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MAY 2014

time-tested for customer satisfaction Inside this Issue... Livestock Markets Working for you Feeders to Meet in San Diego

2 California Cattleman May 2014

Join Us Wednesdays At Galt THD ©

SpECial cattlEmEn’s fEEdEr SalEs FEatUring largE rUns oF top CalvEs and yEarlings From mEmbErs oF thEsE loCal assoCiations ...

Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento • San Joaquin-Stanislaus • Calaveras • Contra Costa-Alameda Fresno-Kings • Tuolumne • Madera • Santa Clara • Sonoma-Marin • Tahoe • Napa-Solano • Yolo

wednesdays: april 30, may 21, june 4 and JUnE 18 plUs satUrday, may 10 WATCh AND bID lIvE EvErY WEDNESDAY:

CATTlEuSA.CoM

Clm rEprEsEntativEs JAKE PArNEll..........................................(916) 662-1298 gEorgE gooKIN.......................................(209) 482-1648 MArK FISChEr.........................................(209) 768-6522 rEx WhITTlE ...........................................(209) 996-6994 JoE gATES ................................................(707) 694-3063 AbEl JIMENEz..........................................(209) 401-2515

12495 SToCKToN blvD. gAlT, CA 95632 (209) 745-1515 office • (209) 745-1582 Fax Website: www.clmgalt.com

CALL NOW TO CONSIGN TO TheSe upCOmING SALeS: June 13 from Cottonwood • July 14-16 from Reno

mark yoUr CalEndar satUrday, JUly 26 Annual Fall-Calving bred Cow Sale

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May 2014 California Cattleman 3

California Cattlemen’s Association OFFICERS PRESIDENT

Tim Koopmann, Sunol

FIRST VICE PRESIDENT Billy Flournoy, Likely

SECOND VICE PRESIDENTS Fred Chamberlin, Los Olivos David Daley, Ph.D., Oroville Rich Ross, Lincoln

TREASURER

Jack Hanson, Susanville

STAFF

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Billy Gatlin

VICE PRESIDENT GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Justin Oldfield

DIRECTOR OF GOVERNMENT RELATIONS Kirk Wilbur

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Lisa Pherigo

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS Stevie Ipsen

ASSOCIATE DIR. OF COMMUNICATIONS Malorie Bankhead

Office Administrator

Katie Almand

PUBLICATION SERVICES OFFICE & CIRCULATION

Office: (916) 444-0845 • Fax: (916) 444-2194

MANAGING EDITOR

Stevie Ipsen stevie@calcattlemen.org

ADVERTISING SALES/FIELD SERVICES Matt Macfarlane (916) 803-3113 mmacfarlane@wildblue.net BILLING SERVICES Lisa Pherigo lisa@calcattlemen.org

4 California Cattleman May 2014

Through Thick and Thin by CCA Feeder Council Chairman Bill Brandenberg

As a lifelong cattle feeder, I find it difficult to find a silver lining in this month’s closure of the beef processing plant in Brawley, which was announced by National Beef earlier this year. The loss of processing capacity will lead to a drastically reduced cattle feeding industry in Imperial Valley. Many operations will be shut down while others will struggle to operate within the new dynamics thrust upon us. One of the toughest outcomes is the displacement of many of our long-time, loyal employees whose lives will be turned upside down as they struggle to find employment in Imperial Valley which currently has 25 to 30 percent unemployment rates. Looking back to the period when the concept for the plant Brawley Beef spawned, construction took place and several of us area feeders operated the facility before we made the deal to sell the facility to National Beef, we accomplished our goal of developing a processing facility to allow us to continue in business in the Imperial Valley. It was a tremendous accomplishment despite being an expensive education. The deal with National Beef was an answer to our prayers. We felt a large packer would be able to operate the facility more efficiently and give us the stability needed to concentrate on what we do best which is run our cattle feeding operations. After the announcement of the closure was made in February, Imperial Valley feeders met numerous times in effort to salvage the plant by negotiating with National Beef. Paul Cameron from Mesquite Cattle Feeders and Bill Plourd from El Toro Land and Cattle Co., were our spokesmen and did a great job in communicating with us and trying to negotiate a deal. The only positive outcome of the negotiating process came from realizing that we had all once again stuck together and spoke as one voice, determined to keep our cattle here in Imperial Valley until we could see there was not any hope of making a deal with National

Beef. As I look back on my experiences with Brawley Beef and National Beef, the one lesson learned is that together we can accomplish much more than trying to act on our own. The same is true for the California Cattlemen’s Association as a whole. With the problems we face here in California – drought, urban ignorance of production agriculture and regulatory issues – we must be more united, agree to disagree among ourselves and publicly speak with one strong, unified voice or we will be severely impacted by legislators who really don’t notice us unless we deliver votes for them. Some cattlemen get hung up on a single issue contrary to CCA’s membership policies and won’t support the association or even worse bad-mouth CCA or CCA leadership who they feel are against them. With feeders, cow-calf, purebred, stocker and dairy segments in California, we are never going to agree on everything and need to look at the big picture. As our cattle on feed numbers in Imperial Valley shrink, our Feeder Council and Beef Council revenues will also take a hit. There will be new dynamics required in how our organizations function. Cattlemen in California need to keep an open mind as these transitions evolve and remember that CCA’s goal of improving the business climate and providing an opportunity to be profitable will not change. Our staff does a terrific job addressing our issues and trying to keep us from being impacted by well-meaning legislators who don’t understand production agriculture. The next time you hear a someone criticize CCA over an issue remind them of the other dozens of accomplishments CCA has achieved that either saves us directly or enables us to operate every day.

SERVING CALIFORNIA BEEF PRODUCERS SINCE 1917 Bolded names and businesses in editorial represent only current members of the California Cattlmen’s Association or California CattleWomen, Inc. For questions about your membership status, contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. The California Cattleman is published monthly except July/August is combined by the California Cattlemen’s Association, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, for $20/year, or as part of the annual membership dues. All material and photos within may not be reproduced without permission from publisher. National Advertising Group: The Cattle Connection/The Powell Group, 4162-B Carmichael Ct, Montgomery, AL 36106, (334) 271-6100. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: California Cattleman, 1221 H Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

May 2014

Volume 97, Issue 5 ASSOCIATION PERSPECTIVES

CATTLEMEN’S COLUMN Sticking together against the odds

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THE COVER

4

BUNKHOUSE 8 The value of networking with fellow producers

YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK An update on CCA’s threatened species efforts

10

VET VIEWS 12 Preparing for newborn calf care

PROGESSIVE PRODUCER 14 CSU Chico receives gift that keeps on giving

COUNCIL COMMUNICATOR 26 Keeping up with your beef council staff

RANGELAND TRUST TALK

38

How can livestock markets help you?

16

Sustainability and the beef industry

30

Antibiotics in the future

34

Your bottomline and Shorthorn genetics

40

Droughts impact on wildflowers

SPECIAL FEATURES

READER SERVICES

Buyers’ Guide 46 Obituaries and New Arrivals

53

Advertisers Index 54

The May issue of the California Cattlemen’s Magazine has traditionally focused on California livestock auction markets and again on the cover this year’s auction yard issue is Cattlemen’s Livestock Market (CLM) in Galt. As California’s livestock marketing headquarters, CLM’s commitment to their customers has been second to none for over 46 years. CLM again features a spring and summer sale schedule offering some of California’s top calves and yearlings, see more on their advertisement on page 3. CLM is dedicated to preservation of our great industry and again offers special cattlemen’s feeder sales. From these sales a portion of the commissions is donated back to each consignor’s local cattlemen’s association. Over the past 20 years, the Frank Loretz family and CLM have donated over $625,000 to local cattlemen’s organizations with the hopes of promoting the beef industry through funding scholarships and programs for future beef industry leaders. Pictured below are long time CLM customer Pat Kirby and CLM representative George Gookin at the shipment of Kirby’s yearling steers near Merced. Also pictured below is CLM Manager Jake Parnell weighing Kirby’s cattle and CLM’s Jim Anderson lending Parnell some much needed roping advice at a local calf branding. Stop by CLM anytime or contact a CLM Representative about how marketing your cattle through an industry leading auction market or on Western Video Market. For weekly market reports and auction yard information visit www.clmgalt.com.

CLM REPRESENTATIVES Jake Parnell........... .(916) 662-1298 George Gookin.... .(209) 482-1648 Rex Whittle........... .(209) 996-6994 Mark Fischer......... .(209) 768-6522 Joe Gates............... .(707) 694-3063 Abel Jimenez........ .(209) 401-2515

C. Anderson ©

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THD ©

May 2014 California Cattleman 5

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6 California Cattleman May 2014

The Central California Livestock Marketing Center Join us AT The conTrA cosTA-AlAMedA & sAn JoAquin-sTAnislAus counTY cATTleMen’s AssociATion shoWcAse feeder sAle

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Brunch served aT 9 a.M. • sale aT 10 a.M.

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Tues. May 20 • Tues. June 3 • Tues. June 17 feATurinG lArGe runs of cAlves & YeArlinGs

Also MArk Your cAlendArs for The 7 Th AnnuAl

cAliforniA cATTle Producers fAll cAlvinG feMAle sAle sATurdAY, AuGusT 2

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froM The sierrAs To The seA, our TeAM is AlWAYs here To AssisT You in MeeTinG Your BuYinG And sellinG needs! TlAY rePresenTATives

MAx olverA.......................... 209 277-2063 sTeve fAriA .......................... 209 988-7180 eddie nunes......................... 209 604-6848 chuck cozzi ........................ 209 652-4479 Bud cozzi .............................. 209 652-4480 John luiz ............................... 209 480-5101 BrAndon BABA................... 209 480-1267 JAke BeTTencourT ........... 209 262-4019 reed Welch - honorArY fieldMAn And friend

Turlock livesTock AucTion YArd office: 209 634-4326 209 667-0811

10430 lander Ave., Turlock, cA P.o. Box 3030, Turlock, cA 95381 www.turlocklivestock.com May 2014 California Cattleman 7

BUNKHOUSE RELATIONSHIPS DO MATTER by CCA Vice President of Government Relations Justin Oldfield The news that California’s largest beef packer will permanently close its doors later this month comes with both frustration and despair for many livestock producers in California’s Imperial Valley. Many know the details of the announcement released by National Beef in January, however most do not the details of what occurred immediately following this unfortunate news. Impending crises and challenges tend to bring people together and not drive them apart. That is exactly what happened in Imperial County following the announcement that National Beef processing plant in Brawley would be closing this spring. It is altogether very easy to focus on the negative circumstances surrounding the situation in the Imperial Valley however some light should be shed on the actions taken by beef producers, local community leaders, state legislators and others who worked tirelessly to avoid the plant’s shut down. Although the National Beef plant is poised to shutdown permanently, these individuals are working to foster new opportunities for Imperial Valley beef producers. These efforts will help fill the gap that will be left with the plant’s closure in order to offset the need for a local beef packing plant to serve local cattle feeders, their employees and all those in the community that depend on the beef industry as the basis for their livelihood. CCA and cattle feeders in the Imperial Valley greatly appreciated the efforts by Sen. Ben Hueso (D-San Diego), Assemblymember Manuel Perez (D-Coachella), members of the Imperial County Board of Supervisors and local regulatory agencies who worked to immediately address the challenges faced by National Beef with potential solutions. This collaboration would not have been possible without the previous close working relationship established between beef producers in Imperial County and their local policy makers. Specifically, CCA has made it a priority to establish close relationships with both Hueso and Perez. Their quick response and willingness to engage came immediately because both members, through work done by CCA and most importantly local cattle feeders, have a true understanding of the importance of the beef industry to their district. We also must not forget those cattle feeders that took it upon themselves to rally others in the industry to present one united voice to articulate the importance of National Beef to their businesses and provide a suite of solutions to put on the table for consideration. The timely support provided by

8 California Cattleman May 2014

local policy makers and the ability to band together as a group are the result of work already done in the community to build support for the industry prior to a negative situation occurring. While there is no timing that is preferable for unfortunate news to JUSTIN OLDFIELD impact California’s beef industry, if there is a silver lining to this situation is that it comes at a time of year when feedyard owners and operators from California and Arizona join together for the annual California/Arizona Feeder Meeting. This year’s meeting, set to begin a day after the Brawley plant closure, will provide a venue for California feeders to show support for one another and work on solutions to problems that will allow their family operations to persevere for future generations. The meeting also provides a chance to hear from speakers about the opportunities within the beef industry, of which there are many. For more information on this year’s feeder meeting, see page 30 of this issue. While a final solution to the dilemma poised by the plant’s closure has not been found, ongoing efforts remain at all levels to protect the viability of the beef industry in Imperial County. Ranchers and beef producers in other parts of the state should look to the actions taken by those in the Imperial Valley as a positive lesson and recognize that building support during the good times will help provide the necessary support to overcome the bad times. This support can be achieved by producers willing to get involved in CCA, Cattle-PAC, your local cattlemen’s association and just generally working to proactively tell your story and the importance of protecting all segments of California’s cattle industry. The beef production community is sure to face many challenges in the future and California’s beef industry deserves a fighting chance to preserve our way of life for the next generation. Relationships matter now and they will also matter in the future so don’t wait to get involved – take part now.

