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WORLD

www.AvBuyer.com ™

The global marketplace for business aviation

July 2012

proudly presents

2007 BBJ 700C Serial Number 36756 See page 12-15 for further details

Business Aviation & The Boardroom: pages 48 - 77 • Safety Matters - Pilot Fatigue

Project2 21/06/2012 15:52 Page 1

PRE-OWNED FALCON

WE BUILT THESE PLANES, WE TRACKED THEIR LIVES, WE KNOW THEM BEST. No one knows a pre-owned Falcon like we do. No one knows more about its past. Because we record the details of every Falcon’s history in our databases. And no one cares more about helping you get the best out of it. Because wherever you fly your pre-owned Falcon, our reputation flies with you.

Visit falconjet.com/preowned France: +33.1.47.11.60.71 - US: +1.201.541.4556

Project2 21/06/2012 15:53 Page 1

Falcon 2000

2001 • s/n 133 • 5,033 hrs. total time • 10 passengers • EUOPS 1 compliant • Eng on CSP, APU on MSP • Aero I Sat Com • May 2012 C check, Landing gear overhaul, and white paint scheme.

Falcon 2000EX EASy

2005 • s/n 063 • 2,242 hrs. total time • 8 passengers • EUOPS1 compliant • Engines on JSSI, APU on MSP • Aug 2011 C check, new white paint scheme and winglets installation • Swift 64 Satcom : 3FMS, 3IRS, 3VHF, 2EFB

Falcon 2000LX

2008 • s/n 151 • 1,285 hrs. total time • 10 passengers • EUOPS1 compliant • One owner since new • Under FalconCare • Iridium Satcom • EFB

Falcon 900EX EASy

2004 • s/n 128 • 3,847 hrs. total time • 14 passengers • EASYII retrofitted • Engines & APU on MSP • One owner since new • EUOPS1 compliant • 2010 C check, 3FMS, 3IRS, 3VHF, Aero H+ • Swift 64 Satcom

Falcon 900EX EASy

2005 • s/n 150 • 2,149 hrs. total time • 14 passengers • EUOPS1 compliant • FWD and AFT Lav • Sept 2011 fresh C check • Aero I Satcom

Falcon 7X

2011 • s/n 128 • 172 hrs. total time • 14 passengers • No Crew Rest • Pristine condition, • HUD, EFVS, EFB, Aero H • Swift 64 high speed Satcom • Brakes wheel well heat modification

AC Index July2011 21/06/2012 13:10 Page 1

Aircraft For Sale AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

605 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 11, 22, 63, 148, 850 . . . . . . . . . . . 23, 148,

AEROSTAR Superstar 700 . . 34,

Learjet

AIRBUS A318 Elite. . . . . . 18, ACJ . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 148,

BOEING/MCDONNELL DOUGLAS BBJ . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 15, 31, 67, 71, BBJ 700C . . . . . . 1, 14, Super 27-100 . . 87, Super 727-100-VIP. .93, Super 727-100-REW. .18, Super 727-200-REW. .87, 737-300-VIP. . . . 141, 757-200 . . . . . . . 87,

BOMBARDIER CRJ-200 XR . . . 148, Global 5000 . . . . 17, 18, 63, 148, Global 6000 . . . . 6, 148, Global 7000 . . . . 25, Global Express . 6, 13, 18, 23, 24, 65, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126, 127, 148, Global Express XRS.. 31, 148,

Challenger 300 . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 22, 63, 69, 148, 601-1A . . . . . . . . 28, 35, 65, 79, 601-3A . . . . . . . . 17, 20, 22, 65, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, 601-3A ER . . . . . 144, 604 . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, 25, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37, 39, 57, 148,

31A . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 65, 103, 35A . . . . . . . . . . . 34, 63, 65, 81, 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 40XR . . . . . . . . . . 103, 124, 125, 45 . . . . . . . . . . . . 20, 25, 63, 65, 81, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115, 45BR . . . . . . . . . . 71, 45XR . . . . . . . . . . 21, 103, 60 . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 55, 65, 60SE . . . . . . . . . . 20, 60XR . . . . . . . . . . 65, 71, 144,

CESSNA

PAGE

Encore . . . . . . . . 147, Encore +. . . . . . . 147, Excel . . . . . . . . . . 28, 103, 147, 148, Jet . . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 55, 65, Mustang . . . . . . . 63, SII . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 37, Sovereign. . . . . . 35, 65, 79, T206H . . . . . . . . . 33, Ultra . . . . . . . . . . 20, 28, 103, 137,

Conquest I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29,

CIRRUS SR22 . . . . . . . . . . 33,

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

20Cargo . . . . . . . 34, 20C-5BR . . . . . . 34, 50 . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 19, 23, 34, 57, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71, 146, 50EX . . . . . . . . . . 5, 63, 146, 50-4. . . . . . . . . . . 146, 900B . . . . . . . . . . 34, 65, 103, 130, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146, 900C . . . . . . . . . . 146, 900EX EASy . . . 3, 19, 146, 147, 900EX . . . . . . . . . 19, 146, 2000 . . . . . . . . . . 3, 17, 25, 37, 133, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147, 2000DX EASy . . 23, 148, 2000EX. . . . . . . . 148, 2000EX EASy . . 3, 19, 148, 2000LX . . . . . . . . 3, 85, 139,

Citation

DORNIER

ISP . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 33, 55, II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 34, 40, IISP . . . . . . . . . . . 34, III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34, 65, VII . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 91, 133, X . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 17, 22, 55, 57, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, XLS+ . . . . . . . . . . 28, 148, 208 . . . . . . . . . . . 144, 650 . . . . . . . . . . . 5, CJ1. . . . . . . . . . . . 113, CJ2. . . . . . . . . . . . 33, 34, 55, 142, 145, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, CJ2+ . . . . . . . . . . 28, 136, CJ3. . . . . . . . . . . . 65, Bravo . . . . . . . . . 34, 35, 55, 103, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138,

Dornier 328 . . . . 141,

GULFSTREAM

EMBRAER

III . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 39, 69, IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 19, 23, 65, 73, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129, 132, IVSP . . . . . . . . . . 31, 65, 67, 134, 148, V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 27, 31, 103, 150 . . . . . . . . . . . 81, 200 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 21, 27, 35, 65, 81, 450 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 18, 27, 31, 39, 550 . . . . . . . . . . . 6, 12, 17, 18, 27, 39, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148,

Aviation Companies, Inc.

1980 MU-2 SOLITAIRE S/N 424SA, N82AF, 7485TT, 385/385 SOH, 75/75 SPOH, GNS 530 WAAS, Avidyne Flight Max, 7500-hr, inspection, New P&I (2010) to customer specs. U.S. $675,000.

1981 MU-2 MARQUISE S/N 1510SA, N17HG, 3840TT, 3840/3840 SNEW, 630/630 SHSI/SGBI, 135/320 SPOH, GNS-400, Collins Pro-Line, Sandel 4” EFIS, SPZ-500 A/P, New Interior (2012). U.S. $650,000.

