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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 42 APRIL 11–17, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 9

IN THE HARTLAND Rep. Phil Hart’s notso-excellent adventure CITYDESK 9

SMOKE SIGNALS Culture vs. the law on Boise smoking ban SCREEN 22

TANGLED WEB How YouTube helps and harms webisodes FOOD 24

STREET LEGAL Farmers market vendors have to play by industry rules

“You can only butt your head on the wall for so long.”

CITIZEN 10

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporters: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com April Foster April@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Interns: Amber Clontz, Annette Rincon Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Zach Hagadone, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Julia Green, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE YEAH, WHAT HE SAID Each week we dig a gem of a quote out of the text of the issue and publish it on the cover of that edition. This week our writers and sources were on fire. In fact, there are so many choice quotes that are cover material, I’ve taken a few lines here to point out the runners-up. How’s this one: “People don’t like me to use the term, but it’s the Christian Taliban.” That one comes courtesy of Democrat Rep. Bill Killen in reference to ALEC, which he says had Sen. Chuck Winder do its bidding with the ultrasound bill that ended up getting so many constituents pissed off even the conservatives under the dome backed off their support. Note to readers: That’s not even the best quote to come from Killen in his interview with News Editor George Prentice, so don’t thumb past Citizen on Page 10 thinking it’s just a snoozer full of political drivel. And in Mail this week, one reader had this to say: “So Garden City isn’t pretty enough for Texas transplant Kerri Hahn and her kitchen coven.” (Extra points for the alliteration.) I’m always torn as to how to feel when readers don’t see the obvious signs in our annual April Fool’s story (BW, Feature, “A Desperate Housewife of Garden City,” March 28, 2012) that we’re doing some serious leg pulling. I’m hoping it’s because they don’t make it all the way through the story because they were so disgusted by what came first. I’m also hoping that those readers who bought the whole thing end to end are in the minority. So here it is in black and white, folks: April Fool’s. And perhaps the nod for best quote of the week goes to Ted Rall for: “As of April 2, finger-rape is the law.” I can almost sense that a proofreader is, as I type these words, so repulsed by that statement, he or she is tempted to scratch it from the page altogether. My guess is, though, that for those of you who read this note before Rall’s column, intrigue will triumph over your own disgust. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Conrad Garner TITLE: Late Night Mutiny at Salty Dog Tavern MEDIUM: Ink drawings, digital photography and color. Printed on archival photo stock.

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

ARTIST STATEMENT: I am a visual artist who enjoys combining graphic design, illustration and photography into my work. You can learn and see more at conradgarner.com. I will also be doing a show at the Flying M Coffeehouse along with Cale Cathey later this year so keep an eye out.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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MAIL

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS

I’M NOT TEXTING, I’M TWEETING Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter signed a bill banning texting while driving. Good thing we can still Tweet and drive. Or Facebook and drive. What about email? Details at Citydesk.

E-BOOK PRICE FIXING Five major e-book publishers and Apple have been accused of price fixing and the Consumer Federation of America called on the U.S. Senate Committee on Antitrust to look into the issue. Details at Citydesk.

OPERA ON CAMERA While we were out and about with the old camcorder, we stopped into an Opera Idaho rehearsal and chatted up the leads of its upcoming show, the Ballad of Baby Doe. Get the scoop at Cobweb.

LABRADOR ON BEING LDS Rep. Raul Labrador made his third appearance on Meet the Press since taking office to speak about faith in politics. He took aim at MSNBC’s Lawrence O’Donnell, calling him out for saying some nasty things about the LDS church. And our readers had a few comments to make about the story. More at Citydesk.

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Rep. Phil Hart’s excellent adventures

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CITYDESK

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CITIZEN

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS Behind the scenes with BCT’s Off the Record

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SCREEN How webisodes are changing the television landscape

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FOOD The market scuffle over beans and potatoes

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WINE SIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 5

MAIL LEAVING A BAD TASTE Tara Morgan’s recent bipolar and surprisingly offensive review of A’ Tavola, left me nearly speechless (BW, Food, “A ’Tavola,” April 4, 2012). While the piece started with an objective and positive rendering of the space and services, it quickly turned somewhat personal and dare I say snarky? ... Yes, I do. What shocked me is how she continued to casually slip in the notion that A’ Tavola only caters to the “well-to do.” It subtly suggests that it’s too expensive for the “average” person. This is simply false and the repercussions of that notion are that it could alienate the Treasure Valley reader from taking in a fun and beautiful culinary experience. I say “continue” because it’s also something she notes in the Jan. 19, 2012, review—commenting on the types of vehicles in the parking lot. If she would have looked closely, she would have also seen my 1990 Toyota Land Cruiser with the rust on the bumper in that parking lot on that day and others. I, for one, am not “well-to do” (whatever that really means), and I love frequenting the store. In my opinion, it is a celebration of good foods that, while a few items will tempt you to expand your range of tastes, also offers familiar dishes with a spin. And as a matter of reference, I can’t recall when I haven’t myself made a creamy chicken or potato salad that didn’t have mayonnaise as an ingredient, and just because it does, I’d hardly describe it with contempt as “mayonnaiseladen.” Finally, it drove me crazy that Miss Morgan keeps only comparing A’ Tavola with two places—Eataly and Dean & Deluca. In three separate articles about the store, she compares it to the

Eataly in Manhattan—has she ever even been there? Exactly what percentage of readers does she think will find that a relevant comparison to judge by? While I’m sure A’ Tavola staff are happy to hear she chose such a lofty comparable, it’s off base. I myself have never been, but from what I’ve seen online, the Eataly is a 50,000-squarefoot market and is based on Italian cuisine. On the other hand A’ Tavola is a small and comforting marketplace whose aim seems to be to give us all a place to truly revel in and enjoy what we eat. And more the better that Lisa and her staff genuinely welcome us to share their passion. Perhaps it would do the reporter some good to applaud new business and a refreshingly original (to Boise) establishment. This would be in reverse of misguidedly comparing it to a Swedish furniture store and an outdated grocery market with a deli and meat department. Really? Get over yourself and have a cookie. —Lea Rainey, Boise

GOTCHA I am not sure where you got your information on some of Garden City’s background but in 1960, Garden City was and unincorporated village an there was no mayor. There was a chairman of the board of directors who happened to be my father, Joe Gowey. There was no pawn shop and no bar called T and A. It must be hard for someone who obviously lives in Riverside Village to comprehend that the working poor need somewhere to live also. And yes, Kerri, those people do vote and I suggest they vote to have you evicted from Garden City. —Ruth Fitzgerald, Boise

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6 | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

So Garden City isn’t pretty enough for Texas transplant Kerri Hahn and her kitchen coven. (BW, Feature, “Desperate Housewife of Garden City,” March 28, 2012.) She is so self-absorbed, the reporter describes her reckless driving while she decries the businesses on Chinden Boulevard that do not meet her aesthetic standards. If the citizens of Garden City did not want tattoos, there would be no parlors. If they did not want “adult” material, there would be no adult book/video stores. If they found the stores and signs repulsive, the stores would go out of business. Kerri and husband Brock/Brocky paid less for their tri-level near the Boise River than elsewhere. Did they wonder why? If you don’t like Garden City, there is a simpler solution than a private annexation. Stay in your tri-level or move. And if you and your pals succeed in seizing Garden City, which you will not, instead of a mangled French name or a tribute to a bad actor and shill for General Electric, I suggest a more appropriate name—Stepford. —George Patterson, Boise Long has Garden City been the undeserving butt of April Fool’s jokes and the point of the article is well taken. On the other hand, for those out there who do want to see our part of the metro area improve, stop by The Riverside Hotel. We are certainly doing our part for the improvement of the city. We are sitting on 14 acres on the Boise River, and we have been working diligently over the last five months, since new local ownership bought the property from a conglomerate, to revamp and renovate. People are starting to take notice and we are hearing good things, and it would have been a much better article if your heroine had only said, “Garden City and us are fighting over who gets The Riverside Hotel!” —Derek McElroy, general manager, The Riverside Hotel WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BILL COPE/OPINION

BILL IN THE MIDDLE I’m just a cockeyed moderate

Those who read Boise Weekly from stem to stern will have noticed last month (March 14) an unhappy letter addressed to me in the Mail section. It was a response to an earlier column (BW, Opinion, “The Flutter-ish 11,” Feb. 15, 2012) in which I referred to a recent study that has put more muscle on the bones of a reality that most liberals have known all along—that the terms “conservative,” “racist” and “stupid” are interchangeable more often than not. The letter’s author, being an admitted conservative, was peeved I took advantage of the study to illustrate yet another reason why conservatives are wrong about almost everything. I won’t bore you with the details of his arguments. Generally, his approach was that I am one mean sum’bitch when it comes to conservatives in that I am always saying nasty things about them. On that point, he is entirely right. I absolutely do say nasty things about conservatives. And I can quickly explain why: Because I believe conservatives to be nasty. That’s why. On most of the critique, I take a pass. Just more blah blah blah from a blah blah blah. However, a couple of his comments tickled my “I should write about that” spot, and today, what with our legislators having slipped back to Fracking Junction, and Mitt Romney auto-destructing without any help from either me or President Barack Obama, I thought now would be a good time to turn those comments into a column. One was a suggestion I go out and get myself some conservative pals “whose political views are not in complete lockstep with [my] own.” The other was a reference to my “radical agenda” and my “extreme views.” As to his advice that I start hanging around people who could fill me in on what conservatives really stand for, I must decline. I’ve already had more than my share of conservative friends. I am a native Idahoan, after all, and even when I work at it, avoiding conservatives in Idaho is like trying not to step on ants. I’m also confident I know what they stand for. In fact, knowing what conservatives stand for is pretty much what made me a liberal. Furthermore, I can’t help but to have noticed that the older a conservative gets, the more boring he or she is. In fact, right here and right now, I’d like to propose a theory: As we age, liberals get progressively more bored, while conservatives get progressively more boring. I must leave that hypothesis up to younger researchers to either prove or disprove. But for this bored old liberal, it is plenty enough reason to avoid associating with any more conservatives than I already have. Now then, on to my “radical agenda” and “extreme views.” Since my critic chose to leave out of his letter any examples of which issues I am radical about or extreme over, I myself went searching through 16 years of written opinions for any agenda or views that WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

might qualify me for foam-at-the-mouth berserker status. And what evidence of my own raving fanaticism did I find? UÊ"˜ÊÃiÛiÀ>ÊœVV>Ȝ˜Ã]Êʅ>ÛiʜLiVÌi`ÊÌœÊ the cronyism, corruption and arrogance in ̅iʓ>œÀˆÌÞÊ«>ÀÌÞʜvÊ̅iÊÃÌ>ÌiÊi}ˆÃ>ÌÕÀi°Ê (Oh dear me, I’m starting to feel like Saul Alinsky already.) UÊʅ>ÛiÊÃÕ««œÀÌi`]Ê>ÃÊÃÌÀœ˜}ÞÊ>ÃÊÊ>“Ê>Li]Ê our institutions of public and higher education, as well as the educators who make them function. (My goodness, where do I come up with such ideas!) UÊʅ>ÛiÊÀi«i>Ìi`ÞÊ«œˆ˜Ìi`ʜÕÌÊ̅iʈ˜viÀˆœÀÊ quality of the GOP’s presidential candidates. (Maybe I should be locked up. Me and George Will and Peggy Noonan and about every Republican analyst with more sense than God gave Sarah Palin.) UÊʅ>ÛiÊ«Àœ“œÌi`Ê̅iʘœÌˆœ˜Ê̅>ÌÊܜ“i˜Ê can choose what’s best for themselves, without any interference from Republicans, in regards to health, contraception and morality. (See! This is what you get when a man grows up without ever being an altar boy with a priest to show him how to ... uh, whatever it is priests show altar boys.) UÊʅ>ÛiÊÀi«i>Ìi`Þ]Ê>˜`ʜ˜Ê>ÊÛ>ÀˆiÌÞʜvÊÃÕLiVÌÃ]Ê«ÕÌʓÞÊv>ˆÌ…ʈ˜Ê̅iÊ>VVՓՏ>̈œ˜Ê of evidence gathered by serious scientists and curious minds over decades and centuries, rather than bow to those who through superstition and greed profit from their followers’ ignorance. (May I burn in Hell!) UÊʅ>ÛiÊÃÕ««œÀÌi`ʜÀ}>˜ˆâi`ʏ>LœÀÊ­ œ˜½ÌÊ let me be around children!) and I have warned of the dangers in allowing megarich oligarchs and corporations to control our lives (Why don’t I go live in Cuba?). I have expressed admiration for President Obama (Commie!), support for gay rights (Homo Commie!), and concern over the continuing degradation of our planet’s condition (Tree-hugging homo Commie!). Ooooh, what a radical I turned out to be. Sarcasm aside, this is the primary reason I’ve chosen to respond to this dumbass letter at all. The notion that I am a radical extremist is a tinny echo of what one hears in perpetuum from the collective conservative blabbery, that there is in America a left equal in rabidness, rapacity and ridiculousness to the rabid, rapacious and ridiculous right. It is bullshit that only conservatives could believe. /…iÊÌÀÕ̅ʈÃ]Ê̅iÊ i“œVÀ>̈VÊ*>ÀÌÞÊ>ÃÊ>Ê whole has shifted so meekly to the tantrums of the tea baggers, I am sad to say it as now a hair right of center. I myself am now, and have always been, a hair left of center, a moderate, and that’s not apt to change. What offends conservatives, including the author of the letter, isn’t so much my agenda or my views as it is what I think of them. And that’s not apt to change, either.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 7