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Western Stockman’s Market

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YOUR DUES DOLLARS AT WORK CCA Work to Prevent Listing of Threatened Species As a whole, ranchers on private and public lands understand all too well the impacts of regulation on their way of life. Recently, CCA has been hard at work tackling several issues surrounding the listing of species under the state and/or federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). Similarly, CCA staff has also been closely monitoring the development of a wolf management plan to deal with the possibility of California once again have a gray wolf population. As the protection of each of these species has significant impact on the ranching community, rest assured that CCA is engaged an active on your behalf. Yosemite Toad & Yellow-legged Frog A year ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) proposed to list the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog and the distinct northern population segment of the yellow-legged frog as endangered species under the federal ESA, and to list the Yosemite toad as threatened under the ESA. USFWS also proposed to list more than a million acres of land in Butte, Plumas, Lassen, Sierra, Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Amador, Calaveras, Alpine, Mariposa, Mono, Madera, Tuolumne, Fresno and Inyo counties as critical habitat for the three amphibian species. In March, the California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) submitted comments to USFWS opposing these proposed regulations. Though CCA had already submitted comments in opposition in June, USFWS had reopened the comment period after submitting a draft economic analysis estimating the economic impacts of critical habitat designation for the amphibians, so CCA

jumped at the opportunity to further solidify our objections to the proposed listing. The regulation has the potential to create significant obstacles for ranchers grazing cattle on public lands. In the proposed listing, USFWS identifies livestock grazing as one of the primary factors affecting the amphibians, and it is reasonable to assume that if the species are listed under the ESA and critical habitat is designated, a number of ranchers could lose access to at least a portion of the public allotments they graze. The most alarming thing about the proposed listing is that it plays fast and loose with the facts, failing to base its conclusions on the best available science as required by the ESA. For instance, USFWS’s proposed listing for the Yosemite toad cites only two sources to suggest a link between livestock grazing and decline in toad populations, and neither of those two sources has been published or peer reviewed. Meanwhile, USFWS seems to ignore good science in their proposed listing—while they do cite a five-year U.S. Forest Service (USFS) study conducted by a team of scientists from the University of California (UC), Berkeley, UC Davis and the USFS, it gives short shrift to this study, and fails to even acknowledge the scientific papers that resulted from it. CCA’s comments drew USFS’s attention to these studies, which convincingly demonstrate that livestock grazing does not impact amphibian survival. According to one of these reports, published in 2013, a variety of fencing techniques demonstrated no benefit to Yosemite toad populations, suggesting the presence of cattle does

10 California Cattleman May 2014

not harm their survival rates. Another paper, published in 2012, demonstrates that toads and cattle have different meadow preferences based on available forage and the dryness or wetness of the habitat, suggesting that the lack of Yosemite toad populations on areas grazed by cattle is not caused by the cattle, but is the result of different preferences between cattle and the toads. Importantly, unlike the studies that USFWS relied on for its proposed listing, reports from the five-year USFS study were peer reviewed and published in respected scientific journals, lending credence to their conclusions that cattle grazing does not harm the Yosemite toad. CCA also pointed out to USFWS the devastating effects that designation of critical habitat would have upon cattle ranchers and rural communities. If public lands grazers lose access to grazing allotments, it will place additional strain on producers’ private lands, potentially leading to the sale of those private lands and conversion of ranchland for other purposes. USFWS is currently reviewing the more than 20,000 comments it received regarding the proposed listing prior to adopting a final rule. CCA will keep members updated on the progress of this important regulatory challenge. Gray Wolf CCA has also been heavily engaged in regulatory issues surrounding the gray wolf, supporting its delisting from the ESA, opposing the proposed listing of the wolf under the California Endangered Species Act (CESA) and actively engaging in a wolf management plan with the California Department of

Fish and Wildlife (CDFW). On April 16, the Fish and Game Commission met in Ventura to hear testimony on whether or not to list the gray wolf under CESA. CCA was on hand to testify against the proposed listing, and to deliver a number of letters from ranchers opposing the listing. A number of CCA members also appeared at the hearing. After hearing testimony from more than 60 individuals, the Commission decided that it would be useful to get more information on the gray wolf. Consequently, the Commission decided to hear additional public testimony at its June 4 meeting in Fortuna, after which it will make its final determination on listing in July. CCA will be on hand at the Fortuna meeting, and encourages CCA members to attend. Ultimately, California’s ability to regulate the gray wolf depends partly on whether it is de-listed from the ESA. The comment period for the federal de-listing closed in March, but given the high volume of comments USFWS received regarding the proposed de-listing, it may be quite some time before a final rule is announced. CCA remains vigilant on the gray wolf issue, and is actively involved in discussions with CDFW to establish a wolf management plan in the event that the gray wolf should venture into California. It is our top priority to ensure that you are able to protect your livestock and your livelihood from this apex predator. Modoc Sucker In more encouraging news, USFWS in February proposed to delist the Modoc sucker—a fish found in streams of Northern California and Southern Oregon—from the ESA. In 2009, CCA petitioned USFWS to downlist the fish from “endangered” to “threatened” because populations had rebounded and threats to the fish’s population had either been eliminated or were being adequately managed. Based on analysis conducted in response to that petition, USFWS has gone beyond the petitioned downlisting of the fish and suggested removing it from the ESA altogether. CCA is encouraged by this news, and submitted comments strongly in favor of the delisting in early April. CCA will update you once USFWS makes a final decision on the proposed delisting. CCA is determined to protect your livelihood from costly, burdensome and unnecessary regulations on the federal, state and local level. For questions or concerns about these or any other regulatory issues, don’t hesitate to contact Justin Oldfield or Kirk Wilbur in the CCA office.

Interested in Serving on the CCA Board? As always, CCA encourages all members to get involved with their state and local cattlemen’s groups. Should you be interested in representing your local association on the CCA board or being more active in CCA committee meetings at the annual midyear meeting or convention, please contact your local association president. Amador-El Dorado-Sacramento.... Cathy Jauch, (209) 256-3710 Butte County ........................................... Irv Leen, (530) 370-2147 Calaveras County............................Nick Muschia, (209) 743-9602 Contra Costa-Alameda............. Mike Bettencourt, (209) 499-0794 Fall River-Big Valley .................... Kathy Deforest, (530) 299-3464 Fresno-Kings .....................................Cindy Tews, (559) 733-2333 Glenn-Colusa .......................................Geoff Bitle, (530) 682-5817 Humboldt-Del Norte ............................. Lou Mora, (707)725-5188 Inyo-Mono-Alpine .......................... William Talbot, (760) 873-5004 Kern County.................................Austin Snedden, (805) 423-0248 Lassen County.............................. .Craig Hemphill, (530) 251-8110 Madera County......................................David Gill, (559) 674-8843 Mendocino County......................... Wayne Lamb, (707) 983-6209 Merced-Mariposa ............................. Steve Obad, (209) 777-1551 Modoc County ................................. Scott Gooch, (530) 279-2583 Monterey County .............................Dan DeRoza, (831) 809-1017 Napa-Solano................................... Martin Emigh, (707) 580-5607 Plumas-Sierra....................................Rick Roberti, (530) 993-4014 San Benito County.............................Allan Renz, (831) 628-3564 San Diego-Imperial ........................Steve Tellam, (760) 789-6115 San Joaquin-Stanislaus................. David Absher, (209) 883-2778 San Luis Obispo County...............Dale Evenson, (805) 712-2589 San Mateo-San Francisco......Clayton Koopmann, (925) 819-0413 Santa Barbara County........................Andy Mills, (805) 245-4229 Santa Clara County....................... .Justin Fields, (408) 607-8335 Shasta County .............................. .Steve Dabovich, (530) 221- 3292 Siskiyou County.................................Mark Coats, (530) 340-2459 Sonoma-Marin................................ Jerry Norman, (707) 484-7473 Southern California ..................... Merritt Maddox, (951) 686-7555 Tahoe............................................. Danny Casillas, (530) 392-0152 Tehama County.......................... Steve McCarthy, (530) 527-6356 Tulare County ...................................Justin Greer, (559) 289-0040 Tuolumne County ........................... Bob Brennan, (209) 532-4225 Ventura County ............................... Tom Crocker, (805) 532-9973 Yolo County .................................... Dan Gallardo, (530) 908-2481 Yuba-Sutter .....................................Marilyn Waltz, (530) 633-2908

May 2014 California Cattleman 11

VET VIEWS Field Resuscitation of Newborn Calves by Anita Varga, DVM, MS, DACVIM, Capay Producing and raising calves is a very important aspect of managing a cow-calf operation. The number of calves weaned and sold, relative to the number of cows in the herd, determine the success and profitability of a ranch. Reproductive performance is significantly influenced by management practices and therefore a good system will help to establish an economically-sound enterprise. The health of newborn calves was topic I felt deserved some attention As we move into summer and fall calving season quickly approaches. Data collected in 2007 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) reported that of all beef calves born during that year, 6.4 percent were born dead or died before weaning. In beef cattle, almost 70 percent of calf deaths occur within the first 96 hours of birth. Immediate recognition and intervention of a sick or weak calf is vital and will increase the likelihood of a positive outcome. Beef calves born after birthing difficulties (dystocia) are up to six times more likely to become ill when compared to calves born without complications. Therefore, immediate intervention is important in preventing calf losses and ensuring ranch income. Knowledge of some resuscitation strategies at the ranch level will help to achieve this goal.

The ABCs of Resuscitation A) AIRWAY • After delivery, move the calf into a sternal position; this will help to maximize airflow through the lungs. •

Clear the mouth and nose of any fluid using your hand or a suction device. A bulb syringe with tubing attached might help to suction small amounts. Another option is to purchase a resuscitator such as the McCulloch calf resuscitator (approximately $120), which has a plastic cylinder and a face mask to suction fluids. It is effective and easy to use.

DO NOT hang the calf by its rear leg or swing it around to drain the fluid from its chest. Doing so will only bring up fluids from the stomach, not the lower airways. Additionally, this will move the gastrointestinal tract forward pushing it against the diaphragm and therefore increasing the pressure in the chest which makes it difficult for the lungs to expand. However, you can place the calf in a position where its head is lower

12 California Cattleman May 2014

then the rest of the body to facilitate drainage from the upper airways. B) BREATHING Once the calf is delivered it should start breathing within 30 seconds. If the calf is not breathing, try the following methods: • Pour cold water over its head. This will help to shock the calf into breathing. • Vigorously rub its body with towels or bedding. • Place a finger or straw in the nose to initiate the gasp reflex. • You could try to do a mouth-to-nose or mouth-tomouth resuscitation, but it is difficult to establish a tight enough seal to prevent air leakage and often the air fills the stomach instead of the lungs. Keep in mind that this method increases the risk of acquiring a zoonotic disease. C) CIRCULATION You should be able to touch the chest and feel a heartbeat. A normal heart rate for a newborn calf is 100-150 beats per minute. If you do not feel the heartbeat or it appears to be very slow, an external cardiac massage can be initiated; in cases where the animal is born without a heartbeat this will be futile. Consult with your veterinarian about learning these techniques. Your veterinarian may also be able to administer emergency drugs to the calf in an attempt to save its life.

OTHER ASPECTS TO CONSIDER: SWOLLEN HEAD & TONGUE When calves become wedged in the birth canal for a period of time, the head and tongue will be edematous and swell up. Once the calf is delivered the circulation will improve and over time the swelling will decrease. Gently massaging the head might be helpful in decreasing the swelling as well. However, in some severe cases, the calf will be unable to nurse. Therefore, colostrum and nutritional support via tube feeding needs to be provided until the calf is able to suckle on its own. PREVENTION OF NAVEL ILL One of the key factors of preventing navel ill is ensuring that the calf receives early, good quality colostrum. Additionally, it is advised to dip the navel from the tip to the abdomen in an antiseptic solution, such as 0.5 percent chlorhexidine. Early navel disinfection subsequently reduces the risk of the calf getting sick or dying. TEMPERATURE Environmental conditions such as cold, wind and moisture can increase calf death. Calves experience a dramatic shift in environmental temperatures when changing from the intra- to extra-uterine environment. Newborn calves do not thermoregulate very well; this is even more impaired in calves born following dystocia. Check the rectal body temperature frequently (every 10 to 15 minutes initially) and use a heat lamp, blankets, hair dryers or heating pads if needed. You can remove the heating aid once the body temperature reaches 98 to 99 degrees F. However the normal body temperature is 100 to 102 degrees F. Make sure that the heat lamp is not placed too closely to the calf, which can lead to burning. Keep checking the calf ’s temperature after removing the heating aid in case the body temperature drops again. COLOSTRUM Colostrum contains antibodies against disease organisms, as well as vitamins, proteins and minerals. Calves are born without any antibodies and need to ingest colostrum within the first 24 hours after they are born. Inadequate colostrum intake will lead to failure of passive transfer of immunoglobulins (FPT) which negatively affects the health

and subsequently the survival of the calf. Ensuring adequate colostrum intake of high risk calves can increase their chance of successful weaning. Dystocia calves should receive colostrum via a bottle or esophageal tube instead of relying on them standing and nursing from their dam. Beef calves that do not get adequate colostrum intake and absorption may be nine times more likely to become ill in the pre-weaning period than calves that do receive and absorb enough colostrum.

A healthy, normal beef calf should: 1. Start breathing within 30 seconds 2. Lift up its head within 2 minutes 3. Place itself in a sternal position within 2 to 3 minutes 4. Try to stand within 20 minutes 5. Be able to stand within 60 minutes 6. Have good muscle tone 7. Respond to pinching between the hooves by pulling the foot away, or to placing a (clean) finger into the mouth by starting to suckle (normal reflexes)

The economic viability of a beef herd is influenced by the number of calves weaned. The care of calving cows and newborn calves is detrimental to increase the profitability of your operation. Please consult with your veterinarian to discuss the different aspects of your calf management and resuscitation efforts.

Identification of High Risk Calves Before Birth

During Birth

After Birth

Premature Birth

Head & Tounge are swollen

No Gasping or Breathing for air

Twin Calvings calf presents incorrectly slow/tight/hard calving

gums & muzzle appear bluish yellow/borown/red fluid is staining the calf poor reflexes when you pinch between the hooves

calf is lying on its side unable to lift its head. Calf is slow to sit up, stand and suckle

May 2014 California Cattleman 13

PROGRESSIVE PRODUCER Measuring Feed Efficiency for Cattle Biological Type Chico State Benefits from Producer Generosity by Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D., Dave Daley, Ph.D., and S. Patrick Doyle, Ph.D., California State University, Chico Increasing costs of production coupled with other issues such as drought, animal welfare and burdensome regulations are challenging beef producers to critically assess their operations and make decisions that affect profitability. Feed costs historically range from 50 percent to 70 percent of the total costs of beef enterprises; however, this year, those costs may reach as high as 80 to 90 percent because of drought and limited feed resources in the West. Improving feed efficiency at all animal production stages (i.e., growth, maintenance, lactation, etc.) will play a significant role in the profitability of individual producers. Feed efficiency is the conversion of pounds of feed (i.e., forage or concentrated feedstuffs) into pounds of gain. There has been increased interest in residual feed intake (RFI) as a measure of efficiency as it represents the difference between what an animal

eats versus what it was predicted to eat based on body weight and state of production. Efficient animals eat less than expected and have a negative or low RFI, while inefficient animals eat more than expected and have a positive or high RFI. Previous studies have shown that cattle with low RFI consume less feed when compared to high RFI cattle at the same level of production. Feed efficiency in commercial feedlots is easy to evaluate on a pen basis. Feedlot managers review records on feed delivered and weight gained and calculate efficiency on every pen. However, determining individual animal feed intake and efficiency measures can be difficult and expensive to collect. Individual data can be powerful when making determinations about the performance of sire lines and can increase the accuracy of genetic prediction tools (i.e., expect progeny differences or EPDs) for individual

animals. Feed intake EPDs are becoming a powerful tool, because of improvements in technology, such as the GrowSafe feed intake system. GrowSafe collects individual data to monitor feed intake and behavior. Each steer is tagged with an electronic ear tag and the system automatically records individual intake by monitoring the weight of feed in the bin before, during and after each steer consumes feed. Having individual intakes for animals in a pen allows cattlemen to identify more efficient animals compared to herd mates, as well as studying animal behavior. More importantly, it provides the data necessary to develop accurate genetic predictors of which animals are truly more efficient. Over the past year, faculty and students at California State University, Chico (Chico State), in collaboration with Green Valley Enterprises, Alturas Ranches and the Agriculture Research

Pictured (L to R) are: Dean Jennifer Ryder Fox, Ph.D., Chico State College of Agriculture; Garrett Wallis, Beef Unit employee; Austin Fischer, Beef Unit herdsman; Hunter Current, Barry Swenson, Leslie Boyle, and Jess Dancer, Alturas Ranches and Green Valley Enterprises; Associate Dean Dave Daley, Ph.D., Associate Professor Patrick Doyle, Ph.D., and Assistant Professor Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D., Chico State College of Agriculture.

