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Architectural Education Awards Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture

The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) is a non profit organization founded in 1912 to enhance the quality of architectural education. School membership in ACSA has grown from ten charter schools to over 250 schools in several membership categories. Through these schools, over 5,000 architecture faculty are represented in ACSA’s membership. In addition, over 500 supporting members composed of architectural firms, product associations, and individuals add to the breadth of ACSA membership. ACSA, unique in its representative role for professional schools of architecture, provides a major forum for ideas on the leading edge of architectural thought. Issues that will affect the architectural profession in the future are being examined today in ACSA member schools.

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture 1735 New York Avenue, NW Washington, DC 20006 Tel: 202.785.2324 Fax: 202.628.0448 www.acsa-arch.org

Copyright Š 2011 The Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture ISBN 978-0-935502-78-7 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the written permission of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture.

CONTENTS ACSA/AIA Topaz Medallion

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ACSA Distinguished Professor

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ACSA/AIAS New Faculty Teaching

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ACSA Collaborative Practice

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ACSA Creative Achievement

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ACSA Diversity Achievement

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ACSA/AIA Housing Design Education

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ACSA Faculty Design

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Journal of Architectural Education

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Jury

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2010-2011 ACSA Awards

Each year the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture honors architectural educators for exemplary work in areas such as building design, community collaborations, scholarship, and service. The award-winning professors inspire and challenge students, contribute to the profession’s knowledge base, and extend their work beyond the borders of academy into practice and the public sector. 4

The 2010-2011 ACSA Awards Winners prove once again the incredible talent found in schools of architecture. From the Distinguished Professors who represent the diversity of teaching contributions to the Collaborative Practice Awards that illustrate both global and local effects, the multiple awards juries had the immense pleasure of awarding a truly talented group of scholars, researches, and practitioners. This year the ACSA also introduced the Diversity Achievement Award which recognizes the work of faculty, administrators, or students in creating effective methods and models to achieve greater diversity within schools and colleges of design. How exciting to have such stellar examples from the University of Kansas and the University of Tennessee-Knoxville to inaugurate this award and set such high standards for its future awardees. Finally, with all the awards, be they specifically for design endeavors or not, it was clear that imagination and the expression of imagination were paramount. Just take a moment to look at Doris Kim Sung’s “Skin Deep” or to read Clare Lyster’s “New Ecologies of Airline Flow” and you will understand.

Ursula Emery McClure, Louisiana State University Chair, 2010-2011 ACSA Awards Committee 5

The Topaz Medallion is the highest award given to architectural educators. It honors an individual who has made outstanding contributions to architectural education for at least a decade, whose teaching has influenced a broad range of students, and who has helped shape the minds of students who will shape our environment. The award is given through nominations that are reviewed by a jury of accomplished architects, educators, and students, appointed by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, The American Institute of Architects, and the American Institute of Architecture Students.

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TM

ACSA/AIA Topaz Medallion Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architectural Education, a joint award given by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture and The American Institute of Architects.

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University of Texas at Austin

Lawrence W. Speck, FAIA

Lawrence W. Speck grew up in a small town on the Gulf Coast of Texas. There were 40 people in his high school graduating class. He attended M.I.T. as both an undergraduate and graduate student receiving bachelor degrees in Art and Design from the School of Architecture and in Management from the Sloan School, as well as his Master of Architecture—all in a compacted period of five years. In the School of Architecture at M.I.T. Larry had five Topaz Laureates as professors. Edward Allen taught him construction in his first year. Lawrence Anderson, who was dean at the time, took Larry and two other rebellious students for an independent design studio in second year because they objected to all of the regular offerings. Spiro Kostof, who was visiting from Berkeley, taught him in a seminar with eight students on the History of Rome. Stanford Anderson was a very special mentor, and Larry worked closely with him in a traveling seminar in Paris studying streets. He was Donlyn Lyndon’s teaching assistant, and Donlyn was his thesis advisor. Larry also got to know a sixth Topaz Laureate, Charles Moore, during this period, since Charles was working with Donlyn on the book, The Place of Houses, at the time. After graduation, Larry joined the M.I.T. faculty in a half-time adjunct position, spending the other half of his time in practice—first with Sert Jackson Associates in Cambridge and later with Huygens and Tappe in Boston. That pattern of having concurrent involvement in teaching and practice continued throughout his career. In 1975, Larry joined the faculty of the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin and started his own practice, Lawrence W. Speck Associates, in Austin. In the early 1980s, Larry’s practice began to gain national notice. He won a Progressive Architecture Design Award in 1982. Between 1981 and 1984, various projects were published in Architectural Design, The New York Times, Architecture, Progressive Architecture, and Architectural Record, being noted primarily for their response to their region and their resource conservation.

ACSA/AIA Topaz Medallion

In 1990, Larry became associate dean of the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin and in 1992, he became dean. During his nine years as dean, the school saw its budget increase six to twelve percent each year and its endowment increase six-fold, achieved “top-ten” ranking among schools of architecture in U. S. News and World Report, and attracted extraordinary new permanent faculty members, including Wilfred Wang, Amy Glassmeier, and Juan Miro, as well as visiting faculty members, such as Glenn Murcutt, Michael Rotondi, and Tod Williams/Billie Tsien. During the 1990s, Larry’s practice continued to flourish as he completed complex urban projects, often in joint ventures with a large Austin firm, Page Southerland Page. He was lead designer for the Austin Convention Center, completed in 1992, the new Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, completed in 1998, and Rough Creek Lodge, completed in 1999, all of which were published in national architectural journals and received numerous design awards. In 1999, Larry joined his firm with Page Southerland Page, where he is now one of five principals of the 450-person firm with offices in Houston, Denver, Dallas, Austin, and Washington, D.C. Over the last decade, Larry has expanded the range of his teaching in the School of Architecture, has been a potent agent for change in the larger University of Texas community, has increased the scope and quantity of projects in his practice, has been contributing editor for one of the national architectural journals, has written a book, Technology, Sustainability and Cultural Identity, and has served on advisory boards for two U.S. governmental agencies, two national environmental non-profit organizations, and six schools of architecture. 9

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DP

ACSA Distinguished Professor Awards

To recognize sustained creative achievement in the advancement of architecture education through teaching, design, scholarship, research, or service.

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2010

2005

Frances Bronet Associates with John Tobin & Richard Hoffman Frances Bronet Associates with John Tobin & Richard Hoffman

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1988

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with Ellen Sinopoli Dance Co. 2006

Frances John To

University of Oregon

Frances Bronet

For decades, Frances Bronet has been committed to addressing complex social, technical, and physical problems through the development of interdisciplinary teams and action based resolutions. Her teaching, administration and research is directly connected to frameworks of collaboration in design and community activism, interdisciplinarity, technology access, leadership and performance. As Dean at the University of Oregon, Frances Bronet’s portfolio includes Architecture, Interior Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Planning, Public Policy and Management, Historic Preservation, Arts and Administration, Art History, Material Studies and Product Design, Fine and Digital Arts; AAA Interdisciplinary Minor, interdisciplinary lab in Sustainable Cities, Cinema Studies – a 3 College collaborative degree, Green Product Design Network and the new building site in Portland.

ACSA Distinguished Professor

She has been publishing work on multidisciplinary design curricula between architecture; engineering; science, technology and society (H&SS); dance; and electronic arts including “Teaching the Design: Feminist Practice,” “Beating a Path: Design and Movement”, “Product Design and Innovation: The Evolution of an Interdisciplinary Design Curriculum,” and “Quilting Space: Alternative Models for Architectural and Construction Practice.” NSF, NEH, NEA have actively funded her research in interdisciplinary pedagogical models; with her partners, she has received HUD COPC funding for Sustainable Livable Communities of Choice and Justice. Currently working with choreographer Alito Alessi and his award-winning mixed-abilities company Danceability on a set of action-installations, she recently completed critically acclaimed SpillOut and Beating a Path with Sinopoli Dance. She has co-led students in full-scale interactive installation and city-oriented projects with McArthur Genius Streb, internationally renowned Terry Creach, Doug Verone, Berkshire Ballet, Emmy awardee Branda Miller on NEA funded projects re: impact of technological development on community. She is a recipient of 2001 Carnegie Foundation for Advancement of Teaching NY Professor of the Year, Darrin and Pan Hellenic Professor of the Year Awards, Rensselaer Distinguished Teaching Fellowship and 2001 William H. Wiley Distinguished Professor Award for excellence in teaching, research, service and contributions to university and community. DesignIntelligence named her one of the nation’s most admired educators in 2011. She was President of ACSA from 2001-2002.

