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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 18, ISSUE 52 JUNE 23–29, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 12

READY, SET, WAR Idaho soldiers prepare for battle CITIZEN 14

HOSTEL TERRITORY BW chats up the owner of Boise’s first youth hostel

NOISE 25

STRONG ARM Don’t mess with Danzig

FOOD 32

DOWN UNDER Food and wine at Twig’s Cellar

“It’s summed up in three words: ‘End the Fed.’”

FEATURE 15

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Business Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Annabel Armstrong Videographer: Blair Davison Interns: Philip Alexander, Stephen Foster, Rachel Krause, Jacob Lyman Contributing Writers: Michael Ames, Bill Cope, Jennifer Hernandez, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Lucas Wackerli, lucas@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Adam Rosenlund Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Steve Klamm, Glenn Landberg, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE BW WELCOMES PRENTICE Things have been pretty heady and serious in this space over the last few weeks. After writing about Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s health-care coverage, delivering news of staff departures and chastising the state for its lackluster record on human rights, I have some good news this goaround. Monday morning, BW welcomed a new member to the newsroom. George Prentice joined the editorial team this week to write and wrangle news, filling the vacancy left by Nathaniel Hoffman. For longtime Boise State Public Radio listeners, let me be the first to commiserate with you on the loss of Prentice in your morning routine. I flipped on KBSX’s Morning Edition, which Prentice hosted for three years, Monday morning and for a split second, wondered why the substitute host. When I finally made it to work, I almost asked Prentice to read the morning’s news aloud to the staff so we could get our fix. But getting used to a new voice on my morning radio is a small price to pay for what Prentice brings to the BW team, particularly in the news department. Though this is Prentice’s first issue as a BW staffer, and the first issue in which he’s contributed to the news section, this isn’t his first edition with a byline. Since March, Prentice has been making regular appearances in the Screen section and for a least the foreseeable future, will continue to tell you which films to see and which not to see each week. This week, Prentice recommends The Secret in Their Eyes (Page 30). Last week I promised news of Boise Weekly’s first-ever short film contest. It’s time to deliver on that promise. Sunday, July 11, is the deadline for the first Local Motion short film contest. Put together any video under three minutes that features Boise in some way and upload it at video.boiseweekly.com. BW readers will vote on the winner beginning on Monday, July 12. The grand prize is $250 in BW Card credit, which you can use at more than 20 restaurants in the valley. It’s free to enter. For details, see Cobweb or check the ad on Page 18. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Martin Wilke TITLE: still trying to find my way back home MEDIUM: Wood, maps, compass and found objects ARTIST STATEMENT: After drawing for decades, I quit. At least for awhile. I’m now building boxes that are designed to hang on a wall. I have about a dozen in progress and they continue to evolve. There are several later creations, as well as several years of drawings at martinwilke.com.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Square formats are preferred and all mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE MAIL

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MONDO GAGA

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Getting ready for war

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Curiouser and Curiouser 15 BW PICKS

THE SHORT SHORT COLLECTION If you missed i48, fret not. BW is compiling them at video. boiseweekly.com. Log on to view the dozen or so already online, or load yours and add it to the mix.

DEATH BY TWEET Just where does Tweeting about executions rank on the tacky meter? Pretty high, apparently. Thank Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff—who sent a 134-character message about authorizing Ronnie Lee Gardner’s execution—for asking the world to ponder the ethics of twittering about execution.

BACK TO AFRICA Fidel FBM Nshombo returns to Africa in search of family and an end to a journey he began 14 years ago. He’s there now, posting updates when he’s able to. Check the Grip for more.

HAVE SPARE TIME? BW ONLINE. From daily updates on what to do with your free time to weekly installments of karaoke reviews, you’re missing out on the latest in fun stuff if you’re not obsessing over Cobweb. All day. Everyday.

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Face the fear, one-on-one with Glenn Danzig 25 MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS Comedian Brian Regan takes the stage at the Morrison Center

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SCREEN The Secret in Their Eyes 30 MOVIE TIMES

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FOOD Two reviewers head underground to sip the offerings at Twig’s Cellar 32 BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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HOME SWEET HOME

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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Join us this summer for Boise’s premier riverfront patio experience. Enjoy wild salmon, local game, sustainable fresh fish, prime beef and local organic produce.

Reserve your table today. 4 | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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2010 Transportation Champions Congratulations to the 72 businesses and over 5,000 employee participants who led the way in May by promoting alternative transportation.

Platinum Champions City of Boise Community Planning Association CTA, Inc. Department of Administration Capitol Mall Parking Department of Environmental Quality Drake Cooper Eide Bailly Elks Rehab System FHWA Idaho Gravitas, Inc. HDR Engineering Healthwise, Inc. Holland & Hart LLP Idaho Conservation League Idaho Department of Commerce Idaho Department of Lands Idaho Industrial Commission

commuteride.com

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Idaho Power Idaho Professional Technical Kittelson & Associates, Inc. Micron Technology, Inc. REI Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center Trout Unlimited US EPA US Forest Service RMRS USDA-NASS, Idaho FO Wells Fargo Bank ACHD Ameriben/IEC Group BOB Trailers, Inc. Central District Health Department CH2M Hill

valleyride.org

BOISEweekly | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | 5

MAIL

FOR A LL THE PEAR LS B ILL C OPE SO SKI LLFU LLY C AS T, THEY AR E ME A NI NGLE SS TO S WINE ...” —WWIImartin, boiseweekly.com (BW, Opinion, “Plug Ugly,” June 23, 2010)

ONE FOR RALL Greetings local alternative information purveyors. I issue this correspondence to bring attention to some things I personally believe are important. While I have the general tendency to wrinkle my nose at Ted Rall and his column, I found myself in total agreement with this week’s rant (BW, Opinion, “Bad Mouth,” June 16, 2010). You see, I am a firm believer in all things constitutional. What I mean by that is I believe America has become such a serious mockery of what was originally intended that maybe the whole shebang should be filed as some sort of failed experiment. But, as Helen Thomas learned, when you have a “Zionist-occupied government,” freedoms become more like permissions, as Mr. Rall stated. Especially when you direct any kind of not only negative sentiment, but even dare to question the authority of decisions. Like it or not, speech is not the only constitutional “permission” that is becoming negated more and more everyday. What about unreasonable search and seizure? Or the second amendment? How about life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness? Also, I fail to understand how other more serious (in my opinion) issues fail to be recognized on a larger scale in your publication. I refer to the tiny column on local food economy, which really needs to be restructured, and the little tiny mention in the 8 Days Out section about the lecture for marijuana legalization at the

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public library. All of these are serious issues that need to be addressed on a larger scale. Freedom is important. So is local economy. As an employee at Bittercreek Ale House, I have the opportunity to meet and work with local farmers and understand the importance of their survival. I like food. I really like fresh food. I also like that at the very least, my freedom to go to the farmers market and purchase fresh food has not been negated by corporations who would rather sell me canned or frozen food for half the price. F*** that! Because canned vegetables taste so much better. Hah! What the f*** is wrong with people? —Bruce DeVino Jr., Boise

ONE AGAINST RALL Ted Rall’s column in the June 16 issue of Boise Weekly is deeply flawed (“Bad Mouth”). Rall states three generations of Jews have made their home in Israel, as if no Jews lived there before the 20th century. Jews have had a constant presence, despite the violent dispersals that started over 2,600 years ago in Israel, once called Palestine. Yes, the ancestors of most Jews there now moved to Israel once it became a state, mostly in the years following 1948—specifically when 800,000 Jews from Muslim countries moved there, fleeing oppression and murder at the hands of their Muslim neighbors, not to mention the European survivors of the Holocaust. In fact,

many Jews from Poland, Germany and Hungary did try to go back to their homes after WWII (as Helen Thomas suggested they should) only to be murdered by their countrymen who didn’t want them to return. Of course Helen Thomas is entitled to her bigoted opinion. I have yet to hear one person say she isn’t. Rall uses free speech as a canard to distract from the real issue: Does Hearst want Thomas’ kind of ignorance and contempt to be representing them on a world stage, specifically at the White House? Just because all of the other haters haven’t been fired for their incendiary speech doesn’t mean that Helen Thomas shouldn’t be. No one owes Helen Thomas an apology. Perhaps she owes one to Hearst for tarnishing their reputation. —Elizabeth Rodgers, Boise

ROAD SHARING, THE SAGA CONTINUES I’m glad that Patrick T. Storey (BW, Mail, June 16, 2010) has obtained a free copy of “Idaho Bicycling Street Smarts,” and I hope that many others will do so as well. The advice contained therein is meant to be taken as a whole, not quoted out of context in an attempt to prove a point. For example, while it is certainly true that “A welldesigned bike lane should encourage you to ride in the correct position on the road,” the same paragraph concludes as follows: “Remember: Don’t hesitate to leave the bike lane when necessary for your safety— WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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MAIL all the guidelines about lane position in this book apply whether or not there is a bike lane.â€? The overall message of “Street Smartsâ€? is that (with very few exceptions) the safest way for a cyclist to ride is as part of the normal trafďŹ c pattern, and that it is legal for other trafďŹ c to have to slow down for a cyclist from time-to-time. It’s an excellent resource for all who wish to ride as safely, efďŹ ciently and predictably as possible. —Robert Tencate, Boise

STATUS QUO When are we going to learn that our representatives in Congress are just there to maintain the status quo? Sen. Jim Risch is so proud that he has kept Mountain Home Air Force Base going. This is a fool’s

idea of “jobs for Idaho.� How much of our tax dollars is supporting these insane wars and “military industrial complex� that Republican President Dwight Eisenhower warned us about. Our tax dollars would be better spent developing wind, solar and other non-polluting industries that can power our state. This will allow us to break down the dams that clog the Snake River and let the salmon runs return and feed our tourist industries. Our representatives do not listen to us. They have their own agenda fueled by lobbyists’ donations. We need leaders in Idaho who will break from the failed agendas of the past. —David Theiler, Boise

CAN IT The following comments were posted at facebook.

     

S U B M I T

Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message.

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com/boiseweekly on “Road Sharing 101 Adds Cans to the Mix,� a Citydesk post about trash cans in the bike lane on Ustick Road. The trash company requires those can to be out there—and it looks to me like there is a big wide empty sidewalk right behind the cans so shut up. —Ron Gardner That is a bike lane, the sidewalk is for walkers. How about we put those trash cans out in the street for those of you who are part of our oil crisis? —Andrea B. Gallagher Biking on the sidewalk can be very dangerous with lots of driveways, side streets and curb cuts, not to mention very slow. I wonder where the old trash cans were put? —Marcia Franklin Why are we discussing a dozen trash cans that are only out one day a week? If this is really a problem we should just give up on having a harmonious city right now. — Mikey Pullman

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | 9

OPINION/BILL COPE

MELBA MUSIC’S TOAST And other ponderables for the Class of ’10 I prepared the following speech in May after learning that the Melba school board had decided to drop all of its secondary music programs. No more band. No more chorus. Not in Melba. I then called the district office over there and notified some nice lady that I was available to deliver the commencement address. She said she’d pass it on up the food chain, but I never heard anything back. By now, I assume the Class of ’10 has graduated and already sent their caps and gowns back to the rental outfit. I hate like hell to see a good commencement address go to waste, though. So I present it to you, my readers. And if you take from it the inspiring message that you can be anything you dream of being, you got the wrong damn message. Better read it again, and pay attention this time. U Congratulations Melba seniors, and Goooooo Mustangs!!! But seriously, graduates, you’re getting out just in time, did you know that? Especially you band and choir kids. You may well be the last of your kind. Maybe at some point in the future, you can sit your little brothers and sisters down and tell them what a bittersweet blessing it was to have played the last Sousa march or sung in the last spring concert ever performed in Melba. Or maybe it’s better they never find out what they missed. And let us pray there is no nascent Mozart or Wynton Marsalis or Joan Sutherland coming up through the Melba school system. What a tragedy that is, eh? Talent with no place to go? It was nothing personal, kids. The school board was only doing what it was told had to be done. The State Legislature informed them—along with every other school district in Idaho—that sacrifices had to be made. An overall 7.5 percent sacrifice, actually, according to the boys who run the state. They left it up to the individual districts to decide where that pound of flesh was coming from. So your district ripped the throat out of its music programs. Meridian is lopping off chunks of teacher salaries and bus routes. Undoubtedly, there will be a few districts that shave off their girls’ sports, while others dump the drama department and the art classes. The Boise system recently eliminated 60 positions, and the slashery has just begun. Another year like this, and students might be expected to provide their own lighting and heat when they come to class. If you’ve followed the news like your social studies teacher told you to, you’ll know this isn’t just an Idaho problem. There’s hardly a state left that hasn’t watched their school budgets turned into the thinnest of gruel. It’s a damn bad time to be a youngster, let me tell you. Particularly if you’re a youngster with visions of accomplishment dancing in your

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head. I can well imagine employers of the future looking at your resumes and saying, “Oh dear, you attended public schools during the Bush Recession? Why, Child, you might as well have never gone to school at all!” Now, it’s always possible you will make up for in college what you were screwed out of in public schools. If you can afford to go, that is. I’m sure you’re aware our universities are stuck in the same mud hole public schools are in, only they can do something public schools can’t. It’s called “tuition,” and apparently, there’s no limit to how high it can be raised. You can borrow the money to educate yourself, of course. You might even get the loan paid off by the time your own children reach college age ... assuming the career you dreamed of having wasn’t shipped out to some country with a better-educated work force. And given what’s happening to America’s middle class, the day’s coming when the countries with a more educated work force than ours will be about all of ’em. It’s depressing, but not for everyone. Say you happen to come from a family of America’s wealthiest—the Top 20-Centers, let us call them—things are looking sweeter all the time. If you track it back ... oh, say ... 30 years —maybe to about the time Ronald Reagan got his tax cuts for the rich (which, incidently, marks the beginning of that rapid decline in this country’s educational opportunities)— you will be pleased to know that you and your upper-crust mates have increased your share of America’s total wealth from 80 to 85 percent. Figure the top 1 percent—the super rich—owns about half of that, while the bottom 80th percentile has to scrap over whatever’s left: the 15 percent that sticks to the bottom of the barrel. Even better: While everyone else’s income has decreased in real terms, income has increased dramatically at the top of this lopsided pyramid—one of the benefits of naming your own bonuses, I suppose. And then when George Bush piled on more tax cuts for the rich, the good life’s only gotten gooder. Bigger houses, bigger boats, bigger cars, bigger vacations. Hell, you can even afford a lobbyist firm or two to make sure those tax breaks keep a-coming! But let’s get back to your reality, kids. All of that rosy outlook stuff applies only if you belong to the Top 20-Centers. And it’s not very likely any of them would be graduating from Melba High School, is it? The rest of you are sitting out here in the desert, waiting to see what gets cut next—from your schools, from your children, from your lives—and listening to your leaders drone on about how wrong it is to raise taxes on those who do the producing in this great land of ours—even if all they seem to be producing anymore is a land of lost blessings and disappearing opportunities. Best of luck, Mustangs. You’re gonna need it. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

TED RALL/OPINION

ETHNIC CLEANSING More American chickens come home to roost NEW YORK—Believe it or not, I don’t scour the headlines looking for tragedies and atrocities to blame on the United States. But that’s how it often works out. Now it’s Kyrgyzstan’s turn to fall apart as the result of American malfeasance. The images coming out of Osh, a culturally diverse Silk Road city that recently celebrated its 5,000th anniversary, are reminiscent of the collapse of Yugoslavia. Ethnic Kyrgyz, resentful over the recent ouster of President Kurmanbek Bakiyev and angry about an economy that always seems to get worse, have murdered hundreds of ethnic Uzbeks because they support the new interim government. Kyrgyz rioters burned Uzbek-owned homes and businesses, prompting tens of thousands of Uzbeks to flee across the border into Uzbekistan. Buildings spray-painted with the word “Kyrgyz” were spared. U.S. news consumers following the Kyrgyz crisis are repeatedly reminded about America’s airbase near the capital of Bishkek, used to supply NATO forces occupying Afghanistan. The base, they say, is what we should care about, but the base isn’t why Kyrgyzstan really matters. The big effect is that the events in Osh mark the beginning of a new surge of antiAmericanism with long-term repercussions. This latest violence represents something new. It’s bigger and more widespread. Second, it’s delayed fallout from George W. Bush’s misadventures in regime change. Bush’s military-CIA complex had more than Iraq and Afghanistan on its collective mind. Over the course of six years, it toppled or attempted to overthrow the governments of Venezuela, Haiti, Belarus, Georgia, Ukraine—

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and, yes, Kyrgyzstan. In March 2005, a CIA-backed (and in some cases-trained) mob of conservative Muslim young men from Osh drove up to Bishkek and stormed the presidential palace. President Askar Akayev, a former physicist who was the only democratically elected president in the former Soviet republics of Central Asia, fled into exile in Russia. Akayev’s real mistake was crossing Bush. After 9/11, the United States demanded an airbase at Manas airport, paying nominal rent. Reconsidering after the fact, the Kyrgyz government demanded $10 million a year, quite a chunk of change in a country with an average salary of $25 a month. Bakiyev, the Osh-based leader who replaced Akayev, was supposed to be more accommodating. Instead, he threatened to kick out the Americans unless they raised the rent from $17 million to $63 million. Now he’s in exile, too. Kyrgyzstan was never a lucky country. Surrounded by neighbors with vast energy resources and other natural resources, the Kyrgyz have little but water and rocks. But the country enjoyed a strategic location. Under Akayev, people were poor but the country enjoyed relative stability. Since then, there has been political disintegration, with southern provinces turned into de facto fiefdoms run by brutal forprofit warlords. Neither Bakiyev nor Otunbayeva, both brought to power by mobs, has enjoyed legitimacy or full acceptance. This is the real story: political and economic chaos masquerading as ethnic cleansing. And it’s largely our fault.