14 California Cattleman May 2014

Institute, have been investigating the growth and carcass differences of different biological types of cattle. The collaboration began in January 2013 as a pilot study where commercial and half-blood Lowline Angus steers were placed on feed for about 140 days to determine growth and carcass characteristics. Results of this study evolved into a larger research project with the goal to determine the individual feed efficiency of these different biological types. In August of 2013, Barry Swenson, owner of Green Valley Enterprises and Alturas Ranches, made a $50,000 donation to Chico State to be used towards the purchase and installation of a GrowSafe feed intake system at the Chico State Beef Unit. This generous donation was made to support research into animal efficiency, specifically residual feed intake. In the current project, 20 Angusbased commercial steers and 20 half-blood Lowline Angus steers were placed on feed in the GrowSafe system for a 70-day gain test. The two breed groups will continue to be fed to market weight, and then slaughtered at Chico State’s University Farm Meats Lab. Data will not only include gain and feed efficiency, but standard carcass traits, tenderness and economic differences. The installation of GrowSafe at the university’s farm has revolutionized the breadth of research and educational opportunities at the Chico State Beef Unit. Students are exposed to cuttingedge technology with opportunities to conduct research and manage cattle operations. For example, students in Advanced Beef Production and in the Agricultural Experimentation courses play key roles in weighing cattle, managing and analysis of data, and data dissemination. In addition, students at the Beef Unit manage the day-to-day operation of the feedlot, including cattle management and GrowSafe system maintenance under the guidance of the Animal Science Faculty Kasey DeAtley, Ph.D.,, Dave Daley, Ph.D., and Patrick Doyle, Ph.D. For more information about this project, contact Kasey DeAtley at kdeatley@csuchico.edu. .

Celebrate all month long with the 29 cuts of heart healthy lean beef!!

The

INAUGURAL FEMALE SALE Saturday, May 24th

12 noon MDT • At the Ranch • Caldwell, Idaho

TheLadies BEHIND

TheBull BusinessBrand Selling 239 Head!

After nearly 70 years of owning registered breeding stock, Shaw Cattle Co. is pleased to present our First Female Event.

78 HEREFORD LOTS

Donor Dams & Embryos | Spring Three-in-One Heifer Calf Pairs | Fall Cow/Heifer Calf Splits | Fall Bred Heifers

45 ANGUS LOTS

Donor Dams | Spring Three-in-One Heifer Calf Pairs | Fall Cow/Heifer Calf Splits | Fall Bred Heifers

10 RED ANGUS LOTS

Spring Three-in-One Heifer Calf Pairs Selling mostly young females already in production with heifer calves at side. Virtually all of the fall calvers are confirmed safe with heifer pregnancies by leading AI sires!

Catalog online at shawcattle.com

& mcsauction.com | Live bidding at liveauctions.tv

Catalog mailed with the May Hereford World. Contact the owners or the sale manager to request your copy.

SHAW CATTLE CO.

22993 Howe Road, Caldwell, ID 83607 www.shawcattle.com greg@shawcattle.com HEREFORD | ANGUS | RED ANGUS

Greg Shaw Sam Shaw Tucker Shaw Ron Shurtz

(208) 459-3029 (208) 880-9044 (208) 899-0455 (208) 431-3311

SALE MANAGEMENT

incorporated

Matt Sims Cell/Text (405) 641-6081 matt@mcsauction.com www.mcsauction.com

May 2014 California Cattleman 15

SOLD! by CCA Director of Communications Stevie Ipsen

It is no secret that the livestock industries in California have evolved to a whole new playing field in the last several decades. No one knows that better than the men and women who manage California livestock market facilities, which play a crucial role in the businesses of many livestock producers up and down the state. In the 1950s, if one were to travel from town to town throughout California and ask locals where the latest news, best cup of coffee and best burger could be found, they probably wouldn’t be directed to the nearest diner, but rather the town sale barn. For many towns where western heritage still runs strong, the best news, coffee and burgers can still be found at California livestock marketing venues. Though livestock markets can no longer be found as the highlight of many small towns, most California beef producers are fortunate to still have at least one livestock market within a driving distance of an hour or two. And one thing is still certain – these marketing facilities are still a vital part of California’s beef business. While West Coast cattlemen and women have a variety of marketing options from selling “on the video,” on the Internet, through cooperative programs, private treaty or independent production and consignment sales, auction markets remain a reliable option for many producers marketing cattle. According to Livestock Marketing Association Region Executive Officer Forrest Mangan, Folsom, the No. 1 reason producers should market their animals at a livestock market is the opportunity to sell via a competitive bidding process.” “Livestock markets specialize in selling and true price discovery is achieved,” Mangan said. “Many local livestock markets also use technology to market and promote their sales, expanding their buyer base and giving consigners a greater opportunity for improved value of their animals.” For producers in vastly different parts of California, each has their own reasons for marketing with a local livestock marketing facility. For North Coast beef producer Lawrence Dwight, McKinleyville, having a variety of marketing options is essential as the secluded North Coast presents its own unique transportation and weather conditions. “The North Coast is a great place to raise cattle. We usually have grass and the temperature allows cattle to be very comfortable and grow well. But marketing can be a challenge,” Dwight explains. Dwight has sold cattle through Harris Ranch’s Partnership for Quality Program, sells some cattle private treaty and depending on the weather and grass situation, 16 California Cattleman May 2014

often utilizes his local auction market, Ferndale-based Humboldt Auction Yard, owned and managed by Col. Lee Mora and his son Lou Mora. “The majority of producers in my area rely on the local sale yard to get their cattle moved,” Dwight said. “Most ranchers here are small producers with less than 100 head so getting a few head out of the area is only one predicament. Finding someone to buy just a few cattle private treaty is also hard and most of us don’t have many big lots to sell on the video.” “The Moras know our cattle, know their buyers, they know where our cattle would be going and if they would perform well for buyers. In addition, with smaller lots, the auction yard has the ability to couple small, similar lots together to fill a full load.” Mangan echoed Dwight’s comments in saying a livestock auction market is able to bring in thousands of head of livestock in a day, giving buyers greater convenience and more choice of animals to fill orders quickly at fair, competitive prices. Mangan also says that livestock marketing facilities are not just a great option for those selling livestock, but also for those buying cattle. “Livestock are veterinarian-inspected prior to sale to ensure the health and quality of the animals; animals are sorted by type and size to create uniform lots for buyers,” Mangan explained. “Something else to consider is that because livestock markets act as agents to transfer ownership from the seller to the buyer, there is reduced risk of buying mortgaged or stolen livestock. Additionally, this ensures free-and-clear title to the buyer.” Fixed-facility auction markets are owned and operated by professionals who are bonded and regulated by the government for fair trade and commerce, Mangan adds. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

EL NIñO COULD BRING RELIEF While the snowpack that feeds the Colorado River is expected to produce 5 percent more water this year, renowned climatologist Evelyn Browning-Garriss says the main event that could bring more serious relief from the Western drought is a potential El Niño brewing in the Pacific. “California is seeing snowpack that is 23 percent of normal and the state’s reservoirs are at 63 percent, so any increase may help a parched California,” said Browning Garriss. “While the 5 percent increase is a minor thing in a long-term drought, consider it an appetizer. The Pacific still looks as though it will produce our main course: an El Niño. If the El Niño develops into a long event that continues into next winter, it will bring a lot of good moisture to California.” Browning-Garriss says both the record-breaking cold experienced in other parts of the nation this winter and the drought are caused by a dynamic jet stream shifting the cold far north in the West and far south in the East. While California is experiencing its worst drought in a century, it’s not the only state facing problems—56 percent of the lower 48 states are in dry or drought conditions. “We could see El Nino conditions beginning in the summer,” said Browning-Garriss. “This would be a boon for U.S. grains, for fruits and vegetables and overall good for world crops.”

Madera, California Join us for a Special Spring Feeder Sale May 6 • 1 P.M.

Featuring quality stocker and feeder cattle from reputable Central Valley ranches!

Sale every tueSday at 10:30 butcher cattle followed by pairs/bred cows, stockers.and feeders. Butcher cows sell every Friday at 12:30

Tim SiSil, manager (209) 631-6054 Sonny BorBa (559) 283-6950 larry JohnSon (559) 474-7257 www.producerSliveSTock.com

(559) 674-4674

1022 South Pine Street • Madera, Ca

Your Complete marketing ServiCe ... We’ve Got You Covered!

SaleS every WedneSday

733 North Ben Maddox Way Visalia, CA 93292 (559) 625-9615

SaleS every Saturday 221 North Main Street Templeton, CA 93465 (805) 434-1866

Take advantage of our experienced staff and weekly auctions at two locations coupled with first-class Internet marketing as well as order buying and direct sales!

Randy Baxley (559) 906-9760 • Sam avila (559) 799-3854 www.viSalialiveStock.com

Also watch for daily cattle sale listings five days a week

www.roundupcAttle.com, with live Internet auctions monthly.

May 2014 California Cattleman 17

...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16 Brentwood seedstock and commercial producer David Dal Porto of Dal Porto Livestock is no stranger to the cattle marketing scene. Through his own production sale each fall in Denair with sale partner David Medeiros of Rancho Casino Angus, the two have sold cattle at levels a seedstock producer can only hope for. But, Dal Porto says a great deal of effort goes into a production sale. From advertising and facility development to hiring a ring crew and auctioneer, there are many details to consider. Dal Porto also utilizes nearly every other avenue of marketing including several livestock markets, where he says the ease of the process and customer service makes marketing a breeze. “At a sale barn, you can count on them being their week after week and working hard for you every time. You don’t have to worry about the hassles of transporting to buyers,” he says. “You take them to the market, drop them off and can rest-assured they are in good hands.” In addition to the hassle-free way of marketing, Dal Porto says he is continually impressed by the knowledge of auction yard managers and representatives who are on the leading edge of an ever-changing industry. “I know when I consign my cattle to a sale, the auctioneer will have done his homework, understands the genetics of my cattle and what they are worth. He knows the vaccination history of my herd and will work hard to communicate that to buyers,” Dal Porto says. “I like that the open bidding forum lets the buyers decide for themselves just what my cattle are worth.” Just like any other sector of the beef industry, being proactive and forward-thinking is essential in marketing chain. When stressing the professionalism of livestock market operators, Mangan says market owners, managers and employees have a vested interest in the well-being of the livestock they market; because of that, excellence in handling is important. Livestock market owners and their employees actively participate in animal handling trainings, as well as some species-specific programs such as the Beef Quality Assurance program. In addition, livestock market owners will encourage producers to complete similar trainings. As Dal Porto said, leaving their cattle – their livelihood – in someone else’s hands isn’t something that producers take lightly and knowing that their stock is in good hands is vital. Similarly, the decision to sell – and where to sell their livestock – is important. “Decisions about when to sell your animals, genetics, herd health and other niche program trends can be daunting and have a big impact on the marketability of livestock,” Mangan says. “Professional livestock auction market operators are able to serve as an advisor to navigate these decisions. Creating a cooperative relationship with your local auction market means that the auction can do the best job possible representing your animals and promoting them to bidders to maximize their value. To increase value of cattle, Mangan says producers should build the foundation with effective management of their herd. Keeping accurate records will enable producers 18 California Cattleman May 2014

to improve their herd through culling, breeding decisions and overall herd health/nutrition. A defined calving season utilizes prime season for available forages and allows producers to make decisions regarding reproduction. This leads to a larger, more uniform set of calves to market, which could increase value. Peace of mind is what Mangan says is most important to the majority of cattle producers when they market livestock. He says livestock markets protect sellers by acting as the agent to transfer ownership from the seller to the buyer. As such, livestock auction markets assume the risk of non-payment for a small cost: commission. When producers sell at auction, there is assurance that they will be paid in full, and for most producers, commission is a small price to pay for the peace of mind that comes with selling at auction. While it is certain that through the years, more livestock markets will leave the business and once in a while a new one will open, some things will remain constant. Just like the loyalty of their customers, auctioneers and market representatives will continue to work hard for every dollar and get buyers the best product for the best price through the art and practice of true price discovery. Another thing that is certain – livestock markets will continue to be the best place to find the most intriguing conversation, an outstanding cup of coffee and the best burger around.

