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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 28 JANUARY 2–8, 2013

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TAK EE E ON E! FEATURE 9

FICTION 101 Celebrating the best short-fiction in Boise

FIRST THURSDAY 15

READY, SET, ART Plan your January First Thursday

NOISE 21

RECORD BLUES BW asks: Is the album dead? SCREEN 24

WINNING BIG SCREEN DUO Hyde Park on Hudson and Promised Land deliver big

“It takes me a lot longer to drink now.”

FOOD 25

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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Sultan of Events: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editors: Amy Atkins, Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Sarah Barber, Bill Cope, Damon Hunzeker, Christina Marfice, Ted Rall, revor Villagrana, Carissa Wolf Intern: Jordyn Price Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Zach Ritchie, Zach@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, production@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Patrick Sweeney, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE THE WRITE OUTLOOK Sometimes it’s easy to forget the reach Boise Weekly has and the impact of what is published in these pages. But there is no such confusion when it comes to the annual Fiction 101 issue. After 11 years, our short-fiction writing contest has garnered a fervent following, not just among writers, but those who love reading good fiction. It seems like every time the subject of Fiction 101 comes up, someone turns to me, eyes wide with excitement, and says, “I love that issue.” None of us at BW would ever argue with them because it’s one of our favorites as well—although I admit I was rather surprised when I learned that groups of local writers get together regularly for the express purpose of working on their Fiction 101 entries. Each fall, we receive more than 100 entries, and it’s my job to assemble a panel of judges whose experience, talent and passion bring a high level of credibility to the contest. Occasionally, as I moderate a judging session, I am struck by the assembly of literati seated around the table, and I geek out a bit. It’s never too hard to get a full slate of volunteers, despite the hours it takes to read and review every entry. Though BW does provide some lovely snacks for the final round of judging, each judge tackles the task because he or she truly wants to support local writers. And, luckily, Boise is home to an incredible amount of talent. While we love being able to publish the cream of the crop each year, we also like being able to give our winning authors just a little more of the limelight they deserve. Luckily, the crew at Rediscovered Bookshop feels the same. For the third year we will be heading to Rediscovered for a Fiction 101 reading and question-and-answer session with nearly all of our 2013 winning authors as part of First Thursday, Jan. 3. The event is free and open to the public and gives everyone not only the chance to hear each writer read his or her story, but to learn about the motivation or process behind the tale. The reading begins at 7 p.m., but come early to snag a seat and maybe raise a glass of wine with the winners. It’s somehow fitting that Fiction 101 is always the first issue of the year, because what better way for a newspaper to herald in a new year than by celebrating great writing? —Deanna Darr

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Eliza Fernand TITLE: Flying Geese Pyramid on American Tour (Michigan T-Dock) MEDIUM: Digital print

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2012 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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ARTIST STATEMENT: While touring with Quilt Stories, I photographed the traveling tent. Flying Geese Pyramid and Log Cabin Brick Pyramid, traveled with me in my hatchback for more than 8,000 miles. A series of landscape photographs chronicle the the trip from Washington to Massachusetts.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Get ready for the 2013 Idaho Legislature

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Fiction 101

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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FIRST THURSDAY Soak up some history at the Sesqui-Shop 15

THE END OF SKIING Climate change is effecting ski areas globally. How much? Find out on Cobweb.

BOISE’S TIME CAPSULE What should Boise put in a 2012 time capsule for future generations to learn from? We asked our readers. Read their suggestions on Cobweb.

PUT THE FUN BETWEEN YOUR LEGS Boise likes its bikes. And now, Boiseans can get themselves a locally made custom bike frame. Get the deets on Cobweb.

HOW SNOWFLAKES ARE MADE Chemists have put together a short video explaining how snowflakes are made in the clouds. You can see it on Cobweb. Spoiler alert: It doesn’t involve birds or bees.

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FIRST THURSDAY LISTINGS Plan your January First Thursday adventure 16 SUDOKU

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NOISE Did MP3s kill the album? 21 MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Promised Land and Hyde Park on Hudson deliver 24 FOOD Boise’s smoking ban turns 1 year old 25 WINESIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

20 PUM’KINS

Some pain should never go away As you probably know, every year, Boise Weekly closes up shop for a period extending from a few days before Christmas to after New Year’s Day. As a result, the column you are reading now, plus the preceding two, were due on the editor’s desk well before my normal deadline day. This one, especially. As I begin to write what you’re now reading, Christmas is still nine days off, and New Year’s Eve is over two weeks out. It’s Sunday evening, Dec. 16. I just finished watching the memorial service in Newtown, Conn. I have always tried to make my first column of the new year light and playful. Some of you, no doubt, would say “silly.” That’s OK. I don’t mind writing silly. In fact, I often wish I were more silly than I am. My nature is, frankly, not very playful. What little playing I do is usually with words and the fantasized eccentrics I concoct for what I intend to be your reading pleasure, whether it actually works out to that end or not. This explains why in past new year columns, I have presented you with such flufferies as fake predictions for the year to come or a phony newsletter from an organization (The Society for Making People Better) that exists nowhere but in my imagination. Think of it as a New Year’s resolution that I know can’t possibly last—a wish that both you and I begin a year with a lightened heart and maybe even a laugh or two. With that in mind, and with the early deadline for this piece looming, I set out to come up with 1,000 words that fit the bill— light, playful, perhaps even silly. After hours of struggle, I gave up, having produced nothing that reached even the level of mediocre. I went at it again this morning with the same result. Everything I’d written was leaden instead of light, ponderous instead of playful, soggy instead of silly. And I knew why. I knew exactly why. I could not let those 20 kids go out of my mind. You are reading this, at the earliest, 19 days after the abomination that took place in Connecticut. Maybe you’ve moved on. Maybe you’ve already done what we all must do after such things happen, and maybe you’ve entered into 2013 with a heart almost back to being unbroken. Maybe you’ve already tucked Sandy Hook into that ribbon-tied bundle in your soul’s cedar chest where you keep Columbine, 9/11, Katrina ... all those sad, sad pin points in time when we know as a people that we’ll never be the same again but we have to keep slogging along anyway. I’m not there yet, nor do I want to be. My heart does not want to be unbroken yet. I’m not ready to stash this one away yet. I still hear the wailing, the sobbing, the hopeless, desperate silence, coming on this night from 26 households in Newtown. I’m still imagining what that level of pain would do to a father, a mother. I still cannot stop myself from thinking how I would have been destroyed WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

had something so unthinkable ever happened in my own life. I was blessed to have been able to pick my daughter up from school throughout her elementary-school years. Blessed to be there when she and 25 pum’kins like her came bouncing out of their classrooms. Blessed, every day, to see her face go reliefhappybrightbeaming when she saw her dad there waiting for her. It is a memory I wouldn’t mind being my very last, when that time comes. Tonight I want to hold tight to the dreadful vision of those little pum’kin faces in Connecticut asking, How can this be happening?, as the understanding of their situation unfolds. I want to share in the terror of their teachers and I want to grasp what kind of bravery it took for those teachers to put their wards’ lives ahead of their own. I want to be one in grief with their mothers and fathers, stricken down as though their souls had been shriveled on the spot to a cinder by the notice their own little pum’kin is never again coming home. I want to be left dumbfounded by a horror so incomprehensible and I want the whole nation to be dumbfounded with me. So, my friends, nothing silly coming from me this first week of the year. Nothing playful. It wouldn’t come even if I wanted it to. Instead, I must do what I have done often on this page, to shift the weight off my heart onto a page full of the best, most appropriate words I can drag out of my innards. Writing has always been my way to heal. It is the only way I know to speak of the unspeakable. In real speech, I neither talk like this, nor could I even if I tried. It is only through this slow, internal, reflective process, contemplating each word, each phrase and sentence and image. How to get from what I wrote seconds ago to what I would wish to write next, that I can give those 20 little faces, those 20 little pum’kins, the final attention they deserve. This is the last chance for me to tell them how sad we all are they’re not coming home, so I have to make it as right as I can. Tomorrow, the day after, sometime next week, that ache to keep my thoughts on them, on their bright little lives, will begin to drift away. Unlike their mothers and fathers, their brothers and sisters, I will eventually let them go. I hope this doesn’t sound silly, but right now, as this December night winds down, I want those 20 little faces inside of me living on as long as possible. Back when this was happening, I hope they lived on in you, my friends, for as long as you could hold onto them. I hope when we all look back, we’ll know there were a few days when those little pum’kins belonged to all of us, all across this land and around the world. When we all mourned them as our own. I can think of no other response to such a thing as this.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | 5

OPINION/TED RALL

FOOLED AGAIN

After re-election, Obama sells out liberal democrats After the election, Kerry Eleveld wrote a piece for The Atlantic titled “Why Barack Obama Will Be a More Effective Liberal in His Second Term.” “In response to their initial disappointment with the president’s early performance, many progressives speculated that Obama was just waiting for a second term to be more liberal,” Eleveld wrote. That was true. They were. “A more likely explanation is that Obama was still finding his groove, figuring out which levers worked best for him in the context of governing the nation. And in some ways, he was still developing the courage of his convictions,” Eleveld continued. That was false. There was a time when liberal Democrats who chose to ignore Obama’s conservative first term, career in the Senate and pre-politics career as a University of Chicago law professor, believed that his re-election would lead to a progressive second term. “It’s time for President Obama to assume the Roosevelt-inspired mantle of muscular liberalism,” Anthony Woods wrote in The Daily Beast. “This is his moment. He only has to take it.” It’s his moment, all right. But Obama’s economic policies are closer to Herbert Hoover than Franklin Roosevelt. Everything you needed to know about Obama boils down to the fact that he voted 10 times to fund the Iraq war. Everything became clear in December 2008, when his cabinet picks didn’t include a single liberal. I thought Obama was a Democrat, so why appoint a Republican as secretary of defense? Not just a Republican but a homophobe? In 1998, Republican Sen. Chuck Hagel criticized

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President Bill Clinton’s nominee for ambassador of Luxembourg not only for being gay, but for being “openly, aggressively gay.” The fiscal cliff negotiations have led to a replay of Obama’s 2008 sellout. Throughout the 2012 campaign, the president promised to raise taxes on the top 2 percent of American households—those earning more than $250,000 a year. As of Nov. 9, he was still “sticking to his guns,” calling his stance nonnegotiable. On Dec. 17, however, he not only offered House Speaker John Boehner to protect the wealthy taxpayers who earn up to $400,000 from a tax hike, he quietly sold out senior citizens by gutting the system that calculates cost-of-living increases for Social Security and other entitlement programs. At first, few would notice Obama’s switch to a so-called “chained consumer price index.” This year, the inflation rate under the chained CPI is .3 percent less. But inflation is exponential and the effect is cumulative. By the time you hit age 92, you’d lose an entire month of Social Security benefits each year. The good news is, the anticipation is over. Liberals can settle down for four more years of depressing Republican-lite kowtowing to corporations and the 1 percent. They’re thinking things would be even worse if Mitt Romney had won. I wouldn’t be so sure. Policy-wise, a Romney administration would have been pretty much the same as Obama’s second term. Romney would have galvanized liberals and progressives to fight for a fairer society that treats everyone equally and with dignity. Obama, his sellouts, and his faux liberal apologists represent two steps backward for progressivism.

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NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS

AT WHAT COST? Congressional inaction causes fiscal crisis at Children’s Home Society GEORGE PRENTICE In 2012, the Warm Springs Counseling Center would bill $100 for a therapy session with a child, but that amount would be reduced to $60 by Medicaid. After paying the counselor an average amount of $38 for the session, the center would net $22 for operating expenses. COU RTESY CHILDRENS HOME SOCIETY OF IDAHO

It happened by accident. An employee of the Children’s Home Society of Idaho routinely accessed the State of Idaho’s Medicaid website to verify billing codes – but she was stunned by what she discovered on Dec. 20. “She said, ‘Oh my gosh, look at this. This reimbursement rate is significantly different,’” said Teresa Alexander, Children’s Home chief executive officer. “That was our first indication. We had no prior notification.” The change, effective at the stroke of midnight on Jan. 1, unleashed a new formula that dramatically reduces Medicaid reimbursement, instantly plunging scores of Medicaid providers into a deep pool of red ink. Simply put, the Medicaid battle has been lost in the ongoing political wars being waged in the chambers of the U.S. Congress, at odds over the so-called “fiscal cliff.” Buried deep in Congress’ reams of legislation is something called the Sustainable Growth Rate, which unless legislators override it, triggers drastic Medicaid payment reductions for 2013. “Let me show you how this pencils out,” said Alexander as she walked to a flip chart filled with numbers. “Let’s use Code 90806 as an example: 90806 represents a code for psychotherapy services for a client or family member.”

The Children’s Home Society’s Warm Springs Counseling Center serves 90 clients per day.

But the 2013 formula would see Medicaid pay only $30 for the same session, meaning that once the center pays the counselor $38, the Children’s Home is instantly in red ink, to the tune of $8 per session. “This is what we don’t want to happen: children falling through the cracks, failing in school, diminished self-esteem, children in

detention or incarceration. And we certainly don’t want random acts of violence like …” Alexander took a long pause. She needn’t finish the sentence. Alexander and her colleagues know all too well the trauma that the nation’s children have endured in the previous weeks in the shadow of a gunman killing 20 elementary school students in Newtown, Conn. And if anyone thinks that Idaho is immune to such tragedy, Alexander reminded Idaho’s congressional delegation in a letter, pleading for action: “Robert Manwill, the 7-year-old girl who was so badly bullied at school that she was on the verge of committing suicide, the 5-year-old boy who was so severely neglected that he resorted to violent tendencies,” wrote Alexander. “These are the faces of the hundreds of low-income children and families served by Children’s Home Society of Idaho.” Alexander took another long breath. “That’s why we’re here,” she said softly. “But we don’t have the people on staff to do our political battles for us.” She’s hoping that enough Idaho constituents agree that they’ll push Republican Reps. Raul Labrador and Mike Simpson and Sens. Mike Crapo and Jim Risch to act sooner than later. Or at least, before it’s too late.