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CITYDESK/NEWS

We got a nasty little reminder that racism is alive and not so well in North Idaho. The executive director of Coeur d’Alene’s Human Rights Institute said she found a noose hanging at her home late last week, the second such incident since September. Rachel Dolezal, who is black, said she has been a target of hate-based vandalism at her homes in Coeur d’Alene and Spokane, Wash. Amy Herzfeld, executive director of the Boise-based Idaho Human Rights Education Center says the incidents “underscore the importance of [the Human Rights Institute’s] work.” Herzfeld cites incidents in Boise in February in which flurry of racist fliers were found near Boise State, Boise High School and the downtown YMCA. “There’s a great deal of national political hostility, and [local hate groups] are harnessing that negativity,” Herzfeld said. The Coeur d’Alene Police Department has opened up an investigation into a possible hate crime at Dolezal’s home. The rhetoric was far more public, and the scene equally more civil further south, when Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele visited Sun Valley on June 18 to raise money for Raul Labrador. The Idaho GOP fundraiser was held at the Sun Valley Lodge, and hosted by Earl Holding, the Sinclair Oil magnate, who also owns the resort. The fundraiser started with a $500 per person VIP reception, followed by a $25 general admission event, which drew a few hundred Republican faithful. Republicans in Idaho have a lot to be fired up about. The state’s First Congressional District is held by Rep. Walt Minnick, the third Democrat to hold an Idaho congressional seat since 1962. To do so, Minnick won his 2008 election by just more than 4,000 votes over controversial Republican Bill Sali. Minnick will defend his seat against Labrador, a state legislator who has called himself a quieter version of Sali. Friday’s event opened with a talk by Bob Bergdahl, father of captured American solider Pfc. Bowe Bergdahl. The Hailey man’s speech touched on his family’s suffering, community support and the curse of warfare on families of all nations and faiths and was moving, emotional and intellectually challenging. Had Bergdahl been the only speaker, the event could have raised money from Republicans and Democrats alike. After that, the event was more partisan, with pep-talks by Sen. Jim Risch, right-wing radio host Dennis Prager (via video-chat) and the conservative blogger Eric Golub. After saluting the Bergdahl family, Steele went into attack mode. “We appreciate his sacrifice. We are with Bowe,” he said. “I don’t believe this [Obama] administration— or its ilk—appreciate the sacrifice.” He punched holes in Obama’s cult of personality, warning the crowd that Idaho’s youth “can’t afford to be beguiled and bedazzled by the great talker.” Steele sounded the siren calls of Western conservative values, urging today’s young Republicans to “meet the great doers,” rather than just “wait in another government line.” —Michael Ames and George Prentice

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NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

WHAT DOESN’T BELONG: HATE CRIMES IN NORTH IDAHO OR THE GOP IN BLAINE COUNTY?

THE FAQ ON THE SRP Anthrax vaccine? Check. Last will and testament? Check. Bad teeth? Hold on, soldier. GEORGE PRENTICE The scariest movie in the Treasure Valley last weekend didn’t have vampires. It didn’t play at the cineplex or on HBO. It played at the Officers’ Club at Boise’s Gowen Field. Hundreds of soldiers watched a terrifying film detailing how anthrax paralyzes the body’s white blood cells, invades the brain, and potentially leads to an ugly, painful death. According to the Pentagon’s MILFAX website (vaccines.mil), “the unpredictable nature of terrorism makes it prudent to include biological warfare defense in all our force protection planning.” Following the early morning film, the Idaho soldiers received the fifth in a series of painful anthrax-immunization shots. A movie and a big needle ... hell of a way to start a Saturday morning. On June 19, over the course of several hours, members of Idaho’s Army National Guard underwent a battery of exams, met with a chaplain and even considered drawing up a last will and testament, all as part of Soldier Readiness Processing in anticipation of their deployment to Iraq this fall. In mid-September, Idaho Gov. C.L “Butch” Otter will hand over control of the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team of the Guard to the Pentagon. Approximately 1,500 men and women of the 116th will head to Camp Shelby, Miss., for two months of training. Then, they’re off to Iraq for about 10 months. Roughly 2,200 Idahoans belong to the 116th, and 1,500 have been identified as candidates for deployment. Not all of them will go. “We’re trying to identify those soldiers who have health problems and we want them ‘fixed’ before deployment,” said Col. Fred Friel, the senior physician assistant in the Medical Detachment of the Idaho Army National Guard. In the run-up to the September deployment, he and his colleagues have conducted a series of periodic health assessments, the latest this past weekend. “Idaho has a very well run SRP. We’ve seen the others,” said Friel. “We want to get these soldiers in and out as efficiently as possible.” What’s the biggest no-no? Bad vision? Nope. Obesity? Think again. It’s bad teeth. The Army is looking for what are technically known as dental category threes or fours. Simply put, that means someone who will probably have some kind of dental emergency in the next six months or less. At the time of the last deployment of the Idaho Guard in 2004, somewhere between 5 and 7 percent of

Idaho Army National Guard soldiers wait on pins and needles for their pre-deployment vaccines.

the force reported dental problems. “And that was actually less than the national average of 10 percent,” Friel said. “This is a lesson learned.” What’s the problem? The same problem with most of the nation: most of us don’t have a dental insurance plan and so most of us don’t have regular dental check-ups. And if there’s a dental problem in a theater of war, “It’s a significant distraction,” Friel said. “Even if it takes a day or two for a dental procedure, you have to add a couple of days for recovery.” The next biggest pre-deployment challenges: sports injuries and/or arthritis. During the periodic health assessments at Gowen, soldiers made their way through a maze of rooms. After dental exams, they had their eyes checked, their hearing tested, and for anyone 40 or older, an EKG was required. Female soldiers 30 and younger had a Pap smear and cytology exam—about 5 percent of the battalion will be female. Blood work was checked for sugar and cholesterol levels. Each soldier’s DNA was registered. If they were HIV positive, it was a no-go. Even the bravest of the bunch still cringed when they made their way to the room with all the needles. In addition to the usual immunizations (tetanus, diphtheria), there was an anthrax vaccine, a series of five shots over a year and a half, and annual boosters thereafter. The man with the needles, Maj. Thomas McMahan, said the anthrax shot is a “big one” and it burns—a lot. “It will start to hurt pretty soon after and it typically hurts for anywhere from a few days to a couple of weeks,” Barkley said. The anthrax shots have been pre-deployment standard operating procedure since 2004, right about the time the Army also required small pox vaccinations. A soldier can’t get a tattoo within a month of a small pox shot, which will be administered at Camp Shelby, Miss. Idaho troops have to wait until just before they’re

sent overseas because medics don’t want soldiers anywhere near their families while the small pox vaccine is still fresh in their bloodstream, risking a possible transmission. After being poked, prodded and pricked, the soldiers’ next stops required a little self examination. In one room, a legal staff was prepared to counsel and even execute a last will and testament. A bit further down the hall was a room to have your soul checked. A military chaplain asked each soldier about his or her spiritual beliefs. “It’s a very humbling experience,” said Chaplain Maj. Rob Morris. “I’ll see each soldier and make sure we have some kind of record of their religious experience. No preference is an option.” Today’s Army recognizes a pretty long list of beliefs and non-beliefs. According to Morris, the number of faiths is in the hundreds and includes Wiccan, Paganism and atheism. The Army’s Chaplain Corps is more than two centuries old. “We’re the only entity in the military that has no reporting requirements. They [soldiers] need to feel safe to tell their story,” said Morris. Simply put, what a soldier tells a chaplain remains private. This fall’s deployment of the Idaho Army National Guard will be different from the last in 2004. Then, troops were shipped off to Texas for four months of training, and then to Louisiana for three more months before being sent overseas where they spent 10 months in Northern Iraq. More than 2,000 citizen soldiers went that time, making it Idaho’s largest deployment in the history of the Idaho Guard. Few Idahoans didn’t have a father, a sister or a co-worker away at war. Come the third week of September, about 1,500 Idahoans will join about 1,200 others to make up the 2010 version of the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team. By then, they’ll have plenty more to fear than needles. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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CITIZEN

ANDREW MENTZER Local owner of downtown’s new Idahostel TARA MORGAN

How did the idea for a hostel come about? Before undergraduate, I had studied in Australia and stayed in hostels a bit, and then I started traveling last year and just thought it would be a good idea for Boise. I kind of structured it, though, as more of a piece of cultural infrastructure rather than just a place to stay. Explain what you mean by that. The theory is that Boise is years and years behind the Boulders and the Salt Lake Cities in technology startups. Part of the reason behind that is because it doesn’t have the infrastructure, the progressive feng shui of a city ... If we give this kind of thing a try in downtown Boise and create that infrastructure—culturally, artistically, historically—that will bring in further incentive. It takes 1,000 things to create that feel for a whole city, but it’s a starting point to give the city its legs for that kind of exposure. Who do you expect to be your clientele? Primarily, 20-somethings … Millennials. People between 18-30, primarily college students. But we’re not excluding anybody. What are some of the features of the hostel? We’ll have communal bathrooms and a communal common space in here. There will be a dorm there and dorm on the corner, a larger dorm. It’s going to be kind of a big fort the way that it lays out … We’ll have a door

EAT. SLEEP. READ.

here that goes out to the alley. We’ll have our own access so that people can come in after hours. We’ll have a kitchenette, a theater area, a lot of common space. We’re going to put in a little rock-climbing wall, I think, at some point. And then you’re offering activities? Yeah, I’ve worked with a lot of regional outfitters for whitewater rafting, bungie jumping, skydiving. Basically, we’ll give people the opportunity to go out and explore those elements of Idaho. Does Boise have the traveling foot traffic to sustain a hostel? As far as a backpacking community? It’s there. It certainly is, it just hasn’t really been established yet. This is a bit of a new thing. The feedback I’ve gotten so far is overwhelmingly positive. People are into the whole idea of giving Boise that exposure. There’s about 30 hostels regionally between Portland, [Ore.] Salt Lake, Reno, [Nev.] There’s one actually in Nampa, the Boise Hostel. It’s about 45 minutes away … The market that we’re looking at right now is just primarily pass-through traffic on I-84. Do you plan to court bands that are coming through town? Absolutely. I’ve been talking with a few people at The Venue … They’re doing the Promenade Music Festival in October, so we’re going to help them get set up with bands. We can have 24 people here, so it beats the heck out of getting eight to nine hotel rooms at $100 bucks a night ... They can have more fun and experience the city in a better way. What are the rates like? Starting out, it’s $19 for the big dorm and the smaller dorms are going to be $22.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

The hostel is the backpacker’s orphanage. A place where traveling, train-hopping 20-somethings stop in to recharge, grab a (mildly) hot communal shower and pound Jagermeister with Australian tourists. Recently, Boisean Andrew Mentzer decided to open Idahostel in the Idaho Building in downtown Boise. He hopes to have the space up and running by late July.

Have you talked to any of the neighbors in the building? What do they think about this? People at Thomas Hammer seem pretty thrilled about it. The people at the C-Store in the basement are stoked because we’re going to be bringing them some business. I’ve talked to the screen-printing people and the sushi people and everyone’s been pretty positive. What about the actual residents? People who live in the building? We haven’t had any contact with them because we work through a different brokerage. Do you have any worries about transients or the homeless population? Not at all … We make it very clear that you have to have a credit card or a debit card to book with us ... Someone [can’t] come in with $19 cash and just say, “I need a shower and a place to crash for the night.” Unfortunately, that’s not the role we’re trying to accomplish. Do you plan on integrating the Boise arts community into this community here? Sector 17 came in and they’re probably going to be doing a graffiti mural. And then I’ve got Kelly Knopp involved ... All of the interior accent walls are going to be murals … This whole space is intended to be a work of art, with its corrugated aluminum. We’re going to do some really cool things with the feng shui and make it feel like a place where you want to learn things and interact with the city.

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CURIOUSER AND

CURIOUSER Down the rabbit hole with the Tea Party, Libertarians and free marketeers ZACH HAGADONE

“I think you might do something better with the time ... than waste it in asking riddles that have no answers.”

AD AM RO SENLUND

Frustrated words from Alice, in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, spoken to the Mad Hatter at his Mad Tea Party. But Alice would have had an equally tough time cracking the riddle of our present-day Tea Party, with its grab-bag of fevered conspiracy theories, nebulous socio-political anger and wooly lexicon of frothy slogans. “Obama lied, grandma died.” “I’ll take my freedom, guns and my money—you keep the change.” “Central Planning: Destroying human prosperity since 4000 B.C.” The movement, which has hammered populist rage in the depths of the Great Recession into a powerful—if amorphous—political weapon, defies easy labels. For many onlookers—chiefly on the left— the “Tea Party Patriot” scene is a hysterical society littered with racial, sexual and class paranoia, and spiked with a noxious dose of conspiracism and Founder-philia. Hard-core liberal wonks rub their hands in glee, expecting the tricorn set to load Republican tickets with wacky candidates, thus tossing elections to their Democratic picks. More sympathetic readings of the tea leaves tout a desire for some measure of fiscal restraint from Congress and a return to “traditional American values.” The prevailing view from the right, however, plays on the “sleeping giant” imagery of a vengeful populace come to settle scores against a Hobbesian leviathan that has played fast and loose with God-given liberties from the first days of the Republic. Tea Partiers want a radical reduction of the federal government, but many fear cuts to Medicare and favor continued war spending. Signs at Tea Party rallies bearing small government quotes from former presidents Thomas Jefferson (a non-interventionist) and Andrew Jackson (a former general) are as ubiquitous as pocket copies of the Constitution. But for all their ideological schizophrenia, there’s a consistent, and often unexamined, theme running through the Tea Party rallies. It’s summed up in three words: “End the Fed.” At first blush, it’s not a very sexy slogan. In fact, it’s the title of a book by Texas Congressman and diehard Libertarian Ron Paul and hard evidence that his fingerprints are all over the Tea Party. (The first modern “Tea Party” WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

was staged on Nov. 5, 2007, by Ron Paul supporters, on which day they raised $4.2 million in a record-breaking “money bomb.”) In End the Fed, published in 2009, Paul makes the case for auditing the Federal Reserve—the nation’s central bank—then abolishing it. According to “Dr. No,” so named for his opposition to everything from Medicare to relief for victims of Hurricane Katrina, trashing the Federal Reserve achieves the same end Andrew Jackson sought in his epic 1830s struggle with the “monster bank”: freeing the country from a cartel of bureaucrats who have manipulated the money supply for their own gain. The current system of paper currency— backed by nothing more than the “full faith and credit” of the government—would be likewise done away with in favor of a “sound money” system backed by precious metals. Transitioning the national economy from a commodity-based currency to one pegged on the value of gold and silver would be a radical change, so it was either a testament to Paul’s anti-Fed cachet, or further proof of Idaho’s proud place on the bleeding edge of right-wing politics, that Idaho Reps. Phil Hart and Lenore Hardy Barrett received a loud support when they teamed up in January to unveil their sound money legislation to a group of Tea Partiers assembled outside the state capitol. Hart, an Athol Republican and well known tax protestor—who is currently fighting the federal government over $53,000 in back taxes and fees he claims he doesn’t have to pay—proposed the Idaho Silver Gem Act, which would have made taxes payable in special silver bars and provided tax breaks to Idaho mining companies. Barrett’s bill called for silver as an alternative currency in Idaho, along with the establishment of an electronic silver-backed currency exchange. Neither bill made its way to Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s desk, but Hart said the time is coming when sound money will be necessary. “As a society, we have a debt capacity, and we can only handle so much in the way of interest payments,” Hart said. “When we exceed that debt capacity, then the money supply stops unless we print the money out of thin air. That’s where we’re at today. We don’t have much capacity to take on more debt, and it’s caused our economic expansion to stop.” In other words, the current system is unsustainable because it’s based on debt. Money doesn’t come into existence until somebody

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borrows it or the Federal Reserve prints it, and the only reason it has value at all is that everyone agrees that it does. Sound monetists like Hart say that moving to a currency based on something with inherent value—like precious metals—would provide the economy with more stability. Both silver and gold have industrial applications that make them valuable, and Idaho has one of the country’s largest supplies of silver— chiefly in the Silver Valley, which is in Hart’s neighborhood in North Idaho. “You can’t manipulate gold, you can manipulate paper currency,” Hart said. “Some people—if they have the ability to manipulate the money supply—they can’t keep their hands off it.” When Hart says “some people,” he means the Fed and its political cronies, and Paul and other gold and silver bugs would agree. Nonetheless, the gold- and silver-standards went the way of the dodo early in the last century, and supporters have had a hard time convincing state governments to overhaul their economies for a system that fell out of favor about the same time as pince nez glasses and spats. “Some people may say we’re being old fashioned, or that today we’re advanced enough that we don’t need to base the currency on anything but the ‘full faith and credit’ of the federal government, but the greatest periods of growth and economic expansion in our history has been with a commodity currency,” Hart said. “It’s been more of an incremental approach away from gold or silver, and [measures like the Idaho Silver Gem Act] are an incremental way to bring us back. That’s a doable way to approach this thing.” It wasn’t doable enough for fellow lawmakers in the Senate, however. Hart said legislators balked at his bill because they worried that mining tax breaks would have to be extended to other industries. They also didn’t want to burden the state treasurer with resetting the entire state economy. Barrett���s bill didn’t make it out of committee, and the Challis Republican, who lists “mining/investments” as her profession on the Legislature’s website, didn’t return numerous calls requesting comment. Though defeated, the sound money bills made the Gem State a cause celebre in Tea Party and Libertarian circles, and vaulted Hart and Barrett to the forefront of the state’s hardright conservative vanguard—and that doesn’t necessarily mean “among Republicans.” For true believers, blame for our current economic ruin lies with both parties, and it revolves around an unstable monetary policy. According to Tyler Williams, of the group Twin Falls Republican Party Restoration: “I think what has happened, as we see it in Twin Falls, is that the establishment members of the Republican party have gotten used to taking orders from the Republican National Committee—from the top down … Restore Twin Falls GOP is a group of classical conservatives who see the local Republican Party disregarding the Idaho Republican platform and have continuously impeded conservative initiatives for years.” Williams refers to Hart as the “adopted mascot” of the Twin Falls group, and admiration for Idaho’s recent silver bills came from Idaho Libertarian and Tea Party groups, as well as Paulist websites including the Daily Paul blog and campaignforliberty.com. Like Paul, whom he served as a presidential delegate to the 2008 National Republican