EstablishEd 1950

Weekly Sale Schedule

MonDaYS: DairY, FeeDerS, SlaugHter BullS & CoWS tHurSDaYS: FeeDerS, SlaugHter BullS & CoWS

Sale INFORMaTION

oFFiCe ..................................................................209 387-4113 Joel e. Cozzi ......................................................209 769-4660 Joel a. (JoeY) Cozzi .........................................209 769-4662

FIeld RepReSeNTaTIveS

Doug gallaWaY ................................................209 617-5435 Mike Vieira..........................................................209 761-6267 Bill enoS ............................................................209 761-1322 Visit us online at www.dpyauction.com

16575 S. HWY 33 • DoS PaloS, Ca 93620 located 1/8 mile south of hwy. 152 on hwy 33

2014 California Cattleman

Auction Market Directory

Featuring California Livestock Auction Yards who have advertised their services in this issue

OFFICE........................................ (831) 726-3303 FAX.............................................. (831) 728-2677 E-MAIL............................ 101@101livestock.com WEBSITE..........................www.101livestock.com

101 Livestock Market, inc. 4400 Hwy 101, Aromas, CA 95004

CONTACTS Col. Jim Warren........................... (831) 320-3698 Monty Avery ................................ (831) 320-3701 CATTLE AUCTION................................. Tuesday OFFICE........................................ (209) 745-1515 E-MAIL..................................... info@clmgalt.com WEBSITE.................................. www.clmgalt.com CONTACTS Frank “Butch” Loretz..............................President Jake Parnell, Manager................. (916) 662-1298

12495 Stockton Blvd., Galt, CA 95632

CATTLE AUCTION............................ Wednesday MEMBERSHIps........ .NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA OFFICE........................................ (209) 387-4133 FAX.............................................. (209) 387-4476 WEBSITE............................www.dpyauction.com

16575 S. Hwy 33, Dos Palos, CA 93620

ESCALON

Livestock Market, Inc.

CONTACTS Joel E. Cozzi............................... (209) 769-4660 Joel A. (Joey) Cozzi..................... (209) 769-4662 Col. Doug Gallaway..................... (209) 617-5435 Mike Vieira................................... (209) 617-5435 Bill Enos....................................... (209) 761-1322 OFFICE.........................................(209) 838-7011 FAX.............................................. (209) 838-1535 WEBSITE........www.escalonlivestockmarket.com E-MAIL.....escalonglivestockmarket@yahoo.com PRESIDENT Miguel A. Machado...................... (209) 595-2014

REPRESENTATIVES Joe Vieira..................................... (209) 531-4156 P.O. Box 26 Thomas Bert................................ (209) 605-3866 25525 Lone Tree Rd, Escalon, CA 95320 Tony Luis...................................... (209) 609-6455 Dudley Meyer............................... (209) 768-8586

FA R M E R S

LIVESTOCK MARKET P.O. Box 2138 6001 Albers Rd, Oakdale, CA 95361

OFFICE........................................ (209) 847-1033 FAX.............................................. (209) 847-4425 CONTACT Steve Haglund............................. (209) 847-1033 (209) 538-2509 CATTLE AUCTION..............Monday and Thursday

MEMBERSHIps.............. NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEER........................ ������������������Jim Warren UPCOMING EVENTS For more on what 101 has to offer, see our ad on page 23. Mark your calendar for special feeder sales on Tuesdays at 1 p.m. AUCTIONEERS...................... .Jake Parnell, Brian Pachaco, Mark Fischer, Matt Morebeck UPCOMING EVENTS CLM will feature large runs of calves and yearlings on May 10, May 21, June 4 and June 18 at 9:30 a.m. at its special feeder sales. Mark your calendars for July 26 for CLM’s Fall-calving Bred Cow Sale. Visit www.clmgalt.com for an up-to-date list of upcoming events and market reports. CATTLE AUCTION..................Monday and Thursday MEMBERSHIps............... NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS.........Doug Gallaway and Garrett Jones UPCOMING EVENTS Holding special upcoming feeder sales Thursday, May 6 and Saturday, June 7. Join us for lunch prior to the May 6 sale. For details, contact us at (209) 387-4113. CATTLE AUCTION......................................... Monday MEMBERSHIps............... NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..............................Miguel A. Machado, Michael Imbrogno UPCOMING EVENTS Big strings of yearlings and calves sell Mondays in May and June. Call now to consign to our special feeder sales May 5, May 12 , May 19, June 2, June 9 and June 16. Visit our website for more information on what we have to offer. www. escalonlivestockmarket.com MEMBERSHIps........ ....... NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS............. Clint Haglund, Ken Tompson UPCOMING EVENTS Join us for auction sale every Monday and Thursday for dairy, beef and feeder cattle. May 2014 California Cattleman 19

2014 California Cattleman

Auction Market Directory

HUMBOLDT AUCTION YARD, InC.

603 S. 3rd Street, Fortuna, CA 95540

OFFICE...........................................(707) 725-5188 FAX.................................................(707) 725-9822 E-MAIL......................humboldtauction@hotmail.com CONTACTS Col. Lee Mora.................................(707) 845-7188 Lou Mora.........................................(707) 845-7288 Cattle Auction......................... Wednesday OFFICE...........................................(209) 862-4500 FAX.................................................(209) 862-4700 CONTACTS Col. John McGill..............................(209) 631-0848

P.O. Box 756 • 2011 E, Stuhr Rd., Newman, CA 95360

ORLAND LIVESTOCK

Commission yard, INC. P.O. Box 96 3877 Hwy. 99 West, Orland, CA 95963

PRODUCER’S LIVESTOCK MARKETING ASSOCIATION

1022 S. Pine Street, Madera, CA 93637 P.O. Box 510 Madera, CA 93639

SHASTA

MEMBERSHIps.......................... CCA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..................................Lee Mora UPCOMING EVENTS The Mora family invites you to join them ringside every Wednesday in Fortuna.

Cattle AuctioNS..........Tuesday and Thursday Membership....................... .CCA, LMA, CLAMA

OFFICE...........................................(530) 865-4527 FAX.................................................(530) 865-2643 CONTACTS Col. Ed Lacque............................... (530) 865-2643 Col Wade Lacque, Manager...........(530) 570-0547 Cattle AuctioN............................. .....Thursday Membership....................... .CCA, LMA, CLAMA

OFFICE...........................................(559) 674-4674 E-MAIL...............producersmadera@sbcglobal.net WEBSITE..................www.producerslivestock.com CONTACTS Col. Tim Sisil, Manager...................(209) 631-6054 Larry Johnson.................................(559) 474-7257 Bill Clay...........................................(559) 935-3121 Sonny Borba ..................................(559) 283-6950 CATTLE AUCTION....................................Tuesday OFFICE...........................................(530) 347-3793 FAX.................................................(530) 347-0329 WEBSITE.......................... www.shastalivestock.com CONTACTS

LIVESTOCK AUCTion yard Ellington Peek.................................(530) 527-3600

3917 N. Main Street, Cottonwood, CA 96022 Brad Peek.......................................(530) 347-3793 Donald Doverspike..........................(541) 377-6298 P.O. Box 558, Cottonwood, CA 96022 cattle auction....................................... Friday

20 California Cattleman May 2014

AUCTIONEERS........................... John McGill UPCOMING EVENTS Currently accepting cattle for Tuesday and Thursday sales plus Western Video Market sales from Cottonwood on May 23 and Reno, Nev., in July. For details see our ad on page 21.

AUCTIONEERS.........Wade Lacque, Ed Lacque UPCOMING EVENTS Join us for the annual Butte County Cattlemen’s Association Annual Sale. Call us for details. Also see our ad on page 18. Join us Thursdays at noon for our regular beef sales. ALSO CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK!

MEMBERSHIPS......NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS.............Tim Sisil, Garrett Jones UPCOMING EVENTS We hope to see you at a special feeder sale Tues., May 6. See our ad on page 17 for details. Also watch for big runs of calves and yearlings on our regular sale days in May and June.

MEMBERSHIP...NCBA, CCA, LMA. CLAMA CATTLE AUCTION Join us for our regular Friday sales, as well as the Tehama County Cattlemen’s Special Sale on May 2. Don’t miss the Western Video Market sales on May 2 and 23 in Cottonwood. For more information, visit us online at www.shastalivestock.com or wvmcattle.com.

2014 California Cattleman

Auction Market Directory OFFICE.......................................... (805) 434-1866 FAX................................................ (805) 434-1816 WEBSITE......................... www.visalialivestock.com 401 N. Main Street, Templeton, CA 93465 P.O. Box 308, Templeton, CA 93465

CONTACT Col. Randy Baxley......................... (559) 906-9760 Sam Avila....................................... (559) 799-3854 CATTLE AUCTION...................................Saturday OFFICE...........................................(559) 591-0884 FAX.................................................(559) 591-0808 WEBSITE...............www.tularecountystockyard.com

9641 Ave. 384, Dinuba, CA 93618

Turlock Livestock Auction yard 10430 Lander Ave., Turlock, CA P.O. Box 3030, Turlock, CA 95381

CONTACTS Jon & Summer Dolieslager.............(559) 358-1070 AUCTIONEER............................... Jon Dolieslager

OFFICE...........................................(209) 634-4326 FAX.................................................(209) 634-4396 WEBSITE.......................... www.turlocklivestock.com CONTACTS Karen Cozzi.....................................(209) 634-4326 Col. Max Olvera..............................(209) 277-2063 Col. Steve Faria.............................(209) 988-7180 Col. Chuch Cozzitorto.....................(209) 652-4479 Buddy Cozzitorto.............................(209) 652-4480

OFFICE...........................................(559) 625-9615 FAX.................................................(559) 625-9012 WEBSITE...........................www.visalialivestock.com

733 N. Ben Maddox Way, Visalia, CA 93292

Western stockman’s market 31911 Hwy. 46, McFarland, CA 93250

CONTACTS Col. Randy Baxley..........................(559) 906-9760 Sam Avila........................................(559) 799-3854 CATTLE AUCTION...................... ........Wednesday

MEMBERSHIps..NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS........................ .Randy Baxley CATTLE AUCTION Watch for our upcoming spring calf and yearling specials in May and June with our Annual Bred Cow Sale in August. Annual Tri-Counties Breeders’ Choice Bull Sale in October. MEMBERSHIps...NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA BEEF SALES EVERY FRIDAy AT NOON WITH COWS AT 2 p.m. Join us for Special Feeder Sales May 2 and May 15, featuring large runs of calves and yearlings.

Beef Sale Days....Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday MEMBERSHIps....NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..........Max Olvera, Steve Faria, Chuck Cozzitorto, Eddie Nunes, Jake Bettencourt UPCOMING EVENTS Feeder Sales: Sat. May 3, Tues. May 20, Tues. June 3, and Tues. June 17. We hope to see you there! See our ad on page 7 for details.

MEMBERSHIps.... NCBA, CCA, LMA, CLAMA AUCTIONEERS..........................Randy Baxley CATTLE AUCTION Mark your calendar for our Tulare County Cattlemen’s ‘Off The Grass” Sale in May. Join us Wednesdays in May and June for large runs of stockers and feeder calves.

OFFICE.............................................(61) 399-2981 FAX.................................................(661) 399-0177 WEBSITE......www.westerstockmansmarket.com

BEEF SALE DAY.................................... Monday Butcher Cows at 10:30 a.m./Feeders at 12:30 p.m.

CONTACTS Dwight Mebane...............................(661) 979-9892 Col. Justin Mebane.........................(661) 979-9894 Frank Machado...............................(805) 839-8166 Col. Bennet Mebanre......................(661) 201-8169

UPCOMING EVENTS Special feeder sales every Monday in May and June featuring large runs of stockers and feeders. See our ad on page 9 for details.

MEMBERSHIps...................... NCBA, CCA, LMA

May 2014 California Cattleman 21

Tulare County Stockyard Dinuba, Ca • www.tularecountystockyard.com

Beef Cattle sold Every Friday at noon Watch us live at www.lmaauctions.com upcoming special feeder sales: May 2 and May 15

HUMBOLDT AUCTION YARD, INC. Fortuna, California

mark your calendar for our annual bull sale following the feeder sale: friday, September 26

AUCTION EVERY WEDNESDAY (707) 725-5188

jon & summer dolieslager neal spiro, dvm

Lee Mora (707) 845-7188 Lou Mora (707) 845-7288

(559) 591-0884

22 California Cattleman May 2014

THD ©

Celebrating 39 Years of

Taking the Lead in Quality

Winner of the National Beef Quality Assurance Award 101 is only the sale yard in the West certified to sell NHTC cattle. As a leader in EID, 101 is helping develop a new tag that adds value to the tag itself. Your effort in bull selection helps 101 market the best cattle from week to week. At 101, your vaccination efforts pay you back.

101 is the leader in selling program cattle at premium prices. The modern facility at 101 was designed with you in mind to add value to your cattle. 101 feeds the best feed in inline bunks, eliminating waste and helping to get your cattle bunkbroke. Fresh well water at 101 is an asset that helps customers sell more weight.

Where Quality Pays! 101 Livestock Market, inc.

4400 HigHway 101 • aromas, Ca 95004 (831) 726-3303 • (831) 320-3698

in 2010, 101 Livestock Market was seLected froM a nationwide pooL of 750,000 beef producers for their outstanding beef quaLity efforts, Making theM the first auction yard to ever recieve the nationaL bqa honor. May 2014 California Cattleman 23

CALIFORNIAnS To Compete at World Livestock Auctioneer Championship In Oct. 2013, five California auctioneers qualified for the 51st Annual World Livestock Auctioneer Championship (WLAC) on June 20 and June 21 in Knoxville, Iowa’s Knoxville Regional Livestock Marke. The Californians who made made the top 10 at the regional qualifier held at Tulare County Stockyards in Dinuba last October and will continue on in Knoxville are: Col. Garrett Jones, Los Banos; Chuck Cozzitorto, Hilmar; Michael Imbrogno, Fresno; John McGill, Le Grand; and Justin Mebane, Bakersfield. The WLAC event will be held in conjunction with the Livestock Marketing Association’s (LMA) Annual Convention. The WLAC consists of an interview portion (accounts for 25 percent of the total score) and a live auction portion (which accounts for 75 percent of the total score). During the interview portion of the WLAC, each contestant will participate in a live interview in which they are asked three questions by reigning WLAC winner Col. Dustin Focht, Stillwater, Okla. The panel of judges will evaluate contestants on personal presentation, clarity of individual expression and knowledge of the livestock industry. A different panel of judges will score the live sale portion of the competition the following day, in which each contestant will sell eight drafts of livestock. After the top 10 contestants are named, each will return to the auction block to sell an additional 10 drafts of livestock in front of teh same panel of judges. The interview scores will carry over to the top 10 and a new WLAC will be named. Prior to the finals in Knoxville, LMA hosted three qualifying rounds where nearly 80 auctioneers from Canada and the United States vied for 30 sponts in the WLAC Semifinals. The top 10 auctioneers from each of the qualifying rounds then compete for the title of World Livestock Auctioneer Champion.

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Buying or Selling Livestock?