CITIZEN

HOLLI HIGH WOODINGS Seeking common ground at the Statehouse GEORGE PRENTICE

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JE REMY LANN I NGH A M

Rep. Holli High Woodings, fresh off her Nov. 6 election to the Idaho House where she’ll represent Boise’s District 19, had a short wish list in the weeks running up to the 2013 Idaho legislative session, which convenes Monday, Jan. 7. “I would really like to serve on the Environment, Energy and Technology Committee,” she said. “That’s where my professional background is, and that would be pretty fascinating.” Woodings, a renewable energy consultant, got her wish: She was appointed to the committee of her choice by Democratic leadership, in addition to appointments to the State Affairs and Commerce and Human Resources committees. Woodings, about to turn 34-years-old, is one of 44 newcomers to the Statehouse, representing 42 percent of the Idaho Legislature, a new record. But she’s one of only 12 new Democrats, nine in the Idaho House. Prior to the start of her freshman year at the Capitol, she spoke to Boise Weekly about education reforms, keeping veteran legislators on her speed-dial, and the importance of bringing pie to election night festivities. weeks from my work in project development. I’m used to things that consume more of your Technically, our legislators are part-time. But reality tells us that you’ll be putting in very life than the standard 8-to-5 workday. And while I don’t want to do that forever, when it’s long hours during the session and you’ll have broken up into a few months a year, it’s much plenty of homework on weekends. more manageable. I’m accustomed to long days and long

Are you still going to hold down a separate job while you’re a legislator? No. I didn’t renew any of my consulting work contracts that were up in June. I plan to be a legislator, a mom and a wife. Any one of those is huge. 8

Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter has a high noon State of the State appointment, Monday, Jan. 7.

YOUR ROTUNDA DAY PLANNER Depending on your appetite for the nobility of public service or the sublime ridiculousness of old white men demagoguing from sunrise to sunset, this may be your favorite time of year. While the rest of the populace nurses its New Year’s hangover, rotunda watchers are anxiously filling their day planners with all-important dates for the 2013 edition of the Idaho Legislature. Thursday, Jan. 3-Friday, Jan. 4: Select legislators, making up the Economic Outlook and Revenue Assessment Committee, participate in two marathon session, being briefed by state officials and Idaho representatives from the agriculture, construction, technology, timber and travel sectors. Monday, Jan. 7, noon: Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter delivers his State of the State address, per Article IV, Section 8 of the Idaho Constitution. More important–but with a lot less fanfare–Otter’s minions unveil their boss’ proposed 2014 budget. Tuesday, Jan. 8: The first meeting of the Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee, the budget-setting bluster house tasked with crafting a balanced budget, per Article VII, Section 11 of the Idaho Constitution. Wednesday, Jan. 9, 1:30-5 p.m.: Ethics training for legislators. Somehow, we don’t recall this item being on too many previous legislature calendars. Friday, Jan. 18: The deadline for state senators to introduce any of their personal bills. Friday, Jan. 25: The deadline for House representatives to introduce any of their personal bills. Monday, Feb. 11: Deadline for State and House committee introductions of bills, constitutional amendments and joint resolutions. Friday, Jan. 15: JFAC target to complete its budget hearings. Friday, March 8: JFAC target to complete its budget. Friday, March 22: Sine die target date. Yeah, right. And finally, keep some key numbers at the ready as you watch the legislators hammer out a spending plan for Fiscal Year 2014, which begins in July; The Idaho Division of Financial Management is projecting FY 2014 general fund revenue to come in at approximately $2.87 billion–a 6.5 percent jump over FY 2013. However, K-12 schools, higher education, Health and Welfare/Medicaid, Public Safety, Natural Resources and basic inflation and benefit increases are expected to easily top $2.9 billion. Let the games begin. —George Prentice

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CITIZEN CONT’D 7

Was door-knocking the most important element of your campaign? Absolutely.

How many doors do you think you knocked? Probably about 3,000. What was that like? Sometimes overwhelming or intimidating. But most of the time, it was invigorating and energizing. It was pretty great to hear that people were supportive of having younger, progressive candidates to vote for. Remind us of the physical boundaries of your district. On the western border of District 19, we hit Highway 55. On the eastern border, we encompass the Warm Springs Mesa. The northern border is the Ada County line, and then the southern border runs along the river to about 27th Street, cuts up to State Street, near Gary Lane and Pierce Park, and then out to Highway 55. And how would you characterize the demographics? Incredibly diverse: extremely liberal areas in the North End and moderate areas in the East End, in Warm Springs and out toward Eagle. Last summer, you told me that you thought ethics, how women were viewed during the 2012 legislative session and education would probably be the most important issues in your campaign. Did your conversations with voters confirm that? Education mattered the most. And a lot of that was contingent on the Students Come First propositions either passing or failing. In the wake of those propositions being shot down, is it fair to say that [Superintendent of Public Instruction] Tom Luna’s political stock has hit bottom? From what I’ve heard from people in my district, I would agree with that. We expect more of our elected officials than to overrun public sentiment and push things through that

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aren’t very popular. I think that extends to the Legislature as well, because by and large, citizen testimony really wasn’t considered in the passage of those bills. But how do you explain the disconnect between the propositions being shot down while the majority of lawmakers who supported them returned to office? The only thing I can figure is that, as Democrats, we didn’t get our education message out strong enough. I think we could have focused on that more. We had several town hall meetings during the election in our district, and I must tell you that the majority of the discussion involved education. How would you characterize the current state of the Democratic Party in Idaho? We’re in a transitional stage. We have a tremendous opportunity to build and identify candidates for the future. The Democratic Party lost quite a bit of experience in 2012 with the retirements of Brian Cronin, Bill Killen, Nicole LeFavour, Edgar Malepeai and Wendy Jacquet. All of those legislators you just mentioned should get used to the idea that freshmen legislators will have them on their speed-dial. Are any of the old guard still at the Statehouse sharing any advice or inside information? They share more advice than information. I’ve even had some really great conversations with some veteran legislators in the Republican Party. They, too, want balance in the Legislature. Most of us are guessing that a renewed education debate will consume much of the upcoming session. Education will be, by and large, the biggest deal. What I’ll continue to focus on is getting to know my fellow legislators and where we’ll have common ground and common values. What does that mean? Identifying moderates? Not necessarily. There are a lot of folks

serving in the Legislature that are extremely conservative on some issues and possibly a bit more open on others. A fair number of lawmakers already have their own to-do lists for the session. At what stage do you think about sponsoring or cosponsoring legislation? I would be very surprised if I did any of that in 2013. It’s not a focus for my freshman session. How confident were you on election night? The primary election was much more stressful. I don’t want to say it was more gratifying but going into primary night, I was less confident. It was pretty surreal. I felt much more confident in the general election, but it was really gratifying. And how did you spend election night? To be honest, I was really watching the other races. But what really made me popular was the fact that my stepmother brought several pies. She’s an amazing baker. How did you celebrate your win? I slept. Not very glamorous. Honestly, it was really nice to be at home with my family a whole evening. Do you know what I did? I made a nice, hot meal for my family and that’s pretty significant. Now you know how much a campaign costs and how much shoe leather has to be worn down to get out the vote. In about a year, you’ll need to start thinking about whether you’ll run again. I’m already thinking about it. You never stop thinking about it. Would I be surprised 10 years from now if you ran for another political office in Idaho? I wouldn’t put any bets on it at this point. I’m just getting started. I don’t even know if I’m going to like the Legislature. But is it a possibility? It’s a possibility. I wouldn’t discount anything at this point.

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1 1 T H

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F I C T I O N P A I N T I N G

P I C T U R E S

It sounds easy—just 101 little words. Simple, right? But now paint a complete and compelling story with those measly 101 words, giving characters depth while drawing readers into your literary world. Not so easy, is it? Therein lies the challenge and brilliance of the annual Boise Weekly Fiction 101 Contest. Writers must discard their tricks and strip down to raw ability. The winners of the 11th annual contest proved up to the challenge, rising to the top of the more than 100 entries and again showing the depth of talent in the valley. Now, it’s time to appreciate their skill. —Deanna Darr

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Owner of Rediscovered Bookshop

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Professor of English at Boise State University and awardwinning author of Volt

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Adjunct professor of English at Boise State University, author and former Idaho Writer in Residence

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Director of marketing at The Cabin who helped edit the organization’s new anthology of Idaho writers, Rooms: Writers in the Attic

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Director of Literature at the Idaho Commission on the Arts

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or his birthday I sent Genghis Khan my copy of Leaves of Grass. I left the handful of dogears folded. He wrote back, “Wow! What a shot in the arm! My fires had indeed been smouldering. I’ll write again soon. All my love, GK” Some years later, I get a postcard: “Aloha from the Caspian! I’m about to take a dip, couldn’t help but think of you. Hope you’re well. Ever vigilant, GK” One step at a time, I suppose. I just hope he one day gets to catch a glimpse of his soul reflected in a well-tended bed of azaleas.

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ed’s right leg was numb by the time they landed at O’Hare. He stumbled out of his loafer and caught himself on the luggage carousel’s rim; his whole right side began to buzz. Ted’s wife thrust his shoe at him. “Straighten up, people are staring.” Her voice sounded like a dog barking underwater. He slapped his thigh with his good hand to try and get feeling back. When he did, a million atoms broke loose and floated away. He freed a million more with every blow to his body. Ted felt infinite. He struck with a white-knuckled fist, hell-bent on salvation.

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here was no report of a struggle, just a shadow at the bottom of the deep end. Nick unbuttoned his work shirt and unclipped the ring of keys that hung on his belt before wading into the warmth. The last of the swimmers had already climbed out, fat and dripping; Now they stood along the edge like steaming loaves of bread. Nick put in his notice shortly after. Workers were busy preparing for a ball that evening, and he watched as they fitted the last wooden sections of a dance floor across the length of the pool. The water still simmering.

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man who’s his own wife births his twin through his belly button. For months, he thought it a cyst. Fistula. Fir tree germinating in his spleen. He fathermothers this shriven boy, fine as a walnut lung. With equal parts sweetmeats and firm touch, he bathes this babe in a spoon—wee, webbed blood of living kin. Nights, the man daubs his nipples with tea bags, lays a damp cloth on his eyes. He tugs the left swirl of his mustache and wonders aloud: Is he famished? Is this fullness? When he kisses his own hand, his wife strokes his cheek.

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harlie didn’t show for work today. They called. I didn’t know where he was beyond this morning when we woke at the same time, facing each other, our feet hooked together beneath the covers. He looked at me through half-crimped eyes, smoothed my hair, said, “How are you still so sexy with your retainer in?” Which made me laugh, made him laugh— and the sun was coming in behind his head, through his eyelashes. He sent one text though, Don’t worry Jules. I’m fine. Just done. You understand, right? Love you for whatever it’s worth. And I wonder what it is.

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I think it is in the terrarium and the turtle swallowed it. I was watching him swim lazily around his enclosure yesterday. I had to lean forward in my wheelchair to see his eyes. He knew I was watching him. Was he wondering why a seven-year-old child was peering at him so wistfully? He swam toward me and turned his head. I think he understood and I was glad.

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hear a clock ticking faintly but I cannot find it. I ask my father if he hears it too and he shakes his head. He looks tired and sad.

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he gringo missionaries sipped Jamaica in the kitchen, commenting on the drink’s lack of sugar. Isis anticipated Agustin at the door and let him in discreetly. “Why are they here?” “To see what it means to be poor,” she whispered. “Tell them it’s puta mierda.” “No, me amor. We are feliz y contento despite our poverty.” “Feliz y contento? PUTA y MIERDA!” The gringos didn’t know mierda, but they knew puta. They thought he had called her a whore, and they smiled inside to have witnessed machismo firsthand. Another cheap souvenir for the collection. The translator did not bother to clarify.

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t the drive-thru window, I ordered a salad. “Today’s special is the Bacon Temptation with fries.” This girl’s offer was so enticing I ordered the burger instead. I paid, and when she returned my change her fingernails scratched my palm like ketchup packets. Instinctively, I squeezed them. I apologized profusely for my seeming flirtation. “It’s alright.” She handed me my dinner. “It’s not me you’re after. Everything you came for is right here, in the bag.” I parked beneath the Temptation Burger mural of contented cows chewing in an open field. I unwrapped my burger and masticated along with them.

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ernie shrunk a foot when he signed the divorce papers. He crawled into his parents’ vast basement and assembled model airplanes while his mother watched Jeopardy upstairs. Planes littered the floor. Bernie built a knee-high airport, runways splaying down the hallway. He slid from one wall to the other perfecting his tiny world, imagined racing down the terminals. Tiny trees grew at the airport’s entrance, surrounding a molded plastic statue of a soldier throwing a grenade. Bernie built benches where tiny men and women sit next to each other. They watch the planes come and go but never fall in love.

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he new bedsheets. They required an entirely different vocabulary from my dreams. Suddenly, the language of my dreams turned formal—“yes, sir” and “no, ma’am,” “I do believe I shall,” no slang. Men now wear hats, not caps but real hats with brims. Colors have become darker and less defined—very film noir. More blues and blacks, fewer greens. No pink. I wear dresses (imagine that!) bordered with lace. On a horse, I would probably ride sidesaddle. Fog swirls in at odd times of the day. And I no longer dream of my dog but of a bird I don’t have.

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e picks up the last box and stands listening. This now-empty room was once the nursery, then playroom and finally office. The handyman comes tomorrow to patch holes and paint, the buyers move in Thursday. The echoes—crying, laughter, music—are already fading. Then he sees it: the earring lost when Katie was eight. A goofy, costume-jewelry cat she’d cried over for days. He studies it carefully. If he sends it, she’ll just toss it into some dorm-desk drawer. Widening a hold in the drywall, he drops it in, a faint clack somewhere deep in the wall. Turning, he walks out.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | 11

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

The expiration date on gingerbread houses is nearing.

Do you have the skills to rule the arcade?

