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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 10 AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012

TAK EE E ON E! FEATURE 13

BANK ROBBERY Sometimes it turns out that the bankers are the crooks 8 DAYS OUT 20

GET OFF THE COUCH BW has a looooong list of stuff for you to do this week NOISE 24

WHY ASK WHY BW asks indie/rap troupe WHY? some questions REC 30

WILDLIFE WOES Fish and Game looks for new funding methods

“The Gen X retirement crisis represents 46 million people waiting for a savior.” RALL 6

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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Harrison Berry, Bill Cope, Randy King, Ted Rall Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, James Lloyd, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE BALLOT STUFFING, BANKS AND CANADIANS After the conclusion of Best of Boise voting on Aug. 26, we put this issue to press and started the long process of tallying the votes. First, thanks to those of you who took the time to cast your ballot in recognition of what you think is best about this Boise of ours. Second, thanks to Ian and Cory at UrbanChalk, who ran our voting system this year. We’ve heard great things from our readers about this year’s voting process, and we’re stoked to have you guys as partners in this massive annual project. To those of you who still think you can stuff the ballot and get away with it, lemme tell you: You’ve never met the power of Ian and Cory’s new tool. We know exactly which places you stuffed the ballot box for; we know your IP address and your fake email addresses; we know your blood type, your favorite kind of beer and how bad your feet smell; we even know which words you consistently misspell. Better luck next time. This year’s Best of Boise hits stands in one giant issue Wednesday, Sept. 26. Until then, keep an eye on Cobweb for blog posts on years past and maybe a sneak peek of the winners. Or not. As for this week’s issue, good luck getting through the main story, “Balance Sheet,” without feeling utterly disappointed, disgusted and/or depressed. Corruption in banking is rampant, bank leaders shirk the blame, and without fail, it’s we the people who get screwed. Looking for something to buoy your faith in humanity after that story? Read this week’s Citizen interview with Ben Skinner, who started a wildly successful nonprofit to help homeless students when he was only a high-schooler himself. Back in A&E, you can get your funny on in Noise News, and if you’ve ever wondered what would happen if a conservationist took the mic in front of a room full of die-hard hunters and anglers, read this week’s Rec story, “Funding Wildlife.” For news on the Republican Convention, as well as state, Congressional and presidential election news, visit boiseweekly.com and click on the Election 2012 banner at the top of the page. That’ll take you to a comprehensive collection of BW’s election news. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Wingtip Press TITLE: Lipsmackin’ Leftovers MEDIUM: Intaglio, relief and planographic fine art printmaking techniques.

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2012 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

ARTIST STATEMENT: Everyone has something leftover: food, clothes, yarn. Printmakers have paper. So we created an exchange for local, regional and international printmakers to create small editions of fine art “Leftover” prints no larger than 5-inch-by-7-inch. Original prints from 155 artists will be silently auctioned Thursday, Dec. 6, at the Creative Access Art Center and proceeds will benefit the Idaho Hunger Relief Task Force. Visit leftoversanyone.blogspot.com.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

SUBMIT

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Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. PATR IC K S W EENEY

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS For some, school choice means going conservative with education 8 CITIZEN

BIKES AWAY! A parade 5,000 strong took over the streets of downtown Boise Aug. 18 during the annual Tour de Fat bikes and beer festival. Those 5,000 were joined by another 1,500 at Ann Morrison Park throughout the day, and in all the crowd managed to put down enough beer (and fork over outright donations) to raise almost $50,000. Get more at Cobweb.

SMOKE INTO OBLIVION With a headline like: “Tobacco On Pace to Kill a Billion People This Century,” how can you not read it? Scan the QR code to get the full story.

GOOD KIND OF TRAIN WRECK Boise Weekly’s Josh Gross said of Alley Rep’s new play, Levi Middlebrooks: Back 2 Boyzee: “It’s sort of a musical, but could just as easily be described as a concert or as a really big car accident you slow down to rubberneck at on the freeway.” See a video preview of the show, which runs through Saturday, Sept. 1.

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FEATURE Balance Sheet

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE WHY finds its happy place

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS Adult nights prove a boon for museums

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SCREEN Celeste and Jesse Forever

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REC Fish and Game looks to public to help find new ways to raise money

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FOOD Brewforia’s growing empire

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BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

GANGBANG, TAMPA

Forget the egos; let’s hear from the ids Aug. 22: It matters little to me who will speak at the GOP convention. I won’t be watching. I just don’t have the stomach for it. I would rather pierce my own nose than subject myself to even one speech by even one Republican speechifier. If anything significant comes from the mouths of these people, I’m confident I will learn about it soon afterward. I am also confident that nothing significant will come from the mouths of these people. However, my fear and loathing of the modern GOP does not prevent me from offering suggestions on how its convention should be run. I am convinced the lineup of speeches and entertainment I have put together is much closer to the true heart of the Republican zeitgeist than anything you will hear from the spectacle they will stage. At the least, my schedule is thematically consistent, rather than a four-day scattershot of anti-gay, anti-immigrant, anti-union, anti-government blather and bile. The agenda I propose is tight, to the point and reflective of what these frightened, angry little men have shown over and over to be most relevant to them. It unfolds as follows ... U Aug. 27: The convention opens with, predictably, the “Star Spangled Banner.” Without missing a beat, the band Guns and Roses follows the anthem with a raucous rendition of its song “Back Off, Bitch!” After the whooping and hollering dies down, Donald Trump (not Chris “Feed Me!” Christie, as originally planned) delivers the keynote address, a rambling expansion of something he told an interviewer last week. Title: “Women Don’t Get It.” (I foresee that Trump is unable to continue with the body of his speech until the crowd stops chanting the title, followed by the response “But They’re Gonna!”) Aug. 28: Let us call this evening’s events the “That’s Not Your Uterus!” expo. Speakers include Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell, exciting the delegates with vivid descriptions of the things he’s witnessed while researching his decision to push for transvaginal ultrasound procedures. He is followed by Rick Santorum, speaking once again to the sin, the wanton promiscuity, wild sex orgies and rampant swingers’ weekends in which out-of-control females will indulge if allowed to continue using birth control in any form. (By the end of Santorum’s segment, the male delegates will have returned to their chairs, sitting quietly, legs crossed in an effort to conceal their erections.) In an effort to placate the extreme pro-life groups, next comes Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin, who will lecture the crowd as to exactly which female body parts are involved in the prevention of pregnancy during a “legitimate” rape. He brings with him an oversized anatomical diagram of the female form which rolls up into a scroll when he is done poking WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

and probing at it with a laser pointer. Topping off the evening will be Rush Limbaugh. His presentation compares Nancy Pelosi, Elizabeth Warren and Hillary Clinton to Sarah Palin. No matter the focus—be it legs, fannies, breasts or hair-dos—Sarah wins every comparison hands down. In his 30 minutes, he uses the words “slut” or “sluts” 57 times. Aug. 29: The primetime begins with a medley of various songs, performed as a duet by Ted Nugent and Herman Cain. Songs include “I Like Big Butts” by Sir Mix-A-Lot, “Ho” by Ludacris and a stirring finale of Tammy Wynette’s “Stand By Your Man” blended seamlessly with James Brown’s “It’s A Man’s World.” When the tears finally dry in the delegates’ eyes, Rep. Paul Ryan is introduced as the vice-presidential nominee. He spends the next 45 minutes whipping the convention floor into a frenzy by explaining, detail by detail, how women rely on the social safety net much more than men. “Six out of 10 food stamp recipients are women with children. (Boo! Boo!) Medicaid patients are 70 percent women. (Boooo!) Elderly women depend on Social Security and Medicare twice as much as men. (Boooooooo!) But with the Ryan Budget,” says Ryan, “We will change all that. (Yah!) No more federal funding for domestic abuse shelters. (Yaaah!) No more taxpayer dollars for Chapter 9 mandates. (Yaaaah!) We’ll swap entitlements for vouchers, then phase out the vouchers! (Yaaaaaah!) They need to learn selfreliance as handed down to us by our Founding Fathers!” The crowd goes wild. Aug. 30: The final night begins with a beautiful, gauzy film on how righteous cultures from around the world—Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia and, of course, Utah—regard women as gifts from God. Then comes Mitt Romney, introduced by his wife as the next president of the United States. He assures the delegates that as president, he would never dream of interfering with the free market’s wishes … how if employers decide to pay women 70 cents on each dollar made by their male counterparts, that’s their business, not the government’s … how his administration will squelch the contagion of frivolous sexual harassment and discrimination lawsuits … how he will defund not just Planned Parenthood but any other program that would dare come between a woman and God’s Plan for her body … how he is totally on board with the GOP platform, including its exclusion of rape and incest as excuses for abortion, even though, as he explains, “I would have chosen other words.” The convention closes with balloons dropping from the ceiling, confetti flying through the air and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir singing Paul Anka’s “She’s Having My Baby.”

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OPINION/TED RALL

LEAD OR QUIT THE RACE

Voters turn against pols’ follow-the-polls strategy In order to be a good leader, Benjamin Disraeli said, “I must follow the people.” By definition, however, leaders point where their followers should go. Americans haven’t seen much real leadership on the federal level since Ronald Reagan. Where there’s been progress, such as on gay rights, the president only stepped forward after public opinion had shifted enough to make it safe. For the first time in 30 years, a follow-thevoters strategy is running out of steam. This year, the electorate seems to be hungering for presidents in the mold of Theodore Roosevelt, FDR and LBJ—old-school leaders who painted ambitious visions of where America could go, who took political gambles, who anticipated challenges and explained why we had to act sooner rather than later. The craving for leadership is evident in the polls. Though personally popular and enjoying the advantages of incumbency, President Barack Obama is running neck-and-neck against Mitt Romney, an awkward candidate from a minority religion who is seen as out of touch by ordinary voters. What’s going wrong? Mainly it’s the economy. It sucks. Democrats say the president inherited the meltdown from George W. Bush. But many blame Obama. Many people, including yours truly, warned that the millions who were evicted under foreclosure were more “too big to fail” than Citigroup. Some, like former Georgia Democrat Rep. Jim Marshall, voted for TARP, but urged the Obama administration to condition the bailout on forcing the banks to refinance mortgages and write down principal to reflect the new reality of lower housing prices.

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“There was another way to deal with this, and that is what I supported: forcing the banks to deal with this. It would have been better for the economy and lots of different neighborhoods and people owning houses in those neighborhoods,” Marshall said. Voters aren’t mad at Obama for not being clairvoyant. They’re pissed off because he ignored people who were smart and prescient in favor of those who were clueless and self-interested. It’s too late to stop the economic meltdown. But it’s still possible for Obama (or, theoretically, Romney) to get ahead of the economy and other pressing issues. Americans want leaders who point the way forward. For example, there is a huge looming crisis: pensions. In 10 to 15 years, Generation Xers will hit retirement age. Close to none have traditional definedbenefit pension plans. Gen Xers, earn far less than the Baby Boomers at the same age, have been shunted into 401(k)s, which turned out to be a total ripoff: The average rate of return between 1999 and 2010 was .3 percent. If you’re 45 years old and just beginning to save for retirement, financial planners say you should save 41 percent of your income annually. Half of Gen Xers live hand to mouth; the rest save a piddling 6 percent a year. The Gen X retirement crisis represents 46 million people waiting for a savior. Attention Mssrs. Obama, Romney and anyone else presenting yourself as a would-be leader: Show that you care about—and have a credible plan to confront—the problems of the future. If you do that—and we’re not holding our breaths—we’ll pay attention to you.

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CITYDESK/NEWS NEWS

A PRIVATE MATTER For some Idaho parents education may be a matter of political choice GEORGE PRENTICE The Alumni and Friends Center would serve as an “east end gateway” onto Boise State.

UP NEXT FOR BOISE STATE: NEW ALUMNI CENTER

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Yet more Idaho parents than ever before are opting for private institutions. And in spite of a staggering recession that still has many families struggling to balance a budget, more parents are shelling out thousands of dollars for private-school tuition for a more tailored approach to education. But if parents are looking to state officials to score successes or struggles at private academies, they’re out of luck. “When we do test comparisons of how students are performing, we don’t include private schools,” said McGrath. So, that leaves it up to the schools to tell their own story and to parents to determine if that’s worth the investment. Boise Weekly visited Meridian’s Challenger School campus, a rapidly growing private school already offering classes for preschoolers through the fifth grade, with plans to add grades six, seven and eight in the next three years. And it’s a school system that proudly wears its success on its uniformed sleeves, pointing to stellar test scores. But equally important is the school’s culture, which its headmaster confirms is “very, very conservative.”

HIGH MARKS Karren Farnsworth, headmaster of Meridian’s Challenger School, was anxious to present her students’ test scores, reaching for a multi-color visual aid that she shares with potential parents. “I’ll show you right here,” said Farnsworth, pointing to a series of bar graphs tracking 2012 Iowa Test Scores of Basic Skills. (The Idaho State Department of Education scores public students in grades three through 10 using Idaho Standards Achieve-

ment Tests.) Farnsworth said Challenger’s average kindergartner outscored 98 of 100 Iowa test takers at his or her grade level in other private schools around the nation. The average eighth-grader outscored 99 of 100. “Parents always want to know what makes us different,” she said. And for the better part of an hour, Farnsworth extolled Challenger’s differences: its teaching staff, traditional teaching methods and something she called the school’s “values core.” “We’re very, very conservative,” said Farnsworth. “We’re based on how the founders saw America. We’re just very honest, rational thinkers.” Farnsworth has been with the Challenger school system—there are 25 schools in five Western states—since 2006. Following a stint teaching eighth-graders at a Meridian Middle School, which she called “an eye-opener,” Farnsworth served as preschool director for Challenger’s pre-K and kindergarten school on State Street in Boise. In 2008, she was offered the position of headmaster when Challenger decided to build a Meridian campus, including preschool through eighth grade. They start them young at Challenger. Tiny mannequins modeling uniforms for toddlers greet visitors to the school’s lobby. “In fact, the little ones are our strength,” said Farnsworth. “They come in here and learn to read at the age of 3, and they’re great readers by the age of 4.” Farnsworth estimated that the current enrollment was 350, but she expected the number to grow to 400 by the end of the school year. Farnsworth described Challenger’s learning system as a blend of traditional classroom methods, integrating what she called “conceptual thinking.” 10

LE ILA RA MELLA -RA DE R

As the footprint of Boise State continues to expand, so does its growing list of alumni, facilitating a need for a new Alumni Association building. “I’ve been with the Alumni Association for five years, and we’ve been working on it for at least that long,” said Jennifer Wheeler, the association’s interim director. “It has been a longtime dream.” But that dream takes a step closer to reality Monday, Sept. 10, when the City of Boise’s Planning and Zoning Commission considers plans for a new 46,000-squarefoot Alumni and Friends Center. The association is currently squeezed into a small one-story building on University Boulevard between Denver and Grant streets. The new facility would be built in its place, adjacent to the neighborhood’s single-family homes and Boise State’s new Environmental Research Building. “I think the university is looking at this as an east end gateway into the campus,” said Wheeler. The proposed center is halfway funded, according to Wheeler, and would cost between $14.5 and $15 million. The funds were raised by contributions from association members and private donations in partnership with the nonprofit Boise State Foundation. Both organizations are separate from the school. “There’s no state money in it, no student money in it, no university money in it,” said Wheeler. “And it’s on private land.” Approximately 3,600 dues-paying members make up the Boise State Alumni Association, of the more than 70,000 university graduates. “The center would host class reunions, retirement dinners, any special events that anybody can dream up,” said Wheeler. With plans for a banquet hall, an outdoor plaza and an open-air banquet space on a fourth-floor patio, the building is designed to allow students and members of the public to rent space for special events. “The money raised by using the building will go toward scholarships,” said Wheeler. And the revenue would include rent paid by university organizations that plan to share the building with the alumni association. Boise State’s Communications and Marketing Department is expected to be one of the building’s larger tenants. Even the Alumni Association will pay rent for its office space. “The idea is for the building to serve as a living endowment,” she said. According to plans Wheeler will present to Planning and Zoning, the new four-story facility would stand at 70 feet tall at its highest point, facing Bronco Stadium. —Andrew Crisp

Thousands of Idaho parents have made their choice. For one reason or another—maybe a greater emphasis on math and science, or more focus on culture and the arts, possibly their child needs remedial help in basic skills—an increasing number of families are passing on their neighborhood public schools, quite literally, and steering their carpools toward charter or private schools. Idaho lists 44 charter schools, educating more than 16,000 Gem State students. “We definitely believe that school choice is critical,” said Melissa McGrath, Idaho State Department of Education’s communications director. Charters are still a fairly recent phenomenon. Springing from 1998’s Idaho Charter School Law, a total of 49 charter schools opened over 14 years. Five have since closed. In 1999, fewer than 1 percent of Idaho school children attended charters. In 2011, it was closer to 6 percent. Southwest Idaho houses the lion’s share of charter schools, 19, drawing the second-highest number, 4, in the Idaho Falls area. In fact, Idaho is embarking on what McGrath called “a second generation” for public charters. “For instance, there’s Wings Academy in the Twin Falls area, specifically designed for students who are struggling in traditional middle school,” said McGrath. “At Wings, the students receive focused attention in those middle-school years and then transition back into a traditional public high school.” The Idaho State Department of Education gladly provides volumes of information to parents regarding Idaho’s charter school phenomenon. But when it comes to private schools, the shelves are bare. “We have very little data [on private schools] at the state level,” said McGrath. “They’re not really required to report anything to us.”