TED RALL/OPINION

STRIPPED DOWN Strip-searching is legal and democracy is dead The text of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy’s majority is cold and bureaucratic. “Every detainee who will be admitted to the general population may be required to undergo a close visual inspection while undressed,” he writes for the five rightwingers in the majority of the Supreme Court. There’s no looking back now. The United States is officially a police state. Here are the basics, as reported by The New York Times: “The case decided Monday, Florence v. County of Burlington, No. 10-945, arose from the arrest of Albert W. Florence in New Jersey in 2005. Mr. Florence was in the passenger seat of his BMW when a state trooper pulled his wife, April, over for speeding. A records search revealed an outstanding warrant for Mr. Florence’s arrest based on an unpaid fine. (The information was wrong; the fine had been paid.) Mr. Florence was held for a week in jails in Burlington and Essex counties, and he was strip-searched in each. There is some dispute about the details, but general agreement that he was made to stand naked in front of a guard who required him to move intimate parts of his body. The guards did not touch him.” “Turn around,” Florence later recalled his jailers ordering him. “Squat and cough. Spread your cheeks.” A court motivated by fairness would have declared this conduct unconstitutional. Fairminded people would have ordered the New Jersey municipality to empty its bank accounts and turn them over to the man it humiliated. Everyone involved—the police, county officials—ought to have been fired and charged with torture.

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Not this court, the Supreme Court led by Justice John Roberts. Besotted by the sick logic of paranoia and preemption that has poisoned us since 9/11, it ruled that what happened to Albert Florence was perfectly OK. The cops’ conduct was legal. Now “officials may strip-search people arrested for any offense, however minor.” If you get arrested at an antiwar protest, the police can strip-search you. If you’re pulled over for a minor traffic infraction, as was the plaintiff in this case. For setting off fireworks on the Fourth of July. Humiliation is the law of the land. The Court heard examples of people who were strip-searched “after being arrested for driving with a noisy muffler, failing to use a turn signal and riding a bicycle without an audible bell.” They considered amicus briefs by nuns and other “women who were strip-searched during periods of lactation or menstruation.” Body-cavity searches are now legal for anyone arrested for any crime, no matter how minor. As of April 2, finger-rape is the law. Think it won’t happen to you? Fourteen million Americans are arrested annually. One in three Americans under age 23 has been arrested. It happened to me a couple of years ago, for a suspended drivers license. Except that it wasn’t really suspended. I was lucky. My cops weren’t perverts. They didn’t want a lookie-loo at my private parts. How did we get here? Preemptive logic. Saddam Hussein is a bad man. He hates the United States. What if he has weapons of mass destruction? What if 11 he used them against us, or gave them

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ANDR EW C R IS P

TROUBLE IN THE HART-LAND

IO N R E T R AT L U S L A -R A D L T O IL PHO A RAME L E IL

NEWS

NEWS/CITYDESK

Embattled lawmaker faced rude awakening ZACH HAGADONE The city of Hayden doesn’t look like much from U.S. Highway 95—nothing more than the northern-most appendage of a sprawling strip that has become the Spokane-Coeur d’Alene corridor. Visitors tool past posh suburban developments with street names like Stratford Drive, Whispering Pines Road and Canticleer Court. McMansions abound as Hayden turns into the City of Hayden Lake, dominated by the Avondale Gold Club and Hayden Lake Country Club. This is Phil Hart country. With an official population of just more than 9,000 residents, Hayden is the biggest city in Idaho’s recently redrawn Legislative District 2, and while Rep. Hart lives in nearby Athol, it’s in Hayden that he has to lock up enough votes to hold onto his 2B seat for a fifth term. It may be the GOP lawmaker’s biggest challenge yet. While his staunch libertarian and “constitutional” stances have made him a hero of the far-right wing, Hart’s political baggage looks to be weighing him down. First there was the messy business of Hart’s alleged theft of state-owned timber back in 1996, then the matter of his procedural wrangling to get out of paying more than $500,000 in back income taxes and fines. Though Hart maintains that his refusal to pay up is a stance against what he calls unconstitutional taxation, both issues resulted in ethics hearings in 2010 that led to his being booted off the House Revenue and Taxation Committee. Now, with the U.S. District Court’s ruling that legislative immunity won’t protect Hart

from paying the piper, the bad (and weird) news keeps piling up. On April 2, Hart found himself in the middle of a crime scene when he was awakened by sheriff’s deputies while sleeping in his car at a Latah County rest area where a 28-year-old Princeton woman was shot by an apparent stalker. Hart claimed he slept through the incident. Bedeviled by so much drama, Hart’s former image as a Samuel Adams-style anti-federalist firebrand is for many voters morphing into something of a Don Quixote character—sans the noble intentions. Indeed, though Hayden may be Hart country, it’s hard to tell during a pre-primary drive around town. On some streets, every third house boasts a “Ron Paul for President” yard sign. Notably absent are Phil Hart materials. His challenger, Democrat Dan English, meanwhile, looks to be getting his message out. English, a respected former Hayden city councilman, served as Kootenai County clerk and a member of the local school board. Political wonks are beginning to suggest that this election may be the first in 18 years in which a Democrat has a shot in the district. But English isn’t the only contender for Hart’s seat. Ed Morse (a real estate appraiser), former Republican Rep. Ron Vieselmeyer and local firefighter Fritz Wiedenhoff have also thrown their hats in the ring to challenge Hart in the Tuesday, May 15, GOP primary. That is far heftier competition than Hart is used to. First elected with 60 percent of the vote in 2004, Hart won again (2006) and

Things are anything but happy at Happy Land.

IRAQI HOOKAH OWNER SAYS LAW IS TAKING AWAY HIS CULTURE Wake up, again Mr. Hart. It’s (2008) a sheriff’s and again deputy. (running unopposed in 2010). What’s more, Hart is also among the targets of a newly created group of prominent Republicans seeking “reasonable” GOP candidates. Calling itself the North Idaho Political Action Committee, the group made up of area business leaders and former political power brokers, has made no secret of its desire to cull lawmakers like Hart from the Republican establishment—in fact, the group formally endorsed Morse for Hart’s seat on April 5. Hart’s biggest political liability among many voters is that his agenda seems to be himself. At least that’s the temperature of much public discussion, including comments on the Coeur d’Alene Press website, where opinions seem split: one camp maintains that Hart remains an anti-tax crusader, and the other holds the view that while Hart may be fighting the good libertarian fight against unfair taxation, he has lost the moral high ground. As one commenter wrote: “These latest cases are about what level of tax Hart has to pay. It has nothing do with any others’ liability, this time it’s personal. Time to pay up.”

TAKING IT TO THE STREETS Boise parking meters get smart ANDREW CRISP Boise has quietly unveiled its next generation of parking meters. Fifty-eight new meters are expected to be in place in the coming weeks. The first ones have quietly appeared on Bannock Street, between Eighth Street and Capitol Boulevard. More are expected in Boise’s BODO district. “I think they’re pretty spiffy looking,” said Rob Centeno as he exited his SUV. “Wait, is there a 20-minute button?” Centeno scanned the digital face of the “modern meter,” as the city is calling them, looking for the button that gives a free 20 minutes of parking time. “As long as there’s a 20-minute button, I’m good,” said Centeno. A senior gentleman named Spencer Wood, however, struggled to find the button, giving up to duck inside the post office. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

“I’m done with that,” he said. “I can’t figure this out.” The meters to be installed in BODO will be somewhat different. Parking spaces will be numbered and motorists will pay a central machine that serves multiple spaces. “We’ve got these machines from May to June, maybe a bit into July,” said Max Clark, Capital City Development Corporation’s parking and facilities director. “We’ll collect data on ease of use

and what people think of them.” Some of the new meters (approximately 10 percent) will be accompanied by street sensors, designed to detect the presence of a vehicle. “[The sensors] won’t have a camera to detect when a car has come or gone,” said Clark. But they will know the vehicle’s length of stay and keep button-happy residents from ducking out to repeatedly press the 20-minute button. The meters run on solar power. “Our meter enforcement shuts off at 6 o’clock, so you can shut them off and actually save the batteries,” said Craig Croner with Boise’s Administrative Services Division. The technology also offers an option to pay by cellphone. “If you subscribe to the service, you will get a prompt on your cellphone, and you can pay for an extra hour,” said Clark.

Ambitiously set in the huge space of the former Play it Again Sports at 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Ed Alghizi’s hookah bar, Happy Land, is struggling. “They don’t come,” said Alghizi. “A couple people, maybe.” Alghizi and his partner, Lami Abdulridha, were cited for permitting patrons to puff within the building and to smoke cigarettes themselves in a back room. Additionally, they were charged with allowing a 17-year-old to enter the building, something Alghizi blamed on his doorman, who was also charged. “When the police officer come, they say, ‘Talk to the city,’” said Alghizi. “Why are you working for the city if you don’t know [the law]?” Alghizi said he was met with confusion from Boise City Hall employees and lack of response from the City Attorney’s Office. “This Boise law, they don’t give you a chance,” he said. “It doesn’t make sense.” However, BPD spokeswoman Lynn Hightower said Alghizi and Abdulridha were even given a hard copy of the law by Ralph Blount of the City Attorney’s Office. “Officers went to every business that would be affected before the smoking ban went into place. Ninety-nine point nine percent of business owners and staff, they get it; they’re in compliance,” said Hightower. Tobacconists, such as cigar shops, avoid the ban by keeping seating limited, making tobacco 95 percent of their business and offering no live music. According to the law, seating for more than a handful of people and the inclusion of live music—a hookah staple—means no indoor smoke. Alghizi said he opened the club not more than a month after the bill passed. He acknowledged the lousy timing. The middle-aged Iraqi father of two speaks English well, a skill he uses to offset his partner, who doesn’t speak English well. Together, the two opened Happy Land, which has a posted occupancy, written in magic marker above the door, of 140. “They’re taking my culture away from me,” said Alghizi. “What kind of freedom is that? I came to this country for that freedom. I don’t see that freedom.” However, Alghizi admits he wouldn’t go back home to Iraq, though he misses it “very much.” His 18-year-old brother was recently killed fighting in the country. “You want to move forward, but somebody slap you all the way back,” he said. Alghizi said he feels like he was “kept down” by the law, and will struggle to keep his doors open for the remainder of his three-year lease. —Andrew Crisp

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 9

CITIZEN

BILL KILLEN Legislator was frustrated but never bored GEORGE PRENTICE

When did you first sense that your health was deteriorating? At the end of January, there was a bad cold going around the Legislature. I was one of the last to get it. Within a day or two, I started experiencing diarrhea but no fever and no congestion. Did you continue to dehydrate? It kept getting worse. I lost my appetite. I swear to God, everything I eat or drink goes right through me. Did you miss any votes or hearings during the session? I missed a couple of afternoons for doctor appointments. But were you working sick? Oh, yes. I remember one Judiciary, Rules and Administration Committee meeting, I had to get up and leave. My primary-care physician eventually sent me to a gastroenterologist. I’ve been seeing him for about a month now. They ran all kinds of tests, and they keep telling me everything is normal. He’s trying different prescriptions.

