maintained in DE: 2140 South Dupont Hwy, Camden, DE 19934. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., #3, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF COMCAST NY ONE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/19/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Comcast Corporation, 1701 JFK Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19103. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to C T Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 35 WEST 12TH STREET, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 03/17/14. Princ. office of LLC: 35 W. 12th St., NY, NY 10011-8501. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ARS ADVISORS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/24/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 500 Fifth Ave., 14th Fl., NY, NY 10110. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ARCP FEMGYNY01, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/24/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/19/14. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Jenkintown, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o CSC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF AP 3L, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/17/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in CT on 4/17/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Edward P. Nolan, Windels Marx Lane & Mittendorf, LLP, 156 W. 56th St., NY, NY 10019. CT and principal business address: c/o ATC, LLC, 73 Arch St., Greenwich, CT 06830. Cert. of Org. filed with CT Sec. of State, 30 Trinity St., Hartford, CT 06115. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 1114 6TH AVENUE OWNER LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State 3/26/14. Off. location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE 3/21/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 5081 BOLIVAR ROAD SBL LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/19/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 5404 Wisconsin Ave., 2nd Fl., Chevy Chase, MD 20815. LLC formed in DE on 3/11/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a license, Serial Number Pending for beer, liquor, and wine has been applied for by the undersigned*to sell beer, liquor and wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 260 W. 26th St., NewYork, NY 10001 in New York County for on premises consumption. *Tapmasters Chelsea LLC DBA World of Beer Vil: 03/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LEITERSDORF HAW DESIGN LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/11/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 10 E. 53rd St., 37th Fl., NY, NY 10022, Attn: President. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WARRIOR POETS PILOTS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/20/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 407 Broome St., Ste. 7B, NY, NY 10013. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 04/03 - 05/08/2014

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PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Dept. of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, April 11, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition for PANZI ENTERPRISES LLC to continue to maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 92 SEVENTH AVENUE SOUTH in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUEST FOR COPIES OF THE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSED TO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 03/27 - 04/03/2014

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April 3, 2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ARGOSY COMPOSITE PRODUCTS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/19/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 225 W. 34th St., Ste. 1508, NY, NY 10122. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 333 JOHNSON LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/05/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Royalton Capital Inc., 69 Mercer St., PH, NY, NY 10012. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 EMP CAPITAL LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 2/4/14. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process toThe LLC, 111 Fulton St., PH210, NY, NY 10038. General Purpose. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 200 CPS RETAIL HOLDINGS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/7/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 150 E. 58th St., 39th Fl., NY, NY 10155. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 82-96 LORRAINE LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/24/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Kriss & Feuerstein LLP, 360 Lexington Ave., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF AGS INVESTORS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/13/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Adelangela Sara Aimone Fumagalli, 8 Spruce St., Apt. 9D, NY, NY 10038. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 432 38D LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/13/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 350 Fifth Ave., 41st Fl., NY, NY 10118. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 2046 WESTCHESTER DEBT LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/11/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 530 PREF INVESTOR LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/23/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 1/17/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 530 MEZZ FUNDING LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/23/14. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 1/17/14. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to NRAI, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF 300 WEST 22 REALTY LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/23/12. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 10/27/11. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to CSC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TRADECRAFT EAST LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/7/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Lauryn Siegel, 204 Montrose Ave., Apt. 2B, Brooklyn, NY 11206. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014

