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ISSUE-11

LAISSEZ FAIRE -issue 11-

Issue 11 has trouble written all over it. The locus of life as it stands, has the economy residing somewhere between the rock of stagnating demand and the hard place of rising inflation. So here we go again, team Laissez Faire keeping body and soul together on the streets of London with this amazing zinger of an issue. We have gone all graphic design this month. Let your eyes gobble it up. It is one of the most fertile times to get involved and Laissez Faire is offering you the chance to receive a one-off golden hello of 10% for most courses listed here. The hardest thing about being an editor, is that you never get a day off. We have selected some tasty talents to showcase in this edition giving you an insider’s view of their esoteric craft. We joined the movers and shackers of pigeon clubs high and low. High, meant an exclusive gentlemen’s club in the West End. As to low, I am the hand and glove with all sorts of fanciers, Spital-Field weavers and all sorts of odd specimens of the human species, who fancy a bit of fashion, arts, culture and entertainment. Our love of colourful slang and linguistic quirk is connected to our fondness for TV characters such as Del Boy and Black Adder. The ideas are set forth in perfectly turned sentences and paragraphs. So if the daily grind at work is getting you down, whip out a copy of Laissez Faire and let symphony of groans, curses, farts and screams punctuating the background babble fade away. One can forgive you for salivating or occasioning a tear as you flick through these pages. Put the horse before the cart and all that...

CHRIS LLOYD

www.yllw.co.uk

Your muckraking editor, Maximus Jo Kerr McGuire

INSIDE: DONT WORRY BE ‘JAPPY’- Dutch graphic design master on typography MONEY FOR OLD ROPE - Kerry Roper art and design SOMETHING TERIFYING - Batman Returns

LAISSEZFAIRELONDON

LAST OF THE GREAT RECORDS - Keeping live music live REVIEW - Barts speakeasy LITERARY REVIEW -

Seven Years

COMEDY - Alex Horne THEATRE - Assassins from 2nd Company FEELING GOOD ABOUT FILMS - Mills on movies and much more...

LAISSEZ FAIRE LONDON is published by Richmond Media Ltd H.Q: 6 Powder Mill House , 6 Greens Court , Soho , London W1F 0HG www.laissezfairelondon.co.uk editor@laissezfairelondon.co.uk 020 7439 0612 -- 077 7923 8527

JAAP DE MAAT studiojoepjacobs.co.uk

ART & DESIGN ’ ‘ ’ Don t Worry-Be Jappy Next up, man of the hour, is Dutch graphic-design master, Jaap De Maat. His accented, but otherwise flawless English, is filling the minds of the next generation graphic designers, by making a career out of dispensing advice to troubled students at Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design

Project: Design for Accabonac, an artists magazine by students and teachers of Willem de Kooning Academy.

A brilliant teacher and an eye for details, he is also stunning the city with collaborations and on-going projects with the same inquisitiveness about understanding the broad visual forces that define our age. Without wasting time on chitchat, I drew him out with thoughtful questions on typographic policies…

Project: Credit crisis poster for Veenman Drukkers

The definition of typography has had slightly different meanings at different periods in time. Originally, with the invention of the first letterpress you would say that typography is the mechanical notification and arrangement of text. But in the current digital age the term would be more suited with: ‘the means by which we visually manage information.’ Typography is basically the main thing within graphic design; so you are dealing with text and information. When did you become interested in typography and what’s your role at Central Saint

...it’s managing visual information that fascinates me; the added value you can give to information, the message and how to get it across. The use of typography and type is just the biggest part of that...

In a nutshell, what is typography?

What common mistake(s) do you see designers making that could be easily remedied?

Sometimes you see that the design itself becomes more important than the message. Over-designed ’ve always been quite a visual person. It wasn’t a clear-cut decision to study graphic design. One because of all the options they have on a computer. Use them efficiently and never forget what you are of my influences was my grandfather, whom collected stamps and proudly explained about all the trying to communicated. designers. I think that got me into it. In high-school I got fascinated with maps and how the amount of information was visualized. I can still look at them for hours. Then I kind of rolled into graphic design What one thing would you like every designer to know about type? and typography, which as mentioned, is a big part of graphic design. The details and possibilities. I’d also pay attention to the basic details, such as: when to use non-lining I teach the evening typography courses at Central Saint Martins College and also taking on the first figures or small caps and the right quote marks. Martins College of Art & Design? I

year BA Graphic Design course.

Why the fascination with type?

Again, it’s managing visual information that fascinates me; the added value you can give to information, the message and how to get it across. The use of typography and type is just the biggest part of that. Teaching can be repetitive; where do you find your inspiration in order to inspire others?

It can be repetitive, but I always get inspired by the students themselves. When they are interested and want to learn, I never really get tired talking about it. There’s a course structure in place, but I always try to customize it according to what the students are interested in or what area they want to work at. What’s the creative process you try to instill in the students?

I always tell them to question the design brief and make it their own; to try and find something that interests them from within the brief, especially in projects that tend to look boring from the outset, or a branding they are not interested in. I always push them to do a lot of research – this is probably the most important aspect. If you have a big pile of research there is always something you will find interesting that you can relate back to the design brief. So it’s about making the brief your own, especially when you’re not interest at the outset – So make it you own! What’s the ideal learning outcome in the courses you teach?

It’s mainly getting students to be confident using type and to help them establish the range of typographic voices and where they might fit in. Who’s work do you respect and why?

It would probably the designers that I grew up with in Holland; so people like Wim Crouwel, Ben Bos and Gert Dumbar. They designed pretty much everything at that time, or at least the things that caught my eyes. Nowadays I like the work of studios such as Experimental Jetset, Spin and Build, whom continue the clean and minimalistic style of the old Dutch masters.

Joep Jacobs is a design studio based in Rotterdam and London, run by Tymen Cieraad and Jaap de Maat. www.studiojoepjacobs.co.uk

What was the first typeface you fell in love with?

I don’t have one specific typeface that I love; it’s like asking ‘which is your favorite colour?’ It all depends on the content that the typeface would be used in; like choosing the right music for a dinner party or an outfit for a special occasion. What was the most challenging typographic problem you have ever encountered?

During my studies I tried to design my own typeface and that was really hard. It’s very easy starting; you can come up with some rules and some characters to fit those rules, but quite quickly you’ll realise certain characters don’t fit your rules. I’ve never finished a typeface I started on my own. If I do it for a logo or something, I just stick with the letters I am using, but I’ve never finished the whole alphabet, which is pretty challenging and I hope to do it one day; probably when I’m very old with more time available. (Chuckles) Which typographic styles do you think will be the most popular in future and why?

Overall at the moment, in visual communication, I think it’s heading towards more clarity and simplicity in; a bit like back in the old Dutch days, like Wim Crouwel designs; less noise in the message/ communication. I think it also has to do with the overload of information at the moment with digital media and economic uncertainties. People just want simplistic and clear messages.

Project: Poster invitation for the exhibition ‘Street modernism’

What are the main differences between typography in print and on the web?