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Does anything work better than the rest? Not a damn thing. I’ve lost close to 40 pounds now. There are some cases where you can get a virus from a cold or the flu that can totally disrupt your digestion. That’s my interpretation. How does that manifest in your day-today activity? I can’t get very far from a restroom. I also have a colostomy. I had colorectal cancer 15 years ago. I also have CLL, which is a form of leukemia, but all those things I’ve dealt with. Nobody can figure this thing out. I walk around my house and I have to take a rest. There’s no way in hell that I could campaign the way I would need to. Let’s talk about this year’s legislative session. I’m sure that you heard Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter gave the Legislature an A. At best, I would give it a C-minus. I was pleased that they got the suicide hot line re-funded and that they added a little bit of money back to Medicaid—but the amount was a pittance [approximately $1.5 million after cutting nearly $35 million in 2011]. But the most pathetic thing that passed was the tax cut. They created an artificial surplus by low-balling the budget, and they want to give that artificial surplus away. There is absolutely no proof of a positive impact from a trickle-down effect. Is there any way to prove that a $35 million tax cut will create any jobs? No, and here’s why. They keep saying it’s a job creator. Well, there are billions of dollars sitting on the sidelines right now that aren’t being spent. Why? The demand isn’t there. Demand creates jobs, not extra

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Bill Killen is not feeling well. The threeterm Boise legislator has been struck by an illness that remains a mystery. It has him worried, his physicians puzzled and Democrats scrambling to make sure that they don’t lose his District 17 seat in the Idaho House to Republicans. With this year’s Legislature still a recent memory, Boise Weekly sat down with Killen, 73, to talk about his health, the state of Idaho politics and the 2012 legislative session—probably his last.

money. When I was with Hewlett-Packard, we added employees when demand for our product exceeded our capacity. Once you make that decision, how you finance it is secondary. It’s not the other way around. Just because you have money in the bank, you don’t say, “I think I’ll add some jobs.” Does the Legislature have an ethics problem? Yes and the biggest problem is that they don’t realize they have one. Right now, the GOP majority simply doesn’t accept that there’s a problem. But it can’t be unique to only Republicans. If the Democrats were the top dogs, they would have the same kind of problem. It goes with power. I know that you were passionate about the measure to streamline Internet sales tax. It was a good bill. I can’t believe that lawmakers would not want to collect money that is owed to the State of Idaho. God knows, we need the revenue. It’s not a new tax, but it has the word “tax” in it. The Revenue and Taxation Committee is more like the revenue and anti-tax committee. We almost made it this time; we got a hearing and a vote that went 9-9. But that goddamn—pardon the expression—[Boise Republican Rep.] Julie Ellsworth. She flipped on 11 me. In her last campaign, she said she

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CITIZEN 10

supported a streamlined sales tax. I naively didn’t follow up with her as much as I should have.

What does the Democratic Party have to do differently in Idaho? I keep telling everyone that you don’t win on issues, you win on message and you need to have a good message. People vote on emotions, not logic. But a fair amount of people say that voters get the government they deserve. I know I’m not getting the government that I deserve. [Boise Democratic Sen.] Elliot Werk’s theory is that Republicans will go so far to the right that the limb will break and people will finally say, “enough is enough.” Do you think that limb is close to its breaking point? We certainly will be soon. I’m glad to see that someone filed against [Boise Republican Sen.] Chuck Winder. My guess is that it will be a closely followed race. Do you have a theory on where Winder’s ultrasound bill came from? [Winder proposed a measure requiring Idaho women to undergo ultrasounds prior to an abortion.

The bill, which passed in the Senate, stalled in the House]. That was an ALEC bill. [ALEC is the American Legislative Exchange Council, conservative public policy lobbyists]. But ALEC had Winder carry its water on this bill. People don’t like me to use the term, but it’s the Christian Taliban. They use force of law rather than force of force. And ultimately, there was pushback on that bill. But Winder doesn’t see it. He thinks the opponents were on the fringe. I heard through the grapevine that House Republicans couldn’t even get a majority from their own caucus to support the bill. They were swamped with emails, letters and calls from Republican women. Let’s presume that your health mends sooner than later. Would you consider a return to politics? Maybe. I doubt it. You can only butt your head on the wall for so long. Was being in the Legislature emotionally exhausting? Frustrating but never boring.

TED RALL/OPINION to terrorists who would? Can’t take that chance. We don’t need evidence in order to justify bombing and invading Iraq. We have fear and the logic of preemption. The logic of preemption is indiscriminate. What if terrorists are stupid enough to use phones and emails to plot their dastardly schemes? We’d want to know, right? In the old days before 9/11, officials who suspected a person of criminal conduct went to a judge to obtain a wiretapping warrant. Now we’re paranoid. And the government is power-hungry. So government officials and their media lapdogs are exploiting our fear and paranoia, admitting that they listen to everyone’s phone calls and read everyone’s emails. Can’t take chances. What about the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against unreasonable searches and seizures? Quaint relics of a time before the police state. Like the Geneva Conventions. Here comes Justice Kennedy, amping up the perverse logic of preemption. Responding to the nasty cases of the finger-raped nun and the humiliated women on their period, Kennedy pointed out that “people detained for minor offenses can turn out to be the most devious and dangerous criminals.” Timothy McVeigh, who blew up the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995, was pulled over for driving 8

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without a license plate. “One of the terrorists involved in the Sept. 11 attacks was stopped and ticketed for speeding just two days before hijacking Flight 93,” he wrote, continuing with the observation that San Francisco cops “have discovered contraband hidden in body cavities of people arrested for trespassing, public nuisance and shoplifting.” No doubt about it: If you search every car and frisk every pedestrian and break down the door of every house and apartment in America, you will find lots of people up to no good. You will discover meth labs and bombs and maybe even terrorists plotting to blow up things. But who is the bigger danger: a drug dealer, a terrorist, or a terrorist government? This summer will be ugly. Cops will arrest thousands of protesters who belong to the Occupy Wall Street movement, which is fighting corruption and greed and trying to improve our lives. Now that police have the right to strip and molest demonstrators, you can count on horrible abuses. Cops always go too far. I don’t know about you, but I would rather live in a country that respects rights and freedoms more than the paranoid madness of preemption. In the old America where I grew up, we lived with the possibility that some individuals were evil. Now we face the absolute certainty that every policeman is a fully licensed finger-rapist.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 11

R IC HAE S WANB EC K

BOISE WEEKLY PICKS visit boiseweekly.com for more events THURSDAYSUNDAY APRIL 12-15 dance IDAHO DANCE THEATRE’S SPRING SHOW The signs of spring are everywhere: tulips, leaves on trees and slightly warmer weather. Add to that list of season-change indicators Idaho Dance Theatre’s Spring Show, which will take place Friday, April 13-Sunday, April 15. The contemporary dance company will perform with Boise Philharmonic’s woodwind and brass quintets and string quartet for its latest production. It’s kind of like an artsy happy-hour deal: a concert and dance show for the price of one. The company is embracing the out-with-the-old, spring-cleaning idea and instead of reviving older pieces, has opted for all-new choreography. The show will involve three fresh works, all with live accompaniment from the phil. Marla Hansen, co-artistic director, will debut a brandspankin’-new work choreographed to Michael Tilson Thomas’ “Street Songs.” The piece is said to use 6-foot-long black poles in “unexpected ways,” so we’re guessing that pole vaulting is out. The company’s other Co-Artistic Director Carl Rowe will also show his choreography, which has to do with freezing time and examining the world around us to Philip Glass’ “Fifth String Quartet.” Company dancers Yurek Hansen, Lia Mrazek, Sayoko Knode, Caitlin Stanley and Gonzalo Valdez collaborated on the third piece in the show. Each choreographed a section of Paquito d’Rivera’s “Aires Tropicales.” The company will once again offer a preview night, on Thursday, April 12, which provides penny-conscious viewers a chance to catch the show at a discount since admission is by donation, with a $10 adult, $5 student/child minimum. Choreographers and musicians will give presentations about their collaborations before each piece during this performance, but advance tickets aren’t sold for preview night, so bring the family and get there early. Thursday, April 12, 7 p.m., by donation. Friday, April 14-Saturday, April 14, 8 p.m.; Sunday, April 15, 2 p.m.; $10-$35. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, idahodancetheatre.org.

THURSDAY -SUNDAY APRIL 12-15 theater BOISE LITTLE THEATER PRESENTS RABBIT HOLE For many, rabbit holes are strictly associated with Lewis Carroll’s adolescent girl and a trippy adventure. But Boise Little Theater’s Rabbit Hole has absolutely

nothing to do with mad hatters or “drink me” tags. The local company is staging the stirring drama by David Lindsay-Abaire, which opened April 6. The play was the recipient of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for drama, and became even more well-known after being adapted to film, making its debut at the Toronto International Film Festival. The film stars Nicole Kidman and Aaron Eckhart. The story follows Becca and Howie Corbett, whose

12 | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

seemingly perfect domestic life is shattered following an accident. The couple then must face fractures in their relationship and learn to deal with bereavement. Don’t let the premise turn you off. The play instills something that the film left out—humor. Lindsay-Abaire’s daringly brave script mines some rare gems from some pretty dark caverns, and therein lies the magic of theater at its best. Boise Little Theater’s

Horace Tabor is pretty (Baby) Doe-eyed for the heroine in Opera Idaho’s latest production.

FRIDAY AND SUNDAY APRIL 13 AND 15 Ameropera OPERA IDAHO’S THE BALLAD OF BABY DOE When we think opera, Colorado isn’t exactly what comes to mind. But that may change when Opera Idaho presents Douglas Moore’s acclaimed The Ballad of Baby Doe, the Westernthemed opera set in Leadville, Colo., during the late 19th century. You can catch this tale of love, big politics and quickly dwindling fortunes made all the more prescient by our own Western locale Friday, April 13, and Sunday, April 15, at the Egyptian Theatre. “My character, Baby Doe, is married already to a silver miner who isn’t doing very well, and he’s drinking a bit,” said lead Rebecca Davis. “So she leaves him for Leadville—a big deal at that time period. There, she meets Horace Tabor.” Elizabeth “Baby” Doe Tabor, played by Chicago-area native Davis, is a woman fiercely loyal to Tabor, her newfound silver baron husband, at a time when presidential hopeful William McKinley is pushing gold as the American standard. Both leave marriages to be together, as Tabor, played by Constantinos Yiannoudes, enters politics for his silver candidate, William Jennings Bryan. Steeped in American history and based on a true story, the opera is a Western tale, but features inspirations from more classical operas: Puccini for subject matter, classical composers for the arrangements. “The music references back to that kind of Western honky-tonk or player piano,” said Davis. “There are a lot of influences in the music. Yesterday, we were listening and we thought: ‘That sounds like Gershwin!’” Davis has a country-Western background, and she sang backup for country star aunt Suzy Bogguss. While now she favors arias over country minstrelsy, her role as Baby Doe provides a link—like the opera itself—to Americana roots. Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 2:30 p.m.; $15-$69. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208387-1273, operaidaho.org.

production is directed by Mike Mullens and stars Erin Van Engelen and John Myers. The theater will continue its staging of the play through Monday, April 21. Tickets are available at the company’s website. Thursday, 7:30 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, April 15, 2 p.m., $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

SUNDAY APRIL 15 local loot BUY IDAHO MARKET A day in the life of buying Idaho might look like this: cook eggs fresh from a Canyon County farm with ground sausage from Meridian Meat and Sausage on Alpicella bread, catch a quick green chili wrap from

upstar t FitWrapz, and by dinner time, enjoy eats from a local restaurant, sipping a splendid ale from one of the valley’s many brewing companies. Ahhh. Sunday, April 15, Buy Idaho—the group focused on promoting Idaho-based businesses—will open the Linen Building to the public for the chance to score Gem State products. From 10 a.m.-3 p.m., visitors can peruse and purchase from WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

M ELIS S A HAR R IS

FIND AM B ER C LONTZ

BEE WISE GOODS

Meow Mix? Paw-lease. Veronica Livingstone prefers cat caviar.

Put some running shoes on your feet and get ready to beat Pete.

SATURDAY APRIL 14

TUESDAY-THURSDAY APRIL 17-19 cat cash VERONICA LIVINGSTONE, I PRESUME

sprint BEAT COACH PETE FUN RUN Few things may be more gratifying than outrunning a millionaire, no matter how super-nice he/she may be. For the fourth year in a row, Boise State will let you pay to experience this triumph with its annual fund-raising fun run, Beat Coach Pete. Students can pay $15 to run with/against Boise State’s head football coach Chris Peterson, who is pretty much worth his team’s weight (and with a bunch of linebackers, that’s probably a solid number) in gold. Entries fees for the race do not directly fund college scholarships but crossing the finish line before Coach Pete does. Every person who passes Peterson on the approximately threemile-long course represents a $5 donation from the coach for the Boise State general scholarship fund. In addition to feeling awesome, the first 3,000 racers will receive a T-shirt commemorating the event. Since the competition began in 2008, Beat Coach Pete has raised $98,000 for scholarships, while in-state tuition has climbed $500 per semester. Remember that carbing up before the run is smart, but signing up before is even smarter and cheaper. Non-student runners will pay $25 to run if they register in advance, or $30 day of race. 9:30 a.m., Boise State Recreation Center, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-1131, imathlete.com, rec.boisestate.edu.

booths featuring 20 local pur veyors. Loads of parking and free entrance means a one-stop shop for gift ideas and other treats. Featuring members like Ar t Hale Photography, Dorothy Tobin and Andra Jade jewelr y and vintners like Bitner Vineyards, the state now expor ts much more than brown tubers. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., buyidaho.org.