NOTICE OF QUAL. OF SJK CAPITAL FUND LP Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/29/13. Office loc.: NY County. LP org. in DE 7/10/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Philip Korn, 300 W. End Ave., Apt. 8B, NY, NY 10023. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of LP on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Name/addr. of each gen. ptr. avail. at SSNY. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF SJK CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/15/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 5/17/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Philip Korn, 300 W. End Ave., Apt. 8B, NY, NY 10023. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF SJK CAPITAL GP LLC Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/15/13. Office loc.: NY County. LLC org. in DE 6/18/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to Att: Philip Korn, 300 W. End Ave., Apt. 8B, NY, NY 10023. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF QUAL. OF TIGER GLOBAL LONG OPPORTUNITIES, L.P. Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/30/13. Office loc.: NY County. LP org. in DE 8/26/13. SSNY desig. as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to 101 Park Ave., 48th Fl., NY, NY 10178. DE off. addr.: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of LP on file: SSDE, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Name/addr. of each gen. ptr. avail. at SSNY. Purp.: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TRUFFAUT HITCHCOCK PROJECTS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/14/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 750 Lexington Ave., 28th Fl., NY, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/27- 05/01/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF STATUE PARKING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/17/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Icon Parking Systems, 211 E. 38th St., NY, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/27- 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PARTY OF 2, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/7/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1100 Glendon Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90024. LLC formed in DE on 2/27/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SKAR PHARMACY, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/12/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 3/6/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Pharmacy. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF VIVINT SOLAR NICOLE MASTER TENANT, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/10/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 4931 N. 300 W., Provo, UT 84604. LLC formed in DE on 2/20/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, PURSUANT TO LAW, that the NYC Dept. of Consumer Affairs will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at 66 John Street, 11th floor, on a petition for JAPP Business, Inc. to establish, maintain, and operate an unenclosed sidewalk café at 4179 BROADWAY in the Borough of Manhattan for a term of two years. REQUEST FOR COPIES OFTHE PROPOSED REVOCABLE CONSENT AGREEMENT MAY BE ADDRESSEDTO: DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS, ATTN: FOIL OFFICER, 42 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NY 10004. Vil: 03/27 - 04/03/2014

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NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF KNIC PROPERTIES LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/5/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Park Ave., 7th Fl., NY, NY 10177. LP formed in DE on 6/4/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: c/o Capitol Services, Inc., 1675 S. State St., Ste. B, Dover, DE 19901. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/27 - 05/01/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GUARD HILL MAINTENANCE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/14. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Yuco Management Inc., 200 Park Ave., 11th Fl., NY, NY 10166-0005. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 03/20 - 04/24/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF COOK MEDICAL LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/03/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Indiana (IN) on 11/06/03. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. IN addr. of LLC: 750 Daniels Way, Bloomington, IN 47404. Arts. of Org. filed with IN Secy. of State, 302 W. Washington St., Rm. E018, Indianapolis, IN 46204. Purpose: Sale of medical devices. Vil: 03/20 - 04/24/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 50/8 REALTY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/10/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 770 Lexington Ave., 18th Fl., NY, NY 10018. Latest date on which the LLC may dissolve is 12/31/2035. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/20 - 04/24/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 404/75 REALTY LLC Cert. of Conversion filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/14, converting Deborah Realty Co. to 404/75 Realty LLC. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Friedman Management Co., 770 Lexington Ave., 18th Fl., NY, NY 10065. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/20 - 04/24/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF RAINBOW ROOM, L.L.C. Authority filed with Secy of State of NY on 03/05/14. Office location: New York County. LLC formed in DE on 02/04/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Avenue, 13th floor, New York, NY 10011. NRAI is registered agent as well. Address required to be maintained in home jurisdiction: 160 Greentree Drive, Suite 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org filed with DE Secy of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., Federal & Duke of York Streets, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/20 - 04/24/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 313 CONSTRUCTION LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 489 5th Ave., 7th Fl., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/20 - 04/24/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WEST 54 55 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 3/3/14. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. Regd. agent upon whom process may be served: John LaGratta, c/o JD Carlisle LLC, 352 Park Ave. So., 15th Fl., NY, NY 10010, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/20 - 04/24/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF PARMED PHARMACEUTICALS, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/3/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 7000 Cardinal Place, Dublin, OH 43017. LLC formed in DE on 1/1/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/20 - 04/24/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SERVICELINK APPRAISAL, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/4/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 12/30/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/20 - 04/24/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOP MW RESIDENTIAL PARKING LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 03/10/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 03/06/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF BOP MW RESIDENTIAL RETAIL LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 03/10/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 250 Vesey St., 15th Fl., New York, NY 10281. LLC formed in DE on 03/06/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DR RISK SOLUTIONS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/04/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 140 E. 81st St., Apt. 2D, NY, NY 10028. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: RO 35 W. 9TH STREET LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/11/13. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Goldfinger & Lassar LLP, 750Third Avenue, 11th Floor, NewYork, New York 10017. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 UPPER WEST SIDE PLAYGROUP, LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 1/19/11. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process toThe LLC, 10943 Mayfield Rd., Houston, TX 77043. General Purpose. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF NIGHTLIFE OPPORTUNITIES IN SELECTIVE ENTERTAINMENT LLC Authority filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/3/13. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in DE on 9/28/12. SSNY designated agent upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy of process against LLC to principal business address: NIGHTLIFE OPPORTUNITIES IN SELECTIVE ENTERTAINMENT LLC 365 W 52nd ST Apt 1F, NY, NY 10019. DE address: 1521 Concord Pike Ste 301, Wilmington, DE 19803. Cert. of LLC filed with Secy of State of DE: 401 Federal St. Ste 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ADVANTAGE OPCO, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/24/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 7652 Narcoossee Rd., Orlando, FL 32822. LLC formed in DE on 1/31/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DWIGHT GROUP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/05/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Kalnick, Klee & Green, LLP, 767 Third Ave., NY, NY 10017. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014