WEDNESDAY-FRIDAY JAN. 2-4 frosty

WEDNESDAY JAN. 2

WINTER WONDERLAND FESTIVAL

donkey kong 7-ELEVEN TOURNAMENT Spacebar Arcade rapidly became Boise’s hot spot for showing off your old-school arcade video game skills. It’s always on the lookout for new games to help its patrons reminisce about the good ol’ days, when a high score really meant something for a man’s self-esteem. Luckily, the high score is making a comeback at Spacebar’s 7-Eleven tournament—along with a chance to score some extra dough. The 7-Eleven is a classic competition in the gaming world. The rules are as follows: Pay a $5 cover at the door toward prize money. Ten games are announced at the beginning of the night, three of which are selected by contestants. Eligible games will be a mix of video and pinball machines, with five available seats on each. Scores are based on the contestants’ highest point totals on their respective machines. Averages of the top three scores are calculated, thus computing the final tournament score. When the final tallies are presented, the top three finishers are awarded prize money. First place wins 60 percent of the prize money, second place wins 30 percent, and third place receives 10 percent. Registration is done on a first-come, first-served basis between 7-8 p.m., with play beginning at 8:10 p.m. Battle will be waged until 10:30 p.m., when the victors will be crowned. Those who finish just outside the money can always bide their time and try again—Spacebar conducts 7-Eleven tournaments every other Wednesday. The prospect of winning beer money—which we’re sure is good for things besides beer— should count as yet another reason to go old school in the new year. 7 p.m. $5. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., 208-918-0597, spacebararcade.com.

WEDNESDAYWEDNESDAY JAN. 2-9 grass on glass THE ART OF NATURE Winter is not a good season for plants. The Foothills, lush with native

grasses and freckled with sagebrush and desert shrubs, are barren, golden toes dusted with snow and frost. The winter chill has reduced your flowers to stiff, petal-less stocks, and your tomato plants have crumpled into piles of decaying organic matter. Animals have it no better. The bears have retreated to their dens to sleep until the

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snow melts. The yellowbreasted tanagers have fled along with the rest of birds smart enough to get out of the cold. But at Boise Art Museum, the plants and animals are getting a few more days in the sun, thanks to the Art of Nature exhibit. Art of Nature is a collaboration between artists, William Morris and Alexis

Santa came early to Sun Valley, gifting the resort with a Thanksgiving opening day. Brundage Mountain Resort and Pomerelle Ski Area didn’t open until Dec. 14 and Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area didn’t open until Dec. 21. But the gods of snow (and snow machines) looked down on Sun Valley and said, “Let there be gnar pow pow.” The timely season opening and fresh dumps of blinding white snow give the Wood River Valley area an especially wintery feel, and the Sun Valley Resort has been celebrating with the Winter Wonerland Festival, an annual recognition that Ketchum and Stanley have a corner on the deep white stuff market, at least for now. The festival filled the town with concerts, ice shows and holiday carolers. Children decorated gingerbread men and gingerbread houses while hot adult beverages occupied the adults. All of these activities are, obviously, Christmas-themed, and Christmas is clearly, definitely, finally over. Ditto with New Year’s. But the Winter Wonderland Festival persists, in large part because winter isn’t over yet. There’s still time to check out the Gingerbread Village—a mockup of the Sun Valley Village made from the titular foodstuff—the Village Light Display and the Sun Valley Village itself, filled with festive painted windows before the festival ends Friday, Jan. 4. If you don’t take advantage of the festival soon, you’ll be stuck with skiing without gingerbread villages, and how much fun would that be? OK, silly question. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Village, Sun Valley, 1-800-786-8259, visitsunvalley.com.

Rockman, that celebrates the plant and animal worlds on canvas and on glass. Rockman painted three large-scale canvases depicting figurines of animal and plant life—all of which are on display. The paintings ser ved as Morris’ inspiration to create 38 glass vessels adorned with the essences of these themes. The effect is an aesthetic statement about a world easily forgotten in winter, when we distract ourselves from the cold with winter sports and bad television. The exhibit hangs through June 2, but this

slower time of the year is the per fect time to take it in. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$5. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

THURSDAY JAN. 3 sanguine MUSICIANS SAVE LIVES BLOOD DRIVE Not to sound like some

Twilight-obsessed vampire wannabes or anything, but the Knitting Factor y wants your blood. Not all of it, just about 1 pint. Perhaps you’ve donated blood before and left feeling queasy, with nothing but some stale crackers and orange slices. But fear not, because this ain’t your grandmother’s blood drive. On Thursday, Jan. 3, the concert house is teaming up with the American Red Cross for the Musicians Save Lives Blood Drive from 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Besides starting 2013 with some major karma WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

ER IN R U IZ

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FITBIT Idaho Botanical Garden will shine on for one more weekend.

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shiny things WINTER GARDEN AGLOW Are you feeling a little deflated after the holidays? After months of build up to the end-of-the-year festivities—all of the decorations, the lavish food and boisterous parties—hitting early January can feel like you just got smacked upside the head by reality. It’s kind of like that day after college graduation when you realize you have to get a real job. But the folks at Idaho Botanical Garden are helping us gently detox from the holidays. There’s no need to go cold turkey, staring listlessly at the spot where the tree used to stand. The holiday light spectacular known as the Winter Garden aGlow continues through Sunday, Jan. 6 at IBG. The garden has been a stalwart companion to Boiseans all season long—remaining open on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day—and it’s not about to let us down now. Not only will the garden’s more than half-a-million lights blaze on through the weekend, but there will still be a few special vendors on hand to ease us off those high-fat diets we’ve been indulging in for the last few weeks. Both Dippin’ Donuts and Old West Kettle Corn will be on hand Friday, Jan. 4-Sunday, Jan. 6, helping to feed the holiday weary masses. Unfortunately, the holiday model express train will no longer be on display, but maybe that will help with the transition out of the holidays. It has been a good, long season at Winter Garden aGlow, but that season ends soon, so if you missed the lights since they were turned on just after Thanksgiving, this is your last chance to take them in. 6-9 p.m. $8 Adults, $4 children 5-12, FREE children under 4. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, 208343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

points—those will come in handy later—all donors receive some goodies in return. In exchange for your blood, you score pizza from Little Caesar’s and a pair of tickets to a future Knitting Factor y concert. But beware: The Red Cross folks are picky, they only accept blood from healthy adults age 17 or older who weigh more than

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Writers need love, too.

110 pounds. Visit the website for specific donation guidelines. You need an appointment to donate blood, but it can easily be done online by visiting redcrossblood.org and using the keyword “knitting.” Remember to take your ID to the event. We can’t speak for ever yone, but there are ver y few things we wouldn’t do for

write on BOISE WEEKLY FICTION 101 CONTEST READING AND Q&A It’s hard to believe, but another Fiction 101 issue has rolled around. As Boise Weekly’s traditional kickoff to the new year, Fiction 101 has celebrated the best of the best among Boise’s short fiction writers for 11 years. Each year, writers from around Idaho—and even occasionally from around the world—send in their best fiction stories in an effort to claim the sought-after title. Each story not only has to be compelling and show a clear mastery of the art, but it has to be done in exactly 101 words. It ain’t easy—if you don’t believe us, try it yourself. Entries are judged by a prestigious panel made up of authors, writers, teachers and general lovers of the written word. The results of this year’s contest can be found in this very issue of BW (see Page 9). But with all the hard work that goes into creating a winning Fiction 101 entry, we think that the authors deserve a little more attention than just having their creations printed in these pages. That’s why for the past two years BW has teamed up with the crew at Rediscovered Bookshop to host a reading and question and answer session with the Fiction 101 winners. We’re keeping the tradition rolling Thursday, Jan. 3 as part of the First Thursday events at Rediscovered. The reading will begin promptly at 7 p.m. and feature nearly all of the winning authors reading their own works. The audience will have the chance to pick the writers’ brains after the reading to discover the twisted tales of how the stories came to be. The event is open to the public, so swing by, listen to some great fiction, meet some of the judges and raise a glass with the winning authors. 7 p.m.. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, rdbooks.org.

some free pizza and concert tickets, and giving blood to those who need it is hardly something to squirm about. Bonus: You will finally get to play out that weird Bella/ Edward fantasy we know

Want to get your bulging butt a bit more fit this New Year? Then reach for your smartphone, not the dumbbells. A recent study in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that “the addition of a personal digital assistant and telephone coaching can enhance short-term weight loss in comfitbit.com bination with an existing system of care.” The yearlong study tracked 70 overweight adults—one group was given a mobile device to log their daily calories and workouts, and the other was given pen and paper. Participants who used the app lost around 9-15 pounds, while the pen and paper crew barely lost any weight. One app that will nudge you toward fit-town is Fitbit. The free iPhone and Android app lets you log your food and water intake, workouts and weight from your smartphone. But unlike other diet apps, Fitbit offers additional techie devices you can purchase to help you reach your goals. The Fitbit Zip Wireless Activity Tracker ($59.95) tracks steps, distance and calories burned each day and syncs those stats to your smartphone. The tracker also allows you to “set goals, challenge friends and go farther—one step at time.” Fitbit also offers the Aria Wi-Fi Smart Scale ($129.95), which “taps into your home wireless network to upload your information to your private account automatically each time you step on the scale.” —Tara Morgan

you’ve always had. 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. FREE. The Knitting Factor y, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-484-0138, redcrossblood.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JAN. 2 Festivals & Events WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—This holiday tradition features more than 250,000 lights, which turn the Idaho Botanical Garden into a winter wonderland. Enjoy lights, model trains, appearances by Santa and local choir performances. See Picks, Page 12. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. WINTER WONDERLAND FESTIVAL—See the light show and gingerbread village, and take in the Winterfest before it closes for the season. See Picks, Page 12. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley.

Kids & Teens KIDS EXPERIENCE—A science and art program for children ages 6 and older held in The Secret Garden. 3 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org. MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Young designers, inventors and engineers bring their creations to life with Legos. Bring some of your own if you’ve got them. Some will be provided if you don’t. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

Odds & Ends 7-ELEVEN TOURNAMENT—Play a selection of arcade games and pinball machines for prize money and bragging rights. See Picks, Page 12. 7 p.m. $5. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-918-0597, spacebararcade.com.

THURSDAY JAN. 3 Festivals & Events ARABIAN NIGHTS AT THE CAZBA—Enjoy music, drumming and food. Entertainment by local belly dancers. 7-9 p.m. Cazba Restaurant and Opa Lounge, 211 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208381-0222. MUSICIANS SAVE LIVES BLOOD DRIVE—Give a pint of blood in exchange for Knitting Factory concert tickets and Little Caesar’s Pizza. See Picks, Page 12. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

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WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Wednesday. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. WINTER WONDERLAND FESTIVAL—See Wednesday. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley.

Food & Drink BEER AND WINE TASTINGS— Sample a rotating selection of European wines and beers. 5-8 p.m. $10. Tres Bonne Cuisine, 6555 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-658-1364, tresbonnescuisine.com.

LIT/REVIEW PROMISE OF DEPARTURE BY LANDON W. MONTGOMERY The single-page preface to Promise of Departure, Boise writer Landon W. Montgomery’s debut novel, begins like this: “Janet, I can’t do this. I won’t survive divorce.” Then, the entire first chapter is devoted to unloading a motorcycle from a boat. This unbalanced back-and-for th between a ver y compelling stor y and the minutiae of motorcycles continues throughout the book. Promise of Departure’s protagonist Greg was a successful video game developer until he gave it up to focus on his family and inner life. But it isn’t long before Greg destroys both of those and ends up mired in divorce proceedings. Rather than fight it out with the wife he still loves, he signs everything over to her and his daughter, then disappears like a thief in the night. He makes his way to post-earthquake Haiti, where he concocts a half-assed plan to roll around the countryside repairing motorcycles as a way to reinvent himself. It’s a compelling premise. And when Promise of Departure focuses on that story, it’s a compelling narrative—especially since the details are vivid enough that readers get the feeling Montgomery actually spent time in post-quake Haiti. But those details are buried in other, less compelling microexaminations: those of motorcycle functions. Most of the first 100 pages are a narrative of the act of riding a hog with only snatches of exposition or plot dropped in. While a functioning petcock may be essential to a motorcycle, it is not essential to a narrative. And Montgomery spends an almost prohibitively large amount of space on not only the details of motorcycle repair but on the act of riding. Checking mirrors, examining and discussing accessories, exploring the different kinds of hosing to use on long vs. short trips, all of this is from Greg’s inner dialog as he rides. The author’s devotion to motorcycles is as evident as Robert Pirsig’s in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, which was a clear influence on the book. But just as Pirsig maintained that there are two types of riders, those that fix their own bikes and those that have someone else do it, there are also two types of reactions to motorcycle philosophy: “finally someone said it,” and “get over yourself.” When Promise of Departure focuses on the story of a man searching for himself in a country that has lost its way, it’s a tender look at life and love. However, much of its built-up steam is lost in musings about oil pressure and air filters. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

1ST THURSDAY

SESQUI-SHOP Boise 150 opens multi-use downtown storefront CHRISTINA MARFICE

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local movement, in growing, in creating in a way that’s conscious and responsible. It’s kind of a rejection of the suburban sprawl. They’re in their city, making the city a better place by creating things.” That’s the “pioneer spirit” Falwell hopes to

coordinating efforts to commemorate the year in an authentic Boise fashion. “The merchant program was developed as sort of an alternative to traditional commemorative merchandise,” Funk said. “We thought, ‘Why not utilize local businesses and support

LAU RIE PEARMAN

Astute Boiseans may have noticed a fresh face among the Main Street storefronts—one they can count on staying fresh for an entire year. Squeezed between the former Blues Bouquet and Asiago’s at 1008 Main St., the spot is home to the Sesqui-Shop, headquarters for the city’s sesquicentennial birthday celebration, Boise 150. “Every month, we’ll have a new exhibition and a new opportunity to engage with it,” said Rachel Reichert, Sesqui-Shop operations manager. “It’s a fun way to engage with Boise 150.” Each month, the Sesqui-Shop will feature a different theme for its exhibits and events. “We found that not only was this a great opportunity for local artists, but it was a great opportunity to revitalize a downtown storefront,” Reichert said. “This space ended up being the perfect space, in kind of an underdeveloped part of downtown.” Monthly programming for the Sesqui-Shop will mirror concurrent community activities. For example, there will be a music theme tied in with the Treefort Music Fest during the month of March. On First Thursday, Jan. 3, the Sesqui-Shop will debut a collection of community-curated family photos, antiques and relics, all of which tell stories of Boise’s past. The exhibit will remain up through Saturday, Feb. 2. The shop is also a place for Boiseans to participate in some of Boise 150’s yearlong projects including Share Your Story, a Webdriven effort to collect true stories from the past, present and future of Boise. While most story submissions are done online, the SesquiShop also provides an alternative way to share. “We have this great collection of personal accounts of living in Boise, and the great opportunity in having the shop is, we can have people who want to share via typewriter or recorder or handwritten,” Reichert said. “They can come into the shop and share their stories, and those will be transcribed and shared online throughout the whole year.” Reichert said many Boiseans have already participated in the project. Nearly 20 stories were submitted in the first two weeks following the website’s launch. She hopes the shop will encourage more locals to get involved. The Sesqui-Shop will also serve as a space for local artists who received grants for projects related to Boise 150 to display work, hold lectures or facilitate workshops. Nearly 40 local artists and organizations received a total of $98,000 in grant money for their Boise 150 projects. Photographer Melanie Flitton Folwell will debut her contribution, A Portrait Made: Modern Boiseans and the Frontier Spirit, in the Sesqui-Shop in May. “Boise defies stereotypes about Idaho,” Folwell said. “There is this great community of people who are engaged in conservation, in the