S U B M I T

FRIDAY APRIL 13 booze BW + 44 NORTH April 4 BW published its annual guide to all things food and booze: Restaurant + Bar Guide. Now that you’ve spent a week salivating, it’s time satiate your craving for

What would a cat do with millions of dollars? Shred the bills and use them in its litterbox? Buy a ton of Meow Mix, a souped-up jingle ball for its collar or a skyscraper scratching post? It would probably just lie down on a pile of Benjamins and take an afternoon-length nap. The newest Homegrown Theater production involves a cat and a wad of cash. Veronica Livingstone, I Presume tells the stor y of a deceased millionaire and the ultimate crazy cat lady, who leaves her fortune not to her son but to her feline friend. The play will run Tuesday, April 17-Thursday, April 19 at the Linen Building. Homegrown Theatre is exactly what the name suggests: it employs local actors, directors and playwrights. It’s basically the theater version of the eat-local movement. Veronica Livingstone, I presume stars local actors Derek Patterson, Jaime Nebeker, Brecca Chabot-Olson, Edith Dull and Dylan Haas and is directed by Janessa Nichole White. The play is the work of Boise Weekly’s New Media Czar Josh Gross, and even though he’s not technically homegrown—hailing from the exotic city of Ashland, Ore., he’s been pretty darn involved in all things Boise for quite a while now, and can be deemed “local.” The company staged Sarah Ruhl’s Eur ydice in October 2011 and strives to produce three plays per year, funded by its Blip play-reading series that occurs monthly at Hyde Park Books. Advance tickets are available at brownpapertickets.com. 7 p.m., $10, $8 students and seniors. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., homegrowntheater.com.

a gluttonous good time. We’re holding a rowdy bash with our always-downfor-a-good-time friends at 44 North Vodka. Bust out your bejeweled devil horns and glitter pitch forks, because this year’s theme is Demons and Divas, and we’re doling

In an unassuming small strip mall space at 3019 W. State St. across from Lowell Elementary, a reinvention is under way. Now, in addition to The Soda Works, an all-natural, boutique soda pop shop, you’ll also find Bee Wise Goods. Owned by Gabrielle Krake, who also has a hand in Soda BEE WISE GOODS Works, Bee Wise is a made-in3019 W. State St., Idaho paradise where you can 208-392-8493. buy handmade goods, take a Open Tuesday-Saturday, collaging class or learn how to 11 a.m.-6 p.m. operate a sewing machine. Bee Wise held an official grand opening party on April 7. Inside the bright space, reclaimed pottery sat next to tableware, handmade treasures crafted by local artists and items fashioned by Krake and her crew. As a mother of four, Krake wants Bee Wise Goods to be a place where kids can touch things. She will offer weekly rotating craft courses in addition to sewing space and machine time available by the hour. On her website, Krake states: “Our goal from the beginning has been to take steps toward better consumer habits. We are crafty, innovative and full of green living info.” It’s fitting, then, that the store’s motto is “preserving the Earth one project at a time.” —Amber Clontz

out prizes for costumes. The evening will include 44 North drink specials and music by the Rocci Johnson Band. 8 p.m., FREE before 10 p.m. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 W. Main St., 208-3457557.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 13

8 DAYS OUT ARTS/STAGE PATR IC K S W EENEY

WEDNESDAY APRIL 11 On Stage HAMLET—Boise State’s Theatre Arts Department presents this classic Shakespearean tale. Tickets available at idahotickets. com and Select-A-Seat outlets. For more info, visit theatrearts. boisestate.edu. A free ticket may be obtained at on-campus ticket offices with a valid Boise State ID. 7:30 p.m. $15, $12 nonBoise State students, alumni and seniors. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208426-3980, theatre.boisestate. edu. OFF THE RECORD—The hit of the 2011 5X5 Reading Series is now a full production. A member of the U.S. Senate, an undercover cop and a tape recorder make for an interesting play. See Arts, Page 21. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org.

Workshops & Classes BEGINNING SPINNING WOOL INTO YARN—Take an afternoon to learn how spinning wheels work, and how to create your own yarn from wool and other fibers. No previous experience is necessary. Students may borrow a spinning wheel at Puffy Mondaes for the class, or bring their own. Purchase your registration online or call the shop to pre-pay and reserve your space. 2-4 p.m. $45. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., 208-407-3359, puffymondaes.com. KNIT SKILLS CLASS—Learn foundational knitting skills from Ruth Burdeshaw, a local knit instructor with more than 40 years of experience. Learn to define your gauge, read a ball band, choose the right fiber for your project, and have plenty of time for questions. Students must be comfortable with the knit and purl stitch in advance. Purchase your class registration online or call the shop to pre-pay and reserve your space. 2-4 p.m. $25. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., 208-407-3359, puffymondaes.com.

Sports & Fitness HIP, KNEE AND SHOULDER THERAPY—Learn how to gain mobility and manage pain in your hip/knee/shoulder areas with advice from the Boise State Rec Center’s certified athletic and personal trainers. 5:30-6:30 p.m. $10, $5 Rec Center members. Boise State Rec Center, 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5641, 208-426-1131, rec.boisestate.edu.

On the record—Stephen C. Bradbury’s performance is off the charts.

BCT’S OFF THE RECORD On the set for Boise Contemporary Theater’s new play, Off the Record, a glaring fluorescent tube sways over a small interrogation space peppered with dated furniture. At first glance, it’s hard to imagine slogging through a two-hour, two-character production in such a depressing setting. But thankfully, firsttime playwright (and frequent Idaho Shakespeare Festival actress) Lynn Allison’s smart dialogue transforms the bleak environment into a canvas on which her characters explore regret, long-harbored secrets and, ultimately, identity. The plot should be familiar to most Idahoans. A senior Republican senator gets busted soliciting sex in an airport men’s room. On a pitch-black stage, with the muted sounds of airplane takeoffs and toilets flushing in the background, you hear a soft tap, tap, tap. Giggles ripple through the audience. Then again: tap, tap, tap. And suddenly the toilet tap dancer is hauled into an interrogation room for questioning. But that’s where the stor y takes a sharp turn. Allison’s play is undoubtedly Off the Record runs through inspired by the Larry Craig deSaturday, April 28. bacle, but ultimately, it’s not the For more background on same story. Sen. John Michael the play, check out the Arts Goodwin, played by Stephen C. feature on Page 21. Bradbury, is a charming older man who throws his weight around with a smile and a flash of his business card. Officer Joe Mahoney, played by Matthew Cameron Clark, is a petulant wash-up who wields his authority like a loaded gun. There’s no doubt from the first tense moments that these two will butt heads. I didn’t expect to find sympathy in Goodwin—a high-power hypocrite living a lie among his family and constituents—but Bradbury played the role flawlessly, with nuance and fragility. When Goodwin staggers to a bench, loosening his tie and gasping for air—shaking and pleading for “a warning or something”—you can feel the weight of public shame closing in on him. Unfortunately, Clark doesn’t lend Mahoney that same nuance or sympathy. He plays up Mahoney’s unyielding righteousness—“You D.C. guys make the rules, you break the rules, you change the rules”—but when the script calls for softer, more-confessional moments, Clark doesn’t rein it in. Though that generally works to the play’s disadvantage, Clark shines for a brief moment when bellowing out a rendition of “America the Beautiful”—Goodwin’s cellphone ring tone and a recurring motif throughout the play. Allison’s Off the Record is not just a commendable debut, it holds its own next to efforts by much more seasoned playwrights. And though the subject matter might seem overly familiar, it’s given a fresh veneer through Allison’s insightful, and surprisingly timely, lens. —Tara Morgan

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8 DAYS OUT THURSDAY APRIL 12 Festivals & Events SUSTAINABLE FUTURES OPEN HOUSE—In the last year, Sustainable Futures has expanded glass-recycling operations to a larger facility, added production equipment and brought on more program participants. The public is invited for a tour of the new facility. In addition to glass recycling, Sustainable Futures also provides vocational training for at-risk youth, refugees, lowincome seniors and paroled men and women transitioning into the workforce. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Sustainable Futures, 5858 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-3228272.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: MIKE “WALLY” WALTER—Catch the comedic stylings of this nationally touring funny man. 8 p.m. $4, FREE with college ID. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. IDAHO DANCE THEATRE’S SPRING SHOW—Idaho Dance Theatre is collaborating with the Boise Philharmonic woodwind quintet, brass quintet and string

quartet for its spring performance. The concert premieres three new works from co-artistic directors Marla Hansen and Carl Rowe, as well as a piece by five company dancers. Visit idahodancetheatre.org for more info and tickets. See Picks, Page 12. 7 p.m. By donation. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SCOTT WHITE—This installment of Liquid Laughs also features Blake Bard. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs.com, 208941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com. OFF THE RECORD—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org. PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH—Catch this production of the play by Susan Nanus adapted from the 1961 children’s novel by Norton Juster. 7 p.m. $15, $10 students. NexStage Theatre, 120 S. Main, Ketchum, 208-726-2985. RABBIT HOLE—Boise Little Theater presents its rendition of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama by David Lindsay-Abaire. See Picks, Page 12. 7:30 p.m. $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD—The Boise State Theatre Arts Department presents its rendition of this absurdist play that follows two minor characters from William Shakespeare’s Hamlet. 7:30 p.m. $15, $12 seniors, Boise State alumni and non-Boise State students; FREE with valid Boise State ID. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208426-3980, theatre.boisestate. edu. XANADU—This musical follows the beautiful Kira, who travels to Earth to inspire a struggling artist named Sonny to find his voice, discover true love and build the world’s first roller disco (but not necessarily in that order). Purchase dinner/show tickets at least one day in advance at kedproductions.org. Show-only tickets available online or at the door. Visit website for prices and menu. 8 p.m. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Literature SPRING BOOK SALE—Sort through an assortment of hardback and paperback books, first editions, coffee-table books, cookbooks, LPs, CDs and VHS movies, all priced to sell. Proceeds benefit the library and its programs. This year’s event will be held in the warehouse across the street from the library’s main branch downtown. Visit the website for more info. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

WORLD PREMIERE

tickets: start at $15 $10 if you are under 30

OFF THE RECORD

phone: 331-9224 x205

BY LYNN ALLISON APRIL 4 - 28, 2012

online: BCTheater.org 854 Fulton St. Downtown Boise, ID

Talks & Lectures WORKING WOMEN’S SYMPOSIUM—The Small Business Administration, Small Business Development Center and Women’s Business Center have teamed up to present this symposium, focusing on the idea “connect, climb and grow.” Jimsi Kuborn, marketing director for Boise Philharmonic, is the keynote speaker. Visit idahoworkingwomen.com for more info. 9 a.m.-5:15 p.m. $75, $60 Boise Young Professionals members, $25 students. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426INFO, sub.boisestate.edu.

FRIDAY APRIL 13 On Stage | EASY

| MEDIUM |

HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

BAR + RESTAURANT GUIDE LAUNCH PARTY—Join Boise Weekly and 44 North Vodka for Demons and Divas. Music from the Rocci Johnson Band, prizes for costumes and 44 North drink specials. 8 p.m. FREE before 10 p.m. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., 208-345-7557. HAMLET—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $15; $12 non-Boise State students, alumni and seniors. Danny Peterson Theatre, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-4263980, theatre.boisestate.edu.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 15

8 DAYS OUT WEEK IN REVIEW ANDR EW C R IS P

IDAHO DANCE THEATRE’S SPRING SHOW—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10-$35. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub. boisestate.edu. IMPROVOLUTION—Catch the hilarity when this Boise comedy troupe performs. 8 p.m. $10. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SCOTT WHITE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. OFF THE RECORD—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org. OPERA IDAHO THE BALLAD OF BABY DOE—Based on the lives of actual historical figures Horace Tabor, Elizabeth “Baby” Doe Tabor and Augusta Tabor, the opera tracks their lives from Horace and Baby Doe’s meeting to Horace’s death. See Picks, Page 12. 7:30 p.m. $15-$69, operaidaho.org. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454. PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $15, $10 students. NexStage Theatre, 120 S. Main, Ketchum, 208-726-2985. RABBIT HOLE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. XANADU—See Thursday. 7 p.m. dinner, 8 p.m. show. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Literature SPRING BOOK SALE—See Thursday. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

SATURDAY APRIL 14 Festivals & Events OPEN HOUSE—Steve Meyers will give a fun and simple lesson intended for beginning and intermediate guitarists. Attendees will learn how Nashville charts enable them to learn songs quickly in a variety of styles while making music theory fun and relevant. 1-2 p.m. FREE. River City Guitars, 574 W. Main St., Boise, 208-344-7600, rivercityguitars.net.