PUBLIC NOTICE - RIVERSIDE PARK Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless is proposing to collocate antennas (at 77’) on an existing 82’ building located at 760 Riverside Drive, in New York, New County, New York. Public comments regarding the potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30-days from the date of this publication to: Andrew Maziarski - IVI Telecom Services, Inc., 55 West Red Oak Lane, White Plains, New York 10604, CulturalResources@ ivi-intl.com, or (914) 740-1930. Vil: 04/03/2014

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WP 112 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/27/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Hirschen Singer & Epstein LLP, 902 Broadway, 13th Fl., New York, NY 10010. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 568 DRIGGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/10/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Hope Kessler, 425 East 58th St., New York, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ATC TOWER SERVICES LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/10/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 116 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02116. LLC formed in DE on 1/1/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF VIVINT SOLAR ELYSE PROJECT COMPANY, LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/24/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 4931 N. 300 W., Provo, UT 84604. LLC formed in DE on 2/3/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 170 BROADWAY NYC HOTEL LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/25/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1001 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20004. LP formed in DE on 2/24/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 170 BROADWAY NYC RETAIL LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/26/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 1001 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20004. LP formed in DE on 2/24/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/13 - 04/17/2014 NY SNEAKER GAME LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/16/2013. Office loc: NY County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: P.O. Box 165, NY, NY 10033. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF AYTA CONSULTING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/25/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 805 Third Avenue, 15th Fl., New York, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 189 PKG, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Aronauer Re & Yudell LLP, Attn: Michael S. Scher, Esq., 60 E. 42nd St., Ste. 1420, NY, NY 10165. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY NAME: JAX BEACH HOUSE 28, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/25/14. Office location: New York County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 487 Greenwich Street, Apartment 7A, NewYork, NewYork 10013. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014

747 STUYVESANT III, L.P. filed an App. for Authority with the NY Department of State on 2/13/2014. Jurisdiction: DE, and the date of its formation is 12/7/2010. Office location in NYS: New York County. The Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) is designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of such process is: Attn: Mr. Gijs vanThiel, c/o 747 Capital, LLC, 880 Third Ave., 17th Flr. NY NY 10022 The address in its jurisdiction if required or the office address: 2711 Centerville Rd., Suite 400, Wilmington DE 19808. A copy of the Articles of Organization may be obtained from Sect’y of State of DE, 401 Federal St., Dover DE 19901. The list of names and addresses of all general partners is available from the Secretary of State. The purpose of the LP is any lawful act. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 APP FOR AUTH FOR MARSDEN MEDICAL PHYSICS ASSOCIATES, LLC App for Auth filed with SSNY 02/19/2014 LLC. Registered in New Jersey on 05/04/1998 Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, c/o David Marsden, 266 Long Meadow Road, Kinnelon, NJ 07405. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 CITYSCAPE ABSTRACT LLC Art. Of Org. Filed Sec. of State of NY 02/25/2014. Off. Loc.: New York Co. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to The LLC, 111 John Street, Suite 1050, New York, NY 10038. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SKYFALL II LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/12/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/03/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 350 W. 23rd St., PHA, NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., Federal and Duke of York Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF SKYFALL III LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/12/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 02/03/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 350 W. 23rd St., PHA, NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of the State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., Federal and Duke of York Sts., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014

NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF ARHC NPNPZNY01, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/16/14. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Jenkintown, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o CSC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF 110 WILLIAM PROPERTY INVESTORS III, LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/26/14. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/20/13. Princ. office of LLC: 10 E. 53rd St., 37th Fl., NY, NY 10022. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, New Castle Cnty., DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John B. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF GG CGS BRAND CAPITAL LLC Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/18/13. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 411 W. 14th St., 4th Fl., NY, NY 10014. LLC formed in DE on 11/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 03/06 - 04/10/2014 EL SENOR NEW YORK LLC a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 2/4/14. Office location: NewYork County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process toThe LLC, 159 Essex St., Ste. #C, NY, NY 10002. General Purpose. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF INTIMA CAPITAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/11/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. office of LLC: 3 Columbus Circle, NY, NY 10019. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014