Web design is not something I’m an expert on. During my studies, interactive designs or web building was part of graphic design, now it’s starting to separate, which is a good development. Online is a different medium, so it’s a different way of treating typography. Your monitor, or your phone, is a light-source, so it’s a different way of treating the text than it is on printed matter. There are fonts designed specifically for on-screen use and that’s different from fonts that are used for print. You also run a design company call ‘Joep Jacobs’; when did that come about and how do you pronounce that?

It’s Dutch and pronounced ‘Yop Yacobs’. I started this design studio with my best friend and business partner, Tymen Cieraad, in Rotterdam. We had some projects that were on-going whilst studying and when we graduated we decided to start a studio with the little budget we had; we jumped into the deep end made some huge mistakes and learned very quickly from that. The name Joep Jacobs comes from a mutual friend that introduced Tymen and me so we decided to call the company after him. Are you working on any type-related projects right now?

Always! Some things I can’t really say as they are still in the pipeline and also stuff for our own portfolio that isn’t commissioned. An interesting project I’m working on now is an identity for a country that doesn’t exist, just yet; it’s under the sea and has to be raised up! I can’t say much about that, but it’s an interesting project. I’m also working on a book about a new way of dealing with dementia. The research on how a person gets dementia is quite interesting; it gives us a lot of scope for visual stuff. In graphic design/typography jobs, we tend to work with the client as opposed to working for the client. There’s a lot of communication that goes on between us and the client; we feel like we are working on the brief together. What would be your dream design job?

I’ve always dreamed about making money. I mean the actual designing of the note of course. That must be the ultimate job and I can’t imagine anything more exciting. Please give us your final thoughts/advice for those who want to become experts at typography?

Typography is always about finding the right balance. It’s important to judge with your eyes. Different types need different kinds of treatment; there is no set rule. Print it out, give it a bit of distance, pin it up on the wall and judge it will help you lot. DAnk Je Wel.

Project: Legacy Plus, Architecture Foundation

Graphic Designer: Funk Oydssey

Typography Here’s a review that is, just for once, bang on the money, as we sent our graphic design heavy-weight/editor-in-chief, on a reccy to one of London’s top typography short-courses at Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design (CSM).

Overall I found this an enjoyable and informative course. The fact that the course was set in a non-computer based environment was a great leveler for a diverse group. The content was a good mix of theory and practical projects, with the experience on the letterpress being a particular highlight for Joanne Higgs (Student) me personally.

COURSE REVIEW

Reviewed by: MJKM

CSM is situated inside a state-of-the-art beehive of creativity and for the next ten weeks I committed two and a half hours attending ‘Typography’ classes – which is the art and technique of arranging type by skillfully selecting typefaces, point size, line length, leading (line spacing), tracking (adjusting spaces among groups of letters), kerning (adjusting spaces between pairs of letters), etc. The course is led by the experienced, Jaap De Maat, graphic designer and expert typographer with years of teaching at CSM under his belt. I must admit, although Laissez Faire is created through-andthrough with stunning layouts, I humbly put myself as clay in the hands of a master potter. Each class is mixture of theory and lots of practical workshop situations, where under steady tutelage, general typographic wisdom, and occasional nuggets of insight, such as, “there are no bad fonts, only bad uses of fonts”, and, “before using a font, always read the historical content of why it was invented in the first place”. With each colosal task there is always the odd pitiful moan, as the scope of the problem in dealing with Prick Stick, scissors and cut up pieces of text beggared imagination. It is amazing what connotations In my particular class there were 12. Some needed more help than others and Jaap’s skill was to raise these experiments carried in retracing the arc of my learning curve. There is always something magical the bar, gently but relentlessly for all. He has also got a bit of a sixth sense to spot a student in a bit of about art and design; chasing something that is elusive while cracking open a packet of my beloved bother and no type-face fell that Jaap De Maat did not see. Hobnobs. The emphasis of this course is on understanding and applying basic typography skills through a With German precision, a well timed documentary was shown in the 5th week, on the first ever mixture of theory and workshop/homework projects such as: printing press invented by the German, Johannes Gutenberg during the Holy Roman Empire (1440) before one highlight of the course: a visit to the top deck of CSM to try our hand at printing on one • poster design; few remaining original letterpresses in the UK. If you like producing hand-made text and image based • juxtapositioning of text to express a meaning of a word; artwork, you’ll love this. • using a paragraph from a poem to express its emotion; • composition within white space; Class environment is spacey and always conducted with laid-back horizontal music in the background. • spacing letters and words to achieve balance; The lecturer is always keen to help and one can always unwittingly supply more questions for Jaap to • use a photocopy machine like a gun slinger in saloon with answer. unlimited prints (courtesy of CSM); • alignment and layout; The ten weeks culminated with a short test and further practical industry advice, followed swiftly with • we even practiced calligraphy with two HB pencils stuck a rendezvous at the local pub. together with the assistance of gridded paper to re-produce serif and gothic type letters. This course has been given the Laissez Faire London ‘Rubber Stamp of Approval’ See classified section at the back for course details.

ART SCHOOL

Chelsea College of Art & Design 16 John Islip St London SW1P 4JU

CHELSEA COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN Its brand of college is an icon of quality tutorship around the world, its students and alumni boasts an exemplarily list of highly-skilled graduates. Laissez Faire takes a look behind the brick walls of Chelsea College of Art & Design (CCAD).

One may think that the college is nestled in the heart of South West London’s glitziest shopping complex’s, among high-end restaurants or next to a giant advertisement for Gucci, wrong. In fact, it pleasantly sits majestically on the banks of the River Thames and adjacent to another world renowned unimpeachable art establishment, the Tate Britain at Millbank. The building itself is on a par with all the iconic buildings in its neighbourhood and is a ‘grade A’ listed ex-Royal Army medical college. It was renovated in 2005 to be a purpose built art college by the architects, Allies and Morrison, restoring it to a standalone college campus. With its wide corridors and original hospital signage everywhere, one will always feel that the architects left its mark in bridging the old with the new. The original bullet proof windows are also left in-tact. Just as well, since the pyramid structure of the MI6 building is well in its sights.

The Parade Ground, situated within the college, has been transformed into London’s largest open-air gallery hosting events from film screenings to large scale installations in spring 2008. The exhibition ground had previously been used for students and professionals as an open area platform, notably artist Chris Burden’s ‘A Flying Steamroller’ in 2006. Recent exhibitions include Cildo Meirels’s ‘Occasion’, held in association with his exhibition at Tate Modern in 2008. , pertaining to its name, has been designed as a modern angular shaped space for students to show their work throughout the year. The Triangle Gallery

It is famed for courses in interior design, both locally and internationally, as well as fine art and, one of the few places in London to study sculpturing. It offers short-courses in fine art, graphic design, interior design, spatial design and textile design plus more than I can mention.