Challenger owns and operates 25 schools in five Western states, including a Boise Pre-K and Kindergarten and a Meridian school that offers classes from preschool through the eighth grade.

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NEWS

WE ’ RE V E RY FOC US ED ON HELPING CHI LDRE N BEC OME THINK ER S , RE A SONE RS, P ROB LEM S OLVER S . WE TEAC H CONCE P TU A LLY. ” —Karren Farnsworth, Headmaster at Meridian’s Challenger School

“In a typical public-school setting, you’re going to see a major 8 focus on facts, and we recognize the importance of that knowledge. But we teach the big picture,” she said. “We’re very focused on helping children become thinkers, reasoners, problem solvers. We teach conceptually.”

SHARED VALUES Challenger’s website says the school is “always looking for exceptional people.” And when submitting a cover letter and resume, prospective teachers are asked to write “a brief essay discussing your view of America.” But April Mantha was stunned by how much politics was discussed in her job interview with Farnsworth. Mantha, who has taught preschool in Boise public and private schools, applied for a pre-K teaching position at Challenger, and she met Farnsworth for a job interview July 9. “One of her very first questions to me was ‘If you could change any form of government, what would it be?’” remembered Mantha. “It threw me for a loop.” Mantha told Boise Weekly that she really wanted the job at the time, so she told Farnsworth what she wanted to hear. “[Challenger] pays very well, almost double my previous salary,” said Mantha, who said a preschool teacher at Challenger could make $14 an hour. Mantha answered Farnsworth’s question about changing the government by saying the nation could be improved if political parties were abolished. But the political discourse only got deeper, according to Mantha. “It was more than just her asking me questions about my teaching experience; it was her telling me how they were really against Obamacare,” said Mantha. “And how, little by little, the government was taking away our freedom and choices.” Farnsworth told Boise Weekly that conservatism runs through the very fabric of the school, from the children’s uniforms to their patriotic oaths. “I tell parents that their children will say the Pledge of Allegiance and they’ll sing a song about America every day,” said Farnsworth. “We teach them that they were born with a right to choose their own destiny. A 3-year-old will know what that means. Those children will learn that the government is here to protect their rights,

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not to encroach on those rights.” Farnsworth said prior to the launch of the fall semester, teach-the-teacher trainings include a class called “liberty,” focusing on the importance of the U.S. Constitution. “We’re teaching them about the concept of individual rights and what that means, vs. what a collective means,” she said. “We’re teaching them what individual rights, liberty and the pursuit of happiness really mean.” Mantha said the next step in her job interview was to fill out a questionnaire, which Farnsworth later confirmed to BW was part of the interview process. “I remember the last question on the test,” said Mantha. “It said, ‘The benefits of socialism are …’ And you’re supposed to fill in the blank.” Mantha said she wrote that there were no benefits to socialism, even though she told BW later that she didn’t believe what she had written. “And Karren Farnsworth took the paper and flipped to that very last question about socialism to see what I had written, and she said, ‘Correct. You got it right. Awesome.’” Mantha said she was given every reason to believe that she would be hired, but she was upset with herself and the answers she had given. “I was disgusted with myself,” said Mantha. “I had to tell her the truth. I told her that I wasn’t expecting to teach preschoolers about socialism. I told her that there were indeed benefits to so-called socialism, like Medicaid and public libraries. Well, I could tell by her face that she wasn’t happy.” Six days later, Mantha received a short letter from Farnsworth, saying thanks, but no thanks. “We are unable to offer you employment at this time,” said the letter. Mantha said she was personally relieved and has since taken another job, teaching pre-K at another private school. When BW asked Farnsworth about the interview, she said she couldn’t recall Mantha’s name but said her search for ideal teacher candidates is ongoing. “I get a lot of applicants. It goes from a big stack down to a small stack of who we might accept,” she said. “We’re very selective.” And when it comes to pursuing teachers, Challenger makes it very clear that it’s “looking for people who will support our philosophy,” said Farnsworth. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

Sun Valley On Ice runs Saturday nights through September 1 promising a dazzling new spin on our traditional outdoor ice show under the stars.

September 1 Meryl Davis & Charlie White

2012 World Silver Medalists 2011 World Champions 2010 Olympic Silver Medalists 4X US Gold Medalists (2009–2012)

For show tickets or buffet and show tickets go to seats.sunvalley.com or call 208.622.2135.

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CITIZEN

BEN SKINNER Heading to Georgetown but leaving his heart in Boise GEORGE PRENTICE

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Ben Skinner’s first day of class at Georgetown University is Wednesday, Aug. 29. The 18-year-old freshman will study government and film but said he still has a few years before deciding a major. “But I definitely want to work for a nonprofit,” he said. He has quite a head start, having founded OATHS—Organization Assisting the Homeless Student—aiding nearly 500 Boise boys and girls who don’t have a home, let alone school supplies, clothes or sports equipment. The youngest of four and the son of two teachers, Skinner said he spent his summer being a “manny.” “It’s a male nanny,” said Skinner, explaining that he cared for a 6- and 10-year-old. Care giving has become second nature for the recent graduate of Bishop Kelly High School.

donations and we’ve received grants from the Idaho Community Foundation and the Idaho Women’s Charitable Foundation.

You had your dad as a teacher. What was that like? He teaches U.S. history and government. A lot of people asked if it was weird. It really wasn’t. It was quite comfortable.

How long did it take for OATHS to get going? By the summer of 2011, I had filed a 501(c)3 to establish a nonprofit, and once that happened, we designed a one-page application.

How much have you raised to date? Fifty thousand dollars. And we’ve helped 500 students.

Was he any more difficult on you than other students? I sure had to study. I got an A.

How do you get those applications into the hands of homeless students? We got permission to distribute them to local shelters and Boise schools.

But now it’s time to hand this off. You need to start thinking about college. Actually, when I’m at Georgetown, I hope to meet with Washington, D.C., homeless shelters and possibly set up a chapter of OATHS in that city.

Where did the idea for OATHS come from? I was 16 and we were approaching the Christmas break in 2009. I asked my mom, who is a physical education teacher at South Junior High, if her students were looking forward to Christmas. She said, “Not really.” I was shocked. It turns out that Christmas was a reminder that many of her students didn’t have shelter or enough food. Most kids would have been shocked and left it at that. I couldn’t stop thinking about it. I met with Russ Heller [director of History and Social Sciences] with the Boise School District and Jim Everett [executive director] of the Boise Y[MCA]. I got great support from Mayor Dave Bieter, too. I knew I could do something about getting educational supplies to homeless students.

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I’m guessing that it’s difficult for these kids to ask for help. At first they were really shy. But then I would ask if they needed new shoes. They said yes. Do need a backpack? Yes. Paper, notebooks? Yes and yes. I think they were more comfortable in talking to one of their peers, rather than an adult. But you supply much more than paper and notebooks. Absolutely. Sports equipment, musical instruments. We sent some kids to camp this summer and we paid for prom tickets and caps and gowns for some high-school kids. How do you fund raise? Our very first event was a dance, bake sale and film festival at Bishop Kelly. We solicit

But is OATHS sustainable here in Boise, in your absence? We already have four seniors from B.K. who are what we call “ambassadors” to interact with homeless students. Plus, we have 10 younger students to help out on a regular basis. Last year, we had as many as 200 people help OATHS. And your ultimate goal? That one kid can find his or her own way out of homelessness. These are great kids and it’s so unfair for them to have this huge burden. People told us early on that we would have too many requests for help, and I always said that if we couldn’t afford to fill the request, we would keep raising funds until we could.

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CORA CO C RA CUR CURRIER AND LENA GROE GER, PROPUBLICA A | ILL US STRATIONS BY JEN G RABLE

P E N A LT I E S O R F I N E S H A V E B E E N L E V I E D AN INVESTIGATION IS STILL ONGOING AN EXECUTIVE HAS BEEN FIRED OR HAS RESIGNED

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As many have noted, this summer has seen one bank after another slapped with fines or rocked by reports of wrongdoing. You’ve probably heard something about Libor, or credit card overcharges, or money-laundering, but it can be hard to keep track. ProPublica has laid out the details on some of the most notable cases, including fines, resignations and which investigations aren’t over yet.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | 13

LIBOR FIXING THE BANKS

WHO’S BEEN HURT

Barclays, JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, UBS, Deutsche Bank and more.

Ordinary consumers and investors. Libor is used as a benchmark for trillions of dollars in ďŹ nancial contracts, from derivatives on down to student loans and credit cards. If the rate was messed with, consumers could have paid artiďŹ cially high rates, or investors could have lost out if rates were too low. And submitting artiďŹ cially low rates during the ďŹ nancial crisis could have misled the public and regulators about the health of the banking system.

THE DETAILS In late June, Barclays settled with British and American regulators over charges that it manipulated the Libor, a critical international interest rate set in London each day by a panel of banks. Barclays traders tried to rig the rate (and its Eurozone counterpart, the Euribor) in order to beneďŹ t particular trades, schemes clear from emails where traders promised one another bottles of champagne for their help. Also, during the ďŹ nancial crisis, Barclays submitted artiďŹ cially low rates to make the bank look stable. This kind of behavior wasn’t limited to Barclays, and the investigation is still growing. Regulators ďŹ rst started getting worried about Libor in 2008. And in the wake of Barclays’ settlement, ofďŹ cials at the Bank of England and the New York Fed have come under ďŹ re for not pressuring the British Bankers’ Association—the industry trade group that oversees the Libor—to do more to reform the way the rate was set then.

WHO’S TAKEN A FALL Barclays’ CEO, chairman and chief operating ofďŹ cer have all stepped down. The Libor itself is also being targeted for reforms by the British government.

PENALTIES $453 million in a settlement from Barclays to the U.S. Justice Department and Commodity Futures Trading Commission, and the U.K.’s Financial Services Authority.

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WHAT DOES BARCLAYS SAY? In its settlement with the Justice Department, the bank admitted that traders tried to rig rates and also acknowledged lowballing rates during the ďŹ nancial crisis. CEO Robert Diamond has said no one “above desk supervisor levelâ€? knew about traders’ scheming and that he did not know about rate suppression by the bank until the settlement was reached this summer.

WHO’S STILL UNDER INVESTIGATION More than a dozen banks have disclosed that they are under investigation by U.S. or other regulators. They have all said they are cooperating with requests for information. UĂŠ1 -ĂŠĂ€iÂŤÂœĂ€ĂŒi`ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠi>Ă€Â?ĂžĂŠĂ“Ă¤ÂŁÂŁĂŠĂŒÂ…>ĂŒĂŠĂƒÂœÂ“iĂŠ regulators—including the antitrust division of the U.S. Justice Department—had promised them leniency in exchange for cooperating with the investigation, but the bank could still face charges from

other regulators. Some individual traders have also reportedly been offered nonprosecution agreements. The bank has reportedly ďŹ red or suspended more than 20 staff in the wake of the scandal. UBS was sanctioned by Japanese regulators in December for traders trying to manipulate the Tibor, Tokyo’s Libor equivalent. UĂŠ ÂˆĂŒÂˆ}Ă€ÂœĂ•ÂŤĂŠ`ÂˆĂƒVÂ?ÂœĂƒi`ĂŠÂœÂ˜}œˆ˜}ĂŠÂˆÂ˜Ă›iĂƒĂŒÂˆ}>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂƒĂŠ in a recent ďŹ ling. Japanese regulators also sanctioned Citigroup in December as part of their investigation into rate rigging by Tokyo traders. UĂŠÂ˜ĂŠĂ•Â?Ăž]ĂŠ iĂ•ĂŒĂƒVÂ…iĂŠ >Â˜ÂŽĂŠĂƒ>ˆ`ĂŠĂŒÂ…>ĂŒĂŠ>Â˜ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŒiĂ€Â˜>Â?ĂŠ investigation had identiďŹ ed a “limited numberâ€? of staff who were involved in rate manipulations and cleared all senior management. UĂŠ,ÂœĂž>Â?ĂŠ >Â˜ÂŽĂŠÂœvĂŠ-VÂœĂŒÂ?>˜`ĂŠĂƒ>ĂžĂƒĂŠÂˆĂŒĂŠÂ…>ĂƒĂŠwĂ€i`ĂŠ four employees and maintains that the wrongdoing is conďŹ ned to a “handfulâ€? of individuals. UĂŠ Ă€i`ÂˆĂŒĂŠ-Ă•ÂˆĂƒĂƒi]ĂŠ- ]ĂŠ*ÂœĂ€}>Â˜ĂŠ Â…>Ăƒi]ĂŠ Bank of America and a few other international banks have also acknowledged they are part of the Libor probe.

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A BLIND EYE TO MONEY LAUNDERING

THE BANK

others who may have moved money with little scrutiny.

- °

WHO’S TAKEN A FALL

THE DETAILS A scathing report released by the U.S. Senate ĂŒÂ…ÂˆĂƒĂŠĂ•Â?ÞÊ>Â?Â?i}i`ĂŠĂŒÂ…>ĂŒĂŠ- ĂŠv>ˆÂ?i`ĂŠÂœĂ›iĂ€ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ last decade to perform basic anti-moneylaundering protections and evaded Treasury sanctions against Iran, Myanmar and others. /Â…iĂŠĂ€iÂŤÂœĂ€ĂŒĂŠĂƒ>ĂžĂƒĂŠ- ĂŠ>Â?Â?ÂœĂœi`ĂŠLˆÂ?Â?ÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂƒĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ cash to ow between Mexico and the United States despite warnings drug money was involved, opened Cayman Island accounts for customers with little-to-no background information and provided cash to banks with terror ties. The report also faulted the government’s OfďŹ ce of the Comptroller of the Currency for taking virtually no action against the bank despite being aware of problems for years.

WHO’S BEEN HURT

- Â˝ĂƒĂŠÂ…i>`ĂŠÂœvĂŠVÂœÂ“ÂŤÂ?ˆ>˜ViĂŠĂ€iĂƒÂˆ}˜i`ĂŠĂ•Â?ÞÊ£n°

PENALTIES $27.5 million in a ďŹ ne to Mexican regulators. Â˜ĂŠ>ĂŠĂ€iViÂ˜ĂŒĂŠw˜>˜Vˆ>Â?ĂŠ`ÂˆĂƒVÂ?ÂœĂƒĂ•Ă€i]ĂŠ- ĂŠ said it had put aside $700 million as a “best estimateâ€? of what it may have to pay U.S. regulators. The Justice Department, OCC, Treasury and others are investigating.