We’ve Got Your Back.

LMA member auctions have your best interests in mind. In the livestock business, success is based on established relationships and trust. Members of the Livestock Marketing Association have a vested interest in helping livestock producers stay in business, and thrive even in these challenging times.

We’re here to ensure: • You earn top dollar for your livestock • Receive immediate payment whether the market receives payment or not • Hassle-free compliance with state and federal livestock disease trace and other health rules • Your animals are handled humanely to reduce shrink and stress • You complete all documentation needed for packers and COOL compliance

Auction markets that belong to the LMA are the most professional and reliable markets in the business. To find LMA members in your area call 1-800-821-2048 or visit www.lmaweb.com.

May 2014 California Cattleman 25

Council Communicator AROUND-THE-CLOCK BEEF PROMOTION

BEEF COUNCIL HARD AT WORK FOR CALIFORNIA PRODUCERS from the California Beef Council On the Road with CBC Spring is always a busy season for the California Beef Council, and this year has been no different. We’ve been all over the state in recent weeks, sharing beef ’s messages with everyone from elementary school students to professional chefs and culinary instructors. In fact, we’ve probably run into more than a few of you during our travels. Here’s just a glimpse of what we’ve been up to on your behalf lately. Our registered dietician, James Winstead, recently traveled to San Diego to help cook up a delicious beef meal for a charity event at the San Diego Ronald McDonald House, which has provided a “home away from home” to families pursuing essential pediatric treatments at area hospitals for over 30 years. More than 650 people got to enjoy a savory beef dinner and learn about the health benefits of beef, all while supporting a great cause. While in sunny San Diego, Winstead also made a stop at San Diego State University, to talk about the nutritional profile of beef with dietetic students. He shared his story with approximately 40 future nutrition professionals, helping them understand the many benefits of beef in a healthy diet before they enter the workforce. Jill Scofield, our manager of producer communications, recently joined other agricultural organizations at the 2014 Pro Start Cup Farm-to-Fork Expo, in Sacramento, sharing information about beef nutrition and ranching with professional chefs, culinary arts instructors, and future foodservice professionals and chefs. This was the first year the Pro Start Cup – an annual competition for high school culinary arts programs to showcase their skills – also held an exposition featuring agricultural groups, helping participants better understand the important role of agriculture in the kitchen. CBC Executive Director Bill Dale and CBC Manager of Consumer Communications Annette Kassis traveled to Selma in early March to join California CattleWomen, Inc. for their beef promotion day and share beef materials. CBC delivered over 125,000 brochures, recipe booklets, nutrition pamphlets and other outreach materials to California CattleWomen, who will use these materials at county fairs, ag in the classroom events, and countless other outreach efforts throughout the year. Influencing Consumers on Health and Nutrition Over the past few years, much research has been done on the purchasing preferences of millennials, their attitudes about beef, and what influences them to purchase (or avoid) beef. But until recently, there was limited information on the influences and perceptions specifically of millennial consumers who have made changes in their lifestyle for health reasons. In late 2013, the Beef Checkoff funded a study on the perspective of such consumers when it comes to health

26 California Cattleman May 2014

and nutrition influencers, conducted with over 600 millennial parents who have children under 18 living in the household. All study participants had to have made a change in their lifestyle or the lifestyle of their family in the preceding six months. For the respondents, the triggers for making a change in lifestyle varied from health diagnoses, health scares from friends or family, a desire to lose weight, having a child or attempting to improve the health of a child. The most prominent change in behavior respondents had made to alter their lifestyle was related to food – improving the healthfulness, quality or portion size of the foods one eats. When it comes to beef specifically, the findings were quite positive. For millennials making a change in their health, they associate beef with many favorable components of their health improvement strategy. In particular, respondents strongly agreed with the following key statements about beef: • It’s a great source of protein. • There is a place in their lifestyle for healthy, lean beef. • Beef is a good source of energy and fuel for their body. • Beef is a food that is an ideal balance of good taste and good nutrition. Lastly, when it comes to influencers, there’s a combination of “real” people – bloggers, friends, family and co-workers – and experts, such as doctors, clinics and hospitals, nutritionists, chefs, teachers and fitness trainers, that millennial consumers making health changes look to for information and recommendations. For the California Beef Council and those of us in the beef community, research such as this helps ensure we continue to reach those audiences and influencers who make the most impact on consumer choices, as well as use the messaging and information that seems to best resonate with consumers. For more on this and other studies that highlight consumer preferences and decision making, visit www.mybeefcheckoff. org or www.beefresearch.org.

Keep Up With the CBC! Keep up-to-speed with the CBC’s efforts by signing up for our producer e-newsletter. Simply e-mail your contact information to jill@calbeef.org to start receiving our latest news and updates.

Telling Your story, Promoting Your Product

from the California CattleWomen, Inc. This year, Emma Morris of as nutrition, beef ’s effect on the environment, animal care, etc. Etna is representing California on The contestant has to respond in a factual and professional the National Beef Ambassador way on the spot. Similarly, the mock media interview is simply team. In February 2013, Morris an interviewer asking the competitor questions about the competed at the county level in beef industry. Issue response is a timed written response in Siskiyou County and won the “letter to the editor” format. The contestants have 30 minutes senior division. In April 2013, to compose a 250-word response to a negative article about Morris went on to win the state the beef industry. The education and outreach portion was competition in Chico. judged on a binder that the contestants prepared before There were several the competition. Morris made her binder on her Ag in the requirements Morris had to Classroom lessons she prepared, but there was also options to Emma Morris meet in order to compete at the host a college campus beef promotion event or create a social national level. She had to complete two consumer interaction media page. events, three classroom presentations and one media interview. After the long day of competing, the winners were To fill these requirements, Morris attended the California State announced, and Emma was named as one of the five National Fair in Sacramento and promoted beef with the California Beef Ambassadors, as well as the individual winner of the issue CattleWomen; participated in a Raley’s beef promotion event; response portion. Morris is spending 2014 traveling the country and interviewed with California Farm Bureau Federation’s with her team, learning about the beef industry, and promoting California Bountiful magazine. She also did Ag in the Classroom beef. So far this year, she has traveled to Wooster, Ohio; lessons for second, third and sixth graders around her local Harrisburg, Penn.; Nashville, Tenn.; and Denver, Colo., and is Scott Valley area. going to attend the New York Boilermaker Marathon in Utica, After completing these prerequisites, Morris traveled to New York this summer. Fayetteville, Ark., on Sept. 27, 2013 to participate in the national Morris says the experience thus far has taught her so competition. More than 30 other senior competitors from much about interacting with consumers and being an effective across the country representing their states competed for the advocate for the beef industry. She says the skills and knowledge national title. On the day of the competition, the competitors she’s gained will help her both in college and in pursuing a were sequestered in a holding room throughout the contest, future career. which consisted of four parts: consumer interaction, media For her senior project, Morris decided to organize the 2014 interview, issue response and education and outreach. Siskiyou County Beef Ambassador competition. She used Consumer interaction is set up as a mock beef promotion the skills she gained from being a National Beef Ambassador booth with a free sample of beef. Three “consumers” approach to organize the contest, train the contestants, come up with the contestant and ask questions about a variety of things such questions and coordinate judges.

Carne Asada for a Cinco de Mayo Celebration Total Recipe Time: 20 to 25 minutes • Makes 2 to 4 servings

INGREDIENTS 2 boneless beef strip steaks, cut 1 inch thick (about 10 ounces each) 2 teaspoons ground cumin 2 large cloves garlic, minced 2 lime wedges 1/2 to 1 cup prepared guacamole 8 6-inch corn tortillas Additional lime wedges (optional) INSTRUCTIONS 1. Combine cumin and garlic; press evenly onto beef steaks. 2. Place steaks on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, covered, 11 to 14 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, 11 to 15 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. 3. Squeeze juice from 1 lime wedge over each Steak. Carve Steaks into thin slices. Serve with guacamole and tortillas; garnish with lime wedges, if desired. Test Kitchen Tip: To broil, place steaks on rack in broiler pan so surface of beef is 3 to 4 inches from heat. Broil 13 to 17 minutes for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning once. May 2014 California Cattleman 27

California & Ar izona 2014

Cattle Feeders’ Meeting

The annual business meetings of the California Cattlemen’s Association’s Feeder Council and the Arizona Cattle Feeders Association will take place May 22 and 23 at the Coronado Island Marriot Resort and Spa in Coronado. As always, this two-day meeting is packed with information vital to the future of cattle feeding in California and Arizona. The event will feature speakers from throughout the beef chain and beyond. From banking and future beef demand to animal health and handling, the meeting will help feedyard owners and managers improve their day-to-day operations as well as help them prepare for the challenges they may face in the future.

It is no secret that many of the hurdles faced by feedyard operators are hurdles that all beef producers, in all segments of the industry can relate to. As such, this special section of the magazine highlights a couple of the speakers and topics that will be addresed at the meeting. California and Arizona feeders would like to thank the generous sponsors who have made this event possible. For a complete list of speakers, topics and sponsors, refer to the column to the right. Though the event is nearly completely booked, for more questions about the event, visit www.calcattlemen.org or contact Lisa Pherigo in the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 or lisa@ calcattlemen.org.

A Special thank you to these Major Supporters!

May 22 & 23 28 California Cattleman May 2014

Coronado, CA

2014 Feeder Meeting Sponsors

Zinpro Animal Health International feeder meeting ad Co-West Commodities Elanco Merck Animal Health Diamond V Merial Animal Health E.B. Wakeman Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica JD Heiskell Baker Commodities Pacific Elements Nutrition Physiology Corp Seley and Company Allflex USA, Inc. Temple Tag Laird Mfg Westway Feed Products Rabobank Global Animal Products Zoetis TPI Premix Bayer Animal Health Hanford Commodities Farm Credit Services Southwest IMI Global, Inc. (WFCF) JBS MWI Kunafin Veterinary Services Incorporated Micro Beef Wells Fargo 2014 Feeder Meeting Speaker s & topics Duane Lenz, Cattle-Fax, Beef Forecast and Export update Mike Hall, discussing the benefits of crossing Limousin & dairy breeds Kevin Hill, Merck, “Reducing Stress & the Effects of Stress on Production” Brad Morgan, Ph.D., Zoetis, “Why the Fuss About Food?” Kim Stackhouse-Lawson, Ph.D., NCBA, Sustainability in the Beef Industry Mike Apley, DVM, Ph.D., Kansas State University, FDA FInal Guidance #213 & The Future of Antibiotics Frank Mitloner, Ph.D., United Nations Livestock Advisory Committee Jimmy Maxey, Cattlemen’s Beef Board, CBB Update Colin Woodall, NCBA, NCBA Issues Update Brian Bledsoe, meteorologist, 2014 weather forecast Guadalupe de Jesus Vizcarra-Calderon, SuKarne, Perspective on the Global Beef Industry

Barry Carpenter, North America Meat Association, Country of Origin Labeling

May 2014 California Cattleman 29

Here for the Long Haul Beef Industry Proves Its Sustainability by John Robinson, director of organizational communications, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association The checkoff-funded Beef Industry Sustainability Assessment, which was certified by NSF International, is a first-of-its-kind life cycle assessment (LCA). The work, led by Kim Stackhouse-Lawson, Ph.D., NCBA Director of Sustainability, provides benchmarks on beef ’s economic, environmental and social contributions in the United States. The assessment demonstrates that the beef industry has improved its sustainability over time and identifies areas along the supply chain where future research and improvements may be needed. “The completion of this project provides the industry, for the first time, the science-based evidence necessary to lead conversations about the sustainability of beef,” said Stackhouse-Lawson. “The Beef Checkoff and the Beef Promotion Operating Committee had the foresight to see the importance of this work and make it a priority for the industry. By completing the LCA, the checkoff really positioned beef as a leader among competing proteins.” She explained that the Beef Industry Sustainability Assessment is the most detailed examination of a commodity value chain ever completed. “Overall, the results of the sustainability assessment tell a very positive story for the beef industry. In just six years the beef industry achieved a 7 percent reduction in its environmental and social fingerprint,” said StackhouseLawson. “When you factor in all facets of sustainability; environmental, social and economic components, the entire beef value chain achieved a 5 percent improvement in its sustainability between 2005 and 2011.” The study examined three separate time periods and took into account data from a number of sources representing the full value chain.

30 California Cattleman May 2014

“We examined all the inputs and outputs required to produce a pound of boneless, edible beef and we did that for the 1970s, 2005 and 2011,” said Stackhouse-Lawson. She explained that each of those time periods represents major shifts in beef production practices. “The 1970s was chosen because that’s when we transitioned to boxed beef. We selected 2005 when the beef industry started feeding significant volumes of distiller’s grains. The 2011 calculations represent present day,” she said. “We went back and examined data from each of those years from pre- and post-harvest sectors and then created complex models to simulate the data and calculate indices that measure industry sustainability.” Stackhouse-Lawson worked closely with the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Research Service, the USDA Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center, Neb., BASF Corporation and other groups to compile and analyze the data. The NSF International certification provided stringent third-party evaluation to make the work credible to stakeholders inside and outside the industry, including non-governmental organizations which have a growing influence in determining how food is produced in the United States. “We have found that this work is being widely accepted and it has positioned the beef industry to tell a proactive and positive story about our improvement over time. As a result of conducting this ground breaking work, we’re better able to find common ground with skeptics and work toward constructive solutions that haven’t been possible in the past,” she explained. “We’ve also seen the beef industry, across the entire production chain, come together around this work and work cooperatively toward solutions that will help us with a

more sustainable future.” Many beef producers look at sustainability as the ability to pass a ranch or business from one generation to the next, but it’s more than just that piece, Stackhouse-Lawson explained. Sustainability also encompasses beef ’s contributions to the economic landscape, the environment and towns where the beef industry is an integral part of the socials fabric of the community. Beef producers contribute to the tax base, while the industry creates jobs and provides a number of additional social benefits that the sustainability assessment was able to quantify. The results show that in many of these areas the industry has made significant improvements in a short period of time. The research group also identified areas where there are still opportunities for improvement. “There are pieces of the production puzzle that we just can’t do much about. Methane and ammonia emissions from the cowherd are an area where we can’t make much improvement and we recognize that. But there are other areas, like energy and water consumption, where we might be able to make improvements. Those are really the areas where we want to target our efforts to help make the industry more sustainable in the future,” Stackhouse-Lawson said. Some areas where the industry has already made improvements include major reductions in emissions to soil, air and water as a result of the installation of covered lagoons in packing plants. Those lagoons, many of which are also designed to capture and convert biogas to energy, lead to reductions in electricity use and add to industry sustainability. Those improvements offset other areas where efficiencies and improvements are more difficult to achieve or quantify. “It’s important to remember that this science is still relatively new and evolving,” said StackhouseLawson. “There are some aspects of beef production where it’s difficult and often very expensive to benchmark sustainability. For example, the intangible value created by the open space and wildlife on a ranch or the effects of wildfire mitigation resulting from the result of good grazing practices are things that we are still working on.” Researchers are working on new tools to benchmark ongoing and future improvements in some of those areas. Those measurements will add to the science and future beef sustainability assessment work, she explained.