At its centre piece, the college comprises of three notable on-site exhibition spaces:

As I leave the college grounds, it was that of a man emerging from the cave in which he had been living Chelsea Space, an international and interdisciplinary platform for professional practitioners to exhibit all his life, blinking in the sunlight as he perceived reality for he first time. CCAD’s reputation on art experimental curatorial projects. The gallery also releases regular publications from participating and design is worthy of a King’s ransom and a location to inspire the mind of budding art enthusiast. author, artists and designers. See courses listings at the back

SOMETHING TERRIFYING

A typography piece based on a Batman quote. The mood of each word determined the chosen font. Printed on Black Speckletone with silver pantone. Available for sale at www.kargov.com

I love comic books, I love typography and, I love print. I’ve wanted to merge the two for quite some time. Finding the perfect typeface to match the mood of each word was a tedious delight. I added in subtle details here and there to elevate the piece. Things like that filling-in the counter of the “A” in the word “FEAR”; because it’s dark, closed in, you do not know where you are going. Switching the counter of the “R” for a bat: Batman’s original fear. Adding a halftone shadow to the word “SHADOWS”. I chose metallic silver on a black substrate to achieve the gun-metal appearance of the type. I wanted it dark, just like the grittiness of Batman’s words.

kyle.kargov@gmail.com

ART & DESIGN

KERRY ROPER www.KerryRoper.com

‘ ’ Money For Old Rope Kerry Roper, graphic design extraordinaire, is just another one of my carefully timed acts. Plucked from the beauty parade of this crazily incestuous thing we call ‘art’, just got a little more crazily incestuous. She combines graphic design flair with furious intensity to produce some of the best work my eyes have laid upon. Without over inflating the build-up, we are definitely going to get all front and centre on this one. Look over your shoulder, and if there’s a swarm of bodies starring wide-eyed, slack-jawed and room temperature dropping 20 degrees, it’s probably because it’s: ‘Roper-Time’.

Time Waits For No Man

I Want

Dick

Modern Youth

China Red Promo

Modern Youth

Atom Bomb

Roper MJ Tee

Fuck

Moth Album

How did you become such an amazing graphic designer?

Blood, sweat and tears. Did you harbour any ambitions to design at an early age?

Ever since I was a young child, I’ve enjoyed drawing and all things art related. What other areas of graphic design you’d like to explore?

I’d love to get involved with moving image and fashion. What is the typical way you go about creating one of your illustrations?

I’ll usually try to think of a strong conceptual idea and then take it from there. I’ll gather the assets I require – ink marks, photography and typography, then I’ll then use Photoshop to compose my image. Are there any rules you hold true when it comes to art and design?

I think ideas are the most essential part of any project. Good craft and consideration for typography and image treatment are also of the utmost importance. Ideas should always be the main priority. Your final solution should always engage the audience. Who’s your favourite design artist?

I have a few favourites – Wolfgang Weingart, Barnbrook, Tomato and Wim Crouwel.

Lens Modern

Nike Jordan

Snickers Ad

What has been the highlight of your career so far?

I think I’ve had a few – the ‘Snickers Ad campaign’ was a great project and also being asked by ‘Nike ‘to create a T-shirt for ‘Air Jordan’. We heard you were one of eight artists that collaborated with Top Shop; they say, ‘never ask a woman her age’: so how old are you?

I was 32 at the time. It was in 2008. You do the math. Is there was a particular designer you’d like to work with?

Not really sure – I’d love to have the chance to work with Grayson Perry. I love the craft and wit of his work. How would you sum up your style?

Mixed, aggressive and thoughtful; I love being spontaneous and organic with my image creation. It helps give the work energy and makes it feel more natural. Do you work alone or part of a team?

Usually alone. What thought process and planning do you have to go through in preparing for a project?

I just digest the brief and let the thought process just happen. I try not to think about it too much. Then the ideas come. What lies on the horizon for Kerry Roper?

Lots more blood, sweat and tears. MANY THANKS KERRY

Nike T-Shirt

THE BIG SCREEN

www.facebook.com/pages/movies-by-mill/124445137614043

Thrills and spills with Brian Mills, belting out this months latest sure-fire blockbuster tips whilst also finding time to dive-in for the pre-screening of ‘Salmon Fishing in the Yemen’

FEELING GOOD ABOUT FILMS Though I have never fished in my life, I have always observed that there is an aura of tranquillity around fisherman when I have passed them on the banks of the River Thames. That calmness is felt in the beautiful visuals of this film, for fishing is I feel a meditative pursuit with a subconscious mantra ‘I will catch the big one.’ “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” is definite proof that the UK is using the right bait to catch audiences far and wide with this delightful romantic comedy which is based on a bestselling novel by Paul Torday. It tells the story of Fred Jones (Ewan McGregor) a fisheries scientist trapped in a loveless marriage. His world is suddenly changed when he is ordered to oversee a project that he believes is utterly ridiculous: introducing salmon fishing into the wadis of Yemen. The seemingly scatterbrained idea comes from a Yemeni Sheikh (Amr Waked), owner of a sports estate in Scotland who is willing to pay 50 million pounds to achieve his goal. When the Prime Minister’s chief PR Patricia Maxwell (Kirstin Scott Thomas) hears of the Sheikh’s plan, she grabs the story with gusto to divert the attention from the government’s latest blunder. Fred is joined by the Sheikh’s effervescent representative Harriet (Emily Blunt) who tries to persuade Fred that everything will go as planned. Eventually Fred’s intransigence abates and he begins to warm to the Sheikh’s plan and to the attractive Harriet. The upstanding and outstanding Sheikh reminds Fred of the virtues of fishing is to have faith and patience.

SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMAN

Directed by Lasse Hallstrom, starring: Ewan McGregor & Emily Blunt.

Rarely in a film does a minor character manage to steal a scene, but Conleth Hill who plays Fred’s long suffering boss, Bernard Sugden, exudes magnetism and demands your attention when he tells Fred that he no longer has a job. Hill releases all his frustration that his character has suffered over the years in a thankless job in one moment that allows him to retrieve his power to fire an employee. Like the film it will not be forgotten. Release date: 20 April th

Other Films Worth Watching: DELICACY

Directed by David & Stephanie Foenkinos Starring Audrey Toutou & Francois Damiens

Release date: 13

th

April

Nathalie’s world comes crashing down when her husband dies in an accident. For the next few years she tries to focus on work until one day she impulsively kisses a coworker, Markus, and so begins an unlikely relationship. Together they embark upon their emotional journey that raises all kinds of questions and hostility. Marvelling at their newfound love, Nathalie and Markus decide to run away to give their relationship a fighting chance. Rediscovering a zeal for life and the rebirth of dreams that Nathalie thought had died.

JEFF WHO LIVES AT HOME

Directed by Jay & Mark Duplass, starring Jason Segel & Ed Helms

Jeff is 30, unmarried, unemployed and still lives with his mother at home in the basement shrouded in pot fumes and grunge. He endlessly watches the movie “Signs” believing that it contains the key to the universe. Destiny will take care of itself, all you have to do is stay alert to the signs that the universe is sending you, is Jeff’s philosophy. Pat, Jeff’s brother, is stuck in a lifeless marriage that seems as hopeless as Jeff’s life. When their mother demands that Jeff leaves the basement to perform a simple task, life gets a little complicated as he is told to spend a day with his brother to help him track down his possibly adulterous wife. Release date: 20 April th

CAFE DE FLORE

The film opens in the present day as we are introduced to Carole, a discarded wife and mother. She takes drugs to help her sleep and she dreams of a strange woman in Paris many years ago experiencing a similar pain in her relationship. Carol visits a spiritual advisor to help her understand the visions. The parallel story is set in Paris in 1969, Jacqueline, a single mother cares for her young son who was born with Down’s syndrome. Jacqueline was abandoned by her husband after the baby’s birth. This film is a haunting spiritual experience and is rightfully being praised by critics and audiences alike. Release date: 11 May th

Directed by Jean Marc Vallee Starring Vanessa Paradis & Kevin Parent

LITERATURE

SEVEN YEARS By Peter Stamm Translated by Michael Hofmann Book review by Britt Pflüger

German architects Alex and Sonia seem to have it all: the perfect marriage, a thriving business, a house on the lake and the latest cars. And looks, of course – one of the reasons why, all those years ago in Marseilles, Alex proposed to Sonia when she was living with her friend Antje while training with a famous architect. Only their dream of becoming parents remains unfulfilled.

