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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 47 MAY 16–22, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 7

COFFEE KLATSCH It’s beer vs. coffee in the battle for one Boise business FEATURE 11

TECH STATE Will IGEM be what Idaho needs to grow tech? ARTS 28

RAWSOME RAW event highlights local creative talent FOOD 32

BEER SAGES Local brewers collaborate for Craft Beer Week

“Your music is a lot better when you don’t mind being repulsive sometimes.”

NOISE 25

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NOTE POLITICAL CLAIRVOYANCE Voting in Idaho’s first closed primary will be history as this edition of Boise Weekly hits stands and oh, to have a crystal ball so that I could write this week’ Editor’s Note with more relevance on the outcomes of several races. Not to mention that it’s difficult to write about the future when it will be the past before it’s actually read. As of May 14, the day I sat down to write these words, the election coverage plan at BWHQ was along the lines of our municipal election coverage last November: disperse a team of reporters to file via social media while live blogging the whole shebang at Citydesk. If all goes (went) right, we’ll have the night’s recap published at boiseweekly.com. But the details of how we’re going to pull off our reporting aren’t what I’d want a crystal ball for. Nah, I’m more interested in how a few of the more contentious districts will shake out thanks to reapportionment. Fratricide was the buzz word last week thanks to an Idaho Statesman story detailing how Republican leadership is duking it out among themselves using politics’ most powerful tool—money. For the latest news on just how the November races will shape up locally, in addition to news on the presidential race and the so-far low-key races Idaho’s two incumbent Congressmen face, visit boiseweekly.com and click on the “Election Coverage Twenty Twelve” bar. As for this week’s paper, the main feature is a look at IGEM, the governor’s long-awaited endorsement of Idaho’s tech industry and the state’s attempt to mimic USTAR, a similar program in Utah that has been instrumental to that state’s tech growth. As reporter Zach Hagadone’s story reads: “Idaho may be rich in ideas but turning them into companies is a perennial challenge. Now it’s a matter of state policy.” Will that make the difference? “The Politechs of Innovation” explores the answer. In A&E this week, we’re hitting you with not one but two arts stories. Same in Screen on Page 31, where you can read about the first death row inmate exonerated by DNA evidence and the local filmmaker who’s making his remarkable journey into a film. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Ben Brunn TITLE: Chumline MEDIUM: Colored pencil, ink ARTIST STATEMENT: One of my earliest memories happened when I was 3 years old. I walked out into an intersection with traffic going by and sat down. Someone stopped their car and asked me what I was doing sitting in the street ... I pointed over to the sidewalk and said, “that’s the street over there.”

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears play Alive After Five in July.

ALIVE AFTER FIVE LINEUP IS OUT The lineup for the Alive After Five concert series in the Grove was announced on May 11. Among the highlights: Polecat on Wednesday, June 20, and Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears on Wednesday, July 11. Cobweb has the full list.

ARE YOU READY FOR SOME FOOTBALL? AND IT AIN’T THE BRONCOS. The College of Idaho has decided to reinstate its football program after a 35-year timeout. Details at Citydesk.

EYE OF THE STORM Idaho held its first round of closed primaries May 15 and Boise Weekly was thick on the scenes of both the Democratic and Republican party headquarters as votes were counted. Get results and commentary at Citydesk.

BEHIND THE MUSIC Scenes from a Scene #046 relives the glory of Record Store Day on April 21. Scan the QR to the right to check it out.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS The Crux in flux as its beer vs. all-ages access

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The last sockeye

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE The Politechs of Innovation

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Catching up with Margot and the Nuclear So and So’s

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS Getting RAW

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SCREEN Monsieur Lazhar

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FOOD Local breweries team up for American Craft Beer Week 32 CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

ALEC, WE SEE YOU Part two

Ever wondered who talked Idaho leaders into letting a Tennessee corporation run a large portion of our penal system? Or why they continue to let it go on, in spite of that corporation’s documented failings in protecting, rehabilitating and processing inmates? Did you ever vote for someone who openly campaigned to hand the prisons over to people whose maximum profits come from full prisons? Or maybe you’re still curious about how Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna and his pack of cronies in the Legislature came to the decision that classes from private online companies and laptops, all paid for with taxpayer dollars, are the solution to kids who don’t care if they ever learn anything and the parents who raised them that way. Then there’s the nagging question of how Idaho’s law-making mob came up with the policies of female subjugation (forced medical procedures), polling manipulation (the new voter ID requirements), and firearm coercion (Stand Your Ground legislation), all at the same time such assaults on freedom and common sense were taking place in a dozen other states. As I was saying last week, the spider at the center of this web is the American Legislative Exchange Council. It says right there in the title: It exchanges legislation. The rest of the name is not so accurate as I don’t consider what it does as being very American, and the “Council” part of it seems to amount to little more than “Do what we say and you’ll get money. Don’t do what we say and we’ll find somebody who will!” ALEC has been infiltrating GOP cadres for more than 30 years, pulling off their power grab primarily at the state level. The Koch boys, David and Charles, were in on the bottom floor of ALEC and are still an artesian well of funding for the organization. (We’ve discussed the Koch brothers before, remember? They’re the silver-spoon spawn of an oil baron, and the family as a whole is as close to being fascists as they can get without actually pulling on the knee-high boots.) Over the years, other corporate entities presumably less offensive than the Kochs have contributed to ALEC’s coffers. Today, those contributors number in the hundreds. It’s next to impossible to name an oil, pharmaceutical or insurance company not in its fold. More surprising are those companies with such familiar and friendly faces as McDonald’s, Coca-Cola and Johnson & Johnson. But we should know better than to judge a corporation by its advertising, shouldn’t we? I’m willing to give many, if not most, of these companies the benefit of the doubt that they didn’t realize what a right-wing fringe bin they were hopping into when they signed up with ALEC. In fact, before the recent WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

exposure of the outfit’s fifth column nature, I can imagine oblivious corporate officers recommending it as just another lobbying effort. I’d rather not believe that the big shots from Wendy’s or the Gates Foundation ever foresaw the day that the money they sent ALEC would be used to force theocratic repression and the NRA’s twisted wet dreams on the American people. And as it turns out, since the Trayvon Martin murder in Florida, contributors have been dropping out like they’ve found a mouse carcass floating in their bowl of ALEC Flakes. Even the briefest summary of what legislation ALEC has been pushing—disempowering women and the most vulnerable of voters, the rash of pro-gun and anti-immigrant idiocy—makes it clear it is as intent on imposing its cultural conservatism upon us as making this land a laissez-faire paradise. Further, when the matter at hand is privatization of government functions, as in the commandeering of public education and the penitentiary system, it’s obvious their central agenda is to redistribute our public money into its private pockets. The website alecexposed.org has listed more than 2,000 state legislators with affiliations to ALEC, including 16 from Idaho. I urge readers to go there and see who’s on that roster. However, it may be more instructive to find not who’s on that list, but rather who and how many of our GOP Poo-Bahs are allied with the Idaho Freedom Foundation—or as I think of it, an open sore situated over in Smeed County. From its inception a mere four years ago, the IFF has been oozing a steady flow of pre-digested legislation to our one-party leadership. And every bit of it looks suspiciously like the same contentious slop that has been tearing other states apart. Honestly it appears more and more that we are paying our Republican lawmakers $16,000 a year (plus whatever per diem perks they can rake in) just to have them pass imported legislation off as their own. Now, even though Wayne Hoffman, IFF’s chief huff’n’puff, has yet to find the integrity to tell Idahoans where he gets the funding for his operation, he did announce (April 30 in the Idaho Press-Tribune) that he—and whatever the IFF amounts to beyond his unctuous presence—gets guidance from ALEC: “ALEC has been an invaluable resource and friend to me and the [IFF]. Few people know how often I have asked ALEC’s staff for help.” So by Hoffman’s own admission, any local pol (from the governor on down) who flaunts his or her association with the oh-sonobly-named Idaho Freedom Foundation is in reality just another obliging toad, nestled deep in the pocket of ALEC. It all makes me wonder if there’s a Republican politician left in Idaho who can come up with his or her own ideas.

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 5

OPINION/TED RALL

LEADING FROM THE BACK Obama accepts 21st century view of gay marriage

True leaders lead. They declare what society needs and tells it what it should want. Leaders anticipate what is possible. They open the space where long-held dreams intersect with reality, allowing progress. The role of a leader has been clearly defined since the first time a member of a clan convinced his tribe they should follow him if they wanted to find more food. So why has it been so long since we Americans had a real one? In recent decades, we have had two kinds of political leaders—bullies and followers. Beginning with Richard Nixon but more so with Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush, Republican presidents have been bullies. Unwilling or unable to achieve the consensus of the majority for their radical agendas, they got what they wanted by any means necessary—corrupting the electoral process, lying, smearing opponents and fear-mongering. The Democrats—Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama—have been followers, and thus far less effectual. Obama’s decision to come out in favor of gay marriage is classic leading from the back. “Public support for same-sex marriage is growing at a pace that surprises even professional pollsters as older generations of voters who tend to be strongly opposed are supplanted by younger ones who are just as strongly in favor,” notes The New York Times. “Same-sex couples are featured in some of the most-popular shows on television, without controversy.” No wonder: The latest Pew Research poll shows 47 percent of voters support gay marriage, vs. 43 percent against. (Among swing voters—of more interest to the Obama cam-

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paign—support is 47-to-39 percent in favor.) “I believe marriage is between a man and a woman. I am not in favor of gay marriage,” Obama said before the 2008 election. At that time, Americans were running 40-to-56 percent against allowing same-sex couples to wed. I can’t read his mind, but I bet Obama was OK with gay marriage in 2008. Wrongly, he sided with anti-gay bigots because he thought it would help him win. The president’s change of ideological heart was painfully awkward. “I have hesitated on gay marriage in part because I thought that civil unions would be sufficient,” he told ABC. “I was sensitive to the fact that for a lot of people, the word ‘marriage’ was something that invokes very powerful traditions, religious beliefs and so forth.” But now that’s changed, he said. “It is important for me personally to go ahead and affirm that same-sex couples should be able to get married.” If Obama was a real leader, he would have gotten out front of the issue four years ago, when it mattered. The truth is, Vice President Joe Biden’s remarks forced the issue. Six states and the District of Columbia have legalized gay weddings. True, the president’s statement may hasten the demise of the vile Defense of Marriage Act, which blocks federal recognition of gay marriage, but it comes too late to be meaningful. Gay marriage was an inevitability before Obama spoke. The nation led itself on this issue. The public debated and thought and finally concluded that gays and lesbians deserve equal treatment before the law. Obama didn’t lead us. We led him.

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NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS PATR IC K S W EENEY

THE CRUX IN FLUX Coffee is currently the only brew offered at Boise’s new nightspot

Gary Anderson’s Schwinn was wrecked in an accident involving a Boise Police vehicle.

BOISE POLICE INVOLVED IN CYCLING ACCIDENT

ANDREW CRISP The Crux defies categorization. The unique blend of nightclub, coffee shop and beer garden has been open since January, but the all-ages venue/tavern/coffee klatsch is currently minus an element it had for its first three months of operation (and planned from its inception): beer and wine. “Our family didn’t want to get into the bar business,” said Bob Cooper, owner of The Crux. “We were looking for a Europeanstyle cafe—and hitting the mark.” But The Crux is missing a key provision of those European cafes—the ability to serve alcohol to adults, while still admitting those younger than 21 years of age. “[Idaho State Police] officers came down here and said that they wanted to post that it’s a place for 21 and older,” said Cooper. “And I said no, no, no, we’ll pull the beer. We’re not going to do that.” Cooper said he wants an environment where customers can imbibe coffee, sip a beer, catch a concert or just hang out in the space. During the Treefort Music Fest in March, The Crux was at-capacity for a

Bob Cooper envisioned European-style cafes, with an ability to serve coffee and beer in an all-ages environment, when he opened The Crux on Main Street. Due to state laws, those plans are now on hold.

Robert Clements, chief of Idaho’s Alcohol Beverage Control. “They should have been posting their doors limiting minors.” Clements is one of only two officers tasked with enforcing the state’s alcohol beverage laws. With limited staffing and budget, Clements follows up on approximately 5,000 licensees across the state. In April, he met with one of them, Cooper, to talk about how his license didn’t allow for an all-ages venue. “I’m not trying to tell you there were no mistakes made by us. We’re very naive about

T H E F D A S E E S [ C OF F E E ] A S F OOD; SC I EN T I F I C A L LY I T ’ S C O NSI DE RE D FOOD. WE L L , I ’M N O T G OI N G T O G I V E Y OU A [BE ER AN D W I NE ] R E S TA U R A N T LI CE NSE WITH J U S T C O F F E E . ”

number of concerts, packing in swarms of people along its corrugated-steel bar. The Crux remained one of few Treefort venues for underage patrons. But on the evening of May 3, the place was nearly empty. Half of the people in the building were on stage, performing for a bartender and a sole patron. Cooper said sales are down 30 percent and two full-time employees are down to 15 hours a week after two Idaho State Police officers told The Crux in April to ban minors from the establishment or quit serving beer and wine. “They didn’t qualify as a restaurant so they qualified as a bar/tavern,” said Lt. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

this business,” said Cooper, who also manages a flooring company in Portland, Ore. “We’ve never been in this business before.” Cooper said he didn’t open The Crux to simply create another drinking establishment, and said he didn’t feel like Idaho law barred his vision of a coffee shop with booze on the side. Much of his immediate family, including his sons, serve as his employees. “If they gave me a liquor license tomorrow, I would not want it,” said Cooper. “And we don’t want to be a bar. If we were a bar, we’d do 21 and over. It’s not what we had in mind to bring downtown and to run as a business.”

So when the ISP came to tell him to surrender his license or remove the beer and wine, Cooper locked his kegs and taps in a back room, hoping to iron out his problem sooner than later. But beer and wine haven’t flowed at The Crux since. “They wanted to give us a $1,000 fine, or take away the beer license for two weeks—or 10 days—I can’t remember, but it was our choice,” said Cooper. Ultimately, The Crux wasn’t penalized. Cooper said his original intent was to apply for a license to pour beer and wine under the terms of a restaurant endorsement, which allows drinking in an establishment with patrons of all ages. But Clements told Cooper that his business didn’t qualify. “You look at legitimate restaurants—a chain or local restaurant—you can tell they hold themselves out as a food-eating establishment,” said Clements. “You would not typically look at a restaurant that charges a cover to get in.” To bring himself back into compliance, Cooper asked Clements what he needed to make his coffee shop more like a restaurant. He said he was told The Crux needed to have a menu, offer food prepared on site and purchase an oven. “I was going to be a smartass and ask, ‘Do I have to plug the stove in?’” said Cooper. Through the massive picture window of The Crux, Boise’s Main Street reflects a bit of Cooper’s old-world city vision: the city’s antique-looking light posts, automatically clicking on at twilight, Cooper said he crafted a menu of sandwiches, drew up new design plans with an architect, and has added a kitchen space to his plans. “But I said, ‘Really, tell me what you want. Six sandwiches? Eight sandwiches? You tell me and that’s what I 10 will do to get what I want,’” he said.

Gary Anderson really didn’t want to be reminded that this was Boise Bike Week. When he looked at photos of his badly damaged Schwinn cruiser, he winced. “My bike was really my only source of transportation,” said Anderson, 61. But for now, Anderson is walking, and that’s doubly difficult considering he’s recovering from a serious bike accident involving a Boise Police Department cruiser. “I’m hurting, especially right here,” said Anderson, reaching to his lower right hip. Anderson said when he was hit on the evening of May 2 he was thrown from his cycle, “maybe as much as 20 feet.” Because the crash involved a Boise Police vehicle, the Ada County Sheriff’s Office has taken over the investigation. “They call it conflicting out,” said Andrea Dearden, public information officer for ACSCO. “We’ll hand over everything we have to the prosecutors, who will decide charges or citations, if those are appropriate.” At 9:40 p.m. on May 2, Anderson was on his way to his custodial job at Boise State, where he works the graveyard shift Sundays through Thursdays. Because he travels at night, Anderson said he had two lights on the front of his bike—one on each handlebar—and another light on his seat. Traveling south on Sixth Street, a one-way thoroughfare, Anderson said he had a green light to proceed through the Sixth and Front streets intersection. But that’s where he was hit by a north-bound police vehicle, traveling the wrong way on a one-way street. “But, bam,” he said, clapping his hands. “The next thing I know, I was hit by a police cruiser, and the vehicle was coming from the wrong direction.” Dearden confirmed that the police officer had his emergency lights on. “He was not in pursuit but he was responding to a call,” said Dearden. Anderson was rushed to St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center, where several X-rays were taken (he didn’t break anything), and he was given some pain medication. Anderson guessed that he has already paid approximately $100 in out-of-pocket medical expenses, though his job, which he has had for 11 years, provides him medical insurance. “But I still have to get to work somehow,” he said. Anderson said he has already been contacted by a representative from Intermountain Claims, representing the City of Boise, regarding the accident. And he’s obviously skipping this week’s Boise Bike Week activities. “Right now, more than anything, I need a bike.” —George Prentice

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 7

NEWS IDAHO R IVER S U NITED

Larry is now stuffed and mounted on the wall at the MK Nature Center in Boise.