April 3, 2014

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SCOOPY’S, continued from p. 3 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 142 DUANE OWNER LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/28/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 150 E. 58th St., 39th Fl., NY, NY 10155. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 144 DEBT LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 151 BRUCKNER HOLDINGS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 75 125TH HOLDINGS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/9/13. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bluestone Group, 225 Broadway, 32nd Fl., NY, NY 10007. Purpose: any lawful activities. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF RAD & DYLAN, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 01/16/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. The address to which SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC is to: Rad & Dylan LLC,136W 131 st, apt-1, New York, NY 10027. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 1763 AMSTERDAM EQUITIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/12/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Exact Capital Group LLC, 100 Park Ave., Ste. 1600, NY, NY 10017. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014

ACCOUNTING  CITATION        

 

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WINTER ART CO. LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/13/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to princ. bus. loc. of LLC: 730 Fifth Ave., 12th Fl., NewYork, NY 10019. Purpose: any purposes permitted by applicable law. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 158 AVENUE C REALTY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/15/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/oThe LLC, 632 Broadway, 7th Fl., NewYork, NY 10012. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MEETSNYC LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/16/14. Office location: NY County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Cooperman Lester Miller LLP, 1129 Northern Blvd., Ste. 402, Manhasset, NY 11030, Attn: Barry R. Carus, Esq. Purpose: any lawful activity. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VDK, L.P. Cert. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/4/2013. Office location: NY County. Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business addr.: c/o Virginia Commander Knott Family Trust, 232 Cleft Rd., Mill Neck, NY 11765, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from Sec. of State. Term: until 12/2/2063. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014 NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION OF YORK MULTI-STRATEGY HEDGEFOCUS FUND LP Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/7/14. Office location: NY County. Princ. bus. addr.: 11 Madison Ave., NY, NY 10010. LP formed in DE on 2/5/14. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/addr. of genl. ptr. available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. Vil: 02/27 - 04/03/2014

 

                  File  No  2010—0664/A  

SURROGATE’S  COURT  -­‐  NEW    YORK  COUNTY   SUPPLEMENTAL  CITATION   THE  PEOPLE  OF  THE  STATE  OF  NEW  YORK  

TO:   Allen  W alker,  John  F.  Ross,  Thelma  Colbert  Young,  if  living  or  dead,,  to  the   their  heirs,  at  law,  n ext  o f  kin  and  distributes  whose  name  and  places  of   residence  are  unknown  and  if  they  died  subsequent  to  the  decedent  herein,  to   their  executors  administrators,  legatees,  devisees,  assignees  and  successors  in   interest  whose  names  and  places  of  residence  are  unknown,  and  to  all  other   heirs  at  law  next  of  kin  and  distributes  o f  Calvin  Ross,  Jr,  the  decedent  herein,   whose  names  and  p laces  of  residence  are  unknown  and  cannot  after  diligent   inquiry  be  ascertained.    

  A  petition  and  an  account  having  been  duly  filed  by  Stanley  Ross   Whose  address  is  1127  16th  Street,  NE  Washington  DC  20002.    

  YOU  ARE  H EREBY  CITED  TO  SHOW  CAUSE  before  the  Surrogate’s   Court,  New  York  County,  at  31  Chambers  Street,  New  York  on  June  3,  2014  in   Room  503  at  9:30  o’clock  in  the  fore  noon  of  that  day,  why  the  account  o f   Stanley  Ross,  a  summary  of  which  has  been  served  herewith,  as  Administrator   of  the  estate  of  Calvin  Ross,  Jr  should  no  be  Judicially  settled,  and  a  kinship   hearing  be  scheduled  t o  establish  Stanley  Ross  as  the  sole  intestate  distribute   of  the  d ecedent  herein.    