Unbeknown to Sonia, Alex has rekindled his affair with Ivona, a Polish bookshop assistant and fervent Catholic. Exactly what attracts Alex to her is unclear to both him and the reader: unattractive, simple and undemanding, Ivona is the opposite of the beautiful and intellectual career woman Sonia. In fact, Alex compares her to a dog and comments on her unfashionable clothes, the moles on her body. And yet it is her heavy body with its pendulous breasts he seems unable to resist, a place where, away from the pressures of his ‘perfect’ life, marriage and thriving business, he finds comfort, where nobody makes demands on him, least of all his ambitious wife, whose ideas about architecture differ vastly from his own (she is a fan of Le Corbusier’s clean lines, he admires the rather more eccentric Aldo Rossi). When it is, rather ironically, Ivona and not Sonia who falls pregnant, Alex is forced to come clean about his affair, and, ever the pragmatist, Sonia agrees to adopt the little girl. With her trademark stoicism, Ivona gives in: it appears that Alex is all she has ever wanted, even if she can never fully have him. But when, years later, following a brief phase of euphoria in the wake of German reunification, the recession bites and the golden couple find themselves on the brink of bankruptcy, their lives begin to unravel at an alarming rate... Told in the first person from Alex’s perspective (to Sonia’s old artist friend Alice), Seven Years, Stamm’s third novel, explores the main protagonist’s struggle with the dichotomy between his expectations from life (and expectations others have of him) and his true desire. For years, arguably intimidated by her higher social standing, he has bowed to his wife’s ideas about architicture while deluding himself that this is the life he has always wanted. There is certainly a degree of self-hatred in his degrading treatment of Ivona, but Alex is by no means an entirely sympathetic (or indeed reliable) narrator – he appears narcissistic and cruel at times, and it is difficult to sympathise with him even when he descends into depression and begins to drink heavily. The single perspective also means that we never really get to grips with either Sonia and Ivona, both primarily foils to Alex’s flaws. Added to the spare, almost emotionless prose, this could have resulted in a painfully anodyne read, but there is something irresistible about this skilfully constructed zeitgeist story, despite or maybe precisely because of the fact that it relies on quiet shifts of character and outlook rather than dramatic event. My only quibble is with the translation. Michael Hofmann, an acclaimed poet, critic and translator, has chosen to stay as close to the German original as possible. A brave choice, but one that I fear will divide the critics. And while I can see the merit of retaining the flavour of the original language, it just doesn’t work for me here, seeing as it produces some less than graceful results at times.

Granta Books 19 April 2012 264pp £14.99

Britt Pflüger is a literary scout and agent. She also runs literary consultancy Hardy & Knox: hardyandknox.com

THEATRE

Our resident theatre/comedy enthusiast, Jon Madge, has chosen two from his fatstock of theatre requests to shine the spotlight on the hottest tickets in town.

ASSASSINS

Music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim Book by John Weidman Based on an idea by Charles Gilbert, Jr

Whatever your thoughts on the recent budget, a play about political murder is likely to be a controversial subject, right? Well, in the case for Assassins, the answer is yes. Stephen Sondhein’s musical journey into the minds and motives of nine historic figures who tried to kill their president of the USA caused controversy when it was released 20 years ago and 2nd Company’s current run with it at the Pleasance Theatre does those two decades justice.

The show tells the story of John Wilkes Booth, Lee Harvey Oswald and seven others who tried, and on occasion succeeded, to kill American Presidents from Lincoln to Reagan. The first casualties of the performance is the conventions of naturalistic theatre. The characters sing and dance to music from the periods in which they were alive but the tunes are the stuff of full-on musicals and, by the end of the first number, the fourth wall isn’t so much broken as it is shattered and trampled underfoot.

These talents are used to great lengths in a production that clever plays on established musical clichés to help deliver alternative perspectives and new possibilities for the characters of the nine historic murderers.

In one beautifully laid-out scene, Lynetter Fromme and John Hinckley sing love songs to the loved ones in whose name they’re planning to commit their crimes. Each is oblivious to the other’s presence, What’s found in Sondheim’s work but rarely elsewhere, and this may be the key to his lasting success, gazing longingly at photos yet the choreography has them dancing together like romantic leads. is the ability to explore personal identity through darkness. It’d be easy to damn Booth for shooting Lincoln, to portray him as a stock violent confederate, or to tell to his story away from the assassination, Everything about this performance shows a reverence for the work at its core. With such an established but to do one using the other, to blur the line between man and monster, requires a much subtler hand cast, some up-staging would be expected but instead the characters are true and flashes of charisma and and a keener insight. attention-grabbing performances enrich the dark and intriguing characters. The only real flaw is that the music fell a little short of matching the scope of the piece but so much is done with so little that That calibre of deft touch requires a cast as good as the writer. This show has it. that’s almost unnoticeable. The acting talent has been ripped from the cream of the West End, with Les Misérables, Sister Act and The timing for this performance is perfect, with questions over vulnerability in society and the excesses Jekyll and Hyde all giving up performers to a much darker piece of theatre. of politicians are heavy in the headlines. I urge you, go and see it.

Words by Jon Madge

COMEDIAN

ALEX HORNE

Horne is a comedian that seems to go out “ of his way to be difficult to characterise. Even