A LONESOME LEGEND The 20th anniversary of Lonesome Larry GEORGE PRENTICE “Dewey Defeats Truman.” “Passengers Safely Moved and Steamer Titanic Taken in Tow.” Some headlines got it wrong—some more than others. “First Sockeye Swims Back Into Redfish: Fish and Game Hopes There Will Be Enough Salmon to Breed,” read the headline of the Idaho Statesman on Aug. 5, 1992. But Fish and Game couldn’t have been more wrong. In fact, the sockeye that fluttered into Redfish Lake Creek on Aug. 4, 1992, would be the only sockeye to swim back to the weir that year. The sockeye would become better known as “Lonesome Larry.” But Larry’s legacy does live on to this day. It’s believed that as many as 10 percent of every year’s returning sockeye salmon are directly descended from Lonesome Larry. His iconic journey spawned the Idaho Department of Fish and Game’s captive breeding program, but environmentalists warn that Idaho’s redfish still aren’t safe. It was 20 years ago this month that Larry entered the Columbia River system. It’s believed that he hatched from an egg sometime around March 1988. But while he was swimming in the Pacific Ocean, his relatives were dying in record numbers. On Nov. 14, 1991, about the time Larry was 3 years old, sockeye salmon were listed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (now National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries) as endangered. It’s believed that Larry began swimming up the Columbia River in May 1992. Larry was among 15 sockeye salmon to pass lower

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Granite Dam between June 8 and Aug. 30, 1992, but he was the only fish to survive the remaining journey. According to Idaho Rivers United, Larry swam 900 miles up the Columbia, Snake and Salmon rivers. He scaled eight dams, dove through major rapids and climbed 6,547 feet. And on Aug. 4, 1992, he made his solo entrance into Redfish Lake. “This lone fish … swam the lonely ocean for two or three years and then fought to return—alone,” said Greg Stahl, IRU assistant policy director. “Only he survived. The tragedy can’t be overstated.” But Lonesome Larry’s legend was only beginning. His milt (seminal fluid) was put on ice and used to fertilize eggs from returning females in 1996 and 1997. According to the IRU, Larry’s genes are now scattered throughout a percentage of every new generation of sockeye, including the 1,000 or so fish that are likely to return in 2012. A series of court-ordered spills along the eight Snake and Columbia river dams have assisted salmon survival, along with the ESA listing, but IRU remains concerned. “The return rate is still dismal—probably only 10 percent of what it needs to be,” said IRU board member Tom Stuart. Stuart’s colleague, IRU Executive Director Bill Sedivy, said hatchery programs and the current spill program won’t be enough to recover the species. “Removing the four low-value dams on the lower Snake River in eastern Washington is still the only sure way to keep redfish in Idaho’s Redfish Lake,” said Sedivy.

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CITIZEN

SALLY JEFFCOAT St. Alphonsus CEO on faith, hope and dignity GEORGE PRENTICE

Do you look at your position dramatically differently than when you first came here? In 2009, we were in the process of looking at acquiring three hospitals to the west, in Nampa, Ontario, [Ore.], and Baker City, [Ore]. I knew that was a possibility when I came into the position. My first year was very much about creating that new health system. It was great to create something from scratch. Now, we have a family of four hospitals, 900 physicians and a lot of associates. How many employees are in your system? About 5,000 associates. Are you experiencing any staffing shortages for any particular specialties? It goes in cycles. I think with the economy, a number of people who would not normally be working full-time are holding onto those

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jobs. So our nursing vacancies aren’t as severe as in years past. The areas in greatest need are pharmacy and medical imaging—radiology, ultrasound and MRI technicians.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Sally Jeffcoat always knew she would be a caregiver. “My father was a surgeon. He was my inspiration,” she said. A self-proclaimed Army brat, Jeffcoat moved around a great deal but spent many of her formative years in Texas, receiving her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nursing from the University of Texas. “Hook ’em horns,” said Jeffcoat. “But I’ve been gone from Texas for 10 years now, and my family and I adore Idaho.” In June, Jeffcoat will mark her third anniversary as one of Idaho’s highestprofile caregivers: president and CEO of St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center. Though she spends many of her days in a neverending string of meetings, she sat down long enough to talk about her colleagues, health-care reform and how she still loves to take time to visit with patients.

What is your current operating budget? Across the four hospitals and medical group, our revenues total close to $700 million. The Boise operation is about $440 million. Are you expecting more growth? A little bit. Our volume of patients is modest; maybe it’s a 1 percent increase. But we’re seeing a big shift from inpatient to outpatient, so our growth is on the ambulatory side. As the population continues to grow older, we see a lot more utilization of our critical-care services. Won’t that eventually level off? It’s going to be a long time. We’re certainly going to be adding more critical-care beds. If you’re really ill, St. Al’s is the place to be. Other systems are good and give great care, but I think having a Level II Trauma Center offers highly skilled delivery of care. Do you have a sense of how many people walk through your doors? We impact approximately 300,000 people a year. Is that a daunting number for you? I see it as a sacred thing—the opportunity to live our mission, caring with dignity. I get a little philosophical about it at times and I take it quite seriously. I think it’s really important to interact with as many people as possible. And part of that is being a faithbased organization. I hope that at least once every day somebody feels that I bring God’s

presence into the room with me. Even in our business meetings, we start with a reflection, and it’s remarkable how that can set our tone. Someone can think, “Oh, that’s why I’m here. To bring healing and hope, to further the mission.” And how does that mission relate directly to a patient’s care? Last Sunday, I had noticed one of our nurses had been crying. She told me about a 95-year-old woman, diagnosed with dementia. Her guardian decided that she didn’t want to be her guardian anymore. Plus, the patient had been really missing her dog and she was quite emotional. One of our nurses brought the patient one of our St. Al’s [plush] bears and told the woman, “You get to name him and take care of him while you’re here, until you see your dog.” She was so happy and the nurses were so touched. They were trying to get that woman into a better spiritual place. I’m so proud of the people that I’m privileged to work with. I must note that your eyes are welling up; do you find yourself occasionally emotional? Every once in a while. I’m very decisive and very clear when I need to be. But the more you can be yourself and disclose what you really care about, that 10 engenders trust and natural passion.

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 9

CITIZEN Do you ever take a break from your meetings and go visit the nursery? It’s probably one of the things that I get the most satisfaction out of but have the least time to do. It’s one of the most joyful things that takes me back to my roots. 9

Part of St. Al’s mission statement invokes social justice and caring for the poor. Have you seen an increased need for your care from those who may live in the shadows? Last year, we delivered $37 million in charity and community benefit systems. But there is always much more to do. The downturn of the economy has affected so many people, and so many aren’t seeking care because they simply can’t afford it. I don’t know if we really know what’s out there. And by the way, when I think of the poor and vulnerable, it’s not just people who are economically poor. You can be poor in spirit as well. What can you do differently? We’re piloting three patient-centered medical homes and that’s very exciting for us. What do those homes look like? It’s a different model of care: a team of people prepared to care for the individual. We’re asking that primary-care physicians serve as team leaders, working with a number of individuals to coordinate the pa-

UNDER R THE

2012 PLAYS ROMEO AND JULIET

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Photo Credit: Betsy Mugavero*, Christian Durso*, Romeo and Juliet (2012). Photo by Roger Mastrioanni. *Member Actors’ Equity.

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Where are you with this project? We just started. We’re investing significant resources into the program. One is on Overland Road, another in Eagle and another on Federal Way. Once these are successful, our plan is to roll out similar homes throughout our whole region. Let’s talk about the Affordable Care Act. How anxious are you about the pending ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court? There are so many different predictions, but it’s not affecting our plan. We know that the health-care system is broken. If you look at our nation in a global context, it’s easy to conclude that our healthcare system is too expensive and doesn’t produce the kind of outcomes you would expect if you’re investing as much as we do. Our ability to succeed as a nation, with a more stable economy, is going to require that we address our health-care system. We know that we have to change the way we deliver care, and the patient-centered medical home is an example. I quite simply believe that everyone should have access to a fundamental level of care. As a clinician, as a nurse and as somebody who has been in a lot of health-care settings in different communities, I just can’t imagine turning somebody away if they’re in need.

NEWS Quoting from Idaho State Code, however, Clements said it may take more than just offering food. He wouldn’t speak to The Crux specifically, but for a location to qualify as a “primarily food-eating establishment,” certain criteria must be met. “Primarily, are they advertising themselves as a food-eating establishment? If they are advertised as a dancing, drinking, nightlife establishment, then they are not going out of their way to promote themselves as a restaurant,” said Clements. That qualification as a restaurant can also come from a ratio of 40 percent food to 60 percent non-food sales, but only if other conditions are met. Cooper believes coffee counts as food. “Is coffee food or not?” asked Cooper. “Well, the FDA sees it as food; scientifically it’s considered food, but Lt. Clements says, ‘Well, I’m not going to give you a restaurant license with just coffee.’” Cooper said Clements makes his decision based on his personal opinion of what defines a restaurant, not Idaho Code. “I tried to explain to him that Oregon has that same uniform code, written the same way,” said Cooper. “They interpret it 7

Freely adapted from Molière by Oded Gross and Tracy Young. Originally produced by Oregon Shakespeare Festival Sponsored by Holland & Hart, LLP and Boise Weekly

tient’s care. In an ideal setting, there would be 2,000-3,000 individuals assigned to a patient-centered medical home.

as a shop like this is perfect for being food.” Cooper said he was told Clements needs to be able to sit down in an establishment and order a meal in order to classify the location as a restaurant. “The gist of it was: ‘When I come into your place, if it’s a restaurant, I want to be able to have a meal.’ Well, the key word in that whole thing is the word ‘I.’” However, Clements pointed to Idaho statute and adopted rules, which specify what makes up a restaurant, including food-prep employees, a kitchen and cooking equipment. He said a restaurant is also defined by its regular menu, advertising and other atmosphere elements, as well. “We’d have to look at other things, like ‘Do they have full cooking facilities? Do they have regularly priced food items?’ It doesn’t have to be just a waiter,” said Clements. For now, The Crux continues to try operating in a gray area of the Idaho Code. Neither a cocktail lounge, nor a dance hall, bar, speakeasy or coffee shack, The Crux is in flux. And Cooper is waiting to complete his next set of paperwork—permits from the State Health Department—before launching his new kitchen.

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n Idaho ideas sprout as abundantly as the state’s signature tuber—more so, even, since high-tech products account for more than 60 percent of the Gem State’s exports, according to TechAmerica’s annual Cyberstates report. Year after year Idaho racks up accolades for its techno friendliness, a characteristic reflected by data in the most recent Idaho Patent Report released by business law firm Stoel Rives in 2011. According to the report, Idaho inventors received 974 patents from 2009 to 2010, an 18.3 percent increase over 2008-2009. What’s more, Idaho is routinely ranked among the friendliest states for small business start-ups—most recently earning an A-plus ranking from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation in conjunction with thumbtacks.org. In the study, released May 8, Idaho was one of only four states to earn top marks, joined by Colorado, Oklahoma and Texas. Even better, Idaho ranked seventh nationally in the category labeled “Optimism about the future.” With international tech heavyweights like Micron and Hewlett-Packard, a national laboratory and robust research programs at three state universities, Idaho has long been regarded as an up-and-coming innovation superstar. But going from “eureka!” to a marketable product is a high hurdle in the best of times. Idaho may be rich in ideas but turning them into companies is a perennial challenge. Now it’s a matter of state policy.

THINK GLOBALLY, INVENT LOCALLY Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter is fond of his good ol’ boy mystique. Routinely seen in cowboy duds and toiling on his sprawling ranch in Star, Otter first made a name for himself working for his late father-in-law, potato magnate J.R. Simplot. The gov is an ag man for sure, but he’s also an increasingly ardent supporter of pushing Idaho’s ideas out of the ground and onto the market. Case in point: the Idaho Global Entrepreneurial Mission, or IGEM, an idea hatched by the Idaho Technology Council and which Otter helped usher through the Legislature with broad support this past session. Though labeled with the somewhat vague tagline, “Driving industry through innovation,” IGEM has a specific set of goals: increasing the amount of research being conducted at state universities, marrying the fruits of that research with private industry, accelerating commercialization into products and, ultimately, creating new home-grown businesses. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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It’s a public-private collaboration fueled by three pots of money from the state’s general fund: $1 million to the Department of Commerce, with $950,000 earmarked for bridge funding grants to start-ups; $2 million in permanent, ongoing support for the Center for Advanced Energy Studies, another collaboration effort between state universities and the Idaho National Laboratory; and $2 million in increased research funding, which will be competed for by Boise State, the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Modeled after the successful USTAR program in Utah, IGEM is an effort to bring together—with funding—three legs of what Boise State Vice President for Research Mark Rudin calls the “triangle.” “Oftentimes, whether it’s the university or the government or industry, they all try to

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figure out how to leverage their separate abilities to increase economic growth,” Rudin said. “This represents the state trying to invest some money into that triangle. ... “I believe this is the first time this has happened in Idaho, and I think it really has energized the private and public sector to take it upon themselves to accept the challenge and move development forward.” At an unveiling of the program at the University of Idaho, officials pointed to research in areas that could save commercial trout fisheries as a potential economic boon. At Idaho State University the IGEM presentation included a tour of the university’s nano crystal laboratory. According to Rudin, Boise State is focused on ramping up its computer science department— specifically, turning out more CS graduates. “We produce probably a couple dozen

[computer science] graduates per year, but the work force needs are much more than that,” Rudin said. “The IGEM opportunity allows us to compete for additional funds to do a couple of things: one is to propose more faculty lines within our CS department and augment graduate assistantships. ... “Ultimately the purpose of the grant is to bring in talented faculty and grad students that can engage with industry, conduct research with industry, and really beef up the number of graduates that we produce annually as kind of a work force development initiative.”

COME TOGETHER, RIGHT NOW Peter Midgley, a Boise patent attorney and founding member of the Idaho Technology Council, couldn’t agree more that IGEM’s overall purpose is to bind Idaho’s tech sector

stakeholders in a new way. And it’s been a long time coming. “The need for IGEM goes way back,” Midgley said. “If you look historically at the tech industry in this state, it’s kind of been a work in progress. The various companies and thought leaders in the industry were not necessarily coming together in a coordinated and cohesive way—especially if you compare the technology industry to other industries, like the dairy industry or natural resources industry. We didn’t have Silicon Valley or the Research Triangle—there wasn’t that power base that was a coalescing force.” At the same time, Midgley added, other states were being much more proactive in forging links between the public and private sectors, specifically when it came to research and development. “The challenge of technology is there’s a lot of front end-loaded costs,” he said. “We need world-class research, we need to attract that caliber of researchers, and it’s not just human capital, it’s the physical equipment and lab facilities that are just really cutting edge. That’s a very significant investment and it required significant vision on the part of the public sector.” As anyone who has watched the Idaho Legislature knows, the politics of wrangling general fund dollars for any visionary project is no mean feat. Yet IGEM sailed through with sweeping support from lawmakers. “If the 19th century was an agrarian economy and the 20th century was an industrial economy, the 21st century is going to be an information economy. I think that’s clear,” Midgley said. “I think for Idaho to stay competitive with that, we need to take steps to make sure that our public policies are consistent and evolving. ... We can’t just stand idly by and watch other states take steps and just remain trapped in a predominately agriculture-based economy or natural resources-based economy. That’s just not a viable option going forward for Idaho. “And even with all the difficult economic challenges, even with all the political challenges—and you’d be hard pressed to find a state that’s more fiscally conservative than Idaho—even with all of that, to see this level of commitment speaks to the urgent need for this initiative.” Idaho Technology Council President and founder Jay Larsen agreed, adding that while the need has been urgent for a long time, a combination of factors conspired to delay any move to fill it. In some ways, he said, Idaho—and Boise, in particular—were victims of their own success. “We had some tremendous business foundations in Idaho. At one time, Boise, specifically, had more Fortune 500 companies headquartered here per capita than anywhere in the nation,” Larsen said. There was a great entrepreneurial spirit, he added, but as the economy tanked and those corporate giants moved on, it became clear that Idaho had rested too much on its laurels as a low-tax, cheap-land haven. “When the collapse took place, it peeled back the onion and allowed you to see what your strengths and weakness were,” Larsen said. “We were based on land price and home construction. We didn’t have the organic growth from small- to mid-size businesses, no tech transfer and very little emphasis on research. We were too reliant on the big corporations.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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Peter Midgley, founding member of the Idaho Technology Council, believes the coordinated effort offered by IGEM has been a long time in coming for the Idaho tech industry.