1974 MU-2K Dash 10 on MSP - Price Reduced S/N 305, N50K, 6370TT, 1180/1180 since -10 (MSP), 750/750 SPOH, Dual Garmin 430’s, RDR-2000, M4-D A/P, New Paint (2009). U.S. $535,000.

1980 MU-2 MARQUISE S/N 756SA, 5Y-MUZ. 12925TT, 1990/2060 SOH, 1990/2060 SHSI, 260/220 SPOH, Collins Pro-Line, M4D A/P, New Paint (2010), Located in Africa. U.S. $475,000.

1975 MU-2M S/N 326, N165MA, 3750TT, 3750/3750 SOH, 235/235 SHSI, 680/370 SGBI, 410/410 SPOH, GTN-750/650, Traffic, XM Weather. U.S. $395,000.

1974 MU-2K S/N 285, N11SJ, 4630TT, 2350/2350 SOH, 525/525 SHSI, 230/230 SPOH, Garmin 530W, RDS-81 Color Radar, M4D A/P, New Paint & Interior (2009). U.S. $345,000.

1972 MU-2K S/N 240, N64LG, 6100TT, 4655/4655 SOH, 1100/1100 SHSI/SGBI, 920/775 SPOH, Garmin G-600, Dual GNS-430W’s, Dual GTX-320 TXP’s, TCAS, XM Weather. U.S. $295,000.

234 Air Park Blvd., Aiken, SC (USA) 29805-8921 Tel: USA +1 803-641-9999 • Fax: USA +1 803-641-4040 www.air1st.com • Email: mike@air1st.com 4

AIRCRAFT

IN THIS ISSUE

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

ERJ 135 . . . . . . . 11, ERJ 145 . . . . . . . 11, Legacy 600 . . . . 18, 55, 63, 67, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148, Legacy 650 . . . . 103, Lineage 1000. . . 18, Phenom 100 . . . 55,

FAIRCHILD Merlin IIIB . . . . . 55,

FALCON JET 7X . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 6, 23, 28, 57, 69, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103, 146, 148,

HAWKER BEECHCRAFT Beechcraft 400 ............34, 400A . . . . . . . . . . 25, 29, Premier 1A. . . . . 34, 39, 115,

AC Index July2011 21/06/2012 13:11 Page 2

07.12

• AIRCRAFT • HELICOPTERS • PRODUCT & SERVICE PROVIDERS AIRCRAFT

PAGE

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

King Air

MITSUBISHI

200 . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 34, 35, 350 . . . . . . . . . . . 29, 34, 57, 65, 81, B200 . . . . . . . . . . 29, 55, 81, 103, 105 C90 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34, 103, C90B . . . . . . . . . . 20, 59, 81, 103, F90 . . . . . . . . . . 34, 105, 115,

MU-2K . . . . . . . . 4, MU-2M . . . . . . . . 4, MU-2K Dash 10 4, MU-2 Marquise . 4, MU-2 Solitaire. . 4,

Hawker

PIAGGIO

400XP . . . . . . . . . 34, 65, 148, 700A . . . . . . . . . . 35, 800A . . . . . . . . . . 6, 142, 800B . . . . . . . . . . 31, 63, 800SP. . . . . . . . . 87, 800XP . . . . . . . . . 20, 23, 34, 43, 65, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69, 81, 850XP . . . . . . . . . 31, 39, 71, 900XP . . . . . . . . . 25, 39, 147, 1000B . . . . . . . . . 128, 4000 . . . . . . . . . . 20, 59, 147,

P180 Avanti . . . 65,

PILATUS PC12/45. . . . . . . 29, 65, PC12/47 . . . . . . . 141,

PIPER Meridian . . . . . . . 29, Malibu Mirage . . 33,

SAAB IAI

AIRCRAFT

PAGE

TBM 700B . . . . . 34, 105, 135, 141, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144, 147, TBM 700C1 . . . . 35, TBM 850. . . . . . . 105,

HELICOPTERS

LANCAIR

SOCATA

Lancair L4 . . . . . 65,

TBM 700A . . . . . 105,

65 . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,

AS 365 N2 . . . . . 30, AS 365 N3 . . . . . 115, EC 120B . . . . . . . 30, EC135T2i . . . . . . 103, EC135P2i . . . . . . 143, EC135P2+ . . . . . 131,

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS

AW 109C . . . . . . 103, AW 109E. . . . . . . 30, AW Grand . . . . . . 103, A109S Grand. . . 115, 143, A119 Koala . . . . 39,

MD 600N . . . . . . 39,

SIKORSKY

BELL

C++ . . . . . . . . . . . 51, C1+ . . . . . . . . . . . 51, S-76A+ . . . . . . . . 115, S-92 . . . . . . . . . . 51,

206B . . . . . . . . . . 143, 206L3 . . . . . . . . . 115, 206L4 . . . . . . . . . 142, 212 ............142, 412EMS . . . . . . . 142,

CORPORATE AVIATION PRODUCTS & SERVICES PROVIDERS

EUROCOPTER SABRELINER

PAGE

AGUSTAWESTLAND

340B . . . . . . . . . . 37,

Astra 1125 . . . . . 65, 147, Astra 1125SP . . 27, Astra SPX. . . . . . 37, 57,

AIRCRAFT

AS 332C1 . . . . . . 143, AS350BA . . . . . . 103, AS350B3 . . . . . . 103, AS 355 N . . . . . . 115, AS 355 NP . . . . . 103,

Find an Aircraft Dealer The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

Aircraft Engine /Support . 61, Aircraft Perf & Specs . . . . . 46, 119, Aircraft Title/Registry . . . . 47, 95, Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78, 107, Ground Handling . . . . . . . . 41, Mods-Parts-Spares . . . . . . . 41, Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . 46,

avbuyer.com/dealers

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

5

Project3 21/06/2012 16:11 Page 1

Project3 21/06/2012 16:11 Page 1

Panel July12 20/06/2012 09:18 Page 1

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The global marketplace for business aviation News - Aircraft listings - Editorial World Aircraft Sales (USPS 014-911), July 2012, Vol 16, Issue No 7 is published monthly by World Aviation Communications Ltd, 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 and has a targeted circulation to decision makers within business and corporate aviation throughout the world. It is also available on Annual Subscription @ UK £40 and USA $65. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: World Aircraft Sales Magazine 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517. Postage is paid at Wichita, KS and additional mailing offices.© Copyright of World Aviation Communications Ltd. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of material published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. However, the publishers cannot accept responsibility for claims made by manufacturers, advertisers or contributors. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Editor or the publishers. Although all reasonable care is taken of all material, photographs, CD & Disc’s submitted, the publishers cannot accept any responsibility for damage or loss. All rights reserved. No part of World Aircraft Sales Magazine - Advertising, Design or Editorial - may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any other form, or by any other means, electronic, mechanical, photographic, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publishers.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE IS A MEMBER OF THE FOLLOWING ORGANISATIONS: Aircraft Electronics Association (AEA) - British Business and General Aviation Association (BBGA) British Helicopter Association (BHA) - European Business Aviation Association (EBAA) Helicopter Association International (HAI) - National Aircraft Finance Association (NAFA) National Aircraft Resale Association (NARA) - National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)

8

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Emma Davey Emma@avbuyer.com PUBLISHER John Brennan 1- 800 620 8801 John@avbuyer.com USA OFFICE 1210 West 11th Street, Wichita, KS 67203-3517 EUROPEAN OFFICE Cowleaze House, 39 Cowleaze Rd, Kingston, Surrey, KT2 6DZ, UK +44 (0)20 8255 4000 PRINTED BY Fry Communications, Inc. 800 West Church Road, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055

Panel July12 20/06/2012 14:09 Page 2

Contents

Volume 16, Issue 7 – July 2012

Featured Articles Business Aviation and the Boardroom 48

48

It’s Just Transportation: Those constrained by the rhetoric of politicians concerning Business Aviation should consider the use of it by federal, state and local governments.

