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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 01 JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011

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TAK EE E ON E! PICKS 14

HOLIDAY WEEKEND So much to do in three days FEATURE 21

COLDEST BEER BW’s 10th annual guide to the frostiest suds

REC 42

SURFIN’ ID No coast doesn’t mean no waves

FOOD 44

KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL Behind the lines in Boise restaurants

“Safe and sane is not so safe or sane.”

NEWS 10

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Sheree Whiteley Contributing Writers: Sarah Barber, Alex Blackwell, Bill Cope, Todd Dvorak, Stephen Foster, Guy Hand, Jennifer Hernandez, Damon Hunzeker, David Kirkpatrick, Andrew Mentzer, Ted Rall, Kat Thornton, Jordan Wilson Interns: Lizzy Duffy, David McNeill, Brady Moore, Shelby Soule, Trevor Villagrana ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Julia Green, Glenn Landberg, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow, Ben Wilson Photography Interns: Will Eichelberger, Will Jones, John Winn, Matthew Wordell CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE TWO DECADES DOWN, MANY MORE TO GO In the upper right corner of each week’s cover are two numbers: a volume number and an issue number. On this week’s cover, you’ll see “Volume 20, Issue 01.” This edition of Boise Weekly marks the first in our 20th year of existence. For two decades, Boise Weekly has been Idaho’s only alternative news outlet, and while many businesses focus on those years ending in “zero” in which to revel in public success, we don’t. For us, these 400 or so words will be about all that mark the milestone of 20 years because, in true alty style, we’re much more focused on the age of 21. The same was true of anniversaries 15 and 16—we celebrated our sweet 16 with more verve than the nice, round 15-year mark. So this time next year, expect a full issue dedicated to our 21st anniversary. But what of the first 19 volumes of Boise Weekly? From co-founder Andy Hedden-Nicely on Boise Weekly’s infancy: “Of all the great things I remember about the startup of the Boise Weekly, it’s the people who we worked with that made it work. The first year, our revenues where half of our projections, and our expenses where twice what we thought they would be. It was sobering and not for the timid, but people just believed in it from the get go and they supported the crazy idea of having a different voice in our town.” Hedden-Nicely admits that it took “brave advertisers to invest hard-earned money” in Boise Weekly. “So far, I think the paper has held up its end of the bargain. People love the Weekly, because it’s always stayed true to its heart and still does,” he said. Sally Freeman, current Boise Weekly publisher and sole owner, recently made a surprising discovery about her ownership of the paper. As she starts her 11th year, she will have owned the paper longer than all the previous owners combined. “Boise Weekly is somewhat like my third child. I have watched it grow up and mature with my kids. And Boise Weekly is the reason that I call Boise my home,” said Freeman. The first line of our mission statement says that nothing contributes to the well-being of a community more than a good local newspaper. Two decades later, we’re still working to be meaningful contributors, and I hope that in another two decades, one of my successors is echoing these words. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Elijah Jensen TITLE: BUBBLEGUMMMMMMUSHROOMCLOUD MEDIUM: Re-assembled graffiti, acrylic on plexiglass

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

ARTIST STATEMENT: Come out to Visual Arts Collective Friday, July 8, at 4 p.m. We’re throwing a huge party for owner Anneliessa Balk to show her how much we love her. There’ll be a Robert Smith look-alike contest, silently auctioned elephant art and tons of live local music. For more info search TRUNK UP! on Facebook.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

SUBMIT

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Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. ANDR EW M ENTZ ER

INSIDE

MOUNTAIN MOTORING Writer and wanderer Andrew Mentzer posted the newest installment of his Motojournal series, which takes a run through the High Valley. It’s gorgeous this time of year. See Cobweb for photos and directions.

UPDATES ON HOLLYWOOD MARKET Margaret Lawrence, the iconic owner of the North End’s Hollywood Market, passed away last week at the age of 95. Visit Citydesk for a photo slideshow of the market and see the July 6 edition for more on the story.

BROKEN RECORD A couple of Boiseans hold a new world record in the one-mile dash. It’s a record that involves rubber balls rather than rubber soles. Intrigued? Check out the video we shot of history in the making.

MONEY, MONEY, MONEY Citydesk reported this week that Micron chief Steve Appleton is among the Northwest’s top-paid CEOs. Want to see who else in Idaho is raking in a hefty corporate pay check? Visit Citydesk for details.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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MAIL

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Illegal fireworks mean big business in Idaho

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CITYDESK

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CITIZEN

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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FEATURE A decade of the valley’s coldest beer

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NOISE Muffalo’s long-distance relationship

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN The Tree of Life

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REC Hanging 10 riverside

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FOOD Behind the scenes and in the kitchen

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FOOD REVIEW Brewforia

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BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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MAIL

Stars that shine as bright as the sun 2011 Olympians on Ice

Mirai Nagasu 2011 US Bronze Medalist US Gold Medalist

& Nathan Chen

2011 US Novice Gold Medalist

July 2

Alissa Czisny 2011 US Gold Medalist

July 9

Evan Lysacek 2010 Olympic Gold Medalist World Champion 2X US Gold Medalist

July 16 & 23

Performances start at dusk Saturday nights July 2 – September 3. For a Complete listing of Ice Shows and tickets, call 208.622.2135 or visit SunValley.com/IceShows. For Hotel & Ice Show Packages, call 800.786.8259.

BE INFORMED Reed DeMordaunt recently told the Boise Weekly: “I make certain that I’m as informed as I can possibly be.” This is an unconvincing assertion coming from the District 14 Republican (Eagle, Star, West Boise, North Meridian). DeMordaunt claimed during a floor debate in the Legislature this year that “union shops” are a big problem in Idaho. There haven’t been any in Idaho since 1986. He later admitted not knowing what a union shop was. The standard for being informed should be higher than simply parroting partisan political talking points. Reed is a founding parent of North Star Charter School, located in Eagle. Last November, 83 percent of the teachers at North Star joined the teacher’s union. Had he stayed informed, Reed might have reconsidered introducing anti-union legislation that harms his school’s teachers. But that’s what happens when you govern by ideology. It’s easier to act on what you believe instead of what you know. The list goes on. Fortunately, there is a solution to Republican misinformed and harmful legislation: elect good Idaho Democrats to hold Republicans accountable. For example: Republicans again gave special interests more than $1 billion in tax exemptions without review or justification—almost half the revenue the state could rightfully collect. These special interests remain fully protected while education and social services are cut. It’s clear whose side the Republicans are on—and it’s not yours. Property taxes continue to remain high while property values continue to fall. A vote for Republicans

is becoming a vote against your financial best interests. Small businesses continue to lose customers as goodpaying jobs leave the area and new employers bypass Idaho. Republicans have failed to provide businesssmart leadership. It’s up to you to be informed. Stop allowing Republican candidates to take your vote for granted. The more they get your vote based on blind faith, the less they have to do to earn it. If you want good government, give good Idaho Democratic candidates a chance to show you they can represent your best interests. We can’t afford to wait for DeMordaunt and his Republican colleagues to learn how to be informed on their own. —Steve Berch, chairman, Legislative District 14 Idaho Democratic Party

A healthy valley is a small price to pay so that one Virginian can get rich. This guy has tried to deceive others before, now it’s up to you, Payette County. Are we really more foolhardy than Elmore and Owyhee counties, even with all the damning news about AEHI and their CEO Don Gillispie? Yikes! (Both Owyhee and Elmore counties chose to pass on this plant). Lastly, why is a nuke plant a county decision anyway? Most of Southwest Idaho (including those of you in Boise) is in the evacuation zone. We have the best rivers in this country that serve a myriad of other useful purposes. People need to wake up and do everything they can to protect them against slippery folk and three-eyed fishes. —Ethan Kelley, Payette

NUCLEAR SHYSTERS

RIP MARGARET

So an East-Coast shyster wants to build a nuclear power plant in Payette County, and the local shysters, otherwise known as commissioners, are selling out for a sniff of the snake oil. Will this project ever progress beyond the rezoning and earth-moving phase so that the ultimate goal of affordable power for California and skilled jobs for out-of-staters can be realized? Doubtful, but we should try anyway. After all, nothing seems a higher priority to Idahoans than raping our lands for the benefit of California. The “high-paying” jobs that were dangled like radioactive carrots will never materialize, other than a few short-term construction gigs, and that is fine, as long as the few that really profit off this criminal enterprise will be long gone, sitting on a beach, laughing at the folks in Payette County. (Well, that or behind bars!)

After the death of Margaret Lawrence, owner of the Hollywood Market, BW readers shared their memories of the Boise icon. Here are a few comments.

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | BOISEweekly

The fierce storm last night was obviously a send off for the fierce spirit of Miss Margaret. We’ll miss you terribly! —samiam, boiseweekly.com Margaret, I want to be like you when I grow up. Such a feisty and honorable and loving woman. —Alita Ashmore, facebook.com/boiseweekly

MEA CULPA An incorrect photo credit was given for the thirdplace winner in the Places category of Boise Weekly’s Black and White Photo Contest (BW, Features, June 22, 2011). The image as taken by Kyle Farmer. We regret the error. Also, in the Sun Valley Guide, the correct headliners at the 34th Northern Rockies Folk Festival include James McMurtry and The Gourds. For a full lineup of bands visit northernrockiesfolk festival.com. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BILL COPE/OPINION

MERIDIAN SECONDARY A great place to raise menial labor

Notice: To all respectable universities, colleges and military academies, as well as any prospective employers from either the private or public sector: be forewarned! It would be in the overall best interest of your institutions for you to avoid any association with future graduates of the Meridian school system. Those produced by that system prior to the school year 2011-2012 are probably acceptable—or, let us say, as acceptable as the alumni of any other Idaho school—but as to individuals exiting in or beyond the spring of 2012, it would be prudent to pass them by in matters of enrollment, recruitment or employment. This is not to say that remarkable students could never emerge from the inferior position that Meridian schools has been forced to assume in relationship to other Idaho school systems. Yet depth of background and preparation count for much, do they not? So when considering prospects for acceptance into your circles of influence, why take a chance on a Meridian kid? U Gad, it hurts to have to say that. But it’s the responsible thing to do, don’t you agree, to let shoppers know when there’s a bum product on the shelf? And what else will Meridian students be from here on out if not defective goods? No doubt that sounds harsh, especially to the loving parents of all those little boys and girls, tweens and teens, who will be squeezing into Meridian schools in a couple of months. I can imagine their outrage: “You can’t call my kid a defective good and get away with it, buster! And what’re you doing warning people not to hire my baby or let her go to their colleges? My kid’s not inferior to anyone else’s, by damn!” Certainly not! No argument! I’m sure your kid is a fine specimen. But I’m not saying he/she is inferior, am I? What I’m saying, if you listen carefully, is that if he/she is unfortunate to be attending Meridian schools from here on out, then his/her education will be inferior to other kids’ educations. No way around it. It’s just a fact. And please believe me when I say how badly I feel for having to publish such an obvious truth. After all, I, myself, am a product of the Meridian school system. My siblings are all Meridian grads, as was my mom. My daughter came out of these schools just three years ago, back when we Meridian folks had nothing to be ashamed of. But see, we all got out before the district had to accommodate the demands of less than 10,000 of the cheapest, most shortsighted, most selfish and ignorant jackasses in Ada County. That’s correct, Mom and Dad. It is not I who decided your children would have to make do with a second-rate education, nor is it the fault of the school district. I voted WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

for the levy, and the district was simply trying to maintain itself at its current levels. It was the 9,369 yahoos who voted against the levy that you should hold responsible. They decided that the $83 per year (for each $100,000 of home value) was more important to them than a properly educated United States. So don’t blame me for pointing out your offspring will be less prepared for the world beyond senior prom than ... say ... Boise grads. Don’t blame me because your kids will be setting off on the marathon of life by tripping over the shoe laces that 9,369 of your neighbors refused to help them tie. U Oh, you think I overstate? OK, then, let us add up the damage and see. Forget that one of the manipulations originally planned to cut the necessary millions from the budget was to convert kindergartens into full-day slogs. This proposal brought out the most intense protest and it appears it will be abandoned. At least, until next year’s budget cuts. Forget also the 62 vacuums left behind by the 62 teachers who will lose their jobs this summer. What is that ... about three elementary schools worth of personnel? (Of course, this figure does not count the untold number of educators who will never consider applying for work in the Meridian district, as the local voters have shown so decisively just how little regard they have for education.) And forget the added fees parents will have to pay if their kids want to participate in sports, bands, choir, drama—in other words, anything and everything that might make school palatable to thousands of students. And now that kids from financially stressed families will be shut out from participating in those activities where all the fun is had and all the friends are made, forget that the dropout rate is likely to rocket high into the failure-o-sphere. But again, forget all that, and let us concentrate on the 14 days that have been dropped from the school calendar. That’s right, Meridian students will now have 176 days of school while others … say, in Boise … will have 190. And that’s only one year’s worth of missed opportunities. Add up K through 12, and we find there will be 182 days of learning denied every Meridian student in their history of schooling. A full year of education some kids will get (say … in Boise) that Meridian kids won’t. Think of that, proud Mom and Dad, as you watch your beaming graduate receive his/her diploma. He/she is already a year behind. But take comfort, for there is a bright side. Consider, for example, how our friends in Boise will always have a steady supply of grunts to file their fingernails, mow their lawns, deliver their pizzas and pump out their septic tanks.

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OPINION/TED RALL

SEXUAL FREEDOM

No one should be judged for how they have sex NEW YORK—If slavery was America’s original sin, Puritanism was its original curse. In recent years, the United States has made significant strides toward greater equality and freedom. Racism, sexism and other forms of bigotry have been significantly curtailed by new laws and cultural education. But we still have work to do. Four centuries after people so uptight they couldn’t get along with the British invaded the New World, however, the United States remains one of the most sexually repressed Western countries. “If expression of sexuality is thwarted,” Christopher Ryan wrote in Psychology Today last year, “the human psyche tends to grow twisted into grotesque, enraged perversions of desire. Unfortunately, the distorted rage resulting from sexual repression rarely takes the form of rebellion against the people and institutions behind the repression.” In other words, mean parents, churches and right-wing politicians. “Instead,” Ryan observed, “the rage is generally directed at helpless victims who are sacrificed to the sick gods of guilt, shame and ignorant pride.” Gays, for example. Fourteen states still had sodomy laws on the books by the time the Supreme Court invalidated them in 2003. And the occasional politician. Former New York Congressman Anthony Weiner is the most recent in a long line of elected representatives to step down because of a “sex scandal.” I use scare quotes here for a simple reason: Sexual expression should never result in a scandal. Most of the Democrats I talked to had the same weird take on Weiner. They weren’t offended. Not personally. They

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themselves didn’t think he had done anything immoral, or illegal, or that he had betrayed his constituents. They didn’t care. What Weiner did wasn’t bad, at least not bad enough to warrant resignation or impeachment. To most Democrats, including the House leadership, Weiner’s mistake was tactical—his failure to anticipate the outrage that reflected lousy judgment—a personality flaw that required him to fall on his (much photographed) sword. It is well past time we Americans grew up. No one should be pressured to resign because of sex. Even when they’re a hypocrite. Perhaps like you, I snorted when Sen. Larry Craig was arrested (and plead guilty to) cruising a men’s room with his “wide stance.” Here was a right-wing Republican who opposed gay marriage, allowing gays to get domesticpartner benefits, or even banning employment discrimination against gays, cruising for hunky tail at the Minneapolis airport. “Let me be clear: I am not gay. I never have been gay,” he said at a press conference. Looking back on Craig now, however, I think we missed a teachable moment. Rather than ridicule the man, we ought to have defended him as a victim of an unjust law. In the 21st century, why should anyone go to jail for soliciting consensual sex? We should have exploited Craig’s predicament as an opportunity to create a dialogue, to ask that, given his status as a gay or bisexual American, he reconsider his politics. One day, I hope, we will live in a nation where another person’s sexual expression is no one’s business. Even if we take pictures and post them online.

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CITYDESK/NEWS A NEW FIELD OF DREAMS?

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NEWS

IDAHO’S FIREWORKS PARADOX You can buy illegal fireworks in Idaho but don’t use them here GEORGE PRENTICE AND SHELBY SOULE Just off Exit 74 of Interstate 84, on a desolate stretch of Elmore County 20 miles south of Boise, it’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas. A giant inflatable snowman sways in the 95-degree desert heat outside a huge warehouse. Open the nondescript doors and you’re greeted by a blast of air conditioning, music and colors usually reserved for candy counters. Inside the superstore, you won’t find electronics or bulk toilet paper, but you will pass row after row of illegal fireworks. “Have you been here before? I know it’s rather overwhelming,” said Fat City Fireworks manager Crystal Lowther as she greeted saucer-eyed customers. “Let me show you around.“ Lowther usually has to give overwhelmed customers a tour through the largest store of its kind in Southern Idaho. She escorts visitors past counters of technicolor packages with luminous names like Crystal Geyser and Burst O’ Color, negotiating their way through red, white and blue plastic curtain strips into an even larger hangarlike facility. “The main thing you need to know here is the color of the ground,” said Lowther, pointing to a half-red, half-blue warehouse floor. “The blue side of the store has all of the so-called ‘safe and sane’ fireworks.” Lowther was referring to the classification of fireworks that are legal in Idaho. Safe and sane fireworks aren’t allowed to emit sparks or showers more than 20 feet vertically. That means no bottle rockets and no aerial displays. Firecrackers are also illegal. But the other half of the warehouse has a red floor, containing illegal fireworks—you can sell them in Idaho but you can’t use them in Idaho. In fact, customers are required to sign an affidavit promising to transport the explosives out of state, and there were plenty of people buying illegal fireworks on the two occasions BW visited. Illegal fireworks are sold regularly at stands in Star and outside of Nampa. There, customers are also required to sign affidavits promising to transport the explosives out of state. “It’s ironic, isn’t it? They sell them but then tell you can’t use them here,” said Dr. Kenneth Bramwell, an emergency medicine specialist at St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center. “Who is kidding who? I’m pretty sure those illegal fireworks are being lit up where people live. And

calls to Boise Police. “The Fourth of July is really a double-edge sword. You see, I love fireworks,” said Doan. “It’s an American rite of passage, but we have to be safe. The stands selling fireworks all around Boise have been inspected, and we count on them to sell the safe and sane items.” One of the dozens of stands returning this year is Fortress Fireworks at 36th and State streets in Boise. Kelvin Peters told BW that his family usually takes vacation time off from their usual jobs to run the makeshift shop, selling more than 360 types of fireworks, none of them illegal. “But everybody asks us for those,” said Peters. But Rick Lowther, the founder and owner of Fat City Fireworks, is quick to defend illegal fireworks and he isn’t the biggest fan of safe and sane explosives. “Safe and sane is not so safe or sane. In fact, they have it backwards,” he said. “The stuff that goes up in the air, boom, it’s gone. But this stuff,“ Lowther said, pointing to the rows of safe and sane products, “this stuff stays dangerously close to the ground, and the grass or a bush could catch on fire in a heartbeat. But politicians don’t understand that, and they keep wanting to restrict the illegal fireworks.” Lowther said some Idaho legislators had unsuccessfully tried to eliminate illegal fireworks from being shift on the Fourth of July. sold inside the Gem State. “I’ve treated a number of ruptured ear “But that’s crazy,” said Lowther. “Our sales drums over the years,” said Bramwell. “And are solid and we collect a lot of sales tax here. countless burns to the hands and arms, all And that’s good for Idaho. The state is broke from illegal fireworks.” and, let’s face it, we need less governDennis Doan has seen worse. Bement and more business.” fore taking over as chief of the Boise In fact, business has been very good Fire Department, he worked 15 years for Lowther and his competitors. Retailon the front lines out of station No. 5 ers BW spoke to at fireworks stands on Sixth Street. across the Treasure Valley said their “I’ve seen people lose sales have maintained a steady pace, fingers or even their hands to even through the worst of the recesillegal fireworks,” said Doan. VIDEO: Take a look at some “illegal” sion. While many customers pay an “Unfortunately, there’s somefireworks and hear average of $40-$50 for fireworks, thing every year.” from the man who will some individual items are priced as Doan said the weekend surengineer Boise’s big high as $150. rounding the Fourth of July is Fourth of July display. “I think when people get usually the busiest for his men depressed by the economy, they’re and women. In 2010, 372 incistill willing to pay good money for firedents of illegal pyrotechnics were reported to works,” said Lowther. Ada County law enforcement, including 189 that means they’re shooting them off in Boise.” This year, like the previous eight, Bramwell will be working the emergency room’s night

JU LIA GR EEN

At a cost of approximately $430 per page, a new market-viability analysis neither recommends nor discourages the possibility of building a new multi-purpose stadium in Boise. But the 57-page study should give Mayor Dave Bieter and Boise City Council members plenty to ponder before stepping into the batter’s box. For example: UÊ/…iÊ`iÛiœ«“i˜ÌʜvÊ>ʘiÜÊÃÌ>`ˆÕ“Ê could allow Boise to attract a higher class of baseball than the Boise Hawks’ current Class A status. Class AA franchises are located exclusively in the Eastern and Southern United States, so it’s highly unlikely that Boise could be included. However, Class AAA franchises are located throughout the nation and could represent a potential opportunity for Boise. UÊ7…ˆiÊVœ˜ÃÌÀÕV̈œ˜ÊœvÊ>ʘiÜÊÃÌ>`ˆÕ“Ê could boost attendance to Hawks games by as much as 43 percent (an average of 4,000 fans per game), a facility could readily host varsity football, baseball, softball and soccer. Concerts and even a wintertime outdoor ice rink for public skating are other potential uses. Convention Sports and Leisure International, a Minnesota-based company, was commissioned to craft the study, including analyses of minor league baseball facilities and franchises across the country. The overriding issue remains the price tag. The average construction cost of Class A Short-Season ballparks built since 2000 is $26.7 million. Most facilities were built by combinations of public and private funding. A stadium in State College, Pa. was built with significant funds from Penn State. Boise would be hard-pressed to find similar generosity from Boise State, given that the school doesn’t field a baseball team. The analysis indicates a multi-use stadium could host a variety of high school athletic events, beginning with home games for the Boise School District’s sports programs. The district’s four high school football teams each play all home games at Bronco Stadium, but scheduling conflicts have occurred in recent years, causing Boise State and the district to consider alternative sites. Some games draw as many as 10,000-12,000 spectators. While the Idaho High School Activities Association doesn’t hold an official state high school baseball competition, an invitational tournament serves as a de-facto championship. Softball championships are typically held in the Idaho Falls-Pocatello region. Soccer championships are currently held in various locations, including fields in Meridian and Caldwell. A surprise disclosure in the study is that the current Hawks’ ownership “has expressed an interest in purchasing a minor league soccer franchise to serve as a second anchor tenant.” The franchise would likely play in the Premier Development League, comprised of 64 teams throughout North America, including an eight-team Northwest Division. If the Hawks were to play in a new stadium, a professional soccer team could follow. Once Bieter and the Council consider the analysis, the city could then commission a separate study to determine the best location for a new stadium. —George Prentice

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2011 Transportation Champions Congratulations to the 73 businesses and over 5,000 employee participants who led the way in May by promoting alternative transportation. Our community thanks you for keeping our air cleaner and our roads less congested. You deserve more than a pat on the back, you deserve recognition as an Alternative Transportation Champion.