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Convention, Hart favors the audit then abolition of the Federal Reserve. But his view on whether it can be accomplished is tempered by political realism. “If we had the audit we’d be so surprised at what we found that there would be momentum created to abolish it,” he said. “But to abolish it right now is probably not politically feasible.” Still, Hart thinks it’s just a matter of time before everyone’s on board with the idea. “I think there’s a few mainline Republicans who are starting to recognize that we need to do something,” Hart said. “I think there’s a lot more awareness of it now than there was even two or three years ago.” Indeed, Paul managed to see his long-held desire for an audit of the Fed taken seriously by Congress earlier this year, but when key Democrats rejected the idea at the last minute, the great reckoning was called off. While Tea Partiers and Paulists lost that battle (for now), the tea kettle certainly isn’t losing steam. Witness the recent Idaho Republican Primaries, when supposed First Congressional District shoe-in Vaughn Ward—with an in-person, public endorsement from former Alaska governor, Idaho native and Tea Party maven Sarah Palin—was up-ended by local Tea Party darling Raul Labrador. Labrador will face off with incumbent Rep. Walt Minnick in November, and if you want your brain to explode, remember this: Minnick, a Democrat, was the only member of his party in the country to receive an endorsement from the Tea Party Express. Alice recommends against wasting our time with riddles that can’t be answered, but there’s got to be something down the rabbit hole that unifies a movement as disparate and tangential as the Tea Party. Again, we return to “End the Fed” and sound money as keystone issues. “A national gold/silver standard currency would immediately put a halt to the deficit spending, and so the Democrats don’t want to get rid of the fiat currency [the technical term for paper money] because it would end many unconstitutional welfare programs; and the Republicans don’t want it because it would end many of the unconstitutional militarization efforts,” stated Williams in an e-mail. “The end of the day implications though, is that the establishment politicians who do not support sound money will eventually be booted out of office, because as Andrew Jackson said: ‘If the people understood the rank injustice of our money and banking system, there would be a revolution before morning’ [his italics].” Williams noted that in Idaho, Republicans are leading the way on this issue. Indeed, the party wrote sound-money principles into its official platform at the 2008 state party convention in Sandpoint. According to Jonathan Parker, executive director of the Idaho Republican Party, the issue is a “contentious” one, and will likely come up at the next party convention on Saturday, June 26, and Sunday, June 27, in Idaho Falls. “I only say it’s contentious because you have many people in our party who differ on the issue,” he said. “The sound-currency support is mostly found in those members of our party that share many libertarian ideals.” And by “libertarian ideals,” Parker alludes to members of the Idaho GOP who ascribe to many of the tenets of the Tea Party. “The Tea Partiers stand for lower taxes WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

and limited government; I think you’ve seen a resurgence of states’ rights under the Tea Party movement. They’re bringing it to the fore,” he said. “We absolutely welcome the Tea Party movement.” Political watchers, both in Idaho and elsewhere, are accustomed to Republican rhetoric on small government, traditional values and responsibility—both personal and fiscal—but the upswing in bimetallist language is a recent development inspired in large part by Paul himself. “Of course it was illegal to own gold in this country from 1933 to 1977, until the Helms-Paul (Ron Paul) act gave that freedom back to the people,” Williams wrote. “So to say that Ron Paul has had an influence on this movement is an understatement: He helped start it! And, of course, Ron Paul is an advocate of free markets [and] promotes the Austrian School of Economics, which has some great literature on sound money.” Williams’ nod to Paul’s advocacy of “Austrian” economics is key to deciphering much of the present-day Tea’d off mania for hard money. And to understand what Austrianism has to do with current right-wing populism, you have to go back to early April 1947, when a worried group of 36 intellectuals gathered at the snowy Mont Pelerin Resort near Montreux, Switzerland. Eight among them were Nobel Prize winners; others were historians, philosophers and businessmen. They’d been invited to the conference by Austrian-born economist Friedrich von Hayek, a student of Ludwig von Mises—the grandfather of radical free market economics. Though their backgrounds differed, the members of what would come to be called the Mont Pelerin Society shared one overriding concern: Big government policies in the United States and abroad were collectivizing society, politics and economics. Nothing less than Western civilization was at stake. While a high-powered Swiss alpine meeting of brainiacs and businessmen might sound like the beginnings of a Dan Brown novel, the Mont Pelerin Society is still in existence and serves as an international partner of other organizations that follow the laissezfaire principles of the Austrian School. Chief among them in the United States is the Ludwig von Mises Institute, founded in 1982 by Mises disciple Llewelyn Rockwell and the late-professor’s widow. Among the distinguished faculty of the LvMI, based in Auburn, Ala., is one Rep. Ron Paul. The LvMI’s viewpoint was summed up by Mises himself: “Government is essentially the negation of liberty.” A perusal through the LvMI website’s voluminous catalog reveals a consistent worldview that ownership of private property is the central pillar of personal liberty and no person or government is right to take it or threaten it in any way. That message sounds increasingly attractive to people fed up with government intrusion and an economy bloated with bailouts and entitlements. But some contend there’s an ugly side to all this hard currency, antigovernment, states’ rights rhetoric. For starters, many libertarian-minded supporters of Austrian economics—including Hart, in his January address to Tea Partiers— invoke biblical proofs to advance the cause of laissez-faire policies and sound money. Specifically, Hart cites, scriptural passages like WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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Leviticus, Deuteronomy, Proverbs and Micah, which extol “just weights and measures.” But Peter Crabb, an economics and finance professor at Northwest Nazarene University in Nampa, said the Bible doesn’t necessarily support one type of economics over another. “Here we talk about that a lot, as a Christian school,” he said, especially from the angle of income inequality, which Austrian economics would allow in unlimited amounts. “Does Jesus support income inequality? Some references say, yes, there are rich and poor. Others say, no. It’s not a question that He answered for us definitively,” Crabb said. “I do think there is scriptural basis for a more laissez faire economy, but I don’t think scripture wants us to answer that question either.” Founding Austrian economists are also silent on the subject of the ecclesiastics of sound money, but the school of thought rejects nearly every social program as “socialistic” and calls the New Deal alternately a fascist or communist regime. But among LvMI’s most controversial claims is the belief that the Civil War wasn’t to end slavery, and Abraham Lincoln was an imperialist demagogue who prosecuted the war simply to expand federal authority over the Southern states. As Paul said during a 2008 appearance on Meet the Press, Lincoln provoked the war to “subvert the original purpose of the Republic.” From that point of view, the Civil War was a brutal violation of states’ rights and the beginning of the descent into statist ruin. Remember, Austrian proponents chide, that the first real fiat money, called “greenbacks,” was backed by nothing but the “full faith and credit” of the government and printed in 1862 to fuel the Northern war effort. Naturally, that telling of history doesn’t sit well with a lot of people, not least of which is the Southern Poverty Law Center, a private group run by civil rights activist Morris Dees. The SPLC views the Ludwig von Mises Institute’s intellectual pedigree—shared by Paul, other Libertarians and proponents of Austrianism—with no small amount of skepticism. The organization even goes so far as to list several prominent faculty members of the institute as “neo-confederates.” That includes author Thomas diLorenzo, whose books, highly critical of Lincoln, have been quoted approvingly by Paul. The LvMI is adamant that it doesn’t support racism or the institution of slavery. Still, it isn’t coy about its belief that the Confederacy had every right to secede in protection of its states’ rights, and doesn’t hide its connections with pro-Confederacy groups like the Southern nationalist organization League of the South, which the institute lists on its website as a member of the “Roll of Honor.” The League of the South, labeled as a “hate group” by the SPLC in 2000, is also a strong advocate for sound money and Austrian economics. SPLC spokesman Mark Potok said sound-money principles aren’t necessarily “neo-confederate” ideas, but those sound monetism and radical ideals—embroiled as they are with issues of states’ rights and biblical sanction—come from a page taken “directly from the radical right.” “Throughout the patriot movement, throughout the militia movement, people believe that the only lawful money is gold and silver,” he told BW. “This whole thing is based on the utterly fantastic notion that there

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is no real money by virtue of the Constitution and God himself other than gold or silver. “Most so-called patriots will talk for instance about the Federal Reserve and the fact that it’s benefiting a tiny elite,” Potok added. “What most of them won’t go on to tell you is that ‘the elite’ is a cabal of rich Jews ... It’s essentially an anti-Semitic conspiracy theory.” The anti-Semitic nature of “End the Fedism” isn’t quite that cut and dried, though. While most white nationalist and anti-Semitic groups agree with the suggestion that the Federal Reserve system was founded by—and maintained for—the benefit of rich Jewish bankers, by and large they reject gold or silver bugs as pawns in a Jewish plot to capture and destroy the capitalist economy. An article titled “Nationalist Economics,” posted on the websites Midwest Free Press and White News Now, criticizes the sound money idea as unsustainable in the long-term, but much of the language has a familiar ring, complete with the “banking elite,” Congressional corruption and the fear of creeping socialism. “Many Americans, including Libertarians and some paleoconservatives, advocate that we return to a gold-backed currency ...” wrote the unnamed author. “The only time I would advocate a gold standard is during a transition period in a country like the current USA, where we are dominated by a banking elite and we need to take the power to spend away from our corrupt Congress. This would shift more control of the nation’s money to the people, and hopefully help us break our current descent into communism.” For Tea Partiers, constitutionalists and proponents of Austrian economics—unlike radical white nationalist groups—the rhetoric comes down to the Tenth Amendment’s directive that “No state shall … coin money; emit bills of credit; make any thing but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts.” Tea Party and libertarian organizations like the LvMI understandably reject claims that sound monetism is rooted in anti-Semitism— Austrian school founders Mises and Hayek, after all, were Jewish—and in Boise, local Tea Partiers eschew racial or ethnic arguments in favor of the Founding Fathers. “The logic is the very same as originally established in the days of our Founders. Today, with the advent of the Federal Reserve, our practice of letting government and politicians manipulate the value of money by inflating it and deflating, has created the financial ruin we face,” according to a statement from Tea Party Boise in response to questions e-mailed by BW. Requests for attribution, or a phone or in-person interview, went unanswered. “We want to return to those roots,” the statement continued. “Therefore sound money policy is critical to doing just that. The Founders were against the notion of a ‘central government banking system,’ which is exactly what we have in the Federal Reserve. They knew how corrupting that would be in terms of sound fiscal policy. They were right and history proves it.” To borrow again from Lewis Carroll: “Have you guessed the riddle yet?” the Hatter said, turning to Alice again. “No, I give it up,” Alice replied: “what’s the answer?” “I haven’t the slightest idea,” said the Hatter. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events S U NVALLEY.C OM

Don’t hate, recreate.

Cruisin’ and groovin’, Sun Valley style.

kickin’ back

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY JUNE 23-27

BOISE REC FEST

bikes SUN VALLEY RHYTHM AND RIDE With the prevalence of both a strong bicycle and enter tainment culture in Sun Valley, it should come as no surprise that the famous Idaho resor t town will host the Sun Valley Rhythm and Ride: Bike and Music Festival this month. The only thing that should cause question is wondering why it took them so long to come up with the idea. Mountain and road bikers alike will enjoy a wide range of activities throughout the weekend, such as free open-range days at the Idaho Smoky Mountain Lodge’s Bike Ranch, yoga classes, time trials, races and a score of musical per formances. The weekend bicycling extravaganza opens with the Ketchum Cruiser Criterium at Forest Ser vice Park on the evening of Wednesday, June 23, which will benefit the Wood River Bike Coalition and Bald Mountain Rescue Fund. Competitive thrill-seekers will have numerous oppor tunities to race, including Saturday’s Sawtooth Centur y Ride, which takes cyclists 50 or 100 miles through the Idaho mountains. Those wishing to leave their wheels behind can sign up to tackle the 10K Dollar Mountain Trail Run, a technically challenging climb up the ski hill. After a day’s worth of riding, ditch the padded bike shorts and cycling shoes for an evening of live music. The Belgian world music group Zap Mama per forms Friday evening at Hop Porter Park in Hailey. Festival Meadows in Sun Valley will host the Rhythm and Ride Concert on Saturday evening, with per formances by the Santa Cruz, Calif.-based band Sambada, which specializes in Brazilian music; New York soul and Afrobeat group Pimps of Joytime; Austin-based Molly Venter; and Seattle brother-and-sister duo plus drums House of Quist. Various times, Wednesday, June 23-Sunday June 27, Sun Valley, 866-305-9798, svr ythmandride.com.

THURSDAYFRIDAY JUNE 24-25 gefilte fish DELI DAYS As if lox-loving residents weren’t already having vi-

sions of bagels dancing in their heads, while anxiously awaiting the return of the Jewish food festival Deli Days, Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel decided to taunt residents even more by posting a deliciously painful photo of fresh-baked spinach and kasha knish on its Facebook page. Deli Days—Thursday,

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SATURDAY-SUNDAY JUNE 26-27

June 24 and Friday, June 25—will ser ve up traditional Jewish favorites of kosher corned beef, pastrami, bagels and lox, Israeli salad, hummus and pita, and potato knish. Also, sample the wide sea of desserts and baked goods, including rugelach and the three-cornered filled pastries known as hamantasch.

For some reason, “recreation” has come to stand for “sweaty outdoor sports.” And while hiking, biking and Frisbee throwing are dandy ways to blow off some steam, some folks prefer to recreate with a cold one gripped firmly in one paw. Luckily, Boise Rec Fest, which runs Saturday, June 26, and Sunday, June 27, in Ann Morrison Park has the outdoor alkies covered. Pabst Blue Ribbon will have a beer garden featuring PBR, Sierra Nevada and Mike’s Hard Lemonade. While you’re getting canned, you can tr y out Pabst’s “One-Handed Games,” which include horseshoes, a bean bag toss and a life-sized Connect Four. And fret not, winos, you can get your kicks at the Idaho Wines Garden, which features vino from Holesinsky’s Vineyard and Winer y, Indian Creek Winer y and Woodriver Cellars. Oh, and lest we forget, here’s what else is going on: a shitload of bands on the Boise Weekly Main Stage, including Bank, lo-fi, Sleepy Seeds and Finn Riggins; an Explore Idaho exhibit with more than 80 local nonprofits, retailers, manufacturers, guides and outfitters; the UnderAid/Boise Rock School Youth Stage featuring Baby, a carbon-neutral Japanese fire truck; the Wings Center Family Activity Area, which has a giant Twister board, Jumbo croquet, dodgeball, foursquare, kickball and double dutch; a kids Bike Rodeo by Safe Routes to Schools; REI workshop tents, where you can learn pilates, Hackey Sack, wilderness medicine or suspension training; Boise Parks and Rec’s Mobile Recreation Unit; beginner and intermediate skateboard camp; horseshoe classes; a food court and so much freaking more. For a full schedule of events and a festival map, visit boiserecfest.com or check out our slick Rec Fest insert in this week’s edition of BW. Saturday, June 26, 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sunday, June 27, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Ann Morison Park, 1000 Americana Blvd., 208-639-0281, boiserecfest.com.

Enjoy live music and dancing as you overindulge and head to the beer and wine garden to help wash down slices of homemade r ye bread. The congregation will also offer tours of the temple during the festival, which is its main fund-raising event. The Deli Days Facebook page, in addition to instilling strong cravings for fresh challah, promises, “You’ll see the mayor, and maybe even the governor.” Shar-

ing pastrami with elected officials in the company of friends and neighbors— huzzah! Thursday, June 24, 11 a.m-8 p.m.; Friday, June 25, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., ahavathbethisrael.org.

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Grand Opening Saturday, June 26 | 11am-7pm Located at Eagle Road & Zaldia (just north of Amity)

Come celebrate the grand opening of Meridian’s Newest Hayden Homes community.

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Thank You Boise Rec Fest would not be possible without the help of our leadership team, sponsors, donors, exhibitors, volunteers, workshop instructors, activity leaders, vendors, performers, supporters, friends and many others. THANK YOU to everyone who helped make the dream of Boise Rec Fest a reality! —Brett Adler, Founder and Festival Director

Boise Rec Fest 2010 Leadership BRETT ADLER, Festival Director BEMONI ALIDJANI, Concessions and Hospitality Director BARBARA CUGINI, CPA, Finance Director LEIF ELGETHUN, Greening Rec Fest Co-Director

MOLLY O’LEARY, Attorney at Law, Legal Director BRETT MAGNUSON, Creative Director KELSEY NUNEZ, Greening Rec Fest Co-Director MICHELLE ROSS, Volunteer Director

ASHLEY FORD, Fundraising Director

TJ STEVENS, Education Director

HANNAH HYSELL, Idaho Rec Connection Board Member

TANDA WEEKS, Advisor

CHRIS KOSTKA, Advisor JIMSI KUBORN, Merchandise Director

RENEÉ WHITE, Operations Director KIMBERLY WOODINGS, Exhibit Director TONY ZARAGOZA, Technology Director

Idaho Rec Connection, Inc. Boise Rec Fest is organized by a group of hard-working and dedicated volunteers who have a passion for recreation and experience in event planning. Idaho Rec Connection, Inc., the organization behind Boise Rec Fest, is an Idaho based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that promotes active, healthy and recreational lifestyles among people of all ages and abilities by educating them about the myriad of recreational opportunities available throughout the state of Idaho. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Stop by The Wilderness Society booth at the Boise RecFest for tips on great hikes and camping spots. For more info on Idaho wilderness, 75 go to wilderness.org. YEARS

1935 – 2010

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3ATURDAY *UNE AM PM3UNDAY *UNE AM PMs!NN-ORRIS GENERAL INFORMATION Road Closures The roads within Ann Morrison Park will be closed to public traffic except for the northwest lot off Americana road, which is strictly for ADA parking and rafter/tuber drop off / pickup.

Getting Here The Boise Rec Fest team encourages you to recreate to Ann Morrison Park rather than driving, such as biking, running, walking, kayaking, tubing or rafting.