The Sesqui-Shop is the headquarters for Boise 150.

capture in her photos. A photo from Boise’s historical archives will inspire each image she plans to create for the project. One of her first subjects will be Brian Garrett, owner of the Saint Lawrence Gridiron food truck. “I want to take his picture with a giant side of meat and his food truck. I have this really cool photo from the historical archives of a guy with his food truck in downtown Boise at the turn of the [20th] century,” Folwell said. “With every image I do, I’m going to try to marry it to an image from the archives.” Folwell considers her photos to be less recreations of historical images than modern images inspired by the “ingenuity and thriftiness” of Boise’s pioneers. “I thought about how a lot of the things people are doing now kind of mirror the things they were doing 150 years ago, when Boise was founded,” Folwell said. “They’re growing food in their yards. They’re raising chickens, canning is really popular, buying local. The pioneers who came here had to be responsive to this environment, and I feel like people are doing the same thing now in the interest of us having a better future.” Local businesses also have opportunities to get in on the sesquicentennial celebration. Holly Funk, Boise 150 merchant specialist, is

our local economy?’” Instead of mass-produced commemorative products, Funk is inviting local businesses to design products to be featured during the year including clothing from Indie Made, accessories from Fosterweld and limited-edition artwork and products from the likes of Sector 17, Usful Glassworks, Olive Wicherski and Morgan Wolf. The product lines officially launch in January, but a handful have been pre-released for the holiday season. Featured products will be available at the Sesqui-Shop each First Thursday, but Funk hopes to drive customers to the businesses where they are already displayed, like Newt and Harold’s and Bricolage. The merchant effort isn’t leaving out Boise’s food-lovers, either. Goody’s is offering a Boise 150 hot fudge ice cream soda, Big City Coffee will soon sling a special Boise brew, and Tree City Juice and Smoothie Cafe concocted a BOISEnberry Rose smoothie for 2013. “The question we ask these artists and merchants is, what they think represents this event and represents Boise,” Funk explained. “The result is a spotlight of the creative minds we have. We’ll promote their products but keep the sales with each merchant to support the local community.”

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS East Side BANDANNA WALKING AND RUNNING—Join Boise’s running community for stories, sharing and good times. 7-8 p.m. 504 W. Main St., 208-386-9017. BASQUE MARKET—Warm up with a scrumptious plate of chicken, chorizo and seafood paella with Vino Especial (hot mulled wine). Also on the menu are lemon beef skewers and other tapas. 4 p.m. 608 W. Grove St., 208433-1208, thebasquemarket.com.

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BASQUE MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER—Enjoy free gallery tours of Hidden In Plain Sight: The Basques and tours of the Jacobs-Uberuaga House every half hour from 6:30-8:30 p.m. and a Basque music jam session. 6:30 p.m. 611 Grove St., 208-343-2671, basquemuseum.com.

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BOISE ART GLASS—Make your own paperweight for $40 per 30-minute session or watch artist demos while enjoying snacks. 5-11 p.m. 530 W. Myrtle, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com.

THE BRICKYARD—Check out Home Grown Thursday with an American Revolution cocktail for $4 or Payette Outlaw IPA or Rodeo Rye Pale Ale for $3. 601 Main St., 208-287-2121, brickyardboise.com. BRICOLAGE—Open for First Thursday. 5-8 p.m. 418 S. Sixth St., 208345-3718, bricoshoppe.com. DRAGONFLY—Enjoy free wine tasting while checking out Dragonfly’s clearance sale. 5-9 p.m. 414 W. Main St., 208-338-9234.

FLATBREAD COMMUNITY OVENDOWNTOWN—Kids younger than 12 eat free with a purchase. Every bottle of wine is on sale. 615 W. Main St., 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com.

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FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE— View art by Ryan Johnson. 500 W. Idaho St., 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com. FRONT DOOR NORTHWEST PIZZA AND TAP HOUSE—Enjoy beer, cheese and chocolate pairings with Full Sail Brewing. 6 p.m. $16. 105 S. Sixth St., 208-287-9201, thefrontdoorboise.com.

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GOLDY’S CORNER—Happy hour from 5-9 p.m., with 50 percent off beer and wine. View work from local artists. 625 W. Main St., 208433-3934, goldysbreakfastbistro.com. HIGH NOTE CAFE—Enjoy live music, $3.50 beers and art hanging on the walls. 4 p.m. 225 N. Fifth St., 208-429-1911.

HUMPIN’ HANNAH’S—Prizes and bar tabs for the best jammers. 8 p.m. 621 Main St., 208-345-7557.

6

INDIE MADE—Local crafters and artists set up pop-up tents in the Pioneer Building until 9 p.m. 108 N. Sixth St., shopindiemade.com.

LE CAFE DE PARIS—Free wine tasting with purchase of an appetizer. 204 N. Capitol Blvd., 208336-0889, lecafedeparis.com. MELTING POT—Enjoy two glasses of wine and one cheese fondue for $22. 200 N. Sixth St., 208-3438800, meltingpot.com. OLD SPAGHETTI FACTORY—Dine amid antiques collected from around the world. 610 W. Idaho St., 208-336-2900, osf.com. PENGILLY’S—The Frim Fram 4 play at 8:45 p.m. 513 W. Main St., 208-345-6344. SILLY BIRCH—Drink up then participate in a Drunken Spelling Bee, hosted by Crooked Fence Brewing. 4-7 p.m. 507 Main St., 208-345-2505. WISEGUY PIZZA PIE—Drop by for $6 pitchers of Rainier, $1 off other draft beers and $3 glasses of wine for First Thursday. 106 N. Sixth St., 208-3367777, wiseguypizzapie.com.

South Side ATOMIC TREASURES—Enjoy a mix of retro and found objects and art. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-3440811.

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BOISE ART MUSEUM—The museum will be open until 9 p.m. for First Thursday. Studio Art Exploration is from 5-8 p.m. 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. CHIC BRIDAL BOUTIQUE—Check out the new expansion into the old Miss Molly���s space. 5 p.m. 404 S. Eighth St., 208-424-8900.

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EIGHTH STREET MARKETPLACE AT BODO— Featuring work by Artist in Residence Mary Lantz. 404 S. Eighth St., Mercantile Building, 208-338-5212, 8thstreetmarketplace.com. IDAPRO INDOOR GOLF—Use golf simulators to perfect your game when it’s too cold to play outside. Buy a VIP savings card worth $270 for $75. 333 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-336-4653, idaproindoorgolf.com. IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM—Bring two cans of food and help end hunger in Boise. Free admission First Thursday. 5-9 p.m. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov.

9

LISK GALLERY—View Mark Lisk’s desert and wilderness landscapes, Carl Rowe’s Foothill paintings, and Jerri Lisk’s colored hills and trees on aluminum. Wine tasting provided by Sawtooth Winery. 401 S. Eighth St., 208-342-3773, liskgallery.com. LIQUID LOUNGE—Drink up during happy hour from 2-7 p.m. and laugh along with numerous comedians starting at 8 p.m. $10. 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THE MONOGRAM SHOPPE—Check out gift ideas. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-853-0839, themonogramshoppe.com.

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NFINIT GALLERY—Check works by featured artists. 405 S. Eighth St., 208-371-0586, nfinitartgallery.com/ first-thursday.

NORTHRUP BUILDING—Featuring work from Pam Demo, Tyler Bush and Abby Christensen. Eighth and Broad streets, second floor, Boise. QUE PASA—Check out Mexican artwork, including wall fountains, silver, Day of the Dead decor and cedar and leather sofas. 409 S. Eighth St., 208385-9018.

16 | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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LISTINGS/1ST THURSDAY RENEWAL CONSIGNMENT HOMEWARES—Renewal Underground. Featuring work by artist in residence Tuong Anh Ens. 517 S. Eighth St., 208-3385444.

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SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Awardwinning wines and Melting Pot chocolate fondue. 5-9 p.m. 786 W. Broad St., 208-345-9463.

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SOLID—Music from Robert Wissinger, happy hour from 4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m.-midnight, wine and liquor tasting, and art by Conrad Gardner. Free appetizers at 6 p.m. and Last Call Trivia at 8 p.m. 4 p.m.-midnight. 405 S. Eighth St., 208-345-6620. SAROLI CHOCOLAT—Join Boise’s newest chocolatier for its grand opening. 5 p.m. 755 W. Broad St., 208-433-9432.

Central BARBARA BARBARA AND CO.—Check out Barbara Barbara’s new location. Celebrate the new year with cookies and cider. 6-8:30 p.m. 807 W. Bannock St., 208-342-2002. BERRYHILL & CO. RESTAURANT—Start the evening with happy hour from 4-6 p.m., followed by jazzy blues by Ken and Rico from 6-9 p.m. 121 N. Ninth St., 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com.

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BLEUBIRD—Eat, drink and enjoy music by Boise Rock School and the art of Olive Wicherski. Think Boise First receives 5 percent of all sales. 5-8 p.m. 224 N. 10th St., 208-345-1055. CHOCOLAT BAR—Snake River Winery will pair with in-house chocolates. 805 W. Bannock St., 208-338-7771, thechocolatbar. com.

ART WALK Locations featuring artists

CITY PEANUT SHOP—Boise’s peanut provider and The Press team up for classic beer and peanuts combination. 803 W. Bannock St., 208-433-3931. THE COLE MARR GALLERY/ COFFEE HOUSE—View the photography of Sharyl Jackson. 6-9 p.m. 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. B 100, 208-336-7630, cmphotoworkshops.com. COSTA VIDA—Open for First Thursday. 801 W Main St., 208429-4109, costavida.net.

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ECIGS BY S. WICKS—Jason Darrah will be showing his work at Boise Vapory’s grand opening. 5 p.m. 208 N. Ninth St., 208-331-3244. GOLITE—Check out sales on ski and snowboard apparel during extended hours. 6-9 p.m. 765 W. Idaho St., 208-871-6352. HEIRLOOM DANCE STUDIO— Laugh with Insert Foot Theater. 8 p.m. $5. 765 Idaho St., 208-8716352, heirloomdancestudio.com.

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IDAHO POSTER AND LETTERPRESS—View a large collection of antique wood sign and poster type. 280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 118, 208-761-9538, idahoposterandletterpress.com. LUX FASHION LOUNGE—Check out sales on designer jeans and jewelry. 785 W. Idaho St., 208344-4589. THE MATADOR—Sip Matador’s private label tequila First Thursday. 215 N. Eighth St., 208-3429988, matadorrestaurants.com. MAI THAI—Enjoy two-for-one handcrafted drinks during happy hour 5-6:30 p.m, and 9 p.m.close. Appetizers are at the bar starting at 3 p.m. Buy two entrees and receive a free dessert. Not valid during happy hour or with any other promotions. 750 W. Idaho St., 208-344-8424, maithaigroup.com. MCU SPORTS—Check out the incoming 2013 Kona and Felt bikes. 822 W. Jefferson St., 208-342-7734, mcusports.com. MIXING BOWL—Warm up with hot drinks and appetizers while you browse. Open late for First Thursday. 5-9 p.m. 216 N. Ninth St., 208-345-6025, themixingbowlboise.com. PLAN B LOUNGE—Imbibe during Skinny Cocktails Night while The Mixing Bowl gives away week-long passes to Axiom Fitness. 5-9 p.m. 121 N. Ninth St., 208-387-3553, berryhillandco. com. THE PRESS—Enjoy free wine tasting. 5 p.m. 212 N. Ninth St., 208-336-9577.

1. Basque Museum

10. NfiniT Galler y

2. Boise Ar t Glass

11. Nor thrup Building

3. Flying M Coffeehouse

12. Renewal Consignment Homewares

4. Goldy’s Corner

13. Solid

5. High Note Cafe

14. Bleubird

20. The Alaska Center

6. Indie Made

15. ECigs by S. Wicks

21. Ar t Source Galler y

16. Idaho Poster and Letterpress

22. The Galler y at the Linen Building

7. Boise Ar t Museum 8. Eighth Street Marketplace at Bodo 9. Lisk Galler y

17. Rediscovered Books

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18. Thomas Hammer Coffee 19. The Ar t of Ward Hooper/Urban Garage

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REDISCOVERED BOOKS—Celebrate the Boise Weekly Fiction 101 contest with a reading and Q&A by the winners. 7 p.m., 180 N. Eighth St., 208-3764229, rdbooks.org. SUPERB SUSHI—Enjoy wine tasting and smoked salmon sampling. 6-8 p.m. 208 N. Eighth St., 208-385-0123, superbsushidowntown.com.

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THOMAS HAMMER—Featuring scenes from around Boise and portraiture by Lindy Photography. 298 N. Eighth St., 208-433-8004, hammercoffee. com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | 17

1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS

19

1ST THURSDAY/NEWS OLIVE W IC HER S K I

THE ART OF WARD HOOPER/URBAN GARAGE—Check out Ward Hooper T-shirt designs and newly acquired, funky items at the Urban Garage. 745 W. Idaho St. 208-866-4627.

West Side

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THE ALASKA CENTER—Take in art by Chi E Shenam Westin, Eric Obendorf, and Allan and Connie Ansell. Quick takes studio portraits $25. Featuring handmade Scandinavian quilts and table cloths. 5-9 p.m. 1020 Main St., Boise.