50

The Fundamental Need for Transportation: Government—like industry—needs efficient, effective and secure transportation. That’s why government employs Business Aviation too.

52

Endowed Aviation Services: Aviation services are either endowed from on high or they are managed as a business unit. Which approach do you use?

56

Celebrate Business Aircraft: Are concerns about public perception

60

toward Business Aviation still clouding your judgment about the long-term benefits of this mode of travel? They shouldn’t do, here’s why.

60

The Value of Time: A wise man once observed we cannot save time; we can only spend it wisely. So how can, and does that apply to Business Aviation?

64

Tax Implications of Personal & Recreational Use: Expenses that are ordinary, necessary and reasonable for the conduct of business are deductible as appropriate costs. Proscribed limits exist, though...

68

‘PUNC’ - Your Checklist for Insurance Coverage: Pilots, Use, Named Insured and Contracts capture the four most important areas of aviation insurance. Read more…

72

The Light Jet Value Guide: A look at the benefits of Light Jets, and a

64

listing of values for models built over the last 20 years.

Main Features 42

Aircraft Comparative Analysis - Hawker 800XP: How does the performance of the Hawker 800XP stand out against the Learjet 60?

88

GA Airports: For more than 4,600 locales, the GA Airport is the main, primary or only access to the nation’s air-transportation network. They’re worth protecting…

96

Ethics & Aircraft Sales: What should buyers look for to ensure they are dealing with one of the many reputable, ethical dealers and brokers in an aircraft purchase?

98

Inside Maintenance – Older Gulfstreams: It’s a balancing act between the lower costs of older Gulfstreams with the maintenance to keep them flying, as Dave Higdon outlines.

104

BizAv’s Niche Jets: A fuller understanding about some of the ‘off the radar’ air planes can lead to true buyer satisfaction.

Regular Features 10

Viewpoint

26

BizAv Round-up

80

Aircraft Specs & Performance Tables

102 Aviation Leadership Roundtable 108 Regional Sales & Use Tax Forum

112

Global Markets – Asia Pacific: Mike Vines gives a round-up of the latest key

110 Pre-Owned Aircraft Sales Trends

stories to emerge from China and Hong Kong, India, Japan and Australia.

118

Safety Matters – Pilot Fatigue: Dave Higdon discusses the issue of Pilot

Next Month’s Issue

Fatigue. How can it creep up unawares, and how can you counter this potentially lethal, but surprisingly common problem?

* Dealer Broker Market Update

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

* Plane Sense on Refurbishments

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

9

Gil WolinJuly12_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 12:51 Page 1

VIEWPOINT

XXX Marks The Spot by Gil Wolin n July 27, athletes from 204 countries will gather at the opening ceremony of London’s Summer Olympics – officially, the Games of the XXX Olympiad. During the ensuing 17 days, more than eight million tickets will be sold, and 906 medals awarded to participants in 302 events across 32 sports – including, for the first time, women’s boxing. For business jet operators, that means flights to the various London area airports will increase by more than 3,000 during this international quadrennial event, according to UK Civil Aviation estimates. That’s an average of 176 incremental arrivals, and 176 departures each day. I remember working an FBO ramp with that kind of volume during the Indianapolis 500. Massive planning and logistics are required to marshal each aircraft, deplane its VIP passengers proximate to the executive terminal and then park the aircraft appropriately based upon its scheduled departure. But to do that daily for 17 consecutive days – not to mention nurturing very special relationships with ground transport and catering companies – Whew! Those planning to fly into any Londonarea airport during the Games had best have slots already reserved. No IFR arrivals or departures will be allowed into or out of London’s terminal maneuvering areas, some 40 airports covering most of southeast England’s controlled airspace, without a slot. London City is likely to be the biggest beneficiary of the Olympic spike, as they are adjacent to the primary venues. Biggin Hill, Farnborough, Luton, Oxford, Southend and Stansted, though a bit further out from the stadia, also will do well. While the passengers will be at the Olympics to watch world-class athletic performances, those of us in Business Aviation will be far more concerned with aircraft performance. Nothing dampens VIP spectators’ celebratory moods over victory – or deepens their gloom over losses – than to find their jet AOG for the flight home.

O

10

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

So the major airframe and engines maintenance organizations have made special preparations to support transient aircraft during the Summer Games. GE will have dedicated field service representation on site at Luton, ready to address engine issues. Eurojet at Birmingham has a new hangar facility, home to an authorized Cessna Citation service center. And JSSI, the hourly cost maintenance service provider, will have personnel at strategic locations to provide AOG technical support at all London area airports. These maintenance companies – and the tens of thousands of other behind-thescenes personnel – will be working together to help bizav users get to and from the 2012 Summer Games easily, safely and efficiently. Teamwork – as well as individual preparation – is behind every champion athlete and every safe flight. Working together underscores the primary purpose of the Olympics: to showcase not only individual achievement, but to foster understanding and cooperation among nations - and sometimes much more, as we saw during the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico. There, certain champions – rather than nations – made statements with their actions as well as their performances. That same year found me a high school senior on the Millburn, NJ track team. Our coach was Paul “Boomer” Beck – nicknamed for his commanding voice. Paul demanded – and got – the best possible performance from his athletes. He was tough, but fair: he never asked his team to do anything he wouldn’t or couldn’t do, be it sprints, push-ups…or those hated squat thrusts. But he was a father, too, and often served in loco parentis to team members. My own dad traveled extensively throughout his long career in aviation, and saw me run only once. But he loved track, and appreciated the role that Boomer unwittingly filled during those Wonder Years. Every March 1st since graduation, I’d call Boomer to mark the first day of track season. And I would thank him, for helping www.AvBuyer.com

me learn discipline, how to pursue excellence as an individual and as a team member, and how to win – and lose – gracefully. Even after many years he remembered each team, each athlete, each meet. Then we’d talk about the here and now. He was fascinated with my chosen career in aviation, and our conversations ranged far and wide, well beyond the past and mere athletics. I was not alone – many former Millburn tracksters stayed connected with Boomer, from as far back as his first years there in the mid-1950s. When I made my annual call this year, I got a disconnect message. I reached out to his son, only to find that Boomer was seriously ill. To the great sorrow of all who knew him, Paul passed away last month. I will miss our conversations, his perspective – and his sometimes-not-so-gentle reminders of what is really important in life. Those of us in bizav – as well as Olympic athletes – can take a few lessons from Coach Paul Beck. No matter how hard you work, never make the mistake of thinking that the safe flight, the stellar performance, the track meet win, is a sole venture. You might be the star, but it’s the team behind you – whether flight crew, maintenance technician, or logistics planner – who supports your own pursuit of excellence. ❯ Gil Wolin draws on almost forty years of aviation marketing and management experience as a consultant to the corporate aviation industry. His aviation career incorporates aircraft management, charter and FBO management experience (with TAG Aviation among others), and he is a frequent speaker at aviation, travel and service seminars. Gil is a past director of the RMBTA and NATA, and currently serves on the Advisory Board for Corporate Angel Network and GE Capital Solutions-Corporate Aviation. Gil can be contacted at gtwolin@comcast.net Aircraft Index see Page 4