Automobile Parking If you must drive we understand but it may cost you more than gas - there is a $5 event parking lot at the corner of Americana and Shoreline or you can park near many great businesses in downtown Boise. First come, first serve ADA parking is available inside the park via the Americana entrance. Please do not park by the softball fields - there is a tournament happening and we don’t want to disturb them.

Bike Parking Bike racks will be available within the festival. PLEASE, do not lock your bike to a tree in the park.

Tread Lightly and Leave No Trace Please help us keep Ann Morrison Park and the surrounding neighborhood unaffected by Boise Rec Fest. Try not to damage the grass. Throw your trash in the garbage, not on the grass. Recycle plastics, aluminum, steel and paper products. Do not bring glass beverage containers into the park. And please extinguish cigarettes and throw them in designated cigarette buckets or the garbage, not onto the grass.

Lost/Missing Children Check with festival headquarters for found/missing children.

ATM’s Cash machines are available in the food court area.

YOUTH ZONE Family friendly activities provided by youth focused organizations, including Wings Center, Idaho Tennis Association, The First Tee of Idaho, Boise Parks & Recreation, Upward Sports (Basketball), and a Bike Rodeo for Better Biking.

ACTIVITIES Local organizations will be on-hand to facilitate activities, including Idaho Tennis Association, Gem State Disc Golfers, Boise Skateboard Association and Upward Sports (Basketball).

BOISE WEEKLY MAIN STAGE Two full days of local performances brought to you by Boise Weekly, Go Listen Boise, Audio Lab and Ron O’Brian.

Mike’s Hard Lemonade. Beer serving starts at noon each day and ends at 7:30pm on Saturday and 5:30pm on Sunday.

THANK YOU TO ALL OUR SPONSORS Platinum Sponsors

UNDERAID/BOISE ROCK SCHOOL YOUTH STAGE

IDAHO POTATO/ COCA-COLA FOOD COURT

Two days of youth performances on a unique and fun stage brought to you by UnderAid, Boise Rock School, Idaho Power and the Elements Tour (sponsored by KAVU, KEEN and Clif Bar).

A variety of concessionaires will provide food and beverages to attendees and will proudly feature Idaho Potatoes and CocaCola beverages.

Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors Idaho Parks & Rec

BOISE CO-OP IDAHO WINE GARDEN Brought to you by the Boise Co-op and features only Idaho wines, including Holesinsky’s Vineyard and Winery, Indian Creek Winery and Woodriver Cellars. Wine serving starts at noon each day and ends at 7:30pm on Saturday and 5:30pm on Sunday.

IDAHO LOTTERY BEER GARDEN

PROMOSHOP/ ecopromos.com™ MERCHANDISE

Media Partners

A variety of Boise Rec Fest and summer time merchandise is available for purchase by PromoShop and ecopromos.com.™

The beer garden and rest area are provided by the Idaho Lottery and will feature Pabst Blue Ribbon, Sierra Nevada and

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REI WORKSHOP TENTS

ISON0ARK !MERICANA"LVD "OISE

REI has scheduled over 30 FREE workshops taught by local experts, authors and organizations.

EXPLORE IDAHO EXHIBIT AREA

INTERACTIVE TENT Saturday

Explore Idaho with more than 80 exhibits featuring a variety of local non-proďŹ ts, clubs, retailers, manufacturers, guides & outďŹ tters, attractions, and visitorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; centers.

presented by

Community Partners Ada County Parks & Waterways, Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce, Boise River Volunteers, Boise State University Campus Recreation, Boise Young Professionals, Idaho Division of Tourism, Idaho Recreation & Tourism Initiative, Leave No Trace, Sustainable Community Connections of Idaho and Tread Lightly

Service Providers Automated Office Solutions (office printer), Barbara Cugini (CPA), Chris Olson (food court), Coolwater Creek Events (event management), H2 Brand Works (sponsorships), KRZ Productions (website), Magnuson Design (branding & marketing materials), Red Sky PR (public relations), Richardson and Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary (legal), Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center (first aid), Treasure Valley Digital Printing (printing), Ward Hooper (artwork)

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AAA Idaho Ada County Highway District Anytime Fitness Treasure Valley Awesome Hammocks Big Bad Dad Endeavors Bikes2Boards Bogus Basin Ski Club Boise Bike Wrench Boise Community Radio Boise National Forest Boise River Recreation Park Boise River Volunteers Boise Skateboard Association Boise State Campus Recreation Boise Weekly Borderline Publishing Brundage Mountain Resort/Brundage Whitewater Adventures Bureau of Land Management Cabelaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Summer Fun OutďŹ tters Care/Share Idahoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rangelands Cascade Raft and Kayak Citizens for an Open Greenbelt Clif Bar Conservation Voters for Idaho Education Fund Core Concepts Elements Therapeutic Massage: Emerald Elements Tour EVEN Surf Company FC Nova First Tee of Idaho Freedom Footbags Goathead Avengers Gold Dredge Builders Warehouse Greater Pocatello CVB Hillside to the Hollow Idaho Angler/Casting for Recovery Idaho Athletic Club Idaho Conservation League Idaho Division of Tourism Idaho Invasive Species Idaho Lacrosse Idaho Mountain Recreation Idaho Parks and Recreation Idaho Powerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fun Country

Idaho River Sports Idaho STAR Motorcycle Safety Program Idaho Tennis Association Idaho Trails Association Idaho Wildlife Federation KAVU KEEN Kellyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Whitewater Park Kidney for Lacey KTVB News Channel 7 Land Trust of the Treasure Valley Leave No Trace Meridian Parks and Recreation North Shore Industries Pulse Fabrication R&R Vending (sunglasses) Ruggid Gear Adventure Trailers Safe Routes to Schools Safehouse (by Boise Fire Dept) Sawtooth Music Festival Sawtooth Transportation Skydive Idaho â&#x20AC;&#x153;Feel the Freedomâ&#x20AC;? Snake River Alliance Soulcraft Boarding Co. Southeast Idaho Getaways Southern Idaho Soccer League Spin Art Spinal Dynamics Chiropractic St. Lukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Stevens-Henager College Sun Valley/Ketchum Chamber and Visitors Bureau Sustainable Community Connections Swim and Run Shop SWIMBA Take Shape for Life Weight Loss Program Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance University of Phoenix Upward Sports Urban Pipeline/Hyde Park Cycle Sports Volkswagen Audi Boise Water Ski Pro Shop Western Wolf Coalition Wilderness Society Wings Center Neighborhood Fun

10:00 11:00 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00

PILATES with Audrey Millstien - Lululemon Athletics and music provided by James Or COLD WATER BOOTCAMP with Kim Jackson - Idaho Parks & Recreation ZUMBA with Danica Rhodes - BSU SUSPENSION TRAINING with Jason Wanlass - Monster Fitness BOOTCAMP with Tanya Pennington - Anytime Fitness HACKY SACK with Sunny Freeman - Freedom Footbags HOW TO PACK YOUR DAYPACK with Coleen Back - Idaho Mountain Recreation BIKE MAINTENANCE with Brook Robinson - REI

Sunday 10:00 11:00 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00

YOGA with Marisa Smith - Lululemon Athletics HOW TO SIZE YOUR ATV FOR YOUTH with Rich Gummersal - Idaho Parks & Recreation QI GONG with Nedda Jastremsky - YMCA DISC GOLF TECHNIQUES with Jordan Mardis - Gem State Disc Golfers PEAK (PROMOTING ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS IN KIDS) Angie Thornton - REI GYMLESS FITNESS with Jennifer Price - BSU WILDERNESS MEDICINE with Mat Erpelding - BSU CAMP COOKING with Tricia Daigle - REI

LECTURE TENT Saturday 10:00 11:00 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00

AVALANCHE SAFETY with Kirk Bachman - Sawtooth Mountain Guides HIKING AND TRAIL RUNNING with Steve Stuebner - Local Author ROAD CYCLING IN SW IDAHO with Steve Stuebner - Local Author MOUNTAIN BIKING BOISE with Steve Stuebner - Local Author FLOATING IDAHOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RIVERS with Steve Stuebner - Local Author BACKCOUNTRY SKIING IN IDAHO with Francie St. Onge - Sun Valley Trekking WATERSHED PROTECTION with Boise WaterShed and Partners For Clean Water WILDERNESS MEDICINE with St. Alphonsus

Sunday 10:00 11:00 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00

EXPLORING HELLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CANYON with Piper Hyman - Idaho Power BOISE CLIMBS with Sandy Epeldi - Local Author SO YOU WANT TO RUN A MARATHON with Melinda Hinson Neeley BACKCOUNTRY RUNNING with Sandy Epeldi - Local Author GOATHEAD IDENTIFICATION AND ERADICATION with Casey Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary - Goathead Avengers DAY HIKING STANLEY, SUN VALLEY AND KETCHUM with Scott Marchant - Local Author HIKING IN IDAHOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WILDERNESS with Craig Gehrke - The Wilderness Society STREET SMARTS with Kurt Ziegler/Karen Beshara - TVCA

BOISEweekly | BOISE REC FEST | 5

!CTIVITY3CHEDULE

WINGS CENTER Wings Center will lead many fun activities for kids, including a giant Twister board, Jumbo Croquet, Dodgeball, Foursquare, Kickball, Double Dutch, and more. They will also introduce the new Motion Evolution (MO-EV) program, a wellness/fitness for kids and families. And much more.

IDAHO TENNIS ASSOCIATION Idaho Tennis Association will offer skills and drills clinics for adults on-court at Ann Morrison, with help from local professional tennis instructors, club pros, and college teams. Idaho Wheelchair Tennis Association will also coordinate up-down exhibition play. And QuickStart junior tennis instructors will be on hand throughout the event in the Youth Zone to showcase IDTA’s premier family-friendly summer tennis program, Tennis 101.

Safe Route to School, in partnership with Boise Bike Wrench, Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance, and Ada County Highway District, will provide a bike rodeo for kid’s age 5-11. The bike rodeo will feature 5 hands-on stations, including 1) bike mechanics, 2) helmet-fitting, 3) rules of the road, 4) proper starts, stops and turn and 5) straight-line riding and scanning. Classes run between 12-2PM Saturday and Sunday.

BOISE SKATEBOARD ASSOCIATION CAMPS The Boise Skateboard Association is hosting the following free classes at Rhodes Skate Park near Ann Morrison Park on Saturday, June 26th. 10:00 - Beginner Skateboard Camp 2:00 - Intermediate Skateboard Camp

Saturday

HORSESHOE CLASSES

11:00 - Idaho Wheelchair Tennis Association, up-down demonstrations and play (all ages) 1:00 - Boise Racquet & Swim Club, junior clinic 2:00 - Boise Racquet & Swim Club, adult clinic 3:00 - River City Racquet & Fitness, skills and drills (all ages) 5:00 - Hillcrest Country Club, skills and drills (all ages)

National Horseshoe Pitchers Association Hall of Fame Member Don Titcomb will teach horseshoe classes 2PM - 5PM on Saturday and Sunday.

Sunday

11:00 - Idaho Tennis Association activities (all ages) 1:00 - Boise Racquet & Swim Club, junior clinic 2:00 - Boise Racquet & Swim Club, adult clinic 3:00 - River City Racquet & Fitness, skills and drills (all ages)

BOISE PARKS & RECREATION The Boise Parks & Recreation Mobile Recreation Unit is a cargo van outfitted with balls, jump ropes, bases, painting supplies, a sound system and other supplies for fitness, nutrition, art, drama and dance activities for kids. The Mobile Rec Unit will be on-site 12PM to 4PM, Saturday and Sunday.

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BETTER BIKING BIKE RODEO

GEM STATE DISC GOLFERS Gem State Disc Golfers will provide skills clinics, including putting, approaching and driving.

UPWARD SPORTS Clinics for elementary age kids, contests and a place to challenge a buddy to a one on one basketball game. The basic skills clinics will run every two hours beginning at 12:00 on both Saturday and Sunday and will last approximately 30 minutes.

FIRST TEE OF IDAHO The First Tee of Idaho is a youth development program that teaches life skills through the game of golf. First Tee will have a variety of youth golf activities available utilizing SNAG® (Starting New At Golf) equipment. This modified, developmentally appropriate golf equipment helps youngsters build their confidence prior to utilizing traditional junior golf clubs. Activities will include a driving range, putt-tac-toe, zoo chipping, and more. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

7D>H: REC FEST 2 0 1 0 BOISE WEEKLY MAIN STAGE Two full days of local performances brought to you by Boise Weekly. Acts were booked by Go Listen Boise, which supports and promotes the local music community. Sound is provided by Steve Fulton’s Audio Lab. And Ron O’Brian, Idaho’s only Airborne Traffic Reporter, will emcee.

Saturday

Sunday

12:00 - Sonic Minstrel 1:00 - Bellamy Rose 2:00 - low-fi 3:00 - Bank 4:00 - Poke 5:00 - Gizzard Stone 6:00 - Thomas Paul 7:00 - Steve Fulton

12:00 - Boise Rock School 1:00 - Soul Serene 2:00 - New Transit 3:00 - Sleepy Seeds 4:00 - Finn Riggins

UNDERAID / BOISE ROCK SCHOOL YOUTH STAGE Two days of youth performances on a unique and fun stage brought to you by UnderAid, Boise Rock School, Idaho Power and the Elements Tour (sponsored by KAVU, KEEN and Clif Bar). UnderAid produces events for underage performing artists, athletes, film makers & audiences. Boise Rock School is a local, independent music school that teaches kids 6-17 how to rock! Baby, the star of the Elements Tour, will provide the stage and the Idaho Energy Collaborative will feature speakers between acts. Baby is a one-of-a-kind, carbonneutral vehicle. A former Japanese fire truck, Baby was retrofitted to run on any natural or waste vegetable oil. She also creates, stores, and converts energy generated from wind, solar, and kinetic sources to electricity for later use directly from the vehicle. Baby is used to explain how renewable energy can work on a practical level as well as inspire others to seek out their own solutions to capturing renewable energy. IDAHO ENERGY COLLABORATIVE Shaping Idaho’s Clean Energy Future

Saturday 10:30 11:00 11:15 11:30 12:30

– – – – –

Tumble Time Gymnastics WINGS Cheer WINGS Gymnastics Dada Sol Speaker - Leigh Lustre, Advocates for the West 12:40 – Dance Arts Academy 1:00 – Bronco Elite 1:20 – Dragon Bushido 1:45 – Speaker - Sara Cohn, Idaho Conservation League 1:55 – McKenna Lowe 2:55 – Speaker - Liz Woodruff, Snake River Alliance 3:05 WINGS Cheer 3:20 – WINGS Gymnastics 3:35 – Marissa Jerome 4:00 – Alexa Cashen 5:00 – Speaker - Beth Geagan, Sustainable Community Connections 5:10 – WINGS Cheer 5:25 – WINGS Gymnastics 5:40 – Boise Rock School 7:00 – Travis McDaniel (solo) WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Sunday 10:30 – WINGS Gymnastics 10:50 – MT Theory Breakdancers 11:10 – Speaker - Bruce Poe, GreenWorks Idaho 11:20 – Miss Leta’s Performers 11:40 – WINGS Gymnastics 11:55 – Speaker - Dave Krick, Bittercreek Alehouse 12:05 – Workin’ on Fire 1:05 – Dragon Bushido 1:30 – Arts West Junior High Jazz Combo 2:00 – Speaker - Becky Morgan, ED of Boise Urban Garden School 2:10 – Boise Rock School 3:25 – WINGS Gymnastics 3:40 – Speaker - TBD 3:50 – Seven Feet Below 5:00 – Travis McDaniel Band

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FIND LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

Airbend it like Beckham.

STANDARD RESTAURANT SUPPLY In a rat-ional, democ-rat-ic country, all rodents should be treated equal.

TUESDAY JUNE 29

SATURDAY JUNE 26

elements

fancy rats

THE LAST AIRBENDER

RAT-A-RAMA 2010 Rats have gotten a bad rap over the years. There was that whole Black Death thing. And the digging through your trash/ stealing your cheese thing. Not to mention, the scurr ying rodent has inspired a litany of negative idioms in the English language: “rat someone out,” “rat race,” “smell a rat,” “don’t give a rat’s ass,” “look like a drowned rat.” And, possibly worst of all, rats influenced one of the worst hairstyles in histor y: the rattail. But movies like Disney’s Ratatouille—the story of a rat chef working in a high-end Parisian kitchen—and organizations like RatsPacNW, a Northwest “fancy rat” club encompassing Idaho, Washington, Oregon and British Columbia, are helping to clean up the rat’s gutter-glistening image. On Saturday, June 26, at the Idaho Humane Society Education Room, RatsPacNW will gather aristoc-rats from far and wide to compete at the seventh annual Rat-A-Rama. The event will include a standards show, pet classes, rat varieties on display, information on care and prizes awarded in categories like “best costume,” “longest tail” and “prettiest.” For those who are inspired by the all the rad rats, you can take home your own “highly socialized, adorable pet,” either from a breeder or a rat rescue shelter. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., $3 adults, $1.50 children, Idaho Humane Society Education Room, 4775 W. Dorman St., 208-761-5071, ratspacnw.org.

to the Starland Vocal Band and Captain and Tennille, one group of Millennials will be road tripping across the country as social activists. The nationwide, youth-led nuclear abolition campaign Think Outside the Bomb has spent the last four months traveling across the country, stopping at revolutionary hotspots to spread a message of nuclear disarmament. By the end of their tour in August at Los Alamos, N.M., the birthplace of the atomic bomb, the tour will have stopped at more than 50 cities.

S U B M I T

TOTB will stop at the Boise State Student Union as the culminating event for the Youth Conference on Responsible Energy. On Friday, June 25, the tour will hit Donnie Mac’s. The event’s host, Snake River Alliance, is working to build a local movement to stop the French nuclear power company Areva from building a $4 billion uranium enrichment plant in Eastern Idaho. The alliance cites nuclear waste, financial costs and proliferation risk as reasons to stop the facility from being built.