In that earlier climate of go-go prosperity, it was easy for the private sector to become complacent, but Larsen said those were the players who should have been working all along to push collaborative programs like IGEM. That’s what was happening in Utah, where government, education and business came together in the wake of the Dot Com Bust to diversify the state’s tech sector. The result was USTAR, and the upshot was that while Idaho lost more than 4,000 jobs in the early days of the great recession (and many thousands more in the years to follow), Utah enjoyed an unemployment rate 2.5 to 3 percent lower than ours, invested $460 million over seven years into research and development and tech transfer and, according to Larsen, probably added 110 new companies and 8,000 jobs. Today, the Milkin Institute ranks Utah as a first-tier economy and Idaho sits in the third tier—out of four. “Its easy to do that armchair quarterback thing and look back and say what we should have done,” Larsen said. “But now is the time to look forward to what we can do now to diversify our economy on the tech side, so when there’s a downturn in the economy, you don’t have all your eggs in one basket. IGEM represents that.”

SCHOOL OF HARD KNOCKS Not everyone is convinced that the need for IGEM is so urgent, however. As with any government-supported program, there are those who cast a skeptical eye on whether the state can outperform private industry. When it comes to IGEM, Rick Ritter, who has long helmed Idaho TechConnect, is one of those skeptics. TechConnect is a statewide private nonprofit that helps start-ups with everything from raising capital to commercializing their products. It’s also the organizer of events like TechLaunch, a business pitch contest on May 15-16 at the Grove Hotel in Boise. Ritter points to TechLaunch, in its ninth year, as a prime example that Idaho’s private sector is already doing a bang-up job of turning ideas into market-worthy ventures. “We had 29 applicants to TechLaunch from around the state—almost double the best year in eight years,” Ritter said, adding that number was winnowed down to 10 finalists competing for $15,000 in cash prizes.

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“Clearly, there are some well-thought-out ideas and they’re spread widely across the state—from Sandpoint to Rexburg and all the places in between,” he said. “All of them will be top-quality ideas and most will be ready to invest in now.” Ritter, while supportive of increased investment in university research, said that IGEM runs the risk of “throwing good money after bad.” The Center for Advanced Energy Studies, which will get $2 million in permanent, ongoing support from IGEM, has received funding from the Legislature since its inception—though under IGEM, those monies will be increased and made a permanent line item—and Ritter contends that university research programs have already benefited from state support through the Higher Education Research Council, which operates under the State Board of Education (albeit, the amount of HERC funding has been smaller than that offered by IGEM). “It’s a similar program to what they’ve done for the past three years,” Ritter said. “How many businesses have we gotten out of that? Frankly, they’re giving them $2 million to continue doing what they’ve been doing without any evidence that it works.” Rather than focus solely on university research, Ritter said a better public-private model would be similar to what is done in Washington, where businesses and entrepreneurs seek out university partners to meet specific needs—not the other way around. “All the money stays inside the education system, but the business gets the direct benefit of it because you’re solving technical issues that they actually have, not something that some faculty member dreamed up in their head,” he said. “Let’s be solving business problems, not creating something we don’t have a clue on.” What’s more, Ritter added, it would be wiser for support to go where the start-ups already live. “Ninety percent of all the start-ups in the state have nothing to do with the universities,” he said. “Are we making an investment in 10 percent of the marketplace to somehow get higher returns? ... I understand the need to have research, but saying you’re going to invest in university research and it’s going to result in more start-ups—there’s no evidence for that.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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Rick Ritter, president and CEO of Idaho TechConnect, believes that the private sector, not the state, is the power to build Idaho’s future in tech.

Bill Connors, president and CEO of the Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce, said what matters most is that IGEM is based on a good formula. “My impression is that it doesn’t happen very often, but when you can get business, government and higher ed together, it’s a good thing,” he said. “It’s not a lot of money but the formula is good. ... If we can expand on that with more money in the future, great, but I think it’s a step in the right direction. Higher ed has been taking a hit over the past couple of years, so reversing that trend is a good thing.” Midgley, meanwhile, admits that the amount of start-up activity generated by Idaho university research has been limited, but counters that it’s a matter of perspective. “When you look at our track record here in Idaho and you look at the amount of activity that we’ve generated based on the amount of dollars that we’ve spent, I think we’ve done as well as anybody and as well as can be expected,” he said. “The truth is that the research and development dollars spent in Idaho are historically on the low end. That’s the reason you have not seen dozens or scores of start-ups spilling out of our universities and our national lab— in part the reason for that is the number of dollars being spent in the past.” Even with an upswing in funding for university research—and a $1 million slated for direct support to start-ups—Midgley urges caution when it comes to expectations. “We are not expecting to invest $10 today and see a return of $20 by the end of the year,” he said. “In order to have that kind of activity, you need to make a significant investment, and like any investment, you have to understand and expect that not every dollar spent in R&D is going to have immediate return—that’s the nature of making those investments. They’re forward thinking and they require risk and some of them will fail. ... “It only takes one blockbuster drug that comes out of your chemistry department to generate millions and millions of dollars in licensing fees,” he added. “That one success can cover the nine other losses. IGEM is a good first step.”

BABY STEPS While the idea for IGEM was born of collaboration between members of the Idaho WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Technology Council, now that it’s a reality, the baton has been passed to the IGEM Council—a new 12-member group that replaces the former Idaho Innovation Council. Operating under the Department of Commerce, IGEM Council members will be appointed by Otter and, according to a Commerce Department spokesperson Megan Ronk, a prospective membership list is being compiled for consideration by the governor, with a final roster planned to be announced in the next few weeks. Once the membership is finalized, the group will start establishing its meeting schedule and rules. “Our goal is to ensure the committee gets up and running and writing rules for the program as quickly as possible so we can get the parameters of the grants established and start getting some of those funds out there,” said Ronk. Though still fluid, IGEM’s structure is three-fold: The IGEM Council will oversee and make final decisions related to the program, with Commerce administering the $1 million innovation grant, and the $2 million pile of university research funds managed by the Higher Education Research Council. According to Midgley, who is also a member of HERC, the council sent out requests for proposals to the state’s universities, and several projects have already been submitted for funding, though details are not yet available. “The walls are starting to come up around this thing and it’s very exciting,” Midgley said. “It’s absolutely happening and we’ve received some significant proposals. Very forward-looking, very innovative. Within the next few weeks, certainly by mid-summer, I believe those funds will be awarded.” Rudin is similarly enthused about IGEM. “I can’t be more supportive of IGEM. It really was a visionary step by the governor to propose this and the Legislature to do a lot of great work to take the necessary steps to implement it,” he said. “It’s a beginning, and we need to be in this for the long haul. I think it’s really initially about capacity building: recruiting and bringing in talent, setting the stage to do bigger and better things. There are different types of deliverables. If we can bring in some good talent to augment the talent we have, that’s a good thing.”

9:30AM - 1:30PM 8th Street from Bannock to Main Street & on the Grove Plaza

A Free Service of the Market! JOIN US FOR FOOD REVOLUTION DAY AT THE MARKET!

* Fresh locally grown produce, herbs, & flowers * Idaho Specialty Foods & Wines * Local Artwork *

Chef Abbigail Carlson Cooking with fresh, seasonal produce from the Market Saturdays Q 10am to Noon

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Beer vs. wine, the epic battle continues.

Bikes and beer go hand in handlebar at the Boise Bike Week Block Party.

THURSDAY MAY 17 delish

THURSDAY MAY 17

BEER VS. WINE PART II

pedal party BOISE BIKE WEEK BLOCK PARTY During Boise Bike Week, our fair town will become even more obsessed over the twowheels, favoring fixed-gears over Fiats. To cement that image in the collective minds of Treasure Valley riders, the cycling community is blocking off some sweet downtown Boise asphalt to dedicate to the paragon of human-powered transit: the bike. On Thursday, May 17, the Linen Building will be abuzz with booze and bicycles for Boise Bike Week as Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats provide dulcet Western ditties on the Linen stage. Admission is free, and Boise Bicycle Project will offer a bike corral for loads of semivalet parking. Spandexed road bikers, the fixie faithful, cruiser fans and anyone else with a passion for pedaling are welcome. In the Linen Building’s parking lot, local food trucks Boise Fry Company, B29 Streatery and Riceworks will sling eats to pair with beer provided by New Belgium Brewing Company. New Belgium will also raffle a shiny, themed cruiser bike and a brand new Bob’s Bicycles cargo trailer. The proceeds of the raffle go toward paving the new Boise River Trail. Local cycling vendors and organizations like Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance will peddle their wares or get out the word adjacent to the Linen Building. The festivities kick off at 5:30 p.m., with music beginning at 7:30 p.m. The shindig will have folks kicking up their heels well into the evening hours, followed by a two-wheeled twilight ride home. 5:30-9:30 p.m., FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-385-0111, boisebikeweek.org.

FRIDAY MAY 18 lit up BOOK AND WINE TOUR Few delights compare to uncorking a bottle of wine with which to plop down to read from a good book. Be

it merlot and Murakami or chardonnay and Chaucer, the aromatics of the fermented fruit beverage pair perfectly with the odorous volatiles emitted from paper pages. At Rediscovered Books, tome slingers like Barb OlicHamilton know this and have created an ode to slightly tipsy readings with their Book and Wine Tour. Friday, May 18, marks the next

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sojourn through a collection of selected work alongside tastings of fine wines and Basque Market tapas. “Everybody hears from every book, tastes every wine and samples every tapas,” said Olic-Hamilton. For $50, each participant gets to sample a host of wines and tapas and hear from a carefully selected lineup of 11 books. At the

Americans love a good food battle—witness the seemingly ceaseless stream of competition “reality” television shows that pair words like hell, wars, top and nightmares with culinary terms like cupcakes, chef and kitchen. But what makes a food fight even better is including some stellar booze. Hence Beer vs. Wine Part II. This delicious rematch from the people over at Life’s Kitchen—that neat-o place that helps at-risk youth while teaching them restaurant skills—features a six-course meal from chefs Ryan Hembree and Maggie Kiefer. Each course is paired with a beer and wine, and attendees cast their ballots for the libation that best complements each course. In the end, one chef takes home bragging rights and satiated dinner guests take home cabs. The first installment of Beer vs. Wine was a big hit, and wine emerged victorious after the dessert course in a super-close competition. The Thursday, May 17, rematch will feature an all-vegetarian menu, with selections like stuffed Anaheim peppers, “fancy mac-n-cheese” and rhubarb mascarpone cake. Proceeds from the event benefit the organization. And if the idea of helping out a unique and worthy program while chowing down and drinking up sounds too good to pass by, get movin’—reservations must be made no later than Wednesday, May 16, at 5 p.m. And if you want to choose your dining companions, grab some friends and organizers will work to make sure members of a group sit together. 6 p.m., $40. Life’s Kitchen, 1025 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-331-0199, lifeskitchen.org.

end of the evening, each person picks a bottle of wine and a book to take home. This will be the first time authors will join the tasting tour, with Portland, Ore., writers Alexis M. Smith and Evan Schneider reading from their work. Olic-Hamilton will be one of the booksellers on hand to launch mini-discussions of the other nine books, each chosen by the Rediscovered staff. To keep things moving speedily, the event’s participants will be broken up into groups for the tasting, sipping, reading experience. 7 p.m., $50. Rediscov-

ered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

SATURDAYSUNDAY MAY 19-20 park party EAGLE ISLAND EXPERIENCE FESTIVAL Who wouldn’t leap at the opportunity to sit at an Irish pub tapping your fingers on

a glass full of rich Guinness as you watch Irish folk dancing? Or jet to Spain to sway your hips to the lively guitar strokes in traditional flamenco dancing? Or perhaps even snag a seat overlooking a spotlighted catwalk and gleefully drool over the tantalizing international fashion shows in New York? The question is less about how much you would like to go, but more about how to afford experiencing these cultural treasures without selling off vital organs. Thankfully, immersing yourself in other cultures has never been WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

THURSDAY MAY 17 FIND

hello, Jerry JERRY SEINFELD AT THE MORRISON CENTER Pick a situation in life—any situation—it doesn’t matter which: There is an episode of Seinfeld that addresses its inherent frustration and absurdity. The long-running sitcom is a crucial part of our mythology because it speaks so effectively to the American experience, one of bizarre social obligations and existential decisions with no correct answer. But before there was Seinfeld the character, there was Seinfeld the stand-up comedian, a man who was ranked in the Top 12 of Comedy Central’s greatest stand-ups of all time. The reason why he ranked so high goes deeper than just Seinfeld’s jokes. The 2002 documentary Comedian explored his decision to throw away all the material he had accumulated since he began stand-up in the late 1970s and start from scratch. It was a window into the head of a man with a deep reverence and respect for the craft of making people chuckle who is constantly dedicated to self-improvement. The portrait was made all the more poignant because the film also examined the career of up-and-coming comedian Orny Adams, whose caustic complaints and cynicism about his career, the audience and the world in general stood in stark contrast to Seinfeld’s nearly zen focus on how to craft a joke. In one scene, Adams questions Seinfeld about how he can possibly explain to his parents that after dedicating many years of his life to comedy, he still isn’t rich and famous. Seinfeld, seemingly puzzled by Adams, offers an anecdote about a traveling band caught outdoors in winter weather, which happens across a window that reveals a Norman Rockewell-eqsue family inside, all dressed up and gathered around the fireplace. “How can people live like that?” one of the bedraggled musicians says. Adams nods and chuckles, but he doesn’t seem to get it. Seinfeld is in it for the game, not the results. And that’s what makes him one of the greats. He will perform at the Morrison Center Thursday, May 17. Tickets are available at the box office, all Select-A-Seat outlets or online at idahotickets.com. 7 p.m. $65-$78. Morrison Center, 2201 Caesar Chavez Lane, 208-4261110, mc.boisestate. edu.

JERRY SE I NFE LD.CO M

more affordable than it is at the Eagle Island Experience Festival. Saturday, May 19, and Sunday, May 20, Gruntwerks will team up with Global Lounge to bring you two full days of multicultural “full sensor y” creative arts entertainment—all for free. The only cost to you is $5 for parking, so make some friends and plan a carpooling adventure.

S U B M I T

And if you’re concerned that this event is targeted toward an adult audience, which your far-too-maturefor-their-age children still don’t quite fit into, think again. The folks at the Eagle Island Experience Festival feel “it takes a community to raise a child” and so, sprightly adolescents will be offered a specially catered list of activities, ranging from

DIN-INK CUTLERY PEN TOPS

Score some bento box awesomeness along with a cultural celebration at Japan Day.

