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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, January 25, 2013 • Vol.15, No.4

Fear and controversy arise after recent animal attacks in the Upstate

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© 2012, Greenville Federal Credit Union. All rights reserved. *Annual Percentage Rate is based on a 36-month term. Your loan rate and term amount may vary depending on individual credit history and underwriting factors. A 36-month loan with 2.49% APR would have monthly payments of $28.86 per thousand borrowed. All credit union rates, fees, terms, and conditions are subject to change at any time without notice. +Rate floor is 1.99%. Offer excludes current loans held by Greenville Federal Credit Union. Member NCUA.

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journal news

WoRth RepeAtiNg They Said iT

“That sends the message that they should be scared. It sends the message that clowns are scary – and we’re not.” Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey “boss clown” dustin Portillo, explaining why parents should never tell their children “don’t be scared” when they see a clown.

QuoTe of The week

“It helps, because your old friends don’t understand, but these are people who have been through the same stuff you have.” Army Staff Sgt. Charlie Pannell, on the lunches, hunting trips and other events organized by Upstate Warrior Solution for area veterans.

“It’s a family. It’s not a closed family, but we’ve got plenty of people who have really grown up with the Children’s Theatre.” Artistic Director Betsy Bisson, on SCCT’s mission to grow its own crop of actors and actresses by starting them out young.

“This isn’t a simple or easy thing we’re doing. It’s an opportunity, but it’s not easy.” John Baker, executive director of Greenville Works, on the demands of completing the collaborative workforce training program CareerSkillsNow.

“Even if you were entitled to file a grievance, it would have been denied.” Simpsonville City Administrator Russell hawes, in a letter to recently ousted Police Chief Keith Grounsell.

4.7 million

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Votes Mike Burns needed to win the S.C. House District 17 special primary outright and avoid a runoff on Feb. 5.

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journal news

Upstate schools step up security By Cindy Landrum and CHarLes soweLL | staff

Off-duty police officers and sheriff’s deputies will be patrolling the halls and parking lots of elementary schools in Greenville County and in some Spartanburg school districts. Elementary schools in Spartanburg Districts 3 and 6 are staffed by off-duty law enforcement officers, while zoned security patrols utilizing off-duty personnel from the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office, Greenville Police Department and Mauldin Police Department began Tuesday at Greenville County Schools’ elementary schools and centers that did not already have an on-campus security presence. The added security in all of the districts comes in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., shooting that left 20 first-graders and seven teachers and school staff members dead. “A lot of our elementary schools are remote and there is a fairly long response time in police getting there,” said Spartanburg District 6 Superintendent Darryl Owings. It will cost Spartanburg 6 roughly $216,000 to have officers at the district’s 10 elementary schools, Owings said. Other security chang-

4 THE Journal | JANUARY 25, 2013

es have been made as well to make entry into schools more difficult, he said. “At Newtown, they had the same kind of doors we use here, but they were not manned. Evidently, the shooter put a few rounds through the door and simply walked in,” he said. Owings said District 6 has had long-term involvement with police in the schools. “I don’t see it as a situation where we have guns in schools,” Owings said. “We have professional police officers, just like our school resource officer program that is in our (high) schools.” In District 3, officers will be present for arrivals and departures. The districts are paying for the off-duty officers from their general funds and hope to eventually transition from off-duty deputies to specially certified school resource officers. In Greenville County, off-duty officers from three law enforcement agencies will patrol schools in defined geographic areas multiple times a day, said Superintendent Burke Royster. Officers on patrol will check both inside and outside the school buildings, monitor school entrances, assess security procedures, and provide a visible law enforcement presence each school day.

The security patrols will be jointly funded by the school district and law enforcement. “While school remains one of the safest locations for young people, we must continually evaluate and enhance school security,” Royster said. The district considered various approaches to add additional security personnel, he said. “We believe our students and staff are best protected by professional, highly trained personnel who can provide both a highly visible deterrent and a timely and appropriate response to any situation.” The daily patrol schedule will vary so routines are not established. To safeguard security, Royster would not release specifics such as the number of officers. School officials said the sole responsibility of the zoned patrols is protection. Services such as investigation of crimes will continue to be provided by the appropriate the law enforcement agency. The school district has school resource officers in all of its middle and high schools. Those officers provide a wide range of law enforcement services, including criminal investigation and building supportive relationships with students.

“For years, Greenville County Schools and the Greenville County Sheriff ’s Office have jointly funded a school enforcement and investigation division, and it is through this already existing management framework that the security patrols will be coordinated,” Royster said. In addition to the school resource officers and zoned security patrols, the district has a comprehensive approach to school safety, the superintendent said. This includes ongoing school safety evaluations, enhancements to building security based on the evaluations, regular lockdown and other safety drills, required visitor sign-in, secure school entries, video monitoring, telephones in classrooms and safety training for staffs. The district also has an email address (safeandsecure@greenville.k12.sc.us) and phone number (452-SAFE) for people to report observed security breaches or to share ideas about enhancing school safety. Threats should be reported to law enforcement or school administrators immediately. Greenville County Schools has a coordinator of safe schools and emergency preparedness, a veteran law enforcement officer with experience in emergency planning. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@ communityjournals.com. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@communityjournals.com.

journal news Lynwood Lybrand spent his first couple weeks in the mortuary business digging graves. Back then he was a hungry college student willing to do anything and, in the 48 years since, this bighearted man has done just about everything.

GreG Beckner / Staff

“One day, my boss asked me to come in wearing a suit,” Lynwood recalls, and thus began a long career – with positions ranging from preplanning specialist to training/ development to funeral director – all focused on providing compassionate care. “I’ve been blessed to be part of this profession for many years. I could retire – but I’m not ready yet!”

By april a. morris | staff

The Poinsett Corridor is losing the vacant, dilapidated Piedmont Shirt Company and gaining space for a potential mixed-use development, recreation amenities and a new streetscape, members of the Poinsett Corridor Revitalization Coalition announced this week. Demolition is set to begin next month on the factory that was constructed in the late 1920s, once employed former Greenville mayor Max Heller, and has been vacant since 1988. The building sits on a 4.27-acre site off of Poinsett Highway. Target Contractors of Mt. Pleasant will begin demolition on Feb. 18 and expects to complete the job by mid-June. Greenville County Redevelopment Authority board chairman David Doser said an announcement on a developer for the site could be coming soon. “If discussions continue at their current pace, we expect to be able to provide details perhaps even before the demolition is completed,” he said. Greenville County council member H.G. “Butch” Kirven said the project sits where the old elements in the area and the city “collide,” and the county has helped to link the county, city and other entities in the revitalization coalition. To even further spur redevelopment, the coalition announced the formation of the Greenville Revitalization Corp., a nonprofit created to provide access to additional redevelopment grants for the Greenville County Redevelopment Authority (GCRA). Martin Livingston, executive director of the GCRA, said the site could yield economic and education opportunities. For example, “it would be a great site for a Green-

ville Tech enterprise campus,” he said. The nonprofit’s board will be headed by Erwin Penland president Joe Erwin and include Clemson University alumni relations director Wil Brasington; Kelley Hendrix Hice, former GCRA board member; David Doser; and Amy Dunn, accountant and member of the GCRA board. The nonprofit will offer the GCRA funding to pursue business and educational opportunities. “Making this corridor great again has got to start with reinvention,” said Erwin during the event. In addition, Greenville Recreation District director Gene Smith announced the purchase of the 31-acre site of the former Washington School on Arcadia Drive to develop recreational opportunities, including possible ball fields and tennis courts, said Smith. A former rail bed could connect the Happy Hearts park and the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail, he said. Furman University president Dr. Rod Smolla said that the university wants the community and their neighbors to be vibrant and prosperous. Furman students and staff participate in service projects, including the recent MLK Day of Service. TreesGreenville, Leadership Greenville and Greenville County will also provide shade trees as part of a streetscape project that will also include a new sidewalk on Hammett Street Extension. Launched in 2011, the Poinsett Corridor Revitalization Coalition seeks to renew the area that once bustled with industry and is a gateway between downtown Greenville and Furman University. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

Lynwood “Sonny” Lybrand Funeral Director

A veteran of the U.S. Army Reserves, Lynwood graduated from Newberry College and the Kentucky School of Mortuary Science. He is active with the Shriners, the Masons and the American Legion. “Everything I do comes from the heart,” Lynwood says. Mackey Mortuary. We are here for you … since 1872.

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A large crowd was on hand for the press conference announcing the demolition of the old Piedmont Shirt factory.

Lynwood – also known as “Sonny” to family and friends – is committed to helping people through life’s most difficult moments. “There’s so much satisfaction in doing something good, something special,” he says.

JANUARY 25, 2013 | the Journal 5

JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Give needy children Sanford’s wishful thinking your voice

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

It’s telling that our former governor gave the first lengthy interview on his congressional comeback plans to the National Review and leaked the very first whiff of the news to CNN. Mark Sanford’s South Carolina constituency has always taken second chair to his national audience. Sanford enters the crowded field for the Lowcountry’s 1st U.S. Congressional District seat with more name recognition than his challengers combined. But the question entrancing the nation is what the name brings to mind, exactly, for those Charleston and Beaufort county voters he wants to “look under the hood” and give him another go. Sanford is undeterred by the 30 percent favorability rating he earned in a statewide poll taken last month. He predicts District 1 voters will be more forgiving. The bigger issue, he told the National Review, “is don’t judge any one person by their best day, don’t judge them by their worst day. Look at the totality, the whole of their life, and make judgments accordingly.” Sanford’s challengers can only hope – in fact, should encourage – District 1 voters to do exactly as he asks. That he plainly expects the review to turn out well reveals how unlikely it is our former governor has reflected on his past mistakes. The worst of those are not, as Sanford seems to believe, his infamous affair with the Argentine woman he now plans to marry, or the related ethics violations that cost him what is still, at $70,000, the largest ethics fine ever in South Carolina. As he says, he is hardly the first politician to divorce his wife or governor to fly firstclass while preaching parsimony at home. However disillusioning and hypocritical these actions proved, they pale beside the apex of Sanford’s misjudgments as South Carolina’s governor: his six-day abandonment of office and the reckless pattern of deceit that accompanied it. Sanford disappeared to Argentina and lied to his staff – and through them, the state – about where he was. No one could reach him. Until he did it, the question of “what next” should a governor go incommunicado and leave the chain of executive authority in question had never surfaced. But the choice was characteristic of the self-indulgent arrogance that transformed every year of Sanford’s tenure as governor into a toxic standoff. Government restructuring, tax reform, cutting redundancy and waste – all were reforms state voters wanted so badly they gave him a second term, even though he frittered away the first one on political theater and whiny news conferences. All either died flaming deaths or moved forward by inches rather than leaps. The lack of progress is no surprise in itself, considering the inherent weakness of the governor’s office in South Carolina. But progress was never really Sanford’s goal, if it meant hosting meetings with Senate committee chairmen or giving up bashing the Legislature on the Glenn Beck Show. For Sanford, it was always theater over consensus, national attention over accomplishment. Defecating piglets in the Statehouse. Vetoes by the hundreds. Brinksmanship over the state’s share of the federal stimulus. As one of (then) 435 U.S. House members, Sanford could play the maverick, vote “no” on every spending bill and enjoy nationwide praise for his vision. In Columbia, the same behavior got 156 of his vetoes overridden in 99 minutes. No wonder he wants to go to Congress again. But our polarized capital needs leaders who know that solving this nation’s daunting challenges demands respectful, true-faith negotiations that recognize finding common ground means neither side gets everything it wants. Honestly: Is that a job that screams “Mark Sanford”?

You know the wonderful feeling you had just a month ago selecting special gifts for people you care about? That feeling could last forever, simply by volunteering as a guardian ad litem. You will give a gift that will last a lifetime. When you become a volunteer guardian ad litem, the child will always remember that you gave her your time and a sense that someone cared about him. The feeling you’ll receive is priceless.  There are so many children in Greenville County who need you to give your time and voice to make a lifetime difference to them. Last year, 702 Greenville County children entered the foster care system due to abuse and neglect. It is hard to imagine that a county that consistently tops many “best of ” lists also boasts some of the highest numbers of child maltreatment in the state. While it’s great to acknowledge the accolades Greenville receives because of its beauty, innovation and vibrancy, we must pause to look below the surface and examine some of our opportunities related to improving the lives of our community’s forgotten children. Are we doing the best we can to advocate for them? Are we even aware of the instances of neglect and physical and sexual abuse throughout the Upstate? Abuse and neglect do not have a permanent address. They take up residence in low-income areas as well as some of the wealthiest neighborhoods.  Some worry that they do not have the expertise to work with children in these types of situations. Many believe that they did not choose the right profession to address a child’s needs or that they simply would not have the right words to say to a youth facing difficult times. The good news is, in starting out as a volunteer guardian ad litem, none of those things really matter. If you are over the age of 21, have a heart for children,

IN MY OWN WORDS by WENDI RODGERS

can dedicate around five hours a month of your time and are willing to commit to 30 hours of free training, then we need you. There is an increasing need for males, African-Americans and Spanishspeaking individuals to join us. Child advocates in South Carolina are passionate about helping and protecting children. Year-round, volunteer guardians ad litem serve as the voice of children who have been abused and neglected in their communities. They stand in the gap, serving as a constant in children’s lives while helping find safe, permanent homes for every child. To guardians, the season of giving takes place every month of the year. They are instrumental in helping to restore and rebuild broken hearts and homes. Their dedication is a gift that keeps on giving, time after time. Be the person that says, “I am for the child.” Resolve to stand up for a child and consider volunteering as a child advocate. Visit www.greenville.scgal.org or call 864-467-5862. The next class begins January 28, 2013. The Cass Elias McCarter Guardian ad Litem Program is a division of the S.C. Governor’s Office of Executive Policy and Programs and a member of the National Court Appointed Special Advocate Association. Wendi Rodgers has a seven-year background in communications and working with emotionally disabled and at-risk youths. She serves as a public awareness coordinator and trainer for the Cass Elias McCarter Guardian ad Litem program and can be reached at wrodgers@oepp.sc.gov.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 25, 2013

JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Dear Editor: President Barack Obama made history in the fight against pancreatic cancer by signing into law the Recalcitrant Cancer Research Act, formerly known as the Pancreatic Cancer Research and Education Act. This bill will require the National Cancer Institute to develop a plan, or scientific framework, for pancreatic cancer research. This means we are one step closer to creating a national strategy for combating pancreatic cancer, developing early detection tools and effective treatments and improving the lives of those affected by this devastating disease. Pancreatic cancer is anticipated to move from the fourth-leading cause of cancer death to the second-leading cause of cancer death by 2020, possibly as early as 2015. Speaking for the thousands who have lost the battle and for those brave people fighting pancreatic cancer today, the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network volunteer group of S.C. thanks everyone who helped us in advocating for this much need legislation. Each and every time you made a phone call, sent an email, spoke to your congressman or senator or updated your Facebook status on this issue, you were an important part of making this day a reality. The family of Josh Worley, and all the other S.C. families who lost loved ones to this terrible disease, sincerely thanks you. Joyce Worley Mauldin, SC Dear Editor, Tommy Stringer’s recent “In My Own Words” column conflating the depravity of man and the remedy for America’s malaise in the wake of the Newtown massacre was flawed in several respects.

January 25

America’s Calvinist and evangelical bent has been the subject of much investigation in recent years, from Mark Noll’s “America’s God” to Dan Williams’ “God’s Own Party.” Williams traces, among other things, the John Birch Society ingredient latent in the current tea party that infected some of the more virtuous aspects of Billy Graham’s America. And Stringer mentioned Graham as one we need again on the current scene. Stringer seems to suggest that with the likes of a Billy Graham, troubled folks wouldn’t get their hands on assault and multi-clip weapons and go shootin’ up political appearances, theatres and elementary schools. The Pulitzer Prize winner Marilynne Robinson has a collection of essays, “The Death of Adam,” a thoroughgoing exploration of, among other bits of America’s character, the depravity of man and the influence of John Calvin on our body politic. She is a much deeper thinker than either Mr. Stringer or Billy Graham. Two years ago she spoke at Furman on a Sunday afternoon. Evidently Mr. Stringer didn’t get out to hear her, and his essay shows no evidence he is familiar with her thought. One of Furman’s grandest alums, Marshall Frady, wrote a 1979 bio of Graham, “A Parable of American Righteousness.” Even more recent is Joe Crespino’s “Strom Thurmond’s America,” which follows this evangelical civic boosterism’s effects on Upstate S.C. as it fleshes out Thurmond’s significance, not only for S.C., but the direction of the Republican party the last 40 years. It is must reading for all folks in the Upstate who take their faith and citizenship as seriously as the likes of Stringer challenge us. Long story short, as the son of a Gaffney minister who pilgrimmed there from 19621978, I have been wrestling with these matters a good bit of my waking hours. And in my 59th year, I find Mr. Stringer’s conclusions very sophomoric, to say the least. Stephen M. Fox, Furman, ’75 Collinsville, Ala.

G H S H e a lt H e d u c at i o n

Open House

Guyology: Just the Facts

Sun., Jan. 27 • 2-4 p.m. • Medical Center Powdersville Tour and meet the staff of this new facility, a collaboration between GHS and Baptist Easley Hospital featuring MD360® urgent care, surgery, orthopaedics, physical therapy, and more. Learn more at medicalcenterpowdersville.org.

Sun., Feb. 10 • 2:30-4:30 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This program for boys in 4th and 5th grade eases the transition into puberty through open discussion. Fee: $50 dad/son. To register, visit the events page at girlology.com.

Dangers of Excessive Sugar Intake Mon., Feb. 4 • 6:30 p.m. • GHS Life Center® Learn how sugar affects the body, read and compare nutrition labels, and identify healthy sugar alternatives. Fee: $10; includes food samples, recipes and handouts. To register, call 455-4001.

Get the Facts on Heart Disease Tues., Feb. 5 • Noon-1 p.m. • Caine Halter Y Find out the signs of heart disease and tests to diagnose heart problems from GHS cardiologist Dev Vaz, MD. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Free blood pressure screenings from 1-3 p.m.

Understanding Integrative Oncology Tues., Feb. 19 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • Greenville Memorial Hospital Learn about integrative oncology and how evidence-based complementary therapies impact cancer care. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/360healthed or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

Preventing Heart Attacks, Strokes & Vascular Disease Sat., Feb. 9 • 11 a.m.-1 p.m. • Embassy Suites GHS clinicians will discuss preventing these conditions. Blood pressure checks and hands-only CPR demonstrations at 10:30 a.m. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. 130034

JANUARY 25, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 7

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Owners may face repercussiOns Humans may never know the definitive reason behind a dog’s actions, but experts and trainers try to determine the cause and offer strategies to help families choose the right dog and prevent dog attacks. According to the Humane Society of the United States’ 2011-2012 National Pet Owners Survey, 78.2 million dogs are now owned in the U.S. and 39 percent of households own at least one dog. Because of their pet’s behavior, some owners face the possibility of surrendering their animal. Shelly Simmons of

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The divisive question of what to do about dangerous dogs surfaced once again in the Upstate after two people were victims of dog attacks in separate incidents this month in Spartanburg and Greenwood counties. One woman, Dreamer Denise Rice, remains hospitalized in fair condition at Spartanburg Regional after being attacked in the early morning hours of Jan. 9 by three dogs, suffering bites to her face, legs, arms and abdomen. Responding public safety officers were reportedly forced to fire at the dogs to end the attack, which occurred on the residential street where Rice lives. One dog was killed by law enforcement in the attack and the other two were taken to the Spartanburg Humane Society and euthanized at the owner’s request. The owner was cited for allowing the animals’ vaccinations to lapse and may face charges associated with the attack, said Jamie Nelson, director of the Spartanburg Environmental Enforcement Department. Meanwhile, in Greenwood County, 65-year-old Betty Todd died of neck and spinal injuries on Jan. 8 after being attacked by a pit bull while she was babysitting her three grandchildren. The dog was later euthanized, leaving law enforcement and the grieving Todd family bewildered as to why a family pet of four years would suddenly become aggressive and inflict harm.