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ART SOURCE GALLERY—The second annual Tin-stallation. See Downtown News, this page. Wine from Indian Creek Winery, music and appetizers. 5-9 p.m. 1015 W. Main St., 208-3313374, artsourcegallery.com. BEN & JERRY’S SCOOP SHOP—Enjoy $1 scoops in cups or cones. 103 N. 10th St., 208342-1992, benjerry.com. BOISE 150 (SESQUI-SHOP)— Stop in and check out art from the Boise Visual Chronicle. 1008 Main St., 208-433-5671. THE CRUX—Open late for First Thursday. 1022 W. Main St., 208-784-1182. FOOT DYNAMICS—Check out the Altra zero-drop trail shoes and browse shoe deals. 1021 W. Main St., 208-386-3338. GAMEKEEPER LOUNGE—Enjoy specialty wine flights and live music with the Emily Tipton Band. 5-9 p.m. 1109 W. Main St., 208343-4611, owyheeplaza.com. THE HUDDLE—Drink $2 local beer, $4 glasses of wine and 50 cent wings for First Thursday. 205 N. 10th St., Ste. 110, 208338-5454.

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THE GALLERY AT THE LINEN BUILDING—View Unfinished at the gallery. 5-9 p.m. 1402 W. Grove St., 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. RADIATE MEDISPA—Celebrate a grand opening with discounts on services. 1023 W. Main St., 208-344-4310, radiatemedispa. com. RADIO BOISE—DJs will be on hand to give studio tours. 1020 W. Main St., Alaska Building, Ste. 200, 208-424-8166, radioboise.org.

Check out work by Olive Wicherski at Bleubird this First Thursday.

TIN-STILLATIONS AND DRUNKEN SPELLING BEES Altoid tins—along with 35-mm film canisters—have experienced their fair share of nefarious appropriations. But this First Thursday, an array of Boise artists are refashioning these containers into much more legal mini art pieces. Thursday, Jan. 3, from 5-9 p.m., Art Source Gallery hosts the second annual Tin-stillation at 1015 W. Main St. “Artists were asked to create anything their imaginations could cook up, the only stipulation being that somehow an Altoid tin be included,” Art Source wrote in a press release. “And all kinds of creative wonder and excitement was unleashed by artists who normally work in other mediums; painters, potters and glass artists stepped out of their comfort zones and the results were enchanting.” This year, Boise Open Studios Collective Organization and Treasure Valley Artists’ Alliance members were also invited to participate in the show. The First Thursday opening celebration includes music by the jazz students from Fresco Arts Academy, along with wine from Indian Creek Winery. In other group art show news, the Gallery at the Linen Building hosts the opening of Unfinished on First Thursday, Jan. 3, from 6-9 p.m. Nineteen Idaho artists will showcase their unfinished works on the gallery’s walls. According to the event’s Facebook page: “Unfinished draws upon the value and beauty of the often-unknown rigor and struggle inherent in the creative practice. The exhibition features work that has been set aside, abandoned, unfinished, destroyed, left in limbo, reconstructed or reconfigured.” Participating artists include Ted Apel, Jason Appelman, Brooke Burton, Maria Chavez, Eli Craven, Kirsten Furlong, Charles Gill, Amanda Hamilton, David Herbold, Elijah JensenLindsey, Adrien Kien, Andy Lawless, William Lewis, Amy O’Brien, Kelly Packer, Troy Passey, Jon Sadler, Cheryl Shurtleff and Richard Young. Unfinished will run through Thursday, Feb. 28, at 1402 W. Grove St. Moving from unfinished art to unfinished sentences, Silly Birch, located at 507 Main St., has put together a Drunken Spelling Bee to entertain the First Thursday throngs. Hosted by Crooked Fence Brewing, spelling bee sign-ups start at 7 p.m. and the slurred word mutilation will kick off at 9 p.m. Crooked Fence will also debut a new brew at the event. And if you’d like your First Thursday imbibing to be a little more low-key, swing by Bleubird at 224 N. 10th St. from 5-8 p.m. to check out art by recent Boise Weekly profilee Olive Wicherski and music by Boise Rock School. Five percent of all sales from the evening benefits Think Boise First. —Tara Morgan

18 | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT Sports & Fitness AERIAL YOGA—Stretch out in wraps of silk suspended from the ceiling for a de-stressing workout. 7 p.m. $15. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com. LINE DANCE LESSONS—Beginners to advanced dancers of all ages are invited to line up some new moves at this class. 7:309:30 p.m. $5. Broadway Dance Center, 893 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-794-6843. POWER PARTY SCULPT—Get a workout with disco balls, top 40 music and dancing. 8:15 p.m. $7. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

Kids & Teens KINDERGARTEN READINESS— Prepare your children for kindergarten. 1 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

FRIDAY JAN. 4 Festivals & Events HOKUM HOEDOWN SQUARE DANCE AND OLD-TIMEY MUSIC SERIES—Enjoy music from the Hokum Hi-Flyers and learn squaredance moves, followed by a hootenanny featuring a cast of callers. Pie Hole pizza is served and a full bar is available with ID. 7 p.m. $5, $15 per family. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Wednesday. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. WINTER WONDERLAND FESTIVAL—See Wednesday. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley.

Concerts

Odds & Ends THE MERIDIAN SINGERS—A group for women who like to sing a cappella in the barbershop style. The ability to read music not necessary. 7:30-9 p.m. The Music Den, 245 E. Blue Heron Lane, Meridian, 208-724-6311.

ALL KEYED UP—Join musicians from Boise Philharmonic, Boise State University and Boise Baroque Orchestra for an evening of piano, organ and glockenspiel music. 7:30 p.m. $10 suggested donation. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-7511.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

BENEFIT CONCERT FOR BRONSON BROWN—Bronson Brown is currently fighting aplastic anemia and his mother needs help with the bills. Featuring Young Eurnii, Big Ups, Rough Draft, Prentice, DJ Techstep and DJ Tucci from Brentwood, Calif. Ages 14 and older are welcome; full bar with ID. 7 p.m. $10. Revolution Concert House and Event Center, 4983 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-938-2933, revolutionconcerthouse.com.

Workshops & Classes FIRE DANCING CLASSES— Learn the art of fire dancing from expert instructors in a safe environment. 6-7 p.m. $9. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

Art FIRST FRIDAY ART IN EAGLE— Stroll through downtown Eagle and visit local merchants and galleries along the way. 4:30-8:30 p.m. Downtown Eagle, Old State Street and Eagle Road, Eagle.

Citizen KEGS4KAUSE—50 percent of proceeds from beer sales will benefit the Ben Towne Foundation and research for a pediatric cancer cure. 5 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing Company, 111 W. 33rd St., Garden City, 208-3440011, payettebrewing.com.

| SUDOKU SATURDAY JAN. 5 Festivals & Events 33RD ANNUAL WEDDING PARTY SHOW—Meet more than 100 merchants offering the services needed for a wedding. Photographers, caterers, florists, venue managers, wedding planners and many other merchants are on hand to offer creative ideas. For more info and a list of participating merchants, visit weddingparty-boise.com. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $7. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Wednesday. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Workshops & Classes | EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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VINTAGE SWING DANCE—Instructions on classic Lindy Hop moves. All ages. No partner required. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, heirloomdancestudio.com.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Sports & Fitness AERIAL YOGA—See Thursday. 10 a.m. $15. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | 19

8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends

Literature

Sports & Fitness

CLUB ISH—Club night created for plus-sized women and the men who adore them. Featuring DJs, a full bar and a VIP area. 9 p.m. $5. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430.

SCBWI MEETING—Monthly meeting of the Society of Children’s Writers and Illustrators. Each month features a short presentation on writing, illustrating or publishing. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

POWER PARTY SCULPT—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $7. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

SUNDAY JAN. 6 Festivals & Events 33RD ANNUAL WEDDING PARTY SHOW—See Saturday. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $7. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208336-8900, boisecentre.com. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Wednesday. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Concerts LEGACY OF FLOYD CRAMER— Jason Coleman, grandson of Floyd Cramer, walks in the footsteps of his forebear, with whom he appeared at the Grand Ole Opry and made his own debut at age 17. 7:30 p.m. $25, $65 for three-concert season. Boise High School, 1010 Washington St., Boise, 208-854-4270.

Odds & Ends DANCE LESSONS—Learn some moves from members of the High Desert Swing Dance Club. 7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com. THAT’S WHAT SHE SAID SUNDAYS—Free pool tournament and karaoke. 8 p.m. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430.

WEDNESDAY JAN. 9

Sports & Fitness

Kids & Teens

AERIAL YOGA—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $15. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

HOW THINGS WORK—Explore the science of how all sorts of everyday things work. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-2976700, adalib.org.

TUESDAY JAN. 8

KIDS EXPERIENCE—See Wednesday. 3 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

Food & Drink

MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, adalib.org.

TUESDAY NIGHT BEER AND WINE TASTINGS—Enjoy appetizers and selections from a different Idaho brewer or winemaker. 6 p.m. $5. Salt Tears Coffeehouse & Noshery, 4714 W. State St.,, Boise, 208-275-0017, salttears. com.

Ongoing ART OF NATURE—See glass vessels with plant and animal motifs by William Morris inspired by three large-scale canvases by Alexis Rockman. See Picks, Page 12. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$5. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Workshops & Classes BELLY DANCE CLASSES—Beginner belly dance classes. 6 p.m. $12. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

Art SENIOR DAY—Guests ages 55 and older will receive half off their studio fees. Ceramica, 510 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3822.

EYESPY MONDAY JAN. 7

Real Dialogue from the naked city

Calls to Artists BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS—Each week’s cover of Boise Weekly is a piece of work from a local artist. BW pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All media are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded. For more information contact Art Director Leila Rader at leila@boiseweekly.com or 208-344-2055. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-3442055, boiseweekly.com.

20 | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | BOISEweekly

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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NOISE/NEWS NOISE

REQUIEM FOR THE RECORD Are tanking album sales the sign of a dying musical format? JOSH GROSS resources into high-quality singles and videos, and making the rest of its material exclusive to live performances rather than putting out a full record. Across the board the answer is, “Probably not.” “I’ve had a lot of bands say ‘this is the model we’re going to do,’ and then they haven’t actually done it,” said Jim Merlis, co-owner of Big Hassle Media, a publicity firm representing everyone from Typhoon and Beat Connection to legends Tom Petty and Ornette Coleman.

up and get drum tones, they should track the songs, even if they’re not going to finish them. Then they can come back and not get charged for the same setup time.” With studio time costing an average of $60 an hour, setup costs add up quickly. Fulton says the limited resources of independent bands are stretched further by recording in bulk. Both Fulton and Merlis said that albums also represent complete artistic statements, allowing a musician or band to check those songs off their list, then move on and grow as artists. But still, album sales are down. Current music industry economics seem to indicate the consumer wants more choice, less cost and wider availability. Another theory is that what’s happening to the music industry has less to do with the death of the album and more to do with the bifurcation of the consumer market. Casual listeners are gaining more ways to listen casually without much time or financial investment on their part, and audiophiles are sinking deeper than ever into their album collections. “It depends on what kind of experience you’re looking for,” said Michael Bunnell, owner of The Record Exchange and executive director of the Coalition of Independent Music Stores. “Do you want to have a rich experience or do you want to have a shallow experience?” Vinyl album sales have quadrupled since 2006, even as quality and price have increased with the introduction of deluxe heavyweight editions of new albums. “We’re seeing people come into the vinyl section that never bought CDs because vinyl is sexy, and they like the way it sounds and they like the ritual,” said Bunnell. “I think Record Store Day had a lot to do with the rebirth of vinyl. When that started five years ago, I would guess that 20 percent of people were putting vinyl releases out, mainly indie-centric. And now, you’re not legitimate unless you put vinyl out.” Bunnell also said the albums that move the most copies are often sold with value-added content such as posters, T-shirts, digital download cards, additional singles or DVDs. Often, the value added is the quality of the album itself. Great albums are more than just a collection of songs, they’re a unique snapshot of an artist’s creative period. And albums that hit that high standard still do quite well, many as expensive deluxe editions collectors covet. “I think a lot of kids are realizing that experience can be richer, deeper, and there’s a cultural side to it,” Bunnell said. “It’s like we lost them for 10 years, and now they’re going, ‘That scene looks pretty interesting.” The album’s cultural clout may have diminished, but in the words of Mark Twain, reports of its death have been greatly exaggerated. JAMES LLOYD

Boise band Finn Riggins had a lot going on when it put out its Benchwarmers EP in April 2012. Keyboardist Eric Gilbert was working on Treefort Music Fest, drummer Cameron Bouiss was planning a European tour with Hillfolk Noir and guitarist Lisa Simpson was working on various side projects. Though the band had enough material to do a full album, it wasn’t just its schedule that drove the decision to make a shorter release. “It just seems like a bite-size culture right now,” Gilbert told Boise Weekly. Physical album sales have been on the decline for more than a decade because of growth in the digital download market. Even including digital album sales in the numbers, total album sales have dropped by more than half, 330.5 million in 2011, from their peak at 785 million in 2000. And that drop occurred despite the number of songs digitally downloaded increasing from 141 million in 2004—the first full year measured—to 1.27 billion in 2011. From the moment that CDs were introduced music has moved toward a la carte offerings. It’s true that singles and 45s largely drove the market from the record industry’s very beginnings, but they still had to be sought out and purchased, whereas streaming audio and video services like Spotify and YouTube have turned the prix fixe album industry into a dim sum audio buffet. Now, an endless supply of new songs, videos, playlists and downloads are delivered instantly to casual listeners. This has caused some pundits to label the album dead. Op-eds in The Guardian, Gizmodo, Minnesota Public Radio and countless blogs have said so. Radiohead said it would abandon the format after In Rainbows because it was too cumbersome a process. In an opinion piece on CNET, Shark Tank investor Mark Cuban went so far as to suggest that musicians abandon bundled collections of songs altogether and convert to a television model in which they release songs on a week-by-week basis that listeners can subscribe to via RSS feeds. That idea’s not completely crazy or new. They Might be Giants gained notoriety with its Dial-aSong answering machine started in the ’80s, which was updated regularly with a new song. UK beat-boxing artist THePETEBOX gathered his following by releasing a regular series of live-performance videos, and later bundling that audio into an album. Despite whatever sentimental attachments bands may have to the album format, any current act looking to succeed should ask itself if it would be better off putting its limited

Merlis explained that, while it seems like less is more, it’s actually far less effective. “With an album, there’s always sort of an event,” he said. “When you’re releasing a single or an EP, it’s not as much of an event.” Merlis explained that an album grants a greater level of legitimacy and interest from a promotional perspective, representing a complete artistic statement to journalists, promoters and fans. The album is more of a full meal, not just a snack. Steve Fulton, co-owner of Boise recording studio Audio Lab, said full albums are also more efficient to record. “In the last three or four years, there’s been more people coming in doing two songs, three songs, and they’re not necessarily making a CD, they’re putting them out on Reverb Nation, or whatever,” said Fulton. “I always suggest that if they’re going to take the time to set

Break the Cycle kicks off the New Year in Boise.