On Stage IDAHO DANCE THEATRE’S SPRING SHOW—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10-$35. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub. boisestate.edu.

16 | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Laurie Pearman puts the “fun” in dysfunctional at Flying M.

AN ARTSGASM After a couple weeks of live-music overload, the tinny echo in our ears has given way to a renewed appreciation for the quieter arts. And with First Thursday’s myriad visual art openings and a number of live stage productions, this week was a welcome change of pace. Boise Weekly reporters swarmed the surprisingly chilly streets of downtown on First Thursday, April 5. Staff Writer Andrew Crisp swung by Flying M Coffeehouse for Laurie Pearman’s new photography exhibit, Scenes from a Dysfunctional Dollhouse. According to Crisp, “The photos were shot entirely within the small confines of a dollhouse Pearman played with as a child, but the characters engaged in actions that would make Barbie blush,” including sex, drugs and violence. Crisp also stopped by Beside Bardenay to rub elbows with Opera Idaho’s cast from The Ballad of Baby Doe. Live arias were paired with a Silver and Gold martini—Wild Turkey bourbon and Herradura silver tequila with a chili, sugar and salt rim. To cap off the evening, BW New Media Czar Josh Gross pressed on to Bricolage for a letterpress demo from Movable Type, a delivery truck converted into a cross-country mobile letterpress studio. According to Gross, “Press operator Kyle Durrie was demonstrating the press to anyone who stepped inside by printing the bottom half of a poster with the words ‘another dingbat.’ People could then take that poster outside and have the top filled in with the word ‘another day,’ by Idaho Poster and Letterpress owner Bingo Barnes.” On April 6, BW’s April Foster swung by Visual Arts Collective for a last-minute opening reception for a new exhibit from BOCOLAB and Francis Fox called Transition. According to Foster, “The exhibit consists of a small sculpture gallery with various distorted and futuristic shapes that combine wood, stone and metals.” The show will continue through Saturday, May 26. And speaking of transitions, BW intern Amber Clontz lost her drag show virginity on April 7 during LipsInc!’s latest, Easter-themed performance at Balcony. In Clontz’s opinion, “LipsInc!’s newest talent, Nikoa Mak, might have stolen the show if it wasn’t for the bodacious Bridgette Diamond Halston. It was a toss-up between Mak’s acts that dripped with sex, vs. the laughter that came from Halston’s turns as a healthy dominatrix and a walker-wielding nursing home resident.” Boise Contemporary Theater’s latest production, Off the Record, also dripped with sex, but in a much more veiled and nuanced manner. Check out an interview with playwright Lynn Allison on Page 21 and a review of the play on Page 14. And in more wholesome arts news, the Morrison Center was near capacity for all three performances of Ballet Idaho’s Cinderella. BW’s Mika Belle snapped photos on April 7 and caught up with Marketing Director Kim Kaine. “This afternoon’s matinee show was amazing,” said Kaine. “We had every little girl in the city of Boise wearing their Cinderella dress.” —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SCOTT WHITE— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. OFF THE RECORD—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH—See Thursday. 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. $15, $10 students. NexStage Theatre, 120 S. Main, Ketchum, 208-726-2985. RABBIT HOLE— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

Kids & Teens RE-ART: THE ART OF POP-UP CARDS—Children ages 5-10 can create their own pop-up greeting cards, from super-simple varieties to those that are more complex and require detailed cutting. Visit trica.org for more info. 1-2 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995; 3-4 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900; boisepubliclibrary.com.

SUNDAY APRIL 15 Festivals & Events BUY IDAHO SUNDAY MARKET—Twenty vendors offer Idaho products. Visit buyidaho.org for more info. See Picks, Page 12. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

On Stage IDAHO DANCE THEATRE’S SPRING SHOW—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $10-$35. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SCOTT WHITE— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. OPERA IDAHO THE BALLAD OF BABY DOE—See Friday. 2:30 p.m. $15-$69. operaidaho.org. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454.

ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $15, $12 seniors, Boise State alumni and non-Boise State students; FREE with valid Boise State ID. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3980, theatre.boisestate.edu. XANADU—See Thursday.7 p.m. dinner, 8 p.m. show. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Food & Drink 44TH STREET WINERIES SPRING RELEASE EVENT—Celebrate spring wine releases with Coiled, Periple and Telaya wineries. Gourmet barbecue from the Saint Lawrence Gridiron food truck will be available in the parking lot and the Vinyl Preservation Society will provide tunes from 2-6 p.m. Tasting fees will be waived and wine by the glass will be available. Noon-6 p.m. Urban Winemakers Cooperative, 107-1/2 E. 44th St., Garden City, 208-376-4023, urbanwinemakerscoop.com. NAMPA FOOD TRUCK RALLY—Enjoy tasty selections from the B29 Streatery, Archies Place, Brown Shuga Soul Food and Rice Works, music and microbrews at the inaugural Nampa Food Truck rally. Proceeds from beer sales will be donated to the Pix Theatre. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square, Intersection of 14th and Front streets, Nampa.

Literature SPRING BOOK SALE—See Thursday. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Sports & Fitness BEAT COACH PETE—Help fund Boise State scholarships and race against Bronco football coach Chris Peterson in this fifth-annual run/walk. Visit rec.boisestate.edu for more info and registration. The three-mile race winds through campus and the Greenbelt, then finishes at Bronco Stadium. See Picks, Page 13. 9:30 a.m. $25. Boise State Rec Center, 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5641, rec.boisestate.edu.

Green SECOND SATURDAY SERIES IT’S A HOOT—Each April, the Great Horned Owl babies appear in Hulls Gulch. Learn about the owls of Idaho, then join a short hike to view the owls with binoculars and spotting scopes. All ages welcome, with activities for adults and children alike. No registration required; leave pets at home. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208514-3755, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

Citizen 2012 ADA COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CAUCUS—The 2012 Ada County Democratic Presidential Caucus is open to all. Enter on the north side along the Boise River. Caucus begins at 10 a.m. and doors will be closed at that time. Attendees are encouraged to arrive early. 8:30 a.m. FREE. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 17

8 DAYS OUT PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH—See Thursday. 3 p.m. $15, $10 students. NexStage Theatre, 120 S. Main, Ketchum, 208-726-2985. RABBIT HOLE—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St. 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $15, $12 seniors, Boise State alumni and non-Boise State students; FREE with valid Boise State ID. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3980, theatre. boisestate.edu.

Literature SPRING BOOK SALE—See Thursday. Noon-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Kids & Teens RE-ART: THE ART OF POP-UP CARDS—See Saturday. 1-2 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844200; 3-4 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996; boisepubliclibrary.org.

DOV DAVIDOV—The Comedy Central and HBO star presents his comedic stylings. 8 p.m. $15. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

TUESDAY APRIL 17 On Stage

DANGEROUS CURVES AHEAD: BURLESQUE ON THE GOGO—Enjoy killer moves, sexy glam and hilarious hijinks with burlesque superstars Anita Cookie, Clams Casino, Darlinda Just Darlinda, GiGi La Femme and Minnie Tonka. They’ll be joined by locals Mimi ma Shuga of Hot Mess Burlesque and Anne McDonald of Red Light Variety Show. For more info, visit burlesqueonthegogo.com. 8 p.m. $8 at brownpapertickets.com or $10 at the door. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208514-2531, drinkfattys.com.

VERONICA LIVINGSTONE, I PRESUME— Homegrown Theater presents this comedy written by Boise Weekly staffer Josh Gross, about a millionaire who passes away and leaves her estate and company to her cat, Veronica Livingstone. The late millionaire’s son and the family lawyer scheme to get the company back by giving it to a 13-year-old girl with the same name as the cat. See Picks, Page 13. 7:30 p.m. $10 general, $8 student/senior. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

OFF THE RECORD—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org.

Green

VERONICA LIVINGSTONE, I PRESUME— See Tuesday. 7:30 p.m. $10 general, $8 student/senior. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

BOISE STATE EARTH WEEK— See Monday. Boise State Campus, 1910 University Drive, Boise, boisestate.edu.

WEDNESDAY

Kids & Teens

APRIL 18

GET LOUD AT THE LIBRARY— Enjoy movie-related, family friendly crafts and activities centered on movies. There will also be snacks, music and prizes. Dress as your favorite movie character and join in the fun. Visit the library’s website for a full list of activities and events. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208562-4995; Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996; Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200; Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900; boisepubliclibrary.com.

On Stage

MONDAY APRIL 16 On Stage 5X5 READING SERIES—Catch five exciting new plays in their raw stages and join a discussion with the actors and directors. 7 p.m. $12. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Literature POETRY SLAM DELUX FINALS—Eight poets will compete to represent Boise at the National Slam in August. Visit boisepoetry.com for more info. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

BLUE TURF COMEDY—Come in for more than an hour of laughs, gaffs and spontaneous, extemporaneous zaniness during the maiden voyage of Boise State’s newest improv comedy troupe, sponsored by the Boise State Theatre Majors Association. Tickets available at the door. 7:30 p.m. $3, $5 for two. Boise State Student Union Forum, 1910 University Drive, Boise.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Green BOISE STATE EARTH WEEK— Join Boise State’s Sustainability Club in celebrating Earth Week Monday, April 16-Saturday, April 21. Events include panel discussions, a local market, “trashion” show and garden party. Visit the Boise State website for a full calendar of events. Boise State Campus, 1910 University Drive, Boise, boisestate.edu.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

18 | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE WEDNESDAY APRIL 11

THURSDAY APRIL 12

FRIDAY APRIL 13

ALCEST—With Deadlight Effect and Oilslave. 9 p.m. $8. Shredder

ACORN PROJECT—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

AARON MARK BROWN ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid HANNAH’S GONE WILD—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. $5. Humpin’ Hannah’s HEARTLESS BASTARDS—With David Vandervelde and Brian Lopez. 7 p.m. $12 adv., $14 door. Neurolux JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—6:30 p.m. FREE. The Brickyard

BROCK BARTEL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DEUCE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock. Stock & Barrel FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HANNI EL KHATIB—With Sundelles. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux JOHN JONES TRIO—With Mike Seifrit and John Hyneman. 8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DAN COSTELLO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub DEACON 5—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel FANGO FLUTE—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s Cellar

THE ROSELINE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

GREG BRIDGES—8 p.m. FREE. The Press

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

IAN MCFERON—With Alisa Milner. 9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

JAC SOUND—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Twig’s Cellar

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

CALEB KLAUDER COUNTRY BAND—With Random Country Growlers. 8 p.m. $10. Neurolux

THE NAUGHTIES—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

STEVE AND GRACE WALL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

WORKING DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

BOBAFLEX—With Edisun, Atom Smash, Abrupt Edge and Workin’ On Fire. 7:30 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Knitting Factory

JEANNIE MARIE—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye RECKLESS ABANDON—With Steady Rush. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—Join Boise Weekly and 44 North Vodka for the Demons and Divas party. See Picks, Page 13 for more info. 8 p.m. before 10 p.m. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid SALLY TIBBS—With John Jones, Mike Seifrit and Jon Hyneman. 7 p.m. FREE. Brickyard THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club THE SHAUN BRAZELL QUARTET—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

REVIVAL TOUR, APRIL 14, NEUROLUX Punk celebs Chuck Ragan and Tom Gabel are best known as frontmen of Hot Water Music and Against Me!, respectively. But they have since teamed up with outlaw country vet and Lucero contributor Cory Branan, Alkaline Trio’s Dan Andriano, and acoustic star Nathaniel Rateliff. The result is a “come to Jesus” group aimed at rousing the spirit of folk. Though its members might be known for hard-hitting punk rock, the band has slowed things down with the aptly named Revival Tour. The group has taken a page out of the late Earl Scruggs’ book, pairing banjo and acoustic guitar with voices that drop into the bluegrass realm on tracks befitting the Louisiana swamplands. And the two genres mesh together surprisingly well. The brashness of punk shows its defiance in the refrain of “Open the Roads,” which is belted out over twangy country tracks. —Andrew Crisp

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

8 p.m., $16. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 19

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE SATURDAY APRIL 14 THE REVIVAL TOUR—Featuring Chuck Ragan, Cory Branan, Tommy Gabel and Nathaniel Rateliff. See Listen Here, Page 19. 8 p.m. $16. Neurolux DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DANGERBEARD—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SCREAMING FEMALES, APRIL 17, THE CRUX Some people are born and, somewhere during the course of their life, decide to pick up a musical instrument. Some people appear to be born specifically to pick one up. Screaming Females guitarist Marissa Paternoster is the latter. The New Brunswick, N.J., trio wields a mighty sound somewhere between power-pop and the riot grrrl alt-rock of the mid-’90s. But live, it’s hard to pay attention to much beyond the rare level of control Paternoster wields over her instrument. She moves seamlessly from wailing solos to humming melodies to snarling riffs to squealing accents to twinkling ambience, yet somehow manages never to let it overshadow the songs as a whole. Paternoster and company will play The Crux on Tuesday, April 17. Know Patternoster will be there to do one thing: play guitar. The rest is just going through the motions. —Josh Gross With Art Fad and Sword of a Bad Speller. 7 p.m., $10. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St.