Greenville County Animal Care said that the organization occasionally receives dangerous or aggressive dogs. Greenville County Animal Control brings them in, but some owners also give up their pets because of aggressive behavior. If Animal Care receives an aggressive dog that may have also bitten or attacked a person, staffers evaluate the animal and isolate it until court proceedings, Simmons said. “Sometimes, though, a dog that is labeled as aggressive may not be displaying that behavior while under our care,” she said. “In fact, many dogs labeled ‘aggressive’ or ‘dangerous’ appear to be very friendly to us.” Simmons said a dog may bite or attack out of fear or to show dominance if it is in pain or to protect its food, toys, territory or human family. She said Animal Care took in nearly 10,500 dogs in 2012 and euthanized 321 (roughly 3 percent) for reasons of “aggression or temperament.” The Greenville Humane Society does not accept dogs that are labeled aggressive or dangerous, said Rhonda Lund, assistant manager. The organization recommends owners seek the advice of a professional trainer if their pets show signs of aggression. is breeding destiny? The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) recommends potential pet owners research dog breeds as one way to help prevent bites and aggression. Some breeds once served specific functions for humans such as hunting, guarding or fighting, and “even though pet dogs of these breeds rarely fulfill their original purposes these days, individuals still carry their ancestors’ DNA in their genes,” the agency website says. “That means members of a particular breed might be predisposed to certain types of aggression.” Despite this, it’s neither “accurate nor wise to judge a dog by her breed,” according to the ASPCA. Nonetheless, dog breeds may impact their owners’ rental or homeowners’ insurance policy. Some insurance companies exclude certain breeds from coverage while others offer dog liability insurance that covers everything from bites to a dog knocking someone over and causing injury. A 2001 study published in Vet Med Today tracked the breeds of dogs involved in fatal human attacks between 1979 and 1998, listing pit bull-type dogs and rottweilers as involved in more than half the fatalities during the time period. The authors cautioned, however, against breedspecific legislation due to constitutional

issues and the difficulty in determining a dog’s breed with certainty. “Fatal attacks represent a small proportion of dog bite injuries to humans and, therefore, should not be the primary factor driving public policy concerning

JOURNAL NEWS

LAWS VARY BY LOCATION In addition to providing food and shelter for the animal, owning a dog comes with legal responsibilities. Many municipalities and counties have ordinances that focus on the humane treatment of animals, including dogs and cats. Both Greenville and Spartanburg counties require pet owners to keep animals on their property and abide by ordinances that outline what constitutes mistreatment of animals. County laws also delineate how an animal may be deemed dangerous, usually through court proceedings after an animal has attacked or killed a person or domestic animal. Restraining dogs with chains or tethers is another hot-button issue; some experts maintain that such restraints contribute to aggression. The City of Greenville addressed the practice in November 2012, revising the requirements for tethering an animal. Municipalities in 41 states have breedspecific legislation that outlaws or restricts ownership, according to Dogsbite.org, a dog bite victims’ group. Travelers Rest is one of them, classifying several breeds as a “vicious type of dog,” including rottweilers, Doberman pinschers, pit bulls and chows – or any dogs that look like those breeds – and any dog that exhibits threatening behavior or bites a person. Violators may be fined up to $500 or imprisoned. Francis Allen, director of public works and animal control officer for Travelers Rest, said enforcement is complaint-driven. Residents found to own one of the prohibited breeds will receive a letter requiring them to remove the dog from the city limits within a certain time period, he said. Typically owners are cooperative, but he has encountered some who bring the animals back into the city after being cited. Travelers Rest officials have about four cases associated with the breed-specific law each year, Allen said, adding he has

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

yet to seize an animal in violation of the ordinance. BAD REPUTATION FOR SOME BREEDS The “bully” breeds get a bad rap, says Jasmine Weaver, a former dog breeder and head of Jazzy Pit Bulls Kennel and Rescue. Weaver has been rescuing pit bulls since 2005, taking on up to 10 at a time. She has adopted out approximately 200. “I spend a lot of my time trying to educate people about the dogs,” she said. Pit bulls “are no different from other dogs; they all have teeth. The only difference with a pit bull is that they are stronger because of their muscle mass.” Pit bulls are “very protective and very loyal dogs. And just like any animal, if it’s not properly socialized and trained, it can be aggressive,” Weaver said. Media coverage of pit bull bites contributes to public fear, she said. “Statistics prove that dog bites from pit bulls are not more frequent; they’re actually way less. But the rate of fatality is higher because of the strength of the dog.” Weaver said breed-specific legislation is “biased, it’s prejudiced, it’s racist … To say that one certain kind of dog can’t live here because one bit somebody at some point is ridiculous. One that was not socialized and reacted to a situation should not outline or define an entire breed.” Weaver said she does not know the full situation in the Greenwood attack, but believes the grandmother may have disciplined a child and the dog reacted. “I think something had to have happened with one of the children,” she said. REHAB DIFFICULT BUT POSSIBLE Whether a dog that has been involved in an attack or is showing aggression may be rehabilitated is up for debate among experts. Rehabilitating the animal may be difficult but possible with a “very strong commitment” by the owner, said Simmons of Animal Care. Families face a difficult decision “when their beloved dog starts to show aggressive behavior or after an unfortunate bite incident,” she said. “It is very sad when a family comes into our shelter after making the decision not to rehabilitate the dog, but I do understand and can empathize with their decision. Rehabilitation is just not always an option for some dog owners,” she said. Weaver reports that she has not encountered a rescue dog that exhibited aggression toward people, but all the animals she has taken in were capable of socialization and training. Journal contributing writer Jeanne Putnam contributed to this story. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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dangerous dogs,” the authors wrote.

God, The Source of All comforT The Martha Frances and Elizabeth Morgan Christian Life Series is a ministry to Buncombe Street United Methodist Church and the community. The series offers periodic, short-term sessions on particular topics and is held on Sunday mornings at 10:00 AM. The goal of this four-week class is to help those who are grieving — and those who love them — to find practical ways to cope, and to ultimately look to God as the source of all healing and comfort.

Caring for the Caregiver–Even When it is You 10:00 AM - January 27, 2013 Leader, Kim Atchley

Finding Comfort and Purpose During Trials and Grief 10:00 AM - February 3, 2013 Leader, Jessica Mast

The Nature of Grief

10:00 AM - February 10, 2013 Leader, Amber Blackwell

A Time to Heal: Journaling Our Grief 10:00 AM - February 17, 2013 Leader, Beth Marshall

BuncomBe Street united methodiSt church In Downtown Greenville | www.bsumc.com | 864.232.7341

JANUARY 25, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 9

journal news spartanburgregional.com

News and information from Spartanburg Regional

healthmatters IS THIS AN EMERGENCY?

Medical needs do not always require an emergency center visit. A minor, urgent or immediate care facility is a convenient way for patients to be seen after regular business hours, when your primary care physician’s office is closed. Minor care centers are equipped to care for non-life-threatening problems such as cold, cough, fever, sore throat or flu and related symptoms like dizziness and ear aches. Other conditions include stomach aches, diarrhea or vomiting and suspected fractures or sprains. There are some medical issues that must be treated in an emergency center to ensure you get the best care for your serious symptoms. If you have a severe emergency (like a potential heart attack or stroke), you should always call 911. Other emergency symptoms include difficulty speaking, a head or any injury with a loss of consciousness or seizures, severe burns or deep cuts. It is important that you have a primary care physician who can follow up with you regarding your care. Minor care should not be used as your primary care provider. Spartanburg Regional’s Westside Minor Care at 8311 Warren H. Abernathy Highway, 560-9696, is open Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., and Saturday-Sunday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Visit spartanburgregional.com/Physicians/WestsideMinorCare for more information.

THANK YOUR FAVORITE PHYSICIAN ON DOCTOR’S DAY

The first Doctor’s Day observance was March 30, 1933, in Winder, Georgia. Eudora Brown Almond, wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, decided to set aside a day to honor physicians. Doctor’s Day is now celebrated nationwide. Spartanburg Regional Foundation celebrates Doctor’s Day by accepting donations in honor of local physicians. All donations to the Foundation support health care in our community, so a gift in honor of a physician can be especially meaningful. Visit regionalfoundation.com or call 560-6727 for more information.

TAKE YOUR HEALTH TO HEART As Heart Month, February is an opportunity to make adjustments to your lifestyle to lower your risk of heart disease. The most important health choices you can make to avoid common risk factors are:

• Regular physical activity (at least five 30-minute periods of activity a week) • Do not smoke or use tobacco of any kind • Maintain a healthy weight (a BMI of 24.9 or below) • Manage high cholesterol, high blood pressure and diabetes (have recommended screenings by your physician annually) • Eat a diet rich in vegetables and unprocessed foods (low in fat, cholesterol and salt) For a complimentary plan for prevention of heart disease, please call the Joe R. Utley Heart Resource Center at 864-560-4472. HEART MONTH EVENTS Join us for the following events that promote a heart-healthy lifestyle: ♥ NATIONAL WEAR RED® DAY Friday, February 1 Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States. Wear red to show your support for heart health! ♥ CARDIOVASCULAR AND STROKE RISK SCREENINGS Tuesday, February 5, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursday, February 7, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Heart Wellness Center, 299 Pearl Street Free cardiovascular and stroke risk screenings will be performed by appointment for those currently not under a cardiologist’s care. Please note that fasting lipid panel screening will be from 7:30 a.m.-12 p.m. and carotid artery scans are 7:30 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1-4 p.m. ♥ CPR SATURDAY Saturday, February 9, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Westgate Mall, Costco mall entrance This “CPR for Family and Friends” course is not for a school or job requirement. It is recommended for ages 8 and over. Each participant receives a free t-shirt, while supplies last. Spartanburg Regional will give away an automated external defibrillator (AED) to the church that brings the most participants (based on the percentage of attendance per church membership). ♥ RED SHOE LUNCHEON Tuesday, February 19, 11:30 a.m. First Presbyterian Church, 393 East Main Street Kerri Lindberg, RD, LD, registered dietitian, will speak about what women can do to prevent heart disease. This is a free event, but you must register.

Call 560-7999 to register for any of the Heart Month events. TUNE IN TO DISCOVER HEALTH on WYFF News 4 on Sundays at 12:30 p.m. to learn more about the latest advances in medical care at Spartanburg Regional.

10 THE Journal | JANUARY 25, 2013

You can teach an old dog new tricks By jeANNe PUTNAM | contributor

Matt Snyder has been a trainer and owner of All About K9 Training for nearly 20 years. In the wake of recent dog attacks in the Upstate, he offers advice on how to prevent aggressive behavior in pets.

hoW do you as a trainer deal With aggressiveness in dogs?

We first develop an effective way to communicate with them by teaching them obedience training. Without obedience training we have no effective way to communicate with our dogs. After laying a solid foundation of obedience training, we will then begin to work on the issues at hand. What Would your advice be to oWners if they find their dogs behaving aggressively?

Seek the advice of a professional trainer immediately. There are many types of aggression that your dog could be demonstrating, so leave it to the professionals. The bottom line is: Do not allow the behaviors to fester. Get help immediately. What do you advise oWners to do to make sure their dog knoWs the oWner is in control?

First off, make sure your dog does something for everything that they will receive from you. The easiest thing to do is to get your dog to sit; once they comply, praise them and reward. We consider this the “No Free Lunch Program” because it

MOBILE MAMMOGRAPHY Spartanburg Regional’s mobile mammography unit will be at the following sites on the dates listed below: February 5: Food Lion, 1130 W Cherokee Street, Blacksburg Call 216-5912 to schedule February 7: Family Physicians at 290, 175 East Main Street, Duncan February 27: Inman Family Practice, 12230 Asheville Highway, Inman Call 560-7999 to register except where noted. Mondays, February 5-March 26, 5-7 p.m. Bearden-Josey Center for Breast Health Education Room The Mind-Body Skills Group is an eight-week program where participants will learn the scientific basis for mind-body medicine while experiencing the power of the small-group approach. Call Hunter Mahon at 560-1981 for more information or to register.

We at All About K9 Training believe that training can start as young as eight weeks of age. A puppies’ imprinting period is between eight and 16 weeks of age. During this period, it is very important to safely expose puppies to all sorts of sights, sounds and objects. Doing so will help ensure they will grow up with confidence and strong nerves.

Yes, you can certainly train senior dogs. The only time we consider not training is if the cost would outweigh the pets’ life. We firmly believe that you can teach an old dog new tricks.

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When is the prime age to train a dog?

do you feel that senior dogs can be trained?

journal news

MEDICAL WEIGHT LOSS INFORMATION SESSION Tuesday, February 12, 4-5 p.m. Spartanburg Regional Cafeteria Conference Room This free class covers information about our medical weight loss programs: Rapid Weight Loss, Healthy Lifestyle and 9- or 18-week Optifast®. Call 560-7070 for more information or to register.

WEIGHT LOSS INFORMATION SESSIONS

For more information about training, visit www.allaboutk9.com. teaches the dog that nothing in life is for free. Another good thing to do is to keep all of your dog’s toys up out of sight so they cannot get them on their own. The job for us as the alpha is to loan a toy, not to just give it. Like children with toys, if they are always in sight, they become everyday boring objects. do you feel that dogs that have attacked people can be rehabilitated?

This is a very debatable subject. We categorize our bites and attacks on a scale of one through five, with five being the worst case. When evaluating a case of this nature, it is important to get a very detailed report of the incident to determine what led to the attack. From there, we will evaluate the dog further to determine a possible rehabilitation program. Depending on the case itself, dogs on the lower end of the scale have a good chance for rehabilitation, whereas dogs towards the higher end do not. Any dog attack needs to be taken seriously. All of us can help prevent attacks by socializing our puppies with people and other puppies between eight and 16 weeks of age, as well as educating our children on dog safety.

Wednesday, February 13, 6:30-9 p.m. Regional Outpatient Center, Family Medicine Conference Room This free class covers detailed information about LapBand® surgery. This procedure does not require stapling, cutting or intestinal rerouting and is adjustable. Wednesday, February 20, 6:30-9 p.m. Regional Outpatient Center, Family Medicine Conference Room This free class covers detailed information about gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy surgeries. Register online at spartanburgweightloss.com or call 560-7070 for more information on any of our weight loss procedures.

LOOK GOOD...FEEL BETTER Monday, February 11, 12-2 p.m. Gibbs Cancer Center Auditorium This free makeover program for cancer patients is held the second Monday of each month. It is open to all women receiving chemotherapy, radiation or other forms of treatment. The goal of the program is to help women manage the appearance-related side effects of cancer treatment. Register at gibbscancercenter.com.

CENTER FOR WOMEN MATERNITY TOUR Tuesday, February 19, 5:45-6:45 p.m. Information Desk, Montgomery Tower A guided tour of our labor, delivery and post-partum areas eases stress on the day of the delivery by allowing you to become familiar with the hospital, parking and waiting areas. If regularly scheduled tours do not meet your schedule, please call Colleen Gilmore at 560-2294. Register online.

Online registration and event details are available at spartanburgregional.com or by calling 864-560-7999.

Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

JANUARY 25, 2013 | the Journal 11

journal news

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Clemson President Jim Barker begins rehab By Cindy Landrum | staff

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Clemson University President Jim Barker has begun rehabilitation after undergoing emergency heart surgery one week ago. Barker sent an email to the Clemson community on Monday telling them he was up and walking at Greenville Memorial Hospital Sunday, two days after he had quintuple coronary artery bypass surgery. Provost Dori Helms is acting as Clemson’s president while Barker recovers, a move approved by Clemson University trustees the day of Barker’s surgery. “I was able to walk a lap around the ICU yesterday!” said the email sent to Clemson students, faculty, staff and supporters. Doctors discovered the blockages last Thursday. Barker was originally slated to have three bypasses, but ended up having five. “The doctors are pleased with my progress, but they advise that it will take some time to heal. I am beginning my rehab work, and I plan to give it my best,” wrote Barker, who is 65 years old. Visitation was limited to family, and Barker said he’d send another email after he is discharged from the hospital. Bypass surgery is the most common heart surgery. More than 400,000 are performed each year in the United States, according to the

Clemson University President Jim Barker is recovering from emergency heart surgery.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Coronary artery bypass surgery involves sewing a section of vein from the leg or another part of the body to bypass a part of a diseased coronary artery, creating a new route for blood to flow. Barker, who was named Clemson president in 2009, received hundreds of well wishes on a page set up on the Clemson University website. “The well wishes, prayers and encouragement mean everything to us,” Barker wrote. “I’m looking forward to returning to TigerTown. Until then, Mac’s and Mookie are holding down the fort at the President’s Home.” Mac’s and Mookie are the Barkers’ dogs. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@ communityjournals.com.

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journal news

Simpsonville official responds to ousted chief’s grievance By JEANNE putNAm | contributor

The saga over the firing of ousted Simpsonville Police Chief Keith Grounsell took another turn this week as City Administrator Russell Hawes released a statement on Jan. 22 addressing Grounsell’s 50-page grievance letter. In his response, the city administrator said Grounsell is not entitled to file a grievance since the former chief was still in his probationary period when he was let go. Nonetheless, Hawes chose to address several issues raised in the 24page letter. Howell said Grounsell acknowledged in his grievance letter that Grounsell had a conversation with a person not employed by the city regarding a confi-

dential meeting at City Hall. This conversation constituted “a violation on the confidence placed in you by the City of Simpsonville,” Hawes wrote. In addition, Hawes asserted that Grounsell recognized that a vital part of his job was the ability to work with the City Council, city administrator and human resources director. However, upon reviewing Grounsell’s grievance, “even a cursory review of your Jan. 7 document reveals where you complain bitterly about the actions of the city administrator, the incompetence of the HR director, and question the intelligence of City Council members,” Hawes wrote. In conclusion, Hawes wrote that despite the fact Grounsell was ineligible for the grievance process as a probationary employee, “even if you were en-

titled to file a grievance, it would have been denied.” Following another packed Simpsonville City Council meeting Jan. 22, Grounsell said he was told by letter shortly after his termination that he was allowed to file a grievance, even in his probationary period. “The Termination Action form the city signed and sent me three days after my termination clearly said you have rights under the Employee Grievance and Appeal Procedure,” he said. Grounsell said he followed the instructions provided in the letter and now is being told the opposite. Grounsell said he firmly believes he would be reinstated if he could have a public hearing and present “all of the facts.” He said his top two objectives

now are “to clean the city up” and get his job back. Grounsell was sworn in as chief on Sept. 18, replacing Charles Reece. He completed the Criminal Justice Academy on Dec. 21 before being fired on Dec. 28. Grounsell claimed he was not allowed to discipline former Assistant Police Chief Colleen O’Neil over an alleged relationship with Fire Chief Wesley Williams and stated this was the reason behind his firing. Simpsonville City Council said Grounsell was “not a good fit” for the town. O’Neil stepped down earlier this month and Williams was reinstated by City Council. Contact Jeanne Putnam at jputnam@communityjournals.com.

SC House District 17 seat candidates headed for a runoff Feb. 5 Mike Burns and Chris Sullivan emerge as frontrunners By April A. morris | staff

In a field of five candidates for the South Carolina House of Representatives seat representing District 17, two candidates emerged as front-runners following Tuesday’s primary election: restaurant owner and businessman Mike Burns will face off against Chris Sullivan, owner of Burns a public relations firm. The two will be on the ballot for a runoff election on Tuesday, Feb. 5. In unofficial results, Burns came away from the contest with 49.96 percent of the vote, just narrowly missing winning the primary outright by eight votes, said Conway Belangia, Greenville County’s director of elections and voter registration. Chris Sullivan captured Sullivan 39.19 percent of the vote. Mike Burns said he was pleased with the turnout on Tuesday and will continue to gain more votes before the runoff. “We’re going to continue door-to-door visits –

14 THE Journal | JANUARY 25, 2013

we’ve burned a lot of shoe leather and will keep going.” He said he appreciated the constructive tone of the campaign and candidates. “There was a lot of energy in the campaign – all positive.” Sullivan could not be reached for comment. The primary slate also included third-year law student Roy Harmon, chiropractor Tom Kolarik and retired farmer Randall Young. In unofficial results, Harmon came away with 6.41 percent of the vote, Kolarik with 3.36 percent and Young with 1.08 percent, according to Belangia. A total of 2,242 voters cast ballots in the special election primary – a roughly 10 percent turnout – which Belangia called “a decent turnout for a special primary.” He said there are approximately 20,000 voters in district 17, which encompasses much of northern Greenville County, including Tigerville, SlaterMarietta and Travelers Rest. Several polling places typically located at school sites were moved because school was in session. School administrators, parents and poll workers had requested the change because of security concerns, Belangia said. Despite the relocation, voters did not have difficulty, he said. One issue was that the new Tigerville polling place listed on the voters’ notification letters had an incorrect ZIP code: Taylors instead of Travelers Rest. Several voters reported that when they searched the address on the Internet, it gave them directions to the far side of Taylors instead of to the Tigerville Fire Station, Belangia said. The special election is a result of S.C. Representative Tom Corbin relinquishing the seat after winning both reelection and an S.C. Senate seat in the Nov. 2012 election.