LOCAL SHOW-DOWN Look, we know your heads are still pounding and your stomachs are still churning from New Year’s Eve. We’re right there with you, typing this column from a bed with a bucket nearby. But the show must go on, and that means you must go to the show. What show? Well, if you’re hardcore, then local punks Nude Oil and Diluted will shout themselves hoarse with touring punks Break the Cycle and Year of the Wolf at The Venue during the first punk-rock show of the year, Wednesday, Jan. 2. That show starts at 6 p.m. and costs $5 at the door. But let’s say your hangover is seriously kicking and you need something smoother on the ears to ease into the week. Something like Classical Revolution: Boise, for example. The ad-hoc collective of local classical musicians will be making its second local appearance at The Crux on Thursday, Jan. 3, as part of this month’s First Thursday festivities. The performance is free and features a variety of players from local orchestras like The Boise Philharmonic, The Boise Baroque Orchestra, and the Boise Cello Collective, performing shorter pieces for smaller ensembles. That should get going around 7 p.m. Once your stomach has settled, you might be ready to head back out into the world and par-tay. One place to do that is Red Room Friday, Jan. 4, when Audiomedics will be putting on its regular EDM-apalooza event, Audiotherapy. Audiotherapy features a rotating cast of house, EDM and dubstep DJs making with the dance party from 9 p.m.-2 a.m. That event is also free. But if all that wub-wub and wicky-woop makes you chomp down on your corn cob pipe and grumble about the old days when dancing was for squares, then you’re not going to be left out on the cold. You can just shuffle on over to The Linen Building Friday, Jan. 4 and get down at the Hokum Hoedown with the Hokum Hi-Flyers. The monthly oldtime event and square dance goes from 7-10 p.m. and costs $5 at the door or $15 per family. Make sure to wear your dress overalls. Finally, take Saturday, Jan. 5 a little easier and a little tastier with Lee Penn Sky and Willy Dallas at The High Note Cafe from 8-10 p.m. The soothing tunes will fill your ears and heart, while a brunch burrito fills your belly. That’s a two-fer. —Josh Gross

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | 21

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY JAN. 2 B.I.P.P. PRESENTS: BREAK THE CYCLE—With Year of the Wolf, Nude Oil and Diluted. 6 p.m. $5. Venue

CAMP, JAN. 8, NEUROLUX Should your New Year’s resolution call for consuming more tunes, Radio Boise Tuesday returns Tuesday, Jan. 8, at Neurolux, with performances by Boise’s Lucid Aisle and Ugly Hussy, along with Twin Falls outfit CAMP, followed by a Radio Boise DJ set. Headliners CAMP wield typical rock instruments: Cameron Andreas leads with guitar, Aaron Ajeti’s bass comes with a punch and Pops Miranda’s drums crash and rattle the sound into movement. On top of that, CAMP is willing to experiment, dabbling in electronic influences, adding a dash of distortion and regularly featuring a horn element via Shane Cox. Those elements flip the word “typical” on its ear. This freshness can be found on the song “Drift,” as Cox pumps out a bluesy solo outro, with Ajeti’s bass adding thrumming punctuation. According to its Facebook page, the band hopes to record a follow-up to its 2012 No Smoking live EP in the coming months. —Andrew Crisp With Lucid Aisle and Ugly Hussy. 7 p.m., $3, Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

22 | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | BOISEweekly

FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s OPEN MIC NIGHT—With Dakota Mad Band. 8 p.m. FREE. New Frontier Club PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

JIM FISHWILD—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

KATIE MORELL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

LIQUID LABS—Featuring D Ron Groove and Mixstress Morningstar. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid PAUL DRAGONE—6 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

FRIDAY JAN. 4

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

BRET MOSLEY—9 p.m. $5. Reef

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BUDDY AND THE BB’S—6 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s

SPUDMAN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

DUELING PIANOS—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity

DJ NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Club Max

WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

DUELING PIANOS—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity

YOUNG EURNII—With Proctor and DJ Tucci. 7 p.m. $10. Revolution

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

STEADY RUSH—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

THURSDAY JAN. 3 BUDDY AND THE BB’S—6 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s DUELING PIANOS—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid HOKUM HI-FLYERS—7 p.m. $5. Linen Bulding

Rocci Johnson

ROGUE GALLERY—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

SATURDAY JAN. 5

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

DJ NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Club Max

THE WELL SUITED—8 p.m. FREE. Woody’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

DOUGLAS CAMERON—9 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

TURNS OUT—Midnight. FREE. Liquid

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE ALEX LAK E

GUIDE PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

TUESDAY JAN. 8 LIQUID THROWDOWN—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid RADIO BOISE TUESDAY—With Camp, Lucid Aisle and Ugly Hussy. See Listen Here, Page 22. 7 p.m. $3. Neurolux Ben Burdick

SUNDAY JAN. 6

MONDAY JAN. 7

WEDNESDAY JAN. 9

BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

ALIGATOR—With Wrong Answer, Comprimised, Blackcloud and Smuts. 6 p.m. $10. Venue

BOURBON DOGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s TURNS OUT—Midnight. FREE. Liquid

A-N-D FRIENDS—6 p.m. FREE. Moxie Java-Five Mile BLUES JAM WITH WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

LIQUID LABS—Featuring D Ron Groove and Mixstress Morningstar. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel PAUL DRAGONE—6 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s WILSON ROBERTS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown WOE IS ME—With Texas in July, Capture the Crown, Umbrellas and Too Close to the Sun. 6 p.m. $14-$16. Venue

DAN COSTELLO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown KEANE—With Youngblood Hawke. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $32-$65, Knitting Factory

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

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KEANE, JAN. 9, KNITTING FACTORY It’s hard to argue that pop doesn’t have a bad name. Its reputation for meaningless, irksome odes to focus group-tested emotions is well-earned. But there isn’t anything about a peppy beat or a catchy melody that mandates pop be throwaway filler. It just has to be emotionally and melodically relatable. One band that is still proud to fly the pop banner is British trio Keane. The band’s 2004 debut, Hopes and Fears, hit No. 1 on the UK charts its first week and went on to go platinum nine times over. The record put Keane in the same category as Brit-pop supahstahs Oasis and Coldplay. But what sets Keane apart from other pop-rock bands is its keys-first approach to songwriting. Keane will be in Boise to promote its pro-piano agenda and its new album, Strangeland, on Wednesday, Jan. 9. —Josh Gross Keane with Youngblood Hawke, 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $32-$65. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | 23

LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

A PROMISE AND A NEW DEALER O BROTHER, WHERE ART THOU?—Boise Classic Movies presents the first in its Januar y series of Coen Brothers films playing at the Egyptian Theatre. George Clooney, John Turturro and Tim Blake Nelson play three escaped convicts in search of love, riches and adventure in this comedic take on Homer’s Odyssey. Saturday, Jan. 5, 7 p.m., $9 adv., $11 door. The Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Promised Land and Hyde Park on Hudson ring in 2013 with style

Opening

No one disputes that natural gas is clean energy but some of the efforts to get to the gas are dirty. Filthier still are those who lie through their teeth denying that it might be unsafe. Promised Land—a first-rate dramatization of what happens when an economically hobbled community is given promises of jobs, better schools and untold wealth—is the first Matt Damon (left) stars in Promised Land, and Bill Murray (right) portrays FDR in Hyde Park on Hudson. must-see film of 2013. More importantly, it’s required viewing for any Idahoan. A different but equally noble type of courmore than a few from Idaho legislators. Regular Boise Weekly readers should age is considered in this week’s other OscarSo viewing Promised Land was a bit like know quite a bit about natural gas exploracaliber release: Hyde Park on Hudson. watching a home movie. tion and fracking—the In the genius casting move of the season, Exploring broad themes of method of shooting Bill Murray perfectly embodies President decency and respect, the high-pressured fluids HYDE PARK ON HUDSON (R) Franklin Delano Roosevelt in April 1939—a film’s screenplay, crafted by and solids into the Directed by Roger Michell time when our nation inherently trusted its co-stars Matt Damon and Earth’s core to enStarring Bill Murray, Laura Linney and John Krasinski, accomplish- leaders to do the right thing. hance gas flow. For Olivia Williams “We have all learned the lesson that es a rare feat: an honest, renearly three years, we’ve Opens Friday, Jan. 4, at The Flicks spectful portrayal of modern government cannot afford to wait until it has watched speculators lost the power to act,” said Murray as FDR farming culture. hold sway in a series of Promised Land will reso- in a radio address to the nation, assuring an Payette County town nate with those paying close economically crippled United States that it hall meetings, and we’ve PROMISED LAND (R) was indeed proper for a government to come attention to the fracking sat at dozens of kitchen to the rescue and that federal bailouts were debate and gas exploration. tables, listening to Idaho Directed by Gus Van Sant If the subject is new for you, not a sign of weakness. farmers and ranchers Starring Matt Damon, Frances McDorIn Hyde Park on Hudson, we’re reminded this film may shake you to talk about offers to mand and John Krasinski that there was once a time in our hisyour core. Promised Land make them wealthy beOpens Friday, Jan. 4, at The Flicks tory when we were less concerned with the will no doubt come under yond their dreams once attack from energy corpora- personal foibles of our chief executive or his they signed away their unashamed embrace of intellectualism. What tions for what they will say land and mineral rights. is its heavy-handedness. Don’t believe it. This we truly needed, an ultimately received, was To date, natural gas exploration companies a leader in a time of peril. is a promise worth keeping. have snapped up hundreds of land leases—

TEXAS CHAINSAW 3D—After the horror at the Sawyer compound years earlier, a young woman is bequeathed a Texas home in the will of a grandmother she didn’t know. She embarks on a road trip with friends to the estate, only to discover that someone has been living in the mansion’s cellars. (R) Opens Friday, Jan. 4. Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22.

HYDE PARK ON HUDSON—It’s spring 1939, and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt is hosting the British Royals—who lobby for him to side with England against Germany in the impending European war—at his estate in upstate New York. The visit is colored by Roosevelt shuttling between wife and mistress. Starring Bill Murray. See Review, this Page. (R) Opens Friday, Jan. 4. The Flicks. PROMISED LAND—Matt Damon plays a salesman who has been sent to a small town to convince the locals to sell his company gas drilling rights, only to be met with stiff resistance. See Review, this Page. (R) Opens Friday, Jan. 4. The Flicks.

GEORGE PRENTICE

SCREEN/TUBE shrieking dysfunction. But even when buttered-up frog juice drips from their beards, characters on Duck Dynasty are nowhere near as gross— We haven’t put a person on the moon in the past 40 years, but America physically or intellectually—as anyone on Jersey Shore. is still a nation capable of unfathomable feats. Take, for example, a SouthIt’s refreshing to see the patriarch, Phil, condemn cellphones and ern family that got rich during the recession by selling duck-tricking tools. video games with sincerity, and then, with a stoic The A&E show Duck Dynasty follows the owners glare and careful attention to his words, proclaim, and employees of a duck-call business in Louisiana. “Kids in America today are fat.” The show doesn’t sound good or smart, but it is. Others on the show are a bit more flippant. After Season 3 premieres in early 2013, but it’s worth Willie proposes an employee handbook, Uncle Si catching up with the first two seasons online, if for no points out, “The Viet Cong had a bunch of rules and other reason than it’s funny and you’ll learn how to regulations, too. You see how that worked out.” cook frogs. But most importantly, the show subverts He then goes back to napping and “dreaming expectations by pulling off something new to reality about beavers.” Which he means quite literally. television: chronicling the lives of people who are perfectly functional. —Damon Hunzeker This show is all it’s quacked up to be. The reality genre seems to require stupidity and

DUCK DYNASTY: WHY ISN’T THIS SHOW TERRIBLE?