20 | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

DESERT MOON BAND—9 p.m. FREE. Huck-n-Finn’s

THE WORKING DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY APRIL 16

WEDNESDAY APRIL 18

WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

CHRIS GUTIERREZ—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

HANNAH’S GONE WILD—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. $5. Humpin’ Hannah’s

SHON SANDERS—With Amy Weber. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub SPEEDY GRAY—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

SUNDAY APRIL 15

HECKTOR PECTOR—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

AN APPLE A DAY HIP-HOP TOUR—With DJ Ganzobean, Burnell Washburn, Pigpen and Pat Maine, and Charles Engels and The Family Matters. 7 p.m. $3. Neurolux

LACUNA COIL—8 p.m. $15. Knitting Factory

BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

OLD DEATH WHISPER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE ISRAELITES—9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

ROBIN SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

JASON BUCKALEW—10:30 a.m. FREE. Berryhill

GOD-DES AND SHE—7:30 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. New Frontier Club

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s

LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

PIST OFFICER—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

NATHAN MOODY—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SCREAMING FEMALES—With Art Fad and Sword of a Bad Speller. See Listen Here, This Page. 7 p.m. $10. Crux

SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—6:30 p.m. FREE. Brickyard

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid SALLY TIBBS—With John Jones, Mike Seifrit and and Jon Hyneman. 7 p.m. FREE. Brickyard THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

SUNNYVALE STRINGBAND—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

TUESDAY APRIL 17 DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SPARE PARTS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La OLIVER THOMPSON AND DR. JOE BALDASSARRE—7 p.m. FREE. Open Space PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers WORKING DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

ARTS/NEWS B OIS E W EEK LY AR C HIVES

ARTS PATR IC K S W EENEY

OFF THE RECORD The Larry Craig story is a launching pad for BCT’s new play ANDREW CRISP

We all know the story: a U.S. senator from Idaho enters a busy bathroom at a large airport. An undercover police officer in the adjacent stall witnesses a “lewd gesture” and toe-tapping beneath the divider. The senator is hauled to an interrogation room in the bowels of the airport. Off the Record, the new play by first-time playwright and longtime actress Lynn Allison, is not the Larry Craig story. “It’s not that story under a different name,” Matthew Cameron Clark (left) and Stephen C. Bradbury (right) star in Lynn Allison’s Off the Record. said Matthew Cameron Clark, Boise Contemporary Theater artistic director, who plays the role of officer Joe Mahoney. “It uses our required tapping into Boise’s larger theater awkward. Allison uses that situation to segue awareness of that story as a launch pad, and community. A Kickstarter campaign for into larger discussions of identity. ends up going in a very surprising direction.” the production overshot its funding goal of “‘Who are you?’ is the fundamental quesWhile related thematically to the Craig $10,000 by 25 percent. Allison also submitted tion. And, ‘What makes you tick?’” said scandal of 2007, involving undercover officer the play to BCT’s 5x5 reading series, where she Allison. “It’s trying to ultimately humanize Dave Karsnia’s apprehension of the Republiworked out some of the play’s kinks. everybody, rather than just drawing lines in can senator, the names and details have been “If you’re saying somebody else’s words, the sand. I mean, there’s plenty of that, and changed. Instead, Allison’s senator is named you’re responsible for that little piece of it,” John Michael Goodwin, and the upstart young plenty of hypocrisy in high places. But we said Allison. “It’s still nerve-wracking on some officer, the white-bread Joe Mahoney. The play know that story.” level, but to have other people say words that Instead Allison suggested that the play is begins moments after the bathroom stall bust, you put down on the page, you feel much a chance for the audience to understand the but she stresses the story is not a lampoon. “It’s not at all intended to be a dramatiza- entirety of the two men’s characters—an explo- more responsible.” According to Peterson, the 5x5 reading ration entirely left out tion of those events. series is designed to hone the skills of Idaho of what was covered It’s intended to be an talent and for BCT to try brave or bold new nationally. At its core exploration of those Off the Record runs through Saturday, April 28. For a review of the play, see Page 14. things, all of which describe Off the Record. is the senator’s forced events,” said Allison “It’s amazing how much time these things outing, and how his coover coffee. “UltiBOISE CONTEMPORARY THEATER take. It’s not something that happens oververt efforts caught up 854 Fulton St. mately, fundamentally, 208-331-9224 night, especially as a first-time playwright,” with him. Clark plays it’s two people in a bctheater.org said Peterson. Mahoney alongside room forced to deal Allison said that, at first, she was tempted Stephen C. Bradbury as with each other, and to rewrite sections or massage language when Sen. Goodwin. all that goes with that. an issue came up. But at some point, she had “They both have a reason to talk about It navigates a number of different waters, so to let the words stand on their own. being gay and whether or not the public is to speak.” “Writing a play is like writing a piece of aware of your sexuality,” said Clark. “It Some of those waters include political deals a lot with hiding and public perception, literature that isn’t really complete until it is on debate on heady issues. But it also raises the its feet. Even the reading aloud of a play can be and sort of deliberately creating your public question of what a play about a closeted different than ... getting it in front of an audipersonality. It’s very much crafting a characsenator confronting the law looks like free of ence,” said Allison. “That’s the most telling; ter. We all do that.” the national media spin. The details of Craig’s that’s going to be the most informative.” Crafting a character is a skill that Allison transgressions were played out time and again Allison handed off the play to be crafted has been honing for years as an actress with as the scandal around the senator unfolded, Idaho Shakespeare Festival. Clark and Helene into a finished product by director Dwayne the jokes and puns often writing themselves. Blackaller, with help from Clark and Bradbury. Peterson, BCT’s managing director, suggest However, the larger issues related to the situa“You come to discover a play is just like Allison’s career is what makes Off the Record tion went largely unexplored. a blueprint for a house,” said Allison. “It so compelling. “I was kind of handed a situation, and I depends on who your general contractor is, “There’s no question that her work as an thought, ‘Oh, it’d be interesting to see what the craftsmen you’re pulling in. Your product actor has led to her being able to write really their on-the-record exchange was, and then can be totally different from one expression to what happens if you turn off the tape recorder. exciting dialogue. ... It may be her first play, but she’s been telling stories on stage for quite another.” And what could happen,’” said Allison. a while,” said Clark. “She’s clearly paying The public knows little about the emotionattention.” ally charged atmosphere in the room, though VIDEO: BW interviewed the director, playwright and cast about the But getting the play off the page and onto the conversation between Karsnia and Craig play that’s not (exactly) about a its feet has been a much different process than was officially recorded. Chances are body certain Idaho senator getting arAllison typically experiences as an actress—it language and subtext was terse, official and rested in an airport bathroom. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Irene Deely says Woman of Steel isn’t closing.

THE STEEL DEEL A “for sale” sign that recently popped up in front of the Woman of Steel Gallery has stirred up concern among local art enthusiasts. But there’s nothing to worry about, explained Irene Deely, Woman of Steel artist/ owner. The welded-steel and cast-bronze art space is simply expanding. “Over the last year or so, my studio work has increased,” said Deely. “I’ve had to pull away from trying to run the gallery and do all the events in favor of my studio work. That’s led to a large portion of my building being unused, so I’m actually looking for someone to either lease or buy the building that would be compatible with the art district goals that we have.” If Deely manages to lease or sell the entire space, she’ll move into a brand new studio nearby. If she only leases out a chunk of the space, she’ll stay in the studio but also do some expanding. Deely owns the 30,000-square-foot parking lot just west of Visual Arts Collective, at the corner of 37th and Osage streets in Garden City. It’s there that she intends to build a studio that’s more suited to her needs. “It’d be nice to have a larger studio that could handle the scale of work that I’ve been doing,” said Deely. In other expansion/re-location news, In Retrospect vintage clothing store, formerly at 1615 W. State St., has moved up a few blocks. The new spot at 1940 W. State St., a big yellow house just across from the Westside Drive-In, is bigger and better suited for the store’s old-fashioned aesthetic. “We own this property. Before, we were just leasing,” said store owner Nancy Zurcher. “It’s bigger and it just goes really well with the vintage clothing we sell—the house was built in 1940.” Zurcher said that she just finished moving all of the unique, old-fashioned clothing that she peddles into the new location. To celebrate the move and introduce customers to the new location, In Retrospect will hold an open house Saturday, April 14-Sunday, April 15, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The event will feature a variety of sales, giveaways and treats. —April Foster

BOISEweekly | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 21

SCREEN/WEB

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. ANDR EW ELLIS

ROAD TO WEBISODES TV travels from Lucille Ball to YouTube JOSH GROSS CBS was excited about the sitcom it was cooking up with Lucille Ball in 1951. But there was one problem: sitcoms were broadcast live from the East Coast, and Ball insisted on staying in Hollywood, Calif., for her family and to maintain a film career. Ultimately, Ball and her costar husband Desi Arnaz agreed to a $1,000-aweek pay cut to cover the costs of shooting the series on film, instead of live. The catch was that they owned the finished films, which were later rebroadcast for millions of dollars. That decision was the start of a long and A behind-the-scenes look at Boise webisode Bagel Shop Bebop. slow reshaping of the broadcast industry, first through the creation of shows that could be rebroadcast, then through proliferafrom dissatisfied with it. He isn’t alone. A sampling of other Idaho tion of tapes for home viewing, and finally, “What I really liked about it is that it webisodes available on YouTube include The through the Internet. The industry evolved was a low-impact way to use a lot of [actors], Bronco Buffet, a locally shot sports series covfrom a top-down, studio-controlled process ering Boise State; an outdoors and nature show and that would motivate me to do it again,” to what it is now becoming creator-owned he said. content with personalized global distribution called Wild Lens; and Mule Deer Country, an And since webisodes are spread primarily Idaho-based big game hunting show. All are networks accessible to anyone. In modern by social networking, the number of people well made and totally unfit for film festivals. parlance: webisodes. involved can be crucial to success. Every extra Another element of creative freedom the For those not up on Web jargon, a webiactor or grip is one more person who can webisode allows is the ability to tell stories in sode is a short video series that bypasses TV tell their friends to check out the video they a serial, rather than a clipped format. That and cinemas altogether and goes straight to appealed to Boise filmmaker Andrew Ellis after worked and push a series toward going viral. the Web. And due to revenue-sharing plans “It does create sort of a game,” said Ellis. he saw action dramas like The Wire and 24. from streaming video sites, media companies “I’m not holding them up as great art,” said “We put them up on YouTube. ... It’s fun to looking to expand on existing franchises or check in and see which of the episodes have offer additional premium content and the wide Ellis. “But what they did in the first season gotten the most hits.” availability of cheap digital video cameras and was ... they would tell you a seven-minute The answer is Episode 14: Blondes III, story and then cliffhang you. Then they would editing software, the direct-to-Internet serial which has been viewed 332 times. come back and tell you another seven-minute short format is booming, even here in Boise. But while it’s great that Ellis’ friends outside story and then cliffhang you ... then end with a Beyond distribution, a major appeal of the whopper of a cliffhanger that would bring you the region can now easily see his work, that direct-to-Web format is creative freedom. consumption also represents a major shift. Afback the next week. I grew intrigued with the “I think one of the saddest things is that ter the completion of Bagel Shop Bebop, Ellis idea of seeing if we could do that.” short format got pigeonholed into the festival and Schmeckpeper held a theatrical screening So Ellis and his longtime collaborator Will circuit,” said Joshua Malan, the auteur behind Schmeckpeper decided of the complete run and found it woefully the short-lived local under-attended, especially considering the vast to give it a shot. Web series Ducks in a number of people that had worked on the They didn’t even Column. “The InterWatch Ducks in a Column at youtube.com/ user/ducks-inacolumn. series. This was disappointing to Ellis. come close. net has given a life to “There’s something priceless about sharing “What I was short format outside Watch Bagel Shop Bebop at youtube.com/ it,” he said. “About sitting in a theater with actually pitching to user/BagelShopBebop. of festivals.” the people who made it and seeing if it works, him was an episodic The constraints of if people laugh in the right places and are quiet storyline, the idea the festival circuit have in the right places. And you will never get that being that we would shoot these three- to long been cited as a thorn that shapes filmfour-minute storylines that would interlink and with YouTube distribution.” makers’ projects. Films must be lengths that Ellis and Schmeckpeper used to run Small fit programming needs, and their content must create an overarching arc that would propel Pond Films, a screening series. Ellis can draw the viewer from one episode to the next,” said turn enough heads to earn one of the limited a clear line when attendance started dropping Ellis. “And Will didn’t exactly write that.” slots. Malan’s series—which follows a snooty and the birth of YouTube. But the populist in Instead, Schmeckpeper wrote Bagel Shop film critic grappling with the twin devils of the Ellis sees the trade-off as worthwhile. Bebop, a set of 16 psychedelic slices of life uncultured masses and his imaginary friend— “Anyone who has the time and energy to go set inside Blue Sky Bagels, on Fourth and wasn’t the sort of socio-political arthouse film out and get a project done should be allowed that festivals gravitate toward. But Malan feels Main streets. Plots cover everything from to have the world see it,” he said. impressionistic portraits of customers—a la webisodes like his can target a niche market. Malan agreed. “I think a lot of us really “I wanted to do something that I felt I could Jim Jarmusch’s Coffee and Cigarettes—to the would like to be the next James Cameron,” he events surrounding an employee’s noir-ish, get a good amount of viewership and that I psychotic breakdown, hardly the tightly plot- said. “But for someone like me, I just want to didn’t want to feel like it had to get festival make things and have them be seen.” ted thriller Ellis envisioned. But he was far play,” said Malan.