Bristol Associates April 19/03/2012 16:33 Page 1

Acquisitions * Appraisals * Consulting * Remarketing Challenger 605 sn 5711

Gulfstream IV sn 1124

Gulfstream V sn 627

New to Market! Boeing BBJ sn 30496

ERJ 135 and 145s Available

+1 (202) 682-4000 bristol@bristolassociates.com Www.bristolassociates.com

Avjet - FP July 19/06/2012 17:36 Page 1





  

 

 



 



  

Global Sales & Acquisitionss Andrew C. Bradley Senior Vice President, Global Sales S and Acquisitions andrew@avjet.com Phone: +1 (410) 626-6162









Charter & Management Mark H. Lefever President charter@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190





AV VJET T.COM

 



 







 

 





 













 

  

 





 





World Headquarters Marc J. Foulkrod Chairman and Chief Executivve OfďŹ cer info@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190







  

 

  

    

 



  

 





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World Headquarters Marc J. Foulkrod Chairman and Chief Executivve OfďŹ cer info@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190

  

 







Global Sales & Acquisitions Andrew C. Bradley Senior Vice President, Global Sales S and Acquisitions andrew@avjet.com Phone: +1 (410) 626-6162



Charter & Management Mark H. Lefever President charter@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190

   











 

    













 

 

   

  

 







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World Headquarters Marc J. Foulkrod Chairman and Chief Executivve OfďŹ cer info@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190

  

Charter & Management Mark H. Lefever President charter@avjet.com Phone: +1 (818) 841-6190

 







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Global Sales & Acquisitionss Andrew C. Bradley Senior Vice President, Global Sales S and Acquisitions andrew@avjet.com Phone: +1 (410) 626-6162

  



   

    



  



  

 

 

 



 

Avjet - FP July 19/06/2012 17:37 Page 4

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Project2 21/06/2012 15:56 Page 1

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Avpro July 18/06/2012 16:19 Page 1

Avpro July 18/06/2012 16:19 Page 2

Avpro July 18/06/2012 16:20 Page 3

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Project2 21/06/2012 16:01 Page 1

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2000 Global Express SN 9062

HIGHLIGHTS:

Only 3625 Hours Total April 2012 8C by Bombardier - Hartford Engines on Corporate Care Smart Parts Plus Privately Owned Since New

www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

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New Jet Intl July 18/06/2012 16:30 Page 1

2006 LEARJE LEARJETT 40

Engines enrolled enrolled on MSP Engines Certified EU OPS Certified

s/n 2053

Air frame eT.T - 2400 hrs AirframeT.T Fresh MPI Fresh

2002 LEARJE LEARJETT 45

FFresh resh 4800 hr inspec inspection tion EU OPS C ertified Certified

s/n 226

En ngines & APU on MSP Engines R V VSM C ertified RVSM Certified

2001 LEARJE LEARJETT 60

s/n 211

Engines Pro-Rata Eng ines on JSSI P ro-Rata Airframe Air frame TT.T .T 2664 hrs RVSM, R VSM, RNP5 & 10 Compliant Compliant + EU OPS 1 Equipped Equipped

2001 CHALLENGER CH HALLENGER 604

SP G old prog. prog. APU on M MSP Gold Engines on o GE on Point Point Engines

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2001 FFALCON A CON 2000 AL

A Airframe ir frame TT.T. .TT. - 3455 hrs EU OP PS 1 C ertified OPS Certified

s/n 5487

s/n 161

Eng ines enr olled on CSP Engines enrolled HUD C AT IIIA CAT

2000 LE LEARJET EARJET 45

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Engines on Engines n MSP B B-RNAV, RNP-5 Compliant Compliant -RNAV, RVSM, RVSM, RNP-5 Certified EU OPS C ertified Airframe A ir frame e TT.T .T 6767 hrs

2002 BEECHJE BEECHJETT 400A

Eng ine maint. maint. pr og. JSSI Engine prog. EU OPS Compliant Compliant

A ir fram meT.T - 2602,25 hrs AirframeT.T R VSM Compliant Compliant RVSM

2008 HA HAWKER WKER 900XP

C Collins ollins P Pro ro Line 21 EFIS EU OPS Compliant Compliant

s/n RK RK-343 -343

s/n HA HA-56 -56

Eng iness & APU MSP G old Engines Gold A ir frame e: 965 hrs (01/12) Airframe:

1999 LEARJE LEARJETT 45

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BusAviationNewsJuly12_Layout 1 20/06/2012 11:08 Page 1

BizAv Round-Up

07.12

NEWS IN BRIEF Aerion Corporation is reportedly collaborating with NASA’s Glenn Research Center to mature NASA’s new SUPersonic INlet (SUPIN) computer code, which has been developed to perform aerodynamic design and analysis on engine inlets for future highspeed aircraft, such as Aerion’s planned supersonic business jet. Aerion and NASA will work together on inlet design and advanced boundary layer control methods to achieve efficient and stable supersonic inlet operation without boundary layer bleed. / More from www.aerioncorp.com

BUSINESS AVIATION: IT’S GOOD FOR PRIVATE AND PUBLIC SECTOR ALIKE 

Directional Aviation Capital has acquired charter broker Sentient Jet and aviation fuel management company Everest Fuel Management for an undisclosed sum from Australia-based Macquarie Global Opportunities Partners. Directional Aviation also owns Corporate Wings, Constant Aviation, Nextant Aerospace, Sojourn Aviation and Spinnaker Air, as well as a majority share of fractional provider Flight Options. / More from www.directionalaviation.com

/ More from www.eclipseaerospace.net

26

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

Eclipse Aerospace launched production of the Model 550 twin-engine very light jet last month, alongside its first international Eclipse dealer and sales conference, which was attended by dealers from more than 30 countries. Production for 2013 is already sold out to US customers, according to Eclipse, and orders taken from the international dealers will be delivered during 2014 and 2015.