just calling him a comedian doesn’t seem to do him justice. Rocket scientist, brain surgeon, and front man of a genuinely original indie band, all jobs that are actually difficult to do. Notice ‘comedy reviewer’ isn’t on there. That’s because it’s usually quite easy to describe a comedian, you try to remember whether they were funny, tell the readers that and then say who they look/sound/ dress a bit like. Sometimes you have to give a score out of ten. With Alex Horne it’s not that simple. This is partly down to the types of show he puts on and partly down to whom he is. To date, the subject matter for his shows (and these are whole shows, mind, not individual jokes or sketches) have included avoiding large boats, Roman towns in Britain and the medical and psychological reasons for why we find things funny. Those may not sound like the traditional places to find humour but they have secured Alex a nomination for the Perrier newcomer award, the Chortle Award for Best Breakthrough Act and the unusual accolade in an internet review that his shows ‘featured unusually extensive use of Microsoft PowerPoint for a comic act’. You’d be forgiven if that entire introduction has left you with the question ‘just who is this Alex Horne?’ and then, after a moment’s The latest performance, which is finishing its run in London and is pause, the follow up question, “and what does he think he’s playing taking off to visit the other, slightly less good, cities, is about being at?” alive. Most comedians would take one aspect of this to find humour in, Horne has decided to cover the whole thing and recreate an Horne is a comedian that seems to go out of his way to be difficult entire 79 year existence in a one hour, one man show. Every year to characterise. Even just calling him a comedian doesn’t seem to lasts for 45 seconds and everything we do, from the seven years we do him justice. He is, after all, the author of two books, a one-time spend in the bathroom to the four weeks we spend having sex, is TV presenter, a regular on comedy radio and a current contestant acted out in real time. for the title of oldest man alive (he plans to go for the oldest woman title once that one’s in the bag). It’s hard to truly do the show justice in mere words (he has a stage full of props; a talking panda and a front row of thoroughly abused And you know what? It’s all that which makes Alex Horne so audience members to work with), it’s a combination of QI-style good. He’s unpredictable yet rarely offensive, his shows and so factlets, songs, paintings, a sleeping man, the hiding of a jar of informative you expect a graduation ceremony at the end but you’ll Bovril and jokes. All topped off with one of the most amazing still find your shoulders aching from laughter. beards of this or any other age.

Alex Horne London dates: Tabard Theatre Mon 30th april Bar FM Wed 16th May

REVIEWED

Speak It ‘Easy’ At Barts Tucked away off Sloane Avenue in the heart of Chelsea lies Barts, a speakeasy bar in all its Prohibition inspired surroundings. First timers will no doubt be ambling up and down the streets of SW1 trying to locate the entrance – tip: Chelsea Cloisters!

HOLY SMOKE

The Holy Smoke cocktail is a tangy blend of Perique, Hennessy V.S., Havana Club 7 Y.O. and Vanilla Syrup.

To enter, you run a gamut of unsuspecting doors, one of which is laden with Disney characters and the typical speakeasy small trap door at eye level; where upon buzzing, you will find a pair of baron eyes finding yours. Once inside, the contrast could not be more different. Teacups brimming with gin, suave musicians and a retro dress code. The cocktails created inside are among the best in London, complex yet perfectly balanced blends made with super-premium spirits by ultra-committed bartenders. This worst kept secretive spot, lists a specialty tobacco infused cocktail ‘Smoke menu’. The drinks are wonderfully described and made with all manner of scientific techniques new and old, in particular, ‘Perique Tobacco Liqueur’, a rich aroma of tobacco, but in a form that greatly diminishes the health concerns associated with its traditional use: they are keen to stress. After sinking the specialities faster that the Titanic, it was onto the house cocktails which were every bit as good as it says on the menu, furthermore, all reasonably priced (£9.50/£10.50) comparable to any in the West End. Barts is the kind of place where the long knives would come out if things went south and table service here did not fail the acid test; it was spot with timing, information and friendliness.

IN VOGUE

The elegant In Vogue, combines Perique, Sauza Hornitos Tequila, Raspberry Puree, Gomme Syrup and Crème de Framboise should satisfy any cravings.

It’s not a huge venue, but boasts a smoker’s garden that is cosy in the winter and cool in the summer, thoughtfully designed with comfy seating and décor in keeping with its concept. One criticism that stands out, is that the acoustics are not great, but 10/10 for the vocalist giving it her all with glorious fullness and confidence.

CIG’NATURE

Our reconnaissance is flawless. I think we can chalk this up as mission accomplished and live to fight another day. They say guests will have never tried a signature drink quite like The Cig’nature Cocktail, which is an enticing mix of Perique, Lindisfarne Mead, Lemon Juice and Perrier Jouet Champagne.

If you think your establishment can welcomed guests with enthusiasm that lifts the spirits, then get in touch.

www.barts-london.com info@barts-london.com 020 7581 3355 Opening Hours: Monday-Thursday: 6pm-12.30am, Friday-Saturday: 6pm-1.30am, Sunday: 6pm-11pm

MUSIC

If you think you’re the next big music thing in London then get in touch with Steve at: steve@laissezfairelondon.co.uk Music maestro Steve James Miller gives us the latest instalment in his search for truly great music in London.

LAST OF THE GREAT RECORDS Keeping live music alive

About two or three years ago, Last of the Great Records came into being. Like most of the world’s greatest ideas; it was conceived one drunken afternoon in a pub. Raymond Chan and Rick Barber, founders of LotGR answered a few of my queries (thankfully, sober - I assume): How did LotGR start?

Ray: It was all Rick’s idea/fault. However, a more pretentious reason: the idea of LotGR was to foster a new movement in music. We were sick of promoters ripping off bands, making it so hard for good, talented musicians to showcase their ability to an ever-growing desire for live entertainment. We were also sick of the same dross being put on at gigs, so basically we hoped that this was a small way of readdressing the balance – bringing the thrill of seeing something new, innovative, or just damn good live, like back in the days of yore, which is ridiculously nostalgic rubbish, but some of the magic of live music seem to have disappeared for us.

In your opinion, and in your experience, what is the state of the current live music scene in London?

Ray: There’s still lots of places to go and see music in London despite quite a few big casualties in the last few years. It’s harder for people to put on nights, I find, with small to medium-size places being closed down, so it’s hard to put anything grand or ambitious on. It’s mainly a trickledown effect of places like the O2 Arena, which I despise.

Rick: There’s like a tiered level of gigging in London making it possible to see any types of music. From buskers on the street corner up to free pub gigs, to small venues like the borderline to medium-sized Rick: The hardest part to begin with was finding a venue that wasn’t too expensive, that would let us venues like Shepherds Bush on to arenas (there are other levels but not sure if you want me to go (being unknowns in the promoting world) hire it out and have a good sound system as we don’t have completely in depth!). This shows that everything can be catered for, maybe sometimes though it isn’t any of the kit ourselves. The first thing we started was the usual webpage/Facebook/MySpace but and that’s where independent promoters come in again, as a start up with no content and no idea how to design a web page, it was slow-going. What can people and venues do to increase the popularity of live music for unsigned bands?

What is the mission of LotGR?

Ray: Venues – make it free. Sometimes, a venue has to take a chance and give promoters and bands Ray: I have kind of covered the mission bit above – basically to look for music that generally inspires a free space to play. By doing this, it gives them something to sell to customers – who in turn spend (as per the name of the night). Also for egotistical reasons, we wanted to create a new night/venue that money on beer. A lot of musicians and promoters put a lot of time into this already, on limited budgets, worked on the principles of the Hacienda/Studio 54/CBGBs – in that no matter what, you would have so just by allowing free space would help a lot and stimulate people’s energy in hosting more music. a good night, and see some amazing music. Rick: It’s all about playing live, as much as possible, for the band and utilising every form of contact Rick: In other words choose the bands that you like so you can get behind them and enjoy it; it’s not with people as possible. Social media is now a definite; people like content and to feel involved. As for all about the money! venues, again, it’s all about social media and being constant, doing one gig every now and again can be difficult and a drain on resources, so it is best to keep constant and build up a following. Once people What sort of bands/artists do you showcase? know you put on good nights with interesting bands then they will return. Ray: At the moment, it has been mainly a collection of indie/rock/electro/twee indie. It has been fairly Do you have any personal favourite bands that have played at your events? generic so far but maybe we can expand on this. Rick: Again bands we enjoy listening to, no particular target audience. It’s like a hobby so you need to Ray: Man Flu was probably my fave so far. enjoy it or it becomes a chore. Rick: All the bands that have played have been great, that’s why we chose them, though Ray and I do have differing music tastes which sometimes makes it interesting! Is there any type of music you don’t want to accommodate? Ray: Theoretically, we are open to all genres but I have a certain phobia to Jazz: ‘Jazzaphobia’. Stick Does LotGR have any ambition to expand and/or to take a new direction? that in Urban Dictionary. Ray: Yes to both, but it’s an impossible task sometimes. Rick: Nope there is room for every type of music, whatever takes our fancy. Rick: It would be great to find a nice central venue and have a regular night; it just boils down to time and money, which unfortunately are in short supply most of the time. Thanks guys. Check out LotGR at:

www.myspace.com/lastofthegreatrecords www.facebook.com/events/156249714474578/

THE JOKER

Thanks for all the jokes you have sent in. You lot clearly love this page! Try to keep them clean though London, some of these are really pushing it. Sorry for any offence caused.

Graded this one A+

Offered by an English professor from the University of Phoenix. The professor told his class one day, ‘Today we will experiment with a new form called the tandem story. The process is simple. Each person will pair off with the person sitting to his or her immediate right. As homework tonight, one of you will write the first paragraph of a short story. You will e-mail your partner that paragraph and send another copy to me. The partner will read the first paragraph and then add another paragraph to the story and send it back, also sending another copy to me. The first person will then add a third paragraph, and so on back-and-forth. Remember to re-read what has been written each time in order to keep the story coherent. There is to be absolutely NO talking outside of the e-mails and anything you wish to say must be written in the e-mail. The story is over when both agree a conclusion has been reached.’ The following was actually turned in by two of his English students: Rebecca and Gary. ------------------------------------------THE STORY

(Rebecca)

At first, Laurie couldn’t decide which kind of tea she wanted. The chamomile, which used to be her favourite for lazy evenings at home, now reminded her too much of Carl, who once said, in happier times, that he liked chamomile. But she felt she must now, at all costs, keep her mind off Carl. His possessiveness was suffocating, and if she thought about him too much her asthma started acting up again. So chamomile was out of the question. (Gary)

Meanwhile, advance Sergeant Carl Harris, leader of the attack squadron now in orbit over Skylon 4, had more important things to think about than the neuroses of an air-headed asthmatic bimbo named Laurie with whom he had spent one sweaty night over a year ago. ‘A.S. Harris to Geostation 17,’ he said into his transgalactic communicator. ‘Polar orbit established. No sign of resistance so far...’ But before he could sign off a bluish particle beam flashed out of nowhere and blasted a hole through his ship’s cargo bay. The jolt from the direct hit sent him flying out of his seat and across the cockpit. (Rebecca)

He bumped his head and died almost immediately, but not before he felt one last pang of regret for psychically brutalizing the one woman who had ever had feelings for him. Soon afterwards, Earth stopped it’s pointless hostilities towards the peaceful farmers of Skylon 4. ‘Congress Passes Law Permanently Abolishing War and Space Travel,’ Laurie read in her newspaper one morning. The news simultaneously excited her and bored her. She stared out the window, dreaming of her youth, when the days had passed unhurriedly and carefree, with no newspaper to read, no television to distract her from her sense of innocent wonder at all the beautiful things around her. ‘Why must one lose one’s innocence to become a woman?’ she wondered wistfully... (Gary)

Little did she know, but she had less than 10 seconds to live. Thousands of miles above the city, the Anu’udrian mothership launched the first of its lithium fusion missiles. The dim-witted wimpy peaceniks who pushed the Unilateral Aerospace disarmament Treaty through the congress had left Earth a defenseless target for the hostile alien empires who were determined to destroy the human race. Within two hours after the passage of the treaty the Anu’udrian ships were on course for Earth, carrying enough firepower to pulverize the entire planet. With no one to stop them, they swiftly initiated their diabolical plan. The lithium fusion missile entered the atmosphere unimpeded. The President, in his top-secret mobile submarine headquarters on the ocean floor off the coast of Guam, felt the inconceivably massive explosion, which vaporized poor, stupid Laurie. (Rebecca)

This is absurd. I refuse to continue this mockery of literature. My writing partner is a violent, chauvinistic semi-literate adolescent. (Gary)

Yeah? Well, my writing partner is a self-centered tedious neurotic whose attempts at writing are the literary equivalent of Valium. ‘Oh, shall I have chamomile tea? Or shall I have some other sort of F**KING TEA??? Oh no, what am I to do? I’m such an air headed bimbo who reads too many Danielle Steele novels!’ (Rebecca)

A**hole! (Gary)

Bitch! (Rebecca)

F **K YOU - YOU NEANDERTHAL! (Gary)

Go drink some tea - whore. (TEACHER) A+ I really liked this one. Illustrated by: Alvaro Arteaga www.alvaroarteaga.com

THIS JOKE IS COURTESY OF THE DAILYQUIP (www.thedailyquip.com)

HUMOUR-SCOPES

Artist: Yoanna Pietrzyk in collaboration with Facehunter. www.yoannapietrzyk.carbonmade.com / www.joannapietrzyk.carbonmade.com

As the planets dance across our cosmos during this retrograde period, the annual movements of two Great Chronocrators, Jupiter and Saturn, will set forth emotional roller coasters ploughing through zodiacs. Safety belts on please, things are going to get a little bit bumpy. As usual, a disclaimer is needed as these are only the premonitions of our grumpy star gazer and not the views of LF.

Aries

Taurus

Gemini

Cancer

Leo

Virgo

Fiery moments and fits of hysteria will send plates flying across walls, if you don’t rein in those horns this month. I foresee a new hobby on the horizon, tap dancing or salsa class’s maybe? This may come in handy for dancing your way out of trouble. Avoid the colour red, don’t drink alcohol and avoid traffic jams – I think you get my drift.

I sense a bout of clarity when gazing to the high-heavens for the house of Taurus. Something lost, but now is found, provides that long awaited direction you have been holding back on. An old friend may suddenly get in touch, which brings in a whole new dimension to your life. All is good – trust me!

Finance is at the forefront of everything you do this month. It’s as bumpy as it has ever been, but remember this: a recession is when your neighbour loses his job; a depression is when you lose yours; and recovery is when George Osborne loses his. If volumes fall and margins fail to rise, Gemini’s will find themselves looking into the abyss. If that happens, be well advised to stay away from open windows.

Your cleaver tongue will be whipping up some tips and tricks at parties and events. Crowds will gather to giggle at your jokes. With all this jovial business around, you just can’t help but wonder when the next ton of bricks is going to fall.

Nothing turns on a Leo like sipping champagne in a classy London lap dancing club. Excitement is the narcotic in Leo personalities and here’s the lowdown from the heavens above: let your heart lead the way. If fun is what you want, then fun is what you’ll get, and it’s only what a Leo does best.