Platinum Champions Ada County Highway District AmeriBen/IEC Group BOB Trailers Boise State Transportation & Parking Capital City Development Corporation CH2M Hill City of Boise City of Meridian Community Planning Association CTA, Inc. CTAI Department of Environmental Quality Drake Cooper Eide Bailly LLP Environmental Protection Agency Federal Highway Administration Idaho Division Gravitas, Inc. HDR Engineering Healthwise, Inc. Holland & Hart LLP Idaho Conservation League Idaho Department of Administration Idaho Department of Commerce

Idaho Department of Finance Idaho Department of Lands Idaho Department of Water Resources Idaho Power Company Kittelson & Associates, Inc. Local Highway Technical Assistance Council Micron Technology, Inc. PERSI REI Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center State of Idaho/Bureau of Occupational Licenses State of Idaho Professional Technical Education Trout Unlimited US Forest Service RMRS

Gold Champions Boise VA Regional Office Bureau of Reclamation Central District Health Department Department of Health and Welfare Idaho Department Juvenile Corrections

commuteride.com

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Idaho Industrial Commission Idaho Smart Growth Idaho Transportation Department State Appellate Public Defender U.S. Bank US Ecology, Inc. ZGA Architects & Planners, Chartered

Silver Champions Ada County Boise Cascade/Boise Inc. Boise VAMC Brown Mackie College-Boise Doubletree Club Elks Rehab Hospital Hummel Architects, PLLC Idaho Commission for Libraries Idaho Commission on the Arts Idaho Real Estate Commission Moffatt Thomas MWI Veterinary Supply Oppenheimer Companies, Inc POWER Engineers University of Idaho Boise USDA, NASS, Idaho Field Office

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | 11

NEWS

The American Bankers Association argues that a 12-cent cap on debit transactions is too low.

BANKS WARN FED Lobby says fight continues on debit card fees, warns of dire consequences MARIAN WANG, PROPUBLICA The banking industry stands to lose billions in debit card transaction fees after losing one of its biggest lobbying battles this year—but for the banks, that was just round one. The industry had lobbied lawmakers for months to kill or delay regulations limiting the fees that banks get from retailers whenever a debit card is used. Earlier in June, a bill to delay the rules failed to pass in the Senate, disappointing the banks and delighting retailers who will save some revenue to pocket, pass on to consumers in lower prices, or spend on their businesses some other way. But the banking industry hasn’t given up. “The fight continues,” Frank Keating, the president of the American Bankers Association, wrote in a letter to members earlier this month. “With every battle the banking industry is becoming a stronger political force.” Keating vowed to continue putting pressure on the Federal Reserve, which wrote the rules, and on June 20, he fired off a letter to the Fed urging revisions to the rules “to mitigate the harms” to banks. In arguing that a 12-cent cap on debit transaction fees was too low, the trade group urged the Fed to reconsider how much it costs the banks to process individual debit transactions, arguing that a broader range of costs—such as overhead costs, fraud losses and the cost of customer service reps to resolve disputes—should be factored into the calculations. The Fed, as noted earlier, excluded certain infrastructure costs when it determined what would be a reasonable fee cap, arguing

12 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | BOISEweekly

that they would be incurred even if a particular transaction didn’t occur. The group also requested that they be given a three-month window to comply with the rules, which are scheduled to go into effect Thursday, July 21. The Dodd-Frank financial reform bill originally had this window built in—the rules were scheduled to be finalized last April and go into effect in July—but regulators put off the first deadline after industry lobbying. Failure to ease the rules and minimize the harm to banks “will have dire consequences,” Keating wrote, saying that banks will lend less and start charging for certain services, thus driving out low-income consumers. (It’s worth noting that bank lending is already down, and low-income consumers often end up paying for “free” checking, which often requires direct deposits or minimum amounts.) Community banks and credit unions are technically exempt from the rules that cap debit transaction fees for the biggest banks, but they’ve opposed the rules anyway, afraid that differences in fees will cause merchants to start discriminating against their debit cards. Keating stressed this point as well in his letter, noting the “great harm to banks throughout the country, and particularly to community banks.” According to the Wall Street Journal, industry lawyers and executives are waiting for the final rule, and if the rules aren’t changed, they are likely to sue. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

CITIZEN

BRUCE LAWSON The man behind Boise’s Fourth fireworks GEORGE PRENTICE

Is this a family legacy or is the fireworks business new for you? Relatively new. My wife and I moved to Jamieson, Ore., to run a family farm, and we used to do some blasting here for mainline irrigation systems. Then about 12 years ago, for the Fourth of July, I decided to have some display fireworks, which are federally regulated. So that really began the business for us. We got our wholesale license in 2004. Does that mean you can sell fireworks, too? You bet. I import from China and Italy. We only sell 1.3 Gs to individuals who have federal licenses. What does 1.3 G mean? It’s a special classification for large display fireworks used in big shows. For instance, 1.3 Gs are the type of shells that we’ll use in Boise. In looking at your contract for Boise I see that you’re using more than 1,200 shells on the Fourth. Is that typical? For Boise, yes. I’m just putting the finishing touches on Boise’s show. It will run 20 to 23 minutes.

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Are you always looking to make your displays bigger and louder? It’s a roller coaster ride. We’ll amp you up, then slow you down, and amp you up again. Simply making it bigger or louder isn’t what satisfies everybody. It isn’t what you or I like. It’s what everybody in the park wants to be a part of. How much of this is automated? The Boise show will be a computer show. It’s what we call a pyro-musical. Do you determine the music? I wish. We work with the customer and they tell us the music they like. How much insurance do you have to carry for a typical show. $1 million. In some venues, we’re required to carry $6 million. Are there companies in the Northwest that do exactly what you do? Yes. It was pretty tough until about five years ago. But now our show designs have taken us to a different level. Where do you shoot your shows? On the Fourth of July we’ll shoot anywhere from 45 to 50 shows all over the Pacific Northwest, plus Montana, Wyoming and Arizona. I’m guessing that your technicians have a unique skill. In most states, you need at least three to six shoots as an apprentice before you can get what we call a “lead pyro card.” Then you have to work a minimum of 10 more shows to work with the top pyros. Idaho currently doesn’t have any pyro training. They need one, and we’d be happy to help.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

The highlight of Bruce Lawson’s year is the Fourth of July, personally and professionally. He loved fireworks when he was a kid growing up in Boise, and now he’s the man who runs the biggest show in town on Independence Day. Actually, his Oregon-based company, Homeland Fireworks, runs dozens of shows every July 4, and all year long at venues throughout the West. We caught up with Lawson as he was putting the finishing touches on this year’s spectacular, which will light up the skies over Ann Morrison Park in his hometown.

Other than the Fourth of July, what are your other big events during the year? County fairs. Plus we shoot at a lot of big air shows and weddings. How much might a wedding display cost? Our minimum is $2,500. That will buy you anywhere from eight to 10 minutes, but most weddings average 10 to 15 minutes for a private display. What is your price range? From $2,500 on the low end, all the way up to $180,000. [*Note: Homeland’s winning bid for this year’s show in Boise was $23,500.] How dangerous is your business? Very, very dangerous. Last year, three Mountain Home firemen got hurt when they were setting up a display. Also last year, Melrose Pyrotechnics in South Carolina lost four of their top-notch pyros in a warehouse explosion. Is that what happens when people try to cut the edges? Yup. Cut corners, save some money. We just don’t do that. We have extensive training for our employees, four to five times a year. Do you still have all your fingers and toes? Oh, yeah. And my hearing is still really good, too.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | 13

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Janina Wasilewski and her son Brian fight to be reunited with husband and father, Tony.

THURSDAY JUNE 30 documentary TONY AND JANINA’S AMERICAN WEDDING SCREENING

Widespread Panic’s jammy grooves inspire even wider-spread calm.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 29 music WIDESPREAD PANIC Hailing from Athens, Ga., Widespread Panic sounds like the Southern love child of the Allman Brothers and Grateful Dead. Known for kick-ass live performances, these beasts of the blacktop have been described as having roots in Southern rock, blues-rock, progressive rock, funk and hard rock. And with a discography as deep as the Boise Hole, Widespread Panic is one of those bands that seems to fit in no matter where you hear it. Whether it’s downtown on a Saturday night or in a Middleton cafe, Widespread Panic could be playing and you probably wouldn’t even bat an eyelash. Touring on its latest album, Dirty Side Down, Widespread Panic will rock the roses at Idaho Botanical Garden on Wednesday, June 29. Dirty Side Down has a more complex instrumental feel and adds some great jam-tastic tunes to the band’s repertoire. Jam bands were never meant to be heard through earbuds. They yearn to be heard in their natural environment—loud with a beer in hand under the Idaho sun. 6:30 p.m., $35. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Old Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

SATURDAY JULY 2 reading THE LAST GOOD HORSE READING Fans of author David Martin Anderson can get up close and personal with the

author on Saturday, July 2, at Barnes and Noble when he will sign copies of The Last Good Horse. The novel tells the story of Billy, a young man working in a Montana slaughterhouse in 1939—except this is a slaughterhouse for wild horses. In 1914 there were 4 million wild horses. Today, there are 100,000.

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Aside from the history lesson, Anderson also crafts a good tale. At a little more than 200 pages, most of his Amazon reviewers wished the experience had lasted longer. Somebody even asked for a sequel. According to the book’s website, as research for the story, Anderson “journeyed to Montana’s Pryor Mountain

Tony and Janina’s American Wedding offers a fresh perspective on the U.S. Immigration system that is creating widespread controversy and suffering within our borders. The project blossomed from what was intended to be a three-minute profile of a Dreams Across America tour. Written, produced and directed by Ruth Leitman, this feature-length documentary chronicles the plight of a Polish-American family torn apart by immigration laws. After 18 years spent cultivating a modest life in the suburbs of Chicago, Tony and Janina Wasilewski are informed that Janina is being deported back to Poland, and she will take their 6-year-old son with her. The depths of this domestic tragedy are revealed through Tony’s struggle to cope with the loss of his family and his fight to reunite them. Set against a political backdrop of Chicago’s movement for immigration reform, this film illuminates the post-9/11 human rights struggle that all undocumented immigrants in America face. Dixon hopes this film will add to the national dialogue on the need for immigration reform. The documentary made its debut at the Chicago International Film Festival last year and has had more than 100 screenings across the nation. It will make its Boise premiere as part of the 8th Street Artist in Residence Last Thursday Amor in Exile screening series. Former BW News Editor Nathaniel Hoffman will host this film on Thursday, June 30, at the Cole/Marr Coffee and Photography Workshop in downtown Boise. Donations will be collected at the door to benefit the filmmakers. 7-9 p.m., $7-$10 recommended donation. The Cole/Marr Coffee and Photography Workshop, 404 S. Eighth St., Lower Level, 208-336-7630, amorandexile.com.

to study the last of the Spanish jennets still roaming free but soon to become extinct.” 11 a.m., FREE. Barnes and Noble Booksellers, 1315 N. Milwaukee, 208375-4454, thelastgoodhorse.com.

MONDAY JULY 4 fireworks FOURTH OF JULY EVENTS Though many will have the day off, the Fourth of July is no time to be lazy. Activities and festivals happen all over the Treasure Valley—

morning, noon and night. The Gem State Kiwanis 48th Annual Pancake Breakfast will be held at Julia Davis Park near the Gene Harris Band Shell from 7-11 a.m. A heap of flapjacks costs $5 for adults, $4 for kids and is FREE for active-duty military and their families. Clowns will join the crowds and there will be face painting for last-minute flourishes. The annual Liberty Day Parade will circle through downtown Boise starting at 11 a.m., running along 11th, Jefferson, Fifth and Idaho streets. You can tote along your super-soakers and water balloons but parade patrons are reminded:

“Don’t spray unless sprayed upon.” For more info, visit libertydayparade.com. The First United Methodist Church Cathedral of the Rockies, will host the Organ Fireworks! Concert at 7:30 p.m., featuring organist Richard Elliott from Salt Lake City. Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for seniors and $10 for kids and available at idahotickets.com or at the door. For more info, visit cathedraloftherockies.org. Ann Morrison Park will have its annual fireworks display beginning about 10:15 p.m. The Mystics, Boise Community Band and Pilot Error will perform before the show.

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FIND

NESTREST

Chances are grim that you’ll finish Bars and Stripes sober.

SATURDAY JULY 2

A picture is worth 1,000 swords.

alley cat BARS AND STRIPES Ever tried to blow a bubble with a glob of Bubblicious after biking miles in the roaring heat? Or tried to hopscotch in beat with the Boss as he belts out “Born in the USA” after bounding up a flight of stairs? If you’re one of the brave beer-swilling soldiers who enrolled in BW bootcamp last July—aka the Bars and Stripes Alley Cat race—you were forced to master these dexterous feats and more. On Saturday, July 2, BW staff and Northstar Cycle Couriers will put our drill-sergeant scowls back on and prepare to whip your pansy asses into shape. Bars and Stripes enlistees are required to pedal their rides to BWHQ at 14:00 sharp for registration (2 p.m. for you silly civies). Bike soldiers should be prepared to click their heels, drop and give us 20, and yell “ma’am, yes, ma’am” at every order we bark. You’ll be allowed to tear into your manifest promptly at 3:15 p.m., which will send you to bars scattered across town. But don’t worry, we’re not complete tyrants—we’ll also be hosting a big, beer-filled bash at the race’s final stop to reward your bicycling diligence. 2 p.m. registration, 3:15 p.m. race, $13. Boise Weekly Headquarters, 523 Broad St., 208-344-2055, boiseweekly. com. Must be 21 or older to participate.

The Boise Hawks will play the all-American game against the Yakima Bears at Memorial Stadium, starting at 7:35 p.m. A fireworks show will follow. For a good, old-fashioned time, head up to Idaho City, which kicks off its Fourth of July festivities with a parade at noon and activities in

S U B M I T

John Brogan Park, including a hot dog roast, a reading of the Declaration of Independence, games, races and contests. Fireworks will be shot off at dusk. Meridian Parks and Recreation will hold its Independence Day Festival at Storey Park near Meridian Speedway. An endless list of

WEDNESDAY JULY 6 film THE MARK OF ZORRO SILENT FILM Do you love vigilante, swashbuckling justice but don’t quite have the living-room space to practice your sword skills? Never fear, the Egyptian Theatre will be screening the 1920s classic The Mark of Zorro on Wednesday, July 6, at 8 p.m. The film, which features Douglas Fairbanks as the masked crusader Zorro, follows the hero on his quest to scar the colonial government with his infamous Z and rescue the lovely Lolita, played by Marguerite De La Motte. Zorro meets opposition from Sgt. Pedro Gonzalez, played by Noah Beery, and his gang of oppressive military cronies in this silent feature. Accompanying the silence is theater organist Thomas Trenney, a silent film aficionado and graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Music and the Eastman School of Music. Trenney is the minister of music at the First Plymouth Church in Lincoln, Neb., and was the first organist to receive First Prize and Audience Prize at the American Guild Organists’ National Competition in Organ Improvisation in 2006. 8 p.m., $25 door, $20 adv., $15 seniors, $10 kids. The Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

activities for kids and adults begins at 3 p.m. Races start at 6:30 p.m. and fireworks start at 10:15 p.m. For more info, visit meridiancity.org/ independenceday.

According to a recent study published in Current Biology, a rhythmic rocking motion—similar to that created by a hammock—synchronizes brain waves during a short nap. And while a synchronized hammock snooze sounds pretty damn luxurious on a scorching summer afternoon, a Nestrest nap puts a pedestrian hammock nap to shame. Designed by Frenchies Daniel Pouzet and Fred Frety, the Nestrest is described as “an oversized bird’s nest offering you a secluded, suspended sanctuary and unusual meeting place: It’s the perfect place for relaxation, meditation and openair conversations.” dedon.de A photo on the Nestrest website shows the Hershey’s Kiss-shaped nest suspended from a shady tree, hovering over a serene lake while a bearded boy in black-rimmed glasses thumbs through a novel. If heaven were created by an Ikea designer, this is what it would look like. Made from super-strong Dedon fiber, Nestrests come in either chalk or natural shades, and the inside fabric can be customized to your nesting preferences. We trolled the web for prices and came up empty-handed. So, in designy terms, we’re guessing that means they cost anywhere from a vintage Vespa to a Frank Lloyd Wright mansion. —Tara Morgan

The City of Caldwell’s We the People Celebration begins with a parade through the city at 10 a.m., followed by fireworks at dusk at Simplot Stadium. For more info, visit cityofcaldwell.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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Hours:

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WEDNESDAY JUNE 29 Festivals & Events ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Unwind mid-week with friends, live music and a cold beverage during this family friendly concert series. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove, Boise, downtownboise.org.

On Stage THE COMPLETE WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)— Three actors armed with an outrageous assembly of outerwear and props cram all of Shakespeare’s plays and two sonnets into this two-hour show. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Literature AUTHOR READING: ALAN HEATHCOCK—Listen to the local award-winning author of Volt read. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Citizen BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT VOLUNTEER NIGHT—Volunteers may donate their time to help build and repair bicycles for those in need. 6-8 p.m. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—5-8 p.m. FREE. Located on the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library.

Odds & Ends KARAOKE AND WINE ROCKSTARS—Unleash your inner rock star. Don’t worry, the wine will help. 8-11 p.m. $10 wine tastings. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208-286-7960, helinamaries.com.

THURSDAY JUNE 30 On Stage THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA—Valentine and Proteus’ friendship is put to the test in this comedy by the Bard. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

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THE WIZARD OF OZ—The beloved classic in an outdoor setting. 8 p.m. $10-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road., Crouch, 208-4625523, starlightmountaintheatre. com.

FOOD AND FILM—A three-course meal followed by a movie and discussion. Visit tvfcmoviefeb2011. eventbee.com for info and tickets. 7 p.m. $25, Red Feather Lounge, 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208429-6340, tvfcfoodfundraiser. eventbrite.com.

Food & Drink

WINEMAKER DINNER—Enjoy a six-course meal, including scallops, lobster, braised beef short ribs and more—all paired with wine. Call for reservations. 6 p.m. $75. Bella Aquila, 775 S. Rivershore Lane, Eagle, 208-9381900, bellaaquilarestaurant.com.

BOISE GREEN DRINKS—A social gathering for anyone interested in environmental issues. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Bittercreek Ale House, 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3451813, bittercreekalehouse.com.