WHAT DOES HSBC SAY? The bank has apologized and promised reforms are already under way. It made similar claims back in 2003, when it was cited for similar violations.

Well, we know who’s not been hurt: Mexican drug cartels, Saudi Arabian banks and

THE LONDON WHALE’S BIG LOSSES THE BANK

WHO’S INVESTIGATING?

JPMorgan Chase.

This spring, JPMorgan Chase reported staggering losses from a risky derivatives trade run by the bank’s London ofďŹ ce. Since then the estimated losses have almost tripled to $5.8 billion.

ĂŒĂŠÂ?i>ĂƒĂŒĂŠÂŁÂŁĂŠĂƒĂŒ>ĂŒi]ĂŠvi`iĂ€>Â?ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ Ă€ÂˆĂŒÂˆĂƒÂ…ĂŠ>}i˜VˆiĂƒĂŠ are investigating the losses as of August. In June, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the CFTC told Congress they are looking into how JPMorgan disclosed risks to shareholders and regulators. The OCC, the Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation each said that they were examining JPMorgan’s risk management oversight.

WHO’S TAKEN A FALL?

WHY DOES IT MATTER?

Bruno Iksil, aka the “London Whale,� who was the trader in charge of the blown-up trade, left the bank in July. Ina Drew, who was in charge of the bank’s investment unit, resigned in May and in July agreed to return two years of pay to the bank.

JPMorgan has lobbied heavily against regulations that could put a damper on risky trades like this one. For example, the Volcker Rule is meant to ban proprietary trading— when a bank trades for proďŹ t, using its own, rather than customers’ funds. The rule hasn’t yet been fully implemented. The head of the OCC said in June that the agency hasn’t determined whether the rule would have covered JPMorgan’s trade.

THE DETAILS

WHAT’S JPMORGAN CHASE SAY? CEO Jamie Dimon has apologized for inadequate risk management and for initially dismissing reports of losses as “a tempest in a teapot,� but maintained that it was shareholder money lost—not customers’ or taxpayers’. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | 15

STEERING MINORITIES INTO SUBPRIME LOANS THE BANK

THE SETTLEMENT

Wells Fargo.

f£ÇxĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ?Â?ˆœ˜\ĂŠfÂŁĂ“xĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ?Â?ÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂœÂˆÂ?Â?ĂŠ}ÂœĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠÂ…>À“i`ĂŠ borrowers and $50 million will go to help with down payments in areas of the country hit hard in the crisis and where the Justice Department found widespread evidence of discrimination.

THE DETAILS "Â˜ĂŠĂ•Â?ÞÊ£Ó]ĂŠ7iÂ?Â?ĂƒĂŠ>Ă€}ÂœĂŠĂƒiĂŒĂŒÂ?i`ĂŠĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ Justice Department over claims that the bank ĂƒĂŒiiĂ€i`ĂŠvĂ€ÂˆV>˜‡“iĂ€ÂˆV>Â˜ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂˆĂƒÂŤ>˜ˆVĂŠVĂ•Ăƒtomers into high-interest subprime loans and charged them more than it did white borrowers with similar qualiďŹ cations. The Justice department described a pattern of systemic discrimination between 2004 and 2009.

DID WELLS FARGO ADMIT WRONGDOING? Nope. The bank still denies the DOJ’s claims, saying it settled to avoid a long legal battle.

WHO’S BEEN HURT ,ÂœĂ•}Â…Â?ÞÊÎ{]äääÊLÂ?>VÂŽĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂˆĂƒÂŤ>˜ˆVĂŠLÂœĂ€Ă€ÂœĂœers in 36 states.

MISLEADING CUSTOMERS ON CREDIT CARD SERVICES THE BANK

THE SETTLEMENT

Capital One.

fĂ“ÂŁĂ¤ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ?Â?ˆœ˜\ĂŠfÂŁxĂ¤ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ?Â?ÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂœÂˆÂ?Â?ĂŠLiĂŠĂ€iĂŒĂ•Ă€Â˜i`ĂŠ to harmed customers for a payment of about $70 each.

THE DETAILS "Â˜ĂŠĂ•Â?ÞÊ£n]ĂŠ >ÂŤÂˆĂŒ>Â?ĂŠ"˜iĂŠĂƒiĂŒĂŒÂ?i`ĂŠĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the OCC for pressuring customers to buy unnecessary and costly account features and misleading them about beneďŹ ts, requirements and eligibility.

WHO’S BEEN HURT?

DID THE BANK ADMIT WRONGDOING? Kinda, sorta. In a statement, the bank blamed third-party vendors for the swindling, but apologized and said it was accountable for its contractors’ actions.

The settlement estimates some 2 million Capital One credit card holders were affected.

16 | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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WRONGFUL FORECLOSURE ON MEMBERS OF THE MILITARY THE BANK Capital One.

THE DETAILS On July 26, Capital One settled with the Justice Department over allegations that it violated the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, which gives active-duty military a temporary break from some debts and puts a cap on interest rates they can be charged. Capital One violated those provisions, resulting in wrongful foreclosures and overcharges.

WHO’S BEEN HURT Roughly 4,000 members of the military LiĂŒĂœiiÂ˜ĂŠĂ•Â˜iÊÓä��¤xĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ ÂœĂ›i“LiÀÊÓ䣣°

WHAT’S CAPITAL ONE SAY? Capital One says it cooperated with the Justice Department’s investigation and has already taken some extra steps to offer bonus beneďŹ ts to the military.

KEY READ Similar violations may be ying under the radar. A Government Accountability OfďŹ ce report released in July faulted regulators for not watching banks more closely. The report found that the government reviewed less than half of U.S. banks for compliance and relied on banks to identify which loans actually involved members of the military.

THE SETTLEMENT fÂŁĂ“ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ?Â?ˆœ˜]ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠLiĂŠÂŤ>ˆ`ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠÂ…>À“i`ĂŠĂƒiĂ€Ă›ÂˆVimembers.

DOING BUSINESS WITH IRAN THE BANKS Standard Chartered and ING Bank.

THE DETAILS In June, ING Bank settled with the Treasury for violating sanctions against Cuba, Iran and other countries. In more than 20,000 ĂŒĂ€>Â˜Ăƒ>VĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂƒpĂŒÂœĂŒ>Â?ˆ˜}ĂŠfÂŁÂ°ĂˆĂŠLˆÂ?Â?ˆœ˜p ĂŠĂ€imoved or disguised references to embargoed countries in order to skirt sanctions. In what seems to be a much larger-scale case, New York ďŹ led an order Aug. 6, alleging that Standard Chartered had also outed Treasury sanctions by allowing as much as $250 billion worth of transactions from Iranian clients to pass through its New York ofďŹ ce and like ING, taking deliberate steps to obscure the country of origin. Most of the action happened in “U-Turn transactions,â€? which involved Iran and passed through the United States but started and ended in nonU.S. banks. They were legal until 2008. New York alleges the bank didn’t keep accurate records and sought to mislead regulators about even legal trades.

SETTLEMENTS fĂˆÂŁÂ™ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ?Â?ÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠvĂ€ÂœÂ“ĂŠ ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠĂ•ĂƒĂŒÂˆViĂŠ Department and the Manhattan district attorney (who were investigating alongside the Treasury). $340 million from Standard Charted to New York, in a settlement announced Aug. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

ÂŁ{°Ê-ĂŒ>˜`>Ă€`ĂŠ Â…>Ă€ĂŒiĂ€i`ĂŠĂœÂˆÂ?Â?ĂŠÂŽiiÂŤĂŠÂˆĂŒĂƒĂŠÂ?ˆViÂ˜ĂƒiĂŠ to operate in New York, which the state’s ďŹ nancial regulator had threatened to revoke.

WHAT DOES STANDARD CHARTERED SAY? When New York ďŹ rst ďŹ led its order, the bank Ă€iĂƒÂŤÂœÂ˜`i`ĂŠĂŒÂ…>ĂŒĂŠÂœÂ˜Â?ÞÊfÂŁ{ĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ?Â?ÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂœvĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠfĂ“xäÊ billion in transactions actually violated sanctions. Standard Chartered’s announcement on the settlement last week doesn’t mention that ďŹ gure (the bank did not respond to requests for comment). The precise wording of the settlement is still being worked out, but New York says that Standard Chartered agreed that the “conduct at issueâ€? involved $250 billion. (The New York Times explained the gray area behind the huge disparity in these numbers.)

MORE TO COME? Standard Chartered could still see ďŹ nes from other regulators, though the Treasury, Federal Reserve and Justice Department were reportedly surprised by New York’s order, as they hadn’t yet determined the scope of wrongdoing. Standard Chartered had previously disclosed that it was cooperating with inquiries from those and other agencies But it’s not the only bank in hot water. ,i“i“LiÀÊ- Â˝ĂƒĂŠÂ“ÂœÂ˜iއÂ?>Ă•Â˜`iĂ€ÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠÂ?>ÂŤĂƒiĂƒÂśĂŠ The Senate’s report also alleged a pattern of evading sanctions, and the bank says it is still under investigation by the Treasury.

9:30AM - 1:30PM

8th Street from Bannock to Main Street & on the Grove Plaza Chef Abbigail Carlson - Cooking with fresh, seasonal produce from the Market - Saturdays Q 10am to Noon

This Week at the Market -

Bar-B-Q Fixins! Beef • Pork • Lamb • Chicken • Fresh Roasted Peppers Local Corn • Gourmet Melons

* Fresh locally grown produce, herbs, & owers * Idaho Specialty Foods & Wines * Great Selection of Local Artwork

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | 17

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

It’s wagons, ho at Wagon Days in Sun Valley.

What’s filled with hot air and hovering over all of us? No, not a politician, it’s the Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic.

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY AUG. 29-SEPT. 2 spokes

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY AUG. 29-SEPT. 2

WAGON DAYS

up & away SPIRIT OF BOISE BALLOON CLASSIC For five days every year, hot air balloon pilots assemble in Ann Morrison park for a group launch. This year’s Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic will have nearly 15 balloons in the sky on the first day, Wednesday, Aug. 29, lifting off just after 7 a.m. by the direction of Boise Mayor Dave Bieter. Launches will occur daily at about the same hour throughout the festival. Hot air balloon enthusiasts have made colorful orbs above the Boise skyline a staple each year since 1991, when Scott Spencer and Steve Schmader produced the first event for the Boise River Festival. Wednesday, Aug. 29, through Sunday, Sept. 2, balloons will be launched en masse to commemorate the third decade of the Spirit of Boise Balloon Classic, now celebrating nearly 5,000 balloon flights. Hot air balloon pilots are somewhat subject to the whims of Mother Nature, and this mode of transportation affords little ability to steer. Once airborne, the wind’s movement through the valley shapes the route balloons take. Balloons float along the wind as it moves over the terrain below. In the right weather, though, pilots can pull off tricky maneuvers like the “splash and dash,” in which the basket briefly kisses the waters of the Boise river. This year’s festivities include live music, balloon inflation demonstrations and a POW/MIA tribute. Even the “Happiest Balloon on Earth” from Disneyland will make a debut. Pilots will participate in navigational tasks the morning of Saturday, Sept. 1, and even those who struggle to find their inner early bird can enjoy some ballooning fun at the Nite Glow celebration that evening, when grounded balloons will light up like giant lanterns, surrounded by food vendors and live music before the final launch, aka the “last dance,” takes place Sunday, Sept. 2. 7 a.m. daily; Nite Glow, Saturday, Sept. 1, 6-9 p.m.; FREE. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Blvd., spiritofboise.com.

WEDNESDAYFRIDAY AUG. 29-31 books

BRONCO WELCOME AT BOISE STATE The pencils have been purchased, books bought and notebooks nabbed. And while a communal sigh can nearly be heard from the hoards of students wrapping up their summers of fun and heading back to college, or-

18 | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | BOISEweekly

ganizers at Boise State are ensuring that back-to-school isn’t such a bummer. Ambitious types who chose to forgo a couple extra days of summer by enrolling in a Monday class were met by free short stacks and ice cream on the first day of classes on Aug. 27. But those who tried to

Labor Day honors the contributions of workers, and what better way to celebrate than to remember the laborious efforts of workers in centuries past? Ketchum and Sun Valley will showcase the hard work of those in the mining industry with its annual Wagon Days event, which kicks off Wednesday, Aug. 29. The annual festival has taken place in the mountain towns for more than 50 years, and it gets its name from the historic Lewis ore wagons, which quietly reside in the Ore Wagon Museum until they are brought to life as part of the Big Hitch Parade, the centerpiece of Wagon Days and one of the largest nonmotorized parades in the Northwest. This year’s events include a look at the mining and moving of ore in the Wood River Valley with historian Ivan Swaner on Wednesday, Aug. 29, performances by the Blackjack Ketchum Shoot-Out Gang in front of Ketchum’s historic Casino Club, a children’s carnival at Giacobbi Square and pancake breakfasts. The coveted annual Silver Car Auction will feature all kinds of luxurious vintage rides up for grabs at Sun Valley Resort. The EhCapa Bareback Riders will demonstrate the saddle- and bridle-less horse-riding techniques of Native Americans and antique shows will fill the streets of nearby Hailey throughout the weekend. The Big Hitch Parade on Saturday, Sept. 1, will feature the six gigantic ore wagons pulled by a 20-mule jerkline, accompanied by more than 100 buggies, carriages, carts, coaches and wagons that will transport throngs of visitors back to the days when Ketchum was more about mining than skiing and eating. The parade will be followed by live music throughout the town. Various other events wrap up Wagon Days Sunday, Sept. 2, and attendees migrate to Bellevue for more Labor Day Weekend fun Monday, Sept. 3. Various times. Ketchum and Sun Valley, wagondays.org.

hold out a little bit longer before hitting the books can still partake in free activities around campus through Friday, Aug. 31. Wednesday, Aug. 29, students making a crosscampus trek can stop on the Quad and relive their days on the playground with Quad Recess from 11 a.m.2 p.m. Partake in classic grade-school games while noshing on food and taking a breather. Then, from 4-6 p.m., parents, veterans and returning

students are invited to connect with other nontraditional scholars and enjoy free snacks, bowling, billiards and the like during Family Game Night in the Student Union Games Center. Those looking to test their athleticism can head to Bronco Stadium from 6-7:30 p.m. and learn about the Boise State varsity teams (not just the famed football players). Compete against student-athletes in challenges and complete a Bronco Nation passport to possibly

net a prize and pick up some sporting schedules. Thursday, Aug. 30, events include a lunchtime concert from Illumneye, The Mighty Deltaone and Exit Prose on the Student Union patio, and then move from free music to free harnesses with Trya-Climb at the Recreation Center, where novices and those with rock-scaling experience can enjoy gear rentals on the house and scale the wall in the climbing gym. The SUB will be filled with informative fun Friday, Aug. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

DK M PHOTOGR APHY

FIND JEN GR AB LE

BODY SUGARING Veggies—the kind of things we like to see preserved in jars.

FRIDAY-MONDAY AUG. 31-SEPT. 3 foodie fun COOKING AND FOOD PRESERVATION CLASSES As summer mornings and nights get cooler and the air starts to become more brisk, barbecues succumb to cooking done indoors and the fruits (and vegetables) of spring and summer gardening labors are harvested, sauteed, baked and boil. Luckily for food lovers, there are a number of places around the Treasure Valley that teach ways to get the most out of your time spent in the kitchen. North End culinary hub Fuel for the Soul will present its final August cooking class Friday, Aug. 31. The intimate classes are typically capped at about eight participants, ensuring individualized attention. The menu will feature “a Mediterranean spin on Italian cuisine” and include four courses with savory morsels like chicken marinated in yogurt with rosemary and garlic, and a seasonal fruit salad with sabayon sauce. Those who can’t make that class will have another opportunity Monday, Sept. 3, with an Italian feast in celebration of Labor Day. The menu for that class will feature four courses, including lemon curd tartlets and panzanella. Classes are held from 6-8:30 p.m., cost $50 per person and are designed for adults. Visit fuelforthesoulboise.com for more info or call 208-3427118 to register. More culinary happenings will take place at the Nampa Recreation Center Saturday, Sept. 1, where Ariel Agenbroad, University of Idaho extension educator, will teach a class on how to enjoy homegrown produce out of season, instead of having to give mass amounts of garden goodies to your co-workers when the weather changes. The class will take place from 9-11 a.m. and feature drying, freezing, storage and water-bath canning techniques, and will go over equipment and recipes. Experienced and beginner preservers of all ages may attend, although the class may be a bit too much for those younger than 12. Participants will receive the U of I’s booklets on freezing, pickling and making salsa. The class costs $15-$17 and is capped at 20 participants. Pre-registration is required, either online at nampaparksandrecreation.org or by calling 208-468-5858.