FRIDAY MAY 18 culture IDAHO JAPAN DAY CELEBRATION Wedging a celebration of the rich history of Japan into the confines of the Basque Center might seem odd on paper. But with the amount of culture the Idaho Japanese Association plans to cram into the space Friday, May 18, visitors to the fifth-annual Idaho Japan Day celebration won’t notice the culture clash. With martial arts like judo, music like traditional Taiko drums and arts ranging from calligraphy to bonsai, patrons will feel like they’re rubbing elbows with the shogunate in the former Japanese capital city of Edo, which we now know as Tokyo. Japanese bento boxes will be available for purchase. Sono Bana Sushi will offer a California roll or vegetarian roll bento, while Shige Japanese Cuisine will offer a chicken-andprawn makunouchi bento box. With the consulate-general of Japan in Portland, Ore., pitching in to make the event possible, Boiseans are invited to two separate events to learn more about the country’s history and people. From 1:30-4 p.m. at the Sage International Middle School, attendees can watch screenings of Japanese films, including the documentary Setting Sail from the Ruins, a film about a fisherman struggling to return to prosperity after the Great East Japan Earthquake. The popular film Eclair will also be shown, which follows the life of Akio, who, in 1943, is sent to reform school after sweets-stealing delinquency. Following the screenings, martial arts, music and art take center stage. 1:30-4 p.m., FREE. Sage International Middle School, 601 S. Ninth Street, 208-995-0300, sageinternationalschool.org; 5-8 p.m., FREE with $2 raffle ticket purchase. Basque Center, 601 W. Grove St., 208-331-5097, idahojapaneseassociation.org.

nature walks and tie dying to language activities and singing, all of which promote learning, fun and interaction with others. Saturday, 10 a.m.-10

Do you gnaw on your pen tops like they’re sinewy sticks of beef jerky? Is your shift key sticky with barbecue sauce and your computer screen smudged with soup? Well, first off, that’s disgusting. And second, there’s a new invention that will make your deskchained existence even more amazon.com depressing—oops, we mean fiftytwoways.com awesome. Italian designers from the firm Zo-loft have developed Din-Ink, a line of pen caps that double as cutlery. The three-pack comes with a fork-cap, a knife-cap and a spoon-cap that replace your normal mangled pen cap so you can shovel take-out into your mouth with one end and jot down notes with the other. But this isn’t run-of-the-mill disposable plastic cutlery, Din-Ink pen-toppers are heat resistant up to 221 degrees, made from non-genetically modified corn and potato and biodegradable in 180 days. Not to mention, the packaging is created from wood pulp and vegetable-based inks, so it’s also compostable. Though it’s hard to imagine Italians slurping down forkfuls of pasta at their desks with plastic cutlery, the Din-Ink pen tops have nonetheless found a number of European fans. According to designboom.com, Din-Ink toppers are now available in Paris and Milan and in production by fiftytwoways. com. Another company, Fred & Friends, is currently selling a similar product on amazon.com called Dine Ink for $8.50 a set. —Tara Morgan

p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; FREE, $5 for parking. Eagle Island State Park, 4000 W. Hatchery Road, Eagle, 208-918-1038, gruntwerks.net.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT

Talks & Lectures TALENT SHOW AND LECTURE— The Boise stop on a nationwide senior talent competition and long-term care awareness tour. Part of the 3in4 Need More educational initiative to raise awareness about the need for Americans to better prepare for their long-term health-care needs. For more info, email summerwind-crd@emeritus.com. 1 p.m. FREE. Emeritus at Summer Wind, 5955 Castle Drive, Boise, 208-331-1300, emeritus. com/idaho/boise/summer-wind.

Literature PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP, SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Part of the Idaho Loud Writers’ Program. Includes a performance poetry workshop followed by an all-ages poetry slam. For more information, email cheryl_maddalena@ yahoo.com. There is a $25 prize for the haiku champ. 7 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, boisepoetry.com. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632.

Workshops & Classes THE ABCS OF SBA LOANS— Get the basics of SBA loans with advice from the pros. For more information or to reserve your space call 208-334-9004, ext. 336. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Small Business Administration District Office, 380 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Ste. 330, Boise, 208-334-1696, sba.gov.

Art ESPECIALLY FOR SENIORS— Senior guests (age 62 and older) receive free admission all day plus a guided talk on the current exhibit. 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Odds & Ends LIQUID LAUGHS OPEN MIC COMEDY—Try out your best comedy routine in front of a live audience. Sign-ups begin at 7 p.m. and the hilarity starts at 8 p.m. 7 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

THURSDAY MAY 17 Festivals & Events BOISE BIKE WEEK BLOCK PARTY—Grab your bike and celebrate a week of cycling celebrations with food from Boise Fry Company, RiceWorks and B29 Streatery, brews from New Belgium Brewing Company and

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representatives from dozens of cycling organizations and cycle-centric crafters. A scavenger hunt and raffle featuring a New Belgium cruiser and Bob’s Bicycle’s trailer will be held, with proceeds benefitting the building and paving of the new Boise River Trail. Music by Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats. Visit boisebikeweek.org for more info. See Picks, Page 16. 5:30 p.m. FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. AN EVENING WITH KIRK BLOODSWORTH—Local filmmaker Gregory Bayne and death row exoneree Kirk Bloodsworth invite the public to hear Bloodsworth’s remarkable story of triumph over injustice, and to be part of their feature documentary film, Bloodsworth: An Innocent Man. The evening will be filmed. Admission is free, but donations toward the film’s continued production are encouraged. Tickets are available at bloodsworth. eventbrite.com. To learn more, visit thislovelymachine.com/ bloodsworth. See Screen, Page 31. 7 p.m. FREE. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net. OPEN HOUSE LUAU—Celebrate the clinic’s 10th anniversary with Hawaiian-inspired drinks and appetizers, educational seminars and a grand prize drawing for airfare for two to Hawaii. 5-8:30 p.m. FREE. Therapeutic Associates Physical Therapy Parkcenter, 390 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Ste. 130, Boise, 208-433-9211.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: KRIS SHAW—Catch the comedic stylings of this funny man. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com. JERRY SEINFELD—The observational comedy king returns to Boise. Tickets available at the Morrison Center Box Office, Select-a-Seat outlets, idahotickets.com or at 208-426-1110. See Picks, Page 17. 7 p.m. $65-$78. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SEAN PEABODY—This installment of Liquid Laughs also features Matt Bragg. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs.com, by calling 208-941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. NOT NOW, DARLING—This British farce about two unlikely partners in a fur salon involves mistaken identities, hurriedly closed closets, a lot of suspicion and intrigue. All dinner-show tickets must be purchased at least one day in advance online at kedproductions.org. Show-only tickets may be purchased at the door or online. For more info and menu, visit the website. 7 p.m. $15-$20 show only, $39 dinner and show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

WEEK IN REVIEW TYLER B U S H

WEDNESDAY MAY 16

BW Publisher Sally Freeman gets down disco-style at Dancing With the Stars.

BW PISSES OFF THE SUITS AND DONS LEISURE SUITS Boise Weekly’s Josh Gross is on Viacom/CBS’ shit list. Not only did our intrepid New Media Czar audition for the network’s long-running reality smutfest Big Brother and chronicle the entire experience on BW’s blog—down to the NASCAR jackets, baseball cap-wearing murderphiles and sparkly muffin tops—he did it despite the vague threat of a $5 million lawsuit. And shortly thereafter, Gross also courted the ire of another Viacom program, The Daily Show with John Stewart, when he trailed comedian Aasif Mandvi and a small camera crew around downtown. Gross found out that the subject of the forthcoming piece is the freaky two-headed fish discovered in Eastern Idaho in February. Though the on-site producer refused to comment on the record, he told Gross that the air date for a piece is usually four to six weeks after it is shot. Moving from two-headed fish to drinking like a fish, sample hounds packed The Riverside Hotel on May 12 for the local boozefest Taste 208. After throwing back small pours of local wines, dry ciders and tart beers, attendees then had to pay additional cash on top of the $25 entry fee for a more sizeable glass of hooch. As the evening wore on, the crowd thinned out and some sauced samplers clustered around the 44 North booth for additional tastes of huckleberry vodka. While some BWers were manning a booth at Taste 208, others gathered to watch our fearless leader, Publisher Sally Freeman, glide across the Boise Centre stage for the local version of Dancing with the Stars. Freeman and partner Joel Hunter of Heirloom Dance Studio cut a rug to the Scissor Sisters’ “I Don’t Feel Like Dancin’” in bedazzled white disco get-ups. The evening was a benefit for the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Idaho. At the opposite end of the musical spectrum from sugary disco was the Boise Creative and Improvised Music Festival, which oozed free jazz, noise and atmospheric anti-pop at Visual Arts Collective May 11-12. According to Gross, “Festival organizers took a different approach this year, and combined the festival with a new play—Me and My Shadow—from local writer Heidi Kraay.” Though Gross said the play was “a lush and engaging production,” he also noted that it struggled under the weight of an underdeveloped script. A healthy discourse on the event is brewing in the review’s online comment section at boiseweekly.com. Gross closed out the week on May 14 as the host with the most at Story Story Late Night, the anything-goes Story Story Night offshoot on the topic “crime.” Gross warmed the crowd up with a sordid story of Glade-huffing, banana hammocks and a near-hate crime before story slammers glugged some liquid courage and told their tales fighting the law. Topics ranged from cheating on driving exams to rescuing possibly rabid dogs to getting busted for chronic, and each slammer walked away with a sweet crime-themed prize. The next Story Story Late Night will take place Monday, July 9, on the theme “bodily emissions.” —Tara Morgan

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8 DAYS OUT Food & Drink

Workshops & Classes

BEER VS. WINE, PART 2—Enjoy beer and wine paired with a six-course vegetarian meal. Which chef pairs them better? For reservations, call Erin at 208-331-0199. See Picks, Page 16. 6 p.m. $40. Life’s Kitchen, 1025 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-0199, lifeskitchen.org.

2012 LEGISLATIVE REVIEW— Concordia University School of Law and the Fourth District Bar Association present the 2012 Legislative Review CLE. Panelists are Brian Kane, assistant chief deputy attorney general; Clive Strong, deputy attorney general, division chief; Matt Freeman, Idaho State Board of Education; Ken Howell, Hawley Troxell Ennis & Hawley; and Holly Koole, Ada County deputy prosecutor. To register, visit concordialaw.com and select the “CLE” button. 8 a.m.-noon. $50. Concordia University School of Law, 501 W. Front St., Boise, 208-955-1001, concordialaw.com.

BLOODSWORTH: AN INNOCENT MAN LUNCHEON—Enjoy an outdoor luncheon while supporting the continued production of the feature documentary film Bloodsworth: An Innocent Man. The luncheon will be catered by Life’s Kitchen. Tickets include reserved seating for the evening event at the Egyptian Theatre and a pre-release DVD of the finished film (expected spring 2013). For more, see story, Page 31, or visit thislovelymachine. com/bloodsworth. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $50. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-368-6080, history.idaho.gov/oldpen.html. WINE RELEASE PARTY—Taste two new releases and the 2009 couloir cuvee. Zeppole Bakery’s breads, Chocolat Bar chocolates and cheeses will be paired with the wines. 5-8 p.m. $5, FREE for mailing list members. Fraser Vineyard, 1004 LaPointe St., Boise, 208-345-9607, fraservineyard.com.

LUNCH AND LEARN—Peak Broadcasting and Key Bank Key4Women present this seminar, Make the Most of Your Marketing Dollars. Price includes materials and lunch. All attendees will be entered to win a marketing makeover for their business. To register, visit liteonline.com. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $11. Angell’s Bar and Grill, 999 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-4900, angellsbarandgrill.com. NATURAL SOLUTIONS TO TOXINS IN THE HOME—In order to be healthy, a home must be clean. Same is true of the human body. But many popular products we use might actually be making us sick. Dr. Andrew Rostenberg of Red Mountain Chiropractic will explain which products are best for promoting

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

health inside the home and in our bodies. Sponsored by Boise Schools Community Education Programs. All proceeds support Boise Public Schools. 6:30 p.m. $18. Timberline High School, 701 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208854-6230. VEGAN COOKING CLASSES— Join Francoise Dunn, a health practitioner and instructor of vegan cooking and raw food preparation, for two classes on successive Thursdays, during which you will learn facts about the Standard American Diet vs. the Nature Diet and how to prepare meals that will help you be healthy. 6-8 p.m. $40-$50. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. WEIGHT LOSS AND WELLNESS YOUR WAY—Are you looking for a safe, healthy and natural way to lose weight and keep it off? Join Dr. Nicole Pierce, natural medicine and weight loss specialist, to discuss your options for finally taking off the weight and feeling great. Register through Community Ed at boiselearns.org. 6:30-7:30 p.m. $12. Hillside Junior High School, 3536 Hill Road, Boise, 208-854-5120.

Art ART SOURCE GALLERY OPEN HOUSE—View new paintings, photographs and jewelry while sipping wine from Indian Creek Winery and enjoying snacks and music by Larry Buttell. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Galerie Belle Ame Silverstone Plaza, 3405 E. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-9381342, galeriebelleame.com. RAW ARTISTS: THE BLEND— Boise’s monthly mixed arts showcase will feature film, music, performance, fashion show, hair/makeup design, accessory design and all visual arts. DJ Mykos, emcee Dylan Haas and a no-host bar will keep things moving along every third Thursday. For 18 and older; cocktail attire requested. See Arts, Page 28. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Powerhouse Event Center, 621 S. 17th St., Boise, 208-433-0197, powerhouseevent.com.

Talks & Lectures

| EASY |

MEDIUM | HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

MICHAEL GARRITY, AMERICAN RIVERS—After many years of study and negotiation, a comprehensive management and restoration plan has been approved for the Yakima River Basin in Washington. Michael Garrity of American Rivers helped negotiate this landmark plan that will significantly improve salmon populations, aquatic habitat and fish passage. Garrity will provide a closer look at the instream, riparian and upland work that will be tackled in this ambitious effort. 5:45-7 p.m. FREE. The Boiler Room at Bardenay, 612 Grove St., Boise, 208-426-0538, bardenay.com. TALENT SHOW AND LECTURE— See Wednesday. 1 p.m. FREE. Emeritus at Summer Wind, 5955 Castle Drive, Boise, 208-3311300, emeritus.com/idaho/ boise/summer-wind.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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8 DAYS OUT FRIDAY MAY 18 Festivals & Events COMMUNITY HERO CELEBRATION—Enjoy food, fun, fingerprinting for kids, massages and health checks for adults, an appearance from the Boise Hawks, see crime fighting dogs and get behind the wheel of a police car. Proceeds from raffle tickets will benefit the Ada County Sheriff’s Office K-9 unit. 7 p.m. FREE. Broadview University, 750 E. Gala Court, Meridian, 1-866-253-7744, broadviewuniversity.edu.

ENDANGERED SPECIES DAY—Learn about the importance of conserving birds of prey and other wildlife in Idaho and around the world with live bird demonstrations, exhibits featuring rare birds like California condors and scavenger hunts for the kids. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $7 adult, $6 senior, $5 youth (ages 4-16), FREE to members. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-3628687, peregrinefund.org. IDAHO JAPAN DAY CULTURAL EVENT— This annual event is filled with Japanese art, music and food, including martial arts (judo, shorinji kempo); Sanshin and Amami folk songs, traditional Taiko drums and contemporary guitar; calligraphy, origami, pottery, bonsai, flower arrangement, decorative lanterns and umbrellas and

koi; and Japanese food (bento box). Catch a film screening at the Sage International School campus downtown then head to the block party. Everyone is invited to enjoy the cultural exchange. See Picks, Page 17. 1:30-4 p.m. FREE. Sage International Middle School, 601 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-7790811, sageinternationalshcool.org; 5-8 p.m. FREE with raffle ticket purchase ($2 each). Basque Center, 601 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-331-5097 or 208-342-9983, basquecenter.com.

Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian. com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SEAN PEABODY—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. NOT NOW, DARLING—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $15-$20 show only, $39 dinner and show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

On Stage

Citizen-fundraisers

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: KRIS SHAW—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle

VARIETY SHOW—Enjoy the comedic stylings of Josh Zimmerly, Justin Zora and Aaron Sheehan, along with comedian/guitarist Anthony Andrisek and MC Jade Jesser. Also featuring a performance by Hot Mess Burlesque and vodka specials from Koenig. Proceeds benefit the Fallen Firefighters Memorial fund. Visit boisefirepipesanddrums.com for more info. Tickets available at tixxfixx.com. 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. $15. Powerhouse Event Center, 621 S. 17th St., Boise, 208-433-0197, powerhouseevent.com.

Literature BOOK AND WINE TOUR—Taste wine from The Basque Market and learn about books selected by the Rediscovered staff at various stations. Portland, Ore., authors Alexis M. Smith and Evan Schneider will discuss their books. Price includes sampling and a bottle and book to take home. Tickets available at Rediscovered Bookshop and The Basque Market. See Picks, Page 16. 7 p.m. $50. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org

Food & Drink RUSSIAN FOOD FESTIVAL—Taste authentic traditional homemade Russian dishes at the seventh-annual Russian Food Festival. This year’s menu will include beef stroganoff, shish-kebab, chicken pilaf, Russian crepes, piroshki, manti, chebureki, cabbage rolls, borscht, salads and an assortment of desserts. There will also be an opportunity to meet and watch a local iconographer as he paints, as well as guided tours of the church to introduce visitors to Russian Orthodox worship. Entertainment will include opera singer Alla Markovich, Russian music and theatrical readings. See Food News, Page 32. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. St. Seraphim of Sarov Russian Orthodox Church, 872 N. 29th St., Boise, 208-345-1553, stseraphimboise.org.