Governments using Business Aviation can derive the same types of benefits and efficiencies as private-sector enterprises do, according to a study just released by NEXA Advisors, LLC. The study was commissioned as part of the No Plane No Gain advocacy campaign, which educates policymakers and opinion leaders about the value of Business Aviation to citizens, companies and communities across the U.S. Working in conjunction with the National Association of State Aviation Operators (NASAO), NEXA President and Founder Michael Dyment said his study shows the use of General Aviation assets by local, state and federal governments provides a wealth of benefits. “We found many state agencies and departments, and even some counties with large territories to cover, having the ability to execute

www.AvBuyer.com

public health mandates much more efficiently with aviation,” Dyment said. “In many cases, there was no other way to accomplish the mission without aircraft.” The study found a total of 196 agencies nationwide operating a fleet of 2,002 aircraft (including jets, turboprops, helicopters and large piston aircraft). The vast majority of those aircraft – 1,337 – were operated by the federal government. The most common use involved transportation of key government officials, such as the president, members of Congress, governors and state employees on special missions. On a state and local level, the study found government aircraft were crucial in the timely movement of state officials to areas not served by the airlines. “The most recurring taxpayer value measure, but far from the largest in aggregate, is the

budget savings for travel, given that aircraft use often leads to far fewer hotel stays, lower cost for car rentals, fewer restaurant meals, and reductions in related business travel expenses. Tax dollar efficiency is a measure of how effectively the public budget is managed and the ability to maximize the value of each dollar spent. Government aircraft have been cited as key contributors to economic development, for example, bringing project developers together with key policy makers to locations where the economic development initiative will form,” the study said. The NEXA report concludes that a majority of governors in the U.S. have officially recognized the value of Business Aviation with proclamations to that effect. / More information from www.nbaa.org or www.nexacapital.com continued on page 32 Aircraft Index see Page 4

Gulfstream July 18/06/2012 16:33 Page 1

2006 Gulfstream G550 S/N 5086

2007 Gulfstream G200 S/N 164 2052 TT, 662 Landings, Engines and APU enrolled on JSSI Select. Sixteen (16) Passengers with a Forward Galley $36,950,000

2006 Gulfstream G450 S/N 4039

2511 TT, 1445 Landings, Engines enrolled on ESP Gold. Auto Throttles. Ten (10) Passenger Configuration $9,950,000

2003 Gulfstream G200 S/N 063 2440 TT, 1241 Landings, Fourteen (14) Passengers with a Aft Galley. 26" Club Seats & Enhanced Soundproofing $24,250,000

2002 Gulfstream GV S/N 662

2732 TT, 1547 Landings, Engines enrolled on ESP. Nine (9) Passenger Configuration. Fresh 8 year Inspection $7,500,000 4834 TT, 2086 Landings, Engines enrolled on Rolls Royce Corporate Care. Enrolled on PlaneParts. Sixteen (16) Passengers with a Forward Galley and Forward Crew Rest $27,995,000

2003 Gulfstream G200 S/N 050

2001 Gulfstream GV S/N 634

5526 TT, 1516 Landings, Fourteen (14) Passengers with Aft Galley and Forward Crew Rest $23,000,000

3421 TT, 1497 Landings, Engines enrolled on ESP. Ten (10) Passenger Configuration. Interior refurbished in 2010 $7,000,000

2000 Gulfstream G200 S/N 007

1998 Gulfstream GV S/N 518

7213 TT, 2813 Landings, Fourteen (14) Passengers with Forward Galley and Forward Crew Rest. New Paint February 2012 LEASE ONLY

5815 TT, 3936 Landings, Engines enrolled on ESP Gold. Ten (10) Passenger Configuration. Fresh 12 year Inspection $6,150,000

1995 Astra/ Gulfstream 1125 SP

2010 Gulfstream G200 S/N 233

519 TT, 244 Landings, Engines enrolled on ESP Gold. Auto Throttles. Nine (9) Passenger Configuration. $13,900,000

5471 TT, 3838 Landings, Engines on MSP. Seven (7) Passenger Configuration plus a Belted Toilet. Recent Refurbishment by Duncan Aviation. Flight Environment Sound Proof Package. Airshow. $2,475,000

Gulfstream Pre-Owned. Contact Lynn Beaudry. lynn.beaudry@gulfstream.com Tel: (912) 965-4000 • Fax: (912) 965-4848

Main Office

Bell Aviation West

Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

South Carolina (CAE) 803.822.4114 e-mail: mail@bellaviation.com

Bell Aviation Texas

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Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

Challenger

Falcon

2011 Falcon 7X | 111

Citation XLS+

2009 Citation XLS+ | 560-5060

Citation Ultra

1996 Citation Ultra | 560-0366

Citation S11

1985 Citation SII | S550-0041

Citation Jet

2007 Citation CJ2+ | 525A-0345

1985 Challenger 601-1A | 3044

Citation V11

1996 Citation VII | 650-7074

Citation Excel

2002 Citation Excel | 560-5288

Citation 11

1994 Citation II | 550-0732

Citation 1SP

Also Available: 550-0047

1982 Citation ISP | 501-0255 Also Available: 501-0687, 501-0229

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Main Office

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Colorado (GJT) 970.243.9192 / 970.260.4667 cell

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Bell Aviation Texas

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Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions

Learjet

Beechjet

1993 Learjet 31A | 31A-086

King Air 350

1998 King Air 350 | FL-221

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1976 King Air 200 | BB-169

Pilatus

1998 Pilatus PC-12/45 | 195

Meridian

2001 Piper Meridian | 4697110

1992 Beechjet 400A | RK-36 Also Available: RK-107

King Air B200

1983 King Air B200 | BB-1140

Conquest

1980 Conquest II | 441-0116

Meridian

2008 Piper Meridian | 4697324

Meridian

2001 Piper Meridian | 4697056

For Full Specs & Additional Photos on Exclusive Listings by Bell Aviation, please Visit our Website at www.BellAviation.com

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BusAviationNewsJuly12_Layout 1 20/06/2012 11:08 Page 2

BizAvRound-Up Flying Colours Corp. presented, in partnership with Maine Aviation, its latest ExecLiner/CRJ conversion at last month’s NBAA Regional Forum at Teterboro, NJ. The aircraft is configured for 16 passengers and is the ninth CRJ conversion Flying Colours Corp. has completed. Functionality includes state-of-the-art equipment including a fully-digital touch screen cabin management system, Airshow 4000, iPod connectivity and dual galleys. Forward and aft lavatories have also been fitted for maximum passenger comfort.

2 CHALLENGER 300 IN DEMAND

/ More from www.flyingcolourscorp.com

BOMBARDIER MAKES HISTORY (AGAIN) Guernsey, one of the Channel Islands situated in the English Channel, is to launch a business aircraft register. The Island will team with Dutch company SGI Aviation, which will be responsible for the operational aspects of the registry, including safety inspections, under a public-private partnership. The registry is expected to be up and running within 12 to 15 months. / More from www.gov.je

Gulfstream has opened a full-service multimedia center at its Product Support headquarters to enhance and increase communication with operators. The center, which includes a broadcast studio, control room and equipment room allows Gulfstream to produce live streamed webcasts, videos and recorded broadcasts.