Producer Frank Marshall hearts Boise. Dude has premiered some of his most famous flicks in the City of Trees, including The Bourne Supremacy, The Bourne Ultimatum, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull and The Curious Case of Benjamin Button. And lucky for us, he’s heading back to town to show off his new blockbuster, The Last Airbender, directed by M. Night Shyamalan, of The Sixth Sense and Signs fame. Known for founding the successful production company Amblin Entertainment with his wife Kathleen Kennedy and mega-man Steven Spielberg, Marshall is responsible for producing a number of other notable films such as Raiders of the Lost Ark, Poltergeist, Who Framed Roger Rabbit and Hook. Marshall also directed the films Arachnophobia, Alive, Congo and Eight Below. On Tuesday, June 29, Marshall and The Last Airbender will make their way to the Egyptian Theatre for a special red carpet screening featuring a raffle, a performance by Throwdown of Idaho’s Dragon Bushido XMA Team and a Q & A with Marshall after the screening. Like Captain Planet (minus the wussy “heart”), the world of The Last Airbender is filled with folks who can summon the power of the elements—water, earth, fire, air—to their advantage. Unfortunately, the leader of the Fire Nation has gotten hotheaded and waged a war against the other elemental nations. Now it’s up to Aang—the last known Airbender from the peaceful Air Nomads nation—to save the world. If you want to do even more Hollywood hobnobbing, head over to the Linen Building later that evening at 7:30 p.m. for “Inside The Producer’s Forum,” which will feature a discussion with Marshall and local legend Michael Hoffman. Tickets are $100 a pop and can be purchased by dialing Boise Contemporary Theater Patron Services Manager Amanda Micheletty at 208-331-9224, ext. 205. 1 p.m., $7.75-$17.75, Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net.

Andrea Shipley, executive director of SRA, hopes that people who attend the workshop will begin to “see the links within the nuclear fuel cycle between nuclear power, nuclear weapons and nuclear waste.” The event will feature puppetry, music from Bad

There’s no such thing as a restaurant fairy, an apronwrapped pixie who swings her wand and magically makes all of the food service necessities appear—martini glasses, check presenters, yellow industrial mop buckets, to-go boxes, open/closed signs. Fortunately there is the mortal equivalent: Standard Restaurant Supply. STANDARD RESTAURANT Located on Fairview near SUPPLY Cole Road, Standard Restau6910 West Fairview Ave. rant Supply is a foodie’s Never 208-333-9577 Never Land. Filled with aisle standardrestaurant after aisle of cups, glasses, supply.com plates, pots, pans, utensils, soap dispensers, trash cans, black plastic mats and aprons, Standard is the place to find anything restaurant-related. Need a men’s or women’s bathroom sign? Standard has ’em. Need a 100-quart aluminum stockpot? Standard has your back. The megastore offers everything from iconic, lined guest check pads to Chinese take-out boxes, but unlike other wholesale clubs, you don’t have to pay to be a member. Both individuals and businesses can sign up with the store and receive discounts on all of the store’s merchandise. So, if you’ve always wanted to snag a brightly colored, brushed plastic tortilla holder to make taco night all the more authentic, Standard Restaurant Supply will gladly help you spend your hard-earned dinero. —Tara Morgan

Heart Bull, Robert Jensen of Third Coast Activist and information about the nuclear industrial complex. The tour will also be at the Boise Rec Fest on Saturday, June 26, in Ann Morrison Park. 6-9 p.m., Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., 208-384-9008.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | 21

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JUNE 23 Festivals & Events NATIONAL OLDTIME FIDDLER’S CONTEST AND FESTIVAL—Oldtime fiddlers and fiddle groups compete for the national title as part of the festival in Weiser. Performances, booths, food and parades. $6-$25. Weiser High School, 690 W. Indianhead Road, Weiser, 208-414-2595. RHYTHM AND RIDE BIKE AND MUSIC FESTIVAL—Four days of races, rides and rock. Full schedule at www.svrhythmandride.com. See Picks, Page 20. Sun Valley, Idaho.

Odds & Ends

Food & Drink

BOISE UKULELE GROUP—This ukulele group offers instruction and a chance to jam. All levels welcome with no age limit and no membership fees. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Meadow Lakes Village Senior Center, 650 Arbor Circle, Meridian.

DELI DAYS—Live entertainment and Jewish food festival. See Picks, Page 20. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. $3.50-$7.50. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., Boise, 208-343-6601, www. ahavathbethisrael.org.

POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811.

FOOD AND FILM—A threecourse meal followed by a movie and discussion. Proceeds from the night go toward the growth and preservation of local foods. Held in the cellar room. This month’s film is Earth 2100. 6:30 p.m. $25, includes meal, Red Feather Lounge, 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-429-6340. www. tvfcfoodfundraiser.eventbrite. com.

VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO— Buy, sell, trade and listen to vinyl records with other analog musical enthusiasts. Guest speakers and DJs. 7-10 p.m. FREE, www.vpsidaho.org. Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244.

Workshops & Classes Workshops & Classes FABRIC ART CAMP—Learn to create fabric designs with batik, tie-dye and other mediums. 9:20 a.m.-noon. $45-$75. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, 208344-5501, www.ymcaboise.org.

Talks & Lectures YOUTH CONFERENCE ON RESPONSIBLE ENERGY—Student organized conference on energy sponsored by the Snake River Alliance. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. $5-$30 donation. Boise State SUB, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, union.boisestate. edu.

Citizen BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT VOLUNTEER NIGHT—Volunteer mechanics are on hand to answer bicycle repair questions, help with diagnosis and assist in repairs. 6-8 p.m. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, www.boisebicycleproject.org.

THURSDAY JUNE 24 Festivals & Events NATIONAL OLDTIME FIDDLER’S CONTEST AND FESTIVAL—See Wednesday. $6-$25. Weiser High School, 690 W. Indianhead Road, Weiser, 208-414-2595. RHYTHM AND RIDE BIKE AND MUSIC FESTIVAL—See Wednesday. Sun Valley, Idaho.

On Stage DONNIE MAC’S GOT TALENT— Open talent show for cash and prizes. Sign up any time. $10. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008, www.donniemacgrub.com.

FUNDAMENTALS OF PLEIN AIRE PAINTING—Workshop by artist Gregg Russell. Class limited to six students. register by calling 208-321-4162. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $200. Galerie Belle Ame, 179 S. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-938-1342, www.galeriebelleame.com. LANDSCAPES WITH PALLET KNIFE AND OIL—Workshop by Artist Venture Coy. Class size is limited to 10 students. Register by calling 208-321-4162. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $200. Galerie Belle Ame, 179 S. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-938-1342, www.galeriebelleame.com.

Talks & Lectures YOUTH CONFERENCE ON RESPONSIBLE ENERGY—See Wednesday. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. $5$30 donation. Boise State SUB, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, union.boisestate. edu.

LOCK-UP NAMPA—Fundraiser for the Muscular Dystrophy Association, in which local business leaders are “arrested” by local firefighters and held prisoner at a business networking event until their $1,600 bail—the price of sending two kids to MDA Summer Camp—is posted. 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Jalapeno’s Bar and Grill, 8799 Franklin Road, Boise, 208-375-2077, www. jalapenosidaho.com.

Kids & Teens WASTEWATER: WE TREAT IT RIGHT—Learn about the flow of water treatment through activities like viewing wastewater treatments, TP tube bowling and making TP tube puppets. Kids can also try their hand at cleaning up a simulated wastewater sample. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-4891284, www.cityofboise.org/Bee/ WaterShed.

Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

22 | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT FRENCH CUISINE WITH CHEF PHILIPPE DIDIER—Menu includes mussels and clams, fish cooked in papillotte, ratatouille provencale, saffron rice and more. 6:30 p.m. $50. Pottery Gourmet, 811 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-368-0649.

FRIDAY JUNE 25 Festivals & Events NATIONAL OLDTIME FIDDLER’S CONTEST AND FESTIVAL—See Wednesday. $6-$25. Weiser High School, 690 W. Indianhead Road, Weiser, 208-414-2595.

Art AT THE RIVER—Art and music activities, student art show and food booths, along with a silent auction and jazz festival with 22 visiting artists. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Arts W. School, 3300 W. State St., Eagle, www.artsW. school.org.

RHYTHM AND RIDE BIKE AND MUSIC FESTIVAL—See Wednesday. June 23-27. Sun Valley, Idaho.

Food & Drink Talks & Lectures

DELI DAYS—See Thursday. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. $3.50-$7.50. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., Boise, 208-343-6601, www.ahavathbethisrael.org.

YOUTH CONFERENCE ON RESPONSIBLE ENERGY— See Wednesday. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. $5-$30 donation. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-INFO, union.boisestate.edu.

Workshops & Classes Sports & Fitness

VINTAGE SWING DANCE— Instructions on classic Lindy Hop moves. All ages. No partner required. 7 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, www. heirloomdancestudio.com.

DANIEL DOPPS MEMORIAL DODGE PRCA RODEO—A charitable rodeo that raises funds for educational scholarships, youth activities and improvements to the Optimist Rodeo Arena. 7 p.m. $10. Optimist Park-Mountain Home, Elmcrest and Fifth Ave. N., Mountain Home.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Citizen NEW REPUBLICAN CLUB (TREASURE VALLEY PACHYDERMS)—Guest speakers and an open forum during dinner for local Republicans. For more information, e-mail treasurevalleypachyderms@yahoo. com. 6 p.m. $5 for members and $6.99 for nonmembers; donations accepted. ArtsW. School for the Performing and Visual Arts, 3415 Flint Dr., Eagle, 208938-5410, www.artsW.school. org. THINK OUTSIDE THE BOMB TOUR—An evening of music, performances and movement building organized by the Snake River Alliance to stop the construction of a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment plant in Eastern Idaho. See Picks, Page 20. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3849008, www.donniemacgrub.com.

Odds & Ends BOISE CAFE LATIN NIGHTS— Get a basic Latin dance lesson included in the cover at 9 p.m. and then practice dancing to music by DJ Tomas or DJ Saya. Loosen up with a beer or glass of wine. Empanadas from Tango’s are served Friday evenings. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. Boise Cafe, 219 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-343-3397.

SATURDAY JUNE 26 Festivals & Events BOISE REC FEST— Exhibits, workshops, product demos and activities for all things recreational, along with live music and food vendors. See Picks, Page 20. For full schedule, see insert in this issue. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Blvd., Boise. RHYTHM AND RIDE BIKE AND MUSIC FESTIVAL—See Wednesday. Sun Valley, Idaho. SALSA AT THE LINEN—Latin dance lessons followed by a DJ’d tropical dance party organized by the Idaho Salsa Congress. 8 p.m. $5-$7. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3850111, www.thelinenbuilding.com.

On Stage

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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SUMMER LOVIN’—Drag performance fundraiser for candidates running for Idaho’s Gem Court. 9 p.m. $5. Sin, 1124 W. Front St., Boise, 208-342-3375, www. sinboise.com.

Auditions

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

AUDITIONS FOR LEND ME A TENOR—Four men and four women aged 25-60 needed. Show is Sep. 3-18. 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, www. boiselittletheater.org.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | 23

JOIN THE BOISE SKATEBOARD ASSOCIATON.

8 DAYS OUT

GET MORE INFO & SIGN UP AT THE BOISE REC FEST JUNE 26th & 27th Free Beginner & Intermediate Skate Camps 26th.

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Food & Drink

Citizen

Auditions

FIRST OF HARVEST—Event celebrating the start of the cherry harvest with fruit and wine samples, as well as music and prizes. There will also be a historical car show by the Idaho Horseless Carriage Club. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Williamson Orchards and Vineyards, 19692 Williamson Lane, Caldwell, 208459-7333, www.willorch.com.

KYS: KNOW YOUR STATUS—Free quick-response oral HIV testing. Results in 20 minutes. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Anne Frank Memorial, 770 S. Eighth St., Boise.

LEND ME A TENOR—See Saturday. 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208-342-5104, www.boiselittletheater.org.

Workshops & Classes BEGINNING IRONWORKING CLASS—Make your own fork and spoon with a metal forge and instruction from professional metal artist Andy Franco. Cost covers all materials. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $48. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-4073359, www.puffymondaes.com.

Odds & Ends RAT-A-RAMA—Fancy rat show and educational fair featuring rat breeders to answer questions, contests for longest tail and prettiest rats, as well as adoption opportunities. More info at www.curlywhiskersrattery. com. See Picks, Page 20. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. $1.50 kids. $3 adults. Idaho Humane Society, 4775 W. Dorman St., Boise, 208-342-3508, www.idahohumanesociety.com.

SIGNING TIME ACADEMY PARENT WORKSHOP—Learn to use sign language to communicate with your baby and help him/her learn to speak sooner. Register online for class at www.cwidaho. cc/ce. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. & 1-3 p.m. $15. College of W.ern Idaho, 5500 University Way, Nampa, 208-562-3200, www. cwidaho.cc.

SUNDAY JUNE 27

Art

BOISE REC FEST—See Saturday. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Blvd., Boise.

AT THE RIVER—See Friday. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Arts W. School, 3300 W. State St., Eagle, www.artsW.school.org.

RHYTHM AND RIDE BIKE AND MUSIC FESTIVAL—See Wednesday. Sun Valley, Idaho.

Sports & Fitness

Odds & Ends

DANIEL DOPPS MEMORIAL DODGE PRCA RODEO—See Friday. 7 p.m. $10. Optimist ParkMountain Home, Elmcrest and Fifth Ave. N., Mountain Home.

CARDBOARD CANOE REGATTA—Teams build canoes out of cardboard and duct tape, then race them around the bumper boat pond to compete for a trip to Sea World in San Diego. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Price varies. Wahooz Fun Zone, 1385 S. Blue Marlin Lane, Meridian, 208-898-0900, www.wahoozfunzone.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

MONDAY JUNE 28 Odds & Ends PABST BINGO NIGHT—7 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008, www.donniemacgrub.com.

Literature ECLECTIC READER BOOK GROUP—Group discuss John Scalzi’s literary anthology, Your Hate Mail Will be Graded. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 7079 Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-4229, www. rediscoveredbookshop.com.

Festivals & Events

TUESDAY JUNE 29 Festivals & Events PLAYING IN THE PLAZA—Food and craft vendors, along with live music by Invisible Swordsman. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Generations Plaza, corner of Main Street and Idaho Avenue, Meridian, www.meridiancity.org.

Screen INSIDE THE PRODUCER’S FORUM WITH FRANK MARSHALL—Producer Frank Marshall will discuss his latest film, The Last Airbender, directed by M. Night Shyamalan. 7:30 p.m. $100. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-385-0111, www.thelinenbuilding.com. THE LAST AIRBENDER—Premiere screening of the latest film from M. Night Shyamalan. See Picks, Page 20. 1 p.m. $10-$20. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, www. egyptiantheatre.net.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 30 Odds & Ends SPLASH BASH—Poolside party with live music, food and drink specials and weekly drawings. 6-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., 208-3434611, www.owyheeplaza.com.

Kids & Teens WASTEWATER: WE TREAT IT RIGHT—10 a.m. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, 208-489-1284.

24 | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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NOISE EVILLIVE/ M .NU NEZ

EVEN CHUCK NORRIS IS AFRAID Glenn Danzig talks about new album, book, tour AMY ATKINS For more than 30 years, Glenn Danzig has served as a physical manifestation of the rebellious, anti-establishment ethos of punk rock. As his projects changed—The Misfits (1977), Samhain (1983), Danzig (1987-present)—the 54-year-old, who continues to write, produce and perform, was elevated to legendary status (his otherworldly biceps helped in that regard). His newest release Deth Red Saboath, which was released June 22, is quintessential Danzig and yet different. But it’s not so much a shift in his music as an evolution. It’s a raw, swampy album in which metal, blues and straight-up rock ooze through a pool of dark lyrics with Danzig’s baritone vocals bubbling up and bursting from the surface. At times he voices low, whispery invitations, and at others, loud proclamations of the consequences that result from messing with Danzig. In addition to the album and a nine-city tour that kicked off June 15, Danzig has yet another gift for his fans: a comic book. Hidden Lyrics of the Left Hand contains previously unreleased lyrics to 22 songs and includes hellish illustrations by longtime Danzig collaborator, artist Simon Bisley. It’s a frightening black-and-white look into Danzig’s lyrical process. It’s no less unnerving to interview him. Boise Weekly: Thanks for taking some time to chat with me today. (I’m so anxious, my voice has gone up three octaves.) Glenn Danzig: Yeah.

“Would you be afraid to interview me?”

How many copies have you sold? Well, we started with 10,000. And I think we’re going to be out of them soon, which is pretty big for a book like this. You have an introduction in there, but it would be really interesting if you didn’t explain it was lyrics. It would come across as poetry. (Silence. Shit again.) Um, would it be wrong to refer to it as ... No, it’s free verse. I write all of my stuff in free verse. I always have ... my influences go back to Poe and Baudelaire. Bukowski. Actually, on the first Misfits record, I thanked Bukowski just because reading early Bukowski in the ’70s ... was just— “wow.” Did you hand the lyrics to your artist and ... No, I did everything. I laid it out. Do you have that much of a hand in everything that you do? Of course. (Shit. Stupid question.)