NOISE/CD REVIEW EILEN JEWELL: QUEEN OF THE MINOR KEY Boston-based singer/songwriter Eilen Jewell could be the poster child for the saying, “Big things come in small packages.” There’s a Blythe-doll quality to the slight, soft-spoken Idaho native: a sweetness with an edge. Jewell and her music shouldn’t be mistaken for mild. Pop in her new CD, Queen of the Minor Key (Signature Sounds), and you may need to take a step back. “Radio City,” a twangy guitar and horn instrumental evokes images of a ’60s basement full of slightly stoned kids doing the Twist while the record player is stuck on repeat. And the album never lets up. Even on quieter tracks “I Remember You” and “Only One,” listening to Jewell’s bluesy, airy lilt is like running into a pile of bricks wrapped in goose-feather pillows: it’s soft and has some give, but there’s something seriously strong at the base of it. Queen of the Minor Key shifts effortlessly between rock, rockabilly, Americana and country, a skill Jewell has always had in her wheelhouse and has always used to the greatest benefit. Brushes dance across drums, shakers rattle through harmonies and slide guitar oils up long, slow melodies while lyrically, metaphorical melancholy refrains dare a listener not to reflect on love long gone. In “Only One,” a gospel/blues-inflected tune, Jewell sings, “Wish I was holding you / my arms enfolding you / making you high as the summer sun / you’re my only one / Baby, why am I missing you / when I ought to be kissing you / tell me our love has just begun / You’re my only one.” “Bang Bang Bang” is a track that would tempt out some two-stepping, but is also about watching your heart—in this case, being careful around Cupid and the pitfalls of love: “That little cupid, he’s a real sharp shooter / I don’t believe he’s got an arrow and bow. / People all think he just couldn’t be cuter / but I saw him down at the gun show.” Though only in her 30s, Jewell has the chops—musically and lyrically—of someone twice her age. Queen of the Minor Key though Jewell may be, if country/American music is your thing, this album is a major accomplishment. —Amy Atkins WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT Workshops & Classes

Odds & Ends

PRACTICE AQUI—Attendees should have an understanding of English and Spanish. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2941, gardencity.lili.org.

AMPED AND DANGEROUS KARAOKE—9:30 p.m. FREE. The Red Room Tavern, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-0956.

Literature BOOK SIGNING: DAVID SCHMAHMANN—Meet the author and have him sign your copy of his latest book, The Double Life of Alfred Buber. 7-8 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208376-4229, rdbooks.org.

Sports & Fitness TRICYCLE RACES—10 p.m. FREE. The Lobby, 760 W. Main St., 208-991-2183, thelobbyboise.com.

Farmers Markets CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—4:30-8:30 p.m. Downtown Boise, Eighth Street from Bannock Street to Main Street, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. MERIDIAN URBAN MARKET—5-9 p.m. FREE, Idaho Avenue between Main and Second, 208-331-3400, facebook.com/ meridianurbanmarket.

SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP—Practice rolling/slurring your Rs during this Spanish conversation group hosted by CR Languages. 6 p.m. FREE. Sapphire Bar & Grill, 622 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-7277.

FRIDAY JULY 1 Festivals & Events FREEDOM FESTIVAL—Spend an old-fashioned weekend enjoying live music, dancing, kids activities, a barbecue cook-off and more. 6-10 p.m. FREE. Storey Park, Meridian, theretrotour.com.

On Stage CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION—Four New Englanders enroll in a drama course and find themselves embroiled in some drama of their own creation. Winner of the 2010 Obie Award for Best New American Play. 8 p.m. $10-$30. Company of Fools, 409 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-7886520, companyoffools.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL—The cast and crew perform Disney’s much-loved musical. 8 p.m. $10$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com. IMPROVOLUTION—The improv comedy troupe performs its fast-paced, interactive show, incorporating everything from stand-up to skits. 7:30 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Art ARTIST RECEPTION: LAURA JOHNSON—Meet the artist and enjoy live music from Jake Van Paepeghem. You will have the opportunity to make your own glass pendant or sun catcher. 4:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-9381055, fusions-idaho.com. EXHIBIT OPENING: ANNIVERSARY SHOW—Opening for the gallery’s new exhibit honoring its 10th anniversary. Featuring works by Joan Barrantes, Melissa Herrington, Agusti Puig and more. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Gallery DeNovo, 320 First Ave. N., Ste. 101, Ketchum, 208-726-8180, gallerydenovo.com. FIRST FRIDAY ART IN EAGLE— Visit local merchants, galleries and shops to enjoy a drink, art and music. 4:30-8:30 p.m. Downtown Eagle, Old State Street and Eagle Road, Eagle. GALLERY WALK—Enjoy a viewing of the exhibit Geared: The Culture of Bicycles, a drink and a special screening of The Triplets of Bellville movie. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 5th St. E., Ketchum, 208726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. JULY GALLERY WALK—Opening of the new exhibit All Creatures Great and Small, featuring paintings of animals and livestock by Linda St. Clair, Jennifer Lowe and Craig Kosak. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Kneeland Gallery, 271 First Ave. N., Sun Valley, 208-726-5512, kneelandgallery.com.

SATURDAY JULY 2 Festivals & Events | EASY

| MEDIUM |

HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

BARS AND STRIPES— BW’s annual Bars and Stripes Alley Cat Race. Registration at the Boise Weekly headquarters begins at 2 p.m. and then the racers are off to follow their manifest destinies starting at 3:15 p.m. At the last stop on the course, a big after-party celebrates another fun alley cat race. Must be 21 or older to participate. 3:15 p.m. $13. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | 17

8 DAYS OUT FREEDOM FESTIVAL—See Friday. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE, Storey Park, Meridian, theretrotour.com.

On Stage CHUCKLES COMEDY CABARET—Boise’s newest comedy venue will feature someone new each week, from hot young newbies to established stand-up comedians. 8 p.m. $12. China Blue, 100 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-9515. CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION—See Friday. 8 p.m. $10-$30. Company of Fools, 409 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-7886520, companyoffools.org. THE COMPLETE WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)— See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Literature BOOK SIGNING: DAVID MARTIN ANDERSON— Bring your copy of The Last Good Horse to have the author sign it. See Picks, Page 14. 11 a.m. FREE. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 1315 N. Milwaukee, Boise, 208-3754454, barnesandnoble.com. SANE IN PAIN JOURNALING WORKSHOP—Series of three workshops designed to serve as a means of dealing with stress and help manage relaxation. Visit blog.drummlight.com/sanein-pain to register and pay via PayPal or credit card. 1-3 p.m. $90-$230. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org.

MIDDLETON FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Roadside Park at the corner of Highway 44 and South Middleton Road, middletonfarmersmarket. webs.com.

On Stage

NAMPA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Front Street and 14th Avenue South in Lloyd’s Square, nampafarmersmarket.com.

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)— See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Kids & Teens

Farmers Markets

HANDS-ON HISTORY— An interactive, educational afternoon featuring toys of the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s. Noon-3 p.m. $3-$5. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history.idaho. gov.

EAST END MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Bown Crossing, Bown Street, end of Parkcenter Boulevard, Boise.

Animals & Pets GOT NEWF?—Newf is short for Newfoundland. If you have one, then get together with other dogs and owners and play. For more information, email tandb26@ yahoo.com. 5 p.m. FREE. Morris Hill Park, Boise.

SUNDAY JULY 3 Festivals & Events FREEDOM FESTIVAL—See Friday. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Storey Park, corner of Main Street and Franklin Road, Meridian. theretrotour.com.

MONDAY JULY 4 Festivals & Events FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION AND FIREWORKS—Celebrate the holiday in the park with a day loaded with activities for the family. Artists will create chalk drawings during the first part of the day. The public will vote and prizes will be awarded to favorites. Boise Park and Rec’s mobile recreation program will host kids’ games and activities throughout the afternoon, and live music begins at 5:15 p.m. There will be food available for purchase from vendors, and the fireworks show kicks off at 10:15 p.m. See Picks, Page 15. 8 a.m.-10:15 p.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard, Boise.

Green GARDEN TOUR—Take a tour of the garden with a staff member. 10:30 a.m. FREE members, $5 nonmembers. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Farmers Markets CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. KUNA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-noon. FREE. Bernard Fisher Memorial Park, Swan Falls Road and Avalon Street, Kuna. MERIDIAN FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Crossroads shopping center at Eagle and Fairview roads, meridianfarmersmarket.com.

Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

18 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT FOURTH OF JULY LIBERTY DAY PARADE—Get downtown early, claim a prime piece of real estate and celebrate Independence Day. See Picks, Page 14. 11 a.m. FREE. libertydayparade.com.

Odds & Ends

Workshops & Classes

BEER PONG—Play for prizes and bar tabs while drinking $5 pitchers. 9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s Saloon, 5467 Glenwood, Garden City, 208-322-6699.

OLD-FASHIONED FOURTH OF JULY FAMILY FUN DAY—The celebration begins at noon with a parade down Main Street, followed by a hot dog roast, games and more in John Brogan Park. Fireworks are at dusk at the football field. See Picks, Page 15. Noon-3 p.m. FREE. Idaho City, Hwy. 21, 40 miles past Boise, 208-392-4159, idahocitychamber.com.

BOISE OPEN MIC MONDAY— With Larry Buttel. 8 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny Irish Pub and Grill, 855 Broad St., Ste. 250, Boise, 208-343-5568, hapennybridgepub.com.

WALK-IN GLASS STUDIO HOURS—See Friday. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. $15-$35. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-938-1055, fusions-idaho.com.

KNITTING CLUB—Take your projects to work on or go to learn. All ages welcome. 7 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, adalib.org. PIONEER TOASTMASTERS— Work on public speaking skills with the Toastmasters club. Not so sure you want to speak? No problem, show up and sit in. For more information, email personalityonpaper@yahoo.com. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE, 208-559-4434. Perkins Family Restaurant, 300 Broadway Ave., Boise.

Concerts ORGAN FIREWORKS— Richard Elliot performs the world premiere of a new piece by composer Daniel Gawthrop. See Picks, Page 15. 7:30 p.m. $20 adv., $25 door. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-7511.

TRIVIA NIGHT—The previous week’s losing team gets to pick the new theme every week. Hosted by Matt Bragg. 8 p.m. FREE. Pitchers and Pints, 1108 W. Front St., 208-906-1355.

Food & Drink FOURTH OF JULY ICE CREAM SOCIAL—Stop by after the parade for a root beer float. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

TUESDAY JULY 5 On Stage

FOURTH OF JULY PANCAKE BREAKFAST—Join the Gem State Kiwanis for its 48th annual pancake breakfast. Festivities also include face painting and music. See Picks, Page 14. 7-11 a.m. $5 adults, $4 kids. Gene Harris Bandshell, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., in Julia Davis Park, Boise, cityofboise.org/parks.

CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION—See Friday. 8 p.m. $10-$30. Company of Fools, 409 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-7886520, companyoffools.org. THE WIZARD OF OZ—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

EYESPY

Literature BOOK SIGNING: KATY ROBINSON—The author of A Single Square Picture: A Korean Adoptee’s Search for Her Roots will discuss her book and sign copies. Some will be available for purchase at the signing. 7 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-5624995, boisepubliclibrary.org. DROP-IN WRITING WORKSHOP—Informal writers’ workshop is free to writers who wish to hone their skills, work on character development, overcome writers’ block and be inspired. Led by Adrien Kien, a poetry and composition professor from Boise State. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org. SANE IN PAIN JOURNALING WORKSHOP—See Saturday. 7-9 p.m. $90-$230. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3318000, thecabinidaho.org.

Kids & Teens PAJAMA STORYTIME AND CRAFT—Kids of all ages are welcome to get in their PJs, listen to stories and make craft projects. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, adalib.org. TODDLER STORYTIME AND CRAFT—Kids ages 18 months through 3 years old get to listen to stories and make a craft project. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, adalib.org.

Odds & Ends

Real Dialogue from the naked city BEER PONG TOURNEY—Eight tables set up for play, $4 pitchers and a $300 cash prize. 10 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-5142531, drinkfattys.com. BOOZE CLUES—Trivia and prizes with the one and only E.J. Pettinger. 9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344. STAND-UP COMEDY NIGHT— Test out your routine on patrons during open mic night, hosted by Danny Amspacher. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208322-3430. INTERNATIONAL CLUB—People of all ages are invited to dress to the nines and enjoy a refined evening of dancing to the vocal stylings of Adam Gottesman singing classics from the likes of Sinatra and Neil Diamond. There will be ballroom dance lessons and door prizes. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Club Max, Doubletree Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | 19

8 DAYS OUT NAMI SUPPORT GROUP— Share your experiences and coping strategies with others living with mental illness. Call 208-376-4304 for more info. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com.

Kids & Teens

Odds & Ends

TEEN LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITY—Help plan events by becoming a member of the Teen Advisory Board. 4 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-5706900, boisepubliclibrary.com.

KARAOKE AND WINE ROCKSTARS—8-11 p.m. $10 wine tastings. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208-286-7960, helinamaries.com. SCRABBLE GAME NIGHT—6 p.m. FREE. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 1315 N. Milwaukee, Boise, 208-375-4454, barnesandnoble.com.

NETWORKING HAPPY HOUR— Mingle with like-minded people. There is a guest speaker each week to assist and inspire you. 5-7 p.m. FREE. Her Spirit Center for Growth, 5181 Overland Road, Boise, 208-345-3588. PABST BINGO NIGHT—Play bingo for PBR, swag and other random stuff found at second hand stores. 7 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208384-9008, donniemacgrub.com.

REVIEW/SHOW

WEDNESDAY JULY 6 Festivals & Events ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Unwind mid-week with friends, live music and a cold beverage during this family friendly concert series. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove, Boise, downtownboise.org. LIQUID FORUM—Learn about and celebrate the work nonprofit organizations do for the community. 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP, SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Performance poetry workshop followed by a poetry slam. There is a $25 prize for the haiku champ. For more information, email cheryl_maddalena@yahoo.com. 7 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632, boisepoetry.com.

On Stage CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION—See Friday. 8 p.m. $10-$30. Company of Fools, 409 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-7886520, companyoffools.org.

Citizen BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT VOLUNTEER NIGHT—See Wednesday. 6-8 p.m. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—5-8 p.m. FREE. Located on the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library.

Dax Riggs knows rock, ignores roll.

DAX RIGGS AT RED ROOM Indie, surf, electro, garage, punk ... there’s not a lot of subgenre-less rock around lately, and the term rock ’n’ roll doesn’t really mean much anymore. From the moment Dax Riggs stepped on to the stage at Red Room, it was clear the word “roll” didn’t apply. Riggs was pure rock—guitars and howls channeled via a greasy-haired miscreant with balls so big they could have been hanging out of his pant legs. But eyes closed and amp cranked, the Austin-based former frontman for Acid Bath and Deadboy and the Elephantmen barely even moved. He was too lost in his performance. Riggs wasn’t the only one in a trance. The giant sound rippling through the room was enchanting. The audience crowded the stage, caught up in the pulsing waves of overdrive beneath the tremolo moan of Riggs’ voice. If he had pulled out a flute and a cobra-filled basket, it wouldn’t have been a surprise. Though there are more accurate but obscure references, comparatively, the darkness of Riggs’ tone and riffs were reminiscent of Black Sabbath but more stripped down and less tech. Instead of the proto-metal riffs of Tony Iommi and Sabbath’s lengthy and complex arrangements, Riggs evoked the vacuous desolation endemic to Sabbath’s overall feel in three-minute epics. Had Sabbath been a ’90s Seattle grunge band, it may well have sounded like Dax Riggs. Later listening to some of Riggs’ recordings, the addition of keyboards and ballads opened up his sound like a mournful elegy to the sky as the songs morphed seamlessly from soft existential laments into fearsome roars of distortion. Riggs’ artist profile on his label, Fat Possum, doesn’t exaggerate when it says he “sounds like voodoo.” Riggs didn’t talk much while onstage. Nor did his band. But they didn’t need to. It was all in the music. Sub-genres can be great, opening up new possibilities of sonic experience. But sometimes it’s best just to rock. Sometimes it’s best to can the B.S. and let the listener be swept up in the sound like a tornado, a savage howling force of nature that can take you away to a magical place if you let it. —Josh Gross

20 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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C

ue the fanfare and start the parade: Boise Weekly is officially celebrating a full decade of cold beer. It’s hard to believe that it has been 10 whole years since we made our fledgling steps into the world of cheap, cold beer, like a college student at his or her first kegger. But unlike those coeds, whose taste in brews usually becomes more refined with age, we’ve doggedly stuck to those beers that are best served at a temperature that induces instant brain-freeze. And what has that frosty tunnel vision gotten us besides a hefty bar tab? We proudly boast a deep repository of knowledge of all things that come out of beer taps in Ada County. OK, so it’s not really a marketable skill, but it still earns us some coolness cred—at least judging by

the amount of times we hear, “How do I get your job?” while out testing said beers. Some may accuse us of being fanatics for undertaking such a completely unscientific and overwhelming project like testing nearly 200 bars across the county. But to them we say, if not beer, then what better is there to spend our time on? Undoubtedly we will get at least one annual lecture on the fact that not all beer is supposed to be served below the freezing point. To that argument, well, we agree, but the Warmest Beer contest just doesn’t have the same ring to it. Besides those fine ale establishments that take pride in precise serving temperatures can now point to the official record of their nonfrostiness.

As in recent years, we have limited our testing to only locally owned and operated establishments that serve beer on tap. If a business has multiple locations in the valley, we only test one. Once again, we relied on an army of volunteer beer testers to help BW staff scour the valley in search of the coldest taps around. We offer our unending gratitude to these brave souls who go forth with little more than a kitchen thermometer between them and a raging hangover. Now soak in the sudsy results of all our hard work. After all, continually lifting a pint glass can lead to a repetitive-motion injury.

TESTERS:

SARAH BARBER, ALEX BLACKWELL, RACHAEL DAIGLE, DEANNA DARR, TODD DVORAK, STEPHEN FOSTER, JOSH GROSS, JENNIFER HERNANDEZ, ANDREW MENTZER, TARA MORGAN, SHELBY SOULE, KAT THORNTON, JORDAN WILSON PHOTOGRAPHS BY LAURIE PEARMAN

—Deanna Darr

COLDEST BEER

29.3°

EL GALLO GIRO The Dos Equis Amber is plenty cold but that’s just a bonus. The real goal here is satisfied taste buds and bellies filled with authentic Mexican fare. Don’t miss the tableside, made-to-order guacamole service at dinner. The menu features molcajetes, a stew-like dish served in a sizzling hot stone bowl. 482 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-9225169, elgallogirokuna.com

KEY LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE

FOOD

DJ

LIQUOR

TRIVIA

SMOKE

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2010 | 21

COLDEST BEER

32.8° OUTPOST CAFE

32.6°

THE BEERHOUSE

It’s a house party in a quiet little neighborhood at The Beerhouse and everyone is invited. With horseshoes and volleyball nets in the back yard, this house should be home sweet home for the summer. 9751 Cory Lane, Boise, 208-322-9958

32.7° HARRY ’S

It’s a neighborhood sports/Nascar bar, with daily drink and food specials. It seems like the place where former frat guys congregate now that they are relegated to a life in the suburbs. 2032 E. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-8889868

32.7°

MCCLEARY ’S PUB

Step into the grassy back yard behind this dark, smoky dive bar and you’ll be rewarded with horseshoe pits, a volleyball court, dart boards, a picnic pavilion and all the fresh air you can breathe. 9155 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-9910, mcclearys.net

29.7°

SHORT Y ’S SALOON

Despite its authentic-feeling Western interior, this ain’t your daddy’s saloon. Cowgirls and fly girls dance the Cupid Shuffle atop two long, marble-topped bars to earn free drinks and giveaways. 5467 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-6699, shortyssaloon.com

30°

HOOLIGAN’S PUB

The bar is like a peninsula, jutting out from the wall and making itself the centerpiece of this pub, which hosts three pool tables, various video games, and a day crowd that is ready to drink when you are. 10704 Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-9800

30.5° LINDY ’S

Lindy’s makes the short list for tried-andtrue Boise bars. With a casual, welcoming bar on one side and a family friendly steakhouse on the other, the crew at Lindy’s prides itself on hospitality. Soak up that beer with some of the famous pressure-cooked finger steaks— easily some of the best in town. 12249 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-375-1310

30.8°

TORCH LOUNGE

A dark and sexy gentleman’s club that’s moderately smoky but cool and comfortable. Friendly staff with interesting interior signage: Stripper Street, Sex Drive and Bitch Corner to name a few. 1826 W. Main St., Boise, 208-344-0218, thetorchlounge.com

30.9°

CHEERLEADERS

This suburban bar and grill has waitresses in tiny uniforms, two massive TVs flanking the dining area and a sports info ticker. 3541 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-939-9209, cheerleadersbg.com

31.3°

ANGELL’S

Take refuge in the safari-themed, classy and dimly lit bar for an ice-cold martini or kick back on the patio, which is draped in greenery and surrounded by grass, with an ice-cold beer in hand. 999 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-4900, angellsbarandgrill.com, @angellsboise

31.4°

WILLOWCREEK

Get ready to spread out. First, wine and dine on the grill side, loading up before you head over to the lounge, where the real fun begins. 1065 E. Winding Creek Drive, Eagle, 208-938-3010, willowcreekgrill.com

22 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly

31.6° GINO’S

There’s not much around it but that makes Gino’s all the more of a destination not only for fine dining but also for one of the only bars in the area. You can go for just a beer, but we’re pretty sure you’ll end up with dinner. 3015 McMillan Road, Meridian, 208-887-7710

31.8°

THE RANCH CLUB

That giant, rearing horse on the roof beckons the crowd into a dark-paneled interior that opened in 1947. Reclining bucket seats mounted at the bar provide cushy seating between games of beer pong and horseshoes. 3544 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3437447