Last month, just over one year after the largest business aircraft sale in its history, Bombardier surpassed the record, announcing a firm order from NetJets for 100 Challenger business jets with options for an additional 175 aircraft. Bombardier also announced a longterm aftermarket support agreement with NetJets. The transaction for the firm aircraft order is valued at approximately US$2.6 billion based on 2012 list prices. If all the options are exercised, the total value of the order is approximately US$7.3 billion (also based

on 2012 list prices). The aftermarket agreement is for a term of up to 15 years. Assuming certain aircraft usage projections and a 15-year term per firm aircraft, it is valued at up to US$820 million. If all options are exercised, the aftermarket agreement is valued at up to US$2.3 billion. The combined sale and aftermarket agreement are valued at approximately US$9.6 billion if all options are exercised. The firm order comprises 75 Challenger 300s (deliveries scheduled to begin in 2014) and 25

Challenger 605s, with deliveries scheduled to begin in 2015. The options comprise 125 Challenger 300s and 50 Challenger 605s. NetJets' new aircraft will be operated in North America and Europe. In addition, Bombardier announced that London Air Services (LAS) has placed firm orders for five Learjet 75s, valued at approximately US$65 million. LAS is the first Canadian operator to place a firm order for the new light jet / More information from www.bombardier.com

/ More from www.gulfstream.com

/ More from www.jetaviation.com

London Stansted Airport now has four FBOs, with The Diamond Hangar opening to coincide with the 2012 Olympic Games this month. The new FBO, trading on the renowned Aero Toy Store brand, has Ben Shirazi, son of the U.S. aircraft sales and completions group’s founder, Morris Shirazi, as the major shareholder. The new venture acquired the former SR 32

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

Technics maintenance facility and has invested approximately $3 million in redeveloping it to provide ground handling and aircraft maintenance services. It also intends to get into aircraft management with its own air operator certificate and will seek to exploit its connection with Aero Toy Store by marketing aircraft sales and interior refurbishment work conducted by the U.S. company’s alliance with Italian design group Pininfarina. / More from www.aerotoystore.co.uk

Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) has signed a 15-year on-condition Fleet Maintenance Program (FMP(R)) with NetJets for the PW306D turbofan engines that will power the fleet of Cessna Citation Latitude aircraft that the fractional jet ownership company will begin flying in 2016. P&WC www.AvBuyer.com

evaluates each engine enrolled in the FMP(R) and makes maintenance decisions based on ongoing performance. The oncondition FMP(R) agreement covers 50 installed engines and options for an additional 50 P&WC PW306D engines. / More from www.pwc.ca

Satcom Direct opened two new offices. The new Satcom Direct Savannah office is located in the General Aviation area of Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport at 100 Eddie Jungmann Drive in Suite 101E of the Sheltair Aviation Services building. The new International office will be located inside Hangar 2 at TAG Farnborough Airport, UK, where Satcom will also extend its wireless service to customer aircraft flying in to TAG Farnborough Airport. / More from www.satcomdirect.com

Jet Aviation Dubai received approval from the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) to perform base and line maintenance on Bombardier Challenger 604 and Airbus A318/A319/A320/A321 series aircraft. Meanwhile, Jet Aviation Basel has completed its fifth Dassault EASy II avionics flight deck installation on Falcon 900EX/DX/LX series aircraft.

continued on page 36 Aircraft Index see Page 4

Eagle July 19/06/2012 15:55 Page 1

Eagle Aviation, Inc. 2861 Aviation Way, West Columbia, SC 29170 Phone: (800) 849-3245 International: (803) 822-5520 Email: sales@eagle-aviation.com or visit www.eagle-aviation.com

1997 CITATION JET, S/N 525-0206

2002 CJ2, S/N 525A-0064

1982 CITATION II, S/N 550-0416

1982 CITATION I/SP, S/N 501-0242

2006 MALIBU MIRAGE, S/N 4636394

2008 CESSNA T206H STATIONAIR, S/N T20608805

2007 CIRRUS SR22, S/N 2470

After hours contact • Jet Sales: Dennis Dabbs +1 803 822-5533 • Lee Thomas +1 803 822-5526 • Piston Sales: Ralph Lacomba +1 803 822 5578

Aircraft Sales, Maintenance, Avionics, Completions, Executive Charter, 24/7 Line Service

JetBrokers July 18/06/2012 16:39 Page 1

2004 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258674, 3052 TT, MSP Gold, Support Plus, Delivered with Fresh G Check, JAR Ops, TCAS II, CAMP, 8 pax interior, Asking $4,495,000.00

1989 Falcon 900B, S/N 071, 9464 TT, MSP Gold, 4C c/w Nov 11 by Duncan, 12 pax Interior, Triple IRS’, Asking $9,500,000.00

2001 Hawker 800XP, S/N 258503, 3159.7 TT, Engines/APU on MSP, TCAS II, TAWS-A, Dual NZ-2000’s, L/R Oxygen, Honeywell EFIS, Asking $2.995,000.00

1980 Falcon 50, S/N 010, 7977 TT, JSSI, Collins FDS-2000 EFIS, TCAS II, Dual UNS-1F w/ WAAS, C&CPCP c/w 3/09, Gear O/H in 2/12, Asking $2,200,000.00

2005 Hawker 400XP, S/N RK-411, 615 TT, Garmin GMX-200 MFD, XM Weather, Sat Phone, Like New, Airshow, Freon, One Owner, Asking $2,795,000.00

2002 Premier I, S/N RB-48, 2620 TT, Engines on TAP Elite, TCAS 2, Dual FMS3000, 8.33 Spacing/FM Immunity, Asking $2,000,000.00

2010 King Air 350i, S/N FL-689, 450 TT, Venue Cabin Mgmt – Aircell Axxess II, TCAS 2, Hi-def Video Displays, L3 ESIS, Asking $6,850,000.00

2008 King Air C90GTi, S/N LJ-1902, 1356 TT, Pro-line 21 w/ IFIS, One Owner, Engine Fire Ext., Skywatch, Asking $2,500,000.00

Also Available Beechjet 400, S/N RJ-47 Citation V, S/N 560-0112 Citation V, S/N 560-0059 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0871 Citation II/SP, S/N 551-0039 Citation II, S/N 550-0326 Citation II, S/N 550-0216

Citation II, S/N 550-0127 Citation II, S/N 550-0094 Citation II, S/N 550-0082 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0204 Citation CJ2, S/N 525A-0016 Falcon 20C-5BR, S/N 142 Falcon 20 Cargo, S/N 31 Learjet 35A, S/N 138 Sabreliner 65, S/N 465-67

King Air 200, S/N BB-263 King Air 200, S/N BB-48 King Air F90, S/N LA-45 King Air F90, S/N LA-9 King Air C90, S/N LJ-601 Socata TBM700B, S/N 232 Socata TBM700B, S/N 193 Aerostar Superstar 700, S/N 601P-472-188

JetBrokers July 18/06/2012 16:40 Page 2

2008 Gulfstream G200, S/N 213, 619 TT, SATCOM, Recent 3C Check, Honeywell FDR, Ext Lav Service, Asking $11,500,000.00

2008 Citation Sovereign, S/N 680-0216, Owner Looking for a partner!, 1023 TT, JAR Ops, Pro Parts, Power Advantage, Asking $5,500,000.00 for ½ share

1983 Challenger 601-1A, S/N 3013, 11,579 TT, Engines on GE On-Point, Landing Gear O/Hed 3/12, 60 M/CPCP c/w 11/11, APU on MSP, Asking $2,795,000.00