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Throughout, Dunay has strengthened the linkage between architectural education and issues of national interest. His role in four Solar Decathlon Competitions has established collaborative partnerships between educators, students, practitioners, corporate sponsors and industry leaders. The projects have been recognized with the NCARB Prize, an NCARB Honorable Mention, and the AIA Presidents Award for the Best Solar House. The research has been part of testimony before the U.S. Congress regarding national energy policy; it was the subject of a video conference organized by the Information Office of the U.S. State Department; and the 2005 solar house now resides as part of the State Science Museum in Richmond, Virginia where it serves as a central exhibit and resource for the public school system. LumenHAUS, the 2009 Virginia Tech solar house, won the Solar Decathlon Europe competition over 17 international research universities in Madrid, Spain.

ACSA Distinguished Professor

Virginia Tech

Robert J. Dunay

Professing the Vitruvian value of architecture as the cross connection of disciplines, Robert Dunay has championed the integration of the design fields through teaching, research and building. Dunay has led a series of innovative projects that situate the studio experience to join practice, research, and outreach. Innovative student work has been recognized at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) at the Javits Center in New York (2003 and 2005). Research into industrialized processes received further invitations to cutting-edge international expositions - Salone Internazionale del Mobile, Milan, Italy; the Cologne Furniture Fair in Germany; and most recently in the Materials and Processes section of the ICFF in New York.

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California Polytechnic State University, SLO

Thomas Fowler IV, AIA, is Professor, Assistant Department Head and founding Director of the award-winning community outreach design center CIDS (Community-Collaborative Integrative Digital-Design Studio) in the College of Architecture at Cal Poly State University, San Luis Obispo, California. CIDS attempts to interweave academia with professional development through team research and service both locally and nationally. CIDS also exists as a bridge between diverse disciplines and systems of learning. Since 2000, over 30 students have received recognition for their design studio work through national competitions, publications, and/or news media. Among Professor Fowler’s teaching recognitions are awards for: 2010 Cal Poly President’s Service; 2010 NCARB Prize; 2009 ACSA’s Creative Achievement; 2008 and 2009 AIA Education Honors; and 2005 and 2007 Cal Poly recognition for teaching excellence.

ACSA Distinguished Professor

Thomas Fowler IV

“Academic research strives to further critical thinking, always seeking to improve pathways to learning. Programs can be developed that serve as a bridge to industry, especially important in architecture, which help students to contextualize their class work as they make projections for roles in the workplace. Meaningful work by individual students and interdisciplinary collaborative teams needs to be of the highest quality in order for the contribution to have value, and a mechanism for capture and documentation is essential. Knitting all of this together is an inclusive learning environment where all voices are heard. The learning environment must seek to generate a continuous dialogue of issues that feeds itself, extending beyond the classroom and continuing to evolve as the learners grow.”

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Hampton University

Carmina Sanchez-del-Valle

Dr. Carmina Sánchez-del-Valle is Associate Professor in the Department of Architecture at Hampton University in Virginia, where she was recently honored with the E.L. Hamm Distinguished Teaching Award. Prof. Sánchezdel-Valle has been teaching full time since 1989. She has interacted with at least 1,000 students at four schools of architecture, having taught all levels of design, and courses ranging from 3D modeling to community design. She has provided leadership in determining the vision of the programs where she has taught. Some of the more memorable projects she has worked on with students include: an open air restaurant on the beach for a women’s cooperative in the Dominican Republic; floating theater prototypes demonstrating new forms of energy funded by NREL; transformable structures for the island of Vieques with the community design studio at the University of Puerto Rico; and the Buddhist temple Satipatthana Peace Center for Hampton Roads. Dr. Sánchez-del-Valle has been an ASEE Summer Faculty Fellow at NASA LaRC, a Fulbright-Hays Senior Scholar in Egypt, and a FRN Summer Scholar-in-Residence at NYU. She has collaborated with many colleagues and organizations through the years including ACSA, ACADIA, and NAAB. She thanks all colleagues she has worked with for the experiences gained both in teaching and research. She wishes to acknowledge and share this ACSA honor with all of the people – especially her wealth of students - with whom she has worked.

ACSA Distinguished Professor

Professor Carmina Sánchez-del-Valle received a Professional Degree in Architecture from the University of Puerto Rico, and a Doctoral Degree in Architecture from the University of Michigan. She is a licensed architect.

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NF T

ACSA/AIAS New Faculty Teaching Awards

Granted jointly by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) and the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) for demonstrated excellence in teaching performance during the formative years of an architectural teaching career.

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State University of New York at Buffalo

A second line of scholarship focuses on testing ideas and issues related to environmental sustainability as director of the “Sustainable Futures” study abroad program located in the cloud forest of Costa Rica. This tenweek program is an interdisciplinary program in architecture, landscape architecture, and planning which draws students from a consortium of five universities. In 2011, he received the “Louis Gibbs Fellowship” which brings together grassroot activists and politicians to improve the environment and health in Western New York neighborhoods. He is LEED certified and is principal of Studio NORTH, an independent research office dedicated to working on projects creatively and inventively with ideas of construction and sustainability. These projects are often located within buildings around the city that he has purchased independently. Romano’s work has been exhibited in NYC at the Center for Architecture and the various locations in Buffalo.

ACSA/AIAS New Faculty Teaching

Christopher Thomas Romano

Christopher Romano is a Clinical Assistant Professor at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He holds a B.P.S. in architecture as well as a professional M.Arch degree, with a concentration in architectural theory and design, from the State University of New York at Buffalo. In 2005, he received the CHAIR’S AWARD for consistent, high-caliber design work performed in the studios. His research and teaching explores the relationship between design, construction and the contemporary culture of building. Romano teaches courses in beginning design, construction technology, and digital fabrication with an emphasis on full-scale experimentation and material research.

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Virginia Tech

Jim Bassett

“Each student must enter the world of architecture on their own, and in their own way. And there are many potential paths, ways of thinking, and ways of seeing that students bring to the conversation, yet architectural education is fundamentally a shift and development of one’s perception, enabling the student to create their own place to hold difficult questions alongside a foundational disciplinary knowledge. The teaching supports intuition, curiosity, and a sense of wonder, simple qualities with profound impact, enabling us to embrace the unknown and inherent complexity of our work.

ACSA/AIAS New Faculty Teaching

One practices architecture, not because one knows, but precisely because one doesn’t. Through architecture, one comes into an awareness of the world, of its subtle and underlying patterns, of people, of places, intimating one’s role within it.”

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CP

ACSA Collaborative Practice Awards To recognize programs that demonstrate how faculty, students, and community/civic clients work to realize common objectives.