31, with the Volunteer Expo featuring more than 40 local charity and nonprofit agencies in the Jordan Ballroom from 10 a.m.-2 p.m., and refreshments and entertainment filling the SUB patio from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. as part

S U B M I T

of the Diversity Day Defined celebration. The first-floor dining room of the building will come alive at 6 p.m. with those decked out in blue-andorange attire when the Boise State Broncos kick off the

Backstage comes center stage at Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s Noises Off.

FRIDAY-WEDNESDAY AUG. 31- SEPT. 5 theater NOISES OFF It’s human nature to take a bit of voyeuristic pleasure when watching the exploits of others completely fall apart in a mad flurry of chaotic triumph and tragedy—hence the continued success of reality television. Now imagine if that catastrophe is being acted out on stage by actors in over their heads, saddled with a flop of a play and stuck in a production where just about anything that can go wrong does. The result is the so-bad-it’s-good comedy classic Noises Off—Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s closing production of the season, which opens with a preview night Friday, Aug. 31, and opening night Saturday, Sept. 1. The production is a play-within-a-play, in which actors play actors and stage crew who are stuck in one of the most woebegone plays ever—the fictional and aptly titled Nothing On. It doesn’t help that the cast members (the fictional ones in the fictional play—confused yet?) come with their own colorful, questionable and altogether unimpressive resumes. The result is a tribute to comedic timing and allaround silliness. The cast (the ISF one) includes some familiar faces, including Lynn Allison, Richard Klautsch and Stitch Marker alongside some new additions to the ISF stage. As with all ISF September productions, Noises Off will be the only offering through the end of the season Saturday, Sept. 29, and there will be no Green Show prior to performances. Friday, Aug. 31-Saturday, Sept. 1, and Tuesday, Sept. 4-Wednesday, Sept. 5, 7:30 p.m. Family night Sunday, Sept. 2, 7 p.m. $12-$40, Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

season in East Lansing, Mich., against the Michigan State Spartans. Attendees can watch the game on the big screen and enjoy free pizza and drinks at half-time before sauntering over to the Games

Hair removal tends to result in toilet paper used to cauterize cuts or 40-Year-Old Virgin moments of calling out in pain. This leaves us with two options: embrace the pain or go against the societal grain, growing body hair freely. THE WICKED HAIR Luckily, there’s a sweeter 102 S. 17th St. mode of hair removal—literally. Ste. 301 Body sugaring, which is exactly 208-344-0823 thewickedhair.com what it sounds like, uses sugar to remove unwanted hair. On a recent trip to the Wicked Hair in Boise’s Linen District, Sofie McConnaughay mulled a sugar-water-lemon paste—which she said has been referred to as Flubber—around in a gloved hand. She said the sugars aren’t the normal baking variety, although the substance is edible. After daubing on an organic, additive-free cleanser and powder, the caramel-like concoction is placed on the skin. It’s only slightly warm and pulls up follicles down to their bulbous roots, along with dead skin. The result is smooth and hairless surface area, sans razor-burn or the grip-thechair-and-wait-for-it waxing experience. Services come with a care kit for new clients, along with more info about hair growth and removal than you could ever hope to find out on your own. Treatments cost between $3$125, depending on the area being de-haired. The only hard part about body sugaring? Trying to get Def Leppard’s iconic phrase, “pour some sugar on me,” out of your head. —Sheree Whiteley

Center, where the first 50 students will bowl for free and enjoy giveaways. Various times, FREE. Boise State, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-4636, boisestate.edu.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | 19

8 DAYS OUT WEEK IN REVIEW TAR A M OR GAN

WEDNESDAY AUG. 29 Festivals & Events 2012 SPIRIT OF BOISE BALLOON CLASSIC— Watch the skies of Boise fill with hot air balloons during this annual event. Balloons launch from Ann Morrison Park. See Picks, Page 18. 7 a.m. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard, Boise. SPLASH BASH—Weekly pool party, featuring a poolside bar, special appetizers and live music by Reilly Coyote. All ages welcome. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com.

ZZ Top fans rock their best beards and cheap sunglasses.

On Stage LEVI MIDDLEBROOKS: BACK 2 BOYZEE—Alley Repertory Theater presents this play about a former boy band member’s comeback concert gone wrong. Tickets are available at alleyrep. org. Visual Arts Collective is a 21-and-older facility. 8 p.m. $10, $7 students/military. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Odds & Ends FAMILY GAME NIGHT—Parents, veterans and returning students are invited to a student family game night. Connect with other nontraditional students, learn about available campus resources and ways to be involved on campus. Bring your family and enjoy free snacks, bowling, pool and other kid-friendly activities in the games center. See Picks, Page 19. 4-6 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, sub. boisestate.edu.

THURSDAY AUG. 30 Festivals & Events 2012 SPIRIT OF BOISE BALLOON CLASSIC— See Wednesday. 7 a.m. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard, Boise. 2012 WESTERN ENERGY POLICY RESEARCH CONFERENCE—This conference is for anyone interested in hearing about the latest energy policy research. Nobel Prize-winning scientist Daniel M. Kammen will be the keynote speaker at the conference luncheon. Registration includes conference materials, the conference luncheon and admission into the welcome reception at the Sports Zone. Kammen will also lead an informal discussion at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 29, in the Simplot Ballroom of the Boise State Student Union Building. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $75. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-333-8000.

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CLASSIC FEVER From classic rock to classic movies to classical music from classic movies, Boiseans took an end-of-summer dip in Lake Nostalgia last week. Sharp-dressed Texas trio ZZ Top kicked things off in sleazy style Aug. 21 at Eagle River Pavilion. Famous for songs about leggy ladies and hazy ’80s music videos with big-haired bombshells in cherry-red hotrods, ZZ Top played hits like “Gimme All Your Lovin’” and “Sharp Dressed Man” for a mixed crowd of families and grizzled, bearded dudes. For a photo slideshow of all the awesome facial hair that fans were sporting in honor of the famously bearded band, visit boiseweekly.com. And speaking of classic rockers, Joe Walsh of the Eagles christened the new Revolution Concert House and Event Center with a performance Aug. 22. According to Boise Weekly’s Andrew Crisp, though the 2,200-capacity space featured an array of red sconces and guitars adorning the walls, it largely retained a department store feel. “For all of Revolution Concert House’s well-executed attempts to class up the space, the adjacent environment lacks downtown Boise’s other city amenities,” wrote Crisp. “Near only fast-food vendors, a crumbling Stinker Station and Chinden Boulevard, the Revolution may prove a tough sell for walk-ups and last-minute concert-goers.” Down the street in Garden City, BW’s Josh Gross stopped by Alley Rep’s new play, Levi Middlebrooks: Back 2 Boyzee, which opened Aug. 22 at Visual Arts Collective. “The show chronicles the comeback of Levi Middlebrooks ... member of fictional boy band Kinect4, who after a breakdown is attempting to make it in the world of Christian rock. But there are two big problems: The first is that people only want to hear ‘the hits,’ not the new stuff. And second, Middlebrooks wasn’t exactly the talent of the group,” Gross said. The play is Middlebrooks’ entire comeback concert, with the plot conveyed through original songs and between-song banter. Gross called it “deeply uncomfortable to watch—in the best possible way.” The play continues through Saturday, Sept. 1. Moving from boy bands to dinosaurs, Red Room hosted a screening of the classic ’90s film Jurassic Park Aug. 24, with live performances by bands Memphibians, Andrew Felts and Cerberus Rex. Though there were a handful of costumed patrons, Crisp said that the crowd failed to materialize. And speaking of classic movies, the second installment of Boise Philharmonic’s Picnic at the Pops series featured music of witchcraft and wizardry from Harry Potter, like John Williams’ “Hedwig’s Theme.” “Younger audience members sat in rapture as Franz conducted six songs from the Harry Potter movies,” wrote Crisp. “Just before launching into ‘Nimbus 2000,’ Franz pulled out a special contribution to the evening—a large push broom. ‘This is a Nimbus 200,’ he said, holding up the broom.” —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT BLOCK PARTY AT ROOSEVELT MARKET—The night will be filled with food, dancing and fun. Meet Rep. Cherie Buckner-Webb, a Democratic candidate for Idaho Senate, talk about the issues facing District 19 and get to know your neighbors. 6-9 p.m. Roosevelt Market, 311 N. Elm Ave., Boise, 208-384-9780, rooseveltmarket.com.

JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT— Starlight Mountain Theatre presents its rendition of this classic tale. Dinners is available Thursdays-Saturdays for $14 per person. 8 p.m. $10-$18. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

DISCOVERY CENTER ADULT NIGHT: DIY—Do you enjoy making things? Then check out this evening of food, beer, wine and plenty of interactive do-it-yourself demonstrations, including glass blowing, pottery throwing and jewelry making. Also enjoy more than 180 hands-on exhibits without having to share with the kids. 6-10 p.m. $8-$10. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, scidaho.org.

LEVI MIDDLEBROOKS: BACK 2 BOYZEE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10, $7 students/military. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, visualartscollective.com.

On Stage THE 39 STEPS—A fast-paced whodunit for anyone who loves the magic of theater. 7:30 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208342-2000, stagecoachtheatre. com. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: HOWARD G.—Catch the comedic stylings of this funny man, followed by a dueling piano show and DJ Mighty Delta One. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

LIQUID LAUGHS: RECYCLED MINDS—This show features the improv comedy troupe. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs. com, by calling 208-941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. Buy one ticket, get one free. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Auditions

Concerts STUDENT UNION PERFORMANCE SERIES LUNCHTIME CONCERT—Enjoy a live show by local and regional bands and get immersed in the Boise music scene. Learn more at finearts. boisestate.edu. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, sub. boisestate.edu.

Food & Drink BREWER’S NIGHT—Enjoy cheese varieties paired with beers from Stone Brewing Co., including the 16th anniversary ale and smoked porter with chipotle. 6 p.m. Front Door Northwest Pizza and Tap House, 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208287-9201, thefrontdoorboise. com.

Art

HOMEGROWN THEATER AUDITIONS—Auditions for HomeGrown Theater’s entire season, including A Horrific Puppet Affair by local writers, Holy Musical, B@tman and other shows. Bring a headshot, resume and a one-minute monologue. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Opera Idaho, 513 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3453531, operaidaho.org.

HARD CHEESE CLOSING RECEPTION—Wrap party for an exhibition about the skateboard/graffiti art world. Light refreshments will be provided in the Student Union Building Fine Arts Gallery. Show closes Monday, Sept. 3. 4:30-6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, sub. boisestate.edu.

Odds & Ends THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

LADIES’ LOUNGE—Swig back some cocktails with the ladies of Boise Weekly and enjoy prize giveaways, drink specials and ohso-much more. Visit BW’s promo page to get the 4-1-1. 5 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3315666, willibs.com.

FRIDAY AUG. 31 Festivals & Events 2012 SPIRIT OF BOISE BALLOON CLASSIC— See Wednesday. 7 a.m. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard, Boise. 2012 WESTERN ENERGY POLICY RESEARCH CONFERENCE—See Thursday. 9 a.m.5:30 p.m. $75. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-333-8000.

| EASY |

MEDIUM | HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

DIVERSITY DAY DEFINED—Celebrate the voice Boise State Students have in defining diversity on campus. Refreshments and live entertainment hosted by Student Diversity and Inclusion, Disability Resource Center, International Student Services, Multicultural Student Services and the Women’s Center, including the LGBTQIA Lounge. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, sub. boisestate.edu.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | 21

8 DAYS OUT WAGON DAYS—Celebrate the mining days of the Ketchum/Sun Valley area with this annual festival. See Picks, Page 18. Ketchum/Sun Valley, wagondays. org.

On Stage THE 39 STEPS—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: HOWARD G.—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LEVI MIDDLEBROOKS: BACK 2 BOYZEE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10, $7 students/military. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, visualartscollective.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: RECYCLED MINDS—See Thursday. Buy one ticket, get one free for the late show. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS— This pop musical has a cult following and is more funny and campy than scary. 7:30 p.m. $17 adv., $20 door. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. NOISES OFF—Laughter abounds with Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s production of Michael Frayn’s farce about a company putting on a play that goes horribly—and hilariously—wrong. See Picks, Page 19. 7:30 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. WESTERN ACTION ADVENTURE SHOW AND DINNER—Enjoy an original, Western farce by Bob LaVelle. The night begins with a covered-wagon ride. Enjoy a full barbecue buffet dinner with reserved dinner-and-show seating, or tickets can be purchased for the show only. Call the office at 208-887-7880 for more information and reservations. 6 p.m. $15-$45. Coolwater Creek Event Center, 7355 S. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-887-7880, coolwatercreekevents.com.

FOOD TRUCK FRIDAY— Enjoy lunch from the St. Lawrence Gridiron food truck and chow down at a table near Boise Weekly’s headquarters. Visit boiseweekly.com’s promo page for a chance to win a free lunch. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com.

WAGON DAYS—See Friday. Ketchum/Sun Valley, wagondays.org.

On Stage THE 39 STEPS—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Odds & Ends

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: HOWARD G.—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

FOOTBALL AFTERPARTY—The first 50 students with ID bowl for free. Don’t forget to wear blue and orange. Free giveaways. Held in the Student Union Building Games Center. See Picks, Page 19. 9:30-11 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, sub.boisestate.edu.

JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com. LEVI MIDDLEBROOKS: BACK 2 BOYZEE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10, $7 students/military. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, visualartscollective.com.

GAME DAY AT THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING—Grab your Bronco gear and head to the first-floor dining room in the Student Union Building to watch the Boise State Broncos take on the Michigan State Spartans on the big screen. Enjoy free pizza and drinks during half-time and giveaways. See Picks, Page 19. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, sub. boisestate.edu.

LIQUID LAUGHS: RECYCLED MINDS—See Thursday. Buy one ticket, get one free for the late show. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS— See Friday. 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. $17 adv., $20 door. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

SATURDAY SEPT. 1

Auditions HOMEGROWN THEATER AUDITIONS—See Thursday. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Opera Idaho, 513 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3453531, operaidaho.org.

Festivals & Events 2012 SPIRIT OF BOISE BALLOON CLASSIC— See Wednesday. 7 a.m. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard, Boise.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Auditions HOMEGROWN THEATER AUDITIONS—See Thursday. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Opera Idaho, 513 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3453531, operaidaho.org.

Food & Drink ADULT COOKING CLASS—Learn to craft tasty confections with the theme A Mediterranean Spin on Italian Cuisine. Classes are capped at approximately eight students. Reservations may be made by phone. See Picks, Page 19. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Fuel for the Soul, 1941 N. 18th St., Boise, 208-342-7118, fuelforthesoulboise.com. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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8 DAYS OUT Workshops & Classes PRESERVING THE HARVEST—Enjoy your garden’s bounty year-round through storage, drying, freezing and water-bath canning. Taught by UI Extension educator Ariel Agenbroad. See Picks, Page 19. 9-11 a.m. $15-$17. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Sports & Fitness SPUDTOWN KNOCKDOWN—Watch the Treasure Valley Rollergirls take on opponents in this two-day, double-elimination tournament. Visit treasurevalleyrollergirls.net for more info. Last bouts begin at 7 p.m. 9 a.m. $20 weekend pass; $15 Sunday, Sept. 2; $10 Saturday, Sept. 1. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com/home. aspx.