Religious/Spiritual EVOLVER BOISE: ELECTRIC JESUS READING— With Evolver co-founder Jonthan Talat Philips. The night will open with an in-depth chakra activation, followed by the reading and a discussion about Evolver Boise, the overall Evolver Movement and a rising consciousness culture flowering across the planet. Afterparty TBA. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-429-8220, hydeparkbookstore.com.

Sports & Fitness EAGLE FOOTHILLS BMX SINGLE POINT RACE— Participate in one of the newest Olympic sports, BMX racing, or enjoy watching the excitement for FREE. The Eagle Foothills BMX facility has something for the entire family: a Hott Wheels track for riders as young as 2, a very fast and challenging amateur track for novice to expert racers, and a pro section to test inspiring athletes. For more information, email efbmx@cableone.net. 5:30 p.m. $20. Eagle Foothills BMX, Eagle Sports Complex, 11800 Horseshoe Bend Way, Eagle, 208-870-6138, ef-bmx.com.

Workshops & Classes DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY 102—Learn about software available for manipulating your digital photos, how to get your photos off the camera, how to create photo albums and how to find photos online. 9 a.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995, boisepubliclibrary.org.

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8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends

405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

SCANDINAVIAN DANCING—The nonprofit Scandinavian Society of Southwest Idaho presents this lesson in Scandinavian dancing with a live band. 7 p.m. $5. Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church, 3100 S. Five Mile Road, Boise.

NOT NOW, DARLING—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $15-$20 show only, $39 dinner and show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org.

Food & Drink

SATURDAY MAY 19

RUSSIAN FOOD FESTIVAL— See Friday. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. St. Seraphim of Sarov Russian Orthodox Church, 872 N. 29th St., Boise, 208-345-1553, stseraphimboise.org.

Festivals & Events EAGLE ISLAND EXPERIENCE FESTIVAL—The festival has teamed up with Global Lounge, an organization that promotes programs that encourage an understanding of cultural diversity through music, art and dance. The 12th year of the festival will include all sorts of acts that bring together the textures of global communities. See Picks, Page 16. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE ($5 parking fee). Eagle Island State Park, 2691 Mace Road, Eagle.

info, email info@sageyogaboise. com. 10 a.m. $50. Sage Yoga and Wellness, 242 N. Eighth St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-338-5430, sageyogaboise.com.

Odds & Ends SPRING SWAP MEET—The annual High Desert HarleyDavidson Spring Swap Meet features a little bit of everything and more. If you have something you want to sell, contact events manager Todd Godfrey at tgodfrey@highdeserthd.com for a vendor release form. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. High Desert Harley-Davidson, 2310 Cinema Drive, Meridian, 208-338-5599, highdeserthd.com.

Art

HOME MAKEOVER SHOW: INSIDE AND OUT—Tour 80-plus exhibits to discover what’s hot in decorating, kitchen and bath renovations, landscaping and more. For more info, log onto idahobusinessleague.com. 10 a.m.6 p.m. $1. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com.

SHOSHONE FALLS EXCURSION—Visit the “Niagra of the West” on this van trip, which includes a presentation from former College of Southern Idaho professor Jim Gentry and lunch at Elevation 486, which overlooks the Snake River Canyon. This excursion is offered in conjunction with the exhibits Shoshone Falls: 3 Perspectives, and Shoshone Falls and the Democratic Sublime. Cost includes lunch. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $50 center members, $75 nonmembers. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

SUNDAY MAY 20

Religious/Spiritual

INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM DAY—Join the Boise Museum Association for a family friendly event in recognition of International Museum Day. Featuring games, activities, crafts and living history. Noon-5 p.m. FREE. Basque Block, 601 Grove St., Boise.

ENERGY MEDICINE INTENSIVE—Warrior Healing Energy Medicine Intensive with Evolver co-founder Jonathan Talat Phillips. In this daylong workshop, the wisdom of Reiki, bioenergetic therapy, shamanism and the ancient gnostics will be incorporated to bring more love, confidence and healing into your life and the world around you. For more

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: KRIS SHAW—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SEAN PEABODY—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid,

EYESPY

Festivals & Events EAGLE ISLAND EXPERIENCE FESTIVAL—See Satuday. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE ($5 parking fee). Eagle Island State Park, 2691 Mace Road, Eagle. HOME MAKEOVER SHOW: INSIDE AND OUT—See Saturday. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $1. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208336-8900, boisecentre.com.

JOANN’S IRIS GARDEN GALA AT THE GARDEN—Featuring more than 400 irises, wine tasting, live music, food and arts and crafts vendors. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Joann’s Iris Garden, 1325 N. Hesse Lane, Eagle, 208-631-9498 or 208-2300769.

Real Dialogue from the naked city

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: KRIS SHAW—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SEAN PEABODY—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Sports & Fitness SEVEN WHEELS OF WONDER—Bring your ID, watch, backpack/satchel, pen, some cash and your desire for some biking, boozing fun and participate in this points-based alley cat race. Registration takes place one hour prior. Visit crankthefront.bogspot.com for more info. 4 p.m. $10. Payette Brewing Company, 111 W. 33rd St., Garden City, 208-344-0011, payettebrewing.com.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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8 DAYS OUT Kids & Teens

Kids & Teens

ZOO DAZE—Kick off the beginning of summer with games, face painting, special entertainment and animal enrichment activities. All proceeds from activities go to support improvements to the zoo. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Standard zoo admission rates apply. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-384-4125, zooboise. org.

WHERE THE WILD THINGS PARTY SUMMER READING KICKOFF—Make masks, eat monster cookies, sign up for summer reading, enter a prize drawing and walk away with furry feet. 4 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208562-4995, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Shoreline Boulevard and 13th Avenue on the Boise Greenbelt, the walk travels to the Anne Frank Memorial, turns north on Eighth Street through BODO, and finishes in the Grove Plaza for the Exergy Tour team presentation. Free registration for the walk the day of the event from 5-5:30 p.m., or you can sign up online at walktolondon2012.org. First 500 participants will receive a commemorative T-shirt. 5:30 p.m. FREE.

WEDNESDAY MAY 23

Odds & Ends

Sports & Fitness

LIQUID LAUGHS OPEN MIC COMEDY—See Wednesday, May 16. 7 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Odds & Ends STYLE THERAPY NIGHT—Try on clothes and ask style and closetorganization questions of personal shopper Heather Schwabe, owner of Style Therapy. 5-7 p.m. FREE. Exposure A.L.P.H.A. Interchange, 1009 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-424-8158, exposureidaho.org.

MONDAY MAY 21 Literature POETRY SLAM—Test your word-slinging skills at this slam, featuring world champ Chris August. Visit boisepoetry.com for more info. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208343-0886, neurolux.com.

Talks & Lectures OSHER INSTITUTE LECTURE— This lecture, Friend, Foe or Escargot: Commonly Encountered Insects in Backyard Gardens and How to Deal with Them will discuss the identification, biology, economic importance and practical management of insects and related arthropods commonly encountered in residential landscapes. Participants are encouraged to bring a damaged plant or an unknown insect for on-site diagnosis. Must be a current Osher Institute member. 10 a.m. FREE. Yanke Family Research Park, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise.

TUESDAY MAY 22 Food & Drink BIKE NIGHT AT HELINA MARIE’S—Ride in for wine and beer specials, food, music and karaoke after 9 p.m. Huge outdoor patio with fire pit, tiki bar and dance pole. Must be over 21 or older with ID. $5 glass pours, $2 domestic beers. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208-286-7960, helinamaries.com.

Talks & Lectures THE ORIGINS OF SOCIAL SECURITY—Join speaker Marc Johnson for a look at the origins of Social Security. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

24 | MAY 16–22, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WALK TO LONDON 2012—Join Olympians and Paralympians for a 1.13-mile walk. Starting at

NOISE/CD REVIEW FATHER JOHN MISTY, FEAR FUN Josh Tillman is most widely known for his recent almost four-year stint as the drummer for Seattle’s indie folk darlings Fleet Foxes. He has released seven solo albums as J. Tillman, which up to this point, have been gently introspective and marked by darkness and internal struggle. As Father John Misty, Tillman approaches these latter themes anew, sometimes slipping into mocking playfulness that brings The Joker (Batman, not Steve Miller ... though, perhaps a little of both) to mind. Tillman’s Misty moniker has been in the making for a while via his Twitter and Tumblr accounts. On Fear Fun, his pretty voice is still there but he’s finding the edges of it, letting it tire and crack. It could be the cigarettes taking their toll, but his tone seems to have changed, moving from a searching and broken J. Tillman to an angry and defiant Father John Misty. You can almost hear the bad taste in his mouth. Traces of earlier J. Tillman and Fleet Foxes are present in songs like “Only Son of the Ladies’ Man” and “O’ I Long to Feel Your Arms Around Me,” but these influences don’t overtake the album. Fear Fun isn’t just a folky, harmony-driven side project, it vacillates between several different styles. And this, at times, makes the whole feel a bit confused, like an island for lost songs. But once you give up trying to justify Tillman’s musical meanderings and moments of forced pretension—particularly in the song “I’m Writing A Novel”—you’ll start to really enjoy it. The first track released from Fear Fun, “Hollywood Forever Cemetery Sings,” was introduced in the form of a beautifully shot—albeit rather disturbing—music video. The song’s catchy but abrupt lyrical content, including the repetition of the line “Jesus Christ, girl,” makes it difficult to forget. It’s one of the album’s strongest moments and it transports listeners to an emotional state that is both raw and out of control. The song is reason enough to keep listening. —Catie Young WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NOISE/NEWS

NUCLEAR REACTION Margot & the Nuclear So and So’s radiate rock on Rot Gut, Domestic CHRIS PARKER Consistency is better for butter than bands. While it’s natural to want our favorite artists to stay trapped forever in the amber of their greatest moments, if you love them, you have to let them grow. So raise your glass to Richard Edwards, the leader of Margot and the Nuclear So and So’s. After releasing two well regarded orchestral rock albums during the band’s first four years—including a couple spent on the Sayonara cinematic chamber pop, Margot and Co. now revel in rock ’n’ roll. major label merry-go-round—Edwards took a left turn into rock on his last two albums. Of course, that’s only one perspective. To attacks, so I think that’s probably certainly But after some haggling, Margot was alEdwards, it was the band’s Baroque approach been one of the dominant ... attributes of the lowed to release Animal! as an vinyl/digital on its 2005 debut, The Dust of Retreat, that people that litter the songs.” release, while the label kept five songs, and was the left turn. Working with producer John Congleton added seven new ones for Not Animal, a “di“The initial kind of thing I started doing (The Thermals, Baroness) helped tame Edrector’s cut” version. The band left the label a was much less ornate,” Edwards said from his wards’ self-consciousness on the band’s latest year later, and Edwards split with his bandChicago home, where his 3-year-old daughter mates. He moved to Chicago with his newborn album, Rot Gut, Domestic. Congleton—who Eleanor could be heard playing in the backdaughter and started Margot anew. He blames Edwards said drank four liters of Dr. Pepper ground. “At the time, it felt like a fun, chaldaily—was a whir of energy and they comthe cliquish work habits the band had devellenging thing to do—employ instruments that pleted the entire album in 10 days. aren’t traditionally used in rock music in a way oped, as well as his own changing creative “Every time he finished something, John needs, on the original lineup’s dissolution. that feels creepy and cool and not necessarily was like, ‘What’s next? What’s next?’ When “There were issues, inner-band wise, about for their anthemic potential.” you do that, I think the benefits far outweigh not being that happy about how we were But Edwards wasn’t alone in that idea. recording. At a certain point, I was [like], ‘fuck the negatives. ... You don’t have a whole lot of “At the time when we were making that time to overthink stuff,” said Edwards. it and this chamber pop nonsense,’” Edwards record in 2004, it felt to us like not a lot of The result is an album that feels whole. people were doing it,” he said. “It was exciting said. “So some of it was probably a bit of a From the ambling, moody opener “Disease snotty reaction. But more of it was natural. and challenging, and then we had the really Tobacco Free” to the shifty “Prozac Rock,” I just wanted to fucking play loud. That’s a bad fortune that our record came out like a misconception, too, that we were this soft little with its dreamy ahh-ing background vocals, month after that first Arcade Fire album hit to the shimmering, sun-speckled exultation fey thing all these years. I defy anyone to look and everything about the world became very of “Coonskin Cap,” the album hangs nicely up those old tapes of us playing live and think Arcade Fire-centric at that point.” together. It’s a sweetly textured blur featuring that wasn’t a rock band.” It’s hard not to hear the Decemberists, as much of Margot’s typical musical ebb and Edwards returned in 2010 with a new well, in the tender, swelling violins, tinkling flow. And Edwards’ writing imbues the album lineup and a new album, Buzzard. The band keyboards and sweet dreamy sway of “Skelwith a somewhat cinematic quality, even witheton Key” off The Dust of Retreat. The album excised the strings and horns, and added a out strings and horns. more rocking guitar-bass-drum attack. But injects dark cabaret moodiness and Baroque Edwards has already begun work on the there are still traces of the group’s old spirit in pop elegance into catchy and intermittently the somber, questioning love paean, “I Do,” in band’s next album, and suggests it may be edgy rock. After self-releasing the album, the the tender combination less distortion-heavy but no less aggressive. band was initially Edwards believes his comfort with his personal of strummy acoustic signed by Artemis Relife and his touring band (he always expects guitar and choir-like cords. With Dinosaur Feathers and Whispertown. to bring different folks in to record with) has backing vocals on But after re-mixing, Thursday, May 17, 7 p.m., $12. emboldened him to explore darker places. “Lunatic, Lunatic, mastering and reNEUROLUX “When you’re really feeling shitty—and I’ve Lunatic,” and in the releasing the album in 111 N. 11th St. gone through this, too—it’s not that fun to be moody, psych-tinged 2006, the label merged 208-343-0886 dark. You would rather be healthy and light. ... swirl of “Let’s Paint with V2 and was later neurolux.com I’m married for all intents and purposes to the Our Teeth Green.” absorbed by Capitol. Edwards’ characters mother of my child and my daughter is going The band followed on 3. At a certain point when you have people are notable for their former V2 head Andy that are sort of forced to like you, you can Gershon to Epic, where it continued recording pervasive sense of anxiety, a trait they share afford to be really not likeable in your art,” with him. songs for its second album. For three months, he said with a chuckle. “Not trying to impress “I’ve gone through that stuff personally the band worked on around 25 songs before girls helps. Your music’s a lot better when you to varying degrees of severity,” he said. “I’ve presenting the label with Animal! While Gerdon’t mind being repulsive sometimes.” experienced pretty gnarly anxiety and panic shon loved it, the suits weren’t happy. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Hillfolk Noir will pack up its washboards and head to the United Kingdom this summer.

COMINGS, GOINGS AND CHANGINGS Punk rock may be notoriously macho, but one notorious punker is swinging the other way. Tom Gabel, singer for Florida band Against Me!, announced that he will now be a she—Laura Jane Grace, to be precise. As one of the first major rock stars to come out as transgender, Grace got some serious real estate in the May 11 issue of Rolling Stone, discussing everything from coming out to her band to alternatively praying to both God and the devil for a female body as a child. Grace also told Rolling Stone that she will remain married to her current spouse, with whom she has a child. In news closer to home and yet still far away, Boise band Hillfolk Noir is finalizing plans for a United Kingdom tour this summer that will include performances in London and Brighton. Cameron Bouiss, drummer for Finn Riggins, will fill in for Hillfolk Noir drummer Jared Goodpaster, who cannot tour because of other obligations. In news of comings rather than goings, Idaho native Josh Ritter will be returning to his old stomping grounds for a performance in Boise at the Knitting Factory on Saturday, July 14. Tickets for that show are $25 and on sale now. Local band Spondee has been quiet for awhile, but its members have kept busy with other projects like running the brief-lived all-ages venue Colorcube. But the band is set to re-emerge and to drop a new EP on Saturday, May 19, with a show at The Crux. Fountains, The Very Most and 2’nicorn will open. The show is all-ages and will include the EP for only $3. Local metal venue The Shredder is cranking its pace up from power to thrash. Starting last week, the venue went from being open on show nights only to being open more regularly. Owner Justin Cantrell told BW that the plan is to open at 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays for anyone who wants to have a beer, skate the ramp and just generally be metal as fuck. And finally, Payette Brewing and The Record Exchange are going to throw down for Bob Dylan, celebrating the musician’s 70th birthday with a soiree at the RX. The event will kick off on Thursday, May 24, at 5 p.m. and feature raffles, free beer from Payette, a sale on all products Dylan-related and a ton of local musicians playing Dylan’s hits on the Record Exchange stage. No one has signed up to go electric or be condescending to John Lennon yet, but we have our fingers crossed. —Josh Gross

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 25

ER IC A S PAR LIN DAR LIN/ B ANDWAGON PHOTOGR APHY

NOISE

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE JOS HU A R OPER

GUIDE WEDNESDAY MAY 16 BAND OF BUSKERS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s THE BOURBON DOGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Reef CHRIS GUTIERREZ—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

20TH ANNIVERSARY, MAY 18-19, AUDIO LAB Though there’s no shortage of audio production facilities in the Treasure Valley—especially now that nearly any laptop is a de facto studio—for years, one joint has carried the torch as the gold standard: Audio Lab. The long-lived Boise studio run by musician Steve Fulton has recorded tunes for local bands as well as mega-famous acts like Sum 41. On Friday, May 18, and Saturday, May 19, Audio Lab will celebrate its 20th birthday with live music, studio tours, raffles, discounted rates and a swinging party at Visual Arts Collective. (Audio Lab can’t get in because it’s only 20.) The music will be provided by a variety of musicians who have recorded at the facility, and will include a special set from one of the studio’s co-founders, Todd Dunnigan, on May 18. —Josh Gross Friday, May 18, 7 p.m.; Saturday, May 19, noon-6 p.m.; FREE. Audio Lab and Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-344-9551, audiolab.org.