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University of Virginia, Building Tomorrow & Ove Arup and Partners Int’l

ACSA Collaborative Practice

Anselmo Gianluca Canfora, Joseph Kaliisa, George Srour, Dana Elzey & Ewan Charles Thomas Smith

INITIATIVE RECOVER: PRIMARY SCHOOL, GITA, UGANDA Initiative reCOVER, a design/build program at the University of Virginia, Engineering in Context, a School of Engineering applied research program; Building Tomorrow, a non-governmental organization based in Indianapolis, Indiana; and Arup Associates, a professional architecture and engineering firm based in London, integrated a set of academic and professional objectives in service of realizing this public interest project. Central to this effort was a collaborative framework established to prepare, develop and manage the design and construction of a primary school building for the community of Gita located in the Wakiso district of Uganda. The project team followed these important objectives: first, working closely with the community, establish the first ever primary school in the area; second, in collaboration with local building trades, assist in improving the overall quality of building stock while incrementally introducing innovations in building components and construction detailing; and third, to consider how this school design could be used in the future to inform other Building Tomorrow primary school buildings throughout Uganda. Equally important to this project’s implementation was the comprehensive educational experience achieved through direct involvement of architecture and engineering students in a year-long process, from planning and conceptual work, to actual on site construction and community engagement. Students: Alison Agüero, Systems Engineering, 4th-year Undergraduate; Rebecca Becker, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Anna Bushkar, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Katie Canavan, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Peter Chimicles, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Violette De la Selle, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Esther Diehl, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Meredyth Gilmore, CLAS, Political & Social Thought, Economics, BT chapter President, Fall ‘07 to Fall ‘08; Patrick Hanlon, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Amanda Hubal, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Evan Johnson, Mechanical Engineering, 4th-year Undergraduate; Elissa Kaufman, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Maggie Kirkpatrick, Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, BT chapter Asst. Director Fall ‘06 to Fall ‘07; Nicolette Leung, Civil Engineering, 4th-year Undergraduate; Michael Loew, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Shilan Mehtsun, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate; Jeff Ponitz, Architecture Post-Graduate Research Assistant; Colin Powell, Civil Engineering, 4th-year Undergraduate; Bobby Renz, Mechanical Engineering, 4th-year Undergraduate; Marie Schacht, Architecture 4thyear Undergraduate; Sarah Wade, CLAS, English, BT chapter President Spring ‘09 to Fall ‘09; Ashley Walton, Architecture 4th-year Undergraduate.

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ACSA Collaborative Practice

University of Arizona & Carnegie Mellon University

Mary Hardin, John E Folan & Richard A. Eribes

BARRIO COLLABORATION The BARRIO COLLABORATION is a partnership of university, low income community, city and county with the collective goal of designing and constructing five prototypical, sustainable, low cost residences to be sited on a vacant parcel of land located in Barrio San Antonio, east of Tucson’s central business district. The parcel was deeded to DDBC, a university-based, non-profit design and development team by the City of Tucson Community Services Department, with approval of the neighborhood association. The parcel of land, originally zoned for industrial use, was rezoned and sub¬divided in preparation for the development of the project. The subdivided parcels match the typical infill lot size parameters (50’-0” x 120’-0”) found in Tucson. A competitive grant from the city provided the soft costs of the project and a competitive bond grant from Pima County provided funds for infrastructure development. Goals for the collaboration were to provide affordable housing for a depressed neighborhood while creating replicable prototypes that achieve substantial savings in energy and water usage for the inhabitants. Five parcels provide five opportunities for faculty and students in design-build studios to research various building assemblies and test the results of design hypotheses through real-life application. Students experience the full gamut of architectural practice, from budget development, client meetings, and design and detailing to the code review process, construction and building inspections. The city receives ownership of the permitted plan sets for future use, and the community gains new units of affordable housing as well as proven guidelines for future development. Students: Alisa Hintz, Trevor Soper, Katie McKinney, Jamie Bitler, Rebecca Ford, Russell Dykann, Courtney Gilliam, David Gwin, John Kerbaugh, Peter McBride, Xavier Shirlin, Travis Gold, Eddie Shaeffer, Jason Anderson, Michael Chang, Kim Huston, Erin Hastreiter, Hans Papke, Nadia Pichansky, Bryan Rollins, Megan Burke, Nick Casolari, Magda Dzidek, Ricky Enriquez, Kate Fiegen, Carol Heffern, Fernando Hinojosa, David Joslin, Tim Lambson, Ryan Lyng, Jennifer Martin, Michael Nervik, Grant Noonan, Steve Olson, Charles Pifer, Jarrod Powell, Elizabeth Reiter, Mark Rojas, Lourdes Samaniego, Kassandra Soto, Ben Thomasson, Hector Treto, Eric White, Torsten Anderson, Erin Avera, Cole Benninger, Cristina Camacho, Velen Chan, Kelly Flegal, Andy Malanowski, Ben Galtney, Jose Gastelum, Heather Snow, Patrick Bradley, Jocelyn Buechter, Luat Dong, Emily Formentini, Alexandra Fuente, Sandra Gentsch, Tracy Grice, Jenelle Hoffman, Maggie Kane, AJ Mach, Matt O’Bright, Federico Peralta, Adriana Perez, Tim Thorpe, Renee Vanegas, Billy Webster, Davis Adriaanse, Masa Aoe, Brant Arnold, Bryan Beery, Nate Billimack, Leanna Broersma, Glenn Buack, John Cawthron, Mark de la Torre, Kara Eberle, Tyler Edmiston, Jessica Englund, Heidi Grimwood, Danny Kishinami, Jared Logue, Manuel Melende, Charlie Mueller, Kaveh Namazyfard, Amanda Spear, Brittany Peters, Hwan Shin, Stephen Elliot, Emily Akaba, Jesse Jobert, Chris Hansen, Jackie Hollis, Rauli Lehtinen, Evan Shallcross, Stephanie Poorten, Alfonso Sicre, Daniel Bachelier, Kelly Rehm, Nerissa Rodriguez, Clay Calkins, Manuel Vanegas, Ezra Roati, & Brittany Wong

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Illinois Institute of Technology

ACSA Collaborative Practice Honorable Mention

Frank Flury

FIELD CHAPEL IN BÖDIGHEIM, GERMANY The Field Chapel was designed and executed by the students of a Design/ Build Studio at the Illinois Institute of Technology, College of Architecture, Chicago, led by Professor Frank Flury. Located in Bödigheim, Germany, the chapel was created for an ecumenical church co-operative in the Odenwald, a rural region in northern Baden-Württemberg. The project was assisted by the craftsmen and townspeople of the area; all participants gave their time freely. The students defined the project as, “an interdenominational chapel, a space for people to commune with God, a place for quiet reflection or simple meditation, a space that welcomes hikers and cyclists who appreciate a beautiful rest stop of a higher quality.” The structure is visible from afar, but can only be reached by foot via a steep country lane. A narrow foot-path leads between a hedge and the windowless tower facade to a gravel forecourt, representing the secular realm, which is bounded on 2 sides by massive limestone benches. A brick platform, which traverses the profane to the divine, rises from this forecourt and from here visitors enter the first room, a 10 foot square patio. Enclosed by 4 walls, views are limited to the sky and the tower that rises over the chapel sanctuary. Within the 10 foot square sanctuary, views are limited by the 30 foot tall roofed tower to the inte-rior. The attention of the visitor is, through the transition from outside to inside, brought from exterior concerns to the interior life. Students: Jeffrey Burke, Andrew Clark, Carlie Douglas, Guanmin Hao, Kevin Kamien, Megan Lawler, Joseph Luciani, Juliana Masci, James Mellom, Milanko Milesic, Zhao Qian & John Ruffolo.