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 5 On Stage NOISES OFF—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Food & Drink

Kids & Teens

LADIES NIGHT OUT: 50 SHADES OF CABERNET— Enjoy wine tasting, a book swap. 6-10 p.m. $5. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208-286-7960, helinamaries.com.

HOW THINGS WORK—Children ages 6-12 can explore the science of how everyday things work. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-2976700, adalib.org.

Workshops & Classes BEGINNING BRIDGE CLASS—This class will consist of 30 minutes of instruction followed by an hour of supervised play. 10-11: 30 a.m. $10. Karcher Estates, 1127 Caldwell Blvd., Nampa, 208-9363542, karcherestates.com.

SUNDAY SEPT. 2 Festivals & Events 2012 SPIRIT OF BOISE BALLOON CLASSIC—See Wednesday. 7 a.m. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard., Boise. WAGON DAYS—See Friday. Ketchum/Sun Valley, wagondays.org.

On Stage THE 39 STEPS—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: RECYCLED MINDS—See Thursday. Buy one ticket, get one free. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com. NOISES OFF—See Friday. 7 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Sports & Fitness SPUDTOWN KNOCKDOWN—See Saturday. 9 a.m. $20 weekend pass; $15 Sunday, Sept. 2; $10 Saturday, Sept. 1. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-3318497, centurylinkarenaboise.com/home.aspx.

MONDAY SEPT. 3 Food & Drink ADULT COOKING CLASS—Learn to craft food with the theme An Italian Salute to Labor Day. Classes are capped at approximately eight students. Reservations may be made by phone. See Picks, Page 19. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Fuel for the Soul, 1941 N. 18th St., Boise, 208-342-7118, fuelforthesoulboise.com.

TUESDAY SEPT. 4 On Stage NOISES OFF—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | 23

NEWS/NOISE ER IC A S PAR LIN DRYDEN/ B ANDWAGON PHOTOGR APHY

NOISE

WHYSE GUYS Indie rock/rap troupe WHY? returns to Boise ANDREW CRISP Hillfolk Noir brings its throwback sounds to Boise Contemporary Theater.

BLAME CANADA Once upon a time, there was the unholy Canadian union of punky pop star Avril Lavigne and Der yck Whibley, the singer for Sum 41—Canada’s answer to Blink 182. But he was a skater boi and she said, “see you later, boi.” Instead, she got herself a gen-u-ine superstah busy slamming on his guitar in the form of ... wait for it, wait for it … Chad Kroeger of Nickelback. And you thought Miley Cyrus—progeny of Billy Ray—was bad. Just you wait until these two star t squeezing out the Vanilla Goth Family Band. There’s only one problem, what do we call this doom unit? Avhad? Lavoeger? Chavril? Krovigne? Ugh. Why’d she have to go and make things so complicated? In news of better Canadian lady vocalists with better taste in man-chicken, Alanis Morissette—previously attached to actor Ryan Reynolds (yowza) and now married to rapper Mario “MC Souleye” Treadway (double yowza)—is going to per form in Boise Monday, Oct. 8. Tickets for that show are now on sale for $48-$100. Also just announced is Boise Contemporary Theater’s 2012-2013 music series. The series will feature Boise’s own Hillfolk Noir Saturday, Sept. 15, Nashville songwriter Mindy Smith Friday, Sept. 28, and queen of the minor keys, Eilen Jewell, Saturday, May 4, 2013. Tickets for the series are available now and only $60, so as Hillkfolk Noir sings, “you better run, run, run, fast as you can,” to the box office to get you some of them tickets. And finally, at long, long last, Boise band The Well-Suited will be dropping its debut EP, The Story of James Douglas, with a three-day stint of shows Thursday, Sept. 6-Saturday, Sept. 8. The EP is a concept piece/rock opera exploring the title character’s love-loss in the midst of a robotic apocalypse. A press release from the band described it as “a tribute to optimism.” Thursday, Sept. 6, The Well-Suited will per form an in-store at The Record Exchange at 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, it will per form at Tom Grainey’s with Sun Blood Stories, and Saturday, Sept. 8, the whole shebang will head out to Nampa to play at Flying M Coffeegarage at 8 p.m. —Josh Gross

Jonathan “Yoni” Wolf and his brother Josiah, part of the indie rock/rap troupe WHY?, took to YouTube in September 2011 to apologize to their fans. Yoni’s right hand sat threaded with pins and wrapped in a thick cast, his face pallid. WHY? had been forced to cancel much of its North American tour because of Yoni’s injury. “We are broke now,” Josiah said. “We have no money.” “Destitute,” added Yoni. Canceling the tour was clearly a low Treefort Music Fest alum WHY? will bring its recently expanded line-up to Reef. point for the band, known somewhat ironically for songs like “These Hands,” the first track on its 2009 release Eskimo Snow, on “Rap is just a thing that you do. Yoni was really overwhelmed by everything.” which Yoni whispers: “These hands / are Slowly, Yoni began to piece together new raps, just like I play the drums. Hip-hop is a my father’s hands but smaller.” That song bigger thing,” Josiah said. material while living with his parents in shows a sliver of Yoni’s preoccupation—he With a new EP, a fresh tour and a comCincinnati. That led to the band’s Sod in the often spits references to palms, fingers and pleted LP awaiting release, the band has masturbation. The temporary loss of a hand Seed EP, released in August, and material for a new album, Mumps, etc., which comes picked up two new members, growing its presented a poetic dilemma for WHY? ranks to six. out Tuesday, Oct. 9. Josiah and Yoni grew up with a MessiLos Angeles-based singer-songwriter Josiah admitted that working closely anic rabbi for a father. Yoni got his musical Sarah Winters will join WHY? on tour to with a sibling can be difficult. start with a four-track player he found at provide piano and backing vocals. She au“In some ways, it’s easier, but in the family’s synagogue. ditioned via Skype, which Josiah admitted some ways, it’s harder, too,” he said. “They’re very proud of us,” said Josiah. was a little weird. “We’re similar and we’re so close, and “They like [the band], though it’s not what “She had learned some of our songs, so they would normally listen to. My dad loves sometimes, you’re too close to the situame and Yoni and Liz were sitting there—but tion and it can be pretty tricky. It cuts both old show tunes and standards, I would say it was still daytime in L.A., so it was bright from the ‘Classic American Songbook,’ and ways, I would say.” in her room but really dark in our room on It’s a relationship the two have he also listens to a lot of religious music. our end,” said Wolf. “She said it was kind My mom is the same way, though, she’s not worked on since the early days of WHY? of creepy.” Josiah joined his brother, fellow band as much of a music fan.” The other addition, Ben Sloan, was one member Doug McDiarmid, as well as The band’s frank lyrics often mean part of experimental indie pop troupe No divulging a lot to their more traditional par- former member Matt Meldon in 2005 for Elephant Eyelash, which was a far cry from No Knots. Sloan will share percussion duents. On songs like “Crushed Bones” from ties with Josiah. Yoni’s experimental 2004 album, Oaklan2005’s Elephant Eyelash, Yoni raps: “I’d “Everyone has changed their parts, evdazulasylum. sell my shingles for a thimble dip of snow erybody has moved,” he said. “Probably me When Meldon retreated to a remote / Back then I’da sold my single for a finger the most because there are two drummers. island in Washington to live with his tip of blow.” Last time, I played a lot of bass; this time, girlfriend after the album was released, the “I think they worry about Yoni someI only play bass on two songs and mostly band became a three-piece, with McDiartimes because of some of his lyrics, but play the drums.” mid and the brothers Wolf crafting their those were his struggles of the life he’s Josiah said he and Sloan will share a biggest hit, 2008’s Alopecia. For that had,” Josiah said. “I have those troubles. I vibraphone and marimba on occasion. But record, the band enlisted the help of a long don’t talk to my parents about those kinds squeezing six people on stage might be diflist of collaborators, of things. Yoni is very including Liz Hodson, ficult. open about that stuff. “It’s going to be tough on smaller stages, who is now Josiah’s I think you need to be Why? with Serengeti and DJ Jel. Monday, wife and a permanent but I don’t think we’re playing anywhere honest with everyone, Sept. 3, 9 p.m., $15. too small,” he said. member of WHY? if you can, unless it’s THE REEF The band’s style has shifted notably from Over four studio hurting someone or 105 S. Sixth St. 208-287-9200 the macabre Alopecia, transitioning to a albums and collabosomething. It’s a good reefboise.com much more rhythmic sound with less elecrations with lyricists thing to let people tric guitar and more percussion. “Sod in the like Doseone, Yoni’s know you and who Seed,” the first track off the new EP, seems vocals evolved to you are.” more upbeat by comparison. quickly spit abstract imagery with dark After the accident that hurt his hand “I wouldn’t say the new record is themes. But despite comparisons, Josiah Josiah helped his brother in a months-long happy,” said Josiah. “It’s pretty dark. It’s a wouldn’t call the band hip-hop. The fourpath to writing once again. little more playful maybe with the lyrics. I some doesn’t embrace hip-hop culture. “In the beginning process, I kind of think [Yoni] is in a better place right now, Yet Yoni’s quick-tongued delivery over the helped him organize. We sat down, pulled band’s arrangements is akin to an indie rock so everything he writes at this time will be a all the lyrics out. I just gave him my opinlittle more playful.” ions and tried to help him,” Josiah said. “He take on spitting bars.

24 | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY AUG. 29 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring the Polyrhythmics with Douglas Cameron. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza BOURBON DOGS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Reef DAN COSTELLO—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

THE SHIVAS, AUG. 29, RED ROOM At some point, every guitar player swears he or she is going to start a surf band or a surf-influenced band at the bare minimum. Most never follow through but The Shivas did. The Portland, Ore., band’s set at Treefort Music Fest was a surf-ninja assault of shimmering tremolo and ragged pop riffs drowning in reverb. But the band veers away from the triedand-true, catchy instrumental riff formula of The Ventures and more toward traditional pop rock with vocals and less-static arrangements. There are clear elements of The Pixies but with a far-less-deranged vibe. Though drummer Kristin Leonard shot vocalist Jared WaitMolyneux in the face after robbing a rural convenience store in the video for the song “Gun in My Pocket,” between the band’s dreamy surf-pop soundtrack and its generally nonthreatening demeanor, it comes off as more cuddly than destructive. —Josh Gross With First Borns, Clarke and the Himselfs, and Deaf Kid. 8:30 p.m., $3. Red Room, 1519 W. Main St., redroomboise.com.

26 | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | BOISEweekly

GAYLE CHAPMAN—With Robb Howell. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar GWYNETH AND MONKO—6 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge THE HAND—With Sunblood Stories and With Child. 7 p.m. $3. Neurolux JANE’S ADDICTION—With Big Black Delta. 6:30 p.m. $40. Idaho Botanical Garden JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highland’s Hollow JOHN BERRYHILL—With Greg Martinez and Friends. 6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill JOHNNY BUTLER—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s JOSH INGYU—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La

FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

DOUGLAS CAMERON—5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

PAMELA DEMARCHE—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE—Featuring Pilot Error. 6 p.m. $10, $7 IBG members. Idaho Botanical Garden

FACTORY BEATDOWN VOL. III: CYBERTRON—Featuring Kreeper, Jaden, Stormshadow, MLay and Unikorn. 9 p.m. $8$20. Knitting Factory

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SHIVAS—With First Borns, Clarke and the Himselfs and Deaf Kid. See Listen Here, this page. 8:30 p.m. $3. Red Room STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s WHISTLE PIGS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THURSDAY AUG. 30 BEN BURDICK TRIO—7 p.m. FREE. Buster’s BROCK BARTEL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe DECEPTION PAST—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s EDMOND DANTES—7 p.m. FREE. Modern Hotel and Bar

ILLUMNEYE—With Mighty Deltaone and Exit Prose. 11 a.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building IROCK—6 p.m. FREE. Edwards 22 ROBERT JAMES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid SALLY TIBBS—With Kevin Kirk. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar SUN VALLEY CENTER FOR THE ARTS SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: BONNIE RAITT—With Mavis Staples. 7 p.m. $30-95. Sun Valley Pavilion

FRIDAY AUG. 31 THE BIG WOW—10 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s BILL COFFEY—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THE COUNTRY CLUB—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE HAGUE—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s JEANNIE MARIE—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel LANE LOWERY—8 p.m. FREE. Papa Joe’s LEE PENN SKY—With the Whiskey Apostles. 8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s PUNK SHOW—Featuring Piranhas. 9 p.m. By donation. Red Room ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid

SATURDAY SEPT. 1 BLAZE AND KELLY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

DESERT NOISES—7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE BONNIE RAITT—With Mavis Staples. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $60.50. Idaho Botanical Garden DOUG BROWN—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE JOHN JONES GROUP—6:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s MUSIC FROM STANLEY—Featuring Old Death Whisper. 4 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge PAT RICE—1:30 p.m. FREE. Solid THIS ROMANTIC TRAGEDY— With Legacy, In Alcatraz 1962 and I Omega. 6 p.m. $10. Venue TERRY JONES—10:15 a.m. FREE. Berryhill VAN PAEPEGHEM QUARTET—1:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

POLYRHYTHMICS—10 p.m. $5. Reef ROBIN SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid

SUNDAY SEPT. 2

MONDAY SEPT. 3 MURDERLAND—With Love Songs From the Hated and Wilt Chamberlin’s Baby. 9 p.m. $5. Shredder PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

HANK 3—8:30 p.m. $18-$40. Knitting Factory

TRAVIS WARD—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

JOHNNY SHOES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

VELVET LOUNGE FROGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

JOHNNY OCTOBER—With Pack Fm, Percussive Tongues and Charles Ingles and the Family Matters. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

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WHY?—With Serengeti and DJ Jel. See Noise, Page 24. 9 p.m. $15. Reef

WILLOW AND THE EMBERS—7 p.m. FREE. Modern

GAYLE CHAPMAN—With Robb Howell. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar JACK GISH—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

TUESDAY SEPT. 4 ATYPICAL TUESDAYS—Featuring The Dirty Moogs, A Seasonal Disguise and Silian Rail. 8:30 p.m. $1. Red Room

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highland’s Hollow LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La MOONFACE—With Siinai and Sad Baby Wolf. 8 p.m. $7 adv. $10 door. Flying M Coffeegarage

BARBARA LAING—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

NAOMI PSALM—8 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s

JONAH SHUE AND THE COUNTRY CLUB—5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

PHALGERON—With Krystos, End of All Flesh and Villainous. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

NATHAN MOODY—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

RICO WEISMAN AND REX MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 5 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring Empty Pockets with Juke Daddys. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza

V E N U E S

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s TRAMPLED BY TURTLES— 8 p.m. $18-$25. Knitting Factory

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

MAVIS STAPLES, SEPT. 1, IBG For Chicago native Mavis Staples, singing gospel and chanting the refrains of political hymns have been inseparable. During the heat of the late 1960s, she and her family, The Staple Singers, joined close friend Martin Luther King Jr. by channeling their music into activism. During the Civil Rights movement, The Staple Singers penned popular political songs like “Long Walk to D.C.” and “When Will We Be Paid?” Later, the band covered activist songs like Stephen Stills’ “For What It’s Worth,” and Bob Dylan’s “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall.” Staples’ first solo album came as a self-titled release in 1969. With her latest album, 2010’s You Are Not Alone, the now73-year-old Staples teamed up with fellow Chicago musician Jeff Tweedy of Wilco as a producer. Staples won her first Grammy Award for that album in 2011. —Andrew Crisp With Bonnie Raitt. 5:30 p.m. doors, 7 p.m. show, $60.50. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | 27

NEWS/ARTS ARTS/CULTURE

BOISE PHIL’S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR STEPS DOWN A month before the opening of its 20122013 season, Boise Philharmonic is undergoing a leadership shake-up. On Aug. 16, Executive Director Tom Bennett resigned, citing “personal reasons.” “It’s just a resignation due to some personal issues. He had some deaths in his family and friends, in his personal life,” elaborated Jimsi Kuborn, Boise Philharmonic marketing director. Bennett took over for Tony Boatman as executive director in 2010. Past board president John Stedman will fill in as acting director while the phil wraps up its inaugural Picnic at the Pops series. “Tony Boatman, who was here for 10 seasons, will be returning as of [Tuesday], Sept. 4. and he’ll be our acting executive director through our national search time frame,” explained Kuborn. “So he’s here Sept. 4 through Jan. 31 of 2013.” Kuborn explained that the philharmonic’s executive director is instrumental in the organization’s fundraising efforts. “Our ticket sales cover 38 percent of our overhead, so we need to make sure we’re picking repertoire that either meet that or exceed that because it has to be fundraised,” said Kuborn. “Our executive director, one of his main goals also is fundraising and development, external relationship building.” In other behind-the-scenes arts org news, Opera Idaho recently brought on four new board members: Attorney Kelly Cameron, Meridian Development Corporation Urban Renewal Administrator Ashley Ford, American Civil Liberties Union of Boise Executive Director Monica Hopkins and Idaho Statesman Manager of Infrastructure/Technology Michelle Jensen. And in opening news, on Friday, Aug. 31, from 7 to 10 p.m., the Gallery at the Linen Building will host an opening reception for Matt Bodett’s oneoneoneoneone. Unlike Bodett’s previous solo show at the Linen Building, 2010’s To Be Lost If It Must Be So!, which featured large-scale paintings, this exhibition is comprised of more than 100 small works mounted on wood. According to his artist’s statement, “oneoneoneoneone is an exploration of shared experiences. The artwork in this group explores love, death, war, home and communication by using found materials and poems.” The exhibit will remain up through mid-October. —Tara Morgan

M AC Y S NELS ON

There are 11,111 reasons you should check out Matt Bodett’s new exhibit.