SC House of Representatives District 17 Special Election unoffiCial RESultS fRom gREEnvillE County ElECtion CommiSSion

Mike Burns

1,114

49.96%

Chris Sullivan

874

39.19%

Roy Harmon

143

6.41%

Tom Kolarik

75

3.36%

Randall Young

24

1.08%

This is the first election in the Upstate and the first state contest that was subject to the new state voter ID law, said Belangia. Voters were required to show a driver’s license, S.C. Department of Motor Vehicles ID card, S.C. voter registration card with photo, federal military ID or U.S. passport in order to cast a ballot. The first contest under the new law was a municipal special election in the town of Branchville in Orangeburg County on Jan. 8. There were a total of five provisional ballots cast in the district 17 special election; three were the result of ID issues, said Belangia. One was a 100-year-old resident who did not have correct ID. Two other provisional ballots were cast because of issues with confirming the voters’ registration. The provisional ballots were reviewed on Thursday, he said. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

JoURNAl commUNitY

Search: Things To Do

Lunch & Learn History… If Gen. Daniel Morgan could talk to us today, what would he say? Historian Dr. George Fields will re-enact this local war hero on Friday, Jan. 25, at 12:30 p.m. at Chapman Cultural Center. Thanks to Spartanburg Regional History Museum, we can learn more about our past. $5. Bring your lunch, if you like. Tarleton Blackwell Art Exhibit… Spartanburg Art Museum presents an extensive collection of this living artist’s work through Feb. 16. Very South Carolina, very southern, very big and colorful. Iconic mural-size collages. Who knew pigs were so important? Mary Ellen Suitt art exhibit… Spartanburg Art Museum presents Mary Ellen Suitt: A Retrospect. Trace the life work of one of Spartanburg’s own, including the “blue people” series that made her famous. Ends Feb. 16. Doug McAbee art exhibit… Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg presents The One About Pop, a 2- and 3-D exhibit in honor of the artist’s father. On the surface, the surreal drawings and bright sculptures look whimsical, but look a little deeper for things a bit darker. Ends Jan. 29.

Solutions for

SoldierS

New group to assist returning military personnel By leigh savage | contributor

Staff Sgt. Charlie Pannell returned to Anderson after three tours in Iraq and more than 100 surgeries, and he needed some help. He didn’t have a VA rating, so he couldn’t draw active-duty pay or receive disability assistance, and therefore he couldn’t close on a house. Then he found Maj. Charlie Hall, a volunteer coordinator for Upstate Warrior Solution, a new organization dedicated to assisting veterans as they make the transition from being in the military to being back home. “We’ve found that the place to take care of veterans is right in the community,” Hall said. “We have a wealth of nonprofits, medi-

“[He’s] a one-stop shop. He is not for one specific thing. He knows all the ropes. If he can’t do it, he’ll find someone who can.” Veteran Charlie Pannell (right), about the assistance he has received from Maj. Hall with Upstate Warrior Solution

cal facilities and clinics, but people coming home don’t necessarily have the tools or the inclination to navigate all of the resources.” SOLUTIONS continued on page 16

The Rep’s 25th Gala… For 25 years, The Spartanburg Repertory Company has sung for us. Now it’s time to celebrate the past and look ahead. Get your tickets to this Gala—Saturday, Jan. 26, 7:30 p.m.—to enjoy the music of Daryle Ryce, Rebecca Turner and many more. Have a little cheese and wine. Call 489-9299. Live & Free Music on Sundays… Chapman is now open on Sundays, and starting Jan. 27, we’ll have free and live music. We kick off with Sydney McMath, local singer/songwriter performing contemporary piano and guitar. Have a cultural Sunday afternoon, 1-5 p.m. Les Mis Concert… Did you see the play? The current movie? Now hear the music to Les Miserables, performed by Spartanburg High School Chamber Orchestra. This free concert will be Monday, Jan. 28, at 7 p.m. Music Sandwiched In… The Music Foundation of Spartanburg presents Kathleen Foster and Allison Moore performing the 20th Century Cello Sonatas at Music Sandwiched In, Wednesday, Jan. 30, at 12:15 p.m. at the Main Library downtown. This is a free concert. Bring your lunch or buy one there. Laugh for a Child… For a good time and better teeth, join the happy and smiling people at Laugh for a Child, a comedy show that raises money for local children’s dentistry. Back by popular demand, the Killer Beaz. Thursday, Jan. 31, at 7 p.m. Call 592-4696.

542-ARTS ChapmanCulturalCenter.org 200 E. Saint John St. Spartanburg

JANUARY 25, 2013 | The Journal 15

journal community SOLUTIONS continued from page 15

Upstate Warrior Solution is not intended to provide programs, but to be a clearinghouse for the information veterans need, Hall said. While the Department of Veterans Affairs tends to focus on health care, the collaborative new organization will point clients to local resources that can assist with housing, education, job assistance and social connections. Hall, who also works with the Marine Corps’ Wounded Warrior regiment, said the program is modeled after the Charlotte Bridge Home and the Augusta Warrior Project, both of which have been operating for several years.

Veteran Nate Moore, center, with fellow soldiers Smallwood, left, and Henderson in Barwana, Iraq.

“We’ve been working together to share best practices and work together on strategic alliances,” Hall said. The idea for the organization came up about two years ago when Hall and several other veterans were

discussing ways they could improve the lives of those returning from service. Maj. General Mastin Robeson, who served in the military for 36 years before retiring in 2010, was part of the original brainstorming sessions and became

chairman of Upstate Warrior Solution.   “There are several hundred organizations out there that do great work,” Robeson said. “What we don’t want to do is duplicate any of those projects. The intent is to say, ‘We will navigate through the red tape and find organizations that will help you.’” For Pannell, an Army veteran who received multiple injuries while under grenade fire in Iraq, it was this ability to cut through the red tape that was beneficial. Maj. Hall was “a one-stop shop,” Pannell said. “He is not for one specific thing. He knows all the ropes. If he can’t do it, he’ll find someone who can.” He said it was “taking forever to get my VA rating so I could be discharged, and he got it done sooner so I could get a house to move into.” Pannell, an above-the-knee amputee, is married with two children, including a son born last week. In addition, Hall helped set up a free vacation to Seabrook Island for the Pannells, and organized lunches, hunting trips and other events that gather veterans together to hear each other’s stories. “It helps, because your old friends

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Veterans Charlie Pannell, left, and Nate Moore have received help through the Upstate Warrior Solution.

don’t understand, but these are people who have been through the same stuff you have,” Pannell said. “ It’s the camaraderie of the brotherhood of military people.” One friend he met is Nate Moore, who served in Iraq and Afghanistan with the Marines. Moore suffered four concussions in 20 hours during combat, and has suffered traumatic brain injury as well as post-traumatic stress disorder. While he’s received treatment and made great progress, he said some returning military personnel don’t get the care they need and don’t know where to turn. Upstate Warrior Solution “can do a basic needs assessment and go from there,” he said. A friend of Moore’s was trying to cope with PTSD through drinking, and Upstate Warrior Solution helped steer him to a treatment facility, Moore said. Through the organization, Moore was able to find a paid internship with Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital, and he looks forward to helping returning soldiers in the same way others helped him. Though the organization is still in its early stages, organizers set up a website at www.upstatewarriorsolution.com and have been seeking volunteers as well as veterans in need of assistance. Upstate Warrior Solution will also receive financial assistance from A Hero’s 5K Run and Walk, which will be held Feb. 2 at Furman University. “We’re hoping to have some veteran families out at the race available to meet with people,” Hall said. The organization has no paid staff and is currently volunteer-only, he said, so all funds raised go directly to veterans in need.

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JANUARY 25, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 17

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Raven Magwood inspires others, and now she’s ready to tackle Hollywood By april a. morris | staff

Raven Magwood is accustomed to reaching for lofty goals. She’s authored several books and garnered accolades in gymnastics and track and field, not to mention hosting a television show. And at 19 years old, she finished her communications and writing degree at Clemson University. Magwood, who just celebrated a birthday, said she is ready to take on her next challenge: full-time speaking and writing. She authored her first book at 11

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A young Raven Magwood with some of the trophies and medals she won as a gymnast.

years old when friends and family suggested that she document her journey from a 5-year-old beginner to a level-10 gymnast (just short of Olympic-level) at 10 years old. She went all the way to the 2004 USAIGC National Gymnastics Championships. Magwood penned her first book, “On to Victory!” and not only included the successes, but the challenges she faced along the way. “I had three surgeries that sidelined me from the sport, I had chronic knee pain, I had negative people who told me I wouldn’t be successful in my life. I put that in a book to help other kids who were trying to reach their goals as well,” she said. Gymnastics practice consumed up to four hours each day, so Magwood looked for another athletic outlet that would allow her to continue to speak to groups, landing on track and field. There she also won multiple competitions and accolades. At 12 years old, Magwood spoke at a conference hosted by Steadman Graham after being contacted about her first book. Soon she was invited to speak to multiple groups about her story. Once, after speaking at a church service, Magwood said a man came up afterward and told her he had been planning to take his own life, but after hearing her speech, he changed his mind. “From that point, I said to myself that this is what I wanted to do with my life. I wanted to inspire people and I wanted to touch people. I realized that speaking was a way I could do that,” she said. Since then, she’s graduated high school early and started college at 16, written “Double-Sided,” a novel, and another inspirational book, “The 7 Practices of Exceptional Student Athletes.”

Years before she became a poised public speaker and athlete, Magwood said she was a shy child. Athletic performances and public speaking engagements brought her out of her shell, she said. Just as she tells students she talks with, the three Ds she outlined in her first book – dedication, determination and discipline – help her reach her life goals. Magwood is now waiting to learn where the movie will be filmed and will be on the set – she’ll be listed as a co-producer. She is willing to live temporarily wherever filming will happen, but is not making plans to relocate to Los Angeles, she said.

Raven Magwood

Though this is her first film screenplay, Magwood is no stranger to a smaller screen. She took a year and a half off between high school and college to work on the locally broadcast “Raven Magwood Show.” Magwood was in charge of finding guests, including Dr. Alveda King (niece of Martin Luther King Jr.) and an “American Idol” competitor, she said.

While she awaits news on the film, Raven Magwood is scheduling speaking engagements and spending time writing. She’s busy working on a new film screenplay idea, not to mention a television miniseries. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@communityjournals.com.

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“Double-Sided” has led her into new territory: screenwriting. “So many people told me that they could see it as a movie, so I wrote it,” she said. Magwood didn’t take a course in screenwriting at Clemson; she simply researched and wrote. “It’s one of those things where Google comes in handy,” she said. Just a few months ago, Magwood learned that a production company wants to produce the film. She didn’t have to pitch or shop the screenplay around, but met company representatives when they were being interviewed on the same television show as Magwood.

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Helping student vets Clemson launches Student Veterans Success Center and GI Help Desk By CASEY DARGAN | contributor

Clemson University recently opened a new office to aid returning veterans in their transition back into civilian society. The university’s Student Veterans Association cut the ribbon for the Student Veterans Success Center and GI Bill Help Desk in Barre Hall. Clemson University president James Barker predicted the center “will be the kind of thing where a veteran couldn’t imagine their Clemson experience without this.” The decision for this addition to Clemson’s campus was based on a push from the Student Veterans of America (SVA). “Institutions of higher learning, colleges and university campuses like Clemson play a critical role when military veterans make that transition from combat to college,” said Michael Dakduk, national SVA executive director. Since the Post-9/11 GI Bill, there have been an increased number of military veterans on college campuses across the nation. Clemson currently has around 200 veterans enrolled. The Clemson SVA is one of 700 chapters devoted to student veterans; nationwide, SVA has more than 21,000 members. Other institutions such as Baylor, California State and Florida State have also opened SVA Success Centers. Returning veterans face many complications when enrolling in college. “They’re non-traditional students,

some of them are married, some of them have families, and it’s very difficult to juggle all of that while also trying to integrate into a whole different setting,” said David Thompson, president of Clemson’s Student Veterans Association. The Student Veterans Success Center will serve to help veterans complete GI Bill paperwork, deal with the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs and adjust to a new civilian lifestyle, and will serve as a support network for student veterans. “In the military, we’re used to having each other’s backs,” Thompson said. “This is one way we can help other student veterans; we feel like it’s our duty.” Volunteers from the Student Veterans of America typically staff the Student Veterans Success Centers, upholding their duty to help fellow soldiers and veterans. The 30 members of Clemson’s Student Veterans Association chapter will volunteer in the new office. The new center also promises to attract new student veterans who would benefit from the resources, supporters say. Dakduk said he hopes that all college and university campuses will begin offering these programs. He aims to “take these best practices and spread them to other colleges and universities throughout the country [and] institutionalize these programs and resources.” Thompson said veteran advocates were excited about the new on-campus programs and resources, but also promised that more is in store for the future. “We are not done,” he said. “Opening this office is just the first step in providing the resources to help student veterans at Clemson be successful.” Contact Casey Dargan at cdargan@communityjournals.com.

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The Greenville Regional Workforce Collaborative is expanding its CareerSkillsNow program into West Greenville communities with the help of grants from Bank of America and the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation. Unemployment is high in the West Greenville area, with pockets having rates as high as 48 percent, said Lillian Brock Fleming, Greenville City Council member. The December unemployment rate in the county as a whole was 6.8 percent. CareerSkillsNow, a collaborative workforce training program, was initiated in 2011, said John Baker, executive director of Greenville Works. Since the program began late that year, it has trained more than 120 people in advanced skills. About 75 percent of the candidates have found employment or continued to increase their skills. The goal for 2013 is to train between 150 and 200 people for jobs that are available but demand higher skills, he said. Bank of America donated $10,000 to the program to expand, particularly in the West Greenville area, he said. Also, the Babcock Foundation donated $100,000 to the program. In conversations with business and government leaders, clients and others, Bank of America kept hearing the same issue arise: “The bottom line is jobs affected everybody,” said Brian Jones, market president. “This is something that has widespread impact for families, businesses small and large on many levels and the county as a whole.” Yvonne Reeder, president of the Nicholtown Neighborhood Association, said, “There’s a great need. People who are living in poverty live daily with depression. This program comes into the community and helps people understand there is hope, there is a process. It’s an open door.” She called on the community to ensure that those who need the help participate in it. Fleming agreed, saying, “This is an exciting partnership that will have a significant impact on the future of our

community and its residents.” CareerSkillsNow was developed by a collaborative of public, private and nonprofit partners. It provides career coaching services to low- to moderateincome candidates who seek employment in the region’s advanced manufacturing industry. “Employers tell us the vast majority of the region’s unemployed and underemployed don’t have the skills that match the jobs available,” Baker said. The program provides intensive case management and multiple tiers of training, he said, and offers supportive services through the various partners. It also has begun a work experience section that allows candidates to be trained and gain paid experience during that training period. Candidates are required to have a high school diploma or a GED, a silver rank on three WorkKeys sectors and pass a drug test and a background check, Baker said. The last element to be considered is that the candidates must have a desire to be in the program. Baker encouraged candidates who don’t meet all the criteria to apply and find help in reaching those criteria. “This isn’t a simple or easy thing we’re doing. It’s an opportunity, but it’s not easy,” he said. The collaborative’s training program, however, is not the end, he said. “We help get jobs. But the ultimate goal is for them (the candidates) to get the job after that.” “Collaboration at all levels is the key driver of the program,” said Ted Hendry, president of United Way of Greenville County. “We are grateful to our newest funding partners for showing their commitment to strengthen Greenville County as a whole.” CareerSkillsNow information sessions are scheduled Jan. 29 at noon at West Greenville Community Center, Jan. 31 at 12:30 p.m. at Sterling Hope Community Center, Feb. 7 at 6 p.m. at the Hughes Main Library and Feb. 13 and 21 at 10 a.m. at the West Greenville Community Center. For more information or to apply for the program, visit www.CareerSkillsNow.com. Contact Jenny Munro at jmunro@communityjournals.com.

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Travelers Rest is finalist for ‘Coolest Small Town’ Budget Travel magazine touts Swamp Rabbit Trail, bustling downtown By Cindy Landrum | staff

There’s no resting in Travelers Rest, especially when it comes to work to revitalize its downtown. That downtown revitalization work – along with the Swamp Rabbit Trail – is one reason Travelers Rest has been named a finalist for Budget Travel magazine’s Coolest Small Towns. “It’s ironic: in Travelers Rest – a town whose unusual name came from the inns and taverns that served as stopping points for pioneer-era settlers and cattle drovers trekking through the area – resting is likely to be the last thing on the agenda,” said the magazine’s description of the town. Travelers Rest, with a population of 4,576, sits on the foot of the Blue Ridge, nestled among state parks. The magazine touts that fortunate locale as well as the Swamp Rabbit Trail, the 13.5-milelong bike path built on a former railroad track

that connects the town with Greenville. “The flat trail draws avid cyclists as well as families, helping this small town thrive even through the economic downturn. A bustling downtown, the result of a dedicated revitalization effort, boasts antique shops, coffee houses, and excellent BBQ, chicken and waffle joints,” said the magazine in its online description. Since the trail opened and a downtown renovation was completed three years ago, at least 20 new businesses have opened on or near Main Street. The downtown renovation, which sparked controversy when it was first proposed, narrowed Highway 276 from four lanes to three from U.S. 25 to Poinsett Highway. New streetlights and landscaping were installed and a small park built. The idea was to make the city a place motorists would drive to, not just through, city officials said. The work isn’t complete: The city wants to eventually improve the non-Swamp Rabbit Trail side of Main Street as well as extend the revi-

talization project to Poinsett Highway, Center Street and State Park Road. Towns and cities must have a population under 10,000 to be considered for the “Coolest Small Town” award. They also need an “indescribable something,” according to the magazine. “In other words, cool doesn’t necessarily mean quaint,” the magazine wrote in its rules. “We want towns with an edge and a heart.” Other finalists are Bay St. Louis, Mo.; Camden, Maine; Elkhart Lake, Wis.; Flagler Beach, Fla.; Glenwood Springs, Colo.; Greenville, Ky.; Gulf Shores, Ala.; LeClaire, Iowa; Lititz, Pa.; Mount Carroll, Ill.; Put-in-Bay, Ohio; Quincy, Calif.; Shepherdstown, W.V. and Watkins Glen, N.Y. There were 924 towns nominated. Travelers Rest fans have 21 days left to vote for the “Coolest Small Town” at www.budgettravel. com. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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oUR commUNitY

community news, events and happenings

Paris Mountain State Park will hold a birding program and Winter Walk on Jan. 26. “Winter Birds of the Upstate” will feature Jeff Click of the Greenville County Bird Club from 10 a.m. to noon. The event includes a short lesson, followed by an excursion to identify birds. No registration or fee is required to attend. The Winter Walk will be led by Interpretive Ranger Cathy Taylor at 1 p.m. Admission is $5. Registration is required and all ages are welcome. To register, call 864-244-5565. For more information, visit www.southcarolinaparks.com or www.pmspf.org. Diane Nash, a civil rights champion who helped organize the Freedom Riders, will speak Jan. 29 at 7 p.m. at Furman University. A reception and book signing will follow at 8 p.m. The event is part of Furman’s celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Nash’s talk, “Freedom Riders: A Journey for Justice,” is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.furman.edu/MLK, call 864-294-3104 or email idella.glenn@furman.edu. nash Greenville In Harmony Women’s Show Chorus is hosting a Global Open House on Jan. 29, at 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Mauldin. Those interested are invited for a night of music and an opportunity to experience barbershop harmony. For more information, visit www.greenvilleinharmony.com. The Girl Scout Cookie Program’s door-to-door sales are currently going on and will end Jan. 27. The sales dates at retail locations will be weekends Feb. 22-Mar. 17. Cookies will be $3.50 per box. For more information, visit www.GSSCcookies.org. The Annual Upstate SC Boat Show will be held through Jan. 27 at the TD Convention Center and will feature recreational boats, fishing boats, ski boats, personal