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ACSA Collaborative Practice Honorable Mention

Ohio State University

Lisa Tilder & Stephen Turk

THE POD HOME A team of Ohio State Architecture and Engineering faculty and students formed the first interdisciplinary partnership in the College of Engineering to design and construct a sustainable house, The Pod Home, a minimal dwelling that doubles as an educational exhibit for the Center of Science and Industry’s Big Science Park. The Pod Home exhibition marks the beginning of a series of Energy and Environment educational exhibits at COSI, a children’s science museum located in Columbus, Ohio. Conceived as a design-build research project to introduce undergraduate students to sustainable design, the Pod Home exhibition was also envisioned as a creative means to educate children and visitors about the positive potential of environmental design and technology. The Pod Home was designed as a flexible living “pod” that could be transported to various sites for a range of needs. Designed with the needs of a young adult in mind, the house includes a loft, small kitchen, and a bathroom. The Pod Home explores alternatives to market-rate housing through energy-efficient design and sustainable materials. The Pod Home integrates innovative architectural design with inventive engineering and sustainable technologies—including a custom-designed floor system that utilizes phase-change materials to store and release energy. The Pod Home’s unique exterior form was developed to optimize the use of passive solar energy; the slope of its roof maximizes the collection of solar energy incident on the photovoltaic panels and solar energy collector. Faculty Team: Architecture Faculty: Lisa Tilder & Stephen Turk; Engineering Faculty: Gary Kinzel & Seppo Korpela Student Team: Architecture: Gregory Delaney, Elizabeth Evanoo, Michael Factor, S. Scott Kittle, Robert Scott, Nathaniel Substanley, & Gregory Tran; Engineering: Doug Powell, Anna Schwinn, & Kara Shell Consultants: Architecture: Jerome M. Scott Architects, Inc.; Engineering: Shelley Metz Baumann Hawk, Inc. COSI Team: Sharon Tinianow, Director of Sustainability Initiatives; Steve Langsdorf, Senior Director of Experience Operations; Brian Lobaugh, Sr. Director of Facilities; Michael Forrester, Associate Exhibition Producer; & David Chesebrough, CEO and President

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Mississippi State University

ACSA Collaborative Practice Honorable Mention

Hans Curtis Herrmann

MISSISSIPPI BAND OF CHOCTAW INDIANS RURAL TRANSIT PROJECT Early in 2009 the Carl Small Town Center, at Mississippi State University’s School of Architecture, began collaboration with the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) to perform a study of their rural transit system. The purpose was to provide analysis and informed guidance for further development of their transit system, which services tribal and non-tribal community members in seven rural and suburban communities in a nine county region of northeastern Mississippi. Assistant Professor Hans C. Herrmann led graduate research assistants and a fourth year design studio through a design process that brought focus to the Tribe’s ambitions for system improvement via patron orientated infrastructural upgrades (micro-architecture) and user-based rerouting. Coupling route-planning and high-efficiency vehicles with issues of Transit Oriented Development and Infrastructural Urbanism the studio introduced long-term growth strategies and cost effective operational logic. Most recently, a group of more than 50 freshman architecture students participated in a landscape installation event that was planned as the second phase of project development. Over the past 14 months, this work has brought about the interface of more than 70 architecture students with various MBCI tribal council members, Choctaw citizens, Mississippi citizens, City Planners, Landscape Architects, Landscape Architecture students, Landscape Contracting students, Building Construction Science students, and their respective faculty. Students: Brian Asa, Trent Barrilleaux, William Bradford, Stephen Clairmont, Sarah Grider, Kirke McNeel, Amanda Monarch, Travis Parker, Matthew Scarbrough, Jason Tucker, & Victoria Wolf

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University of Virginia

ACSA Collaborative Practice Honorable Mention

Craig Barton

RECONSTRUCTING THE MEMORY OF THE SCRABBLE SCHOOL On its surface this project is a simple renovation for the adaptive re-use of a two-room schoolhouse in rural Virginia. Built under the auspices of the Rosenwald Rural School Building Program, which provided funds to build schools for African-Americans in southern communities, the Scrabble School served as the civic center of a small African-American community in Rappahannock County. In the late 60’s, the building was abandoned, its records discarded and its students and faculty moved to newly integrated schools in the area. Fifty years after the Brown decision, the school was derelict. The Scrabble alumni, concerned that the school’s contributions to the community would be lost, created The Scrabble School Preservation Foundation to steward the school’s history and memory. With the support of the Rappahannock County government, grants from the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, Jesse & Rose Loeb Foundation and private donors, the Scrabble School Foundation engaged faculty and students at the University of Virginia. Designers from the University’s School of Architecture, historians from the University’s center for African American studies, and their respective students collaborated with the Foundation, the county government, and local residents to document the surviving alumni’s oral histories of the school and its place in the community. Student and faculty designers used this material to both rehabilitate the building and its site and in so doing to give it a “voice” through which to narrate its memory, history and place in the community. The collaborative efforts of students, faculty, practitioners, community activists, and government officials expanded the scope of this project beyond the pragmatic challenges of rehabilitating an aging building. Together this group created a revitalized building serving area senior citizens and an interpretative landscape through which to articulate the school’s position within the collective memory of the African-American community. Design Team: Craig Barton & Marthe Rowen Students: Sela Bailey, Aja Bulla-Richards, Mark Churchill, Scot French, Michael Lewis, Daniel LaRossa, & David Malda

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CA

ACSA Creative Achievement Awards In recognition of a specific achievement or series of achievements in teaching, design, scholarship, research, or service that advances architectural education.

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University of Virginia

John Quale

ecoMOD ecoMOD is a research and design / build / evaluate project at the University of Virginia focused on creating a series of prefab, affordable housing units using rigorous standards for sustainable design. Since 2004, the ecoMOD project has built a total of six housing units for Piedmont Housing Alliance and Habitat for Humanity over the course of four projects. The housing units are designed and built by interdisciplinary teams of students, working closely with faculty and outside experts. Once occupied, student evaluation teams monitor and evaluate them carefully, with the results guiding subsequent designs. The ecoMOD project is a partnership of the UVA School of Architecture and School of Engineering and Applied Science. The project has been fully integrated into the curriculum of both schools. The goal of the project is to provide a valuable educational experience, while demonstrating the environmental and economic potential of prefabrication, and therefore challenging the housing industry in the U.S. to more fully explore this potential. ecoMOD is grounded in the realities of clients, budgets and materials, while it strives to address the two most important challenges facing the next generation of designers: the significant environmental impact of the buildings, and the growing economic divide between high-income and low-income individuals. In the context of this multi-year project, teams of architecture, engineering, landscape architecture, historic preservation, planning, business, environmental science, economics and local vocational education students and faculty are participating in the project.

ACSA Creative Achievement

Over 350 architecture, engineering, landscape architecture, planning, historic preservation and other students have participated since 2004. Note: student receive credit during academic year, and summer participants receive fellowships.

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University of Utah

Ryan E. Smith & Joerg Ruegemer

INTEGRATED TECHNOLOGY IN ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM (ITAP) Integrated Technology in Architecture Program (ITAP) is a teaching and research initiative that links faculty and students in architecture, engineering and construction with industry in an effort to integrate toward lean and sustainable solutions to building. The divide between design and production has statistically resulted in increased schedule delays, cost, and a diminished quality and sustainability of buildings because the act of conception (architecture), optimization (engineering), and production (construction) are not integrated. ITAP is the teaching arm of ITAC, Integrated Technology in Architecture Center, a coalition of interdisciplinary building technology researchers and industry partners, also directed by award recipients, Smith and Ruegemer at the University of Utah. ITAP is an intensive graduate research-based program in which students of architecture in the first year of the M.Arch graduate program engage in a 3-credit course in the fall and 11 credit intensive in the spring. Allowing students to have the space to research one topic and apply it to design develops an intensity and capacity for qualitative and quantitative building technology research-based practice in architecture. Students are teamed in groups for the duration of their first year of graduate school researching process and product technologies including lifecycle cost, lean construction practices and energy efficient design. This organization prepares students for their final year of graduate school studies, and a growing collaborative profession that relies on research based methods toward solutions to the economic and environmental challenges of contemporary practice.