Is your thumbprint on everything? (Why didn’t I stop at “do?”) I was concerned that I wouldn’t have a Of course. The Misfits, I laid out all the copy of the book before this interview, but it record covers the arrived in the mail toold way with rubber day. (My voice is now DANZIG EXCLUSIVE NINE-CITY TOUR cement and X-actos. so high, I’m practically Thursday, June 24, 8 p.m., $29.50-$60 Whatever I had to do. chirping.) KNITTING FACTORY OK. 416 S. Ninth St., That’s definitely a 208-367-1212 cool artistic element Um, shall we start bo.knittingfactory.com in the book, that the there then? fonts are different. That’s up to you. I changed them for each band, I did an You’re the one doing the interview. (Oh, shit. intro for each band, and I did it chronologiThis is not a good start.) cally from newest to the oldest: Danzig newest song ... all the way back to the Misfits. Ohhhkaaay. So tell me why you put out The last song is the earliest Misfits song this book of lyrics. never transcribed. Over the years, you know, the fans have been asking, “How can I get these lyrics?” Let’s chat about the new album. From a They’ve never been transcribed before. [But] rather than just do a book of lyrics, I hired Si- listener’s perspective, it has such an organic mon Bisley, to do an illustration for each song. feel to it. It’s almost like a live album; it WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

feels like everything is happening right there. It doesn’t sound overproduced. (He’s quiet. I realize I just told Glenn goddamn Danzig what his new album sounds like. What is wrong with me?) Am I misinterpreting here? It’s not overly produced. Rick [Rubin] was great for a lot of the things he did, what he did, but one of the reasons I stopped using him—like, on How The Gods Kill (1992) ... because I needed it to get more, like you said, organic. I don’t like stuff too dry, and I needed that roar to it ... I need a lot of that. I did want to ask you about this nine-city tour ... It’s not even a tour. I traditionally don’t go out before a record comes out, but my management really wanted me to go out because we’re not going out again until the fall with my Blackest of the Black Tour, which is going to be really big this year. How on earth did Boise get lucky enough to be on something like this ... You know, we come to Boise all the time. (Forgetting that I’m talking to a music icon, I yell the next part in a far-too sassy tone.) I know. But how ... That’s how! (Danzig yells back, but he’s not angry. We laugh. Phew.) We’re going to places where we have fans and where people wanted the show. On behalf of Boise, thanks. (As soon as the words leave my mouth, I feel ridiculous.) Well, thanks for being so nice to us. I know the last two times we went to Boise, the shows were nuts. One of the times, we had Doyle [Paul Caiafa aka Doyle Wolfgang von Frankenstein] with us and the people up front were going crazy. I was like, “You have to calm down.” Not that we don’t like fans going crazy, but just like totally out of their minds. They were like, “Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhh!” It was cool.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | 25

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE HANK III, KFCH, JUNE 23

GUIDE

With a middle finger held high to the country music establishment— and his label Curb Records—Hank Williams III has petulantly struggled to convince the public to look beyond his famous pedigree: grandfather Hank Williams and father Hank Williams Jr. He’s even taken on Walmart concerning censorship issues with his third album Straight to Hell, which was the first major-label country album to get slapped with a parental advisory label. This incessant conflict may help explain the meaning behind the title of Hank III’s newest album, The Rebel Within, released in May. With a self-described “hell-billy” attitude, the Nashville native has released six albums since 1999 and recently completed a two-week Canadian tour with his band Assjack. He will spend the rest of June on a nine-city U.S. tour, stopping at Knitting Factory in Boise on Wednesday, June 23. Although Williams hints at the country music roots of his family, he’s not afraid to infuse a healthy dose of electric guitars, heavy metal drumming and screaming lyrics into his songs. —Rachel Krause With Izzy Cox, 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $17-$40. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 23

THE MYSTICS—6 p.m. $25. Stonebridge Gardens

ACTUAL DEPICTION—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SINK THIS SHIP—With Dance My Heart, Alive Through Love, Versailles, All Hands Go and Stop Drop and Party! 6 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Lubriphonic with Audio Moonshine. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza ALL SHELLEY’S EVE TOUR— With Les Shelleys and Shelley Short. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage BEN BURDICK TRIO PLUS— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Bouquet CELESTIAL HOEDOWN—With Chase Us. 9 p.m. $3. Terrapin Station HANK III—With Izzy Cox. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $17-$40. Knitting Factory HOORAY FOR HOLLYWOOD BENEFIT—Music and silent auction to benefit family of Brandon “Hollywood” Perry. Bands include RevoltRevolt, Trigger Itch, Zen Zero, Curtis Plum, Heibarger and DJ Naomi Sioux. Donations of diapers and baby-food encouraged. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux JIMMY BIVENS—7:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s JOHN WAYNE AND THE PAIN—9 p.m. FREE. Reef JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

26 | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | BOISEweekly

PLEASANTVILLE KILLERZ— 8 p.m. $6. Bouquet

SLIGHTLY STOOPID—With Steel Pulse and The Expendables. 6:30 p.m. $20-$35. Eagle River Pavilion SOLVENT—Solvent, from Ghostly International. With Hoy and DJ Kitsune. 9 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective

MODERN TANGO WITH JONAH SHUE—6 p.m. FREE. Modern Hotel and Bar OPENING OF JAZZ AT THE RIVER—Jam session with 22 world-class jazz musicians. 7 p.m. $25-$75. The Blue Door Cafe PIANOS BECOME THE TEETH— With Almost is Nothing, Dead Heroes, Bone Dance, Beslan and Portrait of the Assassin. 6 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios

LOSERPALOOZA—Free two-day outdoor festival with Tiamats Destroyer, Vagerfly, Oilslave, J.A.R., The Mongoloids, Big Yuk and Kunk. Head East on I-84, take exit 64 to Blacks Creek Road, turn right, drive two miles and look for signs. Free camping. No dogs. 6 p.m. FREE.

THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

MOVEMENT MUSIC FAN APPRECIATION NIGHT—Featuring Second Family, Island Tribe, Toddy Pype, The Pessimists and The Congregation. 8 p.m. $8. Knitting Factory

SUITE 88—With Fetish 37. 9 p.m. $5. Terrapin Station

PILOT ERROR—9 p.m. $5. Dino’s RIZING RESISTANCE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THURSDAY JUNE 24

FRIDAY JUNE 25

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND— Hannah’s House Party with DJ Naomi Sioux. 9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. Humpin’ Hannah’s

BILL COFFEY—6:30 p.m. $6$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

BLACK SEQUIN DISASTER—8 p.m. $3. Neurolux

SAMBADA—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

CANDREAD AND THE RIZING REZISTANCE—9 p.m. FREE. Bittercreek Ale House

DOWN STAIRE—With Elite and Sub*Vert. 9 p.m. $4. Terrapin Station

THE SEASON—With Forget the Pacific, Stop Drop and Party!, The Paris Funds and Light the Sky. 6 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios

CYNDI LEE AND STRAIGHTWISE—5:30 p.m. FREE. Downtown Nampa Nights

FREUDIAN SLIP—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

SOUL HONEY—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

JAZZ AT THE RIVER JAM NIGHTS—6-9 p.m. $25-$75. The Blue Door Cafe, Cool Hand Luke’s, The Griddle in Eagle

SUMMER LUNCH JAMS—With Lee Penn Sky. 11:30 a.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza

DANZIG—With All Shall Perish and Toxic Holocaust. See Noise, Page 25. 8 p.m. $29.50-$60. Knitting Factory GLENN DANZIG—In-store performance. 6 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange

JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

SYSTEM AND STATION—With Beautician and Black Smith. 8 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE SATURDAY JUNE 26 AMBER PACIFIC—With Halifax, City Lights, Victory in Numbers, The Dude Abides and In the Pause. 7:30 p.m. $10-$12. The Venue BERNIE REILLY AND RYAN WISSINGER—1 p.m. FREE. Solid BLAZE AND KELLY—7 p.m. FREE. Buzz Cafe CRAVING DAWN—9 p.m. FREE. The Plank GIZZARD STONE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s LEE PENN SKY—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Sandwich Saloon LOSERPALOOZA—Free two-day outdoor festival with Sleeping Sickness, Tommy Dirtweed, Beatnikparty, Neo Tundra Cowboy, Therapy O.D., Hot Dog Sandwich, The Meatballs, Sneex Bill, The Jerkwadz, Trigger Itch, Demoni, A New Agenda, RevoltRevolt, End of All Flesh, Benny the Drunken Poet and Curtis Plum. Head East on I-84, take exit 64 to Blacks Creek Road, turn right, drive two miles and look for signs. Free camping. No dogs. Noon. FREE. MOONSHINE AND MAYHEM—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

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MT THEORY BREAKDANCE BATTLE—9 p.m. $5. Neurolux PILOT ERROR—9 p.m. $5. Dino’s ROCCI JOHNSON BAND— Hannah’s House Party with DJ Naomi Sioux., 9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. Humpin’ Hannah’s SOUL SERENE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub TAUGE AND FAULKNER—9 p.m. Liquid THE USELESS—WIth Wetsock, Faithless Saints, Second Best and No Cash Value. 7:30 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory YER MAMA—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny YOUNG CURMUDGEONS—7 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Pub

SUNDAY JUNE 27 ROONEY—With Young Veins and Black Gold. 8 p.m. $15-$30. Knitting Factory SONGWRITER’S CLUB WITH GIZZARD STONE—7 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

MONDAY JUNE 28 FAUS—With Our City Skyline, Armada and Versailles. 7 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios THE PYKNIC PARTERY TOUR— With Drop Dead Gorgeous, Sleeping With Sirens, Attila, Abandon all Ships, For Those Sleeping, Woe is Me and Scarlett O’Hara. 5 p.m. $15. The Venue

TUESDAY JUNE 29 ANDREW ANDERSON—With Sloth Falcon. 9 p.m. $4. Terrapin Station RUBY TUESDAYS—9 p.m. FREE. Bouquet SMOOTH—7 p.m. FREE. Liquid SOUL SERENE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye SOULS OF MISCHIEF—See Listen Here, this page. 9 p.m. FREE. Reef

WEDNESDAY JUNE 30 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—WIth Rubblebucket and RevoltRevolt. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza BADMOUTH—With Burn Idols, Yukon the Archer, Fury of the Cyclops, Adamant Allies and Gernika. 6 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios BEN BURDICK TRIO PLUS— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Bouquet BLACK TUSK—With Zoraster, Dark Castle, Pussygutt and Uzala. 9 p.m. $8. The Red Room Tavern DM STITH—8 p.m. $5. Neurolux GIZZARD STONE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid JEREMIAH JAMES GANG—8:45 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—With DJ Naomi Sioux, 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s RUBY HILL—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

VECTOR—With Krystos. 9 p.m. $3. The Red Room Tavern

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

SOULS OF MISCHIEF, JUNE 29, REEF A-Plus, Opio, Phesto, Tajai. That’s not a list of antidepressants awaiting FDA approval, although taken all at once, this foursome—Souls of Mischief—will lift your spirits. When Souls of Mischief released their debut, 93 ’Til Infinity (Jive Records), in 1993, they joined the likes of Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg and Wu-Tang Clan in shaping the hip-hop scene. Close to 20 years later, the Souls are still crafting wicked beats, extolling the virtues of the likes of Maui Wowee and pulling off what has given their “alternative” hip-hop staying power: four separate entities performing as one. Their 2009 release Montezuma’s Revenge (Clear Label Records) is a continuation of the Souls’ irreverent, smart delivery but with a grownup edge, in part because of Prince Paul’s (Handsome Boy Modeling School) production prowess. Souls of Mischief are old-school and might very well be your dad’s—or at least your older brother’s—hip-hop, but only if your pop or elder sib was cool as ice. —Amy Atkins 9 p.m., $10, Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., reefboise.com. Tickets available through ticketweb.com.

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ARTS/VISUAL EVANS WAR D

GOOD, CLEAN FUN(NY) Brian Regan stands up and waxes ordinary AMY ATKINS Brian Regan is a funny guy and that’s a good thing for a comedian. The stand-up, who has been performing since about 1984, sells out theaters and rooms across the country and has circled the latenight TV talk show circuit several times over. Prior to the ’90s, stand-up comedy mainly made its way into American homes in threeor four-minute segments via The Tonight Show or The Late Show with David Letterman. With the advent of Comedy Central and Comedy Central Presents, comics were given an hour to deliver the goods. By the time “So, I was walking through airport security with a box of Pop-Tarts, and this UPS driver came up to me ...” Regan’s first special, “Brian Regan’s Standing Up,” aired on Comedy Central in 2007, he had been performing for nearly 20 years. “It’s like [politicians] running for presiMeal. He never drops an f-bomb but it’s With that performance, Regan’s rubber-faced dent. They always have to say they aren’t observations of the prosaic earned him a much hardly noticeable. And when so many of his thinking about that, so, um, it’s not somecontemporaries are busting out blue jokes, larger and quite dedicated following. thing I am thinking about doing at all in the From his home in Las Vegas, during a rare Regan could be thought rather brave in his short term,” Regan said. “Maybe down the avoidance of profanity, especially considerrespite from the road, Regan talked about road when, like you say, I burn out on traving he touches on well-covered ground. always being on the road. Sure, his stop in eling, I might want to do something like that. Boise on Thursday, June 24, at the Morrison He riffs on everything from Pop-Tarts (a “I see the other comedians that do that. ludicrously popular bit) to UPS drivers to Center (and one on Friday, July 16, at the Rita Rudner’s been very successful out here,” Sun Valley Pavilion) could be considered part doctors’ visits to airports. His material is he added. “Carrot Top has taken residence of a big tour but one “that started in 1987,” kind of Stand-Up Comedy 101. What comic hasn’t done a “when I was stopped at airport at the Luxor Hotel. It might be something Regan said. security” joke? But what Regan does so well that I would do eventually.” “I’ve learned over the years that musiFor now, however, the road continues to is take that overdone subject matter and find cians do it a little differently than comedicall. Regan’s schedule reads like a retired a way to make it new. And hilarious. ans. A band might go out for two or three couple’s “we are going to live in our motoWhen Regan is written about, the folmonths. A comedian goes out on tour and rhome and visit every corner of America” lowing statement by comedian/actor Patton it’s like Gilligan’s Island: It’s a three-hour agenda—California, Connecticut, Indiana, tour and you never go back. You’re stuck on Oswalt (Ratatouille, Big Fan, United States Texas, New York, Florida, Oregon, etc.— of Tara) is often quoted: “Brian Regan’s the island!” and he recently made his 20th appearance comedy stuns me. It Regan travels on The Late Show with David Letterman. stuns me because he island America so He’s so busy that he actually sets aside one can start down the much, that when he is Friday, June 25, 8 p.m., $39.50 day a week specifically for interviews. Regan road with a premise home, he likes to leave MORRISON CENTER said that back when he was doing week-long that every comedian work behind—even 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, shows in clubs, it was easy to answer the one knows has not one though he resides in 208-426-1609, question he usually gets from journalists: scrap of flesh left on a prime place for a mc.boisestate.edu “Have you ever been to [insert city here]?” its bones, and find a working, well-known For more information, visit brianregan.com. Now, it’s a little tougher. new angle of attack comedian. “When you do [one-night only] shows that yields prime cuts “I do not perform in theaters, you forget where you’ve been,” of comedic meat.” at home. I like to Regan said. “I was doing a radio interview for Because Regan performs what is considhave a home life when I’m here. I just put on some town and they said, ‘Have you ever been ered observational humor, he’s not likely to the husband and daddy hat, which is weird run out of fodder. But there may come a day here before?’ I said, ‘No, I’m looking forward because there’s no better place to perform,” when he wants to stay a little closer to home. to coming. I’m so excited. I can’t wait to get Regan said, laughing. “There’s like 1,000 there.’ I hung up and had a queasy feeling. I By not performing in Vegas now, he has left showrooms here. Why don’t I live somelooked at my calendar and saw that I’d been himself an opening. By the time he’s tired of where else and work here?” there two years before. I kept wondering what planes, trains and automobiles, Regan can Part of what makes Regan such an easy retire from touring and do a Celine Dion: be- those listeners thought, ‘Wow, we must have act to follow is that his “observational hucome the artist-in-residence at a local casino. made a big impression on [Regan].’” mor” is squeaky clean, his timing is spot-on But not to worry, Boise. Regan promises He’s not ready to lay those cards on the table and his material is as universal and relathe’s genuinely excited to come back here. just yet, though. able to middle-class Americans as a Happy

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | 29

SCREEN

CAN YOU KEEP A SECRET? Academy Award-winning The Secret in Their Eyes is top-notch thriller GEORGE PRENTICE Sometimes Oscar gets it right. At the 2010 Academy Awards, the biggest upset wasn’t for Best Picture (The Hurt Locker), it was in the category of Best Foreign Language Film. Germany’s The White Ribbon from Germany was heavily favored as were France’s The “Benjamin, look deep into my eyes. I have a secret to tell you ...” Prophet and Israel’s Ajami. But at this year’s ceremony, when presenters Quentin Taranti“Justice is nothing but an island. This is the In a flashback, Benjamin recalls the moment no and Pedro Almodovar handed the golden real world.” Chilling. when Irene first walked into his office. He’s statuette to director Juan Jose Campanella The movie also provides some comic breathless, tongue-tied and forever smitfor the Argentine The Secret in Their Eyes, relief. Benjamin’s antic colleague Pablo ten. Their dance among the obstacles of a the audience gasped. I’d like to thank the Sandoval (Guillermo Francella) is an alcoholworking relationship and sexual chemistry academy for their vote. soaked buffoon. But just when you think is delicate yet electric. Benjamin’s good Go see this film. The acting is top drawer he is a cliche, his brilliance shines through and the story crackles. It’s a taut crime thrill- looks are tempered by a bit too much drink, and he helps solve the decades-old mystery. tobacco and regret. But the years have been er that is romantic, yet realistic. The movie Plus, there’s a real bonus: The movie offers a kind to Irene. Her dark features have turned follows Benjamin Esposito (Ricardo Darin), surprise ending, something regrettably sparse smoky and her sizzle a retired prosecutor in contemporary cinema. has become a slow who can’t exorTHE SECRET IN THEIR EYES (R) The Secret in Their Eyes is part ghost burn. Very intoxicatcise the ghosts of a Directed by Juan Jose Campanella story, part steamy mystery. But Campanella ing stuff. 25-year-old rape and wastes no time in paying a simple homage It is not lost that murder. He decides to Stars Ricardo Darin, Soledad Villamil, to film noir. He delivers an expertly paced when the movie write a novel, revisitGuillermo Francella drama, which brings to mind 2005’s The flashes back, we are ing the details of an In Spanish with English subtitles in 1970s Argentina, a Constant Gardener or even the 1944 classic unresolved crime, not Opens Friday at Flicks country that is spiral- Laura. It’s interesting to point out that Camunlike In Cold Blood panella cut his directorial teeth in television, ing into a military (technically fiction on both House and Law and Order. dictatorship and about to walk down a very with strong overtones of fact). While many of us are in search of a really long corridor of secrets and lies through a His first visit is to the office of his former good page-turner to get us through the long time when the poor and disadvantaged were superior, Irene Hastings (Soledad Villamil). hot summer (maybe something from John shackled with crimes they had not commitPreviously a judge’s assistant, she is now at Grisham or Scott Turow), it turns out that ted. However, writer/director Campanella, the top of the judicial ladder—in Argentina, the best suspense this year may come from a judge acts much like a district attorney and is not ham-fisted and allows us to apply the Oscar winner The Secret in Their Eyes. appropriate subtext. A corrupt judge says, is involved in investigating and prosecuting.