1999 Citation Bravo, S/N 550B-0891, 5452 TT, On Power Advantage Plus and Pro Parts, Freon Air, Phase 5 c/w 5/10, Belted Potty, Asking $1,950,000.00

1988 Citation III, S/N 650-0164, 10552 TT, MSP Gold, PATS In-flight APU, KMD-850 MFD, Dual GNS-XLS, Doc 8 c/w 12/10, Asking $995,000.00

1977 Hawker 700A, S/N 257010, 8612 TT, MSP Gold, HonAS I, RVSM, 48 Month c/w 12/09, Gear O/Hed 8/08, New Interior 2010, Asking $899,000.00

1977 King Air 200XPR Blackhawk, S/N BB-226, 7678 TT, 1193 TSN on -61 Engines!, Dual Garmin 430W, , Skywatch, Raisbeck Performance Mods, Asking $1,595,000.00

2002 Socata TBM700C1, S/N 244, 1885 TT, KMD850 MFD, Dual Garmin GNS-530, RVSM Compliant, Mode S w/ Diversity, Asking $1,395,000.00

AUSTIN +1-512-530-6900 Phone DETROIT +1-248-666-9800 Phone

ST. LOUIS +1-636-532-6900 Phone

Email: jetbroker@jetbrokers.com

CHICAGO +1-630-377-6900 Phone FARNBOROUGH +44 (0)1252 52 62 72 Phone

Web: www.jetbrokers.com

BusAviationNewsJuly12_Layout 1 20/06/2012 11:09 Page 3

Market Indicators

3

JP MORGAN VIEW

JETNET VIEW

JP Morgan’s Business Jet Monthly Report for June reports that economic weakness would hamper the bizjet recovery. Just recently, JP Morgan's economists lowered their global GDP growth forecast for 2H12 to 2.1% from 2.6%. If it persists, the disappointing economic data should pressure new bizjet demand, further postponing a recovery in a market in which 2011 deliveries were still 40% below the 2008 peak. They say that data points could soften amid macro concerns, as they have during the past two summer slowdowns. In 2011, used inventories bottomed at 10.3% in July before rising 80 bps the next four months, while in 2010, inventories hit 11.4% in July before bouncing 50 bps the next three months. In addition, US flight ops growth stalled out in 2H11 and have yet to recover. JP Morgan says that economic weakness should reinforce relative strength of large cabin jets. High net worth individuals in emerging markets have supported this segment and JP Morgan believes a weaker economy affects these customers less than other buyers, such as public companies. For China in particular, low penetration should mean more pent up demand, even amid a slowdown. Finally, large bizjet buyers are less reliant on financing, which could become scarcer. The company says that the NetJets order is a bright spot. NetJets ordered 100 Bombardier Challengers (plus 175 options) and 25 Cessna Latitudes (plus 125 options). The market often views fractional operators' orders as less firm, but JP Morgan still sees this as a positive development, especially for Bombardier and Cessna. Gulfstream's focus on large jets and the introduction of the G650 should enable it to hold up relatively well if slower growth reduces overall bizjet demand and GD's US defense exposure could be less of a liability in a falling market. Bombardier also has exposure to large jets (as well as small and medium) and the stock's valuation should mitigate downside. The company said that the used inventory declined 10 bps in May. Used inventory of in-production models is now 10.6%, down from 11.1% in February. Heavy and Light jet inventories declined 10 and 30 bps, respectively, while Medium jet inventories increased 20 bps. JP Morgan reports that the average asking price fell 0.9% sequentially in May. A bottom remains elusive for used bizjet pricing, with May representing a new low for the cycle. Prices for Heavy and Light jets were down 1.5% and 0.3%, respectively, while Medium jet prices were up 0.6%. More from www.jpmorgan.com

36

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

For Sale Fleet % For Sale 2012 Fleet % For Sale 2011 % Change For Sale

13.6%

9.2%

6.2%

5.8%

14.3%

10.5%

6.7%

6.8%

(-0.7) pt (-1.3) pt (-0.5) pt J anuary - April 2012 Full Sale Transactions 705 432 393 Avg Days on Market 340 345 414 Avg Asking Price $4.220 $1.281 $1.432 (US$m) Y TD January to April 2012 vs 2011 Change 4.1% 3.1% -14.9% Transactions Change - Days on -70 46 7 Mkt Change - Ask Prices 0.1% 1.7% 5.4%

JETNET has released its April 2012 and first four months of 2012 PreOwned Business Jet, Business Turboprop and Helicopter Market Information. Highlighted in the table above are key worldwide trends across all aircraft market segments comparing April 2012 to April

2011. The “Fleet-ForSale” percentages for all market sectors were down in the April comparisons. Both Business jet and Business turboprop sales transactions increased 4.1% and 3.1% YTD ending April 2012, compared to 2011. However, both turbine and piston helicopters

(-1.0) pt 283 371 $0.212

-21.2% 84 -4.9%

saw double-digit declines in sales transactions YTD at 14.9% and 21.2% respectively. The Piston Helicopter market was the only market segment to show a decrease (-4.9%) in average asking prices in the YTD numbers. / More from www.jetnet.com

Find an Aircraft Dealer Business Aviation

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

avbuyer.com/dealers ▼

/

APRIL

W ORLDWIDE TRENDS B usiness Aircraft H elicopters J ets T urbos T urbine P iston 2537 1246 1139 542

www.AvBuyer.com

continued on page 38 Aircraft Index see Page 4

J Hopkinson July 18/06/2012 16:42 Page 1

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com

follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

Challenger 604 SN 5364, 5903 TTAF, Engines On Condition, Collins ProLine IV, Honeywell EGPWS, Collins TCAS II w/Change 7, Dual Collins FMS-6000 FMS w/Dual GPS4000, DVD, VCR, 9 Pax

Saab 340B SN 166, 48,386 TTAF, 5 Tube EFIS, Mod 3114, Gravel Operation Mods, 34 Pax Interior, EGPWS and GE ECMP Engine Program

Astra SPX SN 117, 2908 TTAF, Collins Proline IV, Color weather Radar, TCAS II/w change 7, Airshow 400

Falcon 2000 SN 088, 4702 TTAF, Enrolled on CSP, Collins EFIS 4000 4-Tube, Dual Honeywell Laser REF III Inertial Reference System, Heads-Up Display, 3-Tube EIED, RVSM

Citation S/II SN S550-0036, 8576 TTAF, 6755 Cycles, 1304 SMOH, Cosmetics Refreshed & Perma-guarded (08/2011), GNS-XLS, GPWS, New Windows 2007, RVSM

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7

BusAviationNewsJuly12_Layout 1 20/06/2012 11:10 Page 4

Market Indicators

4 $21.3 billion and 2,571 turboprops worth $15.2 billion. Of the traditional business jets in our forecast, 65% of these (by value) will be Class Four, Five, and Six (highend) models. This is up from 50% before the 2009 market drop. This change reflects our belief that the bottom half of the market will not recover faster than the top half, implying a permanent shift in favor of more expensive models.