ACSA Creative Achievement

Students: Michael Wilcox, Matt Metcalf, Brent Murray, Jenny Gill, Leandra Merritt, Chris Huntsman, Ned Wright, Eric Carter, Brian Glad, Teran Mitchell, Shawn Patten, John Davis, Chan Tracy, & Doug Grant

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DA

ACSA Diversity Achievement Awards

To recognize the work of faculty, administrators, or students in creating effective methods and models to achieve greater diversity in curricula, school personnel, and student bodies, specifically to incorporate the participation and contributions of historically under-represented groups or contexts

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University of Kansas

William Carswell & Hobart Jackson

MULTICULTURAL ARCHITECTURAL SCHOLARS PROGRAM In 2003, the then chair of architecture, professor Bill Carswell and longtime faculty advocate of multicultural issues professor Hobart Jackson, initiated a diversity enhancing MULTICULTURAL ARCHITECTURAL SCHOLARS PROGRAM. With start-up financial assistance from a University alumnus, and using the structure and rubrics of the existing School of Business’s Multicultural Scholars Program, they drafted a sustainable plan to increase the number of graduating high-achieving multicultural students in the school. The MASP Program employs (i) intensive mentoring, (ii) socialization and (iii) funding for MASP scholars. Each MASP Scholar receives: 1. Five individual, hour-long academic mentoring sessions each semester covering academic and college-life advising including academic skills-building; crisis management counseling; study abroad and internship advice and assistance. 2. Social-cultural and professional development extra-curricular experiences including prepped attendance at theater, opera, dance performances; architectural site and office visits with significant professional practitioners; and expert career preparatory workshops. 3. A need-and-performance determined financial scholarship each semester with discretionary additional financial assistance for study abroad experiences or conferences. All MASP funds come from private donor sources.

ACSA Diversity Achievement

In return, MASP Scholars agree to a contract for learning. In the long-term plan, these multicultural graduates will act as a leadership corps to be available professional advisors and mentors for future multicultural high-school students who want informed, empirical information on the profession of architecture and educational and career paths within it. The MASP Program is a viable, long-term, strategic program for increasing successful high-achieving student diversity in the Schools and subsequently, in the profession and the professorate.

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University of Tennessee-Knoxville

Through the Urban Program in Sustainable Design Education (UPSIDE), Professor Fox has joined UT architecture students and students at the inner city Austin East High School in Knoxville and similar schools in other locations to envision together a new future for communities. The collaboration matches the art of sustainable architecture and design with the social, economic and political hopes of the communities’ youth for a better more self-determined life. UPSIDE is technological transfer and community engagement at their best, not only rebuilding blighted neighborhoods but igniting ambitions and expanding horizons. The collaborations that define UPSIDE have led to new teaching and learning techniques and the employed technologies advance research in the design of high quality, energy-efficient, affordable housing. Thus, UPSIDE is a win, win for service, teaching and research. Professor David Fox’s professionalism, vision and personal commitment to the project are evident throughout and indispensible elements of its success.

ACSA Diversity Achievement

David Fox

URBAN PROGRAM IN SUSTAINABLE DESIGN EDUCATION

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HDE

ACSA/AIA Housing Design Education Awards

Granted jointly by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) and The American Institute of Architects, Housing & Custom Residential Knowledge Committee (AIA, HCR KC) to recognize the importance of good education in housing design in producing architects ready for practice in a wide range of areas and able to be capable leaders and contributors to their communities.

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University of Virginia

John Quale

ACSA/AIA Housing Design Education Excellence in Housing Design Curriculum

ecoMOD Project ecoMOD is a research and design / build / evaluate project at the University of Virginia focused on creating a series of prefab, affordable housing units using rigorous standards for sustainable design. Since 2004, the ecoMOD project has built a total of six housing units for Piedmont Housing Alliance and Habitat for Humanity over the course of four projects. The housing units are designed and built by interdisciplinary teams of students, working closely with faculty and outside experts. Once occupied, student evaluation teams monitor and evaluate them carefully, with the results guiding subsequent designs. The ecoMOD project is a partnership of the UVA School of Architecture and School of Engineering and Applied Science. The project has been fully integrated into the curriculum of both schools. The goal of the project is to provide a valuable educational experience, while demonstrating the environmental and economic potential of prefabrication, and therefore challenging the housing industry in the U.S. to more fully explore this potential. ecoMOD is grounded in the realities of clients, budgets and materials, while it strives to address the two most important challenges facing the next generation of designers: the significant environmental impact of the buildings, and the growing economic divide between high-income and low-income individuals. In the context of this multi-year project, teams of architecture, engineering, landscape architecture, historic preservation, planning, business, environmental science, economics and local vocational education students and faculty are participating in the project. Faculty: John Quale, ecoMOD Project Director; Nancy Takahashi, ecoMOD Landscape Architecture Advisor; Louis Nelson, ecoMOD Historic Preservation Advisor; & Eric Field, ecoMOD Simulation Advisor Students: Over 350 architecture, engineering, landscape architecture, historic preservation, planning, business and environmental science students have participated in some aspect of the project since 2004.

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Carnegie Mellon University

John E. Folan

ACSA/AIA Housing Design Education Excellence in Housing Education Course or Activity

P_PATCH The Pittsburgh Program for the Adaptive Transformation of Community Housing (P_PATCH) is an applied research project executed by upper level undergraduate B_ARCH students in a 9 CU Issues of Practice Course. There are three primary objectives for utilizing the P_PATCH applied research project in the Issues of Practice Course. The first objective is to ensure that requisite knowledge in the relevant subject area is gained. In the Framework of the schools curriculum, the assignation of NAAB criteria forms a baseline foundation for the parameters/scope of that education. The second objective is to ensure that the mechanism for imparting, or gaining knowledge, is relevant to fields outside of architecture and broader society; that the work has purpose. The third objective is to reinforce that architectural practice is in the service of humanity and the environment. The objective of the P_PATCH project is to provide a pattern book for the implementation of sustainable strategies in affordable housing. Utilizing a unique residential building typology identified through Project Scope Definition, students develop an implementation strategy for the adaptive transformation of enclosure, mechanical and site systems. The projects are executed with the support and engagement of a municipal neighborhood design and development partnership, an urban redevelopment authority, and a community design collaborative; entities focused on defining the trajectory of Pittsburgh’s housing needs in the context of significant population loss and disinvestment. The comprehensive project manuals developed demonstrate how modifications may be implemented with full financial, legal, and logistical information provided. Students: Jeff Choi, David Kennedy, Jaclyn Pacely, Jon Spring, Niko Triulzi, Charles Helmstetter, Doug Farrell, Ellen Garrett, Alise Kuwahara, Kaitlin Miciunas, Judy Podraza, Craig Rossman, Nelly Dacic, Don Reeves, Patty Rivera, Diego Taccioli, Alyssa Topinka, Elizabeth Cohn, Jared Friedman, Christopher Gallot, Spencer Gregson & Alyssa Kuhns

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ACSA/AIA Housing Design Education Danny M. Samuels & Nonya Grenader Excellence in Housing Education Course or Activity Rice University