watercraft and antique boats. Hours are Friday, noon-9 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Sunday, noon- 6 p.m. Ticket prices are $6-$7 and children 6 and younger are free. For more information, visit www.upstatescboatshow.com. The Upcountry History Museum is hosting two special free programs for Black History Month. One is a hands-on genealogy workshop with historian and genealogy expert Ruth Ann Butler of the Greenville Cultural Exchange Center. The workshop will be held on Feb. 2, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Attendees are advised to bring a laptop. To reserve a spot or for more information, call 864-467-3100. The Upcountry History Museum is also hosting a screening of the Emmy award-winning documentary “Eyes on the Prize.” The screening will be held on Feb. 16, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Feb. 17, 1 to 5 p.m. The SC Botanical Garden’s Hunt Cabin Open House on Feb. 2, noon-4 p.m., will celebrate black history. The event will explore the rich cultural history of African-Americans on Southern life. Through hands-on projects, participants explore the everyday lives of AfricanAmericans who grew cash crops. In addition, “Chocolate: Seed to Sweet” will be on Feb. 8, 3:30-5:30 p.m. at the Hanson Nature Center. The program will explore where chocolate comes from and allow participants to make goodies. Registration is required at least three days in advance and cost is $6. Visit www.clemson.edu/public/scbg for more information. Greenville Chautauqua will present Benedict Arnold as part of “American Legends.” Benedict Arnold, the historical turncoat, will be played by Ken Johnston at Wade Hampton High School on Feb. 9 and Feb. 10 from 2-3:30 p.m. The show is interactive and will give the audience the opportunity to see Arnold as both villain and hero. Admission is free. For more information, visit www.greenvillechautauqua.org. First Presbyterian Church will hold their third annual “Anything Goes” fundraiser on Feb. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at The Block. The program will include a variety of acts, both serious and funny. Admission is $5 per person and all money goes to the children’s group for activities and their annual summer trip. Charleston Cooks will offer Valentine’s-inspired cooking classes beginning Feb 9. Classes range from 12 to 30 people. A class on Valentine’s Brunch will be offered Feb. 9 and Feb. 16 at 10 a.m. They will also offer a class on making dinner for two, called “Couples Night, Be My Valentine.” This class will be held Feb. 13 and Feb. 16 at 6:30 p.m. To register for classes or for more information, visit www.charlestoncooks.com. Preschool children can celebrate Valentine’s Day at Fiction Addiction with a story time reading of the picture book “Who Needs Love?” by Elise Primavera on Feb. 14 at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 864-675-0540. PFAFF Sewing Company has announced the November finalist for the “World’s Most Creative Sewer” contest: Greenville local Susan Dunnavent. The yearlong competition began in May to celebrate the brand’s 150th anniversary. Each month has a new finalist and the winner of the contest will be revealed Feb. 18. For more information or to view the submissions, visit www.pfaff140anniversary.com. The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control will be accepting applications for its All-Health Team 2013 season until Feb. 15. The All-Health team, established in 2003, recognizes and rewards youth and their leaders for outstanding efforts to promote eating healthy and being active. As many as 12 winners will be awarded. For more information, visit www.sdhec.gov/allhealth or call 803-545-4501. Hospice of the Upstate is offering comprehensive patient-care volunteer training. The sessions are scheduled for Feb. 18 and Feb. 20, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and will be held in the Lyons Conference Room at Hospice of the Upstate. Both sessions are required for those interested in patient care. People interested in office and special projects only need to attend the first session. For more information or to sign up, contact Sunny Wells at 864-328-1945.

22 THE Journal | JANUARY 25, 2013

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oUR schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Blake Tollison recently received the Clemson Faculty Scholarship Award, which is given to students who graduate from Clemson with a 4.0 cumulative GPA. Tollison, son of Dr. Michael Tollison and Cheryl Tollison, is a 2009 graduate of Riverside High School. He will attend the College of Dental Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. Anna Fox and Jack Jopling were Greenville Middle Academy’s Re- tollison flections winners. Fox’s literature entry was selected as the district winner for middle school students and Jopling’s photograph was chosen as the top entry in the middle school photography division at the PTA Council level. Both entries will now be judged at the state level. The Southside High School Forensic Team recently earned an overall first place school win at the 2013 Laird Lewis National Speech and Debate Invitational at Myers Park High School in Charlotte, N.C. Jalen Gray and Branden Lindsay finished in the top 10 for the Individual Student Sweepstakes award. Other team members recognized were William Thompson and Dylan Hooper (champions, Impromptu Duet Acting); Branden Lindsay and Jalen Gray (champions, Duo Interpretation); Victorio Cabrera (champion, Varsity Congress and Best Preliminary Presiding Officer, Varsity Congress); Alexis Tabb (Best Finals Presiding Officer, Varsity Congress); Max Parsons and Vineeth Sama (champions, Novice Public Forum Debate); and Branden Lindsay (champion, Dramatic Interpretation).   The USC Upstate/BMW Manufacturing Academic Chandler Creek Elementary’s student council Outreach Camp will introduce sponsored a Celebrate Diversity Art Contest. students to exciting and realWinners were Haley Kieran, Darius Johnson, Will world applications of mathJames and Alexandra Murillo. ematics, statistics and physics. In addition, their teamwork and leadership skills will be honed and improved. The camp is open to rising high school seniors in Greenville or Spartanburg counties and will be held June 10-14 and June 17-21. Deadline to apply is March 1. For more information, visit www. uscupstate.edu/bmwcamp.

St. Anthony’s School students in third through sixth grade participated in an arts and social studies infusion workshop with local artist Ron Zimmerman. Zimmerman, an art instructor with the Spartanburg Museum of Art, worked with the students on drawing techniques. This ongoing arts infusion project at St. Anthony’s School is underwritten with grants from the Metropolitan Arts Council, the NAESP and Crayola.

Blue Ridge Christian Academy’s drama team will perform Euripedes’ “Medea” at Outreach Church, 2414 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, on Jan. 26 at 7 p.m. Seating is limited and tickets must be reserved. Tickets can be purchased at the BRCA school office, or at 864-895-9008. Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for students for the performance and dinner; or $5 or $2.50 for performance only. Dinner is served at 6:15 p.m. Submit entries to: Community Journals, Our Schools, 148 River Street, Ste. 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or email: community@communityjournals.com

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Southside Christian School will host an Open House and campus tour for parents of students from age 2 years through 12th grade on Jan. 25, Feb. 1 and Feb. 22, beginning at 9 a.m. Anyone interested in learning more about the school is invited to attend.

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The South Carolina State Museum will send one lucky South Carolina school class to its new blockbuster exhibit, “Secrets of the Maya,” for free. Teachers can enter at www.facebook.com/scstatemuseum until Feb. 6 at midnight for a chance to win. Facebook voters will select the winning South Carolina class between Feb. 27 and midnight Mar. 13 by voting once per day. “Secrets of the Maya” is open to the public through June 9. Admission is $15 for adults, $13 for senior citizens and $11 for ages 3-12, and includes general museum admission. South Carolina students in groups are admitted for $5. For more information, visit www.southcarolinastatemuseum.org.

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St. Anthony’s School will host an open house for admissions (grades K3-6) on Jan. 29, 5-7 p.m. Prospective families will have the opportunity to learn more about the school and the new building, pick up applications, and meet teachers and staff. Call 864-271-0167 for more information. J92

JANUARY 25, 2013 | The Journal 23

journal community

the good

events that make our community better

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate will be hosting the 13th Annual Chocolate Soiree on  Mar. 14  at the Poinsett Club in Greenville. The event will start at 6:30 p.m. and will feature a live auction, a tombola prize wall and music by special guest DJ Rootz. The Chocolate Soiree is the premiere fundraising event for The Children’s Museum of the Upstate and features local top chefs competing with their very own chocolate creations. The Chocolate Soiree will also launch the “Find the Purple Ticket” promotion, a Willy Wonka-style hunt for a “purple” ticket. The event will be selling Chocolate Soiree bars at local Greenville retail locations for $5.00 each. Patron packages start at $300 and individual tickets are $125. The ticket price includes admission to the event, heavy hors d’oeuvres, hosted bar, musical entertainment and tasting of the chocolate creations. For more information, visit www.thechocolatesoiree.com. The Fine Arts Center of Greenville County Schools will hold a fundraiser, “Taste of the Fine Arts,” on Feb. 1, 7 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency in Greenville. The event will feature food, entertainment, artwork and auctions to benefit the school that offers students programs in music, dance, theatre, visual art, writing and digital filmmaking. Tickets are $75 each and available at www.tastethearts.org. Those who cannot attend may donate at www.fineartspartners.org. To learn more about the school, visit www.fineartscenter.net. Healthy Smiles presents its annual fundraising comedy show, “Laugh for a Child,” in David Reid Theatre at Chapman Cultural Center on Jan. 31, 6:30 p.m. Proceeds benefit the dental needs of local children. For more information, call 864-542-2787. Tickets for the third annual Julie Valentine Luncheon to hear Dave Pelzer’s inspirational message and learn about the center’s efforts to combat child abuse and sexual assault are now available for purchase at www.julievalentinecenter.org. Individual tickets are $50 and $500 for a table for 10. The luncheon will be held on Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14, at the TD Conference Center in Greenville, with registration beginning at 11:30 a.m. All proceeds from ticket sales and sponsorships will support the center’s programs, including community education, services for children, rape crisis support and treatment. Greer Relief, which helps Greer area residents with food, clothing, shelter and other essential items for those in need, recently received a donation from D and D Ford following Ford Fusion night. Pictured are Skip Davenport of D&D Ford and Caroline T. Robertson of Greer Relief. Cross Country Home Services Inc. (CCHS), a provider of home warranty products and maintenance plans, has given a special New Year’s gift to a Liberty veteran as part of their Operation Appliance AIDSM program. Scott Gray, a retired U.S. Ma-

24 THE Journal | JANUARY 25, 2013

Pictured left to right: Jody Gallagher, president and CEO of AFL; Kim Bowman, CEO of the SC GSSM Foundation; Corie Culp, community relations manager of AFL; Kurt Dallas, vice president and general manager of global cable systems at AFL; Susanne Hite, director of marketing communications for AFL; Steve Althoff, executive vice president and general manager of AFL.

AFL presented the South Carolina Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics (GSSM) Foundation a $10,000 grant to support its GoSciTech program, a summer camp that provides eighth-, ninth- and tenth-grade students with a unique, hands-on experience in the fields of science and technology. rine Corps veteran and employee of CCHS, received a new refrigerator and washing machine. Through the program, CCHS provides appliances and appliance packages to veteran and military service families in need. For more information and to recommend a veteran, visit www.operationapplianceaid.com. The Spartanburg County Foundation recently announced the election of Terrence “Terry” L. Cash to trusteeship. Cash is president and CEO of the Caman Group Inc. Established in 1943, The Spartanburg County Foundation is the oldest community foundation in South Carolina. Additional information is available at www.spcf.org. The Daniel-Mickel Foundation recently donated $25,000 to help add new playground equipment designed for children 2-5 years old to the new Greenville Downtown Airport Community Aviation Park. The airport is also seeking donations to add playground equipment for older children, a picnic pavilion and a “Control Tower” climbing structure. The Guild of Carolina Ballet Theatre recently presented a $21,500 donation to the Carolina Ballet Theatre. The Guild of Carolina Ballet Theatre provides support to the Carolina Ballet Theatre (CBT), its board of directors and production staff through activities that raise community awareness, cultivate community partnerships and develop interest in CBT. For more information, visit www.carolinaballet.org. Send us your announcement. Email: community@communityjournals.com.

JOURNAL CULTURE

Building a show After play is selected, work really begins for set designer, technical director

As set designer for the Warehouse Theatre, it’s Shannon Robert’s job to tell the story without words. As the theatre’s technical director, it’s John Keenan’s job to make it happen. They share a process that is condensed into weeks, not months, and happens several times each season. Once a play By CINDY LANDRUM | staff is selected for inclusion in the Warehouse’s season, Robert has a blank slate from which to begin her work, constrained only by the

The set designed for the play “Eurydice” at the Warehouse Theater began as all sets do: with a rendering of what the set designer wants to produce.

nonprofit community theater’s budget, construction time in between shows, the labor needed for construction, the director’s vision of the script and where he or she wants to take the show. “The conceptual stuff is the fun part,” Robert said. “My job is to tell a story with no words.” The Warehouse’s latest production is “Eurydice,” the Sarah Ruhl play that tells the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice from Eurydice’s point of view. Ruhl is often considered to be one of America’s best young playwrights. The SET DESIGN continued on PAGE 26

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JOURNAL CULTURE SET DESIGN continued from PAGE 25

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Warehouse performed one of Ruhl’s other plays, “Clean House,” two years ago. In Ruhl’s script, a young Eurydice dies on her wedding day and goes to the underground, where she is reunited with her dead father. Eurydice, who loves both men, finds herself torn between her father and her husband. The work to start designing a set began with Robert’s reading the script several times and a brainstorming session with the show’s director, Anne Tromsness. “If I had read the show without talking to the director about the ‘what ifs,’ I would have probably come up with something completely different,” Robert said. “It’s a collaborative art.” What she did come up with is a set that emphasizes roots – and the work began on constructing those roots even before the Warehouse’s Christmas productions The set designed for the play “Eurydice” at the Warehouse Theater is in the final stages of construction. were over. When Robert worked on sets for Broad- tant. The time of year, the light, the socio- the contractor and engineer.” way, budgets for sets alone were often a economic times, religion and politics all Keenan first works to get a sense of couple hundred thousand dollars. At the factor in to what Roberts considers while scale of the set, how it fits and where it Warehouse, the budget often is a couple designing the set. fits in the theater’s space. He then breaks thousand dollars for the whole produc“I pay attention to my gut,” she said. it down to a rough to-do list. tion, she said. The “Eurydice” set includes an elevator “We’re serving the story. If my work is “The only things that limit us is time, la- imposed on the story or becomes the in which it “rains” – with water, not lightbor and money,” Robert said. “If we’re miss- story itself, then I’m not doing my job.” ing effects – and a river. ing one, it takes a little more of another.” While initial work on the set began Roberts consults with Keenan to deRobert is a big recycler when it comes cide what the set ultimately looks like. in mid-December, actual construction to materials used to build sets – partly “We negotiate what happens,” Keenan didn’t start until after Christmas when out of necessity, partly because it is the said. “Shannon is the architect, I’m like the set for the Warehouse’s three holiright thing to do. day productions were disassembled. She’s used paper and cardboard, For each Main Stage production, the Styrofoam and reused lumber. All technical crew has about four weeks material is treated with a fire retarto do its work, Keenan said. dant. She’s borrowed items she’s seen The Warehouse relies on volunteers during visits to people’s houses. to do much of the construction. Dur“When I’m invited into people’s ing the first week of January, seven or homes, I’m looking and taking a eight people worked on the set on a mental inventory of their furniture,” daily basis. Since then, four people she said. “I don’t hesitate to ask to have continued the work. borrow it.” The cast of “Eurydice” includes Understanding the period in Prentiss Standridge as Eurydice, Chris which a play takes place is impor- Shannon Robert Onken as Orpheus, Matt Reece as the John Keenan

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: “Eurydice” WHERE: The Warehouse Theatre, 39 Augusta St., Greenville WHEN: Jan. 25-26, Jan. 31, Feb. 1-2, Feb. 7-9, Feb. 14-16 at 8 p.m. – Jan. 27, Feb. 3 & Feb. 10 at 3 p.m. TICKETS: $30; Jan. 27 performance is “pay what you can” EXTRAS: Pre-show talk conducted by Furman’s Dr. Nick Radel, Feb. 14, 30 minutes before show. – Talkback with cast and director, Jan. 27 & Feb. 14, immediately after show. INFORMATION: 864-235-6948

father, Jayce Tromsness as the interesting man/Lord of the Underworld, Jason Johnston as Big Stone, Anne Pecaro as Little Stone and Elizabeth Finley as Loud Stone. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL CULTURE

There she goes again Best-selling author Jen SO YOU KNOW Lancaster, known for WHAT: Fiction Addiction’s Book Your Lunch memoirs, says her fiction is WHO: Jen Lancaster, New York Times bestselling author far removed from her life WHEN: Jan. 31, noon

Jen Lancaster finds humor in everything – even unemployment that put her and her husband on the verge of eviction. As the time the former associate vice president of a dot-com company was without a job stretched from weeks to months and then over a year, Lancaster started a website and began complaining about being unemployed. “It was a real miserable time for me, and writing was the only thing where I thought I was in control,” she said. As it turned out, blogging (although she had no idea that was what she was doing) helped Lancaster turn writing into a new career. A New York Times best-selling author, Lancaster will be in Greenville on Jan. 31 to talk about her new book, “Here I Go Again,” for Fiction Addiction’s Book Your Lunch Program. The book is Lancaster’s second work of fiction. Her first books were memoirs. Lancaster’s career as an author started without her writing a single query letter. “After two years of rejection in the job market, I feared rejection,” she said. “I couldn’t face rejection in the very thing that allowed me to escape.” Instead, Lancaster wrote every day. She put links to her best pieces on sites where she thought literary agents would see them. “I didn’t go to literary agents. I wanted them to come to me,” she said. And they did. She soon turned moments in her life into hilarious snarky memoirs – with titles such as “Bitter in the New Black” and “Such a Pretty Fat” – about living plus-size, chronicling wardrobe and fashion and her addiction to reality TV and hamburgers. Two years ago, Lancaster made the

WHERE: The Lazy Goat TICKETS: $55 for one person; includes one copy of Lancaster’s new book, “Here I Go Again.” $80 for two people, includes one book Tickets must be purchased in advance at www.bookyourlunch.com or by calling 864-675-0540

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leap to fiction when her first novel, “If You Were Here,” hit the New York Times best-seller list. “The best thing about going from memoirs to fiction is bad things don’t have to happen to me,” Lancaster said. “I still do memoirs when something bad happens or I find myself in a bad situation. But unlike most people who try to extricate themselves from a bad situation, I don’t. I stick around to see what’s going to happen.” Her first novel, “If You Were Here,” was about two new homeowners with a “fixerupper” on their hands. The problem was Lancaster and her husband were moving to the suburbs, too. “But we made good choices,” she said, so the book was filled with what could have gone wrong. The problem, Lancaster said, was that her fans couldn’t tell what was real and what was not. For “Here I Go Again,” Lancaster said she made sure that the characters were “clearly not us.” She grew up in the ’80s; the book is set in the 1990s. “The characters are so far removed from my life,” she said. “Everybody knew a mean girl in school but no one ever had an understanding of why she was. This has an explanation of why the mean girl was the mean girl. Most of them were just hungry.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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JOURNAL CULTURE

Send in the clowns Ringling Bros. circus back in Greenville with new production By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

When Dustin Portillo is at work, he’s always clowning around. But that doesn’t mean the 26-year-old doesn’t take his job seriously. Portillo is a “boss clown” with the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus, which is bringing its new “Built to Amaze” production to Greenville’s BI-LO Center for nine shows starting Wednesday. “Built to Amaze” is in the beginning of a 90-city North American tour, a jaunt that will take more than 110 performers from 17 countries around the world and 95 exotic and domestic animals more than 30,000 miles over two years on the world’s longest privately owned train. The “Built to Amaze” show gives the audience a behind-the-scenes perspective on how the circus is built, right from unpacking the shipping carts. The circus, trademarked as The Greatest Show on Earth, features crowd favorites such as elephants, horses and tigers, acrobats, high-wire acts, the Wheel of Steel and a human cannonball. New are a comedic animal-presenting duo from Russia and the Tower Tumblers, a troupe of competitive aerial athletics from Ukraine. And, of course, there are clowns. Portillo has wanted to be a clown since he was 4 and attended a Ringling circus in his Missouri hometown. “It’s my childhood dream,” he said. He started clowning professionally when he was 13, graduated from high school six months early and started working as a clown at Six Flags. There, he learned physical comedy and classic clowning skills. A Ringling talent scout spotted him there. “It’s more than slapping on makeup and a wig and, hey, you’re funny,” Portillo said. “You really have to have comedic timing down and you’ve got to be able to react to the audience. Each audience is different. An audience in Greenville may think something is funny, but an audience in Florida may not.” Portillo said clowning is the world’s oldest art form – and, like art, each clown has his or her own “look.” Clowns even register their looks so no two will