32.4°

CHANDLERS

Chandlers is a classy place, with a cool color scheme, glass architecture and highbacked leather chairs—like the hotel bars in movies, where one can go to lay out their problems over a cold bud, finding wisdom in the sly and subtle bartender, and though he may not have the answers, you’ll feel better all the same. 918 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3834300, chandlersboise.com, @chandlersboise

32.8°

CREEKSIDE LOUNGE

In the same building as Peregrine Steaks and Spirits, the lounge also serves appetizers, lunch, dinner and an $8.50 Sunday brunch buffet. Ten taps, a big dance floor and an outdoor patio overlooking Indian Creek and the Owyhee Mountains. 751 W. Fourth St., Kuna, 208-922-4421, creeksidekuna.com

32.8°

OUTPOST CAFE

Sure, it’s in the Boise Airport, but a dependably ice-cold beer might make that “enhanced screening” a little more interesting. 3201 Airport Way, Boise

33.1° SOLID

With emphasis on local microbrews and a central BODO patio, Solid is the only state of matter that matters. Indoors a polished granite bar classes up the hardwood and brick, creating unexpected elegance. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-6620, solidboise.com, @solidboise

33.2°

20TH CENTURY LANES

The Big Lebowski meets King Pin. Bowling accoutrements, everywhere and ample gaming opportunities are to be expected from such an establishment. 4712 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-8695, 20thcenturylanes.net, @20thcenturylane

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33.2°

TURNER’S SPORTS BAR

Formerly Turner’s Stage Stop, this old Boise establishment has character. Horseshoe pits out back, 25-cent pool tables, bar arcade games galore and a vintage barn give this place a rustic fit and feel. 4022 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-9090

33.4° JAKERS

A swanky Meridian eatery with muted modern decor and an open kitchen, Jakers is packed for weekday lunch with the businesscasual crowd. Who wouldn’t be content in a place where, if you’re seated in the bar, there are happy-hour specials all day. 3268 E. Pine Ave., Meridian, 208-288-0898, jakers.com

33.4°

SOCKEYE BREWERY

The beer at Sockeye is so good they don’t even have domestic beers on tap. The outdoor patio that rests along Cole Road provides a welcome change from downtown Boise, allowing you to enjoy one of Sockeye’s delicious brews without the hustle and bustle of the 9-to-5ers. 3019 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-6581533, sockeyebrew.com, @sockeyebrew

33.8°

PINNACLE

Yes, there are TVs aplenty tuned in to sports and countless photographs of hall of famers. But it’d be a mistake to lump this place in with all the other Treasure Valley sports bars. The wood paneling, leaded-glass lamp lighting and absence of over-stimulating noise and bustle sets this place apart. There are 16 beer taps, and a star on the menu is the hand-breaded pork tenderloin sandwich. 2902 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-884-4400, pinnaclesportsgrill. com

33.8°

STAGECOACH INN

Giant prawns, enormous steaks and friendly service have endeared generations of regulars for 52 years. The old-school steak house menu and distinctive Western theme are both nostalgic and comfortably kitschy. 3132 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-342-4161, stagecoachboise.com, @boisestagecoach

33.9°

BOULEVARD BAR

Looking for a new hideout? This cozy little working man’s bar is hidden in plain sight near a bustling intersection. The giant rocking chair perched above the business next door is a convenient distraction—they’ll never think to look for you here. 4079 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-383-9035

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33.9°

BOULEVARD BAR

COLDEST BEER

33.9°

SAM’S SALOON

The only bar in Star for smokers, karaoke crooners and anyone with attitude. There’s nothing fancy about this corner tavern, and the clients wouldn’t have it any other way. 10937 W. State St., Star, 208-286-7794

34°

CAFE OLE

Sombreros, tequila shots and a two-for-one happy hour that can’t be beat. Who needs Mexico for a vacation? 210 N. Milwaukee Road, Boise, 208-322-0222, cafeole.com

34°

IDAHO PIZZA COMPANY

Local, delicious and fully equipped with beers on tap, Idaho Pizza Company is a great place to have a party for kids ... even those older than 21. 3053 S. Cole Road, Boise, 208-362-7702, idahopizzacompany.com, @idahopizzaco

34.1°

MONTEGO BAY

Montego Bay’s view of the private pond out back makes for a comfortable vibe. Thong pong Wednesday and lengthy happy hours throughout the week. 3000 N. Lakeharbor Lane, Boise, 208-853-5070, montegobayidaho.com

34.4°

BOISE FRY COMPANY

Boise Fry Company has an earthy, local feel, with a multitude of starch options. Its crisp micros are a welcome delight, washing away the salt-induced thirst. 111 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-495-3858, boisefrycompany.com, @boisefryco

34.4°

DAVINCI’S

Italian food and decor meet a traditional brick-wall corner bar. It’s relaxing enough for a Sunday afternoon beer meet-up, yet classy enough for a date. 190 E. State St., Eagle, 208-939-2500, davincis2.com

34.5°

GOODWOOD BARBECUE COMPANY

Beer and barbecue is a timeless combo, like PB and J or vodka O.J., so sipping on a cold one with the smell of braised and sauced meat hanging in the air is nice—even if it’s in chain restaurant-style digs. However it does have a sweet wine rack made of railroad ties. 1140 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-884-1021, goodwoodbbq.com, @goodwoodbbq

34.5°

MUGGSY ’S

No doubt about the theme here: If you’re into Boise State football, NFL and UFC, this is your watering hole. For sports derelicts, there’s pool, darts and video games to work up a thirst. Check out the 10 beers on tap, $5 lunch specials and a menu boasting a Super Burrito: one regular tortilla burrito wrapped around a deep-fried burrito. Ouch. 501 S. Main St., Meridian, 208-898-9470, muggsyssportsbar. com

34.7°

LULU’S FINE PIZZA

New York-style pie goes down easier when chased by frosty lager and faster after a calorie-burning mountain bike ride leaves you collapsed on the parking lot patio of this neighborhood joint. 2594 N. Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-387-4992, ilovelulus.com

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TOP 10 ALL-TIME WARMEST BEERS 56.3°

GUSTO, 2010

54.1°

IDAHO PIZZA COMPANY, 2007

53.9°

TABLEROCK BREWPUB AND GRILL, 2007

53.8°

SAMMY’S, 2011

52.9°

NEW FRONTIER, 2011

52.1°

BAR GERNIKA, 2002

51.3°

NEW FRONTIER, 2010

50.4°

JD’S AND FRIENDS, 2003

50.3°

TK’S BAR, 2006

49.6°

GRAINEY’S BASEMENT, 2009

TOP 10 ALL-TIME COLDEST BEERS 29.7°

VES’S BROADWAY BAR, 2002 LINDY’S, 2004 SHORTY’S SALOON, 2011

29.6°

RED ROBIN, 2007

29.4°

MUGGSY’S, 2004 THE TORCH, 2005 PF CHANG’S CHINA BISTRO, 2007

29.3°

EL GALLO GIRO, 2011

29.1°

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL, 2004

28.9

HOOTERS, 2005

28.7°

CHILI’S, 2006

28.5°

LONESTAR STEAKHOUSE, 2005 HOOTERS RESTAURANT, 2006

28°

HARRY’S BAR AND GRILL, 2005

26.6°

DONNIE MAC’S TRAILER PARK CUISINE, 2006

34.7° R BAR

This well-kept pub nestled just off the Boise State campus provides a comfortable haven for after-class drinkers looking for a game of Nintendo or just a cushy bar seat. 1041 S. Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-6290029, rbarboise.com

34.7°

STRIKERS BAR

One of the region’s many bars inside a bowling alley. Patrons say the bowling ball pitchers that resemble giant bongs and the good “value” on well drinks—bar-speak for healthy pours—make the place stand out. Try beating this for a Great Recession special: unlimited bowling, burger, fries and a soft drink for $8 every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 324 S. Meridian Road, Meridian, 208-888-2048, meridianbowlinglanes.com

34.9°

THE RED ROOM TAVERN

Eclectic velvet art and vinyl album covers glow eerily under red lighting, lending cred to the descriptive moniker of this downtown fringe bar. A surprisingly laid-back staff and clientele provide a non-judgmental audience for local musicians. 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-0956, @red_roomboise

34.9°

WHITE WATER PIZZA AND PASTA

Description: open, airy, family-owned and family-friendly restaurant with stone fireplace and kayak-theme decor. The menu features pizzas with wheat or sourdough crust, and a wide variety of salads and sandwiches. The fruit cobbler is baked to order, so plan on waiting a few minutes for desert. 1510 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-888-6611, whitewaterpizza.net

35°

4 -E’S BAR

Good luck finding any frills at this longstanding Kuna tavern. Long bar, quarter pool tables and photographs of customers, parties and other hijinks cover the walls. As for the name: The bar was bought in the late 1960s by the Forreys, a longtime Kuna ranching family with 4-Es as its cattle brand. 379 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-922-1853

35°

CASA DEL SOL

A classy yet eclectic version of a mom-andpop Mexican restaurant, complete with an easy-going atmosphere and a two-for-one happy hour. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-3660, mexicanrestaurantboise.com

Editor’s Note: Between 2002 and 2007, franchise bars were included in our testing.

24 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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35.1°

THE BAR AT THE GROVE

This is one hotel lobby bar that’s almost exclusively for out-of-towners, so snag a piece of sofa and play like you’re on vacation. 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-333-8000, grovehotelboise.com

35.1°

BERRYHILL’S PLAN B

This little nook between Berryhill proper and Bacon is a proper man cave, decked out with leather furniture, flatscreens and good-looking drink slingers. 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com, @johnberryhill

35.1°

LONGHORN LOUNGE

Another of downtown Kuna’s venerable watering holes. Nothing fancy but be prepared to joke and jab with the regulars lined around the horseshoe-shaped bar. Drink specials rotate daily and free food gets laid out for Monday Night Football. 458 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-922-4163

35.2°

THE BUFFALO CLUB

Deer and elk heads draped with Christmas lights, fake palm trees and a huge projection screen to watch sports on makes the Buffalo Club seem like you’re drinking inside a Cabela’s in Jamaica. Could you pass me that there shotgun, mon? 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811

35.2°

CHARACTERS

Chill hotel bar with plentiful games, ample dinner menu until midnight, and limited commotion. 1800 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-344-7691

35.2°

CRESCENT NO LAWYERS BAR/GRILL

Whether baking in the sun on the large patio or witnessing current sporting events on the theater-sized projection screens, the Crescent can play a gracious host, just make sure your lawyer friends miss the memo. 5500 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-322-9856, no-lawyers.com

35.2°

CRICKET ’S

With a neighborhood serving as the backdrop of this dive, Crickets feels like the malt shop in Grease, only with adult beverages and fewer leather jackets. 1228 Oakland Ave., Boise, 208-344-6235

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35.1° BERRYHILL’S PLAN B

COLDEST BEER

35.3°

SMOKY MOUNTAIN PIZZA & PASTA

Family friendly dining spot with a big selection of beer, wine and edibles. The outside patio was recently renovated, making it one of the more intimate spots for drinking/ dining in north Boise. 1805 W. State St., Boise, 208-387-2727, smokymountainpizza. com

35.4°

SAM’S PLACE

Almost as if we were in the early 1900s, this bar looks like it was ordered out of a catalog and installed at Ustick and Five Mile roads. Whose place? Sam’s Place. 3395 N. Five Mile Road, Boise, 208-376-0074

35.5°

PIZZALCHIK

Mostly known for its grub, this west Boise haunt serves up a solid array of beer and wine as well. The vibe is set by tons of music memorabilia on the walls and a fairly impressive cactus collection near the kitchen. The owner’s band plays Saturday nights. 7330 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-7757, pizzalchik.com

35.6°

CHARLIE BROWN’S

With elk paintings on the walls, Charlie Brown’s feels like grandpa’s house, only with a full bar and enough arcade games to entertain an army of drunken competitors. 5783 Overland Road, Boise, 208-375-6541

35.6°

DRY CREEK MERCANTILE

A tin ceiling, plank flooring and turn-of-thecentury style outfit the interior of this family friendly community hub at Hidden Springs. Watch the sunset turn the Foothills purple while sipping chilled refreshment on the big front porch. 5892 Hidden Springs Drive, Boise, 208-229-2001, drycreekmerc.com

35.6°

MICKEY RAY ’S

Do not enter with an empty stomach: The thick wafts of smoky barbecue ensure a peek at the menu. The barbecue, Southern hospitality and cold beer make Mickey Ray’s one to write home about. 395 W. State St., Eagle, 208-9397427, mickeyraysbbq.com, @mickeyrays

35.8°

BROADWAY BAR

The atmosphere is akin to drinking at your buddy’s—you can even bring your own food—but the bar full of happy-go-lucky customers, staff and booze makes it a little different than chilling on your friend’s couch. 1712 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-342-9951

35.8°

TK’S BAR

The sort of small and dusty roadside place that’s bustling with people who will give you suspicious glances on a Tuesday afternoon. The bartender’s shock at their beer temp says it all: “We’re usually really warm.” 3231 Federal Way, Boise, 208-331-0654.

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35.9°

RED EYE SALOON

This venerable Kuna watering hole reopened in early June, to the delight of its faithful clientele. So what’s new? No more faux-wood paneling and a fresh coat of paint have brightened up what was once a dark tavern. Dinner specials and Biker Night on Thursdays mean $5 burger-and-fries combos. No Harley required. 414 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-922-9797

36°

REEF

Tiki torches light the way to the thatched roof-on-a-rooftop bar. This urban island is a convenient tropical getaway—no surfboard required. No cheesy pink umbrella in your drink, either. 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9200, reefboise.com, @reefboise

36.3°

TOM GRAINEY ’S

BREWS BROTHERS

An historic establishment with more than 30 years in the biz, Grainey’s boasts local and regional bands on two stages and two different floors, five days a week. Do shots of booze while you shoot the breeze with loyal patrons. 109 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-3452505, tomgraineysboise.com

36°

36.4°

Shuffleboard, Golden Tee and ample TV selections can be found at this sporty spot. With 23 beers on tap, this is truly a classic beer bar. 6928 W. State St., Boise, 208-8530526, brewsbrothersonline.com

QUINN’S

This quintessential neighborhood bar and restaurant adheres to a simple formula— friendly service, warm patrons, quality food and a hearty selection of liquors and domestics. 1005 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-3450135, quinnsrestaurant.net

36.1°

BUSTED SHOVEL

This is just your average neighborhood bar that happens to be biker-friendly. Its name refers to an older Harley engine known for breaking down. 704 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-288-2217, bustedshovel.com

36.2°

THE FLICKS

A Boise institution that needs no introduction. Art house films accompanied by beer, wine and gourmet noshery make The Flicks a true Boise one-and-only. 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com

36.3°

THE OFFICE

Pool on one of three tables, a game of darts, a couple karaoke songs, and catching the late game on one of the flat-screen TVs that are in every corner of this large bar ... it’s just another day at The Office. 6125 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-672-0087

36.3°

Q’S BILLIARD

Walk in and feel like you’ve entered a pool tournament. Patrons at Q’s know how to rack ’em up, and if you feel like you brought your A-game, this is where you want to be. 6570 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-322-9122

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36.3°

BILL-N-LYNN’S PLACE

This place has dive bar written all over it in the best possible way, including the lively bartender who would be a customer if she weren’t serving up shots from the fireball machine. Featuring dark mixed-wood walls, shuffleboard and weekend karaoke. 229 W. Franklin Road, Meridian, 208-888-4075.

36.4°

PLAYER’S

From the outside, this cavernous, family friendly sports bar is cleverly disguised as a bowling alley watering hole. Inside you’ll find clean white walls, scratch-made soups and a $4 burger-fries-drink deal that completely removes any smoky stigma. 5504 W. Alworth, Garden City, 208-376-6555, playerspubandgrill.com

36.5°

THE KIT KAT CLUB

No bar in Ada County has been serving up beer and scantily clad dancers longer than the folks at this fixture on Meridian’s western outskirts. For those looking for something other than the brass pole ballet, there are pool tables and televisions everywhere. 4842 W. Franklin Road, Meridian, 208-888-7731

36.6°

DONNIE MAC ’S

Intentionally themed as an old mechanic’s garage, complete with old cars as booths, this place has a style all its own. It also features burgers, bingo Tuesdays, Old English 40s and brass monkeys. 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008

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36.7° VILLAGE

COLDEST BEER

PUB

36.7°

37.1°

VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE

VILLAGE PUB

As the venue that hosts an array of events including movie screenings, live theater, art shows and the recording of live concerts, VAC is where like-minded creative types gather to entertain and find inspiration. 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com, @vacuber

36.9°

37.2°

This pub is hidden, so much so that you might not have heard of it. But you will be greeted with smiles, Golden Tee and 50-cent pool tables. 9936 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-375-3085

FALCON TAVERN

A cozy neighborhood gastropub with a large patio, hardwood decor, flatscreen TVs for various sporting events and no fancypants required. 705 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-947-3111, falcontavern.com

36.9°

WHITE WATER SALOON

There’s an unmistakable blue-collar vibe to this place. On Sundays the owners lay out free finger food for patrons who partake in pool, darts and games. 1646 N. Meridian Road, Meridian, 208-888-3063

37°

HAPPY FISH

Sushi and martinis are the order of business here. There’s only one beer on tap: Japan’s Kirin Ichiban. But darn it, the cold beer goes perfectly with a hot Fire Roll. 855 Broad St., Ste. 250, Boise, 208-343-4810, happyfishsushi.com

37°

JIM’S ALIBI

ALTERKNIT LOUNGE AT KFCH

Boise’s go-to venue to enjoy your favorite band as it breezes through town. The upstairs bar is a welcome break from the action. 416 Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com, @knitboise

37.2°

THE HUDDLE

New downtown sports joint, complete with all the regalia a fan could ask for. The large windows and patio will allow you to say: Damn it, I like sports, and I don’t care who knows it. 205 N. 10th St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-3385454. @thehuddlegrill

37.2°

QUARTER BARREL

When the Quarter Barrel is not hosting open mic comedy night on Tuesday, or an open blues jam on Wednesday, and not holding karaoke on Thursday and Sunday nights, or the weekly pool tourney on Sunday, you can browse a 2.2 million-song library on the bar’s spiffy Touch Tunes jukebox. 4902 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430

Horseshoe pits, open barbecue grill, dog-friendly back yard, weekly pool and beer pong tourneys ... it all adds up to one of the most kick-ass neighborhood bars in town. 2710 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-342-9220, jimsalibi.com WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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COLDEST BEER

37.9° FIRESIDE INN

37.9°

PHO NOUVEAU

Simple but elegant dining area with a patio, serving modern Vietnamese food in the heart of downtown. 780 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-367-1111, phonouveau.com

38.1°

CASANOVA

In addition to the mouth-watering handcrafted wood-fired pies, this pizzeria offers a rotating selection of craft beers and a variety of primo wines. 1204 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-331-3535, casanovapizzeria.com

38.1°

SCHOONERS

A classic neighborhood bar with 25 beers on tap. The finger steaks are hand cut and battered, and beer pong can be found here. 499 S. Main St., Meridian, 208-884-3737

38.3°

BAR GERNIKA

37.3°

BAAN THAI

Classy Thai restaurant with a bar on the side: Think Thai finger foods with your beer. Get some Eastern elegance as you drink, all in the heart of Eagle. 78 Eagle River St., Eagle, 208-938-8424, mybaanthai.com, @baanthaieagle

37.4°

GIL’S K- 9 BAR

Folksy bar in west downtown boasting the basics: beer, shuffle board, pool table, juke box and comfortable barstools. 2506 Main St., Boise, 208-345-4420

37.4°

PITCHERS AND PINTS

Proud to be a “hole in the wall,” this simple, cozy, smoke-free peripheral downtown bar boasts a bumping jukebox and straightforward beer menu. The year-round back patio has a pool table if you need to get some fresh air. 1108 W. Front St., Boise, 208-906-1355, mypitchersandpints.com

37.4°

THE POCKET

There are two ways to experience this bar: With a poolstick and quarters in hand or in the dimly lit bar area, allowing the beer to chill you out to the fullest. Either way, the Pocket will have you in its pocket. 1487 N. Curtis Road, Boise, 208-375-2474, @thepocketboise

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37.5°

BERRYHILL AND CO.