CORE HOUSES The Rice Building Workshop (RBW) brings architecture students out of the studio and into the community to design and build affordable houses. Our projects are located in Houston’s Third Ward at Project Row Houses, a vibrant neighborhood revitalization group that encompasses housing, education, art and cultural activities, preservation and social services. Three recent RBW houses explore the role of the core (a compact area of mechanical, electrical and plumbing services) in a variety of ways. The EXTRA SMALL (XS) HOUSE re-imagines the typical row house typology in more contemporary terms. NEW CORE/OLD HOUSE promotes the re-use of abandoned housing stock by the insertion of new services contained in a compact cube. Our most recent project, ZEROW HOUSE, translates the row house into a sustainable and modern prototype using active technologies. ZEROW HOUSE is organized around two cores: a wet core and a light core. The wet core contains all engineered systems associated with water and energy in a compact 8x10 area. The light core serves as the primary source for day lighting as well as an outdoor extension of interior living space. After its exhibit in the Department of Energy’s 2009 Solar Decathlon, ZeRow House returned to Houston’s Project Row Houses as a prototype for small, affordable, sustainable housing that can be built in place or delivered to a site. It is now home to a community resident. Students: XS HOUSE: Amy Adams, Jill Bacon, David Barr, Patrick Battle, Miriam Bentley, Sharen Bidaisee, Dan Burkett, Elizabeth Butman, Lisa Cassedy, Amy Chien, Seth Clarke, Allan Co, Carina Coel, Kelli DesRochers, Joey Favarolo, Sharon Floyd, Joseph Gabriel, Anna Goodman, Audrey Handelman, Eric Hartz, CJ Hoogland, Jenny Hoover, Maureen Hull, Julien Jaworski, Laura Johnson, Josh Jones, Chris Kimball, Taryn Kinney, Peter Klein, Jason LaRocca, Lina Lee, Steven Maynard, Christopher Mechaley, Karlene Morgan, Davis Neindorff, Dan Nemec, Chester Nielsen, Jennifer Painter, Jimin Park, Matthew Radune, Bill Rankin, Ben Reavis, Jeremy Richey, Eric Rosprim, Philip Schmunck, Christian Sheridan, Chris Starkey, Michelle Stevenson, Doug Subbiondo, Tara Teter, Gary Tran, Jordan Vexler, Mark Watabe, Sandra Winstead & Soojin Yoo — NEW CORE/OLD HOUSE: Michael Binick, Lindsey Brigatti, John Carr, Federico Cavazos, Alice Chai, Sohael Chowfla, Emily Clanahan, Robert Crawford, Jason Cross, Linh Dan Do, Lauren Eckberg, Beatrice Eleazer, Cynthia Fishman, Will Garris, Seth Goodman, Katie Green, Julia Hager, Justin Holdahl, Stephanie Hsie, Kevin Jones, Tait Kaplan, Mary Jane Kwan, Chad Leahy, Brian Love, Julia Mandell, Brian Meinrath, Brad Naeher, Van-Tuong Nguyen, Benjamin Pollak, Claire Pritchett, Etien Santiago, Sanket Shah, Amanda Slaughter, Kristen Smith, Robert Sproull, Peter Stanley, Florence Tang, Lyon Train, Emily Tseng, Chris White, Adam Williams, Jason Wu, Leming Yang & Kaileen Yen —ZEROW HOUSE: David Alf, Diana Ang, Brent Behm, Courtney Benzon, Jinge Chai, Timmie Chan, Anne Chen, Jessica Colangelo, Kelly Cooney, Craig Corcoran, Jason Cross, Osman Dadi, Andrew Daley, Roni Deitz, David Dewane, Rachel Dewane, Linh Dan Do, Michael Dziedziniewicz, Allison Elliott, Sara Freudensprung, Hunter Gilbert, Seth Goodman, Marissa Hebert, Daniel Hedges-Copple, Michael Heisel, Don Hickey, Brantley Highfill, Ashley Hinton, Dana Hoffman, Marcos Hung, Julian Jaworski, North Keeragool, Kurt Kienast, Ryan Lemmo, William Li, Kevin Lin, Michael Lin, Chris Lin, Cassie Lopez, Douglas Ludgin, Jessica Lutz, Travis Martin, Kate McPhillips, Christof Meyer, Cherry Miao, Megan Mills, Erin Morrison, Alex Mrozack, Ali Naghdali, Joe Nash, Kelly Nicholas, Henry Nielson, Naoki Nitta, Kathryn Pakenham, Ronak Patel, Becca Sagastegui, Roque Sanchez, Charles Sharpless, Jon Siani, Rebecca Sibley, Sarah Simpson, Julia Siple, Tim Solberg, Marissa Spears, Kimo Spector, Scott Stark, Judd Swanson, Jay Townsend, Alex Tseng, Emily Tzeng, Antonia Wai, Seanna Walsh, Colin Ward, Amy Westermeyer, Jessy Yang, Aron Yu & Tsvetelina Zdravena

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Ohio State University

Tilder & Stephen Turk

Lisa ACSA/AIA Housing Design Education Excellence in Housing Education Course or Activity

THE POD HOME A team of Ohio State Architecture and Engineering faculty and students formed the first interdisciplinary partnership in the College of Engineering to design and construct a sustainable house, The Pod Home, a minimal dwelling that doubles as an educational exhibit for the Center of Science and Industry’s Big Science Park. The Pod Home exhibition marks the beginning of a series of Energy and Environment educational exhibits at COSI, a children’s science museum located in Columbus, Ohio. Conceived as a design-build research project to introduce undergraduate students to sustainable design, the Pod Home exhibition was also envisioned as a creative means to educate children and visitors about the positive potential of environmental design and technology. The Pod Home was designed as a flexible living “pod” that could be transported to various sites for a range of needs. Designed with the needs of a young adult in mind, the house includes a loft, small kitchen, and a bathroom. The Pod Home explores alternatives to market-rate housing through energy-efficient design and sustainable materials. The Pod Home integrates innovative architectural design with inventive engineering and sustainable technologies—including a custom-designed floor system that utilizes phase-change materials to store and release energy. The Pod Home’s unique exterior form was developed to optimize the use of passive solar energy; the slope of its roof maximizes the collection of solar energy incident on the photovoltaic panels and solar energy collector. Faculty Team: Architecture Faculty: Lisa Tilder & Stephen Turk; Engineering Faculty: Gary Kinzel & Seppo Korpela Student Team: Architecture: Gregory Delaney, Elizabeth Evanoo, Michael Factor, S. Scott Kittle, Robert Scott, Nathaniel Substanley, & Gregory Tran; Engineering: Doug Powell, Anna Schwinn, & Kara Shell Consultants: Architecture: Jerome M. Scott Architects, Inc.; Engineering: Shelley Metz Baumann Hawk, Inc. COSI Team: Sharon Tinianow, Director of Sustainability Initiatives; Steve Langsdorf, Senior Director of Experience Operations; Brian Lobaugh, Sr. Director of Facilities; Michael Forrester, Associate Exhibition Producer; & David Chesebrough, CEO and President

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FD

ACSA Faculty Design Awards

To represent theoretical investigations advancing the general understanding of the discipline of architecture. The awards recognize exemplary built and unbuilt work that reflect upon practice and research.

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University of Waterloo & University of Toronto

Lola Sheppard & Mason White

WATER ECONOMIES/ECOLOGIES The American Southwest is the site of great contradictions, as both the driest region in the nation and home to the most rapidly increasing populations. The Colorado River Water Basin has been the site for some of the country’s most ambitious 20th Century water infrastructure projects, and the region is, once again, the site of intense debate on how to address growth, fragile ecologies and a complex economy of agriculture and tourism. In a region of rapid landscape transformations, the Salton Sea is manmade, hyper-saline water body, created when water canals broke and flooded the Sea basin. The Sea has since been fed by water run-off of the Imperial Valley, one of the large agricultural regions in the US, and is concentrating agricultural toxins and nature salts, threatening the ecological viability and economic survival of the Sea. There are proposals in place to manage the Salton Sea, but these plans miss an infrastructural opportunity. Water Economies/Ecologies aims to create working public architecture that operates at a very large regional scale, though it employs micro-scale, incremental soft infrastructure. Within the sea itself are deployable buoyant pools that maintain different levels of salinity to encourage a range of applications from recreation to harvest. There are four pool types, varying in scale and complexity, dedicated to production, harvesting, recreation, and habitat. Among other attributes, the pools are equipped to passively separate water and salt, generating a regional water (and salt) economy. The project envisions an infrastructure that behaves as an ecosystem; it can grow, shrink, change priorities, feed, protect, and cultivate new species.