NIGHT AT THE BOOZEUM Adult nights take off JOSH GROSS The Old Idaho Penitentiary is the rare tourist attraction that did better during the recession than before. Around 23,500 people visited in 2008, and that number jumped to 45,000 in 2012. The attendance spike more than doubled revenue from 2007-2012. “We saw a bit of an increase because we’re a cheaper venue,” said Amber Beierle, educaThe Discovery Center of Idaho went from kid-focused to a favorite among adults with its new adult night series. tion specialist for the Old Idaho Penitentiary. But being cheap and local isn’t the only thing the old pen has going for it. Beierle also just families with children; it greatly increases Instead of karaoke, the museum decided to attributes that uptick in revenue to a concerted their appeal to adults,” the report said. have a fashion show: Cocktails and Couture. decision to loosen up from the stuffy image Cultural institutions like the penitentiary “We saw it as a way to showcase history historical sites tend to have. and the historical museum may not be in the in a way that made it really interesting,” said “That is a newer thing,” said Beierle. “We same category as go-kart tracks and water Schorzman. “You could come see something do a lot of family friendly events. But we parks, but they are competing for the same and have a drink and have a little bite to eat.” really listen to people and we really take the dollars and attention from the community. And it was a big shift for the museum, not comment cards seriously. And people said they Arguably the most successful has been the just in tactics, but in appeal. Not only was the wanted an adult event, so we did one.” Discovery Center of Idaho’s Adult Night series, event more popular than the standard speaker Singin’ in the Slammer gave 21-and-up karaoke enthusiasts the chance to sing “Jailhouse event at the historical museum, but Schorzman which has drawn thousands of Boiseans into the facility to get scientifically sloshed with Rock” in a truly unique location. The pen also said it succeeded in bringing out a different themed presentations, food carts and beer. demographic than usually attends. began staging the adult-focused Frightened “I’m not going to say the hook is the alcoBut she doesn’t credit the booze. Felons event and the after-hours Bars and Bal“One thing I have noticed is that people like hol,” said Doug Lambuth, marketing director lads series. for DCI. “But when you want younger people to get dressed up in different kinds of period For the pen, these events have been a big to come out, that is something that makes it clothing,” said Schorzman. “Maybe vintage success, bringing in hundreds of participants clothing is one of their things more than drink- more interesting for them to come out and say, and tens of thousands of dollars in revenue. ‘I can do this and relax socially.’” ing.” And, arguably, one of the most important eleYoung adults are the hardest demographic But the historical museum focused a little ments of that success is beer. for the center to reach. But the museum hopes more on the booze with Prohibition Under“We’re realistic about the novelty, that that if they come and have a good time at people were like, ‘I have a beer in the Old Pen, ground, a roaring ’20s, speakeasy-themed adult night, they’ll come back with their kids, where people were in prison, where they made casino night at the museum, which was also a siblings, nieces or nephews. big success. their own liquor,’” said Beierle. And so far, Lambuth said it’s working. Schorzman said the ISHM will continue As a state-funded agency in an age of aus“The first one drew 150,” said Lambuth. with these kinds of events, though probably terity, the Old Pen needed to find new ways of “And then a couple months later, we did the only at the rate of one per year because of the getting people in the door. And from Beierle’s second one and it was well over 300 people. logistics of planning. She said it’s better to do perspective, these adult-themed events have About three months later, we held our third one good event than lots of small, bad ones. worked well. “We want to appeal one and it was over 800 people.” “Having these Adult night events can nearly triple the Disto a broader range of weird, unique things, covery Center of Idaho’s revenue for a typical people, and fun seems what it does is bring Adult Night Science of DIY, Thursday, Aug. 30, day. And while Lambuth doesn’t have data on like the common dein a new audience and 6-10 p.m., $10 includes drink ticket. return visits yet, anecdotally, he said there has nominator,” she said. get them invested,” she DISCOVERY CENTER OF IDAHO been an increase in attendance. A 2011 report from said. 131 W. Myrtle St. But does it sully the museum’s mission to fill the White Hutchinson And other cultural 208-343-9895 scidaho.org up the place with beer and shenanigans? Not Leisure and Learning institutions, like the according to Lambuth. Group dug into the Idaho State Historical “You just have to think about how you question of whether Museum, are trying out put it out there. Don’t create the wrong alcohol belongs at family event centers. It the strategy themselves. impression, like all of a sudden, here you are found that somewhere between one-fifth and “A lot of events in our past have been at the Discovery Center/XXX theater,” said one-third of adult Americans don’t drink, but geared toward having speakers,” said Anne there are those who do consider it a major part Lambuth. “Never ever would we want to start Schorzman, event coordinator at the Idaho an image like that, because it in no way goes of socializing. The report made a big point of State Historical Museum. “And the last two along with our mission.” the fact that Chuck E. Cheese not only serves years, we’ve decided to have this theme party, But 800 Boiseans having a beer while learnbased around the event. And show people that beer, but calls it the “dad pacifier.” “When [family entertainment centers] serve ing about the science of brewing? It’s hard to history is fun and that coming into the historialcohol, it broadens their market to more than argue with that. cal museum can be a really fun experience.”

28 | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code.

THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

FOREVER AND EVER The rom-com comes of age in Celeste and Jesse Forever GEORGE PRENTICE Celeste and Jesse Forever, a cliche-free romantic comedy that stars neither Katherine Heigl nor Paul Rudd (and it’s to be congratulated for that alone) blazes a new trail through the familiar forest of relationshipdriven cinema. But be forewarned: If you think you’ve been down this path before, you’ll be surprised by some refreshingly contemporary forks in the road. And most of the credit should begin and end with star and writer Rashida Jones. Jones, a fine comic actress (The Office, Rashida Jones and Andy Samberg portray a couple of best friends preparing to get divorced. Parks and Recreation) with ordinary mannerisms and extraordinary looks, wrote to burn it. Much to their friends’ and fami- able to recover. So we root for Celeste and the script along with real-life partner Will Jesse, seeing so much of ourselves in their McCormack, basing the story on their own, lies’ chagrin, Celeste and Jesse are preparfears and faults. ing to divorce. of friends who just can’t be lovers. Jones’ script is also generous to its sup“I think it’s stupid you guys aren’t But Celeste and Jesse Forever never feels porting cast, including Elijah Wood, Chris together,” says Celeste’s friend Beth (Ari scripted—it’s that expertly crafted. The Messina and especially Emma Roberts Graynor). “You guys are best friends. dialogue is more organic, behaviors more That’s the hard part. Nothing else matters.” (niece of Julia), who is so fine as Riley, a believable and consequences much more teen pop star. But Celeste has deconstructed her relatangible. A fine cast, led by Jones and Satur“She’s a vagina in a hairdo,” snarks tionship to a fault. day Night Live’s Andy “I love Jesse dear- Celeste. Samberg, wear their But instead of abandoning the pop star ly, but he doesn’t roles like comfortable CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER (R) to a hackneyed trope, the story chooses have a checking suits of clothes rather Directed by Lee Toland Krieger Roberts’ character to offer insight into account or dress than the imaginings of Starring Rashida Jones, Andy Samberg Celeste’s Gen Y rudeness. shoes,” she says. a scriptwriter. and Elijah Wood “You think you’re smarter than every“The father of my Jones plays Celeste, Opens Friday, Aug. 31, at The Flicks body,” says Riley to a stunned Celeste. children will have a a smarty-pants alpha car. Jesse will always “And that’s your dark little prison.” female to Samberg’s Celeste and Jesse Forever is a chest of be my best friend.” slacker Jesse. The film treasures, but above all, it introduces us to Celeste and Jesse Forever considers the begins where most rom-coms end: with the one of the best movie couples in a generaselfishness and blame that infects us all. simpatico pair laughing their way through tion. I hope they make it work, but I’m not And once we have broken each other’s life. Unfortunately, they also recognize that holding my breath. hearts and we lay shattered, too few are the only way to save their marital village is

DVD/SCREEN BOISE’S FAVORITE DVD RENTALS THIS WEEK

1. THE HUNGER GAMES Second week at No. 1.

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2. BERNIE First week in release.

—Source: Video Memories, 4504 Overland Road, Boise, 208-385-0113

3. THE LORAX Dropped from No. 2 on Aug. 22.

4. FREELANCERS First week in release.

5. THE DICTATOR First week in release.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | 29

NEWS/REC S T. LU K ES W OM EN’S FITNES S C ELEB R ATION

REC JAM ES LLOYD

FUNDING WILDLIFE The annual St. Luke’s Women’s Fitness Celebration needs volunteers.

GARDEN CITY LOOKS TO THE RIVER The battle for a bikable Greenbelt link through Garden City has taken another turn. For years there has been talk about a possible bridge linking the section of the pathway in Eagle—on the north side of the river—to the bike-friendly portion on the south side of the river in Garden City. But that talk came closer to reality when the city received a $98,000 grant through the Federal Highway Transportation Authority to do preliminary engineering on what is being dubbed the Garden City West Bridge. The funds are administered through the Idaho Transportation Department and the COMPASS board signed off on the plan. In order to get the grant, the city and Ada County had to commit to a 20 percent match of funds. Once constructed, the bridge would be the only river crossing between Eagle Road and Glenwood Street and be located near the head of Eagle Island. It would tie into the newly opened section of paved Greenbelt in Garden City and link it with the still-dirt section of the path in Eagle. But what may be of most interest to bikers is that the bridge would mean they would be able to avoid the contentious section of pathway that runs through the Riverside Village subdivision. The dirt path has been the subject of lawsuits by bikers who take issue with the city’s walk-only designation along a short section of the path, which forces bikers to either get off and walk or take a winding detour through the neighborhood. No date has been set for when the new bridge might actually be built. And since we’re talking Garden City, the city is helping kayakers access the new Boise River Recreation Park, which borders both cities. Garden City has leased a plot of land at the end of 35th Street near the river for the express purpose of providing more parking options for those using the river park. While parking is open to all, the city is reminding everyone that the parking area is subject to the same rules that apply to area parks, and that drivers cannot drive across lots or down the Greenbelt from 36th Street to access the lot. And now, for something completely different, the organizers of the St. Luke’s Women’s Fitness Celebration are looking for a few hundred volunteers for the Sept. 20-22 event, which includes the fitness celebration and the 5K run/walk/stroll. For more info, visit celebrateall.org.

Fish and Game department looks for new resources RANDY KING Ross Thompson looked like a guy who was there for a reason, his big flat hat immediately giving away the fact that he was from Owyhee County. He marched over to Idaho Department of Fish and Game Director Virgil Moore and asked why the hell he was wasting his time. The Idaho Wildlife Summit had definitely attracted a few with a bit of ire. Up to that point, the summit, which ran Aug. 24-26, had been a showcase of speeches on conservation and ethics. A lot of “we need to work together on our problems” but not a lot of problem solving. What is the problem? In a word: money. The department is funded in large part by “consumptive users” of wildlife: hunters, fishermen and other outdoor enthusiasts—57 percent of Fish and Game’s budget comes from resident and nonresident tag sales, as well as taxes on sporting goods. The remainpercent is from outstatic, if not shrinking amounts are mostly from land leases to of-state hunters. The ing, customer base? companies like Idaho Power. CROWD POLLING AT THE more hunters and Cue the Idaho In a recent statewide poll conducted for IDAHO WILDLIFE SUMMIT anglers from outside Wildlife Summit. the department, 93 percent of Idahoans said These results are from real-time polls conIdaho, the more No silver bullet they value the right to hunt. But only 11 ducted among the crowd: wildlife Idahoans can was presented at the percent of the citizens hold hunting licenses, 85 percent was older than 35 years old enjoy. year to year. How to hold up nearly universal summit—no grand 73 percent was male Times are tough support with only one-tenth participation is a new idea to save all 73 percent had fished in the last two years at Fish and Game. In wildlife while keepmajor issue. each of the past four The problem gets worse because almost all ing conservationists, 56 percent had hunted in the last two years years, the department hunters and fisherIdahoans expect the “second paycheck” of has seen a decrease men happy. seeing wildlife in our state. Few can imagin the total sales volume of out-of-state deer What Idaho can do is promote itself as a ine driving through the backwoods and not and elk tags. From an all-time high in 2006 hunting destination to out-of-state hunters. seeing a deer. But only a few who are not of about 13,000 tags sold to just less than “We have seen a direct increase in license consumptive users contribute to the depart8,000 in 2011, the department has lost about sales when we have used forms of online ment’s budget. marketing. … It is a whole 40 percent of that revenue. Currently, the only “We got used to selling out all of our new direction for us,” way the department nonresident tags, but that model has clearly Moore said. raises money outside of IDAHO DEPARTMENT changed, and we need to adapt to it,” said “We see a direct corits normal channels is OF FISH AND GAME’S Moore. “Idaho used to have units that would relation with marketing through license plates and BUDGET BREAKDOWN sell out on quota tags within the first few money and nonresident the Blue Bird Box on Idaho days. Now we have leftover tags for those tag sales,” he said. tax returns. The BBB is units.” “Remember, one out-ofan elective checkbox that According to Moore, three things hapstate tag is worth, fiscally, allows Idahoans to donate pened at the same time that have drastically about 10 to 12 in-state money from their state tax affected nonresident revenue. First, wolves tags.” returns. In 2011, the Blue had a marked impact on the elk herds. A A resident Idaho elk Bird Box raised $33,000. tag costs about $31, while reduction in numbers means a reduction in In comparison, the 2013 hunt quality and thus fewer tags are bought. it costs an out-of-state departmental budget is Second, the economic tumult. Third was hunter $416. $92 million. Fish and Game’s decision to raise prices for The department relies This is the dilemma nonresidents by about 20 percent. more on nonresident facing the department: hunters for money than its That combination wreaked havoc on How does it balance the own population base—19 the department’s budget. demands of an increasingly 31 The department does not receive “The main reason that we can percent of revenue is from urban and growing popugeneral funds from the State of Idaho. absorb any of this loss to revenue is on in-state hunters while 22 lation while relying on a