Expect the unexpected. I see a job interview in store for you; something you’ve applied for in the past has finally come to fruition, or is it that long awaited mortgage application? One thing’s for sure, make sure you get that old suit out the closet as you’ll be making formal appearance sometime soon.

Libra

Scorpio

Sagittarius

Capricorn

Aquarius

Pisces

Excitement and stress all at once, is something of a high-wire act requiring a sure sense of balance from all Libra’s this month. Not a problem, since you’re the most rationale star-sign in the zodiac.

Jupiter and Saturn will make you feel like Rocky on the ropes. Stay robust and don’t give up. It will serve you well to double your efforts in the face adversity. On a lighter note, there is light at the end of the tunnel, but sorry to sound negative again, it just looks a rather long tunnel.

“Blah blah blah”, goes another whining Sagittarius skid mark on the world. That’s just what most people think when a Sagittarius is nearby. The universe will have it in for you this month. It’s advisable to stay indoors on the night of the full moon (April 6th) as the natives are becoming a little bit restless.

Watch out for hair-loss this month, as situations could leave Capricorn’s banging their heads at work or at home due to hostilities with competitive acquaintances. Not a good time for stubbornness or using attack as the best form of defence. Just maintain inner-peace and let the month slip by. Before you know it, Jupiter would have given up trying to stir up shit in your sign and just move onto to another.

Tough justice is on the cards as the planets run riot in your zodiac. To be honest, difficult to predict this one. Your subversive streak is never far away, so just play it safe – know what I mean.

Like all Piscean’s you’ve been running up a mountain of debt. Your Wimpey style of economics: I will gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today, will have to stop NOW. Alliances are necessary during this emotional quarter as we head into spring. However, you somewhat obnoxious attitude can deter others from giving you their full support. Just ‘because you got an asshole, don’t mean you got be one – sorry, had to blunt with you Pisces this month!

CLASSIFIEDS -- FASHION -- ART -- DESIGN

CHELSEA COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN www.chelsea.arts.ac.uk/shortcourse Tel: 020 7514 6311

ccwshortcourses@arts.ac.uk

10% discount. All Courses Quote: ‘Laissez Faire’

EASTER SCHOOL WEEK 3 SUBJECT

START DATE

END DATE

DAY

TIME

LENGTH

VENUE

Building Websites With Css & Html

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction to Flash Animation

10 April 2012

11 April 2012

Tues - Wed

Daytime

2 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Getting The Most From Your Digital Camera

10 April 2012

11 April 2012

Tues - Wed

Daytime

2 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Exhibitions Visited Through The Artists' Eye

10 April 2012

12 April 2012

Tues - Thur

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Drawing

10 April 2012

12 April 2012

Tues - Thur

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Contemporary Art Workshop For 11 - 15 Yr Olds

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction to Furniture Design

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Thur

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Textile Design & Print Workshop

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Thur

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Oil Painting

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Graphic Design in Practice

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Contemporary Architecture & Interior Design in London

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Art Direction

10 April 2012

12 April 2012

Tues - Thur

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Painting

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Freehand Perspective Drawing For Designers

10 April 2012

12 April 2012

Tues - Thur

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

In - Focus Jewellery Design Using Laser Cutting

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Camberwell College of Arts

Pre - Foundation Portfolio Preparation At Wimbledon

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Mon - Thur

Daytime

4 days

Wimbledon College of Art

In - Focus Large Format Black And White Photography

10 April 2012

12 April 2012

Tues - Thur

Daytime

3 days

Camberwell College of Arts

Pre - Foundation Photography

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Camberwell College of Arts

An A - Z of Doing Up Your Home

10 April 2012

11 April 2012

Tues - Wed

Daytime

2 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Life Painting

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Collecting Contemporary Art

10 April 2012

12 April 2012

Tues - Thur

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

History Of Interior Design & Style

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Interior Design Professional Portfolio Preparation

11 April 2012

11 April 2012

Wed

Daytime

1 day

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Portrait Photography

12 April 2012

12 April 2012

Wed

Daytime

1 day

Chelsea College of Art & Design

From Concept To Gallery

12 April 2012

13 April 2012

Thur - Fri

Daytime

2 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Promoting Yourself & Your Ideas

13 April 2012

13 April 2012

Fri

Daytime

1 day

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Felt making

13 April 2012

13 April 2012

Fri

Daytime

1 day

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Interior Design Module One

14 April 2012

30 June 2012

Sat

Weekend

12 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Interior Design Module Two

14 April 2012

30 June 2012

Sat

Weekend

12 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Interior Design Module Three

16 April 2012

16 July 2012

Mon

Daytime

12 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Architectural Drawing For Designers

16 April 2012

28 May 2012

Mon

Evening

6 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Freehand Perspective Drawing For Designers

16 April 2012

28 May 2012

Mon

Evening

6 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

1 & 2 Point Measured Perspective Drawing

17 April 2012

22 May 2012

Tues

Evening

6 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Studio Ceramics

17 April 2012

12 June 2012

Tues

Evening

8 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Experimental Drawing

17 April 2012

22 May 2012

Tues

Evening

6 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Interior Decoration in Practice

17 April 2012

10 July 2011

Tues

Daytime

12 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Colour For Interior Design

17 April 2012

22 May 2012

Tues

Evening

6 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

3D Workshop - Design & Make

17 April 2012

12 June 2012

Tues

Evening

8 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Graphic Design

17 April 2012

12 June 2012

Tues

Evening

8 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Life Drawing

18 April 2012

07 June 2012

Wed

Evening

8 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Drawing And Painting - Stage Two

18 April 2012

06 June 2012

Wed

Evening

8 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Interior Decoration

18 April 2012

04 July 2012

Wed

Daytime

12 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Interior Decoration And Design

18 April 2012

20 June 2012

Wed

Evening

10 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Lighting For Residential Interiors

19 April 2012

10 May 2012

Thur

Evening

4 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Drawing And Painting - Stage One

19 April 2012

21 June 2012

Thur

Evening

10 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Interior Design Module Two

19 April 2012

05 July 2012

Thur

Daytime

12 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Portrait Drawing And Painting

19 April 2012

07 June 2012

Thur

Evening

8 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Picture Researching

19 April 2012

19 April 2012

Thur

Daytime

1 day

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Detailing For Interior Designers

19 April 2012

22 June 2012

Fri

Evening

10 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Complete Introduction To Interior Design

20 April 2012

15 March 2013

Fri

Evening

30 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Interior Design Module One

20 April 2012

06 July 2012

Fri

Daytime

12 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Friday Drawing And Painting

20 April 2012

22 June 2012

Fri

Daytime

10 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Freelance Photography

20 April 2012

20 April 2012

Fri

Daytime

1 day

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Adobe InDesign - Basic Essentials

21 April 2012

05/05/2012

Sat

Weekend

3 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Mixed Media Jewellery

21 April 2012

12 May 2012

Sat

Weekend

4 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Intermediate Graphic Design