28 THE JOURNAL | JANUARY 25, 2013

look exactly alike. “Our faces are what we use to tell our story to 15,000 people in an arena,” Portillo said. “Clown makeup is not a mask. It’s an extension of your personality.” Portillo recommends that parents bring their children to the All Access Pre-Show, a way for show-goers to see the performers up close one hour before showtime. “That can take some of the uneasiness away,” he said. Even more important, parents should avoid telling their children, “Now, don’t be scared,” when they see a clown. “That sends the message that they should be scared,” he said. “It sends the message that clowns are scary – and we’re not.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW

WHAT: “Built to Amaze” WHO: Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus WHERE: BI-LO Center WHEN: Wednesday, Jan. 30 at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 31 at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1 at 10 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2 at 11 a.m., 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 3 at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. TICKETS: $15 to $90 plus Ticketmaster service charges and facility fees. Tickets available at Ticketmaster.com, the BI-LO Center ticket office or by calling Ticketmaster at 1-800-745-3000. INFORMATION: www.ringling.com

JOURNAL CULTURE

2 groups, 1 contest

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Hub City Writers Project of Spartanburg and the Emrys Foundation of Greenville both have worked to further the craft of writing. Now the two groups have joined together as partners in a creative writing contest with two categories – fiction and poetry. Winners of each category will receive a full scholarship to the Wildacres Writers Workshop, a weeklong creative writing summer school in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Second- and third-place winners will receive full or partial scholarships to Hub City’s “Writing

in Place” workshop July 12 through 14 at Wofford College. “The reason we love this contest so much is that the prize is not cash, its education,” said Betsy Teter, executive director of the Hub City Writer’s Project. “It’s a means to further a writer’s craft.” Instead of winning money that they can use to buy an iPhone or other electronic gadget, the prize helps writers make connections with other writers while receiving quality instruction. “It’s one of the ways we can find out who the up-and-coming writers are and who may have a publishing future,” Teter said. The two organizations worked together on a contest last year, but this year they are full partners and are sharing the costs, said Carolyn Young Gallagher of Emrys. “It’s something I hope we can continue,” she said. “Although Emrys began as an arts organization with a broader focus, over the years what

we’ve focused most of our energy on is writing.” To enter, writers should submit one published story of no more than 10 double-spaced pages, or three unpublished poems, with 12-point type. Name and email address should go on a coversheet but not on the manuscript. All entries must be received by midnight Feb. 1, 2013, and prizes will be awarded in April. Writers must be at least 18 years old to enter. Entries may be made at www.hubcity.org/writersproject on the contests page or mailed to HCWP, 186 W. Main St., Spartanburg, SC 29306. Emailed entries are preferred. No manuscripts will be returned. Previous winners may not submit in the year following their award. Writers currently living in Greenville or Spartanburg counties are eligible to enter. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

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JANUARY 25, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 29

JOURNAL CULTURE

An Evening with

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Tish Oney

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Rachel Kate Quirky acoustic folk from Charleston. Call 864-235-5519.

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Friday, February 1, 2013, 7 p.m. David W. Reid Theatre Chapman Cultural Center

Crowfield Harmony-drenched classic-sounding rock. Tickets $11. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com.

Tish presents her arrangements of jazz originals and standards in a sampler of her various touring shows. The band includes fellow music faculty from University of South Carolina Upstate, Gregg Akkerman (piano), Adam Knight (guitar), Shannon Hoover (bass) and Tony Christopher (drums).

Tickets, (864) 542-ARTS or ChapmanCulturalCenter.org adults/$10; students/$5

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Col. Bruce Hampton Southern jam-rock legend. Call 864-235-5519. 1/30, THE HANDLEBAR

The Malah Jam band incorporates electronics into stretched-out soundscapes. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com. 1/31, THE HANDLEBAR

Gaelic Storm Hugely popular Celtic band returns to Greenville. Tickets $20. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com. 2/1, THE HANDLEBAR

Sevendust Chart-busting hard-rock band. Tickets $23 ADV/$25 DOS. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com. 2/2, THE HANDLEBAR

Robert Earl Keen Great Americana singer/songwriter. Tickets $30. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com.

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JOURNAL CULTURE

SOUND CHECK WITH VINCENT HARRIS

Crowfield’s unexpected farewell Charleston country/rock quintet prepares to disband after six years Last month, I wrote a piece about Charleston’s Crowfield, a quintet that’s spent much of the last five years combining country and rock into an addictively melodic brew that brings to mind the Black Crowes circa “Southern Harmony and Musical Companion.” The band’s hearty, familial harmonies and strong songwriting caught my attention, and I spoke with singer/songwriter/guitarist Tyler Mechem about the band’s most recent release, “The Diamond Sessions,” named for their late manager, Johnny Diamond. At the time, Mechem said the band had WHO: Crowfield been through a rough patch, but he was WHERE: The Handlebar, 304 E. Stone Ave., excited about their new music and their fuGreenville ture. Sadly, Crowfield has since announced WHEN: Friday, Jan. 25, 9 p.m. their breakup, and their show at The Handlebar on Jan. 25 will be one of their last. TICKETS: $11. Call 864-233-6173 or visit www.handlebar-online.com. This dramatic turnaround prompted me to contact Tyler and speak with him again. Q: The last time we spoke, the new album had recently come out and you seemed optimistic about the band; what changed?  A: I haven’t been able to put this into words very accurately yet, and I can only speak for myself. But I think what I want out of music has changed from what we set out to pursue with Crowfield. Q: Do you plan to do any solo work? A: I will continue to write, record, and release and perform music. I don’t see myself touring to the extent Crowfield did. But I couldn’t stop music if I tried. It’s something I love and enjoy more than ever, whether it’s in front of a thousand screaming fans or for 15 people listening quietly in the corner. There’s just something cathartic about performing what you have created for people. So, I hope people stay interested in my music. I’ll always want someone to perform it for. Q: Will you work with anyone from the band on any other projects? A: I’m sure I will. We’re all still great friends and appreciate each other’s musical talents. I can honestly say that I was probably the least talented musician in the band. So I see it as onward and upwards for the guys. But I will be calling them to record on my music from time to time – for free, I hope. Q: Is there any animosity or bitterness among the band members? A: No. Sorry, there’s not any juicy drama. We all still enjoy being around each other on and off the stage. Q: Do you have any regrets about your time in Crowfield? A: On the business side of it, there are certainly things that hindsight has shown to be inopportune. But I don’t regret any of those decisions. The best you can hope for is that the business doesn’t push you away from the music. You do the best with what you have at the time and move on. My time in Crowfield gave me some of my favorite memories. Along the way, I learned that your definition of “making it” in music will change every day. We’ve “made it” a hundred times, and changed our mind about it a hundred and one times. So, that’s where I’m at, enjoying the view of all the successes and memories of Crowfield. Q: You have your final shows coming up; do you get emotional when you think about that? A: It’s certainly emotional. It was one of the biggest parts of my life for the last six or seven years. I don’t know what it’s going to be like taking the stage with the guys for the last time. I’ve thought about it a lot. I try to imagine counting off the last song... ever. Will the emotions of the situation make me mess up the song? Maybe. But I’ll have my guys behind me to keep it on track and big crowd of friends, family, and fans who are there for the same reason we are: to celebrate. Contact Vincent Harris at vharris@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW

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JOURNAL CULTURE

Actress grows into role of Charlotte SCCT stages ‘Charlotte’s Web’ for first time since 2006

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Atley Citano has grown up with the South Carolina Children’s Theatre – and into the role of Charlotte in the theater’s upcoming production of “Charlotte’s Web.” Back in 2006, the last time the SCCT staged the adaptation of the popular children’s book written by E.B. White, Citano landed the role of Wilbur, the pig whose friendship with Charlotte the spider eventually spares him from becoming Christmas dinner. It was one of the first SCCT plays for which Citano had auditioned. Now an elementary education student at Anderson University, Citano returns to the SCCT stage seven years later as one of the two girls cast as Charlotte. “Atley has matured. Charlotte has very much a mothering demeanor and has the best interest of the whole barnyard in mind,” said Betsy Bisson, the SCCT’s artistic director, who is directing the production. “Age helps with that. Atley’s gained the sensibility to play Charlotte.” Citano said when she played Wilbur in the 2006 version, she looked up to the girl who played Charlotte. “I wanted to be like her one day,” she said. Now she is. Bisson said the SCCT’s mission is to grow its own crop of actors and actresses by starting them out young. The SCCT is unique among community theaters in that the plays it does often has roles for the young through adults. “The legacy is very strong that way,” Bisson said. “It’s a family. It’s not a closed family, but we’ve got plenty of people who have really grown up with the Children’s Theatre.” Citano, the oldest sibling in her family, said the role is unlike those in which she’s usually cast, and is and a welcome change. “I’m usually cast as the really, really innocent character or the bad person.

Atley Citano will play Charlotte in the upcoming production of “Charlotte’s Web” by the South Carolina Children’s Theatre.

Charlotte is not innocent or bad. She’s very wise and humble. She’s motherly,” Citano said. “I feel a lot like that. People tell me I have an older spirit.” Bisson, who is directing “Charlotte’s Web” for the third time, said the play is a “feel-good” play. “It’s the Andy Griffith era, when times were simpler,” she said. “It’s about the value of friendship and doing things for others. It’s a play that holds true at all times, that family and friends are important and that we have to pull together.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@communityjournals.com.

SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Charlotte’s Web WHO: South Carolina Children’s Theatre WHERE: Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre WHEN: Friday, Feb. 1, 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, 1:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 3, 1:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8, 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 9, 1:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10, 1:30 p.m. TICKETS: $26 for adults, $17 for children 18 and under INFORMATION: 864-235-2885 NOTE: All tickets for the 5:30 p.m. show on Feb. 3 are $16.

journal culture

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BLACK A B

the week in the local arts world

Greenville Little Theatre’s Studio 444 presents its fourth annual 24 Hour Play Festival on Jan. 26 at 8 p.m. Three one-act plays will be written, rehearsed and performed in only 24 hours. Tickets are $8. In addition, the Greenville Little Theatre will also be holding auditions for “Elvis Has Left the Building” by Katie Forgette. Auditions will be held Jan. 27 at 7 p.m. and will consist of reading from the script. For tickets or more information, visit www.greenvillelittletheatre.org or call 864-233-6238.

Miller, acoustic rock and jazz; Feb. 17, Rohn Jewell, acoustic rock; and Feb. 24, Guy Workman with Pat Phillips, acoustic rock. For more information, call 542-ARTS.

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Chapman Cultural Center will host two jazz concerts during the second half of the 2012-13 cultural season. Both concerts will feature local jazz musician and singer Tish Oney, a faculty member at USC Upstate, with an extensive international career in jazz performance. The first concert will be “An Evening with Tish Oney” and will feature the Upstate Jazz All-Stars, an ensemble of university faculty, on Feb 1. It will include music by Harry Warren, Peggy Lee, Richard Rodgers and Henry Nemo. The second concert, “Tish Oney: The oney Peggy Lee Project,” will be held April 25 and will honor the songwriting talents of HETG HEUILD GUILD OF for THE OF adults THE GREENVILLE Gand REENVILLE SYMPHONY SYMPHONY Peggy Lee. TTickets are $10 $5 for students. To purchase tickets, visit www.chapmanculturalcenter.org or call 864-542-ARTS.  THE GUILD OF THE GREENVILLE SYMPHONY INVITES INVITES YOUYOU TO TO Send Tus artsOF announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com HEyour GUILD THE GREENVILLE SYMPHONY INVITES THE THE YOU TO

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The Pacifica Quartet will present a free performance at 8 p.m. Jan. 29 at Clemson University’s Brooks Center for the Performing Arts. As part of the Lillian and Robert Utsey Chamber Music Series, the performance is free and no tickets are required. For more information, visit www.clemson.edu/Brooks or call 864-656-7787, 1 to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

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"Bell tower" by Patrick Grills. Watercolor. Can be viewed at Artists Guild Gallery of Greenville, 200 N. Main St., Greenville. www. artistsguildgalleryofgreenville. com. Want to see your artwork here? Send a high-res image to arts@ communityjournals.com.

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The Furman Jazz Ensemble will present its winter concert Jan. 25 at 8 p.m. at Furman University. A variety of music will be performed, including selections by Pat Metheny, Wayne Shorter, the Clayton-Hamilton Orchestra and the Count Basie Band. The concert is open to the public. Tickets are available at the door and are $5 for adults and $3 for students. For more information, call 864-294-2086 or email furmanmusic@furman.edu.

The Chapman Cultural Center is now open every Sunday afternoon, giving it six days of operation per week. From 1 to 5 p.m., the public can visit Spartanburg Art Museum, Spartanburg Science Center, Spartanburg Regional History Museum, as well as the Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg Gallery and the Student Galleries, both of which are free. In addition, on Sunday afternoons, local musicians will play free and casual mini-concerts in the Moseley Building, 2-4 p.m. Each week a different artist will perform, and music will range from jazz to acoustic rock. Performers include: Jan. 27, Sydney McMath, contemporary guitar and piano; Feb. 3, Frank Walker, jazz; Feb. 10, Mark

South Carolina Children’s Theatre is presenting “Charlotte’s Web” Feb. 1-10 at the Peace Center’s Gunter Theatre. This classic story is enjoyed by all ages and is one of the most popular children’s stories. Admission is $26 for adults and $17 for children 18 and under. For more information, call 864-467-3000 or visit www.peacecenter.org.

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Spartanburg High School Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Jeffrey M. Kuntz, presents “Les Miserables et L’amoure” on Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. at the Chapman Cultural Center. The musicians will play a selection of highlights from some of the world’s most-loved music from stage, screen and symphony. Admission is free. For more information, call 864-542-ARTS. 

Kathleen Foster and Allison Moore will perform 20th-century cello sonatas at Music Sandwiched In, Jan. 30, at Spartanburg’s Headquarters Library downtown. The free lunchtime concert series is from 12:15-1 p.m. Attendees are invited to bring lunch or purchase a boxed lunch. For more information, call 864-948-9020.

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Spartanburg Regional History Museum is presenting Lunch and Learn Spartanburg at Chapman Cultural Center on Jan. 25, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Attendees are asked to bring their own lunch and be prepared to learn from experts. Admission is $5. For more information or to buy tickets, call 864-596-3501. 

The elegance of dance meets the magic of illusion in “Botanica” by MOMIX, the famous dance company under the direction of Moses Pendleton, in a performance at 8 p.m., Jan. 31, at Clemson University’s Brooks Center for the Performing Arts. “Botanica” possesses an eclectic score ranging from birdsong to Vivaldi that reveals nature’s changing imagery. Tickets are $30 for adults and $20 for students and are available for purchase online at www.clemson.edu/Brooks and at 864-656-7787, 1 to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

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The Greenville Symphony Orchestra will present “Northern Voyages” on Jan 26 at 8 p.m. and Jan 27 at 3 p.m. Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel will lead the orchestra in its third concert of the 2012-2013 Masterworks Series. The orchestra will offer its free “Active Listening” program to guide newcomers to the symphony with program information, concert etiquette guidelines and background information. Paul Hyde will lead a free pre-concert talk with additional information about the concert program. Tickets range from $15 to $49 and can be purchased at 864-467-3000, 800-888-7768 or at www.peacecenter.org. 

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journal culture

Jamie Wyeth, Rockwell Kent and Monhegan

Arts Calendar The Warehouse Theatre Eurydice Jan. 25-Feb. 16 ~ 235-6948 Greenville Little Theatre Studio 444: 24 Hour Play Festival Jan. 26 ~ 233-6238 Greenville Symphony Orchestra Northern Voyages Jan. 26-27 ~ 467-3000 Greenville Tech’s Riverworks Gallery Graphic Design: Exit Portfolio Through Jan. 27 ~ 271-0679 Peace Center Motionhouse Jan. 31 ~ 467-3000 Furman University Thompson Gallery Andrew Wrangle Photography Through Feb. 8 ~ 294-2074

Opening February 6

Rockwell Kent (1882 – 1971) Late Afternoon, Monhegan Island, 1906 –1907

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 admission free gcma.org

Jan. 25-31, 2013 Greenville County Museum of Art Here’s Your Freedom Through Feb. 24 ~ 271-7570 The Art of Helen Moseley Through Apr. 14 ~ 271-7570 Greenville Chamber of Commerce Works by Lynn Greer & Liz Rundorff Smith Through Mar. 1 ~ 242-1050 Metro. Arts Council at Centre Stage Works by Georgia Harrison Through Mar. 4 ~ 233-6733 Fine Arts Center Textile Artist Terry Diamond Through Mar. 22 ~ 355-2550 BJU Museum & Gallery at Heritage Green From Rublev to Faberge Ongoing ~ 770-1372

Metropolitan Arts Council Gallery Counterpoints: Form & Space Through Feb. 15 ~ 467-3132 Centre Stage Rock ‘n Roll Forever: The ’80-s Edition Through Feb. 23 ~ 233-6733

A Gala Benefit for the Fine Arts Center Friday, February 1, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. Studio 220 at the Hyatt Regency Downtown Silent & Live Auction • Live Entertainment Artwork • Heavy Hors D’oeuvres • Open Bar

Tickets available at www.TasteTheArts.org or by calling 864-214-5278 Sponsors:

34 THE Journal | JANUARY 25, 2013

JOURNAL HOMES F E AT U R E D H O M E S & N E I G H B O R H O O D S | O P E N H O U S E S | P R O P E R T Y T R A N S F E R S

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

2 Quail Hill Court, Parkins Mill Area, Greenville Another fine home by Oasis Custom Homes! The ONLY brand new home in the sought after Parkins Mill Area! This Low Country style brick home is convenient to Downtown, ICAR, I-85, excellent local schools, and to CCES. Set on private 0.84 acre level lot, this home features 10 ft ceilings on the main floor, 9 ft upstairs, and site finished hardwoods throughout the first floor (including the Master Bedroom and Bath). The Master is spacious and secluded, with separate His & Hers granite vanities, and shower with body spray and rain head. Two fireplaces, one in the Great Room, one in the

Screened porch. Four Bedrooms and three full Baths up (all Baths have granite vanities), plus versatile Bonus/ Rec Room. Front and back stairs. Circular and side drives. Three car attached garage. The open Kitchen features granite counters, custom cabinetry, top of the line stainless appliances, breakfast bar, and Breakfast Room with built in window seat. There is nothing “spec” about this inviting home, ready this spring! Still time to customize to your personal taste!