A Path of Continuous Improvement The recently-certified Beef Industry Sustainability Assessment shows significant improvement in the sustainability of beef in the six year period between 2005 and 2011. Improvements in environmental practices and social sustainability components have resulted in a 7 percent improvement in beef’s sustainability in a very short period of time. The results of the comprehensive, holistic value chain life cycle assessment show the industry is on a sustainable path. From 2005 to 2011, the beef industry reduced:

Emissions to soil by 7% Greenhouse gas emissions by 2% Emissions with acidification potential by 3% Emissions to water by 10% Water use by 3% Land use by 4% Resource use by 2% Energy use by 2% Occupational illnesses and accidents by 32%

With the benchmark information provided by the completion of this important work the beef industry is positioned to make progress on it path of continuous improvement to a more sustainable future.

To view the full results of the Beef Industry Sustainability Assessment, please visit www. beefresearch.org/beefsustainabilityresearch.aspx Kim Lawson-Stackhouse will be a featured speaker at the upcoming annual California/Nevada Feeder Meeting in Coronado May 22 and 23. For more information about the event, visit www.calcattlemen.org, or contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845. May 2014 California Cattleman 31

They’re droughT-sTressed, weaned, commingled and processed. and now They’re Taking The long haul righT To your operaTions.

imporTanT saFeTy inFormaTion: For use in cattle only. Do not treat cattle within 35 days of slaughter. Because a discard time in milk has not been established, do not use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, or in calves to be processed for veal. The effects of ZACTRAN on bovine reproductive performance, pregnancy and lactation have not been determined. 32 California Cattleman May 2014

ZACTRAN delivers rapid onset1 and 10-day duration2 against the most prevalent causes of BRD.3 And when those high-risk cattle get ZACTRAN coming off the truck, it can mean fewer retreatments,4 which is even more important in today’s high-priced cattle market. 1

2

3 4

Sifferman RL, Wolff WA, Holste JE, et al. Field efficacy evaluation of gamithromycin for treatment of bovine respiratory disease in cattle at feedlots. Intern J Appl Res Vet Med. 2011:9(2):171-180. Lechtenberg K, Daniels CS, Royer GC, et al. Field efficacy study of gamithromycin for the control of bovine respiratory disease in cattle at high risk of developing the disease. Intern J Appl Res Vet Med. 2011;9(2):189-197. ZACTRAN product label. Van Donkersgoed J, Merrill JK. A comparison of tilmicosin to gamithromycin for on-arrival treatment of bovine respiratory disease in feeder steers. Bovine Practitioner. 2012:46(1):46-51.

®ZACTRAN is a registered trademark of Merial Limited. ©2012 Merial Limited, Duluth, GA. All rights reserved. RUMIOTD1247 (07/12)

May 2014 California Cattleman 33

Antibiotics and food production

by Dave Daley, Ph.D., and Tom Talbot, DVM For the past 50 years cattle producers have been fortunate to routinely access antibiotics to prevent and treat animal disease. The development of antibiotics marked a milestone in animal agriculture, as we were able to significantly reduce both morbidity and mortality. We improved animal welfare and the general health and well-being of all livestock. Who would disagree that antibiotics were one of the most important and influential discoveries in human and animal medicine in the 20th century? As Bob Dylan said, “But times they are a-changing!” In the past decade, we have seen growing concern from the medical community and the general public regarding the use of antibiotics in food animal production. The concern is that our “overuse and indiscriminate use” of antibiotics in livestock is one of the primary causes of antibiotic resistance in humans. The statistic most frequently cited is 80 percent of the antibiotics used in the United States go to livestock production. Although that number is skewed to suit a particular agenda and not entirely accurate, it shows up in every discussion regarding antibiotic resistance. We can argue the science and debate whether the concern with food animal antibiotics is factual or not, but the reality is antibiotic resistance is real and increasing. To be clear, resistance is a natural phenomenon that occurs with the use of antibiotics. If we treat an animal for a bacterial infection, most of the bacteria are killed. Some may survive and reproduce. Those bacteria that survive are more resistant to that particular antibiotic. And, since the bacteria survived, reproduction occurs naturally and quickly—thus perpetuating a more resistant strain. Remember how effective penicillin used to be to treat many infections? That no longer is the case. Bacteria have built resistance. Most of us realize that there are

other sources of resistant bacteria not caused by livestock at all. The human medical community has unintentionally caused significant resistance problems as well. When people go to the doctor, they fully expect an antibiotic be prescribed. Most people do not even realize that antibiotics will not work on viral infections. They just expect to be prescribed “something” so they will feel better. Later, if their condition improves, they often never finish their prescription and leave it in the cabinet for years, or flush it away—and add those antibiotics to the water supply. This common practice has become a significant source of antibiotic resistance. To address the growing issue of antibiotic resistance, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued Guidance for Industry #213 in January 2014 to eliminate the subtherapeutic feeding of medically important antibiotics to livestock if the antibiotics were labeled specifically to enhance growth or feed efficiency. FDA Guidance 213 does not preclude feeding those antibiotics under a VFD (veterinary feed directive), where a veterinarian prescribes feeding the product as a preventative to disease. For example, Tylan® can still be fed in feedlots to reduce liver abscess, under the written guidance of a veterinarian. It cannot be fed specifically as a growth promotant. Almost all major pharmaceutical companies have endorsed this approach, along with several major commodity groups. This is a good compromise, intended to start reducing the amount of antibiotics used in livestock, thus beginning to address antibiotic resistance, but not eliminating the tools used by producers to prevent disease and treat animals. For some in the medical community and consumer activists,

34 California Cattleman May 2014

FDA 213 does not go far enough. For some producers, however, we should not weaken on this issue at all, “because it is a slippery slope.” The rationale is that if we give up subtherapeutic feeding for growth promotion, what’s next? However, for most reasonable people who have studied the science, this is a well thought out approach intended to protect antibiotics so they will be effective when needed to treat both livestock and people. The issuance of FDA 213, resulted in action in our legislature in California. Two bills have been introduced, Senate Bill (SB) 835, authored by Sen. Jerry Hill (D-San Mateo), and Assembly Bill (AB) 1437, which is authored by Assemblymember Mullin (D-South San Francisco). We could argue whether these are necessary, since federal rules will take precedence over the availability of antibiotics for subtherapeutic feeding. However, the Senate and Assembly bills are decidedly different. SB 835 basically mimics FDA 213. It moves us in the right direction, and will not have a significant negative impact on the ability of producers to care for livestock. On the other hand, AB 1437 is quite drastic, and would essentially take the tools out of a producer’s hands that are necessary for them to function, particularly in range conditions. Your CCA staff is working very hard on SB 835 and AB 1437 to make sure the bill’s language reflects FDA rules and will not negatively impact your ability to treat livestock appropriately or are defeated. It looks like this approach has a good chance to succeed. But what does this mean for the future? This issue will not go away, and as cattlemen, we need to seriously think about how we improve our utilization of antibiotics. For many years, CCA and other organizations have regularly administered quality

assurance certification programs. Many of the issues of appropriate use have been thoroughly discussed—dosage, timing, label use, veterinary/client/ relationships, etc. These are all things necessary to do things “right.” Yet, if we are honest, we have all been guilty at some time of inappropriate use as well. California Cattlemen have passed a code of ethics which clearly emphasizes how important it is to consult with a licensed veterinarian and to use products according to the label. So how closely do all of us follow this established membership policy? If you find a sick calf in the field and the only thing you find is an expired bottle of LA 200® rolling around in the toolbox, do you use it? Or, perhaps you’ve taken a “shotgun” approach to treating a problem? We have even heard things from producers like, “Not sure what’s wrong….just give them some sulfa boluses and hope it works.” In reality, we believe these practices are the exception, not the norm. But it does happen. And we need to do better if we want these tools to be around for the future. Most of the major common antibiotics in current use require a veterinary prescription anyway – products like Draxxin® (tulathromycin), Nuflour®

(florenfenicol), Resflor® (florenfenicol), etc. Larger producers who have a purchasing point and a veterinary/client/patient relationship, generally have standing prescriptions available so they can order antibiotics as needed. Meaning their veterinarian knows and trusts that they use the antibiotic appropriately. But what about penicillin, tetracycline and sulfas? Those can be purchased at most feed or farm stores over the counter, frequently by part-time producers, who may have not had quality assurance training. These producers could potentially be given advice by a part-time employee with minimal training. The public will not have confidence in a system that works like that long term. It is a gap in our system that we need to carefully consider, before the legislature makes dramatic changes that really limit our ability to utilize these powerful and important tools. As we visit with producers around the state and nation, the common theme is every one would prefer to prevent disease rather than treat sick animals. It is the right thing from an animal welfare perspective and it is the right thing economically. We need to start paying more attention to appropriate vaccination programs (which the public will endorse), and preserving antibiotics so they are

effective for livestock and for people. As a beef cattle community, FDA 213 will have comparatively minimal impacts on what we do. The impacts on poultry and swine are potentially more significant. However, California’s cattlemen and women have a long history of looking down the road and anticipating where we need to be. That includes a thorough and thoughtful discussion of how we presently use antibiotics, and how we can improve that practice in the future. Careful, judicious and thoughtful use, with veterinary oversight, is a story the public understands and one that we can support.

About the Authors Dave Daley, Ph.D., is a professor of Animal Science at California State University, Chico, where he is also the associate dean in the College of Agriculture. Daley, known for his forward-thinking approach to many animal welfare issues, is also an Oroville rancher who currently serves as a second vice president for the California Cattlemen’s Association. Tom Talbot, DVM, is a veterinarian and cow-calf beef producer in Bishop. Talbot is a past president of CCA and currently serves as chair of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s Animal Health and Well-being Committee.

CCA Producer Code of Ethics

California cattle producers recognize their livelihood and way of life are dependent upon the wise stewardship of all livestock and natural resources.
CCA members pledge to meet the following standards: • • • • • • • • • •

Produce a quality, wholesome, nutritious product. Provide a high standard of livestock health. Manage livestock in a humane manner. Use and maintain transportation and handling facilities that provide livestock health and safety. Provide routine observation of livestock for the animals’ health and well-being. Provide feed and water to maintain livestock health and productivity. Consult with a licensed veterinarian concerning health care practices. Use approved livestock health products according to the label directions. Sustain and conserve natural resources by proper management of land, air, water and wildlife. Support and maintain rural and family traditions important to our society. May 2014 California Cattleman 35

USDA approves combo vaccine to fight BRD viruses & bacteria Elanco Animal Health recently announced news that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has issued a Veterinary Biologics License for TitaniumÂŽ 5 + PH-M, a new vaccine that protects cattle against the viruses and bacteria most associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Titanium 5 + PH-M provides modified-live virus (MLV) protection against bovine viral diarrhea (BVD), types 1 and 2, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) and parainfluenza3 (PI3). Each dose also protects against Mannheimia haemolytica10 and Pasteurella multocida bacteria, and is safe for cattle at all stages of production. Respiratory viruses can cause BRD on their own. But, they also can compromise the immune system that normally protects cattle against bacteria, allowing bacteria to attack their host and cause severe cases of BRD. When cattle are exposed to respiratory viruses, their immune system can be weakened. Once the immune system is compromised, bacteria including M. haemolytica and P. multocida can more easily go deeper into the respiratory tract, where they cause

disease When bacterial pathogens reach the lungs, they are a major cause of BRD, causing increased morbidity, mortality, and labor and treatment costs BRD still is the No. 1 profit-robber, accounting for 75 percent of feedlot morbidity, and 50 percent to 75 percent of mortality, costing an estimated $800 million to $900 million annually. Beyond that, one study showed 68 percent of untreated calves had pulmonary lesions at slaughter — demonstrating that a significant number of animals never diagnosed with BRD do, in fact, suffer from some form of respiratory disease.21 Titanium 5 + PH-M is a combination of two trusted vaccines. Its viral component, Titanium 5, delivers modified-live protection against five important viruses that cause BRD. Its PH-M component provides coverage against two bacteria that are well-known for causing pasteurellosis (part of the BRD complex). The new vaccine is formulated with a low-reactive, water-soluble adjuvant. The result is a low-volume (2 mL), subcutaneous dose that is consistent with Beef Quality Assurance (BQA)

36 California Cattleman May 2014

guidelines. This enables veterinarians and producers to use just one vaccine to deliver a broad immune response against BRD-causing pathogens. Titanium 5 + PH-M is approved for use in cattle 60 days of age and older, and is backed by noninterference, efficacy and safety research. The vaccine also may be given to pregnant cows and heifers,22 as well as calves nursing pregnant cows,23 when administered according to label instructions. In cow/calf operations, Titanium 5 + PH-M is well-suited for branding and/or weaning/preconditioning vaccination protocols. Stocker operators can administer this vaccine upon arrival, with a booster vaccination before turning calves out. Using Titanium 5 + PH-M upon arrival in feedyards is a good fit for lightweight, high-risk calves and heavyweight cattle. Producers should work with their veterinarian to determine the best way to incorporate Titanium 5 + PH-M into their herdhealth protocols. Elanco has begun shipping 10-dose and 50-dose packages of Titanium 5 + PH-M to animal health product distributors..