Beer is happily served here, though you’ll certainly be better off letting the bartenders showcase their martini skills. It’s a posh destination for when you want to impress and a super-fab patio for when you just want to be seen. 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com, @johnberryhill

37.6°

END ZONE

This sports bar’s cozy wooden interior provides a friendly atmosphere with an above-par selection of microbrews. The exterior boasts a spacious deck loaded with flat screens and horseshoe pits. 1010 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-384-0613

37.6°

LEKU ONA

Bright, friendly and simple, with the sort of comforting feel you expect from your mom’s kitchen more than a bar. 117 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-6665, lekuonaid.com

37.8°

BUSTERS SPORTS BAR

This blue-and-orange-themed sports bar houses 14 taps, a burger-centric menu and enough Broncos memorabilia to keep any sports fan comfortably entertained. 1326 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-345-5688, busterssportsbar.com

37.8°

HUMPIN’ HANNAH’S

A large two-floored club with a warmer, wackier vibe than most dance clubs. And that’s how they like it. 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557, humpinhannahs.com

37.9°

36TH STREET BISTRO

A babbling fountain creates a Zen-like experience on the brick patio surrounded by flowers and foliage. Try a wine-paired dinner in this greenhouse setting while you enjoy every dimension of organic. 3769 Woody Drive, Boise, 208-433-5108, 36streetgardencenter. com

37.9°

FIRESIDE INN

North End neighborhood pub with games aplenty. Smoky but low-key, with shuffleboard and pool tables. 1610 N. 31st St., Boise, 208-342-9075

37.9°

MULLIGANS

Smoky, greasy, cheap, loud and raucously of the people. The place in downtown to play pool, foosball, lotto, watch sports or just get good, old-fashioned tipsy. It’s where your night inevitably ends up. 1009 W. Main St., Boise, 208-336-6998, @mulliganstaff

Exposed brick and just a handful of tables make Gernika feel just like ... well, Gernika in the Basque Country. It’s equal parts watering hole and restaurant. 202 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-344-2175, bargernika.com, @gernika

38.3°

BELLA AQUILA

This is where you go to impress a date. Candlelit tables, classic Italian food and a full bar seal the deal. Bonus: stellar wines. 775 S. Rivershore Lane, Eagle, 208-938-1900, bellaaquilarestaurant.com

38.3°

KAHOOTZ

Kahootz is surprisingly upscale but from its simple sporting pub decor, you wouldn’t guess it. It offers an array of local and regional beers on tap and a menu including pricey, yet delicious steak and seafood options. And its stunning arbor-covered patio makes you forget for a moment that you’re right off Meridian’s bustling main street. 1603 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-895-9861, gotokahootz.com

38.3° LOUIE’S

The classic bar and back bar were built in the 1860s and were a staple in the family’s first restaurant opened in Sun Valley in 1965. Great outdoor patio with a splendid, wide-angle view of the Foothills. 2500 E. Fairview Ave., Meridian, 208-884-5200, louiespizza.com

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38.4°

BURGER ’N’ BREW

An aptly named sporty spot. A favorite post-game haunt of many of Boise’s rec league softball teams, this place is known for its inconspicuous but cozy presence on the west side of town. 4295 W. State St., Boise, 208-345-7700

38.4°

THE CURB

Upon first glance, the Curb could seem like just another sports bar, but it has the feel of a neighborhood tavern: good food, refreshing drinks and local owners. With $3 Mimosas and Bloody Marys on Sunday, it’s just like home—almost. 1760 S. Meridian Road, Meridian, 208-286-4401, curbbarandgrill.com

38.5°

THE BOUQUET

Live music is the name of the game here, with a recently remodeled stage and floor plan. Don’t forget to check out the beautiful decor: The preserved bar is the stuff of Boise legend. 1010 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6605

38.5°

CLUB SAVVY ’S

Seven nights a week at Club Savvy’s, you’ll find a big dance floor where the melting-pot crowd boogies to a mash-up of musical genres played by a live DJ, who also doubles as the karaoke host. 3933 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-429-9339

38.6°

GAMEKEEPER LOUNGE

Tucked inside the Owyhee Plaza, the Gamekeeper may be the most romantic bar in Boise. Let the candlelit tables, five-star food and stiff drinks seal the deal. 1109 W. Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com

38.7°

GRAINEY ’S BASEMENT

Warning: One visit to Grainey’s and you might never leave. Live music paired with the wild-west-meets-Irish-bar feel make this place the “Cheers” of the Boise scene. 109 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-2505

38.7°

TWISTED TIMBER

A bright and friendly diner turned pub that is the only sign of civilization for miles in any direction. 4563 S. Cloverdale Road, Boise, 208-362-7157

39° BUDDIES

COLDEST BEER

38.8°

LUCKY DOG TAVERN

Laid-back gay bar with a chatty crowd. Bar games, arcade machines, pool table and darts round out the scene. 2223 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-333-0074, luckydogtavern.com, @luckydogboise

38.8°

NUT HOUSE

The West Boise sports bar is back under the oversight of its original owners, and the bright, airy space remains a haven for those who love to catch the game on big flatscreen TVs. 12505 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-2872191, nuthouseboise.com, @nuthouseboise

38.8°

THE REFUGE

With a large dark wood bar, this looks like the sort of place rich and powerful men swirl glasses of brandy and cackle to one another about their sinister plans to privatize the moon. 404 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Ste. 300, Boise, 208-424-8211, thefefugeboise.com

38.9° THE LIFT

Large bar and patio/pergola for a shady place to chow down or sip a beverage. 4091 W. State St.,, Boise, 208-342-3250, theliftboise.com, @theliftboise

39°

PARRILLA GRILL

Like a twist of lime gracing tequila, this twist of Cabo graces Boise’s North End with a fresh-ingredient tang and flavorful pucker. If Camel’s Back skirts the Foothills, Parrilla is the short and sassy hemline. 1512 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-323-4688.

39°

STUBS SPORTS PUB

Comfortable high-ceilinged and wood-furnished gastropub that brings a little muchneeded class to the strip mall off Federal Way. 3662 Findley Ave., Boise, 208-336-7882, @stubssportspub

39.1°

BARDENAY

The country’s first restaurant distillery has perfected the cozy industrial atmosphere with high ceilings, brick, dark wood and a drink menu that’s one of the most innovative in town. An A-list patio. 610 Grove St., Boise, 208-426-0538, bardenay.com, @bardenay

39.1°

WILLI B’S SANDWICH SALOON

Value-hunters should saddle up at this Western-themed saloon. $1.50 cans of PBR wash down “bunkhouse cooking” all week long. 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs.com

39°

BUDDIES

Bright lounge with multiple counters and TVs, pool tables and ping pong. Beers come in your choice of regular or giant-sized. 8654 W. Overland St., Boise, 208-658-0906 WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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39.2° LANE 21

A huge bar connected to a bowling alley. Bowl a couple frames, grab a beer, maybe a pizza—these lanes are hidden in the rough. 4860 W. Emerald St., Boise, 208-344-2695, emeraldlanes.com

39.2° RUDY ’S

HALL OF FAME

A sports bar atmosphere with billiards and a shuffleboard table. The outdoor patio offers late afternoon and evening shade from the blistering sun. Seven TVs and 14 beers on tap. Wednesday night is Rib Night, when $8.95 gets you a 1-pound rack of baby backs. 2310 E. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-8844453, rudyspubngrill.com

39.2°

TAVERN AT BOWN CROSSING

Upscale bar and grill with a large patio perfect for brunch, mimosa in hand. 3111 S. Bown Way, Boise, 208-345-2277, tavernatbown.com, @bowntavern

39.3° FAT T Y ’S

A whole lot of moving happened in the world of cold beer over the last year. Usually the Top 10 on this grand list of frosty brews contains at least several familiar names. But this time around, only one bar managed to make a return trip to the top of the list. The Ranch Club is the only bar to earn a frosty star this year for making a repeat appearance—although it was only by the slimmest drizzly of its frosty head. The Garden City bar’s temperature increased by .7 of a degree, but it was enough to knock it from fourth place in 2010 to 10th place. Maybe the long, cool spring did something to the taps, but overall, the coldest beers this time around were far chillier than a year ago. In fact, this year’s top three bars all came in colder than last year’s winner, the Longhorn, which posted a 4.9 degree increase. That being said, there were some impressive jumps to the top of the list. Shorty’s Saloon posted a whopping 10-degree improvement, landing the venerable Garden City bar in second place. Both Cheerleaders and Angell’s improved their temps by more than 4 degrees, moving them from the middle of the list to the top. The other end of the list was just as shaken up this year. Still two bars managed to reclaim their positions from last year, earning them special double melted stars. Once again, New Frontier finished as the second-warmest beer, while Sammy’s. Perennial bottom-of-the-listers Bar Gernika and Cottonwood Grille both managed to claw their way up the ladder this year with an 8.3-degree and a 2.9-degree jump, respectively. We couldn’t help but notice the difference a change in location makes. Since BW only tests one stop of businesses with multiple locations—and we like to mix up those chosen locations—several bars saw some big changes in rankings. Willowcreek Grill jumped an impressive 10.7 degrees as testing moved from Boise to Eagle, while The Torch improved by 8.5 degrees compared to The Torch 2, Flying Pie cooled off by 6.4 degrees and Idaho Pizza Company made it out of the bottom of the list with a 10.5 degree improvement. On the other end, Brewforia warmed by 1.4 degrees and Cobby’s jumped by 6.6 degrees. —Deanna Darr

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Beer pong, juke, pool, sweet nightly drink specials, cheapo fatty beers and debauchery seven nights a week—you know, your typical party scene, but it’s an all-new scene. 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-514-2531, drinkfattys.com, @drinkfattys

39.4°

SUDS TAVERN

This off-campus blue- and orange-themed bar houses a raucous crowd of college students and after-work drinking pals anxious to achieve a comfortable buzz. 1024 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-345-9656, sudstavern.com, @thesudstavern

39.5°

CACTUS BAR

An Idaho bar with a Southwest-inspired twist. Cheap drinks, arcade games and a giant patio will help you escape the madness of Sixth and Main. 517 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-9732

39.6°

BEN’S CROW INN

Friendly, bright diner with a large patio where the clams are fried and the beer is copious. Both are served in buckets. Hearts, begin your fluttering now and your attacking after attaining regular status. 6781 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-342-9669

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39.2° LANE 21

COLDEST BEER

39.6°

LIT TLE DUTCH GARDEN

This is perhaps the most unexpected bar in Boise. Surrounded by residential housing, it could easily be mistaken for a garage. But the cheap drinks and plethora of bar games, ranging from pool to horseshoes, make it a strangely compelling destination. 1910 S. Owyhee St., Boise, 208-906-3719

39.6°

TERRY ’S STATE STREET SALOON

The karaoke capital of State Street, this joint enjoys a loyal following. Pool and arcade games, patron pictures on the walls, and a cozy back patio tie the operation together. Karaoke all the time. 3301 N. Collister St., Boise, 208-331-8225, statestreetsaloon.com

39.7°

EASTSIDE TAVERN

Large, dark and smoky bar, where high class is a slur and high culture is a shuffleboard tournament. The perfect place to drink your afternoon and your life away, especially on booming karaoke Tuesdays. 610 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-345-3878, @eastsidetav

39.7°

JUMPIN JANET ’S

A large, laid-back bar featuring just about every parlor game: pool, darts, ping pong and friendly folks just beyond the downtown scene. 572 Vista Ave., Boise, 208-342-7640, jumpinjanets.com

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39.7°

SUN RAY CAFE

With the largest wraparound sidewalk-dining scene in the North End, this is where weekend warriors congregate following sweat sessions in the neighboring Foothills. It also features simple, tasty fare that is more than just fuel. 1602 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-343-2887, sunray-cafe.com

39.9°

NEUROLUX

A dark, smoky lounge packed with the sorts of folks whose hairstyles are rarely cut but always on the cutting edge. Enjoy black walls and black lungs, as well as one of the most happening patios in town. Shake and shimmy at late-night dance parties or just get fall-down snockered. Quick Boise, to the hipster-cave! 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com, @neurolux

39.9°

O’MICHAEL’S

The greenish pallor cast by the lighting in this more-than-40-year-old North End institution reminds us that corned beef and cabbage is year-round fare in some parts, including the Boise Foothills. 2433 N. Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-342-8948, omichaelspub.com

39.9°

THE VOODOO LOUNGE

Base-thumping techno and flashing lights make this subterranean club tricky for a first date. However, as one of the only bars downtown with a pole and live dancers, it’s sure to put a kinky hex on your second date. 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-941-2144, voodooloungeboise.com

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COLDEST BEER

41.4° WOODY ’S

41°

DUTCH GOOSE

A peanuts-on-the-floor joint with tons of gaming opportunities. Big screens galore, huge patio out back (including horseshoe pits), and dollar beer Thursdays. 3515 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-8887

41.2°

PAPA JOE’S

This restaurant-cum-coffee shop sits conveniently adjacent to the university and features a menu of casual Italian food and a modest selection of local beers. 1301 S. Capital Blvd., Boise, 208-344-7272, papajoesboise.com

41.4°

WOODY ’S

This revitalized bar now carries eight microbrews on rotation, sunny patios furnished with horseshoe pits and aspirations to produce the best burger in Boise. 650 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-336-1790

41.5°

40°

FLYING PIE PIZZARIA

The smell of tomato sauce is overwhelming when you enter Flying Pie. The beer is no joke, either, ranging from PBR to locally brewed favorites. Watch yourself when pies are flying. 6508 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-376-3454, flyingpie.com, @flyingpiepizza

40° FORK

Comfort food meets local and fancy. For the ultimate experience, sit inside the gorgeously remodeled Boise City Bank Building and order a cold one with parmesan and rosemary fries. Drool. 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-2871700, boisefork.com, @boisefork

40.1°

OVERLAND BAR

The record needle may scratch off the jukebox the tiniest bit when you walk into the Overland Bar, but that’s just because the locals are cautious you’ll discover their secret: $1 beers all day, every day, in just the sort of friendly, dark and intimate dive people love to blow up. 3907 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-336-4707

40.1°

RICK’S PRESS ROOM

Quiet and comfy bistro-style joint that offers eight taps and daily specials. Started by a guy who grew up fascinated with newspapers, and

32 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly

now dozens of front pages from his collection of big stories of the past 40 years are papered across the walls. 130 E. Idaho St., Meridian, 208-288-0558, rickspressroom.net

40.1°

SAPPHIRE

BIT TERCREEK ALE HOUSE

central fireplace makes outdoor seating a winter pleasure, too. 1520 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-639-8888

40.6°

THE NAVAJO ROOM

A downtown gem, Sapphire favors microbrews and local musicians to suit the tastes of a mostly over-30 crowd. Look for brand new wine taps to make grapes as economical as barley and hops. 622 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-7277

It’s as ancient, dusty and romantic as the Old West depicted on murals on the bar walls, including life-size portraits of John Wayne and Clint Eastwood. Despite being in a strip mall, it feels like it’s been in action since the early 1800s. 4900 W. Emerald St., Boise, 208-3435817

40.3°

40.7°

RIVER ROCK EAGLE

Beer done right: grab a pint and settle into a booth. This recently refocused joint is the perfect place for a Friday night meet-up with the fellas or the fam. 228 E. Plaza St., Eagle, 208-938-4788, theriverrockeagle.com

40.4°

BUSTERS

A TV (or two) on every wall, short shorts and all the booze you could want. Get ready for a burger-beer-lovely-lady-induced coma. 1396 E. State St., Eagle, 208-938-1800, busterseagle.com

40.5°

13TH STREET

FIREHOUSE

A lively, loud sports bar with a couple of tables set up for cards and groups of folks in varying shades of baseball uniform. This Meridian hangout offers wings so hot you might actually need a firefighter to help put the flames on your tongue out. 1767 W. Franklin Road, Meridian, 208-846-9535, firehousepubmeridian.com

40.7°

HA’PENNY

A spacious interior bar in the heart of BODO. Settle in with friends for a night of serious drinking. Bonus: The patio is the perfect people-watching stoop. 855 Broad St., Ste. 250, Boise, 208-343-5568, hapennybridgepub.com

The rich wood of the bar paired with the environmentally conscious low-power happy hour give Bittercreek an earthy feel. The place is awash with rich color and clean lines and any eye wanderer or rubbernecker would find plenty to hold their gaze. 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-1813, justeatlocal.com/ bittercreek, @bitterfeather

41.5°

HYDE PARK PUB

Two-wheeled cruisers accessorize the concrete patio that anchors this historic neighborhood bar. If outdoor temps take a nosedive, the low-ceilinged interior is a cozy venue tinged with neon signs and sporty TV. 1501 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-336-9260, harryshydepark.com, @hydeparkpub

41.5°

PENGILLY ’S SALOON

An old-timey saloon with a comforting vibe, classic hardwood bar and large oil paintings. One of Boise’s mainstays for finding live music. 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344, @pengillys

41.6°

CAZBA/OPA

Cazba/Opa is a little portal to the Middle East. Your beer may be a little on the warm side, but the decor is exotic and the vibe is all satin couches. 211 Eighth St., Boise, 208-381-0222

Two cask-conditioned brews stand out among a supporting cast of more than a dozen clever micros. Mirrors and windows exaggerate square footage, while an enclosed patio with a WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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41.7°

COT TONWOOD GRILLE

Killer riverside patio and a swanky bar-food menu with surprisingly affordable drinks. The place is for the office set to unwind, let down their hair and kick off those sensible shoes. 913 W. River St., Boise, 208-333-9800, cottonwoodgrille.com

41.9°

FLATBREAD COMMUNIT Y OVEN

Upscale pizza and wine bistro with nary a weak item on the menu, alcoholic or otherwise. Patio and indoor seating available. 3139 S. Bown Way, Boise, 208-343-4177, flatbreadpizza.com, @flatbread_pizza

42.1°

THE LOBBY

Dark interior with smooth concrete-andstone decor and garage doors that open for summer. The classier look of a club but the laid-back drinking-focused vibe of a dive. 760 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-2183, thelobbyboise.com, @thelobbyboise

42.1°

LUCKY 13/THE GARAGE

A friendly and well-lit pizza joint, with high-ceilings and a big patio out on Warm Springs that is perfect for a break while on a lengthy bike ride or jog on the Greenbelt. 3662 S. Eckert Road, Boise, 208-344-6967, lucky13pizza.com, @lucky13boise

42.3°

BALCONY CLUB

Year in and year out, Balcony is the best gay bar in town. It just can’t help it. Dance your ass off, make your own party … or just order a cold one and perch on the patio above Eighth Street. 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com, @balconyclub

42.3°

TABLEROCK

Skylights give a glow to this airy space, rife with flatscreens tuned to sports. Between regular brews and seasonal specialties, these house-made beers cater to every palate. 705 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-0944, tablerockbrewpub.com, @tablerockbrew

42.4°

EIGHTEEN ONE

A golf-course restaurant with fantastic fine dining, a rotating menu, and as a bonus, there’s a putting green nearby. 605 N. Edgewood Lane, Eagle, 208-939-0402, eaglehillsgolfcourse.com/eighteenone.htm

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42.4°

MAI THAI

A sophisticated and modern-looking lounge with oriental flair and an indoor fountain, serving pan-Asian food and schmancy boat drinks. 750 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-3448424, maithaigroup.com, @maithaiboise

42.6°

BASQUE CENTER

Eventually, all roads lead to the Basque Center, where you don’t have to be Basque to enjoy a cocktail while listening to at least a couple of languages. They’ll make you feel at home and let you know what beti pozik really means. 601 W. Grove. St., Boise, 208-3315097, basquecenter.com, @basquecenter

42.6°

RED FEATHER LOUNGE

Like a feather tickles the flesh, more than 35 draft microbrews will tickle your palate, as this trendy bar shares handles with its neighbor. Upscale but not exclusive, an eclectic atmosphere invites all. 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-429-6340, justeatlocal.com/ redfeather, @bitterfeather

42.6°

SHIGE STEAKHOUSE

Well-cushioned swivel chairs at the curvy metro bar make for a comfy perch from which to peruse the broadest sake selection in downtown Boise. Saketini: say it. 100 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8423, shigejapanesecuisine.com

42.8°

KAY AND TRACI’S 127 CLUB

Take a seat on the comfy bar stools and order up a bottle that’s been getting plenty cold in an ice bath. There are four pool tables and a big space for live music on Friday and Saturday nights. 127 E. Idaho St., Meridian, 208-884-0122

43° LEGENDS

Giant, high-ceilinged So-Cal-style sports bar with a bazillion TVs and more hot wings than you can shake a drumstick at. 7609 W. Overland Road, Ste. 100, Boise, 208-3771819, legendspubandgrill.com

43°

LIQUID

With a brick and neon decor, this joint serves the drinks stiff and the music loud. A rotating cast of entertainment includes live music, trivia and karaoke. 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise. com, @liquidboise

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43.2°

HIGHLANDS HOLLOW BREWHOUSE

Hand-crafted ales quench your thirst in any season, but the central fireplace and snowthemed artwork make this a favorite apres ski spot. Situated at the bottom of Bogus Basin, the siren call of hops is irresistible. 2455 Harrison Hollow Lane, 208-343-6820, highlandshollow.com, @highlandshollow

43.2°

MAIN STREET BISTRO

It’s Jell-O shots, beer pong, backwards baseball caps and a full-on brodeo every day of the week in this three-barred behemoth. It’s a club for the sports-bar set. 609 Main St., 208-345-9515. msbidaho.com, @mainstbistro

43.5°

PIPER PUB

An upscale high-ceilinged gastro pub with hardwood decor, good liquor and a bird’s-eye view of downtown from its second-floor location. 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-343-2444, thepiperpub.com

43.7°

LOCK , STOCK AND BARREL

It’s classy but casual dining at this Boise mainstay, featuring steaks and a wide selection of wines. Check out live local acoustic and jazz music. 1100 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-336-4266, lsbboise.com

43.9°

MACK AND CHARLIE’S

The large front windows, dim lighting and concrete floors make Mack and Charlie’s feel like a classy garage, complete with pool tables, shuffleboard and muscly dudes talking about their motorcycles. Drinks specials are cheap enough to easily end in a hangover. 507 W. Main St., Boise, 208-830-9977, mackandcharlies.com, @mackandcharlies

44.2°

BREWFORIA BOWN

A clean and modern market/cafe hybrid with hundreds of beers from all over the world and tasty waffle sandwiches. The taps here rotate constantly and new discoveries are always on hand. 3073 S. Bown Way, Boise, 208-3421916, brewforia.com, @brewforiabown

45°

JO’S SUNSHINE LOUNGE

It’s a dark, sunless lounge attached to a hotel, but it also happens to be one of the best places around to find live blues music. 1115 N. Curtis Road, Boise, 208-376-2700, jossunshinelounge.com

45°

VISTA BAR

The dark, smoky environs contained in this ancient A-frame building provide liquid solace to working folks in search of carefree sedation. 813 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-342-9911

45.1°

COBBY ’S

This old-fashioned deli has a menu full of finger-licking sandwiches and a tap selection featuring local craft beers. 1030 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-345-0990, cobbys.com

45.4° SULLY ’S

An Irish-themed pub with Guinness and Smithwick’s on tap and a full menu of pub favorites. It boasts a huge patio and two horseshoe pits. 11123 W. State St., Star, 208-286-7743, sullys-idaho.com

WARMEST BEER

47.3°

THE FRONT DOOR

Get ready to become a pizza and beer snob: The Front Door offers impeccable selections of both. Generous slices are washed down with rare IPAs, ales and lagers. Yes, please. 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9201, thefrontdoorboise.com

47.5°

SYMPOSION

Smoky, off-the-beaten-path, dog-friendly pub with cheap drinks, Jell-O shots, pool tables, popcorn and friendly staff. 2801 Fletcher St., Boise, 208-342-9420

52.9°

THE NEW FRONTIER

Seems more like the old frontier. This is a dimly lit outpost for smokers, drinkers in cowboy hats and players looking for a Texas hold ’em table or two. There probably weren’t any frills when this bar opened six decades ago, so why expect any now? Live music on Friday nights and a vintage shuffleboard table. 116 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-8889034

53.8° SAMMY ’S

Newly renovated Sammy’s (formerly Gusto’s) has a shuffleboard, pool table and bright, yellow walls. Sammy’s acquired just the right facelift for summer drinking. 509 W. Main St., Boise, 208-343-5159.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2010 | 35

NEWS/NOISE NOISE GLENN LANDB ER G

THE WHOLE PUZZLE Carrie Rodriguez returns to Music From Stanley.