—Deanna Darr

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LISTINGS/REC the backs of our employees,” Moore said. “We have a statewide wage freeze in effect.” 30 One option for fixing the department’s woes presented at the summit was for closer collaboration with nongovernmental agencies, like the Nature Conservancy. Hunters and anglers shift in their seats at the idea of a conservation group partnership. Toni Hardesty, executive director of the Nature Conservancy in Idaho, was quick to address the QUOTE/UNQUOTE crowd’s concerns. She The Idaho Wildlife Summit was explained that 70 percent of chock full of soundbites. Nature Conservancy staff in Below is a sampling Idaho either hunts or fishes. of the best: She also addressed the misconception that conserva“Wolves attract so much attention means lack of access. tion, often at the detriment of In her speech, she other game animals.” opened with a story about —Virgil Moore, Director, Idaho Department why her grandparents never of Fish and Game went fishing together. One fished for trout, the other “The right to vote and the right fished for catfish. Thus, they to hunt emerged in history at could not fish together. the same time.” Her point was that the —Jim Posewitz, Founder, type of fish sought is clearly Orion: The Hunter’s Institute an inconsequential divide but one that kept both “The last true stroke of Amerisides apart while fishing. can genius was when Teddy She used this as an analogy Roosevelt established the for sportsmen and nature North American-style conservation model. The idea that we conservancy folks. must preserve this wildness For the most part, was an original thought for this sportsmen and conservayoung country.” tionists have more common “I would rather live in a world ground than either care to where people fight each other admit. Both want to protect all the time over conservation habitat and see animals than one in which no one gives flourish into the future. a damn.” Both also want to see a “To be concerned with consersustainable Idaho Fish and vation is to be a citizen. ... We Game, and both realize that must tie conservation to the the current consumptive-use idea of being an American.” model is unsustainable. —Shane Mahoney, During a break, ThompConservation Force son and I ran into each other in the restroom at the “Our two biggest obstacles to Riverside Hotel. We had the future of conservation are funding and apathy of the next just sat through an impasgeneration.” sioned speech by renowned Canadian conservationist “The model that we have built and hunter Shane Mahoney. is not sustainable for Idaho.” According to him, Teddy Roosevelt was the last great “If we focused on the labels, we would have never genius in America. collaborated.” Thompson looked at me —Toni Hardesty, and said, “Now that we are The Nature Conservancy done with our history lesof Idaho son, do you think that we can get onto solving some of the problems?” For me, it was one of those times in life that I wished I could find the profound words at the right moment. Instead, I just shrugged and said, “hope so.” But the best part about reflection is having the time for a witty comeback. What I would have liked to have said was, “If we forget our history, we are bound to repeat it. I do not want to see any more animals go the way of the buffalo.” WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Events & Workshops BRONCO NATION PASSPORT—Compete against student-athletes in various challenges while completing your passport to Bronco Nation. Everyone is eligible for a prize. Information will be on-hand for the new student rewards program, how to get football and basketball tickets and fall sport schedules. Wednesday, Aug. 29, 6-7:30 p.m. FREE. Bronco Stadium, Boise, 208-426-1000, boisestate.edu. FREE CLASS WEEK—Try out the Rec Center’s six-week instructional fitness programs before you commit. Monday, Sept. 3-Friday, Sept. 7. Boise State Rec Center, 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5641, 208-426-1131, rec.boisestate. edu. GAMES CENTER DISCOUNTS— Students with a valid ID can enjoy bowling and billiards in the games center at a discounted rate during the first week of school. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, sub.boisestate. edu. GET OUT MORE TOUR—Backpacker Magazine makes a stop in Boise on its 12th-annual tour, which features seminars on trip planning, choosing the right gear and apparel, safety in the outdoors and more. Wednesday, Aug. 29, 7 p.m. REI, 8300 W. Emerald, Boise, 208-322-1141, rei.com/stores/boise. QUAD RECESS—Go back to grade school with classic recess games, food and fun. Wednesday, Aug. 29, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise State Quad, Boise. TRY HOCKEY FOR FREE—New hockey players will be provided with skates, sticks, gloves and a helmet and taught the basics of hockey. A gear-fitting session will be followed by on-ice instruction. Registration is FREE, but required. To register, call 208-331-0044. Wednesday, Aug. 29, 5:30-7:15 p.m. FREE. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-331-0044, idahoiceworld.com.

Register PAYETTE LAKE RUN—Register at bluecirclesports.com for this 30K, 8.6 mile or 5K run around Payette Lake, to be held Sunday, Sept. 2. Visit cityoftreesmarathon.com for more info. Shu’s Idaho Running Company, 1758 W. State St., Boise, 208-3446604, idahorunningcompany. com. YOUTH AND ADULT HOCKEY LEAGUES—Register through Friday, Aug. 31, for youth, teen and adult hockey leagues. Youth recreational leagues are open to boys and girls age 3 through high school. Prices vary. Payment plans and scholarships are available. For more info, contact Anna Schimelpfenig at 208-331-0044, ext. 3002, or at aschimelpfenig@ cityofboise.org. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-331-0044, idahoiceworld. com.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | 31

BEERGUZZLER/FOOD KEEP IT IN THE CAN

PAYETTE BREWING MUTTON BUSTER BROWN ALE In the glass, this beer is a lovely cafe Americano in color with a decent head that fades quickly but leaves a nice lacing. The lightly toasted malt aromas are backed by hazelnut, freshbaked whole-wheat bread and a touch of caramel. The flavors open with creamy malt, colored by ripe fruit and toasted grain with a hop spike on the mid-palate. That light bitterness carries through on the finish. PAYETTE BREWING PALE ALE A hazy golden pour that’s topped by a thin head, this beer’s resiny hops come through on the nose with a light touch of citrus. More hops lead off on the palate, followed by light grain and the barest hint of malt. This brew is a leaner-styled pale that finishes with a crisp astringency. It is definitely one for the hop lovers. SNAKE RIVER OB-1 ORGANIC ALE A persistent mocha-colored head tops this brilliant mahogany pour. The nose is filled with grain-laced malt, while the flavor profile echoes those aromas. This brew is filled with sweet malt and grain, with a light touch of hops. Just for fun, I added an equal portion of the hop-driven Payette Pale Ale to the glass. The result was a nicely balanced brew that, to my taste, was rather appealing. No rules!

FOOD PATR IC K S W EENEY

While I love to fire up the grill, even in the dead of winter, Labor Day weekend traditionally marks the end of the summer barbecue season. And beer (especially in cans) is the appropriate adult beverage for this last hurrah. This year, why not keep the celebration local? Boise’s Payette Brewing recently began offering a couple of its signature brews in cans. And to round out the trio, I picked an organic ale from Jackson Hole, Wyo.-based Snake River Brewing, just across the border.

STARBUCKS OF CRAFT BEER With a new location and multiple beer fests, Brewforia aims for world domination HARRISON BERRY From the rust-colored arch above the entrance to Meridian’s new Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park, the campus looks like an airport, complete with a labyrinthine parking lot, saplingRick Boyd hopes to turn the Brewforia concept into a national franchise. lined thoroughfares and stylish new outbuildings. It’s a fitting place for Rick Boyd’s vision 10 rotating taps—and a 1,500-square-foot 10 Barrel Brewing Company, Payette Brewing for Barley Bros. and Brewforia to take off. kitchen. and Tablerock Brewpub. On Saturday, Sept. 1, the park will host the Its larger menu, back patio and open floor Boyd said he hopes to hold more beer Barley Bros. Traveling Beer Show, which feaplan are taking Brewforia into unexplored tures live music, a beard and mustache contest, festivals in the future, but he’s proceeding cauterritory. A new emphasis on food has allowed tiously in the wake of 2011’s Barley Bros. in vendor tents and a hearty selection of beers. Boyd and chef Ryan Hembree to take a moreAnn Morrison Park, after which the city and The $20 ticket to the event buys attendees acnuanced approach to pairing beer and food, Brewforia entered a billing dispute over damcess to more than 250 beers, as well as games though Boyd maintains that beer is still king. age to the park and the cost of city services. and live entertainment. “First and foremost, we are a beer store,” The city alleged that Brewforia owed Boyd hopes the success of Barley Bros. will he said. around $7,800 plus interest for damage to the enable him to hold similar festivals beyond Boyd is currently eyeing a third location in park lawn and police services. Boyd challenged Idaho and further his goal of turning Brewforia, which organized and funded the event, into how the city arrived at its bill, particularly how Spokane, Wash., which he hopes to open in six to nine months. it assessed damage to the turf and charges for a national franchise. “We’re thinking things could progress up police presence during the festival. Boise Parks “We’re in the infancy of what is becoming there pretty quickly,” he said. and Recreation officials said they didn’t want a major industry,” Boyd said about his master While Boyd says that individual differences the festival to return, so Boyd said he was takplan. “I compare it to Starbucks.” between Brewforia locations are a perk of ing Barley Bros. to Meridian. And beer festivals are Boyd’s way of being a young company, he concedes that his That lawsuit is still pending, but Boyd said ministering the gospel of craft beer. He has franchise plans may require him to enforce organized three previous Barley Bros. iterations he hopes to have the issue “resolved soon,” and that he expects to do smoother business in some uniformity. at Ann Morrison in Boise, Alpenfest in 2009, “I personally like there being a little unique Oktoberfest at Centurylink Arena in 2011, and Meridian. Boyd is working with Colin Moss, character to each store. The most important the Winter Ale Festival in McCall in 2011––as recreation coordinator of Meridian Parks and thing is that each store have a similar feel and well as the Ale Fort at Treefort Music Festival. Recreation, to ensure that the city’s relationMcKenzie Christensen, chair of the McCall ship with Barley Bros. doesn’t end in acrimony the right ambiance,” he said. Brewforia’s early expansion plans ran into and litigation like it did in Boise. Winter Carnival committee, said the Barley a hiccup when it opened a location in Bown Moss confirmed that the festival is Bros. Winter Ale Festival helped attract the Crossing in May 2011. The space wasn’t techrequired to carry a 21-35 age demonically a franchise, but rather a licensed facility $500,000 insurance graphic to the otherBarley Bros. Traveling Beer Show, policy, and he plans to owned by former employee Chris Oates and wise family oriented Brewer’s Dinner, Friday, Aug. 31, 4-9 p.m. his wife Kammie. In October 2011, Boyd and assess event damage carnival. The festival $60. Unlimited tasting, Saturday, Sept. 1, Oates severed ties, claiming they had differto the park in person included a local night, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., $20. ing visions for the space and the business was with its organizers. featuring Salmon River JULIUS M. KLEINER MEMORIAL PARK renamed Bier:Thirty Bottle and Bistro. “We do our best Brewery and McCall 1900 N. Records Ave., Meridian Despite any past setbacks, Boyd hopes to to make expectations Brewing Company, live 208-888-3579 very clear for the use of have his franchise program up and running by music and unlimited barleybros.net the end of 2012. He said he already receives all our parks, and we tasting of 100 different regular requests from potential franchisees. hold anyone accountbeers for $20. Boyd’s strategy is to use the Internet as a “We saw a dramatic increase in the number able who doesn’t meet those expectations. This forum where Brewforia locations can make event is no different,” Moss said. of carnival-goers the second weekend, which I rare brews available in 30 states, turning the While Barley Bros. made the move to Mecredit in large part to the new events, including disadvantage of a fractured microbrew market ridian, Brewforia opened a second location in the brewfest,” she said. into an advantage for his company. Eagle this month. Brewforia has also worked outside the Bar“Each franchisee will have access to beers At 4,550 square feet, the new Eagle localey Bros. brand. Ale Fort sold roughly 1,000 tion is larger than its Meridian counterpart to that are exclusive to their region, but that tickets at $25 apiece to attendees and featured people want in other parts of the country,” accommodate more customer seating, more unlimited all-local mini beers from Sockeye beers—between 60 and 80 beers per week on he said. Brewery, The Ram, Crooked Fence Brewing,

—David Kirkpatrick

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ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT A local company with international projects is looking for PT help on projects. Flexible hours, can work from home/school for most of the work, excellent pay, either on a monthly or hourly basis. The projects are related to helping the environment and helping people in developing countries. The position has potential to lead to long term employment. The ideal person would be a good team player, good computer skills, great customer service skills, outgoing, friendly, the ability to work with all levels of people, and has the ability to learn quickly. Possibility of international travel so a passport would be ideal. For more information please respond via email with a brief description of yourself and qualifications. 208-761-6684. HAIRDRESSERS WANTED! Hairdressers wanted for busy, well established leasing salon, centrally located on the Boise Bench. We are a full service salon offering hair, nail, massage services & eyelash extensions. We have a very low weekly lease & semi private rooms. 2 stations available for the right people with some clientele. Possibly an opening for a nail tech. You can sell your own retail. Work your own hrs. Call for more info. 850-9117.

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HAIRSTYLIST NEEDED Stylist needed for fast growing Nampa salon. Leasors preffered. Rent starts at $90/wk. Negotiable. Please call Vickie 463-4422. HELP WANTED!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram.com ADVANCED TUTORING Geoscience, natural science, math, physics (SAT, ACT) in your residence. Ph.D. geophysicist (retired BSU). $30/hr. 343-5549. STATION AVAILABLE! Graffiti Hair Salon has a station available. We are looking for a motivated stylist. We would prefer a leaser but are willing to work with someone needing a commission. We are located across from the Towne Square Mall, next door to Ross. Some of our current stylists are educators or former educators willing to teach. Great foot traffic, we are unable to take all walk-ins & call-ins. Bring a resume to 405 N Milwaukee ask for Ben or Michelle.

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COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS LOCAL DUO’S NEW COMIC BOOK A local duo has put together a comic book that is titled The Legacy. They are currently in the process of spreading the news of their creation. Please support them in their endeavor to show off great writing and great art. NAMPA ART GUILD ARTIST CALL Nampa Art Guild is looking for submissions for its 27th Centennial Juried Art Show. The event runs Oct 24th - Oct 31st at the Nampa Civic Center. The show is open to all artists 18 & older with original artworks created in the last two years. Those works can be in oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, pastel, pencil, pen/ink & mixed media. Three-dimensional categories include: original, one-ofa-kind woodcarving, sculpture, & hand-thrown pottery. September 21st is the deadline for digital entries. Please see the show prospectus at www.nampaartguild. org for more information.

SEE AN ACCIDENT? Red Pickup vs. Silver Civic. Broadway Pita Pit parking lot. August 7th, 12:20PM. Any info. Call: 3447682.

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GIGANTIC WABI SABI YARD SALE SAT. only, 9-4 at 286 SE 4th Street, Ontario. Idaho-Oregon. Buddhist Temple. Bake sale, books, clothes, shoes, electronics, kitchen items, knick knacks, furniture, sport equipment, toys, vintage jewelry, tools. 208-707-2021.

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A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

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1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

BW BEAUTY GRACE & COMPANY HAIR SALON Where beauty meets serenity. We offer evening & weekend appointments. Located on the 2nd floor of the historic Hasbrouck House, 1403 12th Ave S Nampa. Call Kendra 514-7586 or Lisa 515-0879.

Embrace the moment with a sensual massage at ULM. Now accepting new clients. ULM 3408377. Hrs. 8:30AM-8PM. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. RELAXATION MASSAGE Pamper yourself with a relaxing massage. I offer full body massage $40/hr. & $60 for 1.5 hours. I offer in & out services. I’m in SE Boise. Call or text Richard to schedule your massage at 208695-9492.

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BW MASSAGE A better full body massage by male. Private studio. $50. Terry 841-1320. RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231.

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. New Client-Your First Massage $20. 322 Lake Lowell Ave. Nampa. Call Betty 283-7830.