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ASIS CUSTOM HOMES

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HOME INFO PRICE: $799,607 | MLS# 1249555 5 Bedrooms, 4.5 Baths, Abt. 5000 SF Brand New Construction, Low Country Style Brick Home with a 3 Car Garage Contact: Joan Herlong 864.325.2112 Joan@AugustaRoad.com AugustaRoad.com Realty, LLC Send us your Featured Home for consideration: homes@greenvillejournal.com

207 Abbot Trail 29605 – 200 Rock Creek Drive 29605 – 114 Woodland Way 29601 – 6 Riverside Drive 29605~ 108 Mt Vista Ave 29605 – 10 Riverside Drive 29605 – 841 Raven Road 29356 – 5 Club Drive 29605 – 21 Sylvan Drive 29605 – 215 Melville Ave 29605 – 337 Riverside Drive 29605 – 106 Mt Vista Ave 29605 – 218 E. Augusta Place 29605 – 15 Timbers Edge Way 29690 – 18 Lawson Way 29605 – 2 Quail Hill Court 29607 – 36 Dogwood Lane 29607 – 202 Rock Creek Drive 29605 – 40 Dogwood Lane 29607 – 31 Gossamer Place 29607 – 100 Boxwood Lane 29601 – 111 Melville Ave 29605 – 22 Foggy Ridge Way 29690 – 25 Sylvan Drive 29605 – 218 Melville Ave 29605 – 35 Douglas Drive 29605 – 8 Riverside Drive 29605 – 427 McIver St 29601 – 408 Chapman Road 29605 – 417 East Seven Oaks 29605 – 112 Upper Ridge Way 29690 – 2 Riverside Drive 29605 – 501 East Seven Oaks 29605 – 423 Alexander Road 29650 – 705 McDaniel Ave 29605 – 209 Oregon St 29605 – 140 Lake Point Drive 29687 – 44 Lanneau Drive 29605 – 117 Capers St 29605 – 28 Conestee Ave 29605 – 26 Byrd Blvd 29605 – 7 Club Drive 29605 – 207 Robinson Street 29609 – 14 Lawson Way 29605 – 1606 N. Main St 29609 – 117 Aldridge Drive 29607 – 205 Terra Woods 29615 – 25 Club Drive 29605 – 27 Rock Creek Drive 29605 – 341 Riverside Drive 29605 – 102 Jones Ave 29601 – 8 Waccamaw Circle 29605 – 3 Foxwood Lane 29687 – 105 S Almond Drive 29681 – 29 Sylvan Drive 29605 – 301 Buckland Way 29615 – 215 South Ladyslipper Lane 29650 – 9 Snapdragon Way 29356 – 101 High Rock Ridge 29356 – 1 Touch Me Not Trail 29356 – 37 Douglas Drive 29605 – 94 Eagle Rock Road 29356 – 435Alexander Road 29650 – 10 Lavender Lane 29356 – 20 Aurora Trail 29356 – 308 Lake Hills Lane 29690 – 4 Riverside Drive 29605 – 50 Secret Hollow Trail 29661 – 27 Sylvan Drive 29605 – 323 Mountain Summit Road 29690 – 940 Laurelwood Marketed exclusively by Joan Herlong, BIC 864-325-2112 AugustaRoad.com oasiscustomhomes.com · 864-292-5901 Way 29356 – 32 Gossamer Place 29607 – 596 Old Chapman Bridge Road 29685 – 220 E. Augusta Place 29605 – 105 Winding Oaks Way 29690

NEW CONSTRUCTION,

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SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

RENOVATIONS

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DESIGN/BUILD SERVICES

JANUARY 25, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 35

F E A T U R E D OPEN

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Vacant and move-in ready. 2-story foyer with double atrium door entrance, palladium windows, switchback staircase and balcony. Formal DR with butler’s pantry. Formal LR w/space for study or library. 20’ ceilings in GR with built-in entertainment center and side bar, and gas log fpl with custom mantle and surround. Furniture grade cabinetry w/granite c’tops in Kitchen HOME INFO and complete appliance package. Breakfast rm overlooks covered brick Price: $438,700 | MLS#1250446 veranda, sodded & landscaped lawn 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, 4000-4199SF with sprinkler system. Lux MBR Suite Bryson Elementary on main with double sinks, granite Bryson Middle c’tops, custom cabinetry, large walk-in Hillcrest High tiled shower, jetted tub and walk-in closet. 2nd BR with private full BA also Contact: Melissa Morrell on main. 3 BRs on main level, a huge 864.918.1734 Bonus PLUS separate 26x15 family Prudential C. Dan Joyner, Co. media rm that serves as a 5th BR.

OPEN THIS WEEKEND OPEN CLAREMONT

SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

CLAREMONT

SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

S U N D AY, RIVER WALK

JANUARY

SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

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PM

BOTANY WOODS

SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

SYCAMORE RIDGE

SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

212 CHAMBLEE WAY - $799,000 5BR/4.5BA. Gated community. Full finished basement w/rec room, media rm, kitchenette. From GVL: 385 South to Roper Mtn Rd exit, Turn Left & go apprx 5 miles to Right into SD on Chamblee Blvd, Home on Right Patte Wajciechowski, 901-3865 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1250167

523 CHAMBLEE BLVD - $769,000 4BR/4BA. Beautiful home under construction in gated community. MBR and 2nd BR + Study on main. Upstairs-2BR/2BA + Bonus. 385 S to Roper Mtn exit, L off ramp, go 5 miles to Right into SD on Chamblee Blvd. Margaret Marcum/Leigh Irwin, 4203125/380-7755 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252608

23 DEER TRACK RD - $485,000 9 BENION WAY - $475,000 8 STONYBROOK - $439,000 5BR/3BA. Stunning brick home w/3 car 276. Beautiful all brick traditional home com4BR/3.5BA. Fabulous CUSTOM home w/ garage. Beautiful kit w/cherry cabs. Lg plete with a full finished walkout basement 9 ft ceilings and master on main! 4100 sq ft sunroom w/sunken hot tub. Hwy 14 to Five and 6 bedrooms, 6 full baths and 1 half bath. w/800 additional sq ft! 2 gated courtyards & Forks Rd, turn on Parkside Dr, L on River This home is perfect for that large family, lots spacious Florida room- Must see home to Walk Dr, L on Rockberry Terrace, R on Deer of space. Charlotte Sarvis, 864-346-9943 appreciate all the details! Make an offer! April Track. Chris Toates, 360-6696 Prudential C. Carol Pyfrom Realty MLS#1252810 Garrison, (864) 787-2507 Coldwell Banker Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1251171 Caine MLS#1250853

31 SYCAMORE RIDGE DRIVE - $438,700 4BR/3.5BA. Vacant, Move-in Ready Home in Established Sycamore Ridge. Master & Guest Suite on Main Level. Office/Study on Main. Granite, Hardwoods and More. Bonus Room & Media Room. Larget Lot. Sunroom. Melissa Morrell, (864) 918-1734 Prudential C. Dan Joyner MLS#1250446

CONNORS CREEK

RIVER WALK

AUTUMN TRACE

SUN 2-4PM

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

502 GOATSBEARD CT - $194,900 4BR/2.5BA. Bonus, updated kit, scrnd prch. 385 S. to Exit 29, Right on W. Georgia Rd, Approx 3 miles to Left on Rocky Creek Rd, Right into SD on Wakingstick Way, 3rd Right on Coltsfoot, 2nd Left on Goatsbeard. Janie Gibbs, 901-3403 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1248171

104 CAMMER AVENUE - $189,900 2BR/1BA. Charming Augusta Road bungalow with 2 bedrooms + office/playroom, living room, dining room, large kitchen, screened porch. Level lot perfect for expansion. Priced to sell! Virginia Hayes, (864) 313-2986 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1250197

SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

14 CONNORS CREEK CT - $389,900 5BR/3.5BA. Excellent location, gorgeous curb appeal, beautiful front & back, fabluous floor plan. Located off Adams Mill rd near Five Forks Area Michelle Gliatta, 395-0311 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252420

ORCHARD FARMS

SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

908 RIVER WALK DR - $379,900 5BR/3.5BA. Stately brick trad. w/ lg frml rms. New granite in Kit. MBR on main. Scrnd porch. 385 to L on Woodruff Rd, R on Hwy 14, L on Adams Mill, L into SD on River Walk Blvd, R on River Walk Dr. Chet Smith, 458-7653 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1250520

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6 HILEY COURT - $184,900 4BR/2.5BA. Bonus room. Culdesac lot. Great School Area. Batesville Rd to Orchard Farms SD, Turn into SD, Right on S. Orchard, Left on Hiley. Bryan DeYoung, 230-8284 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1249539

314 APPLETON LANE - $165,000 4BR/2.5BA. The Grove, Wonderful 4br 2.5 bath two story home offers spacious open fl plan ideal for entertaining. Master suite w/jetted tub, dbl vanity. Nice cul-de-sac lot. Come take a look! Charlene Panek, (864) 4049544 Coldwell Banker Caine MLS#1252455

36 T H E J O U R N A L | JANUARY 25, 2013

DAILY 2-4PM (1/27)

502 KINGSMOOR DR - $259,900 5BR/3.5BA. Immaculate home in popular area. Bonus, MBR on main level, gourmet kit w/bkfst area. Well appointed and move-in ready.Hwy 14 South, Left on Pollard, Left on Amesbury, Left on Kingsmoor. Steve May,, 346-2570 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1252551

FOX DALE

SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

113 W. OKALOOSA WAY - $139,500 3BR/2BA. Outstanding Ranch Home.385 South to Exit 29, Right on W. Georgia Rd, Right on Standing Springs, Left into SD on Bramford, Left on rediff Way, Right on Turnbridge, Right on Hennepin, Left on W Okaloosa Carolyn Laws-Irwin, 451-9407 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1245114

TUCKER BRANCH

SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

33 DONEMERE WAY - $199,900 3BR/2.5BA. craftsman style, Energy Star home. Upgradees & advanced technology. 385 S to Exit 23, Hwy 418. Go apprx. 1/2 mile and turn Left. Turn Right at light on S. Main, Go 1/2 mile & turn Left into SD Kate Anderson/Kristin Brady, 363-3634/9087200 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. MLS#1249245

EAGLE WATCH

SUN 2-4PM (1/27)

LONG CREEK PLANTATION

MAPLE CREEK

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301 FLANNERY CT - $129,900 6 ACKLEN DR - $129,900 3BR/2BA. Nice ranch with open flr plan. 3BR/2BA. extremely well maintained, large Fenced. Qualifies for 100% financing. From eat in kitchen great covered patio for enterGVL: 385 to Harrison Bridge Rd, Exit Left taining, large fenced, manicured yard. From over Bridge, Right on Main, Right on Putnam, Woodruff Rd turn onto Scuffletown Rd in Left into SD on Flannery, Home on Left. Five Forks, South 1 mile, Left into SD. Olivia Ryan Carlson, 320-5366 Prudential C. Dan Grube, 385-9087 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Joyner Co. MLS#1243460 Co. MLS#1250666

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

F E A T U R E D

N E I G H B O R H O O D LINDEN

PARK

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

OPEN SUNDAY, 1/27 FROM 2:00-4:00pm

At Linden Park, the focus is on each resident’s comfort and convenience. Community pocket parks, filled

with trees and plantings, bring neighbors together, while most homesites offer rear-alley access with a double garage for privacy and parking. Homes are built in traditional Craftsman style, with deep porches, efficient floorplans, and natural materials such as brick, stone, clapboard and shake siding. Simple, classic lines and rich details give each home a timeless appeal that is grounded in old world quality. See for yourself how easy life can be at Linden Park. Call to arrange a tour or meet with one of our builders.

HONEST. DEDICATED. LOYAL. New Address: Riverwalk Building ∙ 101 W. Camperdown Way ∙ Suite 105 ∙ Greenville, SC 29601

Brett Brading

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

Nicole Ream

23 lots remaining priced from $39,900 – $44,900 Directions: I-385 S to I-185 N. Exit onto Hwy 417 S. Turn left onto Hwy 14. Take the first right onto Stokes Road. Linden Park will be on the left. Providence Realty & Marketing 864.676.1719 www.lindenparksc.com Send us your Featured Home for consideration: homes@greenvillejournal.com

More photos, info and over 1,900 neighborhoods online at

Drew Parker

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO

Annie Parker

Suzanne Knox

These are just a few words used to describe our team. We must be doing something right! Ready to buy or sell a home? Call us today and find out how we earned our adjectives!

Your Local Real Estate Experts www.theparkercompanyre.com

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Linden Park is just a stone’s throw from I-385. Neighborhood schools are close by, too, and they’re ranked among the very best in the state. Heritage Park is only 2½ miles away with six baseball fields, hiking and biking trails and pavilion.Less than a mile from downtown Simpsonville, the entire neighborhood is designed on a livable scale. Sidewalks run alongside tree-lined streets, and street lamps glow from dusk to dawn. Community entryways are landscaped and carefully tended.

JANUARY 25, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 37

N E I G H B O R H O O D

OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 1/27 2-4pm

KELSEY

107 S WARWICK • $575,000 • MLS1247820

P R O F I L E

GLEN

Spectacular Custom Built Home! Charming, gracious with very adaptable floor plan. Large Kitchen with bkfst area; GR; sunroom or DR; laundry; MBR; 2 add’l BRs; 2nd floor with large bonus. Lower level has storage rm, Den, BR, BA and flex space, prewired and plumbed for kitchen, exercise/media room or both, stained concrete floors, and its own garage. Upgrades: custom doors, custom cabinetry & bookcases, irrigation. Wraparound porch with Fireplace, and geothermal HVAC for lower utility bills! www.allentate.com/cynthiaserra Cynthia.Serra@allentate.com

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Cynthia Serra 864.304.3372

Eastside Estate

311 Phillips Road • MLS#1251925 • $999,000

Relief from life’s busy moments can be found here in this fabulous ESTATE in Greenville’s Eastside of town. Amazing 6.2 acre property with 6BR/4.5BA home, pool and pool house, cabana, and lighted tennis courts/basketball court and parking for 9 cars! The property is fully fenced and gated and is close to all major interstates.

SUSAN REID

C13R

864.616.3685 | sreid@cbcaine.com

R EA L E STAT E D I G E ST PEOPLE,

AWARDS,

HONORS

Zuraw Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Tammy Zuraw has joined the company Zuraw and serves as a sales associate at the Greer office. Originally from Brooklyn, Connecticut,

Zuraw has worked in the real estate industry for five years and has earned designations as Accredited Buyer Representative (ABR) and Short Sales & Foreclosures Resource (SFR). “We welcome Tammy to our family of REALTORS at the Greer Office,” said Avanelle Pelfrey, Broker-in-Charge. Zuraw currently resides in Wellford area of the Upstate.

38 T H E J O U R N A L | JANUARY 25, 2013

Kelsey Glen, Simpsonville Kelsey Glen offers an rare opportunity to live in a quiet, established community offering scenic mountain views and over 47 acres of secure common area at a fantastic value all while being just 1.5 miles from the Woodruff Rd corridor known for great shopping and restaurants. You will feel worlds away from the hustle and bustle but yet you are just minutes away from all the conveniences! Kelsey Glen boasts a Community Pool, Cabana, and play area in addition to the 47

acres of common area, and a variety of homes to fit your lifestyle. Whether you are searching for single or multilevel living, customizing opportunities, a fantastic value, or the perfect homesite, we have just what you want at a price you can afford. Kelsey Glen features new Ryan Homes in 2 villages: The Meadows and The Enclave. With our award winning floor plans, our fantastic value, our financial stability and our ENERGY STAR® Certification, it’s easy to see why Ryan Homes is the #1 Builder in the Upstate!

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO New Homes from the low $160s 12 Month Average Home Price: $198,209 Amenities: Pool, Cabana, Play Area, 47 acres of Common Area

Schools: Rudolph G. Gordon Elementary Hillcrest Middle School Hillcrest High School

Over 1,900 neighborhoods online at SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

R EA L E STAT E D I G E ST PEOPLE,

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Henson Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®

Henson

Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Jeffrey Henson has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Pleasantburg office.

Originally from Columbus, Ohio, Henson graduated from Upper Arlington High School. He went on to earn his Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration at Furman University in Greenville. He continues to serve as the Vice President of Greek Housing Finance for Residential

Capital Corporation and is currently working towards his CCIM designation as a Certified Commercial Investment Member. CCIMs are recognized experts in commercial real estate brokerage, leasing, valuation and investment analysis. “We are excited to have Jef join the Pleasantburg Office,” said Teresa Cox, Broker-in-Charge. “We welcome him to our family of Realtors.” Henson currently resides in the Downtown area of Greenville. In his free time, he enjoys golf, sports, traveling and cooking.

1325 S. Barton • $649,999 4 BR/4.5 BA • MLS1247269

Rockwood at Augusta, 14 Jenkinson Ct $519,000 • MLS 1243000

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1601 Reid School Rd • $575,000 3 BR/2 BA • MLS1252445

119 Carolina Oaks $285,000 • MLS 1249827

Arnel Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® media, communications and product development. Her involvement aided in the success of the venture within the Greenville market and community.

Originally from Connecticut, Arnel graduated from Stamford High School in Stamford. Prior to joining C. Dan Joyner Company, she was a vital contributor to CityStory Greenville as an early contributor to the founding through public relations, sales, social

Arnel currently lives in Simpsonville with her three children Danielle Hembree, Peter Telesco and Taylor Arnel. In her free time, she enjoys traveling, road biking, photography and writing. She is also an active volunteer and mentor for several community organizations.

Arnel

“We are excited to have Stephanie join our Family of Realtors,” said Teresa Cox, Broker-in-Charge of the Pleasantburg office.

Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® Announces Top Producer Office Awards for November Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce the following Top Producer awards for November 2012. Top Producers for Listings: · Anderson Office – The Clever People · Easley/Powdersville Office –Carol Houston and Sheri Sanders Team · Garlington Road Office – Carol Weinstock and Donna O. Smith & Partners · Greer Office – Paige Haney and Jan Walker Team · Pelham Road Office – Elvin Rivera and Spaulding Group · Pleasantburg Office – Melissa Morrell and The Chet and Beth Smith Group · Simpsonville Office – Susan McMillen and June & John Cousins Team Top Producers for Sales: · Anderson Office – Foronda Hall and The Clever People SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

· Easley/Powdersville Office – Linda Ballard and Sheri Sanders Team · Garlington Road Office – Bob Moffatt and Donna O. Smith & Partners · Greer Office – Brenda Ledford and Jan Walker Team · Pelham Road Office – Elvin Rivera and Spaulding Group · Pleasantburg Office – Melissa Morrell and The Chet & Beth Smith Group · Simpsonville Office – Kathy Fleming and Sandra Palmer/Carl Jones Team Top Producers Overall · Garlington Road Office – Sheila Smalley and Donna O. Smith & Partners · Greer Office – Paige Haney and Jan Walker Team · Pleasantburg Office – Melissa Morrell and Chet and Beth Smith Group · Simpsonville Office – Susan McMillen and Sandra Palmer/Carl Jones Team

Proven Sales Results, Lasting Relationships.

1070 Altamont Road $639,900 • MLS 1251080 NG

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Kary Galloway

864-901-2204 Rex Galloway

864-630-1111 www.GreenvilleTeam.com Home@GreenvilleTeam.com

235 McDaniel Avenue $599,900 • MLS 1252827

Helen Hagood

Selling Greenville for 28 Years! Mobile: 864-419-2889 hhagood@cbcaine.com

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119 Lari Lane • $129,500 3 BR/1 BA • MLS1252481 us R

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138 Big Dipper • $109,900 3 BR/2 BA • MLS1251677

See these homes and more at cbcaine.com/agents/HelenHagood

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Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Stephanie Arnel has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Pleasantburg office.

JANUARY 25, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 39

www.cdanjoyner.com

Agents on call this weekend

MARTHA ROSENBERG 616-4475 PELHAM RD.

CAROLYN LAWS-IRWIN 451-9407 SIMPSONVILLE

CYNTHIA AKINS 640-3167 WOODRUFF RD.

JO SINGLETON 879-4239 GREER

R E A L

CURRAN MORGAN 351-9706 PLEASANTBURG

MARIE BARTON 903-1840 EASLEY/ POWDERSVILLE

E S T A T E PEOPLE,

AWARDS,

ASHLEY SHERMAN 918-7845 AUGUSTA RD.

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

cdanjoyner.com.

D I G E S T HONORS

Jesse Childress Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®

Childress

Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., R E A LT O R S ® is pleased to announce that Jesse Dwayne Childress has

joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Greer office. An Upstate native, Childress graduated from Seneca Senior High and went on to earn a Business degree from Anderson University/Tri County Tech. He has worked in the real

40 T H E J O U R N A L | JANUARY 25, 2013

estate industry for six years and has earned designations as Accredited Buyer Representative (ABR), Short Sales & Foreclosures Resource (SFR), and E-PRO.

Childress currently resides in Greer area. In his free time, he enjoys art, music, writing, reading, playing billiards, darts, golf, hockey and baseball.

“We are excited to have Jesse join the Greer Office,” said Avanelle Pelfrey, Broker-in-Charge. SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

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Rafferty Joins Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS®

Originally from Alabama, Rafferty graduated from Baker High School in Mobile. She earned her degree in English Education at University of Louisville in Kentucky and dedicated her career to teaching. She then pursued her interest in

real estate and graduated from the Wyatt Institute of Real Estate. “We are excited to have Michelle join the C. Dan Joyner Company,” said Anush Showghi, Broker-in-Charge. “We welcome her to our family of Realtors.” Rafferty relocated to the Pickens area during the summer with her husband Jeff and children Ashley, Sarah and Maggie. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her family traveling to the beach and the mountains. She is involved in her local church ministries as well as international missions.