SUMMER SOUNDS IN STANLEY Music From Stanley. Those three words have a lyrical quality of their own. They speak of listening to the strains of a strummed guitar, the rich notes of an acclaimed vocalist or even a rowdy drum and bass rhythm floating through the halcyon haze of a summer Sunday with Redfish Lake and the Sawtooth Mountains as a backdrop. The seventh season of Music From Stanley is in high gear, and every Sunday through Sept. 4 from 4-7 p.m., the concert series provides a chance to experience some incredible Idaho artists in the midst of some of Idaho’s incredible natural artistry. The schedule may be subject to change but following is the current lineup: July 3, Kelly Martin with Dan Costello; July 10, Bearfoot with guest; July 17, Chad Summervill with Boise Rock School; July 24, Todd Hallawell and Robin Kessinger; July 31, Carrie Rodriguez with guest; Aug. 7, Nathan Jay Moody and the Quartertons; Aug. 14, Nate Fowler with guest; Aug. 21, Thomas Paul with guest; Aug. 28, Douglas Cameron; Sept. 4, New Transit. And also this year, there will be three Wednesday performances in August: Aug. 3, James Orr; Aug. 10, Shook Twins; Aug. 17, Cary Judd. Unless you’re Charlie Sheen, “winning” is another lovely word. And unlike the tigerblood-filled actor, young local MC/producer Alex “Customary” Post can now use it to describe himself without any of the irony. A few weeks back, Post and young Tennessee-based singer Erin Elisabeth Aubrey entered the 2011 International Songwriting Competition, a contest that awards both new and seasoned musicians for their songwriting talents. Post met Aubrey at the Contemporary Music Center in Massachusetts and Post said he thought her music sounded “perfect for sampling.” Their collaborative effort, “Fallin’ So Fast,” earned them third place in the R&B/Hip-Hop category, an accolade that may actually help further their careers. “The contest offers some prizes that we will make the most of, such as online airplay [and] tools to help with booking and promotion,” Post said. “But if anything, it gives us some credibility and proves that we are putting out solid work, which is nice to have when we approach labels and advertise our product. If people see we have an award-winning song, they will be more likely to give it a listen.” You can hear “Fallin’ So Fast”—with local Jordan Freiburghaus on bass—at songwritingcompetition.com/winners. —Amy Atkins

36 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Muffalo turns years of experience into Love Songs and Battle Hymns AMY ATKINS The whole is greater than the sum of its parts … sometimes. In the case of Muffalo, the parts are made up of three seasoned musicians who live in different states but are willing to travel back and forth to meet up and whose legacy includes being in bands Cat Butt, Mondo Generator and Queens of the Stone Age. The parts are a lot to live up to. Muffalo is like one of those images made up of a thousand smaller photos: up close, While Stalin tries to look uninterested and Hendrix stares a little too intently, Muffalo’s Derek Myers takes a you can see all the individual stories but breather before the band hits the road. take a few steps back and the whole image becomes one rich, colorful narrative. In this would get together … and it would all jive. case, Muffalo’s 2011 debut CD, Love Songs Soupy Sales’ son)—at 5th Street Studios,” I was in a band in the early ’90s [Jack O’ and Battle Hymns, is a snapshot of the band Myers said. “We had two sessions over a Fire] that would do the same thing but with period of four months.” to date—and Boise-based vocalist/guitarist cassette tapes … It’s easier now with the Once the CD was recorded, it was Derek Myers is looking forward to adding Internet, of course.” turned over to Butthole Surfers’ guitarist more color, shading and texture to MufBut getting all of the necessary parts to Paul Leary for mixing. The result is a kind falo’s overall design. coalesce into a respectable—and hopefully of classic 20th-century rock ’n’ roll with a Myers (Mondo Generator), bassist Dean respected—whole hasn’t always been pretty. 21st-century interpretation. It’s a cohesive Gunderson (Cat Butt, Jack O’ Fire) and For one, Muffalo has been working on album but it’s also surprising—from one drummer Gene Trautmann (Miracle WorkLove Songs and Battle Hymns for eight years. song to the next, it’s not clear what to exers, Queens of the Stone Age) have all been Second, flying between California and pect. For Myers that was intentional. It was around the sonic block a few times. At 37, Idaho hasn’t been cheap and if Myers wants less about expressing an overall sound and Myers—who is the music director of the to play Muffalo songs live in Boise, it doesn’t more about the individual elements. Paul Green School of Rock in Boise—isn’t make much monetary sense to fly in Gunder“The music is song-specific, song-oriented. a starry-eyed teen thinking that an A&R [It’s about] living inside the song,” Myers said. son and Trautmann. Myers has to find local suit is going to have a layover in Boise on musicians to help him pull it off and someMuffalo didn’t want to create an image his way from L.A. to New York, wander times he can’t. An opportunity to open for and then shape the music around it. The into the bar where Muffalo is playing, and Radio Moscow this spring fell through when sign them to his label on the spot because of songs had to be their own thing. he couldn’t find a fill-in bassist. “If you listen to the record, they’re all who one of them once played with. Third, Muffalo had a showcase at the “The reason I’m playing with these guys is very different-sounding songs, but they 2011 South By Southwest. It was not at definitely go together,” Myers said. not because of their past bands. It’s because Emo’s (which might be expected since My“Stitches” charges out of the gate we share the same vision,” Myers said. ers worked there). It was not even in a bar. with a Black Sabbath-y riff before quickly That vision is, in part, a shared desire to It was in an alley. switching up to a warbly T. Rex rendering. see Muffalo succeed, in spite of whatever And last, according to urbandictionary. “Chicken Dinner” flies an Americana flag obstacles might be in the way. com, a “muffalo” is “any girl classified as a and wouldn’t be out of place on a jukebox Together since 2003, Gunderson, Myers loaded with punky cowboy tunes. “Bleeding large or an extra large.” It’s not lost on othand Trautmann found that the chemistry Heart” is on the same boxcar as “Stitches,” ers in the music industry. In March, MOJO they had together was worth the headache magazine tweeted the following: “MOJO’s but Myers’ vocals are a little of having Myers in Boise and SXSW Worst Band Name Of The Day: Muffarther away, leaving a slight Gunderson and Trautmann livfalo or Shit Horse. You decide ...” taste of Bauhaus behind. ing in California. It just meant For more on Muffalo, visit The name may be up in the air—My“Battle Hymn” almost veers getting an album recorded was reverbnation.com/muffalo. ers said they had talked about it after the into metal territory while going to take some time. “Dirty Water” pays homage to MOJO tweet—but Muffalo’s immediate Finally in 2009, they were future is not. ’90s grunge. ready to go into the studio. Myers has been booking both a U.S. and Though geographical constraints have “Two years ago … we hired a producer a European tour—he has dates in Cologne, required that Muffalo piece together the and started flying down to Austin,” Myers Hamburg and Berlin, Germany inked. said. Austin was a natural choice for him: He music, it does go together. The trio’s chemSeems no matter how many pieces the had lived in Texas’ capital city and worked at istry played a big part in that. members have to pull together, they are all “We would be off on our own, doing famed venue Emo’s for several years. looking at the whole picture when it comes separate things,” said Gunderson, who “We started working with [producer] to Muffalo. works as a steady-cam operator. “Then we Hunt Sales—Iggy Pop’s drummer (and

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LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY JUNE 29 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: GIRLS GUNS AND GLORY—With Neo Tundra Cowboy. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

BRUCE COCKBURN, VAC, JUNE 29 There are linguistic slip-ups that will peg you as an outsider. Pronounce Houston Street in New York City like the Texas town and a cabbie will throw you a puzzled glare. Same goes for Canadian folk/rock singer-songwriter Bruce Cockburn. His last name is pronounced “Co-burn,” and in an interview on popmatters.com, Cockburn explained the etymology: “It’s Scottish, and it actually translates as ‘rooster creek’ … as a Scottish name, the c-k in the middle becomes a sort of guttural sound.” Cockburn rose to fame in the 1960s, playing in a variety of bands, including Olivus, which opened for The Jimi Hendrix Experience and Cream. Over the years, Cockburn’s music has turned increasingly political as he visited places like Nicaragua during the Contra War and Mozambique during its civil war. In 2001, Cockburn was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. The ceremony included video testimonials from fans like U2’s Bono and Jackson Browne. —Tara Morgan 8 p.m., $35. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

38 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | BOISEweekly

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La SPUR TANGO—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown THE THROWDOWN FINALS— Featuring the winners of the three previous weeks. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid WIDESPREAD PANIC—See Picks, Page 14. 6:30 p.m. $35. IBG

BRIANNE GRAY—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown BRUCE COCKBURN— See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $35. VAC CAMDEN HUGHES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill DAN COSTELLO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

LAST BAND STANDING—9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s MARC BROUSSARD—With Matt Hires and Chic Gamine. 8 p.m. $15-$30. Knitting Factory MARC BROUSSARD AND MATT HIRES—6 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FRANK MARRA—6 p.m. FREE. Twig’s JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ONRY OZZBORN—9 p.m. $5. Reef

JUNIOR ROCKET SCIENTIST— With Atomic Mamas and Dirty Moods. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

THURSDAY

REILLY COYOTE—7 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s

LARRY CONKLIN—5 p.m. FREE. Piazza Di Vino

JUNE 30

RIZING TIDE—8 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

LETA NEUSTAEDTER—6 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

BECOMING THE ARCHETYPE— With Inhale/Exhale, To Speak of Wolves, Psalter and Resisting Fate. 7 p.m. $10. The Venue

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

PAUL TILLOTSON TRIO—7:30 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

TRAVIS MCDANIEL BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

THE BELLRAYS—With Jumping Sharks. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux THE BOURBON DOGS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

KEVIN KIRK—With Steve Eaton and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DOWNTOWN NAMPA NIGHTS: LOOSE CHANGE—5:30 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JASON WEBLEY—With Grandma Kelsey. 8 p.m. $5 WilliB’s

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE: FABULOUS CHANCELLORS—6:30 p.m. $7 members, $10 general. IBG

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

HIGH DESERT BAND—6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater Pizza

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—6 p.m. FREE. The Modern

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

YAMN—With Equal Eyes. 9 p.m. $10. Bouquet

FRIDAY JULY 1 ALISON KRAUSS AND UNION STATION—Featuring Jerry Douglas. 7 p.m. $50. IBG

SATURDAY JULY 2

CAMDEN HUGHES—7 p.m. FREE. Goody’s

BALLYHOO!—With Bastard Suns. 10 p.m. $5. Reef

CODI JORDAN—10 p.m. $5. Reef

BENEFIT FOR MATTHEW ARNOLD—Featuring Karin Comes Killing, Final Underground, Mortal Enemy and more. 8 p.m. $3-$5. Knitting Factory

DANGER BEARD—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE BLUE DOOR FOUR—7:30 p.m. FREE. The Blue Door BUSTER BLUE—9 p.m. $5. The Shredder DYING FAMOUS—8 p.m. FREE. Savvy’s JON HYNEMAN—With Sally Tibbs and Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

SUNDAY JULY 3 BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape CHRIS GUNDERSON BAND—5 p.m. FREE. Blue Door DJ CRAZE AND THE 12TH PLANET—With Bare, Dayne5150 and Freddy Sin. 8 p.m. $12.50$27.50. Knitting Factory GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GUTHRIE SAURO AND DOUG BROWN—1 p.m. FREE. Solid LE CASTLE VANIA—10 p.m. $10. Reef

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LUCINDA WILLIAMS— See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $35. Egyptian Theatre MUSIC FROM STANLEY: KELLY MARTIN—With Dan Costello. 4 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge

MONDAY JULY 4

JEFF MOLL AND GUESTS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

BILLY ZERA—7 p.m. FREE. Sully’s

KETCH’EM ALIVE: SWAGGER—7 p.m. FREE. Forest Service Park, Ketchum

DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

KEVIN KIRK—With Cheryl Morrell, Clark Sommers and Camden Hughes. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers RUSS PFEIFER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid SIX CENTS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

BROCK BARTEL—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

TERRI EBERLEIN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

LARRY BUTTEL—7 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

UBER TUESDAYS: FOLLOW THAT BIRD—With Teens, Art Fad and Hypno Safari. 7 p.m. FREE. VAC

PUNK MONDAY—Featuring Skaskank Redemption, Matt Smith and Upinatem. 8 p.m. $3. Liquid THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WEDNESDAY JULY 6

TUESDAY JULY 5

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: HONEY ISLAND SWAMP BAND—With Thomas Paul. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove

BROCK BARTEL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe DCI DRUM CORPS SHOW—Featuring The Cadets, Cascades, Blue Knights and more. 8 p.m. $20-$30. Nampa High School DIVIT AND FONNY—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KARMEN WOLFE ENSEMBLE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Blue Door KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers NEKO CASE—8 p.m. $25-$55. Knitting Factory RICO WEISMAN AND KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadMeridian TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill WILSON ROBERTS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LUCINDA WILLIAMS, EGYPTIAN, JULY 3 Lucinda Williams is hard to pin down. The rock/country/ folk/blues singer-songwriter was nominated for three Grammys in 2002: Best Female Country, Pop and Rock Vocal Performance—she took the latter award home. But that wasn’t Williams’ first brush with the Grammys. After decades playing honky tonks and crooning throaty tales of hard drinking and harder loving, Williams won a Grammy for Best Country Song in 1994 for Mary Chapin Carpenter’s cover of “Passionate Kisses.” She followed that up with a Grammy for Best Contemporary Folk Album for her 1998 smash hit Car Wheels on a Gravel Road. Her music might be hard to pin down but her heart was not. In 2009, Williams giddily married her manager Tom Overby in front of 1,500 fans at a club in Minneapolis. Though some worried that marital bliss might sand down the rough edges of this notoriously soul-baring musician, her most recent album, Blessed, shows that’s not the case. —Tara Morgan 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $35. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

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LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

CABLE ONE MOVIE NIGHT—Bring your lawn chairs, snacks (or purchase some there), blankets and the entire family to watch a flick on an inflatable screen in the park every Friday night at dusk this summer. The movie this week is Yogi Bear, rated PG. Friday, July 1. FREE, Settlers Park, corner of Meridian and Ustick Roads, Meridian, meridiancity.org/movienight.

LIFE AFFIRMING Faith that Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life is film at its best GEORGE PRENTICE

GASLAND—Filmmaker Josh Fox travels the country documenting fracking activities. Idaho Conservation League’s Program Director Justin Hayes will lead a discussion about the consequences of chemical drilling and fracking proposals in Idaho. Wednesday, June 29, 7 p.m. $10. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise. com. THE MARK OF ZORRO—Theater organist Thomas Trenney will accompany the 1920 silent film on the theater’s pipe organ. Douglas Fairbanks stars. Sponsored by the American Guild of Organists regional convention. See Picks, Page 15. Wednesday, July 6, 8 p.m. $10-$20. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. TONY AND JANINA’S AMERICAN WEDDING—Documentary that tells the story of a couple whose lives are torn apart because of red-tape issues within the U.S. immigration system. See Picks, Page 14. Thursday, June 30, 7 p.m. $7-$10 suggested donation. The Cole Marr Gallery/Coffee House, 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, 208-336-7630.

Opening

BEGINNERS—Ewan McGregor plays a man figuring out life, love, loss and his relationship with his father (Christopher Plummer), who comes out of the closet and discovers that he is terminally ill at the age of 75. (R) The Flicks INCENDIES—In Montreal, Nawal Marwan reveals that the father of her grown twins is alive, along with the brother they never knew about. She sets them on a journey to find and deliver a message from her posthumously. In French with English subtitles. (R) The Flicks

Every now and then—perhaps once or twice in a generation—someone throws a lifeline to the movies. Treading water in a lake of mediocrity by clinging to special effects that are neither special nor effective, film can often be confused with other media. It’s not unusual, for instance, to experience the same market-driven blandness on a big screen, small screen (television) or smaller “I’m holding up 10 fingers, son. That’s how many Oscar nominations I think this film will get.” screen (smart phone). As a result, film’s ability to astonish has Kubrick-esque scenes of the origins of the and Robert Rodriguez could readily direct been diluted. Once upon a time, pioneers universe. But there is not a wasted frame in each other’s movies, as could J.J. Abrams like Charles Chaplin, Orson Welles and the 138-minute movie. Audiences are chaland Steven Spielberg), Malick is peerless. Federico Fellini blazed new trails, but lenged to consider faith in a deity, faith in His story and characters exist somewhere almost every director since has chosen the between dreams and consciousness, floating one another and, ultimately, faith in themroad most traveled. But then there is Terselves. It’s heady stuff and not for someone among fantasy, memory and fear. rence Malick (Badlands, Days of Heaven, looking for a simple diversion. Labeling The Tree The Thin Red Line, Brad Pitt gives his finest performance to of Life a masterpiece The New World). In date. Forget his previous Oscar nominations portends pretension. The Tree of Life, the TREE OF LIFE (PG-13) (12 Monkeys and The Curious Case of BenIn fact, when the writer/director guides Directed by Terrence Malick movie won the Palme jamin Button). This is the one that should a movie back to adStarring Brad Pitt, Sean Penn, garner an Academy Award nod. With the d’Or at this year’s venturous landscapes, Jessica Chastain Cannes Film Festival, sparest of dialogue, Pitt fits perfectly into reminding us that Now playing at The Flicks I shuddered in fear of the suit of a husband and father constructed at its best, film has of caution and self-doubt. His co-star, Jesa movie placed on a more in common with sica Chastain, plays his wife and mother of pedestal rather than poetry than any other three boys with mystery and wonder. simply on a screen. But in two viewings, I art form. At its core, The Tree of Life examines was thrilled by its power. The Tree of Life is about imagery—rope the most basic moral elements that define The story of The Tree of Life is indeed swings, clotheslines, jack-o-lanterns and a us by our souls rather than our skins. If the story of life itself. While anchored mother’s apron—but it is also about imperyou’re not afraid of a film unlike any other, by a middle-American family in 1950s fection, faith and being in awe of life, subThe Tree of Life beckons you to a nice spot Texas, it also explores the human species. jects most directors never dare approach. just under its lowest-hanging branch. The I watched more than a few people squirm While so many contemporary filmmakdappled shade is heavenly. in their seats (and a few walk out) during ers are interchangeable (Quentin Tarantino

SCREEN/THE TUBE THE REBIRTH OF DAYTIME TV

LARRY CROWNE—Romantic comedy starring Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts as two people trying to find themselves but end up finding each other. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

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Once upon a time, daytime television wasn’t half bad. OK, maybe it wasn’t one-third bad. You could find some decent—and even believable—stor ylines on soap operas like Ryan’s Hope. Mer v, Mike and Dinah hosted respectable talk shows and game shows were pretty entertaining (watch some old clips of Paul Lynde on Hollywood Squares). Daytime television was a cash cow for the networks, generating huge revenue with programs that didn’t make viewers cringe. Fast-forward a few decades and daytime is a mess. Soaps are barely hanging on (All My Children and One Life to Live were recently pink-slipped), there’s really only one successful game show anymore (The Price is Right) and talk shows are an embarrassment. Even the early morning so-called news programs like Good Morning

When you look this good, there’s always a place for you on TV.