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. 24 | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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FOOD/WINESIPPER FEATURE/FOOD LAU R IE PEAR M AN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SMOKING BAN Bar owners see sales decline one year after smoking ban passes CARISSA WOLF Phil Howard still drinks. And he still smokes. But one year after a citywide smoking ban extinguished the co-mingling of the once inseparable vices at Boise watering holes, the two are less intertwined and frequent for Howard and other local tobacco aficionados. Smokers, it turns out, are all right with that. Mostly. “It takes me a lot longer to drink now,” Howard said. Figure the average smoke break takes three to five minutes. Now subtract that time from a night of drinking and you’ll see a dent in the time devoted solely to imbibing. “It now takes me four hours to drink as opposed to two efficient hours,” the 10th Street Station regular said. “As a whole, I do spend less money.” And drink-slingers are not cool with that. “People come in and then go outside to smoke and I’m losing business because they’re not smoking and drinking,” said 10th Street bartender Dan Krejci. Business owners who used to operate inside a wall of secondhand smoke say the ban has snuffed out sales, causing a trickledown of losses. And nonsmokers are not filling in the gaps. The Boise city ordinance that prohibits smoking in bars, parks and along the Greenbelt, put an immediate dent in 10th Street’s business during the early months of 2012, forcing what was once the unofficial smokiest bar in Boise to lay off an employee and institute novel business strategies. “This is the first time in 30 years that 10th Street has had to reinvent itself,” Krejci said. “We heard the big rumors, ‘Oh, you’ll be back in six months.’ But that hasn’t happened.” The Boise City Council passed the smoking ban in late 2011, citing overriding health concerns for service employees and nonsmoking patrons despite opposition from area businesses owners who said the ban could hurt profits. Employees are inhaling cleaner air but local restaurant and bar owners say they’ve seen revenue dwindle since they were forced to go smoke-free. Some smokers have found ways to accommodate the ordinance. Sales of smoke-

Lisa Sullivan of Quinn’s Restaurant and Lounge said sales have fallen 30 percent over the last year.

less e-cigarettes temporarily boomed at 10th Street in the early days of the ban. Others now flock to establishments with cozy, heated patios or head straight to Garden City, where there is no ban. But for the most part, owners see smokers ducking outside for a quick, legal drag or not coming in at all. “It’s been horrible. I’m sitting here right now trying to figure how I’m going to pay $8,000 in property taxes,” said Lisa Sullivan of Quinn’s Restaurant and Lounge. “I’ve robbed Peter to pay Paul all year long.” Even the hair-of-the dog brunch at Quinn’s hasn’t been enough to keep patrons packing the booths to shake a hangover. “The whole time I’ve been saying, ‘Where are all these nonsmokers who said that they would come to Quinn’s when it’s nonsmoking?” asked Sullivan. Sullivan and her father, Gary Sullivan, have rolled with the smoking ban and the Great Recession, keeping Quinn’s in operation for more than four decades. They even erected a wall between the bar and restaurant of Quinn’s when the city passed a smoke-free measure for restaurants, but Lisa says there’s nothing they can build to fill the dent left by the absent smokers. “We’ve been here 42 years and we’ve never experienced anything like this,” Lisa said. Sales have fallen by 30 percent in the last year at Quinn’s. A 16-year veteran staffer lost her job in a subsequent layoff, a janitor was scaled back to part-time and food orders are down. “There’s a ripple effect. The people and the companies that bring us the food and the liquor are suffering now, too, because they’re not making their quotas and they’re not getting their bonuses,” Lisa said. “I don’t see a light at the end of the tunnel. You name it and I’ve tried it” Lisa added. Apparently, all roads now lead to Garden City. “I dropped into the Ranch Club and I knew 80 percent of the clientele from here,” Krejci said. Symposion is also losing some of its

clientele to Garden City. “The ban has caused a decrease in business,” said Sympoison’s Carly Novis. “We are right next to Garden City, so the customers who might have come here are going to Garden City to smoke.” By all measures, business is booming at the Garden City’s Ranch Club. Cars pack the club’s lot on Saturday nights and puffs of smoke greet a steady stream of patrons. But co-owner Al Vogt isn’t quick to credit the ban for a spike in business. “I’m not a big fan of the law that went into effect in Boise,” Vogt said. “I have seen a slight increase in business. It hasn’t been as much as people think. ... In the three years since I’ve bought into the club, business has steadily been going up.” Though a relocation to Garden City isn’t in the works for any of the businesses Boise Weekly interviewed, Sympoison does have a smoking patio on its agenda. Smokers say live music remains a big draw, ban or no ban. Several chilly December nights had the once notoriously smoky Neurolux packed with patrons. Metal riffs and thunderous beats blew out the front door along with smokers lighting Camels, Pall Malls and American Spirits. But when the music comes from a jukebox, smokers need another draw. Vista Bar manager Kyle Vorse said a heated outdoor patio has helped prevent some smokers from leaving the bar, and Mulligans also has patios that lure patrons in. Mulligans bartender Ben Spellman said a steady stream of drink orders and clean air is just fine for him. Years of bartending left him with chronic respiratory infections and sometimes pneumonia. Doctors said Spellman’s lungs looked like those of a smoker. “I love bartending, but my doctor said I have to quit. I said, ‘Are you going to pay my bills?’” Spellman asked. “This is the first winter season that I haven’t been sick. I attribute it to the ban. It’s the only thing that’s changed.”

TEMPTING TEMPRANILLO Derived from “temprano,” the Spanish word for “early,” tempranillo is a reference to the grape’s tendency to ripen early. It’s a hearty, full-bodied variety that is especially well-suited to the Rioja region, though it has become widely planted across Spain and is gaining popularity in wine regions around the globe. Given Spain’s warm climate, tempranillo’s ability to achieve ripeness while still producing modest alcohol levels is a definite plus. Typically, the grape is blended with small portions of other varieties like garnacha and graciano to round out the flavors. That is the case with all three of our top picks. 2006 BERONIA RIOJA RESERVA, $18.99 Dark cherry leads off on this wine’s nose, followed by sweet vanilla, lightly toasted oak, herb and mint. Silky smooth in the mouth, this pick is filled with creamy, ripe, red fruit and impeccably balanced by lively acidity. Touches of spice, tart cherry, coffee and anise come through on the lengthy finish. Riojas that are labeled “reserva” spend at least one year in oak and two more in the bottle before being released. 2005 MARQUES DE CACERES RIOJA RESERVA, $20 The aromas in this wine are a light, enticing mix of dark berry fruit backed by leather, earth, green olive, cedar and a touch of game. There’s a rustic quality to the palate that offers a nice core of tart cherry and berry fruit. This wine opens up with time in the glass revealing dark chocolate, leather, ripe tannins and mineral. This is an elegantly complex rioja. 2009 POMUM TINTO TEMPRANILLO, $24 This wine is a New World interpretation of the grape, grown in Washington by a Spanish expat. The nose is rich and fruity with layers of dark fruit colored by pipe tobacco, game and soft oak. The wine’s flavors are intense and the texture velvety. Ripe cherry flavors play against the wine’s food-friendly, bright acidity. Touches of chocolate and licorice persist on the finish. —David Kirkpatrick

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C A RE E RS BW CAREERS CNA’S ALL SHIFTS AVAILABLE! 24/7 Pro Solutions is currently hiring for part time CNA’s! All shifts available, work as little or as much as you’d like. CNA’s must meet the minimum requirements: Current CNA Certification, Current CPR, Current TB, Current Health Clearance. All employment offers are contingent upon satisfactory results of a criminal background check and pre employment drug screen. Apply online at: agencyrecruiting.apihealthcare.com/247ps/ candidate.cfm or call our office at 908-6080. HELP WANTED!!! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingcentral.net HOME INCOME, ORGANICS! Health and Wealth, Lose Weight with Organics, FREE product offer, Instant Home based business! Take control, it’s going to be a GREAT YEAR! tcollier@iendeavor.com

IN HOME CAREGIVERS ASAP! 24/7 Idaho Homecare has current openings for various clients in the Treasure Valley. Duties would invlude assistting with personal cares, shopping, laundry, light housekeeping and various other tasks as planned. Currently we have all shifts/days/eves available, you can work as little or as much as you’d like. These positions are long term temporary positions, our preference is to keep the client with the same caregivers. Interested applicants should apply at: agencyrecruiting.apihealthcare.com/247ps/ candidate.cfm or you may call our office at 908-6080. LPN’S - 1 YEAR EXP. 24/7 Pro Solutions is now hiring for all shifts! 24/7 Pro Solutions places nurses in various facilities throughout the Treasure Valley on a per diem basis! All shifts available, work as little or as much as you’d like. Minimum Requirements: Current LPN Licesne, in good standing, Current CPR, Current TB & Current Health Clearance. Able to pass a pre employment drug screen and criminal background check. Apply online: agencyrecruiting. apihealthcare.com/247ps/candidate.cfm

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DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

CAREER TRAINING

BW CAREER TRAINING Learn how to be, do, or have anything your heart desires. To get your FREE “ Money Making Secrets Revealed” CD please call 1-800-385-8470.

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES WIDEN YOUR REACH Need more eyes on your business? Ask me how to reach out regionally and/or nationally in print. Email jill@boiseweekly.com NEW HOME SALES CONSULTANT If you possess strong leadership skills, are highly assertive & customer service oriented, this is an ideal sales position with exceptional income opportunity. We are looking for outstanding sales professionals who are career-minded & up for a challenge, highly goal oriented and motivated for success. APPLY: Please send resume and cover letter to ssherman@mycolemanhome.com REACH 5 MILLION hip, forwardthinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http://www. altweeklies.com/ads

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS THE SCREENWRITERS GROUP Learn and practice pitching your screenplay or project at the Idaho Screenwriters Group, meeting the third Tuesday of every month. For more information, email sherry.ae@hotmail. com Meet at the Idaho Pizza Company, 7100 W. Fairview Ave. Meridian at 6:30 p.m. PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT Parents get a night out on the town while children ages 5-11 get to swim, play games, make crafts and more. Snacks are provided. full-facility member $23; program member $35. YMCA, 1050 W. State St. Second Friday of every month, 6-10 p.m. 344-5502, Ext. 263.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

26 | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

BW LOST LOST KEYS Lost keys anywhere from N. End to the shopping mall area; they were on the bumper, key fob & one other key on a large vintage safety pin. 208-499-9654 if found. Thank you.

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BW CLASSES CROSS COUNTRY SKI CLINIC Early winter clinic by coaches & athletes of Bogus Basin Nordic Team. Saturday, Jan. 12. Two sessions: 9:30-11:30am or 1-3pm. Choose skate or classic stride instruction. All ski levels welcome. $42 for one session or $63 for both. Register at bluecirclesports. com All proceeds benefit BBNT, a non-profit organization.

BW FOUND HIP FLASK Found:stainless steel hip flask by BSU. Call 283-1162 to describe and claim.

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PETS

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FOR SALE

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STANDARD POODLE PUPPIES Standard Poodle Puppies were born on 10/20/2012. Dewclaws removed, tails docked, first shots, wormed & had their well puppy checks. Both parents are AKC regestered (puppies will not, sold as pets to good homes) with great genetics and soft coats. Please call 360-513-6820. Email for more info and more pictures. Can meet you half way for a small fee of $50. vic.10@ netzero.net

2010 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER Trail Teams Edition. 22,088 mi., sandstorm exterior, 4X4, excellent condition, warranty. $12,400. ngar@netscape.com CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

FREE MOVING BOXES I have about 25 boxes from moving. I don’t want to place them outside in the wet weather. Please call Shawn at 801-2441563 to pick up. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

TAG AWAY SKIN TAG REMOVER Tag Away is a renowned and an all natural solution for removing skin tags in the home. Greatest yet, Tag Away is currently providing an exclusive and time sensitive 2-for-1 deal for all online Tag Away purchases.

SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS With most all electronics gadgets getting smaller and smaller, even the solar energy field is getting the act. SolarVolt Power has teamed up with an KD Energy Technology to offer an alternative to the standard systems that

CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPY

COUNSELING

ADOPT-A-PET

EAT AND DRINK HERE

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

MIND BODY SPIRIT CLASSES

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

PHOEBE: 9-year-old female foxhound. Good with other dogs, but needs a cat-free home. Spry for her age. Cratetrained. (Kennel 310#17994795)

SKEETER: 11-monthold male American pit bull mix. Sweet dog. Needs training. Good with other dogs and older kids. (Kennel 307- #17759665)

SAMPSON: 9-month-old male Lab mix. Goofy puppy needs a cat-free home. Mannerless, but loyal. Make him an indoor companion. (Kennel 309- #17986853)

ADMIRAL: 4-monthold male domestic shorthair. Inquisitive, shy. Gets along well with other friendly cats. Litterbox-trained. (Kitten Room- #17242199)

CHESTNUT: 6-monthold male domestic shorthair. Friendly, but quirky and independent. Litterbox-trained. (Kitten Room#18738046)

SPUTNIK: 1-year-old male domestic shorthair. Litterbox-trained. Curious, outgoing. Does well with other cats and children. (Kennel 22- #17980031)

BEAUTY

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

CHESTNUT: Chatty older kitten has lots to share with you.

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PATRICK: Adorable orange tabby is sweet and calm.

BONFIRE: This stunning beauty will warm your heart.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | 27

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B O I S E W E E K LY PHYSICAL THERAPY AND PILATES

NYT CROSSWORD | BYWORDS 11 “I’m not doing so well” 15 ___ it up (dress flamboyantly)

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38 Density symbol 40 Anti-apartheid org. 42 1970 hit for Neil Diamond 43 De novo 44 Lies in the hot sun 46 Shacks 48 Marine rescue grp. 50 Fancified 52 Really desire, with “over” 53 Precipitate 57 House of the speaker? 58 Writer 60 Big guns 61 F = ma formulator 62 Very wide shoe spec 63 Text changes 65 Rocket center, once 66 ___ admin 67 “Not doable” 68 Govt. money guarantor 69 Its capital is Sydney: Abbr. 70 “O Sole ___” 71 Just ___ … or “Just ’___” 73 Crones 74 From way back 77 It’s needed for selfcheckout 79 Alternative to broadband 81 Fixed rate 82 Capital north of Cyprus 83 Mat material 84 Not yet out of the closet? 85 Attach a handle to 87 Preceded 89 Give a rude awakening, say 90 Flexible, electrically 92 Derby features 94 Turn blue, say 95 Do wrong 96 Bubbling up 97 Ruination 98 Leonard Nimoy’s “___ Not Spock” 100 “Fish Magic” painter 103 Rapper who played Brother Sam on “Dexter”

105 1996 Olympian noted for performing on an injured ankle 110 Form letters? 111 “No ___” (“Don’t ask me”) 112 Basically 114 Breaks one’s back 116 Boston player, for short 117 Triple Crown winners must lead their league in these 118 Too-good-to-be-true offer, often 119 Roman tragedy writer 120 Florida’s Sanibel, e.g. 121 Zebra feature 122 They’re run up 123 Like some dough

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Unhappy king of legend Prefix with -metrics Vegas casino Roseanne’s husband on “Roseanne” 5 Suit 6 Made de novo 7 Certain baby food 8 So-called “Goddess of Pop” 9 Samovars 10 It’s part this, part that 11 Whom Shelley wept for 12 “Water Music” composer 13 Fr. title 14 “Watermark” vocalist 15 Really bugging 16 Woolly 17 English royal 18 Covers up 25 Street opening 29 Sports announcer’s scream 31 Lost-parcel inquiries 33 Newspaper section 36 It’s almost nothing 39 Prefix with -porosis 41 Took turns recklessly 42 Things may be written in it 44 Cap’n’s mate

45 Kind of well 47 Piece for nine 49 Hockey area in front of the crease 51 Seemingly forever 54 Long-running TV show featuring the Hortons and the Bradys 55 Fishing boats 56 South American zoo animal 59 Revolutionary 1960s Chinese youth 60 Open ___ 64 They’re often behind glass 67 Prompt 68 Apocryphal 69 ABC, for one 70 Wall St. credential 71 Small boat made of wickerwork 72 “___ / Had ’em” (classic two-line poem about fleas) 73 Quibblers split them 74 The Sun Devils’ sch. 75 Sci-fi or western 76 Result of a bang-up job? 78 One running

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80 Beta carotene and others 86 Go out 87 Trick-winning attempt in bridge 88 ___ beer 90 Dwellings 91 TV announcer who broke the news of John Lennon’s murder 93 Earn hand over fist 96 Firenze friends 99 Rumpled 101 Put up 102 Lamb specialty 104 Unwilling to budge 106 Kick back 107 People conquered by the Spanish 108 Wound protector 109 Much merriment 113 Heat org. 115 Got ___ (did great) Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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use one power inverter. There are two model types offered; one is where the inverter is attached to the aluminum rails and the other is attached directly to the solar panel. The module mounted unit can be ordered with communications ability for continuous monitoring, using a modem and your computer. All of this at a very competitive price and 6 months, no interest financing! Go to SolarVolt Power and start building your system today! solarvoltpower@ sbcglobal.net HOMEGROWN TIE DYES FOR SALE Locally crafted, hand dyed tie dyes by HomeGrown Tie Dyes. T-Shirts (adult and youth), dresses, tank tops, socks, undies and much more! I currently have a spot at The Treasure Garden Flea Market located at 6521 Ustick Road in Boise. The Treasure Garden is an awesome shop with tons of other stuff too! Open Friday-Sunday 10am to 6pm. Tie Dye prices start at $10 (youth, socks etc) and MOST adult t-shirts are $12. I have lots of ready to buy items, so stop in check ‘em out! xoxo

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

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BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com Cold Outside? Come in for a Massage! 322 Lake Lowell. Betty 2837830.