ACSA Faculty Design

Along the shoreline of the Salton, the gridded landscape of the Imperial Valley is extended to generate a new water-efficient landscape sustained by the Salton and the Coachella Canal. Rather than a New Deal approach of massive engineering or iconic infrastructure, Water Economies/Ecologies employs adaptable, responsive interventions. The ambition is to supplement landscapes at risk rather than overhaul them, combining existing landscapes with emergent systems to catalyze a network of ecologies and economies in a new public realm. Students: Daniel Rabin, Kristin Ross, Joseph Yau Fei Ling Tseng & Matthew Spremulli

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Challenging the traditional presumption that a building skin should be static and inanimate, this investigation examines the replacement of this convention with a responsive system that is a prosthetic extension of man and a mediator for the environment. With the emergence of smart materials, an elevated interest in utilizing unconventional building systems and an urgent need to build sustainable structures, our buildings can be more sensitive to the environment and the human body, raising the level effectiveness while altering our perception of enclosure. To test this thesis, an 8’ tall portable prototype with a responsive, self-ventilating building skin using sheet thermobimetal, a smart material never before used in building skins, was built. By laminating two metal alloys with different coefficients of expansion together, the result is a thermobimetal that curls when heated and flattens when cooled. As the temperature rises, this deformation will allow the building skin to breathe much like the pores in human skin. Students: Debbie Chen, Jeffrey Chinn, Gregory Creech, Andrew Dutton, Andrew Kim, Dong Woo Kim, Luciana Martinez, Julia Michalski, Sayo Morinaga, Hana Ogita, Daisuke Sato, Dayhana Solis, Atsushi Sugiuchi, Kim Wiebe & Dylan Wood

ACSA Faculty Design

University of Southern California

Doris Kim Sung

SKIN DEEP: MAKING BUILDING SKINS BREATHE WITH SMART THERMOBIMETALS

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ACSA Faculty Design California College of the Arts & University of California Berkeley

Jason Kelly Johnson & Nataly Gattegno

AURORA PROJECT The Aurora Project superimposed the ephemeral qualities of the Arctic ice field with the dynamic behavior of visitors, translating the shifting dimensions of the ice into an immersive system of flickering auroras and responsive luminescent skins. The Aurora Project was comprised of three components: Terra Incognita, the Aurora Model and the Glaciarium. Terra Incognita consisted of maps and diagrams that provided a view into how the Arctic region has been represented, claimed and mythologized in past and present. Through the study of historical maps and abundant contemporary real-time data from the Arctic, Terra Incognita experimented with ways to synthesize, remap and remodel these representations that oscillated between modes of dynamic modeling, cartography and creative fiction. The Aurora Model - superimposed the ephemeral qualities of these representations with the dynamic behavior of multiple users, translating the shifting dimensions of the ice into a responsive light field. The model was constructed using a series of horizontal layers that indexed both static and dynamic relationships occurring in the Arctic: bathymetry, temperature, salinity and ice thickness defined the organization of the surface. Left unattended, the surface of the Aurora Model would be brightly lit through a series of LEDs populating the interior of the surface. Approaching the model as a spectator would trigger a reverse reaction: the LEDs dimmed away from the viewer and a series of ‘auroras’ lit the middle of the surface. The Glaciarium was a smaller interactive instrument that engaged a smaller group of users’ senses through the sight and sound of a melting ice core. Increased observation amplified the internal lighting effects and, depending on the duration of interaction, dramatically accelerated the melting of the ice core rendering the environmental degradation visceral and real. The project was supported by three substantial grants: The New York Prize Fellowship at the Van Alen Institute, the “Research Through Making” grant from the University of Michigan TCAUP and a Graham Foundation grant. Students: Carrie Norman & Thomas Kelley

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University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign ACSA Faculty Design: Honorable Mention

Kevin N. Erickson

urbanCLOUD In New York City, more than 6,000 sidewalk sheds flank buildings and construction sites at any given time, obstructing more than 1 million linear feet of sidewalk. Most remain in place for a year or more, these supposedly temporary structures have become permanent features of the urban streetscape. While intended to protect pedestrians from overhead construction debris, they undermine the aesthetic and social qualities of one of the most important and dynamic forms of public space – the sidewalk. Unchanged in fifty years, sidewalk sheds are heavy, dark structures made of steel tubing, corrugated aluminum, wood planks, and plywood sheeting. They create awkward, narrowed and unappealing spaces, negatively affecting business and the character of neighborhoods, and often providing covered places that promote seedy activity. Because current NYC building code prohibits their surfaces being used for posters, painting or anything visually stimulating, they have become fixed, utilitarian eyesores. For something that occupies nearly half the area of Central Park shouldn’t some attention be paid to quality of design and experience? Kenneth Frampton notes, “architecture can still intervene in the urban fabric, even in a limited way and as an intervention it should guarantee or orient itself towards a space of public appearance”. urbanCLOUD is a simple, transformative new sidewalk shed system that utilizes lightweight translucent materials, which are suspended from buildings, to create a seemingly effortless structure. The result is a protective canopy that levitates above sidewalks, allowing natural light to filter below, generating a soft subtle glow. This glow, enhanced by the ‘clouds’ white materiality, provides a soothing contrast to the chaos of urban life. The underlying thesis behind urbanCLOUD is sidewalk sheds should not be a burden within neighborhoods but rather create interesting spatial conditions, provide an area people want to inhabit, and add value to cities at both the pedestrian and urban scales. Students: Johann Rischau, Brodie Bricker, & Mathew Strack

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University of Arizona ACSA Faculty Design: Honorable Mention

Martin Despang

KROGMANN HEADQUARTERS The Headquarters Krogmann project is a case study representing Despang Architekten´ s methodology of “egalitarian typological prototyping”. The project emblematizes the generational transitioning of the traditional wood contractor company Krogmann in the small town of Lohne in Northern Germany. In the sense of innovating tradition the 1960´s vernacular house of founding Hubert Krogmann happily clears the way for the emerging headquarters of his followers Heike and Konrad, which prepares the business for the post fossil 21st Century and defines small town contextuality in an evolutionary way. Through closest collaboration of architect, client and contractor the project rejuvenates master builder virtues. The practiced IDP methodology rose from building of trust, and respect of Krogmann having been the lowest bidder for Despang Architekten´s ILMASI solid wood school. Based upon this previous auto didactic training between architect and client/contractor the project was napkin designed by Martin Despang, Heike and Konrad Krogmann via SKYPE across the Atlantic and then developed and built under the overseas monitoring of Despang. The project exemplifies the principle of “essentialism”. As a distinct, but simple form it is achieving the goal of making the world a better place in both the most local and global way. The democratic wide open space has made the Krogmann team happier, healthier and more productive and the intuitive methodology achieved “Passive House” performance making its carbon footprint as minimal as its physical. The achieved balance of ecological and architectural friendliness is a result of the architect’s strategy which he calls “Heidiklumization of Birkenstockitecture”.

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A postcard image offers clues into the social, political and cultural atmosphere of a city through its imagery and details in the periphery. Berlin in specific, has registered change at multiple scales in the urban landscape due to its previous division into East and West Germany followed by unification in 1989. Since then, the identity of the east has been diminishing under western influence. This project entitled, Berlin: A Renovation of Postcards, focuses on a moment captured in time through postcards and commercial images that reveal the subtle and sometimes not-so subtle changes taking place in Berlin. Vintage images of East Berlin are collaged into current panoramic views where past and present meet in collages that appear as double exposures of two time frames. A selection of these images was exhibited in Berlin on advertising billboards at the Friedrichstrasse U6 subway platform over the course of four months. Friedrichstrasse holds significance for the site of this exhibition since it was along the dividing line between east and west. As a result, the display of these images holds different meanings for its onlookers. For the westerner, a glimpse of the former East Berlin is visible that was often inaccessible, while the former easterner is asked to contemplate the memory of a familiar cityscape in the postcard now merged with present day imagery. For those onlookers who have neither an allegiance to the east or west, the history of Berlin’s cityscape unfolds backwards and forwards with images of the past and present.