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings BEYOND THE MOTOR CITY—PBS documentary on the struggles of Detroit and its efforts to reinvent itself. Monday, June 28, 7 p.m. $5. Flicks, 646 Fulton Street, Boise, 208-342-4222. THE LAST AIRBENDER— Special premiere screening of the latest film from M. Night Shyamalan, about a war between nations that each control one of the elements. Includes Q&A session with producer Frank Marshall. See Picks, Page

30 | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | BOISEweekly

20. Tuesday, June 29, 1 p.m. $10-$20. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, www. egyptiantheatre.net. MARILYN MONROE MADNESS—Three days of free Marilyn Monroe films in the community room. Wednesday, June 23: How to Marry a Millionaire. Thursday, June 24: Bus Stop. Friday, June 25: Some Like it Hot. 1 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2940, www. gardencity.lili.org.

THE RESPONSE— Short courtroom drama based on trial transcripts from Guantanamo Bay military tribunals starring Kate Mulgrew (Star Trek Voyager) and Aasif Mandvi (The Daily Show). The film was researched, vetted and shot at the Maryland School of Law, and will be followed by a discussion. Saturday, June 26, 5 p.m. FREE. A Novel Adventure, 906 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3448088.

Opening EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP—A French thrift shop owner in Los Angeles acquired a video camera, and became famous for going out at night and filming graffiti artists at work. Opens Thursday, June 24. Flicks GROWN UPS—The death of their childhood basketball coach leads some old friends (Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock), to gather at the site of a championship celebration from years ago. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

KNIGHT AND DAY—Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz star in this action-comedy of a fugitive couple on an adventure where nothing and no one is what it seems. Opens Wednesday, June 23. Edwards 9, Edwards 22 MOTHER AND CHILD—A star-studded cast with Naomi Watts, Samuel L. Jackson and Annette Bening. Follows the lives of three unique women fighting to control the chaos in their lives. (R) Flicks THE SECRETS IN THEIR EYES—See review, this page. (R) Flicks

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SCREEN/LISTINGS continuing

SCREEN/MOVIE TIMES WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23-TUESDAY, JUNE 29 THE A-TEAM— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4:20, 7:15, 10:05 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 11:20 a.m., 12, 1:40, 2, 2:50, 4:25, 5, 7:10, 7:45, 9:55, 10:35 BEYOND THE MOTOR CITY—

Flicks: M: 7

CITY ISLAND—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:45, 7:05, 9:15

DATE NIGHT—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:15, 2:20, 4:35, 7:05, 9:25

EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP—

Flicks: F-Su: 1:20, 3:20, 5:20, 7:20, 9:20; M-Tu: 5:20, 7:20, 9:20

GET HIM TO THE GREEK— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 10:40 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:10, 2:45, 5:20, 8, 10:30 GROWN UPS—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:10, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:45, 7:20, 9:45

HARRY BROWN—

Flicks: W-Th: 5:05, 7:15, 9:30

THE A-TEAM—A group of Iraq War veterans looks to clear their names with the U.S. military, which suspects the four men of committing a crime for which they were framed. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 CITY ISLAND—Corrections officer Vince (Andy Garcia) secretly takes an acting class, but his wife, Joyce (Julianna Margulies) thinks he’s having an affair. (PG13) Flicks DATE NIGHT—(PG-13) Edwards 22 GET HIM TO THE GREEK—A music company assistant (Jonah Hill) is sent to London to retrieve an outrageous rockstar (Russell Brand) for a concert at Los Angeles’ Greek Theatre. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 HARRY BROWN—Michael Caine plays an elderly veteran on a mission to avenge his best friend’s murder. (R) Flicks

IRON MAN 2—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:15, 4:05, 7:35, 10:40

IRON MAN 2—(PG-13) Edwards 22

JONAH HEX—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15, 9:20

JONAH HEX—Josh Brolin plays an old-Western bounty hunter whose encounter with death bestows him with a connection to the supernatural as he tracks down a terrorist to clear the warrants on his name. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

THE KARATE KID— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:15, 4:15, 7:05, 10:15 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:50 a.m., 12:30, 1:10, 3:20, 3:50, 4:15, 6:40, 7, 7:20, 9:40, 10:10, 10:30 KILLERS—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:25, 4, 7:25, 10:20 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 6:50, 9:15

LETTERS TO JULIET—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:30, 9:50

MARMADUKE—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:25, 2:30, 4:40, 6:50, 9:10

MOTHER AND CHILD—

Flicks: F-Su: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; M: 4:30, 9:30; Tu: 4:30, 7, 9:30

PLEASE GIVE—

Flicks: W-Th: 5, 7, 9; F-Su: 1:10, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; M-Tu: 5:10, 7:10, 9:10

PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:10, 7:10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:10 a.m., 2:10, 4:55, 7:40, 10:20 ROBIN HOOD—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 4:05, 10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:20, 3:25, 6:45, 9:45

THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES—

SEX AND THE CITY TWO—

Flicks: F-Su: 1:40, 4:20, 6:55, 9:25; M-Tu: 4:20, 6:55, 9:25 Edwards 9: W-Th: 1, 4:10, 7:20, 10:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:40, 3:40, 6:55

SHREK FOREVER AFTER— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:35, 4:35, 7 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:20, 6:35, 9 SPLICE—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:05

TOUCHING HOME— TOY STORY 3—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:50, 7:10, 9:25

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:05, 4:25, 7:35, 10:10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:05, 1:20, 2:40, 3:55, 5:15, 6:30, 7:50, 9:05, 10:25

TOY STORY 3 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:40 a.m., 12:55, 2:15, 3:30, 4:50, 6:05, 7:25, 8:40, 10

TOY STORY 3 IMAX 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:25, 7, 9:35

T H E A T E R S Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THE KARATE KID—Twelve-yearold Dre Parker (Jaden Smith) moves with his mother to China, where he learns kung-fu (not karate) from his apartment’s maintenance man, Mr. Han (Jackie Chan) in order to defend himself. (PG) Edwards 22 KILLERS—(PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 LETTERS TO JULIET—(PG) Edwards 22 MARMADUKE—Film adaptation of the comic strip. (PG) Edwards 22 PLEASE GIVE—Two young women care for their elderly grandmother while their neighbors, who have already purchased her apartment, wait for grandma to pass away. (R) Flicks PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME—(PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 ROBIN HOOD—(PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SEX AND THE CITY TWO—(R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SHREK FOREVER AFTER— Bored, Shrek makes a deal with Rumpelstiltskin to feel like a real ogre again. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SPLICE—Two experimental geneticists (Adrien Brody, Sarah Polley), splice human DNA with animal DNA and attempt to raise the resulting creature as their own child. (R) Edwards 22 TOUCHING HOME—The story of two young men with the dream and the ability to be professional baseball players. (PG-13) Flicks TOY STORY 3—The good old toys are back but Andy is all grown up and off to college. The toys are donated and must survive the constant craziness of a daycare center. (G) Edwards 9, Edwards 22, Edwards IMAX

BOISEweekly | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | 31

FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

TWIG’S CELLAR

GLENN LANDBERG

Wine bars are sultry beasts. Sparkling candles, gleaming goblets, elegant In this town obsessed with patio dining, you wouldn’t expect a ressmall plates and the low chatter of wine-lipped couples. But if you’re taurant would willingly choose a subterranean location. But for some hungry for more than atmosphere, they often fall short. reason, the basement in the Garro Building on Bannock in downtown Twig’s Cellar, a semi-hidden basement wine cave in the middle of Boise has hosted several eatery incarnations. First, one of Boise’s predowntown Boise, offers more sustenance than your run-of-the-mill wine mier sushi bars and then the impressive Milky Way occupied the spot. bar. Located in the ex-Milky Way and Andre’s space between Eighth Both moved on to bigger, above-ground digs. Next came the fine dining and Ninth on Bannock, the small restaurant’s menu wanders from destination Andre’s. By then, a complete remodel had transformed the Italian—bruschetta, caprese salad, margherita pizza, tiramisu—to new spot into a delightfully comforting and quiet respite from the clatter of American classics like hummus, barbecue chicken pizza and cheesecake. the world above. It’s the kind of comfortable fare you’d imagine first-time restaurant Andre’s is also gone but the plush ambience has been retained, and proprietress Twig Munro whipping up for her pals in her home kitchen. if anything, improved by the latest tenant, Twig’s Cellar. The cozy In fact, Twig’s booths are still there, has a definite “girl’s the tables are close night” vibe with a set but don’t intrude warm red palette, a on one another, and handful of high-top an inviting bar has wooden tables and been added, behind booths, and enough which the owner, chattering middleTwig, pours equal aged women to make amounts of wine and a book club. friendly conversation. With this in mind, She and Tracey, who I grabbed a couple wanders the circuit of lady pals for a of tables, are two spelunking expediof the main reasons tion to Twig’s on a this unlikely location Wednesday evening, exudes such a welthe only night of the coming atmosphere. week, our server soon They treat you like informed us, that the a regular from your cellar doesn’t have very first visit, and live music. We settled there are any number into comfy armchairs of reasons you’ll around a chess table want to come back. in a special private First and foremost, dining area that felt this is a wine bar, and part cigar room and the wine by the glass TWIG’S CELLAR part funeral parlor. The awkwardness of the space list currently offered has something to please just about 816 Bannock St. eased in direct proportion to the fullness of our bottle every taste. There are some 30 reasonably priced choices, 208-344-8944 of Spice Route sauvignon blanc ($18 bottle). The light, most for under $8 a glass. These are not the usual twigscellar.com Tues.-Sat., 4 p.m.-close, grapefruit-y crispness of the wine cut through the greasy California-based suspects. I was pleasantly surprised to Closed Sun.-Mon. heft of a plate of potato twigs ($7), which came with find Ecker Gruner veltliner ($6), Wallace Brook pinot a side of sweet, blueberry ketchup—the best I’ve had gris ($6.50) and Clayhouse cabernet ($8) to name a few. in Boise, where blueberry ketchup has inexplicably The bottle list is even more extensive and a better bargain dripped onto a number of local menus. Augmenting the evening’s rich with a dozen or more of the 70-plus offerings priced at $20 or less. On theme was the Weiss pizza ($9), a decadent mess of sauteed mushrooms, my first visit our table ordered a bottle of Sleight of Hand “The Magicaramelized onions, roasted garlic and truffle oil. While the dough had a cian” gewurztraminer ($25). With its floral aromas, lightly spicy fruit pleasant snap, the pizza had an overall je ne sais quois shruggability. and pleasantly dry finish, this wine made a great match with the perfectly This sentiment was confirmed on a subsequent visit when I bit into cooked garlic shrimp infused with rosemary ($12). the veggie pizza ($9), with artichokes, peppers, onions, spinach, diced The menu at Twig’s Cellar is designed to please the palate while tomatoes, squash, mushrooms and goat cheese. Though the mostly pairing well with the wine. It’s a thoughtful collection of small bites, goat-cheeseless pizza went nicely with a heavy-handed pour of Tilia salads, thin crust pizzas and desserts, though some are more impresmalbec ($16 bottle), it wouldn’t have stood solidly on its own. Two sive than others. I loved the baked artichoke spinach dip ($7), beautimenu items, though, did set Twig’s apart from its fruit-and-cheese wine fully textured with small chunks of artichoke in a flavorful white bar brethren as a bona fide restaurant. The garlic shrimp skewers ($12) sauce served with crisp and garlicky toasted baguette slices. The were a delightful foray into subtlety. Large black tiger shrimp were sau- barbecue chicken pizza ($10) had a nice tang to it with its smoky red teed in butter and lemon and topped off with little wisps of rosemary. sauce, marinated chicken, pepperoncini and smoked gouda, all on a They were juicy and perfectly bouncy—a lovely summer snack. Sealing thin, whole wheat crust. I fell in love with the locally bottled Marjothe deal was the tiramisu ($6), a bed of not-too-boozy ladyfingers wigrie June’s blueberry ketchup that accompanied the Potato Twigs ($7). gling under a down comforter of airy, cheesecake-ish creamy topping. The mix of sweet potato and Yukon golds could have been a little Heavenly. crisper, but they went beautifully with that just-sweet ketchup. I’m Twig’s Cellar is a pleasant place to duck out of the downtown chaos definitely looking forward to further exploring the menu, the wine and kick-start or wind down your evening. But if you’ve got a hankerlist and checking out the live music. Here’s hoping Twig’s Cellar has a ing for pizza, you’d be better off snagging a slice somewhere in between. long and prosperous future. —Tara Morgan has grape expectations when a new wine bar opens.

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—David Kirkpatrick wines when he reaches the bottom of a bottle. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

DINING/FOOD Caldwell THE COFFEE SHOPâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Espresso, drip coffee, fresh baked goods, hot dogs, Polish sausages, cheeseburgers and snow cones. 1115 Albany, Caldwell, 208-454-7300. $-$$ . DUTCH GOOSEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Homemade ďŹ nger steaks, fresh steamed clams, soup, sandwiches and

great hot wings. 2502 Cleveland Blvd., 208-459-9363. $-$$ SU OM. IMELDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Imeldaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is known for light, ďŹ&#x201A;uffy and fresh homemade ďŹ&#x201A;our or corn tortillas and a make-your-own-taco option. Select from a wide variety of meats including chile Colorado, beef guisado, barbacoa, ground beef, cubed pork, chicken,

BEER GUZZLER/FOOD

chorizo, shredded beef, bacon and sausage. Then choose from a variety of toppings that include rice, onions, lettuce, beans, cilantro and even potato. 2414 Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208454-8757. $-$$ . MANCINOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Caldwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mancinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is home to hot, oven baked sandwiches with melted cheese piled high with deli meats. The menu doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave out soups, salads and of course, pizza. 2412 Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, . 208-459-7556. $

Nampa BRICK 29 BISTROâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Chef Dustan Bristol is owner of Nampaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s casually upscale eatery, which serves fancy takes on common foods. Asian pork tacos come with a side of apple-almond coleslaw and fancier still, an open-face Reuben sandwich with a cup of pumpkin bisque. 320 11th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-0029. $-$$ SU OM.

AN ECLECTIC TRIO Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be hard pressed to ďŹ nd three more disparate brews than this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lineup. Beyond their malted barley base, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have much in common. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not from the same continent, they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t share the distinction of being bottled and one comes in a can. The only real thread that connects them is quality: All three are worthy efforts. ABITA RESTORATION PALE ALE Score another one for this Louisiana-based brewery. This smooth, dry ale has a slight earthiness and pours a light gold with a creamy head that fades rather quickly. Soft grain and ďŹ&#x201A;oral hops mark the nose, while the palate has a fresh bakedbread quality with lightly sweet malt melding nicely with the fruity, just-bitter hop proďŹ le. This is not the most complex effort but it is impeccably balanced and delightfully drinkable. BOULEVARD ZON This Kansas City breweryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s take on a Belgian witbier is ďŹ&#x201A;avored with coriander and orange peel and pours a hazy straw color with a thin cap. The soft aromas are nicely herbaceous and ďŹ lled with spicy fruit. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pleasant graininess to the palate, where the sweet lemon ďŹ&#x201A;avors are backed by ample spice. The ďŹ nish is crisp and refreshing with just the right hit of bitterness. LION STOUT From the can, it pours an opaque ebony with a billowy, cafe au lait-colored head that collapses slowly. In the mouth, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like biting into a bar of high cacao, dark chocolateâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;rich and well texturedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;with a lightly sweet espresso chaser. Touches of cherry, a hint of smoke and subtle hops color the ďŹ nish. At 8 percent-plus alcohol, this might not be the best choice on a hot summer day, but it would make a great nightcap. This very impressive stout is my ďŹ rst from Sri Lanka. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;David Kirkpatrick AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Less than $8 $$ â&#x20AC;&#x201D;$8 to $14 $$$ â&#x20AC;&#x201D;$14 to $20 $$$$ â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Over $20

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Wine & beer â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Full bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Delivery â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Take-out â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Open late RE S â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Reservations

COPPER CANYONâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for a delicious steak, Copper Canyon in downtown Nampa deserves your attention. It may be a little off the beaten path, but well worth the trip to enjoy their ďŹ ne dining in an intimate setting. 113 13th St. S., Nampa, 208-461-0887. $$$. RES. ELIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Sâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Eliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Italian Deli offers hot sandwiches, cold sandwiches and italian pasta dishes. While the Bada-Bing is the local darling, the spicier option mufalata knows how to party. 122 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-4668880.$ FLYING M COFFEEGARAGEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; First Flying M moves out to Canyon County and makes a home out of a former garage shop. Now that space is chock full of coolness in the form of a coffeeshop, gift shop and allage art and music venue. Food selections to go along with the in-house roasted coffee include pastries made at the in-house bakery. 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533. $ SU. HOUSE OF KIMâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Top-notch service and unique ambience make House of Kim worth a drive to Nampa. If that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get you to gas up the car, maybe this will: HOK offers spicy, spicy, spicy Thai options as well. 1226 1st St. S., Nampa, 208-4663237. $$ . MONA LISAâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;This atmospheric restaurant specializes in fondue served in an intimate setting inspired by a single piece of art (you know the one). This isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just for ďŹ ne diningâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s positively decadent. Great for special occassions or when you just want to take your time over dinner. 102 11th Ave. N., Nampa, 208-442-1400. $$$ RES SU.

needed/recommended â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Patio S U â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Open on Sunday O M â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Online menu â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Breakfast â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Boise Weekly Card

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Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

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ights Jonathan Tyler & The Northern L

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This 100-year-old North 1111 NINTH ST., BOISE End bungalow combines $395,000 old-world character with 3 bed/4 bath updates to create a vintage, 2,875 square feet yet comfortable home. Blue Rooster Realty Lisa Corbett, 208-368-0803 The three-story home blueroosterrealty.com has plenty of outdoor space, MLS #98439040 including an enclosed porch and a flagstone patio. Original details remain, like leaded glass windows, tall baseboards and crown molding in the foyer, living room, dining room and kitchen, and maple flooring is throughout. A master suite and one bedroom are located at the rear of the main floor. The finished basement contains a bedroom, and the attic has been converted into a spacious suite. PROS: North End bungalow feels comfortable and authentic. CONS: Upper bedroom suite has no privacy door.