21 April 2012

12 May 2012

Sat

Weekend

4 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Contemporary Painting

21 April 2012

05 May 2012

Sat

Weekend

3 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

History Of Architecture & Interior Design

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Sat

Weekend

5 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

In - Focus Enamelling On Copper

21 April 2012

12 May 2012

Sat

Weekend

4 wks

Camberwell College of Arts

Introduction To Sketchup

21 April 2012

28 April 2012

Sat

Weekend

2 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

The Art of Cameraless Photography - In Focus

21 April 2012

28 April 2012

Sat

Weekend

2 wks

Camberwell College of Arts

Urban Garden Design

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Sat

Weekend

5 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Welding For Artists

21 April 2012

12 May 2012

Sat

Weekend

4 wks

Camberwell College of Arts

Introduction To AutoCAD

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Sat

Weekend

5 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Critical Theory In Contemporary Art Practice

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Sat

Weekend

5 wks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

In - Focus Screen Printing

21 April 2012

12 May 2012

Sat

Weekend

4 wks

Camberwell College of Arts

CLASSIFIEDS -- FASHION -- ART -- DESIGN

CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN www.csm.arts.ac.uk/shortcourse Tel: 020 7514 7015

shortcourse@csm.arts.ac.uk

10% discount. All Courses

EASTER SCHOOL WEEK 3 SUBJECT

START DATE

END DATE

DAY

TIME

LENGTH

Quote: ‘Laissez Faire’

VENUE

Computers for Textile Design

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

4 days

King's Cross

Design Your Own Wedding Dress

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Designing for the Music Industry

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Developing Your Creativity

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Digital Photography

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Drawing Skills Workshop

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Entrepreneurship for Creatives

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Exploring Your Fashion Design

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Fashion Design for 16 - 18 Year Olds

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Fashion Styling for Beginners

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Introduction to Advertising Art Direction

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Interior Styling

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Introduction to Fashion Design

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Introduction to InDesign

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Jewellery Making with Metal & Plastic

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Knitwear for Fashion

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Metal & Sculpture

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Mould Making & Casting Workshops, Advanced 10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Packaging Design

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Personal Styling

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Photography, Art & Architecture

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Printmaking - Japanese Woodblock

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Shoe Design for New Professionals

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Technical Drawing for Fashion

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Towards Abstraction

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Typography

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

Visual Merchandising - Interiors

10 April 2012

13 April 2012

Tue-Fri

10:00 - 17:15

4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days 4 days

Back Hill

Designer’s London

Back Hill Back Hill Back Hill King's Cross Back Hill King’s Cross King’s Cross Back Hill Back Hill King's Cross Back Hill King’s Cross King’s Cross King’s Cross King’s Cross King’s Cross Call for more info King’s Cross King's Cross King’s Cross Back Hill Back Hill King’s Cross Back Hill King's Cross King's Cross

SATURDAY COURSES STARTING IN APRIL SUBJECT

START DATE

END DATE

DAY

TIME

LENGTH

VENUE

1000 Design Projects

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

Back Hill

Acting for Absolute Beginners

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

13:30 - 16:00

10 wks

Back Hill

Acting for Absolute Beginners

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

Back Hill

Collecting Contemporary Art

21 April 2012

05 May 2012

Saturday

12:00 - 17:00

3 wks

Back Hill

Cool Hunters London

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

Back Hill

Costume Design for Theatre and Screen

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 13:00

10 wks

Back Hill

Creative Painting

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

Back Hill

De-constructing Fashion

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

King's Cross

Design for Television

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

Back Hill

Designer’s London

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

Back Hill

Digital Design for Furniture and Fashion Fabrics

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

King’s Cross

Digital Photography

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

King’s Cross

Digital Photography and Photoshop

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 17:00

5 wks

King’s Cross

Drawing London on Location

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

Back Hill

Drawing Animation for Beginners

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

11:00 - 13:30

10 wks

King's Cross

Enhanced Illustration - Pencil/Pen/Paint/Pixels

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

King’s Cross

Fashion Design For Beginners

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

10 wks

Back Hill

Flash Website Creation

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 17:00

5 wks

King’s Cross

Foundation in Singing and Voice

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 12:30

10 wks

Back Hill

Graphic Design - Beginners

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 12:30

10 wks

King’s Cross

How to Become an Independent Curator

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 13:00

10 wks

Back Hill

Image and Print on Ceramics

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

King’s Cross

Interior Design - Level 1

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 12:30

10 wks

Back Hill

Interior Design - Level 2

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

13:30 - 16:00

10 wks

Back Hill

Introduction to Fashion Design

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

King’s Cross

Introduction to Maya - Level 2

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

14:00 - 17:00

10 wks

King’s Cross

Jewellery Making for Beginners

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

King's Cross

Make-Up for Fashion

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

King’s Cross

Patternmaking - Level 1

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

King’s Cross

Photography, Art and Architecture

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

11:00 - 17:00

5 wks

King’s Cross

Portfolio Preparation for Mature Students

21 April 2012

23 June 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 14:00

10 wks

Back Hill

Portrait Photography

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

King's Cross

Silkscreen Printing

21 April 2012

19 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

5 wks

Eltham Road

Writing for Magazines and Newspaper

21 April 2012

12 May 2012

Saturday

10:00 - 16:00

4 wks

King's Cross

CLASSIFIEDS -- courses --

15 Gresse Street, London, W1T 1QL | www.fashionretailacademy.ac.uk | 020 7307 2345

PART-TIME COURSES

CONTACT: shortcourses@fashionretailacademy.ac.uk

SUBJECT

START DATE

PRE-REQUISITES

Introduction to Merchandising Career Planning for Retail Introduction to Fashion PR & Marketing Advanced preparation for a Career in Fashion Retail: - Buying, Merchandising & Management

14th - 16th March 2012. Further dates on website May 14th-18th 2012 2nd - 4th April 2012. Further dates on website 11th June - 20th July 2012. Further dates on website

Over 18 years of age Over 18 years of age Over 18 years of age Degree qualification or considerable retail experience

ENROLMENT DATE Now Now Now Now

FULL-TIME COURSES CONTACT: info@fashionretailacademy.ac.uk

SUBJECT

START DATE PRE-REQUISITES

Level 2 Diploma in Fashion Retail BTEC Level 3 Extended National Diploma in Art & Design (Fashion Clothing) BTEC Level 3 Extended National Diploma in Art & Design (Graphic Design) BTEC Level 3 Extended National Diploma in Business (Retail) Level 3 Diploma in Fashion Retail Level 4 Buying & Merchandising Level 4 Visual Merchandising Higher Certificate Fashion Retail (Merchandising) Foundation Degree Fashion Management

1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12

ENROLMENT DATE

No formal entry requirements 4 GCSES inc English Lang. Refer to website for alternative routes 4 GCSES inc English Lang. Refer to website for alternative routes 4 GCSES inc English Lang. Refer to website for alternative routes 5 GCSES inc English Lang and Maths. Refer to website for alternative routes 1 A Level Pass plus 3 GCSE's A-C inc Maths and English 1 A Level Pass plus 3 GCSE's A-C. Refer to website for alternative routes 1 A Level Pass plus 5 GCSE's A-C. Refer to website for alternative routes 80 UCAS tariff points. Refer to website for alternative routes

Laissez Faire would like to apologise for using incorrect artwork for the Westminster Adult Education Service in last edition

Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12

Chris Lloyd, www.yllw.co.uk


Laissez Faire London