22 | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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Fresh Air Enjoy the sights and sounds of the Boise River at lunch, brunch, dinner or happy hour on our expansive outdoor patio—not to mention the finest prime beef, fresh seafood and local game. Open daily with free parking.

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WINESIPPER/FOOD FOOD

IN THE PINK

2011 CINDER ROSE, $14.99 This wine is from the south, but it’s Southern Idaho not southern France. Winemaker Melanie Krause is crafting excellent wines from our local grapes, and this one is no exception. It’s 100 percent syrah with a deeper color than many roses. The sweet berry and melon aromas are deep and full. The palate has a lively texture with racy acidity that balances the ripe red-fruit flavors, while an intriguing minerality colors the crisp finish. This wine is definitely a food-friendly choice. 2011 DOMAINE HOUCHART ROSE, $13.99 This pale pink wine from France’s Cotes de Provence combines grenache, syrah and cinsault with dollops of cabernet sauvignon and mourvedre. Exceptionally well structured with an appealing elegance, this wine gives a touch of clover on the floral nose. The flavors are ripe and lively, marked by bright strawberry, tart cherry and sweet raspberry. It is absolutely delicious. 2011 PENYA ROSE, $10.99 From a cooperative winery in Cases de Pene—a tiny village in the Roussillon region of southern France—this beautiful rose is a blend of 60 percent syrah and 40 percent grenache. It offers both charm and an appealing richness, with sweet cherry and raspberry aromas that lead to ripe red fruit and melon flavors. The finish on this rose is clean and refreshing.

JU LIA GR EEN

I drink roses all year long. When the weather’s cold, they’re my “winter white,” making a nice break from heavier reds. When the heat is on, they’re my “summer red,” crisp and refreshing, but with a nice depth of flavor. My favorites come from the south of France, and if there is one season that cries out for rose, it has to be spring. After months of cabin fever, a lightly chilled glass of pink on the patio is a welcome change. We’re just now seeing the first few wines from the new 2011 vintage. Here are a few favorites.

SMALL POTATOES Farmers market vendors struggle to keep it legal TARA MORGAN Capital City Public Market Executive Director Karen Ellis sounded exasperated on a recent late afternoon. “Eighteen days and counting,” Ellis sighed, referring to the market’s opening day, Saturday, April 21. In addition to showcasing 140-160 local food and art vendors each Saturday, this year’s market will also feature the Taste the Market Program, the Veggie Valet and a smattering of educational activities for kids. But as the market—and the small-scale local-food movement as a whole—grows in popularity, it also struggles to gain legitimacy in the eyes of big ag. “This is the year of enforcement for everybody. … There’s issues with the potato commission, there’s issues with the bean comin the state,” said Erskine. “And if we’re not mission,” said Ellis. following all the laws, then we don’t get to The issues Ellis referred to involve a couple have a seat at the table to make laws.” of Idaho agricultural laws. The first states that One of those is the Idaho State Departcommercial potatoes grown in the state have to ment of Agriculture’s Rule 02.06.06, which have a trademark that says they are an Idaho regulates beans grown in the state: “Bean potato, which vendors acquire by obtaining seeds planted in Idaho shall be from an apa license from the Idaho Potato Commission. The second states that bean seeds planted must proved lot bearing an approved tag on each bag or container, stating the kind, variety and be purchased from an approved bean seed lot number.” grower to keep unwanted blights at bay. “Those are rules that were put in place “All of the sudden, everybody’s looking out back in 2003,” explained Lloyd Knight, adfor everything,” said Ellis. “I think we’re in ministrator of the division of plant industries this society and an economy that everybody’s making sure that the I’s are dotted and the T’s at the ISDA. “The industry were the ones that initially asked us to put these rules in are crossed.” Josie Erskine of Peaceful Belly Farm is lead- place, and they did that because we grow a significant amount of bean seed in the state, ing the charge to get the market, as a whole, and they needed to make sure that we were certified with the potato commission. protected from having new diseases and bacte“The local food movement is growing rial blights.” and when people buy potatoes from farmers But the problem for small farmers is that market—tourists or locals—they’re thinking certified bean seed they’re buying Idaho vendors only sell in potatoes and the pobulk. tato commission takes Opening Day, Saturday, April 21, 9:30 a.m.“The smallest that very seriously, 1:30 p.m., FREE. vendor, they want 2 which they should,” CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET pounds of beans. They said Erskine. “It’s not Eighth Street from Bannock Street to The don’t want 50 pounds that they want to be Grove; Idaho Street between Capital Boulevard of beans, and they’re against us, it’s that and Ninth Street capitalcitypublicmarket.com looking at trying to they want to try to find ways that somefind out how they can body can actually browork with us.” ker that so to speak … so everybody wouldn’t Erskine said that in the past, most Capital have to worry about buying 50 pounds just so City Public Market vendors have not been they can get beans from an approved source,” licensed with the potato commission. She hopes to change that by working with the IPC explained Ellis. Though market vendors might have to certify whole farmers markets and regions shrugged off bean seed requirements in the across the state. past, this year, they’re paying attention. “One of the reasons I kind of stepped in “The bean thing started last year. One of on this is that, as local food and small food our vendors received a really nasty letter from grows, it also has to be taken seriously by ag

the Department of Ag,” said Ellis. That vendor was Robin Caudill of Lazy Dog Gardens. In an email Caudill told BW: “The ISDA sent me a letter that threatened me with jail and $13,000 in fines last year” over green beans. Knight said that “doesn’t ring a bell.” “Every year, we send a number of letters to a number of growers that outline what the requirements and what the potential penalties are ... but we didn’t issue any kinds of those enforcement actions at all,” said Knight. But that’s not to say enforcement action won’t be taken if commercial growers continue to disobey the rules. “We could even go so far as to quarantine or destroy a crop if it was planted with seed that was not tagged. We do have that ability, if need be, but we also are realistic about how we enforce that rule, as well,” said Knight. “We’re not going to go into everybody’s backyard garden to check out their bean seed when they plant it.” Erskine, whose farm is large enough to justify purchasing 50-pound bags of bean seed, sees an upside to the whole situation. “I see it as an amazing business opportunity for someone to start a bean seed company in this area. … I think a small farmer could possibly make a living off of this because of the quarantine area,” said Erskine. “But a lot of the other farmers think that it’s unfair and they would like to see the law go away.” Ellis also understands the necessity of a bean quarantine but still thinks the red tape is getting a little out of hand. “They’re very careful to make sure that the product is pure and I get that, but to some degree, it’s like everything else—it’s regulated beyond ridiculousness,” said Ellis.

—David Kirkpatrick

24 | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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R E A L ES TAT E BW ROOMMATES 28M LOOKING TO RENT ROOM I am looking for a room for rent, looking to pay anywhere from $200-400/mo. Email: paullann02@gmail.com, or call 541337-1832, no txts please. LOOKING FOR ROOMMATE 2BD, 1BA apartment with a spare room to rent out. I am a 24 yr. old female. $320/mo. Split utilities (only electric). I have a cat so no other pets. There’s a pool & fitness center. Close to downtown & BSU, also near greenbelt. If interested & want more details please call 208-283-8251.

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B O I S E W E E K LY RNS NEEDED (LOCAL HOSPITAL) Intermountain Hospital of Boise is seeking Registered Nurses who are interested in acute care psychiatric nursing. This is not an agency position. Qualified candidates must possess a current Idaho nursing license, 6 mo. acute care (or equivalent) exp. & a desire to begin a new adventure. Please e mail résumé to william.fullmer@uhsinc.com or call Bill at 208-377-8400 ext. 2285.

SEEKING ART INSTRUCTOR New concept learn-to-paint business is currently looking for 2-3 artist instructors to work in a creative, positive environment. Must be able to guide complete beginners (up to 30 people) to paint an acrylic painting. Emphasis is more on a fun, social environment, less on art. Mostly evening classes with some daytime opportunities. Prior, documented teaching experience is preferred,

ADOPT-A-PET

but consideration will be given to those without experience but with a fantastic attitude. This is a contract position with the possibility to become a part or full time employee. Pay is per class with a flexible schedule. Please respond to paintnsip@gmail.com for more information. Work and live in rural Buddhist center, California. Help make Buddhist books to donate in Asia. Includes housing, vegetarian meals, classes on Buddhism, living allowance. Must have sincere Buddhist interest, physical strength. Minimum age 22. For details, application call 510-981-1987 Email contact@nyingma.org

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BOISE HIGH BRAVES Baseball Season Opens! Jack Acree Field (next to Elk’s Hospital behind Boise Little Theater). Free parking. Community Rallies behind Bill Buckner’s Boise Braves as they challenge opponents every Thursday & Friday night in March & April. Game time 5pm. Children & seniors welcome. Healthy & friendly concessions. “Baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and Chevrolet!” Mention BW for a discount at the gate. Go Braves!

BW T-SHIRT DESIGN CONTEST Want international exposure for These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

TEDDY: 4-year-old doberman pinscher mix. Extra-large at 94 pounds. House-trained. Good with children. Gentle boy. (Kennel 314- #14239410)

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your artwork? Enter the Exergy Tour-Boise Weekly T-Shirt Design Contest. Theme=Celebration of Women’s Cycling. But hurry, deadline for submissions is May 4th at 5pm at BW offices. Go to

boiseweekly.com & click T-Shirt Design Contest box for guidelines. CALL TO ALL ARTISTS! RAW: natural born artists will be hosting a monthly mixed arts showcase in a local club with a DJ that will feature a fashion show, short film, hair/makeup design, accessories, performance art, bands, and all visual arts. Our mission is to help the newer artists by giving them the tools to promote themselves. Go to www. RAWartists.org/Boise to submit for the May showcase. If chosen you will be contacted. If not chosen for May’s showcase, don’t worry. You may be contacted for June! “Like” us at www.facebook.com/RAWartistsBoise. CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS Boise/Meridian Families. Interviewing families in this area interested in participating in a cultural exchange experience by hosting an international high school student for the coming academic year. For information call Sara Powell at 208-989-7044 or the PAX national office at 800-555-6211.

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HOW CAN I KEEP FROM SINGING Features the 40 voice Una Vocé singing a variety of delightful songs from many different styles. The Concert is Friday, May 11th, in the Swayne Auditorium at NNU. Treasure Valley Young Artists & Treasure Valley Children’s Chorus will begin at 5:30 pm, & Una Vocé concert will begin at 7:30 pm. Tickets can be purchased at the door. Adults $8, Students & Senior Citizens $5, & Family $25. INTERNATIONAL MARKET AT THE WATERFRONT AT LAKE HARBOR Our goal is to represent many cultures, booth space now available. Accepting vendors: food, clothing, produce, crafts, jewelry, art. Saturdays 9-3. Contact: The Waterfront at Lake Harbor, 3050 N Lake Harbor blvd. Suite 120, 208-639-1441. OATH KEEPERS MEETINGS Oath Keepers is a non-partisan association of currently serving military, reserves, National Guard, veterans, Peace Officers, & Fire Fighters who will fulfill the oath we swore, with support of like minded citizens who take an oath to stand with us, to support

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& defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign & domestic, so help us God. Please visit the OATHKEEPERS.ORG, then go to MEETUP.COM & search for Oath at your zip code. Sign up. RSVP to the next meeting. PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE Over the last year Sustainable Futures has expanded glass recycling operations to a larger facility allowing us to add production equipment & bring on more program participants. On Thursday, April 12, from 4-7pm, the public is invited for a tour of this new facility, 5858 W Franklin, Boise. In addition to recycling wine, spirit & beer bottles into usable glassware, Sustainable Futures also provides vocational training for at-risk youth, refugees, low income seniors, & paroled men and women transitioning into the workforce. WIN $1,000 Free 500 Word Essay Contest! K-12, 31 cash prizes, $1,000 first place. May 20th deadline. We hope you have fun entering! For complete rules, go to TheAdventuresofDod.com

BW VOLUNTEERS CARING VOLUNTEERS NEEDED We are looking for quality volunteers to provide companionship to our hospice patients. Even one hr./mo. makes a huge difference in someone’s life. Times are based on your schedule not ours. Training provided. We pay for drug screening & background check. Contact Zach at Idaho Home, Health, & Hospice for more information. 208-8876633. Call today & take a chance on something that just might change your life too.