                Dated,  Attested  and  Sealed,    

     

     

HON  .  RITA  MELLA   SURROGATE   Surrogate  

April  1 ,  2014  

 

   

  Diana  Sanabra  –  Chief  Clerk

 

 

                    Name  of  Attorney  Allen  Wilson           Tel  No  212-­‐714-­‐0300   Address  of  Attorney:  770  Broadway,  2nd  floor,  New  York,  NY  10003      [Note:  This  citation  is  served  upon  you  a s  required  by  law.    You  are  not  required  to  appear;   however,  If  you  fail  to  a ppear  it  will  be  assumed  you  do  not  object  to  the  relief  requested.    You   have  the  right  to  have  a n  a ttorney  appear  for  you,  and  you  or  your  attorney  may  request  a  copy  of   the  full  account  from  the  petitioner’s  a ttorney]     Vil:  04/03 4/03  –  04/24/2014 04/24/2014  

TheVillager.com

and how to keep it from happening to us. And without any sense of what happened, it’s unnerving! … Things don’t add up. The hours of cruising until fuel exhaustion is typically associated with depressurization leading to hypoxia — for some reason the pilots didn’t get oxygen and died? But that doesn’t explain the multiple course changes and altitude changes. I don’t think there will be an explanation in this case without the black boxes...and even then we might not fully understand what or who caused this.”

  Deborah Glick.

GLICK TACKLES VICK: It’s not football season, so Deborah Glick isn’t firing up her Twitter into overdrive about her favorite sport yet. But don’t get her started about the Jets recent off-season trade for Michael Vick. Oh, well, actually we did. Glick was about to wrap up one last loose end of the budget process for her Committee on Higher Education, but when, at the end of a phone call to her about another issue, we mentioned the controversial quarterback, she tackled the question head on. “Vick, oh my God… . Michael Vick,” she said, incredulous. “The Jets are just unbelievably poor at making quarterback decisions. Not just Tebow … They took Sanchez, who was very untested, and then they had a bad front line. Tebow had some skills, he had some talent. They could have turned him into a fullback. They’ve ruined Sanchez and Tebow. And now they brought in Vick, who is easily injured,” she went on. “He’s 33, clearly past his prime. His style is the running quarterback — very much a younger player’s metier. Then, there’s the entire thing that Michael Vick, who is a dog murderer and torturer, should not be playing in the N.F.L. It’s just so offensive. These are people who are supposed to be role models.” Glick said Richard Neer of WFAN

is the only sports talking head who’s calling it right on Vick, saying basically that he should be, well, thrown to the dogs for what he did to the dogs.

STONEWALL PLAQUE IS BACK: After an aborted first effort last summer, it’s hoped that a new and fitting, commemorative plaque honoring the birth of the gay rights movement at the Stonewall riots will be affixed to the exterior of the historic Stonewall Inn on Christopher St. by sometime this June. The last time around, it was felt that not enough stakeholders had sufficient input into the plaque’s language. The effort is being spearheaded by state Senator Brad Hoylman. “The Stonewall Inn currently has a small, undistinguished plaque, and at 11 ¼ inches by 12 inches, it is not much larger than a sheet of paper,” Hoylman told us. “It also makes no mention of transgender people — saying only, ‘Birth of the modern Lesbian & Gay Rights Liberation’ — who have played a hugely important role in the L.G.B.T. civil rights movement, nor does the current plaque note any of the details of the Stonewall Rebellion or mention the various historic registries of which the Stonewall Inn is a part. The idea is that the owner would replace it with a larger bronze plaque that makes mention of transgender people, describes the events and lists the historic designations. That said, it’s a private building and the placement of a new sign is up to the owner, assuming the Landmarks Preservation Commission approves it. Community Board 2 held a public hearing on Feb. 25 and several interested community members attended to discuss the matter. Last week, C.B. 2 approved suggested language for the owner to consider in a new plaque and they’ll send it on to them. It was important that this issue was discussed in a public forum,” Hoylman said, “free for anyone interested to participate.” SO LONG, BROOK...LYNN: Speaking of transgender folk and Stonewall, a recent snafu by an intern at the Stonewall Veterans Association had the organization’s president, Williamson Henderson, giving a major mea culpa to Victoria Hervas, of Councilmember Rosie Mendez’s Office, outside the recent C.B. 2 full board meeting. Basically, S.V.A. had printed up lime-green fliers for Mendez’s appearance as a guest speaker before the group, but underneath her name the flier declared, “Candidate for NYC Council Speaker!” All the fliers had lines hastily scribbled through the glitch, but Hervas wasn’t impressed. “We did not approve this,” she said sternly. Henderson tried to explain that the words were mistakenly left on there because the previous speaker at S.V.A. had been Melissa Mark-Viverito, who actually did become the Council speaker. “It was a transgender intern who made the mistake, Brook Lynn — two words,” Henderson explained to us in an aside, as we listened in. “She was fired immediately. I didn’t want to fire her, but I got there too late.” April 3, 2014

27

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APRIL 03, 2014, THE VILLAGER