Chase Inabinet Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville December 7, 2012 – Coldwell Banker Caine’s Greenville office recently welcomed Chase Inabinet as a residential sales agent. Inabinet

A Greenville native and graduate of Clemson University, Chase was previously employed by The Cliffs at Keowee Vineyard as well as Southern Tide. He volunteers at Loaves

and Fishes Food Rescue, The Country Santa, Project Host, and the Frazee Center. Chase enjoys golfing, boating and hunting, as well as Clemson football. “We are excited about the opportunities that are available to Chase in this field,” said Fritzi Barbour, Broker-in-Charge. “And we are confident that he will have a long and successful career with us at Coldwell Banker Caine.”

Ben Stoudenmire Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville December 14, 2012 – Coldwell Banker Caine’s Greenville office recently welcomed Ben Stoudenmire as a residential sales agent.

Stoudenmire A

graduate of the University of South Carolina and the Charleston School of Law, Ben comes to the real estate industry after working as a Document Review

Attorney for Balint, Brown, & Basri, LLC. Ben volunteers with Upstate Forever, Trout Unlimited, Coastal Conservation League and Habitat for Humanity. In his free time Ben enjoys travelling, hiking, fishing, hunting, sports and cooking. “We are glad Ben has chosen to join our team,” said Brad Halter, President. “And we look forward to being a part of his real estate successes.”

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in November The Marchant Company is known as the Upstate’s local “Signature Agency” in Real Estate, representing buyers and sellers of residential, land, and commercial properties.

Tom Marchant and Valerie Miller were recognized as Listing Unit Agents of the month. Kathy Slayter was recognized as Sales Volume and Unit Agent of the month.

Seabrook Marchant, Broker-inCharge, recently recognized several agents for their outstanding performance during the month of November. Valerie Miller was recognized as Volume Listing Agent of the month. Miller SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

116 Ridge Glen

108 Augusta Court

$895,000 • 4 BR/3.5 BA • 1252670 $574,500 • 4 BR/3.5 BA • 1252698 5 car gar. w/2BR, 1.5BA apt above, Equestrian Barn & pool Great street, 4 yr old cust built home, hdwds on 3 lvls Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778 Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

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1 Stoney Ridge Drive

701 Montebello Drive, Unit 104

$499,970 • 4 BR/3.5 BA • 1243209 Beautiful home, lots of storage, includes Morton steel building w/HVAC, W/D hookup & bath Gordon D. Seay 864.444.4359

$479,000 • 3 BR/ 3.5 BA • 1252477 1 lvl, open corner unit, ≈3000 sf, guest wing, terrace Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

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3 Andy Court

$425,000 • 3 BR/3 BA • 1250243 On the Lake, 5 car garage, workshop, pool Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

W NE

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1 Foxglen Court

$269,000 • 4 BR, Bonus /2.5 BA • 1252440 Popular cul-de-sac, granite, ss appli., Upds: Carpet, Ref. hdwds, paint, roof Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

106 Wren Way

$299,000 • 2 BR/2 BA • 1250156 Great floor plan, hdwds, deck, ≈2500 sf Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

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107 Bluebird Dr.

$224,921 • 3 BR/ 2 BA • 1246780 Lrg garage & workshop, fresh paint, move in ready Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

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6 Shady Hollow Ln.

$189,900 • 3 B/2.5 BA • 1251508 Master down, screened porch, patio, 1 car gar. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

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327 Mockingbird

$149,000 • 2 BR/ 2 BA • 1249454 Updates! $18K: Master BA, $10K: fresh paint, hdwds, carpet & lighting Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

801 Half Mile Way

$169,000 • 3 BR/2.5 BA • 1252081 Upgrades, lrg corner lot, landscaping/irr. sys Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 Karen Turpin 864.230.5176 Fannie Mae owned property 205 Wynterhall Dr 23 Tack Lane 5733 Locust Hill Rd 320 Berea Forest Cr 18 Mauldin Circle 130 Honeysuckle Dr

$199,900 $132,500 $124,900 $66,500 $45,500 $26,000

1252182 1252502 1252003 1252511 1252232 1252019

www.Homepath.com Kathy Slayter • 864.982.7772

Agent on duty: JeanE Bartlett 864.506.4093

Marchant

Slayter

www.marchantco.com 864.467.0085

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Rafferty

Greenville, SC – Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS® is pleased to announce that Michelle Crank Rafferty has joined the company and serves as a sales associate at the Easley/Powdersville office.

JANUARY 25, 2013 | T H E J O U R N A L 41

GREENVILLE TRANSACTIONS DECEMBER SUBD.

PRICE

$2,800,000 $1,610,000 COMMERCE CENTER $1,300,000 $750,000 $675,000 CLUB FOREST $620,000 $600,000 CHAUNESSY $595,000 $550,000 $527,625 $523,739 BARRINGTON PARK $512,000 BOXWOOD MANOR $505,000 COOL COVE $445,000 CLUB FOREST $437,500 $400,000 $390,000 LAKE LANIER PARK $380,000 KILGORE FARMS $378,550 LINKSIDE $365,000 THE VALLEY AT TANNER ESTATES $358,660 MCDANIEL GREENE WEST $325,000 CREEKWOOD $315,450 BOXWOOD $302,000 JAMESTOWNE ESTATES $297,500 THE RIDGE AT SUNSET $280,000 $275,000 $275,000 CHANTICLEER $270,000 POINSETT CORNERS $243,000 SAVANNAH POINTE $234,460 $230,000 BRIDGEWATER $228,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $211,177 THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD $211,096 BROOKFIELD WEST $206,000 SUMMERFIELD $205,000 HERITAGE CREEK $203,000 LAKE FOREST $199,000 REMINGTON $197,847 SAVANNAH POINTE $194,538 PEBBLECREEK $190,000 1200 PELHAM $190,000 DEVENGER PLACE $184,000 TOWNES AT BROOKWOOD $178,675 THE BRIO $177,900 THE FARM AT SANDY SPRINGS $175,071 $171,430 SILVERLEAF $170,000 THE GLEN AT GILDER CREEK FARM $169,900 EAST LEE PLACE $169,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $168,565 POINSETTIA $168,000 ELLINGTON PARK $168,000 SAVANNAH POINTE $160,680 LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON $158,511 VICTORIA PARK $157,150 BROOKFIELD EAST $156,000 DANBURY $155,000 $154,000 $153,500 NORTHCLIFF $149,900 LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON $148,573 WEDGEWOOD $147,900 HERITAGE LAKES $146,500 SUGAR CREEK $140,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $139,000 EAST HIGHLANDS ESTATES $139,000 RIVERSIDE CHASE $135,000 SWANSGATE $132,000 INGLESIDE CONDO $126,500 CHARTWELL ESTATES $125,900 RICHMOND HILLS $125,854 CHURCHILL FALLS $125,000 RIVERSIDE CHASE $124,000 $124,000 FAIRVIEW CHASE $118,505 COUNTRY MEADOWS $116,000 EAST HILL $116,000 LAKE LANIER $115,000 CANE CREEK $115,000 BELLINGHAM $107,900 HILLSIDE AT ROLLING GREEN $102,000 MCBEE ESTATE $83,500 WILLIMON ESTATES $80,000 $80,000 LENHARDT VILLAGE $79,300

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2012

AUGUST

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FLK ENTERPRISES LLC ACCOTEX INC RADICISPANDEX CORP POPLIN WILLIAM ROBERT JR HOUMANN FRANCES E GIGUERE NANCY P WALKER AND WHITESIDE ADDIS EILEEN K OVER THE TOP ENDEAVORS L BELL JACQUELYN G 306 EAST NORTH STREET LL ARNOLD MARY A MCDONALD PAUL ALLAN CALDER PATRICIA A ODOM KATHERINE MCCARTER A PAUL GIBBONS MARIA MINA INGALLS LEWIS R BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT WRIGHT JAMES W JR BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SWANN ERIN E BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HALL DANIEL C FOR 8 CORPORATION INC GALLAGHER MICHAEL HENDERSON WILLIAM E JR PETTIT ANN LYNN FLOWERS GARRY W HARRYMAN CONSEPSION ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC WALLING CALVIN BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT SK BUILDERS INC D R HORTON INC MCCAULEY STEPHANIE C (JT SLAGLE RANDALL L (JTWROS XU ZHAOYANG COTHRAN JOANNE G D R HORTON INC ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC EDGE BURTON JAMES JR GINN DOROTHY E HERRING KENNETH L BROOKWOOD TOWNES LLC NEW CITY DEVELOPMENT LLC D R HORTON INC REESE RAYMOND L CHURCH LOUISE W FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG SCHLEIPFER MARK ANDREW SK BUILDERS INC DILLON’S CONSTRUCTION CO BENNETT AT THOMPSON LLC ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC D R HORTON INC SK BUILDERS INC OTTO ANDREW T WILSON STACEY M BOLING DOROTHY E HILL’S SIDE PROPERTIES L FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG D R HORTON INC RUSSELL JAMES H BAYNE JASON TRAVIS SIGEL MARTHA E SK BUILDERS INC TAYLOR ALISON M DIXON DEVIN L TOMBLIN KAREN FARESS MANN JANE SK BUILDERS INC U S BANK NATIONAL ASSOCI HARRISON BRANDON S HYDER LARRY S JR STIMPSON JEFFREY CALVIN MUNGO HOMES INC WRIGHT JONI DEAN BRENDA K HAMMETT NANCY OWENS (L-E PENNEY DAVID W JOSEPH ROBERT H ADAMS HARRIET H COSTON KATIE E STOCK LOAN SERVICES LLC FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGA ENGLISH PAMELA K

S E FUNERAL HOMES OF SOU ABC CAPITAL LLC BRE LLC DUPREE FRANK M SHIPPEY HEATHER ALENE FARNSWORTH DANIEL J JR ( COX JIMMY E FLOREZ CLAUDIA A (SURV) ANCP PROPERTIES LLC GILLESPIE SYLVIA L UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BACHE BENJAMIN L (SURV) TRIMBLE DAVID WALTER (JT SMITH BILLIE D (JTWROS) ABERNETHY RICHARD P (JTW CHARLESTON SEVEN GROUP L CLINE BRADLEY P (JTWROS) HOBBS ELAINE SCHNOOR ALLEN MATHEW G SPURRIER REZEN HUTCHINSO AUSLANDER MARTIN E ANDERSON BARBARA J (JTWR BOWLES BRIAN CALDER PATRICIA ANNE THOMPSON CYNTHIA BETH (J MCKAY TRUST 1312 AUGUSTA LLC HANSON AGGREGATES SOUTHE GILLESPY CLARK S (JTWROS HIGHTOWER JERRY R NOCE FRANK J O (JTWROS) UDHWANI DEEPSARAN K & UD WILES WILLIAM QUINTON JIRA JOSEPH J (JTWROS) CHAUDHURY FAIZAL KELLEY SHAWN P (JTWROS) YOUNG BRYAN PHILLIPS JENNIFER (JTWRO VICKERY DAVID JACKSON JR SUAREZ STEPHAN NOCE SAMUEL M TOTHEROW GEORGE KEVIN BURRELL J ARNOLD (JTWROS PURVIANCE ZACHARY VICKERS FRANKLIN ANDERSO SILK GARY ROSS ECKERSON CARL R GATLIN LAURA E CROW CINDY F BERRIEN-CLARK BETH ANN LE HAI NGOC BOSTIC ANTHONY D (JTWROS RITCHIE MARK A BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT KIRKSEY CHARLES E (JTWRO SIMS PHYLLIS PHILSON DARIAUS D REDWINE KIRK S (JTWROS) SCHUPPERT DAVID (JTWROS) CLINE MARGUERITE PEEPLES FINN JOSEPH CARL SAWIRIS MONA AWAD YOUSSE ABBOTT ANITA M WILLIAMS DOROTHY N (JTWR BRAZEL CHARLISA L (SURV) RAILEY BRENT W WATTS LISA DAWN GLASER ARIEL CALDWELL SHELBY L FREEMAN D TRACY (JTWROS) OWENS MARY J LARACUENTE OLGA SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N A LUBIANI RENE NIX KENNEY AKINS VIRGINIA RIVER RIDGE PROPERTIES I ROBERT TIM O KLEPPER DANIEL C (JTWROS TO ANDY SCHMIDT JOHN W (JTWROS) REIMERS ROSA REVOCABLE T TURNER MONTGOMERY (SURV) POTTER BRUCE M (SURV) BUCH CODY ALAN HILL’S SIDE PROPERTIES L

1333 S CLEARVIEW PKWY PO BOX 518 50 COMMERCE CTR 26 WOODVALE AVE 1809 CLEVELAND STREET EXT 16 CLUB FOREST LN 10 RAMSEUR CT 212 WEATHERBY DR 667 MOSSWOOD LN 789 KNOLLWOOD DR 77 FORSYTH ST SW STE 600 300 BELFREY DR 111 WOODLAND WAY 8217 HAMMOND BRANCH WAY 214 MICHAUX DR 1211 ROTHERWOOD RD 613 CLEVELAND ST 505 CALEDONIA LOOP 9 FORT DR 196 SANDSTONE DR 204 ABBY CIR 209 MCDANIEL GREENE 122 CREEK SHOALS DR 309 IRON BRIDGE WAY 104 WILLIAMSBURG DR 15 SETTING SUN LN PO BOX 8499 8505 FREEPORT PKWY 1895 CHESTNUT HILL DR 201 RIVERPLACE UNIT 706 26 SAMPIT DR 209 BOBBY JONES EXPY 304 BRIDGE CROSSING DR 644 CHARTWELL DR 245 RAVEN FALLS LN 206 GILDERBROOK RD 407 TANNER CHASE WAY 2513 GREEN RD 26 TRANQUIL AVE 417 SWEET JULIET WAY 30 SAMPIT DR 10 PEBBLE CREEK WAY 1271 SHADOW WAY 408 LONGSTREET DR 506 JUBILEE WAY 1001 S CHURCH ST UNIT 309 27 CAMPBELLS FARM DR 204 TIMBER LN 109 SPRING TYME LN 12 CROWN EMPIRE CT 31 OWENS RD 664 CHARTWELL DR 403 POINSETTIA DR PO BOX 1039 108 RARITAN CT 5 STRAIHARN PL 19 DUNSBOROUGH DR 11 RED FOX CT 47 STAFFORDSHIRE WAY 225 HOLLAND FORD RD PO BOX 1013 122 NORTHCLIFF WAY 4 STRAIHARN PL 113 KESTREL CT 108 SADDLETREE PL 233 BRIAR CREEK RD 629 CHARTWELL DR 210 WILLOW SPRINGS DR 1 IVY SPRINGS DR 702 QUAIL RUN 218 INGLESIDE WAY 5 MARINER CT 451 7TH ST SW 3415 VISION DR 14 BARONNE CT 311 CRESTWOOD DR 11 HEATHERFIELD DR 3840 PENNINGTON RD 202 WALKER SPRINGS RD 122 LANIER DR 205 ENOREE CIR 223 BROOKMERE RD 9 HILLIVEW RD 416 PERRY AVE 2 ARTURO RD 108 BROOKSIDE AVE 600 PINE LOG FORD RD

$535,000 WOODFIN RIDGE $350,000 SPRING POINT $350,000 GLENLAKE $299,055 COAK CREEK $290,000 COTTAGES AT TURTLE CREEK $285,000 CARMEL $272,500 BUENA VISTA ESTATES $254,000 DILLARD CREEK CROSSING $253,244 DILLAR CREEK CROSSING $241,535 $231,236 $210,000 $210,000 PARK PRESERVE $209,000 STERLING ESTATES $204,900 SPRING LAKE $204,060 GLEN LAKE $198,695 $194,401 LONDONDERRY $192,000 GLENLAKE $187,000 BELMONT $168,500 GLEN LAKE $163,000 CONVERSE HEIGHTS $160,000 FULTON ACRES $160,000 COBBS CREEK $156,000 SUMMERWOOD $155,000 LAUREL SPRINGS $153,000 LAUREL SPRINGS AT BENT CREEK $152,500 CONVERSE HEIGHTS $151,500 WINDRIDGE $144,500 HEATHWOOD EAST $140,000 PATRIOT HILL $140,000 WOODLAND FOREST $139,900 BENT CREEK PLANTATION $139,900 PAISLEY POINTE $135,000 SWITZER ACRES $134,500 HEATHWOOD EAST $132,000 WEST FOREST $128,000 EAGLE POINTE $127,000 STEWART ESTATES $125,000 WOODLAND FOREST $124,900 $124,385 FOX HUNT $124,182 HIGHLAND RIDGE $122,500 HIGHLAND RIDGE $122,500 STONEWOOD CROSSING $113,682 PLEASANT GREEN $112,000 $110,000 JAMES CREEK $109,000 BORDEAUX $102,003 $100,869 $100,869 SHERWOOD ACRES $100,500 $100,000 BRADFORD PLACE $97,000 BRADFORD PLACE $97,000 JAMES CREEK $96,000 ARBOURS $92,800 $90,100 HANGING ROCK $90,000 PLUM RIDG $86,000 WOODS CREEK CROSSING $84,000 WOODLAND HEIGHTS $81,000 HILLBROOK FOREST $80,000 MIDLAND ESTATES $80,000 HILLBROOK FOREST $80,000 $72,000 PELHAM MILL VILLAGE $69,000 PELHAM MILL VILLAGE $69,000 $60,000 WOODLAND HEIGHTS $55,299 LAWSON CREEK FARMS $54,402 FERNDALE $53,801 $53,200 PLUSH MEADOWS $51,000 WILDWOOD ESTATES $48,000 INMAN MILLS $41,225 RIDGEVIEW $36,860 CHERRY HILL $36,000 POINTE AT ROCK SPRINGS $35,000 COUNTRY CLUB SPRINGS $32,496 $27,500 MOUNTAIN TEARS $27,000 BROOKSIDE VILLAGE $25,000 FIELDSTONE $25,000 TIMBERLAKE $24,900 LINVILLE HEIGHTS $22,700