Come see our clinic, meet our staff, & take part in an educational discussion led by Dr. Cristin Slater. Bring your questions! All attendees are entered to win a FREE IVF cycle, & everyone gets $100 off their New Patient consultation! Please RSVP to

208-342-5900. ICRM is located at 111 Main Street, Suite 100, in downtown Boise.

OIL PAINTING WORKSHOP FOR

EAT HERE

SHOP HERE

BW CLASSES INFERTILITY AWARENESS! 1 in 8 couples in the U.S. will struggle with infertility. In celebration of National Infertility Awareness Week, the Idaho Center for Reproductive Medicine is having a FREE Patient Education Seminar on Thursday, April 26, 6-7pm.

| NYT CROSSWORD

OF COURSE! BY PATRICK MERRELL / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 21 SST component 22 Golf club repositioning? 25 “I bet I’ll know it” 26 Botanical holder 27 Stock price movement 28 Yonder 30 Cloths with repeating patterns 32 When to get in, briefly 34 Three-time Best Director in the 1930s

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BEGINNERS

5 hr. workshops. 3rd Sat. of each mo. starting 4/21, 1-6 pm at LEE Gallery, 409 S. 8th Street #101, downtown Boise. Discount materials from Quality Art. French Impressionist painting style. Paris

1 There are 336 dimples on a typical golf ball, for instance 2 1970s Wimbledon victor over Connors

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Meager Terrestrial decapod Aussie chick “Chill!” Inits. in bowling lanes Swell Operating in either of two ways 10 Carnival worker 11 Suffix with Milan 12 On the line 13 Protection from bug bites 14 Duffer’s shots? 15 Whichever 16 Enthusiasm 17 Whiz 21 Attacked from the air 23 Not fine 24 Knocked 29 Prefix with management 31 ___ center 33 Shirt 35 Sport named for a British boarding school 36 “I haven’t ___” 37 TV option 38 Milano of “Charmed” 39 Like works of Kipling and Browning 41 Light start? 42 Director ___ C. Kenton 43 They might help produce a blowout 46 Annoy 50 Secretive couple 51 Pro ___ 52 Iroquois foes 54 Cassim’s brother in a classic tale 58 Investors’ news, briefly 59 Come together 62 “Caught you!” 63 Military title? 64 Pharynx affliction 65 One-word query 67 Certain 35mm camera 68 “Lo-o-ovely!”

70 Second of 12: Abbr. 71 Suffix with ear or arm 72 Valued 73 ___ Lake (one of New York’s Finger Lakes) 74 Swedish coins 78 Lincoln in-laws 79 Often-filtered material 80 Shaw who wrote “Rich Man, Poor Man” 81 Location of many organs 83 Org. with boats 84 Lawyer: Abbr. 85 Violate a peace treaty, maybe 88 Club thrown in disgust? 89 Installment 91 Anonymous: Abbr. 92 Herbal tea 93 Early Wagner opera 94 Quick survey 97 Like a real-estate deal that doesn’t involve a mortgage 98 Crusty one 102 Oui’s opposite

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103 Object of curiosity on the first day of school 105 Put on the line 106 Some postal workers 110 Novelize, e.g. 112 University of Miami mascot 114 Egyptian menaces 116 Nephew of Caligula 117 Country in a Thomas Moore poem 118 Mil. awards 119 ___ Pepper 120 That guy 121 Hit Steely Dan album 123 The Indians, on sports tickers 124 As well Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

N A T S I O U S A L T R A B L M A L L S T R A Y A M U T T B R I A I M A M N A M O D E M P L U S L A B S E R S L A R I A G A N D U B E L C O L L T P U R R T R O A S K Y

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 27

PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY trained instructor, Antinon Passemard. Limited to 15 students for personal instruction. Learn the basics of composition, mixing color & brush stroke technique. Cost: $45. + materials. Call to register 208-830-2937.

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ACOUSTIC GUITAR PLAYER Needed for local folk/rock band. The band is almost complete with stand up bass, lap guitar, drums & vocalist! Please email if interested: rmrobertson33@Gmail.com

NOTICES

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BW CHILD PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois).

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BW CLASSES FREE WHOLE FOOD SEMINAR Internationally acclaimed author, public speaker, trainer & educator, Don Tolman, comes to Boise for the first time to share his wisdom of self-care & living symptom-free through whole food nutrition & healthy lifestyle. April 17th, 7pm. Holiday Inn Airport, 2970 W. Elder St. FREE, but must register for guaranteed admission at Wholefoodsboise.com

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio. Aurora the way you are. Call for Happy Hour 24 hr. 7 days/wk. In & Out. 353-3327.

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estate of: Emma Stokes,

MU S IC

Deceased.

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BW HEALTH & FITNESS COMMUNITY ED ~ REGISTER NOW Boise Schools Community Education is taking registration for our SPRING 2012 session. We have classes on a wide variety of exciting topics including languages, Home Arts, Culinary, Computers, Fitness, Health & Wellness, Holistic Living, & much much more! Register today! Our popu-

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28 | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

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Case No. CV IE 1205097 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (I.C. § 15-3-801) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred.

BW HEALING ARTS TRANSFORMATIVE HEALTHCARE If you are suffering from chronic illness, digestive issues, high stress, obesity, mental conditions, & the like; you have come to the right place. I want you to experience better health & Ayurveda offers many transformational tools to get you there. Ayurveda, which literally means the “knowledge and wisdom of life,“ is the traditional healing system of India. It is a system of holistic healthcare that considers the uniqueness of each individual as it helps them to create a state of internal harmony and optimal health. steven@traditionsayurveda.com

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Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the clerk of the Court.

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: DORIS A. MONROE, Deceased Case CV-IE-2012-04416 NOTICE TO CREDITORS [I.C. § 15-3-801(a)] NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 23th day of March, 2012. Mr. Phillip Clark c/o Gary L. Davis MANWEILER, BREEN, BALL & DAVIS, PLLC 355 W. Myrtle, Ste. 100, Boise, ID 83702 (208) 424-9100 Pub. March 28, April 4, & 11, 2012.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | 29

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Some people misunderstand the do-it-now fervor of the Aries tribe, thinking it must inevitably lead to carelessness. Please prove them wrong in the coming weeks. Launch into interesting new possibilities with all your exuberance unfurled. Refuse to allow natural energy to get hemmed in by theories and concepts. But also be sure not to mistake rash impatience for intuitive guidance. Consider the likelihood that your vision of the future might need to be tinkered with a bit as you translate it into concrete details. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): There is a possibility that a pot of gold sits at the end of the rainbow. The likelihood is small, true, but it’s not zero. On the other hand, the rainbow is definitely here and available for you to enjoy. Of course, you would have to do some more work on yourself in order to gather in the fullness of that enjoyment. Here’s the potential problem: You may be under the impression that the rainbow is less valuable than the pot of gold. So let me ask you: What if the rainbow is the real prize? GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “It’s eternity in a person that turns the crank handle,” said Franz Kafka. At least that should be the case, I would add. The unfortunate fact of the matter is that a lot of people let other, lesser things turn the crank handle— like the compulsive yearning for money, power and love, for example. I challenge you to check in with yourself sometime soon and determine what exactly has been turning your crank handle. If it ain’t eternity, or whatever serves as eternity in your world view, get yourself adjusted. In the coming months, it’s crucial that you’re running on the cleanest, purest fuel. CANCER (June 21-July 22): As David Livingstone traveled in Africa, he referred to what were then called “witch doctors” as “my professional colleagues.” In the coming weeks, Cancerian, I encourage you to be inspired by Livingstone as you expand your notion of who your allies are. For example, consider people to be your colleagues if they simply try to influence the world in the same ways you do, even if they work in different jobs or spheres. What might be your version of Livingstone’s witch doctors? Go outside of your usual network as you scout around for confederates who might connect you to exotic new perspectives and resources you never imagined you could use. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The flag of California features a grizzly bear, and the huge carnivore is the state’s official animal.

30 | APRIL 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

And yet grizzly bears have been extinct in California since 1922, when the last one was shot and killed. Is there any discrepancy like that in your own life, Leo? Do you continue to act as if a particular symbol or icon is important to you even though it has no practical presence in your life? If so, this would be a good time to update your attitude. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The cartoon character Felix the Cat made his debut in 1919. He was a movie star in the era of silent films and eventually appeared in his own comic strip and TV show. But it wasn’t until 1953, when he was 34 years old, that he first got his Magic Bag of Tricks, which allowed him to do many things he wasn’t able to do before. I bring this up, Virgo, because I believe you’re close to acquiring a magic bag of tricks that wasn’t on your radar until you had matured to the point where you are now. To ensure that you get that bag, you will have to ripen even a bit more. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I have one child—a daughter— and raising her conscientiously has been one of the great privileges and joys of my life. Bonus: She has turned out to be a stellar human being. Every now and then, though, I get a bit envious of parents who’ve created bigger families. If bringing up one kid is so rewarding, maybe more would be even better. I asked an acquaintance of mine—a man with six kids—how he had managed to pull off that difficult feat. He told me quite candidly, “My secret is that I’m not a good father; I’m very neglectful.” I offer up this story as a way to encourage you, at this juncture in your development, to favor quality over quantity. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I expect there’ll be some curious goings-on this week. A seemingly uninspired idea could save you from a dumb decision, for example. An obvious secret may be the key to defeating a covert enemy. And a messy inconvenience might show up just in time to help you do the slightly uncool but eminently right thing. Can you deal with this much irony, Scorpio? For extra credit, here are two additional odd blessings you could capitalize on: a humble teaching from an unlikely expert and a surge of motivation from an embarrassing excitement. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Some of our pagan forbears imagined they had a duty to assist with nature’s revival every spring by performing fertility rituals. And wouldn’t it be fun if it were even slightly true that you could help the crops germinate and bloom by making sweet love in the fields? At the very least,

carrying out such a ceremony might stimulate your own personal creativity. In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you to slip away to a secluded outdoor spot, either by yourself or with a romantic companion. On a piece of paper, write down a project you’d like to make thrive in the coming months. Bury the note in the good earth, then enjoy an act of love right on top of it. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Once upon a time, I fell in love with a brilliant businesswoman named Loreen. I pursued her with all my wiles, hoping to win her amorous affection. After playing hard to get for two months, she shocked me with a brazen invitation: Would I like to accompany her on a whirlwind vacation to Paris? “I think I can swing it,” I told her. But there was a problem: I was flat broke. I decided to raise the funds by selling off a precious heirloom from childhood—my collection of 6,000 vintage baseball cards. Maybe this story will inspire you to do something comparable, Capricorn: Sacrifice an outmoded attachment, juvenile treasure or youthful fantasy to empower the future of love. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): We all know that spiders are talented little creatures. Spiders’ silk is as strong as steel, and their precisely geometric webs are engineering marvels. But even though they have qualities I admire, I don’t expect to have an intimate connection with a spider anytime soon. A similar situation is at work in the human realm. I know certain people who are amazing creators and leaders but don’t have the personal integrity or relationship skills that would make them trustworthy enough to seek out as close allies. Their beauty is best appreciated from afar. Consider the possibility that the ideas I’m articulating here would be good for you to meditate on right now, Aquarius. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Have you ever had the wind knocked out of you? It feels weird for a short time, but leaves no lasting damage. I’m expecting that you will experience a form of that phenomenon sometime soon. Metaphorically speaking, the wind will get knocked out of you. But wait—before you jump to conclusions and curse me for predicting this, listen to the rest of my message. The wind that will get knocked out of you will be a wind that needed to be knocked out—a wind that was causing confusion in your gut-level intuition. In other words, you’ll be lucky to get that wind knocked out of you. You’ll feel much better afterwards, and you will see things more clearly.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 42