America, Today and whatever they call that thing on CBS have more in common with Entertainment Weekly than Time magazine. But just as it’s always darkest before the dawn, a couple of A-listers are about to step into the daylight. CNN’s Anderson Cooper begins a daytime talk program this fall. His street cred is solid, and while Cooper went the opposite route, he is not unlike a young Dick Cavett, who started out in daytime before his iconic ABC late-night program. (If you’re not familiar with Cavett, The Dick Cavett Show, which ran from 1969-1975, is now available on DVD.) And Katie Couric, perhaps the biggest talent ever launched from the Today Show, has given up the CBS anchor chair to return to daytime. Her talk show begins in 2012. Respectability may still have a place during the day. —George Prentice WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

LISTINGS/SCREEN NEW DVD RELEASE/SCREEN

MONTE CARLO—Three girlfriends skip out on their waitressing jobs in small-town Texas and head to Paris, where Grace (Selena Gomez) is mistaken for a famous socialite. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 40

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code.

SUCKER PUNCH

MAX MANUS

Zack Snyder made an impact with 300 scantily clad Spartans destined to lose in battle against Persians. After the success of the film 300, he followed that formula with the release of Sucker Punch—only this time, he subtracted 295 men, turned them into women warriors in skimpy clothes and threw them into a fantasy world. Emily Browning plays Babydoll, a girl who is locked in an insane asylum after she loses everything she knows. Determined to escape, she rallies four other ridiculously attractive girls to fight for their freedom. Given instructions from a wise man (Scott Glenn), Babydoll leads her followers in a quest crafted from her imagination that will ultimately liberate them from their captors, Blue (Oscar Isaac) and Madame Gorski (Carla Gugino).

Max Manus’ name reached international recognition with the release of this gripping war film, which is based on the true story of a Norwegian war hero. Directed by Joachim Roenning and Espen Sandberg, the movie captures patriotism through a single man’s journey to liberate his country during World War II. A displaced saboteur (Aksel Hennie) finds his way home to Norway during Nazi Germany occupation. Finding similarly outraged countrymen, they form an independent fighting force, Rognes Organization. Max becomes a target for the Gestapo commander Siegfried Wolfgang Fehmer. As the war drags on and lives are lost, Max struggles to perform his operation and holds himself responsible for the lives of his colleagues. —Lizzy Duffy

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

WEB/SCREEN BACON STRIPS AND BACON STRIPS Canada has given us more than just Nickelback and Justin Bieber. Another gift from our neighbor to the north: Epic Meal Time. EMT (the acronym may not be a coincidence) is an online “cooking show” that more closely resembles the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest than Emeril Live. The weekly episodes show six friends demolishing highbuds on an incredible journey.” The dudes only calorie meals that they create from meat, get drunker and more absurd as the series alcohol and fast food. It’s hard to look away. continues. Their most “epic” meal, the Sloppy There is something mind-boggling about an 85Roethlisberger, contained 20 pounds of ground egg sandwich, Four Loko chili and a Deathstar beef and 20 pounds of bacon on a 10-pound made of beef. And any meal is better with bun. It contained 138,226 calories. more bacon strips. Seriously. Debuting in October 2010, the To watch the gallery Host Harley Morenstein used to friends made “The Worst Pizza of gluttony, visit be a teacher, molding young minds. Ever” with KFC chicken, a Taco Bell epicmealtime.com. Now he is molding food into bigger, Crunchwrap Supreme, a Big Mac, more outrageous food. Ah, the chicken nuggets, a Baconator, American dream. french fries, an A&W burger, onion rings and a —Brady Moore cheese pizza in an attempt “to take their tasteWWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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NEWS/REC B R ADY M OOR E

REC

HANGING TEN IN IDAHO Surprised to find surfing in the Gem State ANDREW MENTZER

Thousands of young athletes hope to kick their way to the national level.

HAVING A BALL

—Brady Moore

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savvy at surfing and knowledgeable about river hydraulics. Successfully and safely surfing on a river requires many of the same mechanics as ocean surfing and can be just as dangerous. River rapids are very different from day to day—runoff, rocks, water temperature and other users on the water can make surfing river waves unpredictable and potentially hazardous.

ers who are fortunate to live near a beach, Baker likes to hit local river waves during his lunch break—sometimes he even takes his kayak out. “The surfing community in Boise is very close-knit and dedicated to the sport,” said Baker. Temperatures make what a river can throw at a surfer completely different than what a surfer might get a face full of while catching a wave in say, Hawaii. Not being cautious in icy waters can be a hardlearned lesson. “The water is bone-numbingly cold snow melt ... [that] has given me a healthy respect for the power of the river,” Baker said. Another dedicated member of the surfing community is Jeff Banks with Boisebased Glide Stand-Up Paddle Boards, who has been river surfing for years in this area. “Waves tend to be a little bit slower on the river [than in the ocean],” Banks said. “It’s nice because you can set up in the eddy next to the wave and prepare in a calm setting.” Banks recommends that people looking to try river surfing for the first time—whether on a long board, short board or stand-up paddle board—take a whitewater safety and/ or swiftwater rescue class before trying the sport. He also recommends the upper wave at Kelly’s Whitewater Park in Cascade as a great and safe wave to learn on. Once a surfer feels comfortable enough to test his or her skills, other popular spots in the area include the Gutter outside of Horseshoe Bend, the 36th Street wave between Boise and Garden City, as well as the Weir, Fish Ladder and a handful of other seasonal rapids on the Payette River. Arguably Idaho has some of the best river recreation in the United States, if not the world. And the opportunities continue to arise. Keep an eye out for the completion of the Ray Neef MD Boise River Recreation Park, which will give Boise thrill seekers additional resources for whitewater fun. It may not be long before Idaho is right alongside California or Hawaii when a surfer goes looking for da kine waves. BEN WILSON

In the parking lot at the Simplot Spor ts complex in East Boise, there is usually a mix of 1A and 2C “Famous Potato” license plates. But if you had stopped by the park last week, you would have noticed a number of out-of-state plates. On June 22-26, at least 5,000 athletes on 232 teams from 14 states took to the fields to compete for a chance to play at the national level during the U.S. Youth Soccer 2011 Far West Regionals. Erik Ocampo, coach of the San Diego Surf, a team of mostly 11-year-olds, said he was looking forward to playing more matches and building on what his team had learned at home. Nearby, a group of girls in team uniforms juggled soccer balls and practiced catching goals at the same time a match was taking place a few feet away. With 20 fields for the matches, For more information, and all of them visit full, there was usyouthsoccer.org. activity everywhere. Grass-stained sixth-graders played on a field next to sweaty collegebound high-schoolers—securing a spot on a college team is a major draw for the teens. Coaches from dozens of colleges and universities attended the tourney, hoping to spot their next star player. Laurie McConnell of the Boise Convention and Visitors Bureau said the event, which Boise has hosted three times—in the mid-80s, in 1996 and in 2006—brings approximately $10 million to the valley thanks to the players, coaches and parents who visit. And they all seem to enjoy coming here. “We continue to hear from par ticipants that they love coming to Boise. They love the quality and proximity of the fields, the weather, the location, the amenities Boise has to offer—they love it all,” said McConnell. The national finals will be held in Phoenix later this summer. McConnell said the Idaho Youth Soccer Association would like to bring the tournament back to Boise ever y three or four years and that the BCVB will work to make that a reality.

Without an ocean nearby, you’d think someone living in landlocked Idaho with a yearning to hang ten would be left hanging out to dry. It seems a bit counterintuitive for the Gem State, but wave lovers can carve out some serious fun right here at home. Innovators have begun surfing Idaho’s rivers on standard ocean surfboards or stand-up paddle boards, picking up where only rafters and

Additionally, a river wave will often be kayakers had previously dared travel. in close proximity to more turbulent rapids The specific origins of river surfing are downstream—given that they occur as a up for debate, but there are reports of recresult of geography and a changing river reationists riding both standing waves and bottom. One mistake on a wave and a surfer the occasional tidal bore dating back to the could be in for a crazy ride down river. 1970s. When a high volume of water flows And though sharks may be of no concern over an obstacle, like a rock at the river in Idaho’s rivers, there are other monsters bottom, a standing wave is created. A tidal lurking beneath. Some man-made spots have bore is an erratic increased volume of water twisted rebar hidden pushing up a river just under the surface, from the ocean that which could easily can travel for miles For more information on the Ray Neef MD fillet someone who under perfect condiBoise River Recreation Park, hasn’t done his or tions. They are quite visit boiseriverpark.com. her homework before rare (and don’t hapFor more on stand up paddling, visit glidesup.com. getting amped about pen at all in Idaho). getting on some river Big spring runoff waves. this year made for The challenges and excellent river surfing. inherent dangers of river surfing make for As summer heats up, surfing opportunia relatively small group of avid purists who ties begin to recede. Even though the river know what they are doing. surfing season is wrapping up, it’s a good Dr. Steven Baker of Habitat Veterinary time to start learning more about it if you’re Health Center in Bown Crossing knows thinking of trying it out. Of course, it should what he is doing and, much like ocean surfonly be attempted by people who are both

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

LISTINGS/REC PLAY/REC

Register

VOODOO LOU NGE

THE DIRTY DASH—Prepare to get down and dirty on this muddy obstacle course/race to be held Saturday, Aug. 27, at 9 a.m. Register online at thedirtydash. com through Sunday, Aug. 14. $40-$50. Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-332-5100, bogusbasin.org. FIT FOR LIFE HALF MARATHON—Register online at bluecirclesports.com through race day for this 5K or half-marathon to be held at 7:30 a.m. on Saturday, July 9. The race begins at Memorial Stadium and follows the Greenbelt to Julia Davis Park and back. $28. Hawks Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com.

EXHIBITIONISTIC EXERCISE Not long ago, the Voodoo Lounge downtown began hosting a pole-dancing fitness class open to anyone 21 and older. The instructions at voodoolounge.com were simple: “To sign up, text ‘POLE’ to 914-1670.” So I did what any mid-30s, outdoorsy and somewhat nerdy woman with an impulsecontrol problem would do. I texted the word “POLE” to the number I spent the next hour waiting for a response and cursing the developers who had designed the Blackberr y without an “un-do” button. Other kinds of classes I sign up for involve registration forms and maybe even a liability waiver. But I had to hand it to Voodoo—anonymity fosters boldness. Just as I was about to forget about the whole thing, I received a response: “See you on Thursday. Wear shorts and a tank top. Don’t use any moisturizing lotion on that day—it makes it harder to grip the pole.” And that is why I headed out one weeknight clad in a spaghetti-strap tank and teeny-tiny shorts that I only ever dared use as sleepwear. Not easily intimidated in the arena of sports, I was surprised at how uncharacteristically self-conscious I was when our gorgeous instructor, Eva, opened the class with a demonstration. Her straight black hair made a perfect arc across her shoulders as she swung around the pole. Although she was petite, her toned legs appeared to extend for miles, each ending with a delicately pointed toe. She owned that pole effortlessly. Using just the right blend of flattery and encouragement, Eva convinced me that I was a natural. For some reason, she had me believing that I had been endowed with a divine gift— that I was born to wrap my half-naked body around brass and spin 360s in the name of entertainment (or fitness). “We’re gonna get you upside down tonight,” she said. “No doubt about it.” As the class progressed, I broke a sweat, huffing and puffVOODOO LOUNGE ing more than I had anticipated. 208-941-2144 My perspective on professional voodooloungeboise.com pole dancers was evolving as rapidly as my heart rate. I had always considered them to be little more than pretty distractions for men in seedy bars, but I was learning that they might actually be high-caliber athletes. As a seasoned marathoner, I’m well-acquainted with quad pain. But for the next four days, the entire right side of my body was wrecked with a muscle soreness unlike any other I had ever experienced. Rolling over in bed was ill-advised, and the upper body action of running made even a slow jog out of the question. While I don’t like being sidelined for any reason, I do enjoy a good ache from an effective workout. I also enjoy being good at sports. So although my “booty pop” is solid, I’ll be back at Voodoo Lounge to work on my “inverted corkscrew.” Uh ... I mean my internal core strength. —Sarah Barber WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

GOOSE CREEK RUNOFF—Register online at goosecreekrunoff. com for this 10K or four-mile race to be held at 7 a.m. on Saturday, July 23. There is also a one-mile kids race. $20-$45, goosecreekrunoff.com. HAILEY FOURTH OF JULY CRITERIUM—Registration opens at Wiseguy and KB’s at 11:30 a.m. on Monday, July 4, for this race, to be held after the parade in downtown Hailey. $35, haileyidaho.com. IDAHO STATE CRITERIUM CHAMPIONSHIP—Register online at new.sportsbaseline.com through Friday, Aug. 5, for this criterium to be held on Sunday, Aug. 7, beginning at 9 a.m. $10$30, lostrivercycling.org. TABLE ROCK CHALLENGE— Register online at bluecirclesports.com through race day for this 4.5-mile run up Shaw Mountain to Table Rock Bluffs and back, for a total of nine miles, to be held on Saturday, Sept. 10, at 9 a.m. $25-$35. YOGA IN THE GARDEN—Call 208-343-8649 to register for this yoga class to be held on four consecutive Tuesday mornings at 8:45 a.m. beginning July 5. Open to all skill levels. $30 member, $45 nonmember. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Events & Workshops 2011 BASEBALL CAMP—Kids receive two days of exclusive instruction by Hawks players and coaches during this camp, along with a T-shirt, two tickets to a game a certificate of completion and an autograph session with the team. Wednesday, July 6, 8 a.m.-noon, and Thursday, July 7, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. $80. Hawks Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208322-5000, boisehawks.com. BOISE CRICKET CLUB LEAGUE GAME—Head to the park to watch two of the Boise Cricket Club’s three teams play. 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Blvd., Boise. BOISE HAWKS BASEBALL—vs. Yakima Bears. Monday, July 4, 7:35 p.m.; Tuesday, July 5, and Wednesday, July 6, 7:15 p.m. $7-$12. Hawks Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com.

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FOOD/YEAR OF IDAHO FOOD

BEHIND THE CURTAIN A photo essay of what goes on in a restaurant kitchen WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY GUY HAND Few worlds revolve in such tight orbit and yet are so starkly dissimilar as the “front of the house,” or dining area of a restaurant, and the seldom-seen kitchen area, or “back of the house.” As you sip your syrah comfortably ensconced in serene, softly lit surroundings, the restaurant’s kitchen staff are likely doing battle in an environment that resembles the cramped, overheated chaos of a submarine. Fires flare, knives flash and orders are barked. Split-second decisions can mean life or death to a rare ribeye or somebody’s job. The back of the house can also be exhilarating, nearly heroic, full of dedicated people doing precise, physically demanding work for hours on end. At times it can also be a hell of a lot of fun. For this photo essay, I hung out during three weekend nights at four of downtown Boise’s biggest restaurants. And for letting me peek behind the curtain, I’d like to thank the folks at Red Feather Lounge, Bittercreek Ale House, Fork and Berryhill & Co.

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FOOD CON’T

Clockwise from the right: FORK 199 N. Eighth St. 208-287-1700 boisefork.com RED FEATHER LOUNGE / BITTERCREEK ALE HOUSE 246 N. Eighth St. 208-429-6340 justeatlocal.com BERRYHILL AND CO. 121 N. Ninth St. 208-387-3553 johnberryhillrestaurants.com

SLIDESHOW: Scan the code to see more photos or visit boiseweekly.com.

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FOOD/NEWS LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

FOOD/DISH Restaurants get one chance to hit BW with their best shot. LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

Co-op sushi counter? Sriracha-cha.

SUNSETS, SUSHI AND BEER Sunset Magazine, a glossy monthly mag that covers travel, food and design in 13 Western states, recently named the Capital City Public Market one of the top 10 farmers markets in the West. Ranked at No. 6, the CCPM is sandwiched between the Santa Fe Farmers Market in Santa Fe, N.M., and the San Joaquin Farmers Market in Stockton, Calif. According to the article, the top “find” at the Boise market is a new booth: “See those folks walking around with mason-jar mugs? Follow them to the BuckSnort Root Beer booth, where on tap is Bellevue, Idaho-brewed tea that blends molasses, cane juice, wintergreen and natural roots like licorice and a sassafras extract. Imagine, a soda that’s actually good for you.” To read the entire piece, visit sunset.com. Speaking of good for you, Boise Co-op has been offering a stash of under-theradar, super-cheap, in-house sushi next to its meat counter. Apparently word has gotten out. A few weeks ago, the co-op opened a full-time, made-to-order sushi counter next to the brats and sausages. Though prices have gone up—from around $4.99 to $6.99 a roll—you can now dream up and order your own sushi, Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Roll options include fresh items like Chilean rock crab, hamachi tuna, mango, avocado, sunflower seeds and kabayaki sauce. The co-op uses mostly organic produce in its sushi, only serves natural pickled ginger without food coloring or 47

46 | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Brewforia might be a beer store first but we aren’t pulling your leg: the pulled pork sandwich is easily one of the best.

BREWFORIA AT BOWN Brewforia isn’t kidding around. One flank of the Bown Crossing cafe and market is occupied by snaking shelves, displaying hundreds of beers from floor to ceiling like an alcoholic parody of an academic library. One half expects to see a bespectacled tavern keeper climbing a stepladder to reach a rare porter. Despite there being so many varieties of beer, the space is miraculously uncluttered, with polished concrete floors and wooden tables bathed in natural light from the large front windows. It’s exactly the sort of place where one can truly unwind with a beer sans flashing neon. Co-owner Chris Oates said a beer only stays on tap for a few days until the keg runs dry and is swapped out for something else. Oates also said that Brewforia’s second location is working to implement a rotating cast of food specials. “It’s fun for us as beer-lovers to have different beers on tap,” he said. “It’s the same thing with food. We’re here all the time, and we like to try different things.” Unfortunately, when BW visited, none of those new things were vegetarian, as my dining companion quickly noticed. The clerk suggested the Old World sandwich ($6.99), with granny smith apples, balsamic caramelized onions, arugula and bleu cheese, hold the ham. BREWFORIA AT BOWN Carnivores, on the other 3073 S. Bown Way hand, do well at Brewforia. I 208-342-1916 selected the pulled pork sandbrewforia.com wich, The Charleston ($6.99), along with a watermelon ale. The pork was a high-quality cut and had none of the soggy or stringy texture the dish is notorious for. Instead, it had a firm, yet tender consistency and was marinated in a tangy Carolina mustard. Though the coleslaw was unremarkable, it was a dry mix that did little to degrade the structural integrity of the soft sourdough hoagie roll. Between the bright flavors and the firmness, it was easily the best pulled pork this reviewer has had in Boise. Oates, however, is quick to mention that although his chef graduated magna cum laude from the Le Cordon Bleu program in Portland, Ore., the menu is beer-not food-based. “It’s definitely good food, but it’s secondary,” he said. “We’re a beer store first and a restaurant second.” But if pulled pork like that is what comes from prioritizing beer over food in menu selection, then let’s hope more local restaurants follow suit. Now, if Brewforia can just find a beer that goes well with some vegetarian grub. —Josh Gross

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NEWS/FOOD BEER GUZZLER/FOOD

WITBIERS No country in Europe offers a more diverse array of beer styles than Belgium. From thirst-quenching pilsners and lowalcohol table beers to strong ales and heady lambics, there’s definitely something for everyone. For summer consumption, one of my favorites is witbier. These refreshing wheat brews are marked by ample carbonation and are lightly flavored with a mixture of herbs called gruit (typically including coriander and orange peel). Here are three delicious examples, two from Belgium and one hailing from Missouri. BOULEVARD BREWING ZON BEER This Kansas City entry is named for the Flemish word for sun. It’s a cloudy custard color in the glass with a thin, shortlived head. It offers lemon zest and freshly proofed yeast on the nose, with lightly floral hops and spice. On the palate, it has a pleasant sour tang with soft lemon and a touch of pepper. There is a bit more of a hop presence than is typical, but overall it’s a nice nod to the style. HOEGAARDEN WITBIER This beer pours a hazy, light straw color with a thick, whipped egg-white head that lingers. The aromas are a pleasant mix of fresh hay, ripe citrus and spice, while the flavors are a balanced mix of sweet fruit and sour mash. You get hits of fresh bread, apricot, orange and banana, with subtle spice and a long finish. Just a light kiss of hops lurk in the background in this completely refreshing brew. WITTEKERKE AUTHENTIC BELGIAN WHEAT BEER This offering from Belgium’s Bavik brewery has the same hazy color as the Hoegaarden, but the froth on top is less dense and collapses more quickly. The crisp, clean aromas are marked by soft citrus, wheat and spice. In the mouth, it’s firm and dry with creamy Meyer lemon, yeasty grain. A touch of basil and spice linger nicely on the finish. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

aspartame, and offers brown rice upon 46 request. From brown rice to barley, Brewforia is presenting another beer festival, slated to take place Saturday, Aug. 6, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 7, from noon to 7 p.m. in Ann Morrison Park. The Barley Bros. Traveling Beer Show will offer 200 beers from more than 80 craft brewers, including regional favorites like Ninkasi, Deschutes and Rogue and more obscure breweries like Bear Republic, Laurelwood, Chuckanut and Raccoon Lodge Brewpub. Two weeks ago, Salt Tears Coffeehouse and Noshery introduced its newest concept: Tuesday Night Family Style Dinners. Each Tuesday features a different seasonal menu served in family-sized portions for one flat price per person—$11 for adults and $5.50 for children 12 and younger. Last week’s menu included garden herbmarinated grilled shrimp skewers, roasted Yukon gold potatoes, grilled corn on the cob with ancho chili butter, Farmer Marty’s sugar snap peas, and fresh bread and butter. Whether you’re flying solo or bringing the whole Brady Bunch, Salt Tears guarantees no one will leave hungry. Also, if you want a cold glass of sauvignon blanc or an IPA to wash back your meal, Salt Tears also recently secured its wine and beer license. To view the full booze menu, visit salttears. com. After running into some unforeseen inspection delays, R&R Public House in Meridian has finally opened its doors. The food and beer pub had a soft opening on June 27 and its official grand opening on June 28. The menu features items like Puget Sound Manila clams, steelhead and Cornish game hen with sides like mustard greens with ham hocks, Brussels sprouts and roasted root veggies. Beers currently on tap include Unita porter, Dog Father stout and Anchor Steam Liberty ale. For more info, visit rrpublichouse.com. —Tara Morgan

BOISEweekly | JUNE 29 – JULY 5, 2011 | 47

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2BD +, house in Garden City. W/D, partly furnished. W/S/T incl. Rent $565/mo. Security dep. $350. One small pet? Nonrefundable application fee. Call 208-3437901 or 208-369-3144. BOISE DOWNTOWN CONDO 2BD, 1BA. Hardwood floors, granite, stainless, cherry cabinets. W/D hookup, A/C & all electric. Walk-up street access. Gated secure parking. HOA’s included. $1050/mo. Call Don 880-2746.