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:6HI7D>H:9JEA:M Spacious 1300 sq. ft. above ground basement apt. with huge windows, lots of light must see inside! Available immediately! Fresh paint throughout; new hall & living room flooring and new DW. Large rooms 3BD, 1.5BA, 16x12 living room-decent size kitchen, W/D, small fenced back yard. No pets, no smoking. 2 available parking spots. $725/mo. plus deposit. W/S/T paid by owner. Call Tonya 407-7407 or Chuck 890-6898.

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ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com HIJ9>D6EI# Clean, safe, quiet residential neighborhood off Roosevelt, close to BSU. No credit check or app fee, no lease. $345/mo. Available now. Call 333-0066.

BW FOR SALE BD9:GC;A6>G9:H><C:GDLC:9 2100 sq. ft. Remodeled 3BD, 2BA + office. Walk to 36th Garden Center. Family & LR. New Kitchen. $219,900. 208-724-6968.

-B>A:HHDJI=D;I6B6G68@ Gorgeous log home with beautiful covered porch & filtered view of the lake. Enjoy sheep migration by the home twice a year, summers at the lake, winters in the snow, hunting and fishing near by. This log cabin sleeps 4 in the loft bedroom and 2 additional with the living room hide-a-bed sofa. Water rights come with the home, septic is installed. Sale comes with cabin furniture including beautiful log master bed, 2 twin beds, kitchen dishes & utensils, dining room table & chairs, living room furniture. Scenic drive in Boise National Forest to God’s Acre Subdivision. Available immediately for purchase and enjoyment! Only $149,900. 1221 Fox Road, Cascade. Call Deborah w/ Idaho Properties 208-484-0752. See virtual tour at www.tourfactory.com/535799. =DB:;DGH6A:DCAN'.!.%% Light and airy MFH near Boise Foothills. Featuring 2BD, 2 full baths. Covered 2 car carport, wonderfully landscaped yard and beautiful stone patio. Access to shopping, public school and entertainment. Available for immediate purchase and occupancy. 8171 Casa Real Lane, Boise. Call Deborah w/Idaho Properties at 208-484-0752 for info or showing. For virtual tour go to www.tourfactory.com/535799

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1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 8805772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Boise & Nampa studios. Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577. Thomas. B6HH6<:7N<>C6 Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. Prof. therapeutic massage only by trained & exp. masseur. New client spec. Robert 484-6251.

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Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 3777711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole. ULM 340-8377.

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BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

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Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

6B:G>8DGEHIJIDG TUTOR in greater BOISE and CANYON COUNTY areas: F/T and P/T 10 - 12 month AmeriCorps tutoring positions with Lewis-Clark Service Corps. Benefits include monthly living allowance, health coverage & education award. 208-854-6727. ;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

ADOPT-A-PET

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Wknds.Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

CAREERS

BEAR: 7-year-old male Lab mix. House-, crateand leash-trained. Happy, friendly, playful and good natured. (Kennel 310 #10725105)

OLIVIA: 1.5-year-old pit bull terrier mix (42 lbs). House-trained and good with dogs. Sweet and social. CAT FREE HOME. (Kennel 410 #10541862)

LAINEY: 1.5-year-old female, brown tabby cat. Sweet, gentle and sensitive to loud noises and lots of activity. Nice lap cat. (Kennel 53 - #10217935)

DANCER: 4-year-old Shih Tzu mix (11 lbs.). House- and leashtrained. Loves people and other dogs. Loves to play. (Kennel 414 #10680741).

CALI: Gorgeous 2-yearold black, orange and white cat. Good with other dogs and cats. Very sweet and loving. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 59 - #10495083)

AMMON: Mixed breed (55 lbs). Loves to play with toys. Little sound sensitive. Warms up quickly and wants to be a lap dog. (Kennel 311 - #10646687)

BW HELP WANTED MOVIE EXTRAS earn up to $150/day to stand in backgrounds of major film. Experience not required. CALL NOW! 1-888-664-4621.

G6EJCO:A H6ADC

Now has stations for lease. Great amenities, people and terms. Call 336-5008 for appointments.

OPPORTUNITIES

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

ALL CASH VENDING! Be the boss of your own local route with 25 new machines and candy for $9,995. Call today 1-800-920-9563. Multivend, LLC. BO#200003.

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

BW BUSINESS BW CAREER INFO. $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay. com

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PIXEL: Hobbies: Fantasizing about fish and Googling own name.

CHARLIE: Hobbies: Napping and Texas hold ’em poker.

SEYMOUR: Hobbies: Catnip pruning and Hacky sack.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | 35

| REAL ESTATE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | CAREERS | BARTER | TRANSPORTATION | FOR SALE | | PETS | SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

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ART, ANTIQUES, & COLLECTIBLES

FOR SALE BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464.

NYT CROSSWORD |

19 Country with a blue, yellow and red flag 21 Not fixed 22 Daughter of rocker Kurt and Courtney Love 24 Brilliantly colored lizards 25 Tennis’s Monica 26 Reps’ places? 28 Rap’s 50 ___

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36 | JUNE 23–29, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

61 Cry from Homer 62 Within a lumberjack’s ability to cut down 65 Fair-hiring org. 66 Country with a green, white and red flag 68 “Our quest ___ an end!” 69 Digestive enzyme 72 Penguins’ org. 73 Half of an old Latin aphorism 77 One of 17 on a Monopoly board: Abbr. 78 Take off the board 80 Not troubled by 82 Singer Lisa and newspaper publisher William 85 Put back up 87 With 116-Down, club in “Cabaret” 88 One way to be repaid 90 Country with a blue, white and red flag 91 ___ Chapel 95 Stage a walkout 97 Keeps from prying eyes, in a way 98 Lighting enthusiasts? 101 British mil. award 102 Responds to angrily 103 Toward the dawn 104 British science fiction author Colin ___ 107 Tooth: Prefix 108 Amount of electrical resistance 110 Modern school keepsakes 118 Sartre play 119 Greedy race in the “Star Trek” universe 120 Like some Google Maps views 121 Actress Braga 122 County on the English Channel 123 Rapidly

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DOWN 1 1959 #1 hit for the Fleetwoods 2 “The Trumpet of the Swan” author

3 Bushed 4 They include the wee hrs. 5 Experiment place 6 They cause your eyes to close 7 Maritime birds 8 Mythical birds 9 Alt-rock genre 10 Snag 11 Hot dog ___ stick 12 Actress Kristen of “S.N.L.” 13 Journal 14 You can count on them 15 Shade lighter than emerald 16 Longtime Yes drummer 17 New Jersey community next to Montclair 20 Whatever 21 Costumed animal, maybe 23 “It’s ___ cause” 27 Place for a hammerlock 29 Lover’s question on a long-distance call 30 Involve 31 Card game expert John 32 Fox TV’s “___ Death” 33 Can’t abide 34 Mideast carrier 35 Sunshade 37 Bon mot 39 It rolls in the aisles 40 Good for snacking 41 ___-European 45 Wooley with the 1958 #1 hit “The Purple People Eater” 46 Like a difficult order 47 Boo-boo 49 Belief: Suffix 52 Rapper on “Law & Order: SVU” 53 Drink with dim sum 54 Texas has one, in song 55 One on a diet 57 Sounded like a fan 58 Braver 61 Lentil dish at an Indian restaurant 63 Drugstore eponym

64 First volume of an encyclopedia, perhaps 66 Magazine extra 67 Shakespeare sobriquet 69 Country with a green, yellow and red flag 70 Company calling? 71 Garlic relative 73 Fire ___ 74 Dating service specification 75 Country with a red, yellow and green flag 76 Swear 79 Basset sounds 80 Michael Moore documentary 81 Not windward 83 1975 Joni Mitchell hit 84 Had an unquiet sleep 86 Les États-___ 89 Courtroom schedule 91 Medicinal plant 92 Snared 93 Wood-marking tool 94 “My mama done ___ me …” 96 Cryptologist’s org. 98 Lowly workers L A S T

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99 “Gulliver’s Travels” creature 100 Howlin’ Wolf, Willie Dixon and others 102 “___ Now” (Murrow series) 105 Sharable PC file 106 Motley-colored 107 Bring (up) from the past 109 Actress ___ Scala 111 Miracle-___ 112 Not as experienced 113 Bleaches 114 Mine find 115 Sue Grafton’s “___ for Outlaw” 116 See 87-Across 117 ___-mo Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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Couch & Loveseat - MicroďŹ ber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

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H6G6ÂźH H:8DC9=6C9

We buy your quality goods & furniture for CASH. Call 331-2366.

BW WANT TO BUY I BUY GOLD jewerly. Boise. Call Jim 890-7227.

TRANSPORTATION

SERVICES BW HOME ;:I8=E:I86G: Dog Walking & Pet Sitting. Locally Owned - Fully Bonded & Insured 208-629-7274. >CI:G>DG:MI:G>DGE6>CI>C< Double Take Painting is a local residental painting company. We do interior and exterior painting. Call today for a free estimate or visit us online. David and Darryl Martin: 208-870-7349 or 208-559-5633. doubletakepainting.com

a Judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have ďŹ led a written response in the proper form, including the Case No. CV OC 1009090, and paid any required ďŹ ling fee to the Clerk of the Court at 200 W. Front St., Boise, ID 83702, telephone 208-387-6900, and serve a copy of your response on the Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney at Stephen W. Beane, Attorney at Law, P.O. Box 2694, Boise, ID 83701-2694, telephone 208-336-2690. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. DATED This 21st day of May, 2010.

MUSIC BW MUSICAL INSTRUCTION/OTHER Keyboardist to play original material wanted. Ed 389-9619.

J. DAVID NAVARRO CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT BY: RIC NELSON DEPUTY CLERK

BW CLASSES

BW ADULT ENTERTAINMENT

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Basic Cable Knit Stitch Class all June. Call to schedule a time that works around your busy schedule. 343-3899. 605 Americana Blvd. HJBB:GH:L>C<8A6HH:H Beginner, intermediate & couture. Make a summer dress, Mom & Me Skirt classes, many to choose from. Check our calendar on the web for details caledoniafabrics. com or stop by Caledonia Fine Fabrics. 605 Americana Blvd. 338-0895.

IL><HIL>HI

Craft Classes, Mixed Media & Art Quilt Clubs currently forming. Check our web site for schedules www.twigsandtwists.com or call 342-0600 at 605 Americana Blvd.

BW FOUND

June 2, 9, 16 , 23, 2010.

Looking for descendants of Albert E. Nelson or Richard Nelson of Boise. 208-344-2881.

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N6G9H6A:

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-2898484. This is not a job offer.

Fishing gear, housewares, books, yard/garden, collectibles & music. Fri. & Sat. 6/25 - 6/26. 8am to 4pm. 706 Fulmer Ct., Meridian.

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BUYER BEWARE Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services. ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather be dancingâ&#x20AC;? Shows, dance-a-grams and lessons. 208440-1117. MEET LOCAL SINGLES. Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7584, 18+. SEEKING SEXY SINGLES? Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7583. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. Where Hot Men Hook Up! Call 208-489-2162 or 800-777-8000. Free w/code 2982.

BW CHAT LINES Hot Singles Waiting To Connect! Call 208-287-0343. FREE w/code 5500. Call 800-210-1010.

BW KISSES @>HH!@>HH>>;NDJB>HH:9B: The original Boise Crepe Guy that was on the corner of 8th and Main Street during the Saturday Market is now located on the Grove. We still serve the same delicious crepes, and fresh squeezed lemonade. Sorry if you missed us, we missed you. KISS! KISS!

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SUMMONS Case No. CV OC 1009090 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): A few years ago, a group of artists built a giant bunny out of pink wool on an Italian mountainside. The 200-foot-long effigy will remain there until 2025. There’s a disturbing aspect to this seemingly goofy artifact, however: It has a wound in its side where its guts spill out. That’s why I don’t recommend that you travel there and commune with it. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you would definitely benefit from crawling into a fetal position and sucking your thumb while lying in the comfy embrace of a humongous mommy substitute. But you shouldn’t tolerate any tricks or jokes that might limit your ability to sink into total peace and relaxation. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1998, I spent three weeks reading The Psychoanalysis of Fire and The Poetics of Reverie, two books by French philosopher Gaston Bachelard. His teachings were so evocative that I filled up two 120-page journals with my notes. To this day, I still refer to them, continuing to draw fresh inspiration from ideas I wasn’t ripe enough to fully understand when I first encountered them. You’re entering a phase of your astrological cycle when a similar event could happen for you, Taurus: a supercharged educational opportunity that will fuel you for a long time. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Congrats, Gemini! You have not only weathered your recent phase of relentless novelty, you’ve thrived on the adjustments it demanded. I am hereby awarding you the rare and prestigious title of Change-Lover, which I only bestow upon one of the signs of the zodiac every four years. So what’s next on the schedule? The shock of the new will soon subside, giving you a chance to more fully integrate the fresh approaches you’ve been adopting. I suggest you relax your hyper-vigilance and slip into a slower, smoother, more reflective groove. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here are the low-paying jobs I’ve done that I wasn’t very good at: tapping sap from maple trees in Vermont; driving a taxi in North Carolina; toiling as an amusement park ride operator in New Jersey; digging ditches in South Carolina; and picking olives from trees in the south of France. Do I feel like a failure for being such a mediocre worker and making so little money? No, because although it took me a while, I finally found jobs I was good at, and have been thriving ever since. Why would I judge myself harshly for having trouble doing things that weren’t in sync with my soul’s code? Please apply this line of thinking to yourself.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Each year, Playboy magazine publishes a list of the best colleges to go to if you prefer partying to studying. In its recent rankings, a top spot went to the University of Wisconsin, dubbed “the best beer-drinking school in the country.” As a counterpoint to this helpful information, HuffingtonPost.com offered a compendium of the best antiparty schools. Brigham Young got favorable mention with its policy forbidding students from drinking, smoking or having sex. The University of Chicago was also highly regarded, being “the place where fun goes to die.” For the next three weeks, I recommend that you opt for environments that resemble the latter more than the former. It’s time for you to get down to business, cull the activities that distract you, and cultivate a hell of a lot of gravitas. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’re entering a phase of your long-term cycle when cultivating abundance is an especially smart thing to do. To take maximum advantage, I suggest that you be both extra generous and extra receptive to generosity. Bestow more blessings than usual and put yourself in prime positions to gather more blessings than usual. I realize that the second half of this assignment might be a challenge. You Virgos often feel more comfortable giving than receiving. But in this case, I must insist that you attend to both equally. The giving part won’t work quite right unless the receiving part is in full bloom. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): What have you lost in recent months, Libra? This week begins a phase when will you have the potential to not exactly recover it, but rather to re-create it on a higher level. Maybe a dream that seemed to unravel was simply undergoing a reconfiguration, and now you’re primed to give it a new and better form of expression. Maybe a relationship that went astray was merely dying so it could get resurrected, with more honesty and flexibility this time around. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I’m guessing that you’ve been ushered into a frontier that affords you no recognizable power spot. It probably feels uncomfortable, like you’ve lost the inside track. And now along comes some wise guy—me—who advises you in his little horoscope column that you are exactly where you need to be. He says that this wandering outside the magic circle is pregnant with possibilities that could help you make better use of the magic circle when you get back inside at a later date. I hope you will heed this wise guy and, at least for the moment, resist the temptation to force yourself back into the heart of the action.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): There used to be a tradition in Sweden that young women could dream of the person they would ultimately wed if they put seven kinds of flowers beneath their pillows on Midsummer’s Eve. That’s crazy nonsense, of course. Right? Probably. Although I must note that two nights ago I placed a gladiolus, hydrangea, lilac, orchid, snapdragon, tulip and rose under my pillow, and subsequently dreamed of being visited by the lily-crowned Goddess of Intimacy, who asked me to convey a message to you Sagittarians. She said that if you even just imagine slipping seven flowers under your pillow, you will have a dream about what you should do in order to help your love life evolve to the next stage of its highest potential. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Have you ripened into such a knowledgeable, sophisticated person that you’re hard to surprise? Do you draw conclusions about each new experience by comparing it to what has happened to you in the past? I hope not. I hope you’re ready to be a wideeyed, open-armed, wild-hearted explorer. I hope you will invite life to blow your mind. In the days to come, your strongest stance will be that of an innocent virgin who anticipates an interesting future. Blessings you can’t imagine will visit you if you’ll excuse yourself from outdated expectations and irrelevant complications. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The notorious Wicked Bible was published in 1631. That wasn’t its original name. It was supposed to be as holy as every Bible. But it contained an error that slipped by the proofreaders’ notice: In the book of Exodus, where the Ten Commandments were listed, the word “not” was excluded from one commandment. What remained, an insult to pious eyes, was “Thou shall commit adultery.” Most of these books were later burned, and the publisher was punished. Be on the lookout for a comparable flap, Aquarius: a small omission that could change the meaning of everything. Ideally, you’ll spot the error and fix it before it spawns a brouhaha. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The plant known as the squirting cucumber has an unusual talent: When the fruit is ripe, it opens up and spits out a rapid-fire stream of seeds that travels a great distance. In the coming weeks, Pisces, you’ll have resemblances to this aggressive fructifier. It’ll be prime time to be proactive about spreading your influence and offering your special gifts. The world is begging you to share your creative spirit, preferably with rapid-fire spurts that travel a great distance.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 18 Issue 52