CALIFORNIAns MAKE LOBBy visit to waSHINGTON In Washington, D.C., in early April, one will likely see two things, cherry blossoms in bloom and ranchers in cowboy hats walking the halls of the U.S. Capitol building. This tradition held true in 2014 as ranchers from across the country descended on our nation’s capital for the annual National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and Public Lands Council (PLC) Legislative Conference. This year on April 7 through April 11, CCA sent a contingent from California to the event including CCA officers, staff and members. CCA young producer member Kendra Brennan from Tuolumne County was one of two individuals honored with a scholarship from PLC to attend the event at no cost. The busy week included two full days of active lobbying on Capitol Hill and various federal regulatory agencies in Washington, D.C. Participants had the opportunity to hear from Gina McCarthy, the newly-appointed administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency., who spoke about the release of the administration’s proposed rule to define which waters are subject to federal regulation. This controversial proposal that is a clear overreach by the federal government to not just regulate true navigable waterways but also ditches, pot holes, disconnected wetlands and other non-navigable waterways is being met with strong opposition by CCA, NCBA and other agricultural stakeholders. These concerns were made clear to McCarthy and she committed to continue to work ranchers to address concerns and opposition as a formal review of the proposed rule will soon begin. Other issues that CCA members shared with members of Congress and their staff included the strong opposition to a recent proposal by the USDA to allow the importation of chilled or frozen beef from Brazil without regard to the risk posed for the introduction of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD). California members also specifically lobbied on the need for serious reform of the Endangered Species Act, the timely and effective implementation of federal disaster assistance to help producers struggling with the ongoing drought and address challenges on

The CCA delegation in Washington consisted of Sherri and Kendra Brennan, Sonora; NCBA Policy Division Vice Chair, Kevin Kester, Parkfield; CCA President Tim Koopmann, Sunol; CCA Federal Lands Committee Chair Mike Byrne, Tulelake; CCA’s Justin Oldfield, Elk Grove; and CCA First Vice President Billy Flournoy, Likely.

federal lands that restrict permittees from fully utilizing their grazing permits. CCA encourages all members to

attend the annual NCBA and PLC Legislative Conference. For more information, contact the CCA office.

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RANGELAND TRUST TALK CONSERVING CALIFORNIA’S HISTORIC BEAUTY by Anna-Lisa Giannini, director of communications, California Rangeland Trust Tucked away in the foothills of the Northern Sacramento Valley lies a glimpse of what the majority of California’s valleys and open lands looked like hundreds of years ago. Dotted in vast varieties of overwhelmingly beautiful wildflowers, Bear Valley is a prime example of what Spanish sailors likely saw when they coined California as the “land of fire” in the late 18th Century. This reference to the populations of poppies and other native wildflowers covering the state remind us of the importance of managing our open lands as sustainably as possible. There are four ranches that comprise the majority of Bear Valley, the Bear Valley Ranch (owned by the Brackett Family), the Payne Ranch, the Keegan Ranch and the Epperson Place. The Bear Valley Ranch and Payne Ranch are forever protected by conservation easements held by the California Rangeland Trust. Each year wildflower enthusiasts and rangeland biologists from the West and around the world travel to these ranches to observe the hundreds of rare species of wildflowers that continue to thrive there because the fields are grazed by cattle. “Grazing can enhance wildflower populations on California’s annual grasslands by reducing annual grass cover, thatch and height,” says Sheila Barry, University of California Cooperative Extension. She further explains, “Most of the wildflowers in Bear Valley are native annuals [examples: tidytips, goldfields, buttercups, johnny jump-ups, red maids, etc.] and most are small and require an open environment in the fall to successfully germinate and reproduce.” Don’t worry; the cattle won’t eat the flowers! Barry says grazing cattle is effective at reducing grass cover because of their instinct to selectively eat grasses instead of broad-leaf plants like wildflowers. Grazing these fields also helps to control annual grasses that could pose risk to the flowers. Barry explains that exotic annual grasses, some of which are considered invasive species, maintain their dominance in a stand of grass by competing for soil moisture and light, which poses harm to species like flowers. Livestock can be used to help keep these species at bay according to Barry. “Grazing reduces their height, cover and the accumulation

of thatch that could otherwise prevent the wildflowers from germinating and accessing soil moisture and light,” she says. Managing Wildflower Populations in Drought The wildflowers will still bloom despite the devastating drought California’s ranchers have been battling the last few years. However, rancher Jim Keegan, Wiliams, doesn’t expect to see the magnificent display of colors and varieties one would see in a good rain year. “I only expect a few measly species,” he says. Barry clarifies why Keegan doesn’t anticipate the normal abundance of flowers. She says that similarly to annual grasses, wildflowers like those found in Bear Valley, grow each year from a seed typically after fall germinating rains. This year, on ranches throughout the state, annual grasses and wildflowers had a delayed start because there wasn’t enough moisture in the fall to both germinate the seeds and sustain their growth. Ranchers in the area are doing their due diligence to give the flowers every advantage they need to survive. While it is still important for the valley to be grazed by cattle even during times of drought, Williams-based rancher Ira Brackett says he’s reduced his stocking rate to about onethird the number of cattle that would typically be in his valley fields. “We’ve sold some cattle, shipped some cattle to Colorado and reduced our numbers here,” Brackett says. “We’re also trying to keep the cattle moving between pastures so they all stay grazed but there isn’t as much pressure on them.” Barry isn’t worried about them dying off because of these back to back drought years. “Wildflowers have a long life seed bank in the soil,” she says. “While allowing them to flower and go to seed is desirable, their seed should persist in the seed bank regardless of their abundance and productivity in a single year.” Brackett isn’t all too concerned about the drought killing the flowers either. “They’ve been here a lot longer than we have,” he says. “They’ve probably seen worse.”

American Land Conservancy Photo

38 California Cattleman May 2014

ZOETIS Introduces one-shot BVD VACCINE Zoetis recently announced the addition of ONE SHOT® BVD to its comprehensive vaccine portfolio. The new vaccine helps provide combined respiratory protection against Mannheimia haemolytica and bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) Types 1 and 2 viruses in a single dose. ONE SHOT BVD helps cattle producers expand respiratory vaccination programs that currently include INFORCE™ 3 respiratory vaccine, which is used to help protect beef and dairy calves. Young calves need additional respiratory protection due to underdeveloped immune systems and exposure to environmental stressors, which can cause them to fall victim to respiratory infection. “The superior respiratory protection of INFORCE 3 against

bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and the complementary M. haemolytica and BVD protection of ONE SHOT BVD offers producers a convenient and effective way to help combat bovine respiratory disease (BRD),” said Jon Seeger, DVM, managing veterinarian, Zoetis Cattle and Equine Technical Services. “These vaccines help provide the respiratory protection calves need until they are sold or move to the next production phase.” As the second-most significant disease impacting dairy operations1 and the leading cause of death in beef calves between three weeks of age and weaning, 2 BRD can negatively impact the health, productivity and profitability of young calves. Young calves need additional respiratory protection due

to underdeveloped immune systems and exposure to environmental stressors, which can cause them to fall victim to respiratory infection. “INFORCE 3 and ONE SHOT BVD help provide the antigens that young calves need to build their immunity before being commingled or turned out to pasture,” Seeger continued. “Using the right antigens, at the right time, helps offer comprehensive respiratory protection from BRSV, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus, parainfluenza 3 (PI3) virus, M. haemolytica and BVD Types 1 and 2 viruses.” ONE SHOT BVD is available in 10- or 50-dose vials and can be purchased through veterinarians or animal health retailers.

May 2014 California Cattleman 39

ShortHOrns Helping producers make the mark by Megan Brehm, director of communications and marketing, American Shorthorn Association, Omaha, Neb.

Today’s economic climate makes it a great time to be in the cattle business. Producers are enjoying the benefits of lower national cowherd numbers with record high prices for feeder calves while purebred producers are experiencing all-time high demand for breeding cattle. Cattlemen today are also taking advantage of Shorthorn and Shorthorn composite genetic data available when selecting cattle for their operation; data availability makes it easier for producers to select genetics with performance and profitability in mind. Genomic data allows producers to locate genetics available that meet their individual needs to make a mark on their herd’s performance. Armed with data to support such decisions, commercial cattlemen are opening their eyes to the Shorthorn breed. The Shorthorn breed is not new to the American beef industry, with imports to America first recorded in 1783. Shorthorns were prized for their meat and milking ability, some of the very same traits that continue to help the breed excel today. Today, the American Shorthorn Association registers nearly 15,000 animals per

year, with more than 6,000 junior and senior members. The Shorthorn breed is collecting DNA data for genomic evaluations which will improve the current expected progeny difference (EPD) system and give tools to producers to be successful in the beef industry. In the future the Shorthorn breed will be participating in a multibreed EPD genetic evaluation. This multi-breed EPD system will allow beef producers to easily compare performance traits between animals of several breeds. More and more individuals are choosing Shorthorns for heterosis advantages which directly impact profitability. Shorthorns simply possess the traits that are advantageous to cattlemen. The Shorthorn breed, in its efforts to continually expand to a wider segment of the beef industry, offers a Shorthorn composite registry, ShorthornPlus. ShorthornPlus requires registered animals to be at least 25 perecent Shorthorn. Registering ShorthornPlus cattle offers producers the benefit to access total performance data on composite genetics. The addition of the multi-

breed EPD evaluation will provide performance information previously unavailable. The ShorthornPlus composite program is a valuable tool to those in the beef industry. The vast population comparison included in the multi-breed EPD evaluation allows producers to diversify their herd’s genetics while also having the ability to obtain more valuable performance data. ShorthornPlus composite cattle can add valuable Shorthorn traits to commercial herds of cattle while meeting the demands of the beef industry. All cattle producers are well aware of the value of calves raised during a production year. However, when considering the impact of fertility on beef cattle, the economic impact isn’t always as obvious. It comes as no surprise that fertile cows help improve producer’s bottom line dramatically. Having productive cows that are able to raise heavy calves at weaning and breed back each year in a timely manner improves efficiency. ...Continued on page 40

ASA©

40 California Cattleman May 2014

May 2014 California Cattleman 41

...Contiued from page 38

Consider this... These statistics concerning fertility came from research at the University of Florida in 2008: • Calf price for 500-weight feeder calves is $1.25/ pound. • Percentage of pregnant cows is 85 percent • Weaning weights average 500 pounds. Therefore, the following calculation may be used (assuming that there is little or no difference in the maintenance costs of a pregnant or non-pregnant cow): 1.) Value of weaned calf per exposed cow if 100% cows are pregnant = 500 lbs x 100% x $1.25/lb = $625 per cow 2.) Value of weaned calf per exposed cow when 85% cows are pregnant = 500 lbs x 85% x $1.25/lb = $531.25 per cow 3.) Loss due to failure to become pregnant during the breeding season = $625 - $531.25 = $93.75 Through simple figures, it is obvious that infertility in cattle herds dramatically hurts producers profit threshold. Consider the impact of infertility in today’s thriving cattle markets when feeder calves are reaching over $2.25/pound. The need for more emphasis on cattle fertility is real. Cattlemen must choose genetics with fertility in mind. Iowa State University research has stressed that reproductive efficiency is 100 times more important to financial viability than carcass traits. Research consistently places Shorthorn females as one of the first breeds to reach puberty, on average around 360 days. Along with early puberty, Shorthorn females boast extreme longevity while continuing to maintain their maternal abilities and structural soundness. Along with fertility in cattle herds, maternal ability and weaning weights continue to be main priorities for producers everywhere. Strong maternal traits paired with docility are areas in which Shorthorn cattle excel. On average, research shows feedlots record a $62/head average loss for cattle with disposition scores of 3 or higher (scale 1-6). Shorthorn cattle in the same feedlots averaged an average disposition score of 1.7. Data provided from the Tri-County Steer Carcass Futurity has shown repeatedly that cattle that are the most docile record higher percentages of Choice and Prime yields than do cattle that have a more aggressive nature. Research continues to prove that Shorthorn cattle are 42 California Cattleman May 2014

efficient in feedlot performance. 566 head of purebred Shorthorn steers were fed in large, commercial feed yards in Kansas and Oklahoma. Combined, they averaged 4.03 pounds of gain per day and 5.22 pounds of dry matter fed per pound of gain. Closely related to feed efficiency, carcass quality is a vital trait of cattle that producers continue to place a strong emphasis on. Shorthorn cattle continually meet standards of high quality carcass value. In 2010, 278 purebred Shorthorns graded 72 percent Choice with zero Yield Grade 4s at 15 months of age. Interestingly, research from West Texas A&M University, found that in a study of 18,575 carcasses “results suggest that the incentives to pay a premium for feeder cattle based on hide color diminished once the finished animal is in the carcass form.” Quality and value are not always color-coded in the cattle industry. Armed with performance data and “real” world traits the Shorthorn breed will continue to excel into the future. The American Shorthorn Association’s continued focus on promoting Shorthorn and Shorthorn Influenced influenced cattle to the commercial sector. The breed has the potential to experience high demand and renewed interest from more cattlemen seeking the applicable traits Shorthorns. Today’s beef industry demands producers to improve their herds through improved fertility, higher feed efficiency (docility), and data management practices. Shorthorns are a tool that can make their mark on cattlemen’s herds seeking to add performance and value to their operation.

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May 2014 California Cattleman 43

The Califonria Cattlemen’s Association and California CattleWomen, Inc., invite you to join with your fellow beef producers in attending the 2014 CCA/CCW Midyear Meeting, June 12 and May 13 in California’s capital city. As members of these respective organizations, it is imperative that you attend, not only to show support for your way of life, but also to help drive the direction of it. CCA works hard for your each and every day in Sacramento and beyond but without the input from its membership, the work CCA does can not effectively move forward. As a kick-off to the midyear policy meetings for CCA and CCW, the highly-anticipated 36th Annual Steak & Eggs Legislative Breakfast, will take place on June 11, the day prior to the Midyear Meeting and once again be hosted at the Sutter Club in downtown, Sacramento. The Legislative

Be sure to book your room at the Sacramento Double Tree as soon as possible to ensure you get the room block price of $105/night. Be sure to mention the California Cattlemen’s Association upon making your reservation. Call (916) 929-8855 or (800) 6986-3775 by May 28 to get the special Midyear Meeting pricing!

44 California Cattleman May 2014

Breakfast provides a one-of-a-kind opportunity to sit down face-to-face with your elected leaders and share with them the things that are most important to you and the future of your family ranching operation. Following the breakfast, a media training and local leadership orientation will take place at the CCA office for state and local leaders. The Midyear Meetings on May 12 and 13 will take place at the Sacramento DoubleTree. Other highlights of the Midyear Meeting include presentations from regulatory agencies, the CDFA Secretary of Agriculture and a special antibiotics panel moderated by Dave Daley, Ph.D., and Tom Talbot, DVM. For questions about the meeting or registration, please contact the CCA office at (916) 444-0845 or visit the event registration page found at www.calcattlemen.org.