BENCH DUPLEX New paint & carpet! Near BSU, I-84, Downtown. $600/mo. Call 949-5319.

BW FOR SALE Beautiful lot in the forest, McCall. On the bike path, private nature trail. Walk to golf course, town and lake. Appraised at $115k, now $27,000 Welcome to the recession! Call Michael at 208283-1415.

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BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED HOME Wonderful 2BD, 2BA. 1995 Fleetwood mobile home located in the desirable Ponderosa Mobile Home Park, 2725 N. Five Mile Rd. Space 15. Really nice landscaped home features covered porch and patio. Includes washer, dryer, stove, refrigerator and outdoor storage shed. Convenient to public transportation, retail, grocery, banking and more! Home has gone thru the Idaho Power Energy House Call Program. Call Deborah with Idaho Properties at 208-484-0752 for a showing. See virtual tour at www. tourfactory.com/754891. Priced to sell at $23,500.

BW REAL ESTATE SERVICES REAL ESTATE LOANS Idaho based private lending company will provide short-term ,1-2 yrs.,financing on investment real estate. We do not provide loans on primary residences. Call Diane Barker at 208-720-3438. YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS SINGLES WINE/BEER TASTING If you’re tired of trying to meet single people on line then you have to check us out. We have a safe, relaxed, and great way to meet singles in person. The best part is you get to taste some good beer & wine. We start out by doing some wine or beer tasting depending on which one you choose and mingling with each other. Then we do a little speed dating to allow everyone a chance to get to know each other. Then you are free to mingle with each other afterward. What a great way to meet singles! You can contact us at bobm26@aol.com for more info or check us out on facebook by searching for Boise Area Singles Events group. 1981 BOISE HIGH REUNION 1981 Boise High School ‘30th Class Reunion August 5, 6 & 7. Early registration ends July 15th. All details are on the Official 1981 Boise High 30th Class Reunion website: boisehighreunion81.yolasite. com/

BW LOST LOST TURQUOISE RING Sterling silver, 3 round points on each side of square turquoise stone. Lost in Reserve parking lot trailhead 6/16 noonish. Please email layna03@msn.com if found.

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RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

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BARTER BW HAVE Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. No phone calls please. SWAPCAFE.COM Come join us! Trade your stuff, your skills, your inventory. Submit via SwapCafe.Net for personal swaps or SwapCafe.Com for B2B. Good luck trading! Questions Info@SwapCafe.Net

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COOK EXTRAORDINAIRE Willow Park Assisted Living is seeking a FT Relief Cook. Benefits after 6 mo. of employment. We are currently looking for someone who loves to cook with nothing but the freshest ingredients. This is not an institutional food setting but you will be working with Executive Chef in preparation of meals and special events. If you have the passion to cook & experience, please come apply at 2600 N. Milwaukee, Boise, between Ustick & Northview. No Phone calls or emails please. NOW HIRING The ID Dept. of Finance is seeking a full-time IT Programmer Analyst, Sr. to join their team. $18.73 -$26.17/hr. DOE. Apply online at dhr.idaho.gov or call 334-2263.

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BW HELP WANTED $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

RIGHT SCHOOL, RIGHT DEGREE, RIGHT NOW!

HEALTHCARE CAREER CLASSES Nurse, Medical Assistant, Billing Coding, Dental. www.get-learning.com/healthcare

BEAUTY

boise’s organic skincare Facials and waxing By appointment only Gift certificates available Éminence organic skincare products 729 N. 15th St. 208 344 5883 remedyskincareboise.com

Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

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B OI SE W E E K LY FOR SALE BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 8881464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. RECALL LUNA T-SHIRTS Recall Luna T-shirts in Andrus blue. S - XL. 10 Bucks; XXL XXXL 12 Bucks. Cash only. Call Pete 853-0932. Thanks.

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FREE 20M CHAKRA READING Have you been feeling down and don’t know why? Do you feel blocked? Get a free $35, 20 min. detailed reading in exchange for a testimonial about your experience! This is a great way to experience the amazing accuracy for free & find out all the events, traumas & emotions that are blocking you! This offer will expire so don’t miss out! Contact us today for more details! www.guaranteedhealing.com

A awesome full body by Terrance. $45/hr. In home, studio/outcall. 841-1320. A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

BW HEALTH & FITNESS GROUP WEIGHT LOSS COURSES Group weight loss courses starting soon in Meridian, Eagle, & North Boise. Groups meet one evening/wk., right after Labor Day, continuing for 12 wks. Cost for individuals $295, or couples $445. $20 discount if registered by July 1st or $10 discount if by Aug. 1st. Class size is strictly limited to 20 participants & spaces fill up fast, so reserve your spot now! One on one coaching is also available any time & starts at just $91.50/mo. Call for more details: 283-2844.

BW SHOP HERE

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 8662759. ULM 340-8377.

VIP MASSAGE

Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

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BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

NEXT STEP AWARENESS Psychic reading for $30. For seeing your life for work, love and health. Call Ajna counseling 9192430. Day & evening appointments.

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Work & Live Buddhist center, Northern CA. Book bindery work, no exp. req’d. Also seeking experienced maintenance, groundskeeping, gardening. Includes living allowance, classes. No religious affiliation needed. 510-981-1987 contact@nyingma.org

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GUITAR LESSONS Beginning to advanced. All music styles. 20+ yrs. experience. Making it affordable to all who want to learn to play. Just $20/hr. Call Mitch 297-7642.

SINGER WANTED For Indie project. Looking for a singer to work with & finish some songs that I am working on. I have the recording gear. I am open to ideas & interested in bringing your music to life so collaboration is welcomed & a continued working relationship would be great. Live performance is in the future. My sound is somewhere between the Smiths, The Pretenders, Chris Isaak, Johnny Cash and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. Go to reverbnation.com/superloser or facebook.com/Super Loser to give a few songs a listen. If this interests you, please call or text J.P. at 208-540-0928.

BW SPIRITUAL Check Out: eckankar-idaho.org

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TRADE

Accepting Knick Knacks for in store trade at Thrift Store with a Twist. Jewelry, DVD’s, Clothes. 4610 W. State St. 570-7962.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW BEAUTY DAVID THE BARBER 10th St. Barbershop. Straight Razor Shaves. Now Open Early Mornings & Saturday 105 N. 10th St. 389-1000 Ask for David.

BW COUNSELING PORTAL COUNSELING Intuitive / spiritual counseling: portalcounseling.com

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SERVICES - HOME

PETS NOTICES

BW 4 WHEELS

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Junk cars, trucks, vans. Paying up to $200. 208-963-0492.

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Anthony Gilberto Carvajal Case No. CV NC 1111476 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Anthony G Carvajal, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, had been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Anthony Cale. The reason for the change in name is: I would like my stepfathers name since he is the one who raised me. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on August 11, 2011 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: June 20, 2011 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk Pub. June 29, July 6, 13, 20, 2011.

CAREERS - CAREER TRAINING

OLD HOME MOVIES OR VIDEOS? Give the gift that will bring back all those old memories. Convert old VHS, MINI-DV or 8MM video to DVD. Only $25/2 hrs. Bulk DVD or CD duplication available. Toll free 888-907-1559 or 353-8342. YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

SERVICES BW HOME TREASURE VALLEY HOME INVENTORY Professional & Confidential Home Inventory Services. Be prepared & take inventory before disaster strikes! www.TreasureValleyInventory.com 208-830-7564. FIVE STAR WINDOW CLEANING ~Professional and quality services~ Window cleaning, Residential & Commercial . New construction window cleaning. Pressure washing ~ Structure, driveways, sidewalks, dumpter areas, gutter cleaning/repairs, roof cleaning, hard water stain removal, holiday lighting, snow shoveling. ~Licened & insured~ Austin Pena, owner & operator 954-3755 or 562-8424.

BW PROFESSIONAL CUSTOM MAGNETIC SIGNS Great for mobile advertising 24/7. It’s easy to order custom magnetic from same day sign. You can check out the online store, or just print & fill out the fax order form with your idea. Perfect for construction, deliveries, and more. www.samedaysign.net/Public/ Magnetic-Signs.htm IN-HOME WINE TASTING PARTY! Need a reason to get-together with the girls? Having a housewarming and need help stocking your new wine cellar? Looking for Boise’s exciting, new wine tasting experience? Host a WineShop at Home party! WineShop at Home’s premier, artisan wine will not disappoint you or your guests and will be a great addition to your summer patio parties! Check us out at: www.WineShopatHome.com

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BEAU: 2-year-old male coonhound. House- and crate-trained. Good with teens and large dogs. Needs an active home and strong owner. (Kennel 319- #12936539)

RAIN: 7-year-old male border collie mix. Cratetrained and good with dogs and children. Extra large sized but gentle personality. (Kennel #324- #12921915)

ASIA: 8-month-old female American pit bull terrier. Appears house-trained. Would benefit from obedience classes. (Kennel 411#13232260)

CASEY: 2-year-old female domestic medium-hair cat. Sweet, sensitive, talkative and petite. (Kennel 63#13376753)

TOBY: 7-year-old male domestic shorthair. Mellow, laid back guy. Loves to be petted and receive attention. Very loving. (Kennel 101#13117763)

NAVI: 3-year-old female domestic shorthair. Litterbox-trained. Tiny, talkative and engaging. Likes attention but also independent. (Kennel 107- #13255834)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

SAMBUCA: Sweet, OPIE: Friendly, lovFLOWER: I’m a bigger older kitten looking for able guy seeking forever gal with more to love belly rubs and your love. home. and more love to give.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 29 –JULY 5, 2011 | 51

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B O I S E W E E K LY

NYT CROSSWORD | SAY WHAT?! BY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Nursery sounds 6 Bates’s “Misery” co-star

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33 Spots before your eyes? 34 Alaska Purchase negotiator 35 Symbol of royalty in old Egypt 36 Skunk, e.g. 38 Big-screen canine 40 Jeans brand 41 The majority 44 “You’re in danger, tall hill!” 49 Surname in a Poe tale 51 Check out 52 Like racehorses 53 Objectivist Rand 54 “The chair doesn’t recognize you, steakhouse and chophouse!” 59 Before, to Byron 60 Scorecard blemish 61 Lift provider 62 Vessels with spouts 65 Light TV fare 67 Sticky seedcase 68 Explorer Richard Byrd’s plane 70 Writing surface 71 Make nonsensical notes? 73 Roast V.I.P. 75 Work in the field 76 “I’d be miserable without you, tapestry!” 80 D.C.-based news source 82 Australia’s Lake ___ National Park 83 See 93-Across 84 Inasmuch as 85 “Goodbye, place I used to live!” 89 Philip with a 1975 best seller on C.I.A. secrets 90 Sistine Chapel ceiling figure 91 Like many sunscreens 92 Cessation 93 Is 83-Across 95 Big name in California wine 97 Endorser’s need 99 Another name for Buddha 103 Speak for everyone in the room 104 “Just keep doing what you’re doing, suitcases!” 109 One of the Bobbsey twins

110 “I read you loud and clear, breakfast meat!” 112 “It was all my fault, gun attachment!” 114 Over again 115 Pop singer Lopez 116 Addition to café 117 Keys in a chain 118 Amount that’s settled for 119 Caddie’s offering 120 “This looks like trouble!” 121 Manicurist’s aid

DOWN 1 Some nest builders 2 Lacking color 3 Diesel engine manufacturer 4 Rented out 5 Packs 6 Checked out before robbing 7 Athlete who wrote “Off the Court” 8 Complete 9 “You’re mistaken” 10 Certificate on a wall, maybe 11 “___ Pearl” (Jackson 5 hit) 12 Gossip subject 13 One that’s passed along 14 Brute of fantasy 15 Sign symbol 16 Kipling poem about Burma 17 Lack of constraints 18 James of “X-Men” films 24 Lay the groundwork 26 Great body 29 Old West gambling game 32 Inevitable 34 “Rugrats” father 36 ___ artist (film crew member) 37 Soprano pineapple and others, briefly 38 Con ___ (tenderly) 39 Something that shouldn’t be flat 41 Patrons of the arts 42 Green-skinned god 43 Old Jewish community 44 Pines 45 “Puss in Boots” figure

46 Former carrier name 47 Land heavily 48 Acronymic weapon 50 “Mr. ___” (1983 Styx hit) 55 19th Amendment beneficiaries 56 Cable network with the motto “Not reality. Actuality.” 57 Panhellenic Games site 58 Elementary school grads, typically 63 Ascendant 64 Torch bearer 66 Key group 67 Objected to a shearing, possibly 68 Pines 69 “Shucks!” 71 With deviousness 72 Michael of “Juno” 73 Lodge 74 Diner of 1970s-’80s TV 77 Giveaway at the poker table 78 Make 79 Not just big 80 Fictional island in two Alistair MacLean novels 81 Augurs 85 Situated at the thigh 86 Bearer of a dozen roses, maybe L A S T B A S A L

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87 A, in Arnstadt 88 Turn down 93 Showing deviousness 94 Person of Perth 96 Nurses old grudges, say 97 Runcible spoon feature 98 Banks known as Mr. Cub 99 Wayne’s pal in “Wayne’s World” 100 Fish 101 TV host with “New Rules” 102 Unable to relax 104 Serious attention 105 Lemon juice, e.g. 106 Home of Hallvard’s ruined cathedral 107 Life saver? 108 Vivacity 111 “Incidentally,” in chat rooms 113 Philosophy suffixt Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): When astronaut Buzz Aldrin flew to the moon on the spacecraft Apollo 11 in 1969, he was paid less than $8 a day. That has to stand as one of the most flagrant cases of underpaid labor ever— far worse than what you’ve had to endure in your career. I suggest you keep Aldrin’s story in mind during the next six months as you meditate steadily on the future of your relationship with making money. Hopefully, it will help keep you in an amused and spacious and philosophical frame of mind—which is the best possible attitude to have as you scheme and dream about your financial master plan for the years ahead. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): After meditating on your astrological omens for the rest of 2011, I’ve picked out the guiding words that best suit your needs. They’re from mythologist Joseph Campbell: “If you can see your path laid out in front of you step by step, you know it’s not your path. Your own path you make with every step you take. That’s why it’s your path.” Now here’s a corollary from Spanish poet Antonio Machado: “Wanderer, your footsteps are the road, nothing more; there is no road—you make the road by walking. Turning to look behind, you see the path you will never travel again.” GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Emma Goldman (1869-1940) was a charismatic activist whose writing and speeches had a big impact on leftist politics in the first half of the 20th century. Unlike some of her fellow travelers, she wasn’t a dour, dogmatic proselytizer. She championed a kind of liberation that celebrated beauty and joy. “If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be in your revolution,” she is alleged to have told a sourpuss colleague. As you contemplate the radical transformations, you might like to cultivate in your own sphere during the coming months, Gemini, I suggest you adopt a similar attitude. Make sure your uprisings include pleasurable, even humorous elements. Have some fun with your metamorphoses. CANCER (June 21-July 22): A while back, I asked my readers to propose a new name for your sign. “Cancer” has a bit of a negative connotation, after all. Many people suggested “Dolphin” as a replacement, which I like. But the two ideas that most captivated my imagination were “Gateway” and “Fount.” I probably won’t be able to convince the astrological community to permanently adopt either of these uplifting designations, but I encourage you to try them to see how they feel. This is a good time to experiment: For the next 12 months, you will have substantial potential to embody the highest meanings of both.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The year’s half over, Leo. Let’s talk about what you want to make happen in the next six months. My analysis of the astrological omens suggests that it’ll be an excellent time to formulate a long-term master plan and outline, in detail, what you will need to carry it out. For inspiration, read this pep talk from philosopher Jonathan Zap: “An extremely effective and grounded magical practice is to identify your big dreams, the missions you really need to accomplish in this lifetime. The test of a big dream comes from asking yourself, ‘Will I remember this well on my death bed?’ If you have a big dream, you will probably find that to accomplish it will require a minimum of two hours of devoted activity per day.” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “The passion to explore is at the heart of being human,” said Carl Sagan. “This impulse—to go, to see, to know—has found expression in every culture.” But Steven Dutch, a professor at the University of Wisconsin, disagrees. He says there’ve been lots of societies that have had little interest in exploration. Africans never discovered Madagascar or the Cape Verde archipelago, for example. Few Asian cultures probed far and wide. During a thousand years of history, ancient Romans ignored Russia, Scandinavia and the Baltic, and made only minimal forays to India and China. Where do you personally fit on the scale of the human exploratory urge, Virgo? Regardless of what you’ve done in the past, I bet you’ll be on the move in the coming months. Your hunger for novelty and unfamiliarity should be waxing. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the coming months, it’s likely you will experience more action than usual—some of it quite expansive—in your astrological eighth house. Traditional astrologers call this the sphere of sex, drugs, and rock ’n’ roll, but I refer to it as the realm of deep connection, altered states of awareness, and lyrical interludes that educate and enrich your emotional intelligence. Are you ready to have your habit mind rewired, your certainties reworked and your pleasures reconfigured? SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I hope that in the first half of 2011 you have been doing some devoted work on tidying up the messy old karma that had been interfering with the free flow of grace into your intimate relationships. If there’s still work to be done on that noble task, throw yourself into it now. The renaissance of togetherness is due to begin soon and last for many months. You don’t want any lingering ignorance, self-deceit or lack of compassion to gum it up.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1498, Leonardo da Vinci completed one of his masterworks, the mural known as “The Last Supper.” Nineteen years later, the paint had begun to flake off, and by 1556 Leonardo’s biographer considered the whole thing to be “ruined.” Over the centuries, further deterioration occurred, even as many experts tried to restore and repair it. The most recent reclamation project, finished in 1999, lasted more than two decades. I hope that in the coming months, Sagittarius, you will show a similar dedication to the high art of regeneration. Please work hard on bringing vitality back to what has fallen into stagnancy. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Last year, I asked Capricorns whether you ever obsessed on your longing to such a degree that you missed actually satisfying them. In response, a reader named John G. sent me the following corrective message: “We Capricorns comprehend the futility of too much longing. We understand it can be a phantasm that gets in the way of real accomplishment. It’s like a telephone that keeps ringing somewhere but can’t be found. We don’t waste energy on dreamy feelings that may or may not be satisfied, since that energy is so much better funneled into mastering the details that will bring us useful rewards.” I’m here to tell you that the coming months will be an excellent time to make use of the capacities John G. describes. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Truth is, everybody is going to hurt you,” sang Bob Marley. “You just gotta find the ones worth suffering for.” How are you doing on that score, Aquarius? Have you been discerning in picking out allies whose value to you is so high that you’re willing to deal with their moments of unconsciousness? Have you created a family and community that bless you far more than they drain you? The next 10 months will be an excellent time to concentrate on refining this part of your life. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Any minute now, you might start learning at a faster rate than you have since 2000. Any day now, you will be less bored than you have been since 2006, and any week now, you will be expressing more spontaneity than you have since early 2010. Any month now, Pisces, you will find yourself able to access more of your visionary intelligence than you have since maybe 2007. What does it all mean? You may not feel an amazing, spectacular, extraordinary degree of personal unity tomorrow, but you will soon begin building toward that happy state. By December, I bet you’ll be enjoying an unprecedented amount of it.

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