26 | MAY 16–22, 2012 | BOISEweekly

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s VELVET ROPE ACOUSTIC MUSIC SERIES: VICCI MARTINEZ—6 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

POSSUM LIVIN—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WELL SUITED—9:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper Lounge REILLY COYOTE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

FRIDAY MAY 18 ACTUAL DEPICTION—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THURSDAY MAY 17

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL—9 p.m. FREE. Graineys

BROCK BARTEL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

ENABLER—With Pig Noose. 9 p.m. $5. Shredder

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

THE CELLAR DOOR—With Mickey the Jump. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Vista

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La

MARGOT AND THE NUCLEAR SO AND SO’S—With Dinosaur Feathers and Whispertown. See Noise, Page 25. 7 p.m. $12. Neurolux

JARED HALLOCK CD RELEASE PARTY—6 p.m. FREE. ShangriLa

NEW TRANSIT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s PAMELA DEMARCHE—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La RICO WEISMAN AND REX MILLER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

THE NAUGHTIES—10 p.m. FREE. Graineys REBECCA SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Buster’s RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

ANDREW CORTENS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill AUDIO LAB 20TH ANNIVERSARY—See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. FREE. VAC

JIM LEWIS—7 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m. $3. Kay and Traci’s 127 Club NO QUARTER: A TRIBUTE TO LED ZEPPLIN—8:30 p.m. $12. Knitting Factory PATRICK RICE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club THE SHAUN BRAZELL QUARTET—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SOUL SERENE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub SPRING HIP-HOP FEST—Featuring One Be Lo, Chicharones, Whiskey Blanket and Raashan Ahmad. 10 p.m. $8, $15 for weekend pass. Reef WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

SATURDAY MAY 19 AUDIO LAB 20TH ANNIVERSARY—See Listen Here, this page. Noon. FREE. VAC ATOMIC MAMA—8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

GUIDE/LISTEN HERE R OS S HALFIN

GUIDE CELTIC RESIN—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub THE CRY!—With Deaf Kid. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage DC3—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SPRING HIP-HOP FEST—Featuring One Be Lo. Chicharones, Whiskey Blanket and Raashan Ahmad. 10 p.m. $8. Reef WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

FLOATER—8 p.m. $16. Knitting Factory FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Kahootz JIMMY BIVENS—4 p.m. FREE. Firehouse Pub LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III—See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $50. Boise Contemporary Theater MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m. $3. Kay and Traci’s 127 Club POKE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper Lounge

SUNDAY MAY 20 BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL—9 p.m. FREE. Graineys

SHAUN BRAZELL AND SAM STROTHER—7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

TUESDAY MAY 22 DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE SUPERVILLAINS—10 p.m. $7 adv., $10 door. Reef TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WEDNESDAY MAY 23 BAND OF BUSKERS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s

MONDAY MAY 21

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

BERNIE REILLY—8 p.m. FREE. Red Feather

THE COUNTRY CLUB—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock. Stock & Barrel

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SCHOOL OF ROCK: LED ZEPPELIN TRIBUTE—7 p.m. $7 adv., $10 door. Venue

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

SHERPA—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD— With Finn Riggins and Art Fad. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux JOHNNY BUTLER—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe KATIE MORELL—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

JASON BUCKALEW—10:30 a.m. FREE. Berryhill THE WORKING DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Graineys

GROUPLOVE—8 p.m. $15. Knitting Factory

BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

RICO WEISMAN AND REX MILLER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian THE RINGTONES—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye STEADY RUSH—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SUMMER BEACH BLAST— With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III, MAY 19, BCT Stars are a flash in the pan but artists endure. Loudon Wainwright III is the latter. He’s been putting out Grammy-winning albums of catchy and clever folk-rock since the late 1960s. While many other folksters of the day waxed metaphorical about politics in the abstract, Wainwright preferred a clever turn of phrase. And it’s clear from a recent ukulele video he posted to YouTube called “Newt Gingrich is running for Pres” that he still does. And as well known as Wainwright is for his music, he’s almost as well known for his family. His marriage to folk singer Kate McGarrigle resulted in the birth of Rufus and Martha Wainwright, both well-known musicians in their own (wain)right. Wainwright last played Boise at a special intimate performance at Boise Contemporary Theater. It was such a hit that BCT is bringing him back for an encore performance. —Josh Gross

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

8 p.m., $50. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 27

NEWS/ARTS BODIES AND BUILDINGS

—Tara Morgan and Jaclyn Brandt The body politic.

28 | MAY 16–22, 2012 | BOISEweekly

ARTS/CULTURE LAU R IE PEAR M AN

If Medusa got a 21st century makeover, she’d probably ditch the stone in favor of polymer preservation, a process in which human tissue is preserved with liquid silicone that is treated and then hardened. This is the very same process that has allowed for the creation and proliferation of the oh-so-popular Bodies exhibitions. Beginning on Saturday, Sept. 29, Boiseans can get their fill of preserved human flesh at the opening of Bodies Revealed at the Discovery Center of Idaho. The 6,000-square-foot exhibition will feature 12 full-body specimens and more than 150 organs and partial specimens. According to a press release, the specimens are “preserved to the cellular level, showcasing the complexity of the body’s many bones, muscles, nerves, blood vessels and organs.” Bodies Revealed will run through March 31, 2013, and tickets cost $18 for adults and $14 for youth age 17 and younger. Speaking of bodies, the lithe dancers at Trey McIntyre Project are preparing for some big changes as the company enters its fifth year, including a new managing director and a new building. Currently housed at 775 Fulton St. in downtown Boise, TMP opted to relocate to a new space when its lease is up at the end of June. The building TMP selected is located at 2285 Warm Springs Ave., across from the Old Idaho Penitentiary and Idaho Botanical Garden. Brian Aune, the new managing director and general counsel at TMP, said this more than 10,000-square-foot space will allow the company the opportunity to expand in the future. Aune is excited about the building being more of a destination and is looking into ideas like holding food truck rallies so the public will feel welcome. TMP is on a four-week tour through China, the Philippines, South Korea and Vietnam, where McIntyre will help select a company to travel back to the United States as part of a cultural exchange. That collaboration will receive its world premiere at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, but Boise will be treated to a preview on Saturday, Nov. 10, at the Morrison Center. And speaking of premieres, artist Rachel Teannalach will debut her inaugural New Moon Salon series on Sunday, May 20, from 7-9 p.m. at 2610 Regan Ave. The evening will feature ceramic artists Kevin Flynn and Amber Day along with music by Boise Philharmonic harpist Matthew Tutsky. The series will continue every month. For more info, visit teannalach.com.

RAW MEAT RAW event showcases up-and-coming artists, designers and performers TREVOR VILLAGRANA Fresh out of high school in 2003, fashion designer Heidi Luerra packed her bags and made the trek from Redding, Calif., to Los Angeles. After struggling to make a name for herself in a vast sea of ambitious creative types, Luerra decided to start her own clothing line, selling her pieces at swap meets on the weekends. However, with a part-time job, an internship in the fashion district and full-time studies, she began to wonder if there was a better way to get exposure as a designer. “I was trying to market myself, and there was no approachable entity available for me,” Luerra said. “I had friends and acShowcase Director Amy Johnson-Myers will help set the stage for the debut of Raw: Natural Born Artists. quaintances that had brilliant work in fashion, music, art and film. It didn’t seem fair that we didn’t have a platform to sell and helping out different artists in different “The main aspect that has worked show our work. Our options were either a areas,” said Burt. “It’s been really awesome against us is continually proving our validlocal swap meet or walk into big boutiques ity,” Luerra remarked. “When you’re doing getting inspiration and ideas from all of or galleries. There was no middle ground, these other people.” something that has never been done before so I took matters into my own hands.” Boise’s Fleet Street Klezmer Band and there is nothing to compare it to, you’re And that’s when Luerra came up with Klezmer, a Sephardic Jewish and Gypsy muessentially going against the grain. Pushing the idea for RAW: Natural Born Artists, sic group, will also perform alongside trathrough the stigmas of helping artists has an event spotlighting artistic talent in film, ditional belly dancers. Formed in 2008 by been somewhat challenging.” fashion, music, visual art, performance Victoria and Shlomo Kostenko, the group is Fortunately, Boise State alum Amy art and hair and makeup with the goal of known for its spirited live shows. Johnson-Myers caught wind of Luerra’s providing “independent artists within the Another face to look out for at Boise’s project and offered to scout talent as a local first 10 years of their career with the tools, debut RAW event is ballet dancer YuRAW showcase director. Though reaching resources and exposure needed to inspire rek Hansen. With more than 13 years of out to artists and battling suspicions about and cultivate creativity.” the new event were roadblocks in the begin- experience dancing and choreographing A precursor to RAW made its debut in with Idaho Dance Theater, Hansen blends Los Angeles in 2005 to more than 750 peo- ning, RAW has slowly gained buzz in the timeless ballet artistry with more modern artistic community. ple. After hosting a number of other suchip-hop aesthetics. “Boise’s a tough market and I told them cessful events, Luerra decided it was time Also sharing the stage is singer-songwritthat in L.A.,” said Johnson-Myers. “People to take RAW to the next level. In 2009, don’t want to leave their houses at night un- er and painter Shari Olivieri, whose sultry she paired up with web designer Matthew voice and quaint guitar licks have garnered less it’s something really fantastic.” Klahorst to launch the creative behemoth her attention locally. Olivieri has watched Fashion remains a key component to that RAW is now. To date, there have been the Boise creative scene swing and sway RAW’s success. Mindi Burt, mother by day RAW installations in 62 American cities over the years and hopes that people are and Australia. And next year, the event will and local fashion stylist by night, will stage willing to give RAW a chance. a fashion show that revolves around the expand to Europe and China. “I hate to see really great events fall juxtaposition of clothing and accessories On Thursday, May 17, Boise will debut through because Boise can’t support great from different time the first in a series promoters, great events and the art scene,” periods. of RAW summer said Olivieri. “If people don’t support it, it “I’m taking either showcases at the RAW: The Blend, Thursday, May 17, 8 p.m.won’t exist, so I hope that Boise can make a key silhouette from Powerhouse Events midnight, $10 adv., $15 door. everyone proud.” a different era or I’m Center. The evening POWERHOUSE EVENT CENTER Johnson-Myers echoed that sentiment: taking a key item and will highlight an 621 S. 17th St. “Basically, if there’s one thing you’re I’m mixing them,” eclectic array of musirawartists.org/boise going to do this month, then this should be explained Burt. “So cians, photographers, it,” said Johnson-Myers. “It’s got everyyou’ll have like an designers and other thing all in one night, in once place, and Egyptian top with a artsy folks looking to Dior skirt from the ’50s, the colors might be you get to dress up. There’s not enough opbroaden their horizons. portunities to dress up here in Boise so I’m The gallons of hot coffee and hours spent bright like an ’80s neon kind of thing, with excited about that, too.” a hairstyle from the ’20s.” in the office have been both fruitful and RAW will return every third Thursday Burt is working exclusively with used humbling for Luerra, who said it has been through October. A list of artists participatclothing from St. Vincent de Paul. difficult to sell her idea to communities “It’s a collective art show but it’s really a ing each month can be found at rawartists. such as Boise that aren’t quite hip to RAW’s org/boise. collaborative effort and it’s a lot of people mission. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

VISUAL/ARTS

LET IT BURN William Lewis’ Rapid Oxidation debuts at Enso Artspace CHRISTOPHER SCHNOOR give the impression of Since its inception, Enso overheated combusArtspace has focused on tion, while “Bonfire 2” exhibiting the art of its evokes a burning world members in its small but in free fall. distinctive warehouse in The most haunting Garden City. Howimages in the exhibit ever, Enso’s mission is a are Lewis’ dead or dybroader one, stipulating ing campfires—some, that it “seeks to engage like “Smith’s Ferry Fire and invigorate the arts Ring,” glow with a few community by hosting remaining embers, and regular exhibitions and others are completely events.” expired. Oil paintings With funding from like “Dead Out” have a Boise Weekly Cover a scorched earthiness to Auction grant, Enso is them that recall, in their now showing its first way, the Wehrmachtnon-member exhibit, tortured landscapes of William Lewis’ Rapid German painter Anselm Oxidation. Kiefer. Enso co-founder Cate The paintings are Brigden called Lewis a studies in black and prolific artist whose art dark grays, their night on canvas and paper is shadows creep across bold and thoughtful, the encircling stones, and the implications of obscuring the charred which are often unexremnants, letting in the pected. cold and dark. These “We knew it would works stand as chilling make for a strong metaphors for being show,” Brigden said. alone in the wild. The point is well The theme of selftaken. Lewis is not only imposed solitude is a contemporary artist of considered another way originality and skill, but “Thoreau’s Cabin (Replica),” oil on canvas, 2012. in Rapid Oxidation. an intellectual historian The title can also be whose subject matter interpreted as “fire of encircling either a fire yet to be set or just and technique reveal a the mind,” as Lewis puts it, referring to the dying embers. deep interest in human thought and its relaspiritual and intellectual ferment of the midIt’s tempting to see the Enso exhibit as tion to the natural world. From pre-modern 19th century characterized by utopian coma sequel to Burn Pile, Lewis’ 2010 show at illustrations combining science and faith to Northwest Nazarene University. Whereas the munities, ideological societies and essayists degraded roadside remnants of small town latter depicted the various stages of what can like Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David billboards and hardscrabble farm impleThoreau (plus the dark romanticism of writbe described as a family cleansing ritual—in ments, Lewis finds beauty in commonplace ers like Edgar Allan Poe) and the trajectories which the debris of daily rural life is pushed ingenuity, imagination and design. His renthey created for the future. together and burned—Lewis’ large gouaches derings of manufactured artifacts from 19th To make his point, Lewis portrays two in Rapid Oxidation seem spontaneous and and early 20th century America are nostalcabins belonging to a pair of famous nonout of control like a force of nature. gic, yet refreshingly alive and personable. conformists, who took to living in the woods These pieces are reminiscent of William In 2008, Lewis turned to portraying for solace and solitude. His large oil on canTurner’s famous “Burning of the Houses of lone figures and objects in nature in simple vas, “Thoreau’s Cabin (Replica),” depicts the Parliament in 1835,” another compositions that convey a shanty Thoreau built in 1845 beside Walden icon of romanticism. psychology of contemplation Pond to pen his American classic. In oil on canvas and and isolation. This increasRapid Oxidation runs In a contemporary extension of this nonwatercolor and gouache on ingly prominent streak of through Friday, June 1. conformist ideal, the other cabin belongs to paper, Lewis portrays various romanticism in Lewis’ art ENSO ARTSPACE incarnations of fire in the wild, Unabomber Ted Kaczynski, who hid out for comprises single figures in na120 E. 38th St., Ste. 105 years, stewing in his extremist environmental including the soaring vertical 208-991-0117 ture and solitary rock formaensoartspace.com ideas and planning lethal attacks. A diptych “Large Fire,” which shoots tions with hidden meanings, called “Kaczynski’s Cabin (Two Views)” huge flames into the night sky, both of which echo German depicts his windowless structure both on site and the broad “Large Fire artist Caspar David Friedrich’s and in FBI custody. 2,” which generates intense heat and light early 19th century romantic portrayals of On the gallery floor before it, a porcelain against a crisscross composition of blackened man’s spiritual communion with nature. In sculpture of a burned-out campfire sits as a wood, like a Franz Kline painting on fire. these, Lewis introduced his motif of the rumute witness to such craziness. Even small, abstract gouaches like “Plasma” dimentary campfire, a simple ring of stones WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 29

LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

TO MONSIEUR WITH AMOR HEART AND SOIL—This family-friendly documentary explores the rich landscape and lives of small-scale farmers, farmers markets and farmto-school programs. Proceeds benefit the Boise Urban Garden School. Sponsored by Franz Witte Nurseries. Saturday, May 19. 3 p.m. $15, $12 youth. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3424222, theflicksboise.com. READY TO FLY—Zion’s Bank presents this film about the U.S. Women’s Ski Jumping Team’s quest to have its sport included in the Olympic Games. Director William A. Kerig and associate producer Whitney Childers will provide commentary and answer questions about their documentary. Wednesday, May 16, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. SCAVENGER HUNT: AN UNLIKELY UNION— Scavenger Hunt is a feature-length documentary about California condor recovery and the issue of lead poisoning in wildlife. The screening will be followed by a discussion session with filmmakers Matthew Podolsky and Eddie Chung. Saturday, May 19, 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org.