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BW HEALING ARTS ACCESS BARS Science tells us that everything, at its most basic level is energy. Change the energy & you change how that area of your life shows up. Access Bars™ provides a very simple process for changing the energy so you can start having a different result in any or all aspects of your life, be it with your health, your wealth, your relationships, your business or work. This therapy allows your body & you to begin releasing all the limiting thoughts, ideas, attitudes, decisions & beliefs that you have ever had. There are 32 points on the head that correspond to different aspects of your life; we call all of these points The Bars™. Having your Bars run, meaning the 32 points are gently touched, effortlessly & easily releasing anything that doesn’t allow you to receive. What if having your Bars run completely changed your life? What if you opened up new possibilities? What if everything you thought wasn’t possible, happened? Have your Bars run. Call 208-995-0179. Vibrant Health Boise.

BW CHILD KOOTENAI KIDS PRESCHOOL Now open & enrollment discounts are available. Located on the Boise Bench, near Overland & Orchard, is ideal for those parents working downtown or going East & West on the Freeway. Check out our website for more information & contact us for our current discounts. We are also ICCP approved! Hurry because our discounts will not last! rwinn@ K2Preschool.com

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ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

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PRECIOUS: 4-yearold female miniature pinscher mix. Housetrained, good with dogs and older kids. Needs a cat-free home. (Kennel 318- #15680619)

INDY: 2-year-old male border collie mix. 101 pounds. Crate- and house-trained. Good with other dogs. Knows basic commands. (Kennel 324- #16665673)

ELLIE: 6-year-old female Lab mix. Sweet and reserved. Gentle. Good with other dogs. (Kennel 410#16954550)

BUG: 2-year-old male domestic shorthair. Has lived happily with other cats, dogs and children. Litterboxtrained house cat. (Kennel 14- #17000711)

MOCHA: 2-year-old female domestic shorthair. Friendly, outgoing personality. Litterboxtrained. Enjoys being held and petted. (Kennel 20- #13398710)

TANNER: 18-monthold male domestic shorthair. Robust, handsome cat. Litterbox-trained. Good with other cats. (Kennel 08- #16673012)

PEACH SPA O R I E NTA L M A S S A G E 322-0081 619 N. Orchard.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

TAFETTA: Need a mouser? Adopt me, I’m free.

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JON SNOW: Handsome EMERALD: I’m a Pick flamepoint Siamese of the Litter—only $10 mix is ready to go makes me yours. home with you today.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | 35

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RESORTS PIANO VOICE LESSONS BOISE Harmony Road Music Studio is offering music classes for ages 3 & up. Call 331-0278 for more information.

BASS LESSONS Pro Bass player offering bass lessons. Techniques, “finding the groove” song analysis. General music theory. Trouble shooting. $20/hr, $15/1/2 hr. I will also negotiate long & short term deals. I am mobile-I come to you. I offer a fun patient teaching method that moves at your pace. Thank you Sandy Sanford 208-392-5379.

COMMON GROUND CHORUS Open auditions for all vocal parts. Sept. 10, 17 & 25. For more information visit commongroundboise.org or phone Randy 208794-7839.

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PATIO FURNITURE FOR SALE 2 adorable patio chairs are available for $60 for the set. These chairs have a unique style & look fantastic as patio furniture or eclectic living room furniture. These pieces were originally purchased from the prop warehouse at Universal Studios and were featured in dozens of films & TV shows. Please email erika@onceuponareality.com if interested. Pricing is negotiable. All decor at Kahula’s Kloset. Consign, kids, adults, home furnishings, arts & crafts. Easy parking. Clean, quality merchandise. 1726 W. Main. 570-9740.

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NYT CROSSWORD | ‘OH, REALLY?’ BY FREDDIE CHENG / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 14 Go by again 20 Figures in TV’s “V” 21 Acid, e.g.

ACROSS 1 Polo need 7 Some ballroom dances

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36 | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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47 More than dislike 48 Speed at which the apocalypse is coming? 51 Having allegorical meanings 56 43-Down follower 57 Brought in 61 Gold-compound salt 62 Balkan native 64 Obsessive-compulsive soap purger? 66 Source of indigo 70 Kate who married a prince 73 Classic Jags 74 Big gambling loss in the Biggest Little City in the World? 77 Venetian strip 80 Louis Armstrong played one 81 More gung-ho 84 Excitement 89 Former Treasury secretary Paul and former Yankee Paul 91 Bad precept for U.S. foreign policy? 93 Spa item 97 L-P center 98 Non compos mentis 99 Not a happy ending on the yellow brick road? 105 Choice word 106 “Are you ___ out?” 107 Do a hula, e.g. 108 Swerve 110 Goes (for) 112 Nastily slander 116 Wrong 120 What a chair may hold 121 TV detective with his unbalanced suspect? 125 Solemn pieces 126 Like the Boston Tea Partiers 127 Whence the phrase “Beware of Greeks bearing gifts” 128 Opposite of dethrone 129 Big name in pasta 130 Curses out?

DOWN 1 Some mil. brass 2 Settled down 3 Lead-in to type 4 Bikers’ woes 5 Japanese mushroom 6 J.F.K. search party? 7 Clandestine group 8 Link letters 9 Joint concern 10 Opposite of flat 11 Part of a bray 12 Santa ___ 13 Dump 14 Dump 15 Red-letter word 16 Article of apparel that’s not made where you might think 17 Like CH3CO2H 18 Run 19 Asserts something 24 Plaster support 28 1980s New York Philharmonic maestro 30 Peter of “The Last Emperor” 32 Part of some e-mail addresses 33 Radar anomaly 34 Class action grp.? 36 Spanish 101 word 37 Many-layered 38 “Little” comics boy 40 Rear 41 J’adore perfumer 42 Perennial succulent 43 Religious figure 45 Sandbox frequenters 49 Manhattan Project physicist 50 Jazz vocalist Shaw 52 Antelope related to the gemsbok 53 Cram 54 “Am ___ only one?” 55 Mitt Romney and others, once 58 Pizzeria order 59 “The Lord of the Rings” tree creature 60 U.K. mil. decorations 63 Con

65 66 67 68 69 71 72

China’s Zhou ___ With the bow, in music Really bright Memo intro Blonde Anderson Appropriate Death Row Records co-founder, familiarly 75 Chap 76 “Finally!” 78 Like election laws, typically 79 Ugly one 82 Watson of the Harry Potter films 83 Musical with the song “Seasons of Love” 85 Sabotage 86 Dump, say 87 A long time 88 Big vein 90 Some Blu-ray players 92 Louis XIV, for one 94 Wreath source 95 Solution reaction 96 Miss’s partner 99 It might result in a meltdown 100 Tchaikovsky’s “Eugene ___” 101 Bag handlers L A S T A S P I C

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102 House of ___ 103 Broadway smash starting in ’87 104 Pizzeria need 109 Chart holder 111 Spark, so to speak 113 Consort of Zeus 114 Big oil exporter 115 Mini’s counterpart 117 Summer cooler 118 Record problem 119 Lays the groundwork for? 121 Half a laugh 122 New element in each of this puzzle’s theme answers 123 Geog. abbreviation 124 Tiny application Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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MY KISSES My kisses poems were from guy to gal. Some others objected, I’ve never known how. Mine were cryptic, relieving burdens of lead. Despite all my efforts, I’m confused in my head. Who’s playing me now?

BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. SF 45y.o. redhead looking for M pen pals/friends who love to have fun & are happy & outgoing… #47852 Kimberly Sherman 605 North Capital, Idaho Falls, ID 83402

S married F 25y.o. looking for a pen pal(s) to write back and forth to. My name is Georgia Smith #82451, C/o Bonneville County Jail, 605 Capital Ave. Idaho Falls, ID 83402 Hi. I’m a 48y.o. country boy doing a little time for some DUI’s looking for someone to write. Jesse Black #85503 ISCI Unit 10-A-11 P.O. Box 14 Boise, ID 83707

NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: GUILLERMO NAVARRO Case No. CV NC 1213055 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Guillermo Navarro, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the Dis-

trict Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Guillermo William Navarro. The reason for the change in name is: I only have a first name. I am adding a middle name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on September 20, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Jul 31 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT BY: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. August 8, 15, 22 & 29, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Shane Michael Twiddy Case no. CV NC 1210820 ANOTHER NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE

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BW KISSES BOISE CAT CLINIC Happy 1st Birthday! Thank you for loving our cats as much as we do! BOISE WEEKLY DRIVERS Hey, you guys & gals are the best. Thanks for getting the paper to your readers with a smile every Wednesday. Looking forward to seeing you!

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BW A Amended Petition to change the name of Shane Michael Twiddy, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Shane Michael Jiron. The reason for the change in name is: because my stepparent raised me.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on October 2, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: July 25, 2012. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA J. URIZAR Deputy Clerk SUMMONS Case No. CV-OC 1008026 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA. Noel Jay Whiteley Plaintiff, vs. Shawna Scott, I.S.C.I.; Jacob Sackett, I.S.C.I.; Matt Vallard, I.S.C.I.; Sterling Mathis, I.M.S.I.; Michael Johnson, I.M.S.I., Defendants. Notice you have been sued by the above named Plaintiff, the court may enter judgment against you without further notice unless you respond within 20 days. Read the information below; TO: DEFENDANT, STERLING MATHIS You are hereby notified that in order to defend the lawsuit, an appropriate written response must be filed with the above designated court, any time after 20 days following the last publication of this summons, the court may enter judgment against you with out further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper

form, including Case No. CV-OC 1008026. A copy of the complaint is served with this summons. If you wish to seek the advise or representation by an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be filed in time and other legal rights protected. An appropriate written response required with rule 10 (a) (1) and other Idaho Rules of Civil Procedure and shall also include: 1. The title and number of the case, 2. If your response is an answer to the complaint, it must contain admissions or denials of the separate allegations of the complaint and other defenses you may claim, 3. Your signature, mailing address, and telephone number or the signature, mailing address, and telephone number of your attorney, 4. Proof of mailing or delivery of a copy of your response to the plaintiff as designated below. To determine whether you must pay a filing fee with your response, contact the clerk of the above named court. A copy of the summons and complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or Plaintiff listed below. DATED this 16th day of July 2012. Christopher D. Rich, Clerk of the District Court, by Janet L. Ellis ADA County Courthouse, 200 W. Front ST., Boise, IDAHO 83702 Plaintiff Noel Jay Whiteley, 45869 I.S.C.I. 11-A-6-A PO Box 14, Boise IDAHO 83707 Pub. August 8, 15, 22 & 29, 2012.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I’m afraid your vibes are slightly out of tune. Can you do something about that, please? Meanwhile, your invisible friend could really use a tarot reading and your houseplants would benefit from a dose of Mozart. Plus—and I hope I’m not being too forward here— your charmingly cluttered spots are spiraling into chaotic sprawl and your slight tendency to overreact is threatening to devolve into a major proclivity. As for that rather shabby emotional baggage of yours: Would you consider hauling it to the dump? In conclusion, my dear Ram, you’re due for a few adjustments. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Is happiness mostly just an absence of pain? If so, I bet you’ve been pretty content lately. But what if a more enchanting and exciting kind of bliss were available? Would you have the courage to go after it? Could you summon the chutzpah, zeal and visionary confidence to head out in the direction of a new frontier of joy? I completely understand if you feel shy about asking for more. You might worry that to do so would be greedy, or put you at risk of losing what you have already scored. But I feel it’s my duty to cheer you on. The potential rewards looming just over the hump are magnificent. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’ve got some medicine for you to try, Gemini. It’s advice from the writer Thomas Merton. “To allow oneself to be carried away by a multitude of conflicting concerns,” he wrote, “to surrender to too many demands, to commit oneself to too many projects, to want to help everyone in everything, is to succumb to the violence of our times.” It’s always a good idea to heed that warning, of course. But it’s especially crucial for you right now. The best healing work you can do is to shield your attention from the din of the outside world and tune in reverently to the glimmers of the inside world.

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38 | AUGUST 29 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I dreamed you were a magnanimous taskmaster nudging the people you care about to treat themselves with more conscientious tenderness. You were pestering them to raise their expectations to higher standards of excellence. Your persistence was admirable. You coaxed them to waste less time, make long-range educational plans and express themselves with more confidence and precision. You encouraged them to give themselves a gift now and then and take regular walks by bodies of water. They were suspicious of your efforts to make them feel good, at least in the early going. But eventually they gave in and let you help them.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the spirit of Sesame Street, I’m happy to announce that this week is brought to you by the letter T, the number 2, and the color blue. Here are some of the “T” words you should put extra emphasis on: togetherness, trade-offs, tact, timeliness, tapestry, testability, thoroughness, teamwork and Themis (goddess of order and justice). To bolster your mastery of the number 2, meditate on interdependence, balance and collaboration. As for blue, remember that its presence tends to bring stability and depth. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the creation myths of Easter Island’s native inhabitants, the god who made humanity was named Makemake. He was also their fertility deity. Today, the name Makemake also belongs to a dwarf planet that was discovered beyond the orbit of Neptune in 2005. It’s currently traveling through the sign of Virgo. I regard it as being the heavenly body that best symbolizes your own destiny in the coming months. In the spirit of the original Makemake, you will have the potential to be a powerful maker. In a sense, you could even be the architect and founder of your own new world. Look up the word “creator” in a thesaurus, write the words you find there on the back of your business card and keep the card in a special place until May 2013. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When novelist James Joyce began to suspect that his daughter Lucia was mentally ill, he sought advice from psychologist Carl Jung. After a few sessions with her, Jung told her father that she was schizophrenic. How did he know? A telltale sign was her obsessive tendency to make puns, many of which were quite clever. Joyce reported that he, too, enjoyed the art of punning. “You are a deep-sea diver,” Jung replied. “She is drowning.” I’m going to apply a comparable distinction to you, Libra. These days, you may sometimes worry that you’re in over your head in the bottomless abyss. But I’m here to tell you that in all the important ways, you’re like a deep-sea diver. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): No false advertising this week, Scorpio. Don’t act like you know it all when you really don’t. For that matter, you shouldn’t portray yourself as an unambitious amateur if you’re actually an aggressive pro, and you should avoid giving the impression that you want very little when in fact you’re a burning, churning throb of longing. I realize it may be tempting to believe that a bit of creative deceit would serve a holy cause, but it won’t. As much as you possibly can, make outer appearances reflect inner truths.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In Christian lore, the serpent is the bad guy that’s the cause of all humanity’s problems. He coaxes Adam and Eve to disobey God, which gets them expelled from Paradise. But in Hindu and Buddhist mythology, there are snake gods that sometimes do good deeds and perform epic services. They’re called Nagas. In one Hindu myth, a Naga prince carries the world on his head. And in a Buddhist tale, the Naga king uses his seven heads to give the Buddha shelter from a storm just after the great one has achieved enlightenment. In regards to your immediate future, Sagittarius, I foresee you having a relationship to the serpent power that’s more like the Hindu and Buddhist version than the Christian. Expect vitality, fertility and healing. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In Lewis Carroll’s book Through the Looking Glass, the Red Queen tells Alice that she is an expert at believing in impossible things. She brags that there was one morning when she managed to embrace six improbable ideas before she even ate breakfast. I encourage you to experiment with this approach, Capricorn. Have fun entertaining all sorts of crazy notions and unruly fantasies. Please note that I am not urging you to actually put those beliefs into action. The point is to give your imagination a good workout. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’m not necessarily advising you to become best friends with the dark side of your psyche. I’m merely requesting that the two of you cultivate a more open connection. The fact of the matter is that if you can keep a dialogue going with this shadowy character, it’s far less likely to trip you up or kick your ass at inopportune moments. In time, you might even come to think of its chaos as being more invigorating than disorienting. You may regard it as a worthy adversary and even an interesting teacher. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You need more magic in your life, Pisces. You’re suffering from a lack of sublimely irrational adventures, eccentrically miraculous epiphanies and inexplicably delightful interventions. At the same time, I think it’s important that the magic you attract into your life is not pure fluff. It needs some grit. It’s got to have a kick that keeps you honest. That’s why I suggest that you consider getting the process started by baking some unicorn poop cookies. They’re sparkly, enchanting, rainbow-colored sweets, but with an edge. Ingredients include sparkle gel, disco dust, star sprinkles—and a distinctly roguish attitude.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 10