42 T H E J O U R N A L | JANUARY 25, 2013

PRICE

SELLER

19-24, BUYER

2012 ADDRESS

ELDER JR, TOY M AUNT SUZIES LEARNING CENTER 2298 OLD FURNACE RD RICKY CAMP CONSTRUCTION HARRIS, WILLIAM T 124 BAY TREE CT JACKSON, BILLY J SEIDMAN 1985 FAMILY TRUST 331 HILLCOVE PT NVR INC PACHECO, LUIS M 802 HARTSCOVE CT HARRIS, WILLIAM T JACKSON, BILLY JOE 626 LATIMER DR YOUNG, LORI N EVANS, DUSTIN 3067 ENGLISH COTTAGE WAY LORENZ, JOEF CHITTUM, ANTHNY 468 GRAND OAK WAY SMITH, SHANNON L BENNETT, DWIGHT 185 BUENA VISTA DR S C PILLON HOMES INC BILOTT, BRANDEN J 412 JAMESWOOD CT S C PILLON HOMES INC CHAI, JINAN 558 HORTON GROVE RD POTEAT, ELIZABETH M BLACKWELL, MICHAEL R LOT NUMBER: 1 DAVIS, KERRY R RICH, JAMES 130 SCHOOL RD DAVIS, KERRY R RICH, JAMES 130 SCHOOL RD NIEMITALO INC POLIVKA, JUSTIN 130 GLENDOWER LN ONLEY, WENDY M CHHIM, SOSAROEUN S 392 RHAPSODY LN S C PILLON HOMES INC ROUTON, RUSSELL WAYNE 541 MEADOWSEED CT NVC INC LIN, XIN 556 SHORELINE BLVD FANNIE MAE GARRISON, JAMES H 505 MEMMINGER CT LANFORD, DIANNE M LESLIE, ROY H 234 DONEGAL DR ENCHATNED CONSTRUCTION LLC BUHRMAN, JODI L 147 DEWFIELD LN BO SETTLE INC HARDING, DELPHINE R 878 AFFIRMED DR BROWN, J C COLCOLOUGH, CHERYL P 416 PIERVIEW WAY FIX, JOHN P DALLESKA, JACQUELINE 619 NORWOOD ST WILSON SR, JOE H MELLEBY, JOSEPH T 219 DAVID RD SPAULDING QUALITY HOMES LLC GREENE, ERNEST LANE 515 ELLERSLY CT COX, CHAD M TINSLEY, LACEY M 155 BERRY BLVD BLACKBURN, BRIAN A MCKINNEY, CHRISTINA E 712 WATERBROOK LN WHEELER, EDWARD L WILLETT, TERRY L 754 WATERBROOKLN MCCRAW, RONALD A HORTON JR, WILLIAM ANDREW 223 CLIFTON AVE ROBISON, WANDA K BALLENGER, JARED J 267 BETHANY CT ANDERSON, JAMES A BRYSON, STEPHEN J 104 ROSWELL TER SINOBAS, JAVIER WILKINS, VERLANTRA T 308 BRANDON OAKS DR DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC BAIRD, BRIAN R LOT NUMBER: 16 NICHOLSON, KOEY W BRYANT JR, JACK D 402 WEEPING WILLOW CT LAGNIAPPE DEVELOPERS LLC BRIAN, TREVOR 122 PAISLEY PROMENADE LJMC LLC LISTER JR, ROBERT W 305 SILAS CT RICHTER MOSS, LISA WHALEN, WESLEY CHRISTOPHER 223 HEATHWOOD DR WADDELL, MARY FRANCES T STRICKLAND, MICHAEL 407 HARRISON LN ROBBINS, JENNIFER F KOENIG, NENA L 514 MANGO PL HOWELL, JAMES ALVIN PUTNAM, TIMOTHY C 402 AMBER LEA DR DISTINGUISHED DESIGN LLC LARK, ANGELA D LOT NUMBER: 15 LIGHT HOUSE BAPTIST CHURCH WALKER, E SHELDON 710 GREEN LAKE RD GATE, RONALD W DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST 412 HUNTERS TRL BARKER, PAUL M DUBESKO, COREY E 315 TARTAN CT BARKER, PAUL M DUBESKO, COREY E 315 TARTAN CT MUNGO, HOMES INC EMORY, JAMES A 275 STONEWOOD CROSSING DR ISKRA, KEITH D LUX, DAVID 205 LUKE CT FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE GLUR, GERALD 856 HAMMETT RD REDUS SC HOUSING LLC DUNCAN SR, RICKEY D 707 BUCKSKIN TRL HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT RENO, KEITH 442 LISTRAC DR BALLARD, JANICE R CITIMORTGAGE INC 581 HOUSTON ST BALLARD, JANICE R CITIMORTGAGE INC 581 HOUSTON ST JEFFRIES, CAROLYN MARINO, ANDREW 195 FOXHALL RD DAWKINS, SONYA FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE 1071 MIDNIGHT RD SMITH, MONA LISA KHOROSHYLOV, OLEKSIY 141 SHELDON DR SMITH, MONA LISA KHOROSHYLOV, OLEKSIY 141 SHELDON DR DEUTSCHE BANK PETERS, MATTHEW 171 STOCKBRIDGE RD KING, JEFFREY A DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST 1 WISTERIA CT WALTERS, TIMOTHY D JPMORGAN CHASE BANK 475 WEDGEWOOD DR RATH, WERNER A FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 174 SLATE DR BREMMER, KEVIN JOHN MCCORD, VERONICA S 618 WICKSON CT US BANK NA HORTON, BLAKE K 364 SPLIT OAK LN ARTHUR STATE BANK BURDICK, JONATHAN A 252 HOLLY DR COLLINS, SHERRA ANN HEADMAN, RODNEY LEE 101 HILLBROOK DR QUINTON, AMYM US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 210 KENNETH DR COLLINS, SHERRA ANN HEADMAN, RODNEY LEE 101 HILLBROOK DR JENNINGS, STEPHEN L BYRD, TIMOTHY L 186 JENNINGS RD WEST, JACKIE R SETZER, RICK A LOT NUMBER: 19&20 WEST, JACKIE R SETZER, RICK A LOT NUMBER: 19&20 MERSHON, AMANDA S DUFRESNE, MELISSA J 664 HAMMETT RD US S BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION MAVROFTAS, GENE 120 HOLLY DR HORNE, MATTIE R U S BANK NA U S BANK NA COOPER, TANYA GRACE UNLIMITED INTERNATIONAL IC 152 COLDSTREAM DR SHUTLS SR, WILLIAM C BANK OF AMERICA NA 642 ARLINGTON RD CHEA, JOHNATHAN JPMORGAN CHASE BANK 213 WOLFE LN MARK III PROPERTIES INC XU, XIAOYOU 505 603 BRIDLEWOOD LN HAWKINS, HEATHER J JPMORGAN CHASE BANK 14 5TH ST RANCK, ANNABELLE RANCK, MATTHEW A 110 ANITA DR FANNIE MAE HOLT, ROBERT C 221 CHERRY HILL RD BEESON HENTHORN DEVELOPMENT BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION LLC 313 GRAYLIN DR SNIPES, RENEE C SNIPES JR, CONNIE M 23 HIDDEN SPRINGS RD FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE CARPENTER, DARON F 120 N CLEVELAND PARK DR FBSA 1 LLC WELLS, EDWARD 741 TEAR MOUNTAIN RD MORTON, SHONTA M WELLS FARGO BANK NA 203 KNIGHTON DR ALLEN, THOMAS R FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 243 ARENA PARK DR ERMSON, DEANNA G MIKHAYLENKO, VIKTOR A 110 ENGLEWOOD DR FANNIE MAE CLARK, LEONARD J 118 CHELSEA ST

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

journal culture

THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT CASE NO. 2012-CP-23-5354 Betty Abercrombie, PLAINTIFF, vs. Miguel Gonzalez-Ruiz: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in the above entitled action, copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve copy of your answer upon the undersigned at their offices, 900 E. North Street, Suite 210, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof upon you, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND/OR MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a Guardian Ad Litem to represent said minor(s) within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff(s) herein. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that

the original Complaint in the above entitled action was filed in the office of the Clerk of Court for Greenville County on DECEMBER 3, 2012. GUEST & BRADY, LLC. By: RICHARD K. ALLEN, III, SC Bar # 74865 ATTORNEYS FOR THE PLAINTIFF 900 E. North Street, Suite 210 Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 233-7200. PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2013 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-13-03 APPLICANT: HQ PROPERTIES, LLC PROPERTY: Tax Map #460-1-27; 250 Phillips Trail, Greenville SC REQUEST: Variance in right side setback for existing house.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Purple Money, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 2607 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this license/ permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than February 3, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

CB-13-04 APPLICANT: NO LIMIT HOLY TEMPLE CHURCH PROPERTY: Tax Map #WG02.42-4.6; 38 Rosemond Dr, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for addition of a Modular building on site for church office. CB-13-05 APPLICANT: N.E. GREENVILLE CONGREGATION OF JEHOVAH’S WITNESS PROPERTY: Tax Map #538.7-119; 1400 Old Spartanburg Rd., GREER SC REQUEST: Variance in LEFT side setback for existing storage building and Use by Special Exception for an additional storage building. CB-13-06 APPLICANT: SOUTHSIDE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL PROPERTY: Tax Map #539.3-124.2; 2211 Woodruff Road, SIMPSONVILLE SC REQUEST: Variance in LEFT side setback for visitor bleachers and Use by Special Exception for visitor bleachers and installation of athletic track and new lighting. CB-13-07 APPLICANT: JOSEPH D. BAGWELL/SpecializedMatthews LLC PROPERTY: Tax Map #547.11-9.5; 1130 Woodruff Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: Variance in REAR setback requirement for Building expansion. CB-13-08 APPLICANT: GREENVILLE COUNTY RECREATION DISTRICT PROPERTY: Tax Map #278-166.2; 301 Butler Springs Road, Greenville SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for reconstruction of Concession stand. CB-13-09 APPLICANT: ENCLAVE PARIS MOUNTAIN APTS. PROPERTY: Tax Map #445-12.2; 101 Enclave Paris Drive, Greenville SC REQUEST: Variance in sign ordinance to allow a larger sign.

LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145 tel 864.679.1205 fax 864.679.1305

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Spinx Co. Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 402 Haywood Rd., Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than January 27, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Spinx Co. Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 461 S. Pleasantburg Dr., Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than January 27, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Spinx Co. Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 627 N. Main St., Mauldin, SC 29662. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than January 27, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

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JANUARY 25, 2013 | THE Journal 43

journal culture

the week iN photos

look who’s in the journal this week

photos by GreG beckner / staff

Andrea Smith introduces and announces the winners of the 2013 Win A Dream Contest.

Attendees at the 2013 Dreams in Actions Celebration at Greenville High School listen as Pastor Curtis Johnson gives opening remarks. Pastor Curtis Johnson, chairman of the MLK Dream Weekend executive board, welcomes everyone to the Dreams in Actions Celebration at Greenville High School on Dr. Martin Luther King Day.

Providing entertainment for the 2013 Dreams in Actions Celebration, presented by Michelin, JDew performs the oneman show “One Voice: A Black History Narrative.”

2013 Win A Dream Contest award recipients, second place Chanda Cohen of Full House, left, and first place Michelle Jordan of purpose4teens.com.

TM

Totally p

Come

For tickets call 467-3000 or visit scchildrenstheatre.org

44 THE Journal | JANUARY 25, 2013

journal culture

the week iN photos

look who’s in the journal this week

photos by Gerry pate / contributinG

Poster and poetry contest winners take the stage during the celebration.

Crossword puzzle: page 46

Sudoku puzzle: page 46

Master of ceremonies Pastor Walter R. Belton of St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church gets the show started at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Unity Celebration Monday night at Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium.

The Sound of Diversity Choir and Orchestra provided the music during the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Unity Celebration.

Kristin Harling with her nine-month-old son, Solomon, check out some of the winning posters.

Betty Russell’s third-grade class at Stone Academy with illustrator Michael White. White presented “The Start of Something Big: A Language and Visual Arts Program” to Stone Academy students.

Rob Green (left), Wal-Mart’s marketing manager for the Upstate, joins Steve Valand, vice president of education at Greenville Technical College, to announce a $43,300 grant to the Greenville Tech Foundation. Wal-Mart awarded the grant to support services provided at Command Central, the veteran’s services hub in the Beattie E. Huff Student Center on the Greenville Tech campus. The grant will purchase furniture and computer equipment as well as provide counseling and tutoring assistance to any of the almost 500 veterans enrolled at Greenville Tech.

JANUARY 25, 2013 | THE Journal 45

journal culture

What’s in a name? By: Richard deBondt

figURe. this. oUt. ThaT’s a wrap!

By Elizabeth C. Gorski

What’s in a name? Would that which we call a Pouilly-Fuissé, by any other name still smell as sweet (or dry). Well, yes and no. Pouilly-Fuissé is a very specific appellation, in the region of Macon, a sub-region of Burgundy in France. The name is a conjunction of the names of the two most prominent villages in a geologically unique place with an array of hillsides ideally suited for the wine-grape Chardonnay. Even within this tiny area, differences in soil type, mineral content, drainage, sun exposure, temperature, and humidity have caused individual vineyard sites to have names that describe surface areas as small as a couple of acres. There is an insidious movement in the world that seeks to replace names such as “Domaine Ferret Pouilly-Fuissé Les Clos” (a name that denotes a special section of vines, less than 2 acres, between a winery building and the old church of the village of Fuissé) with the simple name “Chardonnay” (a generalist name, not even very botanically specific, for the grapes grown there). This is a bit like refusing to use the name “Symphony Number 5 of Ludwig van Beethoven” and instead insisting that it be referred to as “C minor”. It is a fact that Beethoven’s 5th is in C minor, but it does little to identify the piece. So it is with wine names. The best wine names not only identify the geographic local of origin, but inherently take into account the wine making culture of the place. This brings to mind the famous Monty Python sketch in which all the characters are named “Bruce” until a new arrival is introduced as “Michael Baldwin” to the consternation of one of the Bruces who argues that this different name will be confusing. Indeed a Pouilly-Fuissé would be just as fine if called “Chardonnay”, just not clearly identified. Alas, poor PouillyFuissé. Richard deBondt founded Northampton Wines in Greenville in 1975. With his business partner David Williams, he oversees retail wine and restaurant operations, along with wine travel.

Northampton Wines www.northamptonwines.com 211-A East Broad Street • 271-3919 46 THE Journal | JANUARY 25, 2013

Across 1 Actress Birch 6 Trattoria glassful 10 Many a GE product 14 Ruse 18 Have lunch at home 19 Pressing need? 20 Set of beliefs 22 Tear down, in Tottenham 23 Husky features 25 Line at a rodeo? 26 “QB VII” author 27 “$40 a Day” chef Ray 28 __ facto 30 Librarian’s reminder 31 Players 32 Grafton’s “__ for Lawless” 34 Scottish tongue 36 Supermodel Wek 38 Disney film featuring Berlioz, Toulouse, Marie and their mom Duchess 44 Nontraditional performance genre 48 Carpet cleaning tool 49 Poses 51 Route to the lungs 52 Swashbuckler Flynn 53 Arise (from) 55 Codger 57 High-speed scene 58 Bledel of “Gilmore Girls” 60 First name in fashion 62 Fruity treats 64 It ends in Nov. 65 Ready for aroma-

therapy, say 69 Blood typing letters 70 Spot in front of the telly? 71 Tom yum soup servers 74 “I’m not impressed” 76 “Was __ blame?” 77 Big Island volcano 78 Like a bunch-spoiling apple 81 Numskull 84 NBC weekend staple 85 Old Athens enemy 87 Astrologer to the rich and famous 88 One who’s not striking 90 It has its highs and lows 93 Not as warm 94 C.P.E. Bach’s birthplace 96 “Up and __!” 98 Court plea 100 2011 World Series champs 102 Packages from recent guests, perhaps 104 Symbol of purity 105 Time past 106 Sailor’s direction 107 Clump 110 Bread in a jar? 112 Gp. with forces 114 Lasagna cheese 120 Madonna’s “La __ Bonita” 121 Call forth 123 The Chicago Bulls had two in the ‘90s

125 Future doc’s exam 126 Lats’ neighbors 127 It’s south of Vesuvius 128 Like ballerinas, at times 129 Cake mix additions 130 Late for a party, maybe 131 Berth place 132 Some aromatic cakes Down 1 Four: Pref. 2 “Yuk yuk” 3 Of the ear 4 Like chocolate truffle cake 5 “Diana” singer 6 Soloists in Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 7 Lyricist Gershwin 8 Words of denial 9 How freelancers may work 10 Puzzle book offering 11 Teen leader? 12 Pod veggies 13 “__ Weapon” 14 Trademark caps for Ashton Kutcher and Justin Timberlake 15 __ avis 16 Yard sale caveat 17 Recurring pain? 21 Mexico’s national flower 24 “Drink to me only with thine eyes” dedicatee 29 Span. ladies

33 Editor’s “leave it” 35 Legally bar 37 Kick out 38 Gripping pattern 39 Throws 40 Everglades bird 41 “... like __ of chocolates”

Easy

56 Friend of Shylock 59 Way up 61 Z’s overseas 63 Old hi-fis 66 Coolidge and Hayworth 67 Symphony that includes a funeral march 68 Intimidate 71 Household regulators 72 Disconnect 73 Recording 74 “The Cryptogram” playwright 75 Online message 78 Lawyer’s document 79 “This is only __” 80 Bar fliers 81 Valleys 82 Big name in coffee makers 83 Smartly dressed 86 Theater opening 89 “Don’t play games with me” 91 1977 ELO hit 92 Environmental extremist 95 Reacted with outrage, as a mob 97 Rooney __, who played Salander in “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” 99 Navel type 101 Turn at the bar, perhaps 103 Brought home 107 Coach’s call 108 “The Perfect Storm” rescue gp. 109 Penalty __ 111 Game divided into chukkers 113 “__ Be in Love”: Kate Bush song 115 Naval noncoms 116 Vintner’s prefix 42 Dog topper 117 “Later,” in London 43 Bully’s words 118 Camaro roof option 45 Mindful 119 Grieg’s “__ Death” 46 Dreaded Jamaican? 122 Gold meas. 47 Nautical ropes 50 Toyota Camry model 124 GOP platformpromoting org. 54 Midler’s “Divine” nickname Crossword answers: page 45

Sudoku answers: page 45

journal culture

60 & BeYoNd with peggy henderson

Love hurts: mourning Lizzie Belle

   In the course of 47 years of marriage to my stoic and Renaissance husband, two children, two granddaughters, and a diverse collection of nine dogs, we just recently said good-bye to our 10th – and most special – golden retriever of eight years, Lizzie Belle. I know. I know. All family dogs are the “most special” until the next ball of fur cuddles into your arms and your heart and mind melt. Honestly, it’s just because Lizzie shared her years with us while both my husband and I reached our crossroads of 60 & Beyond. When I hugged Lizzie this last year, I was looking at a sweet, elderly white muzzle and eyes blinded by brain cancer. She was leaving us and I am left staring at “soonto-be 70” in the mirror. Lizzie and I grew old together. Regarding kindly condolences from admirers of Lizzie, a universal truth of loss prevails: “There’s such a hole in my heart.” For some unknown reason I woke up with the lyrics to “Love Hurts” in my foggy mind (and I don’t even like Rod Stewart): “Love hurts. Love scars. Love wounds and mars any heart.”  Perhaps there is a lesson here that needs to be faced, I tell myself. I Google the stages of mourning, and find the three basic steps for us humans and our pets are Shock/Denial; Pain/Pain Reflection; Acceptance.  Presently, I’m practicing the Reflection/Acceptance stage with the aid of Lizzie’s ashes ensconced on a bookshelf in my study.  Two goldens spent their life with us in the last two decades. Chassie, the Belle before Lizzie, carried an air of majesty about her. She knew she was beautiful and reveled in her glory. Along with her queenly behavior, she would from time to time get a wild hair and decide to find her way out of the wrought-iron fence in the back and preen her 85-pound figure up, down and around Converse Heights. Much to my chagrin. She was a love bug and I miss her dearly. Unlike Chassie, Lizzie didn’t care if she was gorgeous or not. Being a homebody, she owned an inner clock that directed her daily schedule (and mine) of meals, walks, upstairs or downstairs for particular nappy times. She was a personification of a programmed hall monitor. Lizzie Belle was the gate greeter of our sidewalk; I could tell by her joyous bark that either someone was giving her a treat or there were children holding out their hands to her.   What makes me smile the most is that during the hot summery days, I would watch her from the laundry room delicately picking blue salvia leaves off the long branches like an African giraffe, chewing them up with her eyes closed with pleasure.  After the acceptance stage of the grieving process, The Puppy Discussion is inevitably approached with its pros and cons. I call this a classic catch-22 decision because the cons favor an intelligent, objective, pragmatic approach that on paper makes sense.  1. Extended trips are curtailed because of long kennel stays. Not fair to dog or family dog sitting. 2. The brutal reality of the first 18 months of puppyhood at a certain age. Purgatory. 3. My “earned” love of peace, harmony and writing solitude. 4. What about my garden? 4. What are we thinking? 5. Perhaps a smaller dog? Or two smaller dogs so they can each have a playmate? 6. No question we have lost our minds.  Of course we have lost our minds and we have submitted our names on an adoption list for a female golden retriever puppy that has not even been conceived as I write. The breeder mother lives in Florida. The mother’s name is Laney and though she is a knockout, beloved Chassie would give her a run for her money.  I wonder if the future Gracie Belle will like blue salvia, too?    Peggy Henderson is a 60 & Beyond former freelance writer turned newspaper columnist. Besides appearing in the Spartanburg and Greenville Journals, her column is syndicated with Senior Wire News Services. In addition, she’s a staff writer for the website www.Go60.us. Contact her at peg4745@aol.com.

DAVE PELZER: MY HOPE IN THE HUMAN SPIRIT Join us February 14th for the 3rd Annual Julie Valentine Center Luncheon to hear the remarkable story of an extraordinary man. Listen as #1 New York Times and International bestselling author Dave Pelzer recounts his tale of unspeakable tragedy, but more importantly, unbelievable triumph.

AUTHOR

DAVE PELZER

RSVP BY

FEB. 7TH 2013 SPONSORED BY

From a childhood of abuse, chronicled in his book A Child Called “It”, to an adulthood filled with accolades and accomplishments, including being named “The Outstanding Young Person in the World,” Dave Pelzer’s life is a celebration of an exceptional human spirit.

FEBRUARY 14, 2013 AT NOON 11:30 CHECK-IN • TD CONVENTION CENTER

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When it matters most, count on us. Call today for a free in-home evaluation

1-800-439-4590 www.interimcares.com

JANUARY 25, 2013 | THE Journal 47

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Jan. 25, 2013 Greenville Journal