Opening BATTLESHIP—Earth must fight for survival against a superior force in this action-adventure film. (PG-13) Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22 THE DICTATOR—This comedy by and starring Sacha Baron Cohen tells the story of a dictator who risked his life to ensure that democracy would never come to the country he so lovingly oppressed. Inspired by the best-selling novel Zabibah and The King by Saddam Hussein. (R) Opens Wednesday, May 16. Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22 MARLEY—This film features rare footage, performances and revelatory interviews with the people who knew Bob Marley best. (NA) Flicks

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING—Cameron Diaz stars in this film inspired by the New York Times bestseller of the same name, which follows five couples dealing with the challenges of impending parenthood. (PG-13) Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. 30 | MAY 16–22, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Monsieur Lazhar’s life lessons GEORGE PRENTICE Monsieur Lazhar, the Oscar-nominated French-Canadian export, is a mystery worth solving. Not a contradiction, the film is instead a paradox. The movie involves a tragedy, but it is life-affirming; its plot holds deep, even dark secrets, but maintains a lilting pace. Perhaps most surprising is how many of the film’s stars, not more than 11 or 12 years old, convey adult themes such as abandonment and loss, with such gentle perception. Mohamed Fellag stars as Monsieur Lazhar, a substitute teacher who guides students through a tragedy. Written and directed with expert economy by Philippe Falardeau, Monsieur Lazhar was named Best Canadian Feature at the are inwardly traumatized by the loss of their an outstanding North American debut as the 2011 Toronto International Film Festival, title character. Primarily a comic actor, Fellag previous teacher and their young souls are swept last year’s Genie Awards (Canada’s instead portrays Lazhar with the gentlest of too bruised to understand how to heal. To Oscars) and was one of the five nominees affectations. complicate matters, in a 21st century classfor Best Foreign Language Film at this year’s Even finer are two ingenues—Sophie Neroom where teachers are scolded for being Academy Awards. The film’s 94 minutes are lisse as Alice and Emilien Neron as Simon— too close to their students or discouraged sublime and worthy of high praise. who both offer grace and passion in their from hugs or physical affection, Monsieur Monsieur Lazhar is Bachir, an Algerian performances. Lazhar reminds us of how delicately adults refugee who mysteriously appears on the Films about inspirational teachers who must tread in helping doorstep of a Monadolescents cope with manifest change have, unfortunately, become treal public elementary unbearable cliches. Dangerous Minds and loss. school, applying to be MONSIEUR LAZHAR (PG-13) Dead Poets Society are cringe-worthy with In a concurrent a substitute teacher Directed by Philippe Falardeau their over-the-top earnestness and lack of and equally compelin the wake of the Starring Mohamed Fellag, Sophie Nelisse and reality. But Monsieur Lazhar reminds me so ling plotline, Lazhar’s school’s sudden and Emilien Neron much of To Sir With Love, the 1967 groundbackstory is slowly tragic loss of one of its Opens Friday, May 18, at The Flicks breaker starring Sidney Poitier, which underunveiled. He is recoveducators. stood adults and adolescents as the complex ering from his own “A classroom is a creatures that we are (or were). personal tragedy and place of friendship, Having already seen Monsieur Lazhar faces possible deportation to his country, of work, of courtesy, a place of life,” says twice, I look forward to watching it again. where he feared for his life. Fellag (known Lazhar. Don’t skip this class. in his native Algeria by his one name) makes But his class is broken. His students

SCREEN/DVD BOISE’S FAVORITE DVD RENTALS THIS WEEK

1. HAYWIRE First week in release.

2. CONTRABAND Dropped from No. 1.

—Source: Video Memories, 4504 Overland Road, Boise, 208-385-0113

3. UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING First week in release.

4. THE VOW First week in release.

5. NEW YEAR’S EVE Stays at No. 5.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

EXTRA/SCREEN

Kirk Bloodsworth is the first death row inmate in the United States to be exonerated by DNA evidence.

A BLOODSWORTH-Y CAUSE Gregory Bayne previews new documentary CHRISTINA MARFICE Bayne, founder of the Lovely Machine Boise filmmaker Gregory Bayne says he likes to tell stories about remarkable people facing film production company, has chronicled Bloodsworth’s story in a feature-length docuremarkable situations. On Thursday, May 17, the Egyptian Theatre will host an evening mentary, Bloodsworth: An Innocent Man. Bayne is raising funds to finish the film, with Bayne and Kirk Bloodsworth, the first which will be partially animated. Bayne said death row inmate in the United States to be exonerated by DNA evidence. It’s no wonder that though progress has been steady, more support is needed to complete the animated Bayne wants to tell this story: Both the man and the situation are, in a word, remarkable. portions of the film this summer. The event at the Egyptian is free, though Bloodsworth, an honorably discharged Bayne will be seeking donations to help ex-Marine, was sentenced to death in 1985 fund his work. Bloodsworth for the rape and murder of a will give a firsthand account young girl. He was mistaken of his story and the entire Thursday, May 17, 7 p.m., for a composite image created FREE. event will be filmed and inby two eyewitnesses, both cluded in the documentary. small children. EGYPTIAN THEATRE 700 W. Main St. “I just want to get people “Long story short, they 208-345-0454 to come and hear his story decided he was the guy based and be part of the making of More info at on eyewitness identification, thislovelymachine.com. this film,” said Bayne. “He’s but none of the kids actually really compelling when he identified him in a lineup,” talks about it, especially in said Bayne. “Through very flimsy evidence, he was convicted. There was front of an audience.” Though Bayne doesn’t consider himself a no physical evidence at all.” social-issues filmmaker, he was attracted to While imprisoned, Bloodsworth read a book about the use of DNA evidence to con- Bloodsworth’s story because of its ability to vict criminals. He knew that if such evidence universally resonate with an audience. “It’s a remarkable story in terms of could be used to prove guilt, it could also the injustice. I know that people don’t like prove his innocence. There were only two to admit it, but when they look at things DNA labs in the United States at the time, but Bloodsworth pushed to have the evidence like this, they think, ‘This can’t happen to from his case tested. His DNA did not match me.’ Here’s the evidence that this can happen to anybody.” the evidence, and he was released in 1993. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 31

NEWS/FOOD LAU R IE PEAR M AN

FOOD S HEILA FR ANC IS

Slurp some stroganoff at the Russian Food Festival.

BORSHT, DUMPLINGS AND YAKS If you’re growing wear y of standard Boise burger and beer fare, we’ve got some good news for your snoozing tastebuds. On Friday, May 18, from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday, May 19, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., St. Seraphim of Sarov Orthodox Church will host the seventh-annual Russian Food Festival. Attendees can sample Russian classics like beef stroganoff, borsht and cabbage rolls or waltz into more adventurous territory with manti (steamed meat or veggie dumplings) or chebureki (spiced meat pockets). There will also be ample sweet treats, like baklava, medovik (honey cake) and oreshki (caramel and almond filled cookies), and plenty of Baltika beer to wash it all down. For more info, visit stseraphimboise.org. And speaking of dumplings, everyone’s favorite mobile Nepalese/Tibetan dumpling purveyors, Momo Dumplings, will soon be slinging savory bites in a permanent storefront location at 3223 E. Louise Drive, Ste. 106, in Meridian next to Buffalo Wild Wings. In addition to offering an array of steamed and fried dumplings in pork, turkey and vegetarian varieties, Momo Dumplings will also serve up sides like samosas, French fries, chicken salad and rice balls, and carry a beefed-up selection of sauces. Momo co-owner Yogendra Poudel said he plans to open the fast food-style eatery to the public by the first or second week of June and confirmed that Momo will maintain a presence at the Capital City Public Market and the East End Market at Bown Crossing. For more info and updates, visit momodumpling.com. Speaking of new fast-food options, a seasonal grab-and-go restaurant called Yak Shack will open Saturday, May 19, from 4-7 p.m. at the Boise Whitewater River Park across from Quinn’s Pond. The Yak Shack will carry an assortment of cold drinks and snacks for ka-yak-ers in addition to Sugar, Sugar handcrafted gourmet ice cream sandwiches. Yak Shack will only be open Thursdays-Sundays from 10 a.m.-9 p.m. seasonally, and will offer barbecued “winner winner chicken dinners” in the evenings. The shack is currently located on Idaho River Sports’ property, but owners plan to open a brick-and-mortar restaurant by 2014 in a nearby building. For more info, visit yakshack.com or sugarsugarid.com. In other comings and goings news, North Shore Hot Dogs has a sign posted on it’s door that says, “Closed for flood damages from floor above us. Sorry.” Management could not be reached for comment.

Sage Pale Ale brewers from left to right: Mike Francis, Paul Holle, Ian Fuller, Matt Hurlbutt and Kris Price. Not pictured: Chris Compton.

BREWS BROS Local breweries collaborate for American Craft Beer Week HARRISON BERRY Idahoans will feel at home with. Under the industrial lighting of Payette Brew“Sage is a very predominant smell, from ing Company’s oversized Garden City brewery, Boise to Ketchum to McCall,” he said. the smells of hops and sage were nearly overThough the Sage Pale Ale was brewed at the powering. By the bar overlooking the brewing Payette Brewing facility, it won’t be branded floor, Matt Hurlbutt, co-owner and co-brewer at McCall’s Salmon River Brewery, tore open a under any single company. “Everybody gets kegs,” Holle said. plastic bag full of grassy-looking hops pellets. American Craft Beer Week is as much about “Rub them together in your hand. Smell it,” business as it is about the culture of drinking he urged. expertly crafted beers. According to the BrewThe pellets crumbled, releasing the telltale ers Association, sales of craft beer grew 13 perodor of hops, but also the faint aroma of dry cent by volume in 2011, and most Americans earth after a heavy rain. live within 10 miles of a craft brewery. On April 27, five Idaho breweries––HighStill craft brewers have to convince bar lands Hollow Brewhouse, Payette Brewing owners that this is a meaningful shift in what Company, Salmon River Brewery, Sawtooth their patrons are drinking. Enter Jacob Black, Brewery and Crooked Fence Brewing––joined Payette’s sales manager. A former high-school forces to brew 30 barrels of a limited producwrestler, Black now wrestles big-name brewertion ale that will has been distributed excluies like Miller and Budweiser for market share sively in kegs to bars and pubs all over Boise and taps at Boise’s watering holes. for American Craft Beer Week, which runs “We want to be the permanent handle, and through Thursday, May 24. Craft Beer Week is a national celebration of the outside breweries should rotate on taps,” he said. craft beer’s culture and community. In And Black is winning his handles. Boise, it will include collaborative and Payette Brewing has 90 accounts specialty beers on tap, as well as events serving its three year-round beers. And and specials at bars. Payette has expanded its operation–– Craft Beer Week is also a rare from 2,500 barrels per year to 3,800 opportunity for brewers to work tobarrels per year––while remaining gether to carve out a niche for local playful with its new brews, 12 of craft and specialty brews in a market Scan this QR code for a list of Craft which will be on display during flooded with mass-market domestics Beer Week events. Craft Beer Week. like Budweiser, Coors and Miller. Craft Beer Week is a chance for “We’re all pretty young,” HurlPayette to produce as much beer as butt said. “We’re just trying to show it can sell. But for smaller Idaho breweries, it’s some unity in Idaho.” This year, that unity came in the form of the the other way around. Salmon River Brewery Sage Pale Ale. Paul Holle of Sawtooth Brewery has 17 accounts, 12 of which are in McCall, and this is a chance for Hurlbutt to reach out in Ketchum said that the inspiration for this year’s collaborative brew celebrates the season. to the larger Boise market. “We’re excited to expand our operations a Instead of mixing up a batch of hop-heavy bit,” he said. India pale ale, these comrades chose a pale ale But tapping into the Treasure Valley’s beer to complement warm afternoons and brisk scene will require more than just impressing evenings. Boise beer aficionados. Salmon River plans to “It’s springtime in Idaho: Let’s focus on follow up Craft Beer Week with the purchase something light,” Holle said. of a new truck, more kegs and a 15-barrel ferAs for the herbal tinge that will be this menter to boost production and enable a wider beer’s calling card, Holle said it is a flavor

range of distribution. In McCall, Salmon River also runs a brewpub to complement its brewing operation. Owners said they felt a brewpub was necessary in McCall, where beer sales are significantly lower outside the tourism season. “We have a brewpub because we felt like we had to have food and a brewery so we could sell more beer,” Hurlbutt said. “We love our restaurant, but we love making beer more.” Highlands Hollow is also a restaurant/ brewery. And though it’s part of Boise’s old guard of breweries, Highland’s Hollow joined other small operations this year to produce the Sage Pale Ale. General Manager Jerie Fishwild said this year’s Craft Beer Week will be the most significant to date. “It’s going to be bigger than all of them,” she said. To drum up excitement for its beers and food, Highlands Hollow will hold a brewers dinner Saturday, May 19, during which appetizers, main courses and desserts will be paired with Highlands Hollow beer. Additionally, it’s participating in this year’s Craft Beer Week Passport with Ram Restaurant and Brewery, Payette Brewing Company, Crooked Fence and Sockeye Brewery. The passport is a challenge for Boiseans to visit breweries and bars all over town. Participants who collect 10 stamps on their passports will receive a commemorative T-shirt. “It’s a fun thing that gets more people involved in the beers,” Fishwild added. Back at Payette’s headquarters, Payette Head Brewer Mike Francis climbed to the top of a fermentation tank in a pair of black galoshes while Hurlbutt checked a rubber tube on the side. They exchanged glances and smiled. Thanks to the collaborative Sage Pale Ale and other events, this will be the largest Craft Beer Week in Boise to date. And the assembled brewers agreed: the more work they put into it, the more enthusiasm––and future sales––they’ll get from Boise’s beer drinkers.

—Tara Morgan

32 | MAY 16–22, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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BW LOST LOST CD CASE NW BOISE Black and flame zip case with 20 cds/dvds, possibly lost in NW Boise/Hillside Jr. High area. Reward for return! 368-9718.

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BW VOLUNTEERS VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR CATCH, Inc. (Charitable Assistance to Community’s Homeless) provides housing to families with children who are currently living in homeless shelters & helps them become established in our community in homes & become self-sufficient within six months. We are in need of a volunteer who will work closely with the Office & Resource Manager on a variety of tasks, use Excel, Outlook and Word, identify community opportunities to promote CATCH & solicit volunteers, run ads & further assist where needed. If this sounds like the right opportunity for you, please contact Blenda Davis, Office & Resource Manager, at 246-8830.

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BW MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 4/4 VIOLIN HIGH QUALITY For advanced musician. Beautiful tone. High-quality instrument & wood/horsehair bow by Otto A Glaesel; Scherl & Roth case; accessories included. Great condition. Currently in a climate-controled music studio in Sun Valley, I’ll bring it to Boise area for serious buyer. Paid $2000, asking $1500 obo. Pics avail. 208-7279310, txt or call.