All CCA and CCW members should be receiving registration materials in the mail but in case you haven’t, CCA encourages you to register for the meeting online at www.calcattlemen.org. In addition, by going online you can see a complete line up of meetings and speakers.

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BRIDGING THE GAP Educating Consumers & Producers Whether it’s on the ranch or “in town” education and outreach matter most when there’s a gap to be filled. California Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) members and California CattleWomen, Inc. (CCW) members have had a busy spring educating others, as well as themselves, about the beef cattle industry as a whole. Each year, various opportunities are offered to ranchers and those who work on cattle operations to improve their animal handling and ranch safety techniques through the Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) Program. For example, in March, over 50 feedyard and calf nursery managers and employees gathered at the Harris Ranch Inn and Restaurant in Coalinga to fulfill the requirements of their BQA certifications. Though many were previously BQA certified, every other year a recertification must be met to keep up-to-date with the most recent best management practices in feedyard BQA. In several other cases education and outreach can help bridge the knowledge gap from pasture to plate for students and young people. This year, California’s Ag Day at the Capitol made for an excellent educational opportunity to those members of the community interested in learning more about agriculture. CCA and CCW members served over 2,600 tri-tip sandwiches and passed out beef pamphlets while engaging in conversations with those waiting in line to receive their sandwich. CCW President Tammie McElroy, Gridley, also helped educate middle school students about beef production at the Marysville High School Ag Day hosted by their FFA chapter. By asking students true or false questions about the beef production cycle, McElroy was able to positivley reinforce knowledge of the beef industry, because all of her answers were true. “I want the students to hear the correct answer coming from me, a cattlewomen, so they can share that information with their friends and parents,” she said. The bottom line of education and outreach stands on the saying, “Where there’s a will, there’s a way,” and cattlemen and cattlewomen maintain a will to inform at the strongest capacity in industry. It all begins with a story, and that’s how to start bridging the gap. 52 California Cattleman May 2014

CCW eagerly attended Ag Day at the Capitol to educate attendees about ranching.

CCW members served Tri-tip sandwiches to Ag Day attendees

CCW member Camille Borba and baby Adalina proudly promoted beef at Ag Day.

FFA members showed their enthusiasm for beef at Ag Day

CCA’s Malorie Bankhead and YCC member and Miss California Rodeo Salinas Grace Tobias also attended Ag Day.

CCW President Tammie McElroy attended Marysville Ag Day with CCA’s Malorie Bankhead.

UC Davis’ Jim Oltjen, Ph.D., and Noelia Del Silva Rio, Ph.D., DVM, alongwith DairyExperts’ Alfonso Lago, Ph.D., DVM, presented at a Beef Quality Assurance training for feedlot owners, calf raisers and their employees at a program at Harris Ranch on March 24, to show educating producers is just as important as educating consumers.

IN MEMORY

New Arrivals

Donald Guidici Donald Winters Guidici passed away peacefully at his home on March 20 at the age of 86. Don was born Jan. 8, 1928 in Oroville to Fred and Myrtle (Winters) Guidici. Guidici attended the Summit School for the first eight years of schooling and then attended Loyalton High School and Oroville High School. After high school, Guidici joined the U.S. Navy. He served on the USS Washington and USS Amphion until his discharge two years later. After his service Guidici attended UC Davis majoring in Animal Husbandry, after which he returned to the family ranch in the Sierra Valley where he worked and lived until his passing. On Sept. 28, 1952, Guidici married Doris Mae Jones of Loyalton. They had 4 children: David, Doug, Donna and Diane. Guidici was very active in the community as a lifelong member of the Sierra Valley Grange and county farm bureau. He was also one of the original members of teh Sierra Valley Roping Club. Guidici was president of the Plumas-Sierra Cattlemen’s Association for many years and a director for many more. He enjoyed organizing the annual cattle sale they had in Quincy for many years. In addition to these community organizations, Guidici was a member of teh Plumas County Fair bord and the Sierra Valley Grandwater dDistrict. After suffering rom a stroke in 1995, Guidici retired from many of his civic groups but never stopped caring about he Sierra Valley. Guidici was also a member of the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War. He loved learning about the history of war and enjoyed to to meetings and participating in their ceremonies. Don is servived by his four children David (Fern) Guidici, Vinton; Doug Guidici, Oroville; Donna Guidici, Vinton; and Diane Guidici of Saco, Maine; one grandson Nicholas Guidici, Saco, Maine; and his sister Freida Smith of Arizona. He was preceded in death by his parents and wife.

Giuliana Yarbrough Proud parents Josh and Kaitlin (Duni) Yarbrough, Oakdale, welcomed baby girl Giuliana Nicole Yarbrough on March 20. Guiliana weighed 6 pounds 4 ounces and was 19 inches long. Grandparents are Thais Duni and the late Ronald Duni, Los Banos and Greg and Chis Yarbrough, Oakdale. Kaitlin is a past employee of CCA. She and her husband are both employed by Seneca Foods, Modesto.

Hudson Van Egmond Another beef advocate joined the world as Chris and Christie (Noble) Van Egmond, Acampo, welcomed Hudson Wilhelm Van Egmond to their family on March 17. He weighed in at 7 pounds 5 ounces and 19 inches long. Grandparents are Bill and Diane Van Egmond, Woodbridge; and Phil and Ellen Noble of Yreka. Christie is currently employed by the California Beef Council and Chris is employed at DeLaval, Inc.

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www.norbrookinc.com

May 2014 California Cattleman 53

Advertisers’ Index 101 Livestock.........................................................................23 101 Ttrailer Sales..................................................................43 All West Select Sires.............................................................54 Amador Angus.....................................................................46 American Hereford Association.........................................48 American Shorthorn Association......................................41 Apache Polled Herefords.....................................................48 Bar R Angus..........................................................................46 BMW Angus.........................................................................46 Bovine Elite, LLC..................................................................51 Broken Arrow Ranch...........................................................46 Broken Box Ranch................................................................50 Buchanan Angus...................................................................46 Byrd Cattle Company, LLC.......................................... 46, 56 California Custom................................................................51 California Shorthorn Association......................................31 California State University, Chico......................................49 California State University, Fresno.....................................49 California Wagyu Breeders.................................................50 California Windmill.............................................................51 Cargill Beef............................................................................43 Cattlemen’s Livestock Market............................................1.3 Cherry Glen Beefmasters....................................................48 Conlan Ranches California.................................................50 Conlin Fence Company.......................................................50 Conlin Supply.......................................................................39 Corsair Angus Ranch...........................................................46 Cowboy Conservation.........................................................37 Dal Porto Livestock..............................................................46 Diamond Back Ranch..........................................................50 Donati Ranch........................................................................46 Dos Palos Y Auction Yard...................................................18 Edwards, Lien & Toso, Inc..................................................50 Escalon Livestock Market....................................................24 Farm Credit Services Southwest.........................................31 Farmers Livestock Market...................................................22 Five Star Land & Livestock..................................................47 Five Star Land Company.....................................................50 Freitas Rangeland Improvements.......................................45 Furtado Angus......................................................................47 Furtado Enterprises..............................................................51 Genoa Livestock...................................................................49 Gonsalves Ranch..................................................................47 HAVE Angus.........................................................................47 Hone Ranch...........................................................................48 Humbolt Auction Yard, Inc.................................................22 J/V Angus..............................................................................47

Kennedy Nutrition Services................................................51 Kerndt Livestock Products..................................................50 Lambert Ranch.....................................................................49 Laurel Fowler Insurance Broker.........................................50 Livestock Marketing Assocation........................................25 McPhee Red Angus..............................................................50 Merial Animal Health................................................... 32, 33 Newman Stockyards.............................................................22 Noahs Angus Ranch.............................................................47 Norbrook...............................................................................53 Novartis Animal Health........................................................2 O’Connell Ranch..................................................................47 ORIgen...................................................................................51 Orland Livestock Commission Yard, Inc..........................17 Orvis Cattle Co.....................................................................49 Pacific Trace Minerals.................................................. 45, 50 Pitchfork Cattle Co...............................................................49 Powell Scales, NW................................................................24 Producer’s Livestock Marketing Association....................17 R&R Farms............................................................................49 Rabobank...............................................................................36 RayMar Ranches...................................................................47 Sammis Ranch......................................................................47 San Juan Ranch.....................................................................48 Schafer Ranch.......................................................................47 Schohr Herefords..................................................................49 Shasta Livestock Auction Yard..............................................6 Shaw Cattle Co......................................................................15 Sierra Ranches.......................................................................49 Silveira Bros...........................................................................47 Silveus Insurance Rangeland Division...............................45 Skinner Livestock Transportation......................................51 Sonoma Mountain Herefords.............................................49 Spanish Ranch.......................................................................48 Tehama Angus Ranch..........................................................48 Templeton Livestock Market..............................................17 Teixeira Cattle Co.................................................................48 Tulare County Stockyard.............................................. 22, 51 Tumbleweek Ranch..............................................................48 Turlock Livestock Auction Yard...........................................7 Universal Semen Sales.........................................................51 Veterinary Services, Inc.......................................................50 Vintage Angus Ranch..........................................................48 Visalia Livestock Markett....................................................17 Western Fence & Construction, Inc...................................50 Western Stockman’s Market..................................................9 Wulff Bros. Livestock...........................................................48

We Believe... ...our goal is to be more than just a semen supplier, but a genetics partner that creates pregnancies that are designed to meet your desired outcome. Low birth weights, high grid values and female replacements that improve your bottomline.

Calving ease. Carcass. Cows. 1-800-278-8254 www.selectsiresbeef.com contact@allwestselectsires.com

CCA Welcomes New Members The following members joined CCA between Jan. 1 and April 15 of this year.

Producer Members

Vito Antoli, BT Land & Cattle, Solvang Dan Armstrong, Ridgecrest Joe & Michelle Baker, Diamond B Ranch, Norco Theresa & John Ballestin, Shasta Valley Veterinary, Montague Michael Braught, Rockin’ B Ranch, Laytonville Nathan & Mattie Bunting, Lazy Spade, Red Bluff Wayne & Erin Criss, MacDoel Michael Cummings, Oroville Dan & Mary Freitas, Freitas Livestock, Montague Troy Javadi, Javadi Farms, Paso Robles Jacob Kalbfleisch, Ridgecrest Janice Luke & Lloyd Pickering, Luke-Pickering Livestock, Kelseyville Jesse Midgley, Midgley Ranch, Janesville Tony Ormonde, OrmondeTS5, Arroyo Grande Ben & Evelyn Reed, Whitmore Ernie Spaletta, Spaletta Dairy, Point Reyes Steve & Sonya Taylor, Paicines Curtis Thomas, Galt Clinton Vance, Crown V Ranch, Sanger Gary Williams, San Miguel Michael Davis Fischer Jr., AM Ranch, Valley Springs Richard Foreman, RC Bar Ranch LLC, San Jose David & Joseph Golonka, Golonka Cattle Co., Klamath Falls, Ore.

54 California Cattleman May 2014

Associate Members

Lynn Ballantyne, Goleta Mary Pride, Clark Compassionate Veterinary Care, Coloma Rich Dobbins, Agra Marketing, Chico, Kenneth & Kathy Legan, Kathy’s Deli & Bakery, Montague Larry Pestorich, LP Livestock Trailers, Fresno, Joe Young, MWI Veterinary Supply, Amarillo, Texas Point Reyes Seashore Ranchers, Inverness Kent Reeves, Sacramento Bill & Cindy Romans, Romans Ranches Charolais, Harper, Ore.

Young Members

Kristi Allwarot, Red Bluff Jessica Copeland, Redding Jimmy Gardner, Lompoc Luke Gardner, Lompoc Kaitlyn Milam, Fresno Emily Palmer, Gerber Nathan Pombo, Tracy Paytynn Ross, Ridgecrest Ryder Shaw, Ridgecrest Kiah Twisselman, Santa Margarita Cole Williams, Placerville Chelsea Woodcock, Clovis

2014 BULL BUYERS’ GUIDE

RESERVE YOUR SPACE NOW FOR THE JULY/AUGUST ISSUE! CONTACT MATT MACFARLANE AT (916) 803-3113 OR MMACFARLANE@WILDBLUE.NET

Are you spending more $$$$ than ever on your cattle? LET US HELP YOU GET IT BACK ... FAST! Byrd Cattle Company offers unmatched customer service, taking pride in placing our customers’ calves for top dollar. With the goal of making our clients more $$$$, we make numerous calls to procurement managers for both traditional and grass-based finishing programs on their behalf. These contacts have indicated a willingness to pay significantly more for our customers’ cattle, as there are “mountains” of data documenting the profitability of BCC genetics in every segment of the beef production chain. At Byrd Cattle Company, we’re continually moving forward with new technology – again with the goal to put more net dollars in our customers’ pockets. We see feed efficiency as an untapped “great frontier” in the beef business – but it’s about to blow up and be HUGE!

With feed costs accounting for nearly 70% of the cost of raising cattle, it isn’t surprising that new grid pricing programs have appeared with a premium for feed conversion. BCC customers are primed to capitalize as we don’t just talk about feed efficiency; we’re one of very few breeders nationwide that have been testing for it for generations. Every bull in our sale sells with individual Residual Feed Intake (RFI) data, in addition to Zoetis 50K DNA percentile rankings. This adds a substantial cost on our end, yet the benefit to you, our customer, is priceless. If you’re thinking about buying Angus bulls, females or embryos, let us show you how BCC genetics can make you more profitable. We sell affordable cattle bred with cow sense, but most importantly with common sense!

Every Bull Sells with Individual Residual Feed Intake (RFI) Data and Zoetis 50K DNA Percentile Rankings!

14th Annual “Best of Both Worlds” Angus Bull & Female SalE

Friday, September 5

150 Bulls & 80 Females sell 2002 CBCIA SeedStoCk ProduCer of the YeAr

BYrd CAttLe CoMPANY, LLC P.O. Box 713 • Red Bluff, CA 96080

Dan 530-736-8470 • Ty 530-200-4054 byrdcattleco@hotmail.com • www.byrdcattleco.com THD ©

The West’s #1 Source for Low Birth, High Growth Bulls with Marbling, Muscle and Feed Efficiency!

56 California Cattleman May 2014


May 2014 california cattleman magazine