ACSA Faculty Design: Honorable Mention

University of Texas at Austin

Lois Weinthal

BERLIN: A RENOVATION OF POSTCARDS

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ACSA Faculty Design: Honorable Mention University of Waterloo & University of Toronto

Lola Sheppard & Mason White

ICELINK: OCCUPYING THE TEMPORAL SEAM It would be difficult to find a site more geographically charged than the Bering Strait. A region rich in scientific speculation, exploration, resources, ecology, and myth, the remote position of the strait has relegated it to the role of a global seam, a spatial and temporal rift. IceLink consists of two primary infrastructural elements: an ecological park and a tunnel-bridge link. The tunnel surfaces to reveal a bridge as it approaches the international date line to establish a port and public walkway. The park intensifies the existing phenomenon of ice-floe collection that happens in the shallow space between the Diomede Islands. The Bering Strait is part of a rich cycle of north-south exchange that is heavily informed by seasonal changes. As the summer months thaw the ice shelf, causing it to migrate northwards, freshwater is released into the sea. The natural production of ice allows for the storage of precious freshwater, which is increasingly threatened. The current water crisis has left more than 884 million people without access to safe drinking water. IceLink harvests water for two purposes: to conserve freshwater before it thaws into the seas and to increase freshwater production in order to infuse more into the seas and promote phytoplankton production, forming a robust foundation to the oceans’ food chain. Straddling the international date line and the United States/Russia border, IceLink is an ideal zone of diplomatic, cultural, and economic exchange. New programs that promote exchange envelop the bridge and spatialize the symbolic significance of this link. Infrastructural, resource-based, and ecological flows in and around the Bering Strait create a central node that connects its surroundings with global impact. Students: Ghazal Jafari, Sandy Wong, Matthew Spremulli & Fei Ling Tsengs

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ACSA Faculty Design: Honorable Mention

University of Michigan

Anca Trandafirescu & Glenn Wilcox

HOT AIR HOT AIR is an uncommissioned, inflatable and inhabitable (temporary) monument created to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the fall of communism in Romania, 1989. It was exhibited in November, 2009 on Victory Square, Timisoara, Romania, at the site of the first public revolutionary demonstrations that lead to the end of the twenty-four year political dictatorship of Nicolae Ceausescu. HOT AIR is an antimonument in the shape of a fallen statue head meant to recall the rituals of revolutions that purge the city of the symbols of their former regimes. HOT AIR valorizes no one individual, however. Rather, it is a blank, everyone’s head meant to symbolize all who were toppled in the bloody exchange of a failed revolution. HOT AIR is constructed of common polyethylene sheets, heat welded with a household iron. The monument is inflated with a single, small fan. Its low technology and inexpensive means are invitation to participation in the simple act of taking (up) the space that once belonged to the state but now belongs to all. HOT AIR asks viewers: who, in a democracy, has the right to author the representations of collective memory? Though HOT AIR began without commission, once gifted to the people of Timisoara the project was supported generously by the city of Timisoara, Romania, the University of Michigan through the Weiser Center for Emerging Democracies, the Center for Russian and Eastern European Studies, and the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning. Student: Le Nguyen

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Clemson University ACSA Faculty Design: Honorable Mention

Daniel Nevin Harding

northSIDE infill On a lot filled with trees and lilac bushes in Bozeman, Montana’s North East neighborhood, the idea to build a contemporary home emphasizing sustainability and energy efficiency was realized. The site mandated a small footprint that would support the preservation of the existing hedge protecting it from the street and most importantly the mature trees sheltering the rear yard from the elements and neighboring structures. The infill lot created by the subdivision of a yard belonging to an historic home next door determined the context and volume of this 1650 square foot residence. Programmatically, the house is organized to place more public and utility spaces on the ground level while bedrooms and other private spaces are elevated within the surrounding tree canopies on the second level. The second level deck projects into the treetops creating elevated outdoor private spaces. In keeping with the spirit of this eclectic neighborhood, custom steel shingles, much like scales, and contrasting window frames were utilized, referencing the steep-pitched shingled “roof facades� and colorful Victorian accents of neighboring historic structures. Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) were used for the exterior walls and structural system. This highly insulated envelope, combined with passive ventilation and radiant heating, provides a high level of energy efficiency. Likewise, a monolithic waffle slab allowed the home to float over the existing root system of the prolific trees that characterized the site. From the street one notices the unique bonderized steel shingle walls and simple form peeking above the hedgerow and among the trees.

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JAE

Journal of Architectural Education Best Design as Scholarship Article This award is selected as the JAE Best Scholarly Article from the all those submitted to the journal in the award year. The JAE has for more than 58 years represented the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture as the flagship publication of this important architectural organization.

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University of Illinois at Chicago

How can the discipline participate in a city that is increasingly organized by infrastructural work? Architecture’s claim to the infrastructural city is through the design of alternative typologies of space in the flow networks that organize the contemporary metropolis. A total of 60 million people travel by air every month in the US and low cost airline travel in Europe doubled between 2003 and 2004. Deploying air travel as a vehicle for urbanism demonstrates that airline infrastructure is a latent site for new opportunities in architectural research and practice. Read the complete article in the Journal of Architectural Education volume 63:2, March 2010.

JAE Best Design as Scholarship Article

Clare Lyster

NEW ECOLOGIES OF AIRLINE FLOW

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JAE

Journal of Architectural Education Best Scholarship of Design Article This award is selected as the JAE Design Best Article from the all those submitted to the journal in the award year. The JAE has for more than 58 years represented the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture as the flagship publication of this important architectural organization.

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University of British Columbia

This paper examines how racial politics have contributed to the complex construction of identity in a multi-ethnic and multi-faith country. The rise of Malaysia as an economic power has been accompanied by a series of ambitious building projects that explore the representational power of architecture to express Malaysian identity. Recent projects provide a context for a discussion of Kampung Baru, a highly politicized neighborhood within the Kuala Lumpur city center that will soon undergo development. Read the complete article in the Journal of Architectural Education volume 63:2, March 2010.

JAE Best Scholarship of Design Article

Mari Anna Fujita

FORAYS INTO BUILDING IDENTITY: KAMPUNG TO KAMPONG IN THE KUALA LUMPUR METROPOLITAN AREA

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ACSA/AIA Topaz Medallion Richard D. Licata, Licata Hansen Associates; Edward A. Vance, Ed Vance and Associates; Kenneth Schwartz, Tulane University; Anne Cormier, University of Montreal & Tyler Ashworth, American Institute of Architecture Students

ACSA Distinguished Professor Ursula Emery McClure, Louisiana State University; Geraldine Forbes Isais, University of New Mexico & Steve Badanes, University of Washington

ACSA/AIAS New Faculty Teaching Sharon Haar, University of Illinois at Chicago; Marc Swackhamer, University of Minnesota; Justine Lewis, Georgia Institute of Technology & Kristy Swann, Auburn University

ACSA Collaborative Practice Ursula Emery McClure, Louisiana State University; Danielle McDonough, American Institute of Architecture Students; Gregory Luhan, University of Kentucky; Thomas Fisher, University of Minnesota & Randall Ott, Catholic University of America

ACSA Creative Achievement Ursula Emery McClure, Louisiana State University; Danielle McDonough, American Institute of Architeture Students; Gregory Luhan, University of Kentucky; Tom Fisher, University of Minnesota & Randall Ott, Catholic University of America

ACSA Diversity Achievement Ursula Emery McClure, Louisiana State University; Danielle McDonough, American Institute of Architecture Students; Gregory Luhan, University of Kentucky; Tom Fisher, University of Minnesota & Randall Ott, Catholic University of America

ACSA/AIA Housing Design Education Roberta Feldman, University of Illinois at Chicago; Michael Pyatok, University of Washington; Deane Evans, New Jersey Institute of Technology & Diane Georgopulos, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

ACSA Faculty Design Julia Czerniak, Syracuse University; Ursula Emery McClure, Louisiana State University; William Braham, University of Pennsylvania & Xavier Vendrell, University of Illinois at Chicago

Journal of Architectural Education 90

JAE Editorial Board; Ursula Emery McClure, Louisiana State University; Danielle McDonough, American Institute of Architecture Students; Gregory Luhan, University of Kentucky; Thomas Fisher, University of Minnesota & Randall Ott, Catholic University of America

JURY 91

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2010-2011

ACSA PRESS

WA S H I N G T O N , D C


2011 Architecture Education Awards Book