EAT HERE

WEEKEND MARKETS

FABULOUS IBANEZ SEMIHOLLOW Fabulous. Ibanez Artcore (AS73TCR) semihollow electric guitar. Cherry translucent finish. Barely used & in close to perfect physical condition aside from some barely noticeable finish swirling, but in perfect working condition. Sounds fantastic! Super low action! Comes with brand new hardshell Ibanez case. $575 OBO! Call 343-5290. CELLO Half-size student cello in good condition. Hard standup travel case included. Call to check it out. $500. 272-0191. GIBSON, LES PAUL STUDIO GUITAR W/CASE 1992, black, minor nicks from use. Bridge Pick-Up is Seymour Duncan, Neck Pick-Up is original. Tuning Pegs upgraded to Sperzel Locking Tuners. Previously owned by Ben Smith of New York Band, Sweet Diesel. Plays great—sounds like a beast! $575. Call 866-2693.

NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA Asa Tyrell Wonderful Chelsea Lynn Wonderful Asynn John Wonderful Case No. CV NC 1206292 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGES

A Petition to change the name of Asa Tyrell Wonderful, Chelsea Lynn Wonderful and Asynn John Wonderful, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Asa Tyrell Gentry, Chelsea Lynn Gentry and Asynn John Gentry. The reason for the change in name is: because that is the name given to Asa Tyrell at birth and the family wishes to conform. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on June 14, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: APR 23 2012

by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: APR 03 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Nichelaus Eugene Huffaker Case No. CV NC 1207335 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Nichelaus Eugene Huffaker, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change

CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. May 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Jessica Audrey Marchewka Case No. CV NC 1205764 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Jessica Audrey Marchewka, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Jessica Audrey Trent. The reason for the change in name is : because I divorced my spouse. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on June 7, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed

to Nichelaus Eugene Mack. The reason for the change in name is: Stepfather raised me and I want his last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on June 28, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: May 04 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. May 16, 23, 30 & June 6, 2012.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

BUDDY: 7-year-old male Doberman Pinscher mix. House-trained, good with dogs but needs a cat-free home. Low key and nice manners. (Kennel 310- #15941958)

TYLEE: 1-year-old female domestic shorthair. Petite cat. Litterbox-trained. Enjoys attention and being held. (Kennel 16#16150751)

MR. VALENTINE: 3-yearold male Siamese mix. Medium-length fur. Litterbox-trained. Good with children of all ages. (Kennel 10#15378579)

SASHA: 3-year-old female standard Schnauzer mix. Needs a gentle owner. Appears crate-trained. Good with dogs. (Kennel 304#16073767)

JAKE: 5-year-old male Chow Chow mix. Can be independent. Warms up to people who earns his trust. Gentle, happy personality. (Kennel 401- #16059197)

PETE: 1-year-old male domestic shorthair. Good with children of all ages, other cats and cat-friendly dogs. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 11- #16160776)

SHOP HERE

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

GULLIVER: Handsome blue-eyed boy seeks companion for life’s adventures. Is it you?

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EMBER: Loving grey KATIE: Staff Pick for girl will warm your heart May. Only $20 to adopt and home. me.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 35

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NYT CROSSWORD | A-V CLUB BY ALEX VRATSANOS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 26 Protector of the dead, in Egyptian myth 27 As a result 28 Seek (out) 30 Easy run 31 Slowly 33 It runs down the neck 35 Title role for Kilmer and Costner 37 In accordance with

ACROSS 1 Something you willingly part with? 7 Air Force college athlete 13 Calm 20 Tied up 21 Nervous 22 Fixes 23 Have, say 25 Record collection? 1

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68 End of the main part of the Constitution 71 Flashed hand signal 72 Canadian Indian 73 Bit of a jam 74 “Either you do it ___ will” 75 Often-dried fruit 78 Get-rich-quick scheme? 79 Nix 82 Annual quartet 83 ___ Bornes (classic card game) 84 Certain link 85 10 kilogauss 86 Sister ___, 1920s-’30s evangelist 87 Noted ring family 88 Foreign one 89 Electrical pioneer 94 Crib cry 97 Mex. women 98 Bit of a jam 99 Valuable violin 103 “Zip-___-Doo-Dah” 105 Two-finger keyboard shortcut in Windows 109 Itinerary info 111 “Love ___” 112 Old country name from the Portuguese for “beautiful” 114 Common houseplant with colorful blooms 117 Competitor at a hippodrome 118 Speaker of the line “He thinks too much: such men are dangerous” 119 Store, as corn 120 Kind of organ or overload 121 Some of them are marching 122 Got in the end

DOWN 36 | MAY 16–22, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

1 In-box contents 2 Pickle

3 Botulin, e.g. 4 Record label for the Kinks and Pink 5 Abbr. to the left of a number 6 Falco of “The Sopranos” 7 Pardoned 8 Tom, Dick or Harry 9 Part of the Pentateuch: Abbr. 10 Alphabet quartet 11 No Mr. Nice Guy 12 Wyo. neighbor 13 Like Quito and La Paz 14 Place to see una ópera 15 Wager 16 Bibliographical abbr. 17 Greek with a storied life 18 Brunch serving 19 Word often preceded by poly24 Multitudes 29 Bawl out 32 Kind of surprise 34 Shiver-inducing stare 36 Shakespeare contemporary 39 Steadfast 40 Locker rooms often have them 41 Romeo’s “two blushing pilgrims” 42 Bldg. directory listings 43 Microchannel 44 Narc’s find 45 Dickensian cry 46 Some succulents 50 Brandy, for one 51 1920s Olympic track gold medalist Paavo ___ 52 Tooth: Prefix 54 Yakutsk’s river 55 Parry 56 Newsman Roger 57 Bric-a-___ 59 Intense hankering

95 Not just esteem 96 “Great blue” creature 100 On again 101 Singer with the multiplatinum albums “19” and “21” 102 Was sweet (on) 104 CPR pros 106 Crunchy munchie 107 Beginning to cry? 108 Born’s partner 110Cinematographer Nykvist 113Oklahoma Indian 115Sussex suffix 116Like Haydn’s Symphony No. 12 or 29

60 Setup, of a sort 62 Bakery display 63 Tub-thump 65 Sailor’s cry 66 Portable home 67 Desktop feature 68 They come out of the head 69 One of Egypt’s plagues 70 Arrow shooter 73 Like a shoe 76 Cancún, por ejemplo 77 Barbecue blocks 78 Portray 79 Go easily (through) 80 Hi-tech special effects 81 French ___ 83 Actress Farrow 84 “Just for the taste of it” or “Just do it” 86 ___ U.S. atty. 87 Embodiments 90 Golf pencil’s lack 91 It might go up via an escalator 92 Like some garages 93 No more than 94 Drifts L A S T S P O T

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Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

G O E S U K U L N E R A A T E D S E T R I H E A V A I E S T S S Y A K S O A E F C R A T S H T A T E I R E N E W A W O T A L B R A A E S T

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REAL DISCREET, LOCAL CONNECTIONS Call FREE! 208-287-0343 or 800210-1010. www.livelinks.com 18+.

BW I SAW YOU SAW U SUNDAY, APR 30 CO-OP Talked to you about lentils, etc. LOL Meant to introduce myself, but was in a hurry. I was in a FD shirt. You: medium length blonde hair. Me, brown hair. WE LOVE YOU, LORELEI! What can we say about our eldest daughter? All the usual...kind, loving, beautiful, smart. But truly, Lorelei is and always has been a girl on her own path to wonderful things. Congratulations to our amazing graduate! We love you! Mom and Dad.

BW KISSES Cheers to Tom Scott Honda for looking at my car and realizing the warranty covers the repairs. Looks like you just earned my business! MY DEAR POET As you have forgotten about me, so I too, have forgotten about you. For I have bottled you up and set you on a shelf labeled “a past life”. The Kit Kat. The only gentleman’s club in Ada County that allows smoking only seconds from the 10 mile interchange.

BW KICKS Boo to you Larry Miller Honda! Trying to charge me over $300 to fix something that another dealership said is covered under the warranty. Looks like I know where I’ll buy my next car.

BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. My name is Kaila Martinez. Most people call me “Chepis.” I’m looking for a pen pal to help me pass the time. I’m 25 y.o., Hispanic, 4’10”, and bisexual. If you would like to know more write me at Kaila Martinez #89787 200 Courthouse Way Rigby, ID 83442. M4W: 23 y.o. M looking for BBW! I’m 5’8”, 180 lbs., blue eyes. Not looking for money just lonely. Will be released Feb. 2013. Steven Goins #90250 11-A-21-A ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I’m currently locked up for 10 more months. Looking for a pen pal to write. Jennifer Fisher #91819 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Outdoorsy girl looking for a wild mountain man for pen pal. Cheyenne Campbell #74995 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Cowgirl looking to be roped by my cowboy. 49 y.o. W incarcerated wanting pen pal. Pennie Davies #49916 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. WM, 31 y.o., green eyes, dirty blonde hair, athletic build and lots of ink. ISO F to write. I’m really into music and concerts, especially Thrash metal and rave music. I am a fun and open guy. I’m currently in prison for DUI. Adam Greathouse #70853 SICI MCU C-17 PO Box 8509 Boise, ID 83707.

Incarcerated 25 y.o. F, 5’2”, red/auburn hair, hazel eyes. Very funny and outgoing from the Nampa area. Seeking a pen pal. Write me at Tarah Gilliland 15 N. 2nd E. Rexburg, ID 83440. Incarcerated 31 y.o. F, 5’4”, blonde hair with blue eyes. Love the outdoors, seeking M pen pals. Write Brittney Clements 15 N. 2nd E. Rexburg, ID 83440. Incarcerated 27 y.o. F, looking for M pen pals. Intelligent, funny and would like the same. Lisa Croghan 15 N. 2nd E. Rexburg, ID 83440. Incarcerated 27 y.o. F, from Florida. Blondish/brown hair, blue eyes, 5’10”, outgoing and very down to earth. Seeking a M pen pal for companionship. Kelly Bury 15 N. 2nd E. Rexburg, ID 83440. 29 y.o. SF looking for SM pen pal that could become more. Curly brown hair, brown eyes, 5’2”, fun, flirty, good humored and looking for the same. Somer Hulse 7210 Barrister Dr. Boise, ID 83704. 47 y.o. SF looking for SM pen pal that could become more. I am energetic, fun and love to laugh. Young at heart and appearance. Looking for same. If interested write Bonita Campbell 7210 Barrister Dr. Boise, ID 83704. 52 y.o. bad girl looking for a good man to correspond with. Be friends and companions. Melanie Shaw #85356 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. I’m a SWF, 44 y.o., hazel eyes blonde hair, ISO someone to write that likes to have fun and laugh. If you can’t sleep at night let me purr you to sleep. I have lots of curves for you to have fun with… SO if you would like to take this journey and have fun doing it, write me at Nannette Wilson #77918 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204.

ADULT ENTERTAINMMENT

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 37

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Is there a difference in sound quality between relatively inexpensive modern violins and the multimillion-dollar violins created by master craftsmen in the 1700s? In research done at the Eighth International Violin Competition, most violinists couldn’t tell them apart. In accordance with the astrological omens, Aries, I urge you to do comparable tests in your own sphere. There’s no need to overpay for anything, either with your money, your emotions, your energy or your time. Go with what works, not with what costs the most or has highest status. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If we thought of your life as a book, the title of the next chapter could very well be “In Quest of the Primal.” I encourage you to meditate on what that means to you and then act accordingly. Here are a few possibilities: tapping into the mother lode, communing with the core, returning to beginnings, seeking out the original, being in tune with the pulse of nature. Does any of that sound like fun? According to my reading of the astrological omens, you have a mandate to be as raw as the law allows—to be the smartest animal you can be. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A Russian woman named Marija Usova decided to go skydiving even though she was eight months pregnant. “I wanted my baby to have the beautiful feeling of flying through the air and free-falling before it was born,” she said. Soon after she jumped out of the plane and opened her parachute, she went into labor. Luckily, her daughter waited until she landed to be born. What does this have to do with you? I don’t recommend you do anything remotely like what Usova did in the next few weeks. But do be alert for healthier, saner approaches to the basic theme, which is to be adventurous and wild and free as you birth a new possibility. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You spend nearly one-third of your life sleeping. For one-fifth of that time, you’re dreaming. So pretty much every night, you watch and respond to as much as 90 minutes’ worth of movies created by and starring you. Much of this footage is obscure and confusing and not exactly Oscar-worthy, which is one reason you may not recall many of the details when you wake up. But according to my astrological analysis, the immediate future could be different. Your dreams should be full of riveting entertainment that reveals important information about the mysteries of your destiny. Please consider keeping a pen and notebook near your bed or a small recording device.

38 | MAY 16–22, 2012 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): It’s oxymoron season for you. That means you’re likely to encounter more than your usual share of paradoxes. The logic-loving areas of your brain will have to seek assistance from your non-rational wisdom. I’ll give you a heads-up on some of the lucid riddles you should be ready to embrace: 1. a humbling triumph; 2. a tender rivalry; 3. a selfish blessing; 4. an opportunity to commune with risky comfort; 5. an invitation to explore a relaxing challenge; 6. a chance to get up-close and personal with a long-distance connection. For best results, Leo, memorize these lines from Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and recite them periodically: “Do I contradict myself? / Very well then I contradict myself. / (I am large, I contain multitudes.)” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): There’s at least a 50 percent chance that the coming days will be over-the-top, out-of-the-blue and off-the-record. I’m halfexpecting florid, luscious and kaleidoscopic events, possibly even rococo, swashbuckling and splendiferous adventures. Are you ready for all this? Of course not. That’s the point life will be trying to make: nudging you to learn more about the fine art of spontaneity as you improvise your way through unpredictable lessons that will lead you toward the resources you’ll need to succeed. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Obsessions. Enchantments. Crushes. Manias. Some astrologers think you Libras are mostly immune from these indelicate but sometimes delightful modes of human expression. They seem to believe that you love harmony and balance too much to fall under the spell of a bewitching passion that rivets your focus. I disagree with that view. It may be true that you’re better able than the other signs to be objective about your fixations. But that doesn’t necessarily dilute the intensity you feel when they rise up and captivate your imagination with the force of a thousand love songs. My advice? Have fun and stay amused. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “The chains that bind us most closely are the ones we have broken,” said Scorpio poet Antonio Porchia. In other words, the oppression from which we have freed ourselves may continue to influence us long after we’ve escaped. The imprint it left on our sensitive psyches might keep distorting our decisions and twisting our emotions. But I’m here to tell you, Scorpio, that you’re entering a time when you have an enhanced power to dissolve the lingering taint your broken chains still impose. You finally have the resources and wisdom to complete the liberation process.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In the coming weeks, you will have an excellent chance to develop more skill in the art of high gossip. High gossip has almost nothing in common with the mindless prattle that erodes reputations and fosters cynicism. It’s not driven by envy, pettiness or schadenfreude. When you engage in high gossip, you spread uplifting whispers and inspirational hearsay; you speculate about people’s talents and call attention to their successes; you conspire to awaken generosity of spirit and practical idealism. High gossip is a righteous approach to chatting about the human zoo. It might not flow as easily as the cheap and shabby kind—at least at first—but it lasts a whole lot longer and creates connections that help keep your mental hygiene sparkling clean. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Sometimes I have a dream that seems cryptic or meaningless when I first wake up, but a few days later, I realize it was a brilliant insight into what I most needed to transform about my life. If you don’t recall many of your dreams, that might not be a familiar experience for you. But you’ve probably had waking-life experiences with a similar arc. I predict you will be given at least one of those in the coming week. It may confound you while you’re in the midst of it, but will eventually reveal choice clues that have the power to change your life for the better. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You may not have heard about the “forbidden colors.” And you certainly haven’t seen them, even though they exist. They’re reddish green and yellowish blue, which the cells of your retina are not built to register. However, scientists have figured out a trick by which these hues can be made visible. A few lucky people have actually caught a glimpse of them. I bring this to your attention, Aquarius, because I suspect you are close to experiencing a metaphorical version of this breakthrough—seeing something that is supposedly impossible to see. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “There’s no such thing as a wrong note,” said jazz pianist Art Tatum. “It all depends on how you resolve it.” Jazz trumpeter Miles Davis had a similar philosophy. “It’s not the note you play that’s the wrong note,” he said. “It’s the note you play afterwards that makes it right or wrong.” I think that’s an excellent understanding for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks, Pisces. Be wary of coming to premature conclusions about alleged mistakes. Wait to hear the entire song and see the bigger picture.

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BOISEweekly | MAY 16–22, 2012 | 39


Boise Weekly Vo. 20 Issue 47