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Embrace the moment with a sensual massage at ULM. Now accepting new clients. ULM 340-8377. Hrs. 8:30AM-8PM. FULL BODY MASSAGE Experienced Certified Massage Therapist. $40/60 mins. & $60/90 mins. Call or text Richard at 208695-9492.

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*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

FULL ROOM MASSAGE

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio. Amy, CMT. $75/hr. 375-2346.

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Deep tissue Swedish. Full body: $50/hr., $40/half hr. Foot Massage: $25/hr., $20/half hr. 7 days a week. 9am-10pm. 626-345-4266. 320 N. Orchard St.

MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. MASSAGE BY LIZ $50/1 hr., $75/1.5 hr. & $100/2 hr. (most popular). Unique style of massage, blending several influences to tailor each session to your needs. I balance targeted pressure with long, flowing movements in order to create an overall sense of well-being & relaxation. Sessions are full-body. My specialty is neck & shoulder work. Incall or out-call, 9am to 9pm start times every day. Liz 901-0511.

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BW SPIRITUAL EXPANDED CONSCIOUSNESS I am starting a group for spiritual growth through expanded consciousness. I use channeling & bring in Divine Wills. This is a weekly group. I have studied Light Body Consciousness & love to share the new consciousness with others. $5/session. 505-603-3634.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

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SPECIALIZING IN PAIN RELIEF

FREE Head & Should Massage with 1 hr. Chinese Reflexology Foot Massage at VIP Massage. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole. Tantra sessions available with Jamie. 440-4321. THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE Experienced massage therapist who enjoys healing others. $30/ half hr,. $55/hr., $125/2 hrs. Please call Petra 208-658-6587.

BW YOGA BECOME A CERTIFIED YOGA INSTRUCTOR. Shanti Yoga. Ongoing Registration, call 208-634-9711,or email deb@ shantiyogastudio.org BELLY BUSTIN’ CORE Purify, strengthen, align and stretch while connecting to your inner core. This Yoga-Pilates fusion class combines core conditioning with the breath, balance and relaxation of yoga. sageyogaboise. com or 338-5430. HAVE A STUDIO? Let us know. Boise Weekly wants to spread the word. Email: classifieds@boiseweekly.com MUUV Yoga in an incredible setting on the Boise River: Vinyasa Flow with Jenny Lewis is a fun, challenging class to build strength, body, mind, spirit. Your first class is free, visit MUUV.com to sign up! NEW YOGA CLASSES IN NORTH END Full schedule of yoga classes for new year with experienced teachers at Yoga Tree of Boise. Beginners to experienced wanted! YogaTreeofBoise.com YOGA Teacher training starting soon in the North End. Call or text for details. 208-440-6344.

PAIN FREE LIFE BEGINS HERE Say goodbye to chronic pain. Weekly classes on Sundays & monthly pain clinics. Simply Somatics by Tami Brown, 861-6073. Register at sageyogaboise.com

BW HYDROTHERAPY BATTLE THE HOLIDAY BULGE WITH A NEW YEAR CLEANSE! Colonics, FIR Sauna therapy & the NEW Vibra-Trim- 3-packpower-punch, wins the BATTLE, hands down! Cleanse Specials available-makes an awesome gift! High Stream Healing-Boise Colon Cleanse. 850-8075. boisecoloncleanse.com

HYDROTHERAPY

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | 29

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): In 2013, I pledge to conspire with you to increase your mastery of the art of friendship. Together, we will concentrate on making you an even stronger ally than you already are. We will upgrade your skill at expressing your feelings with open-hearted clarity, and in ways that don’t make people defensive. We will also inspire you to help others communicate effectively in your presence. I hope you understand that this will empower you to accomplish feats that were never before possible. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Chickens and alligators share a common ancestor. That’s why chickens have a gene that has the ability to grow teeth. A few years ago, a biological researcher at the University of Wisconsin managed to activate this capacity, inducing a few mutant chickens to sprout alligator teeth. I predict there will be a metaphorically comparable event happening for you in 2013, Taurus. The chicken part of you will acquire some of the gravitas of an alligator. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “People wish to learn to swim and, at the same time, to keep one foot on the ground,” said French novelist Marcel Proust. An attitude like that is always a barrier to growth, of course, but in 2013, it would be especially ill-advised for you Geminis. In order to win full possession of the many blessings that will offer themselves to you, you will have to give up your solid footing and dive into the depths over and over again. That prospect may sometimes be a bit nerve-racking. But it should also generate the most fun you’ve had in years. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here’s the horoscope I hope to be able to write for you a year from now: You broke free of the chains that kept you enslaved to your primary source of suffering. And now you have forged a resilient new relationship with your primary source of suffering—a relationship that allows you to deal with it only when it’s healthy for you to do so and only when you feel strong enough to do it. Very nicely done. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “In this world,” said Oscar Wilde, “there are only two tragedies. One is not getting what one wants, and the other is getting it.” I’m counting on you to refute the last part of that questionable assertion, Leo. According to my analysis of the long-term astrological omens, you will definitely be getting what you want in the next six months. You will receive your prize ... claim your birthright or find your treasure. When that happens, I trust you will make sure it is an enduring blessing. There will be no sadness involved.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): English poet Alfred Tennyson wrote so many memorable lines that he is among the Top 10 most frequently cited authors in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. One of his most famous passages was “’Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all.” When he was on his death bed at age 83, his enigmatic last words were, “I have opened it.” Let’s make that declaration your mantra for the coming year, Virgo. In your case, it will have nothing to do with death, but just the opposite. It will be your way of announcing your entrance into a brighter, lustier, more fertile phase of your life. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Back in 1830, it was expensive to stay up and do things in your room after dark. In order to earn enough money to pay for the whale oil that would light your lamp for an hour, you had to work for 5.4 hours. And today? It’s cheaper. You have to put in exactly 0.001 second of hard labor to afford an hour’s worth of light. I suspect that in 2013, there will be a similar boost in your ease at getting the light you need to illuminate your journey. I’m speaking metaphorically here, as in the insight that arises from your intuition, the emotional energy that comes from those you care about, and the grace of the Divine Wow. All that good stuff will be increasing. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I’ve been absolutely terrified every moment of my life,” said Scorpio painter Georgia O’Keeffe, “and I’ve never let it keep me from doing a single thing I wanted to do.” I think her declaration is excellent medicine for you. In 2013, you will have great potential for upgrading your relationship with your fears--not necessarily suppressing them or smashing them, but rather using them more consistently as a springboard, capitalizing on the emotions they unleash, and riding the power they stir up. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Ambition can creep as well as soar,” said Irish philosopher Edmund Burke. That will be good for you to remember throughout 2013, Sagittarius. Later this year, the time may come for your ambition to soar—in the month of April, for example, and again in the month of August. But for the foreseeable future, I think your ambition will operate best if you keep it contained and intense, moving slowly and gradually, attending to the gritty details with supreme focus.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In Tom Robbins’ book Skinny Legs and All, one of the main characters, Ellen Cherry, has a conversation with a voice in her head. The voice gives her a piece of advice: “The trick is this: keep your eye on the ball. Even when you can’t see the ball.” I think that happens to be excellent counsel for you to heed during the next six months, Capricorn. You may not always be able to figure out what the hell is going on, but that shouldn’t affect your commitment to doing the right thing. Your job is to keep your own karma clean and pure— and not worry about anyone else’s karma. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’ll be bold and predict that 2013 will be a time when you’ll discover more about the art of happiness than you have in years. Here are some clues to get you started. 1. “It is not easy to find happiness in ourselves, and it is not possible to find it elsewhere.” —Agnes Repplier. 2. “There is only one way to happiness and that is to cease worrying about things that are beyond the power of our will.”—Epictetus. 3. “For the rational, healthy person, the desire for pleasure is the desire to celebrate his control over reality. For the neurotic, the desire for pleasure is the desire to escape from reality.”—Nathaniel Branden. 4. “Our happiness springs mainly from moderate troubles, which afford the mind a healthful stimulus, and are followed by a reaction which produces a cheerful flow of spirits.”—E. Wigglesworth. 5. “Happiness is essentially a state of going somewhere, wholeheartedly, one-directionally, without regret or reservation.”—William H. Sheldon. 6. “We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, when all that we need to make us really happy is something to be enthusiastic about.”—Charles Kingsley. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In 2013, I pledge to help you feel at peace and in love with your body; I will do ever ything in my power to encourage you to triumph over media-induced delusions that tempt you to wish you were different from who you actually are. My goal is to be one of your resourceful suppor ters in the coming months—to be a member of your extensive team of allies and facilitators. And I will be working with you to ensure that this team grows to just the right size and provides you with just the right foundation. If all goes well, your extra help will ensure that you finish almost ever ything you star t in the coming year. You will regularly conquer ever yday chaos and be a master of ar tful resolutions.

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SERVICES BW HOME DIRECTV/DISH NETWORK DEALER Superior Satellite - Free Install and Equipment. Buy Local! Lowest prices on DIRECTV, Dish Network and CenturyLink Internet. Ask about Home Theater and custom wiring work. Call today to save $30/month on average. 208-4269800 HANDYMAN SERVICES Profesional Handyman Services. No job to big or small. Licensed and Insured. Call Jonathan Stewart Construction, 921-1561 or visit jonathanstewartconstruction.com JOURNEYMAN PAINTER 30+ years experience in the trade clean and courteous fair rates lic/ insured 463-7771.

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MUSIC BW INSTRUCTION GUITAR & BASS LESSONS Learn guitar & bass in my home studio near Orchard & Emerald. Beginners & intermediates. 40 + yrs. of professional experience. Have fun while you learn! $30/hr. Rick Segoine 922-7192 or 7243297. PIANO TEACHER My teaching is gentle yet effective. I love to share the joy of music. All ages. Piano lessons $15/lesson. 505-603-3634.

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WHAT’S NEW? There happens to be a lot in Classifieds for the New Year! Keep reading & tell us what you think. classifieds@boiseweekly.com

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BW PEN PALS SUPPORT GROUP FORMING For victims of CPS, IDHW & the Courts. For info. go to: suncanaa. com & kidsforcash.com. Tom Kofoed 906-6883. Help to get your children back home!

ADULT BW ADULT

BW PROFESSIONAL RECYCLE OLD ELECTRONICS Go green & recycle your old, obsolete & broken electronics. At United Electronics in Boise. Free pic-up for businesses. 3809 S. Eagleson Rd. 424-3655. uerecycle.com SECURITY TECHNICIAN NEEDED Company in need of security technician. We are looking for an individual with experience servicing and installing: Burglar Alarms, Fire, CCTV, & Access Control Systems. We are looking for an individual who can work independently and efficiently. Pay will be determined upon hire, based on experience. Please email resumes to: kory@ics-lv.com or dan@ics-lv.com ULTIMATE TRANSMISSION Vehicle need servicing? Give us a call or stop by! Custom transmissions, transmission repair, oil changes, tune up, brakes, and much more! We are located at 220 W. 37th St. in Garden City. 631-2133. ultimatetransmission@ yahoo.com WE’RE COMING OUT! Engagement, Wedding, Anniversary Announcements for everyone! Boise Weekly welcomes all and does not discriminate against gay or straight couples! Call 344-2055 for a price quote!

PAUL DRAGONE Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Acoustic/Folk/ Singer-Songwriter. At Shangri-La Tea Room, 1800 W. Overland Rd. 424-0273.

BW MUSIC EXCHANGE CALL TO WOMEN SINGERS I am starting an a cappella group for women singers who can read music and sing without vibrato. Classical music. Call 505-6033634.

BW LIVE MUSIC HOKUM HOEDOWN SQUARE DANCE & OLDTIMEY MUSIC SERIES Enjoy music from the Hokum HiFlyers while you learn squaredance moves, followed by an old-time hootenanny featuring a cast of callers. Pie Hole pizza will be served and a full bar is available with ID. $5/person, $15/family. First Friday of every month, 7 p.m. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 385-0111. KARAOKE Navajo Room at 8 p.m. nightly. 4900 Emerald St. 343-5817. OPEN MIC NIGHT Every other Friday, 7 p.m. Rembrandt’s Coffee Shop, 93 S. Eagle Road. Call 938-1564. PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN Wednesdays, Dec. 26, Jan 2, Jan. 9 & Jan. 23 at 7 p.m. Acoustic/ Folk/Singer-Songwriter at Lock Stock & Barrel, 1100 W. Jefferson St., 336-4266.

GETTING PAROLE IN IDAHO IS NOT EASY

If you have a family member or friend who is trying, there are things they can & must do to help their cause. Contact Maloney Law on our 24 hr. line 208-392-5366 for a free consultation. Assistance available in parole & probation violations also.

BW CHAT LINES FUN LOCAL SINGLES Browse & Reply FREE! 208-3458855. Use FREE Code 7887, 18+. MEET GAY & BI SINGLES Listen to Ads & Reply FREE! 208-4722200. Use FREE Code 5988, 18+.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 2–8, 2013 | 31


Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 28