OVERCAPACITY PROBLEM

22ND ANNUAL TEAL GROUP BUSINESS JET OVERVIEW SUMMARY  Business aircraft have been hit harder by the economic downturn than any other aerospace market. After record growth in 2003-2008, the market fell by 28.7% (in value of deliveries) between the 2008 market peak and 2011. This market decline is typical of a downturn. Yet these top line numbers understate the pain felt by a large part of this industry. The top half of the market – jets costing $26 million and above – actually grew through the 2008-2011 downturn, with deliveries rising by 0.3%. The bottom half – jets costing $4-25 million – fell by a catastrophic 56.4%. The market has never seen bifurcation like this in any previous downturn or growth period. The good news is that the market has stopped falling, and while 2011 was bad, we will see growth in the second half of 2012. Key leading indicators offer encouragement. Corporate profits and other global wealth indicators are up very nicely. Used jet availability has fallen to a healthy level. Pricing is still soft, and there are still a few dark clouds in the world economy that could complicate the recovery, but there are enough positive signs to believe that the market is poised for a modest - but welcome - turnaround.

CONSERVATIVE GROWTH Our forecast calls for just 6% growth this year, followed by 8% in 2013, and a four year recovery period with 12% growth per year starting in 2014. Compared with prior market recoveries that have exhibited 15-17% compound annual growth rates (CAGRs), this is a conservative forecast. Our conservatism is largely based on the likelihood of greater financial caution in the aftermath of the global credit crisis of 2008/2009. Unfortunately, with this growth rate we won’t see a recovery to the 2008 peak deliveries level until 2015. Using these assumptions, we forecast production of 13,879 aircraft worth $310.3 billion (in 2012 dollars) over the next ten years (2012-2021). This includes 10,249 traditional business jets worth $249.5 billion, 568 corporate versions of jetliners and regional jets worth a combined total of $42.3 billion, and 3,062 business turboprops worth a total of $18.6 billion. For comparison, the last ten years (2002-2011) saw production of 10,886 business aircraft worth $198.6 billion (also in 2012 dollars). This includes 7,782 business jets worth $162.2 billion, plus 438 jetliners and RJs worth

/ More from www.tealgroup.com

TEAL GROUP VIEW

This shift – from a top half/bottom half to a top two thirds/bottom third market structure – means this industry faces an overcapacity problem in the bottom segment of the market. The five legacy players have been joined by Embraer, with Honda arriving soon as a niche player. Unless we see faster than expected growth, we might see additional product line eliminations or industry restructuring. Hawker Beechcraft is particularly vulnerable due to its heavy debt load and declining military business. Looking at traditional business jets, Bombardier and Gulfstream will be the market leaders (32.8% and 29.9% respectively, by value of deliveries), followed by Dassault (14%), Cessna (10.6%) and Hawker Beechcraft (5.7%). Embraer will have 6.5%, which is up from almost nothing in the last ten years. Embraer’s impressive achievement is particularly impacting Cessna, which had enjoyed a 17.8% market share over the past ten years. Honda will have the remaining 0.6% in our forecast. These figures exclude turboprops, jetliners and corporate regional jets. Some good news: We do not believe the anti-business jet cultural environment we saw in the downturn will impact demand moving forward. Preference for, and acceptance of, business aircraft is returning along with world economic growth and trade. Also, the past 15 years have seen Business Aviation transformed from a backwater market to a key part of the aerospace industry. This transformation will not be reversed. Even at the low point of the market (2010/2011), the business jet industry was over twice as large as it was in any year prior to 1997.

continued on page 40

38

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

Aradian July 20/06/2012 09:29 Page 1

FILE PHOTO

2013 Gulfstream 450

Gulfstream 550

1st Quarter delivery position

Several aircraft available including 2012 delivery positions

1997 Challenger 604

2008 Hawker 900XP

8200TT. Beige leather interior. GE On Point. Smart Parts. Satcom

1175TT. Beige leather interior. MSP Gold. Support Plus. Satcom

2007 Beech Premier 1A

2007 Hawker 850XP

2007. 1200TT. Support Plus 2008. 540TT. TAP Elite. Support Plus

1290TT. MSP. Tan leather interior. Satcom

2004 Agusta 119 Koala

McDonnell Douglas MD 600N

1550TT. Recent paint. Air Con. Very well equipped

Three MD600N available

ALSO OFFERING: Beech King Air C90GT/C90/B200/350, Hawker 400XP, Citation XL/XLS/Sovereign, Agusta Koala, Gulfstream G100/G150, Hawker 800XP/850XP/900XP. Call/Email For Details

www.aradian.com UK office Tel. +44 1481 233001 Fax.+44 1481 233002 steverogers@aradian.com

US office: Mesa Tel. +1 480 396 9086 Fax. +1 480 393 7008 rick@aradian.com

US office: Atlanta Tel. +1 770 331 1416 davidb@aradian.com

Also in: South America, South Africa, Russia, Spain, Germany, India & UAE

BusAviationNewsJuly12_Layout 1 20/06/2012 11:11 Page 5

aerosmithpenny.com

BizAvRound-Up

5

ARRIVALS

Dave Eickhoff or Bob Nygren 8031 Airport Blvd. Suite 224, Houston, TX 77061 Phone: (713) 649-6100 • Fax: (713) 649-8417 Email: aspinfo@aerosmithpenny.com

David Dixon – has been promoted to the position of president, Jetcraft Asia, one of the world’s leading business aircraft sales, acquisitions, trading and brokerage services firms. In his expanded role, Dixon will manage overall operations and lead sales initiatives for Jetcraft Asia, spanning a territory from Beijing to Sydney. Robert Frost - Leading Edge Aviation Solutions, LLC announced the hiring of Robert Frost as vice president, aircraft sales. Frost will be based in the Parsippany, New Jersey office. He previously served Gama Aviation for six years as vice president, Aircraft Management.

1990 Citation II, S/N 550-0636

DAVID DIXON JETCRAFT ASIA

Steve Hughes - Hong Kong-based Metrojet has named Hughes as director of maintenance and engineering. He will oversee all aspects of Metrojet’s maintenance, including CAMO DME and Part 145 repair station accountable manager responsibilities.

Jeff Kreide - Gulfstream recently named Jeff Kreide vice president of Business Solutions. Total Time: 6202, Sperry 3 Tube EDS-603 3 Tube EFIS, Global GNS XLS w/GPS, Thrust Reversers, Freon A/C. PRICE REDUCED

1986 Gulfstream III, S/N 477

Joe Lombardo - The National Aeronautic Association (NAA) announced that Joe Lombardo, executive vice president, Aerospace Group, General Dynamics, has been selected to receive the 2012 Cliff Henderson Trophy. The trophy is awarded to “a living individual, group of individuals, or an organization whose vision, leadership or skill made a significant and lasting contribution to the promotion and advancement of aviation and aerospace in the US.” Kenneth Ricci - Flight Options chairman, received the William A. Ong Memorial Award from the National Air Transportation Association. Presented annually since 1984, the Ong Memorial Award is given for “extraordinary achievement and extended meritorious service to the general aviation industry.”

ROBERT FROST LEADING EDGE

KENNETH RICCI FLIGHT OPTIONS

Karen Schaefer – recently joined

Fresh Engines Due 2017 and 2019. 72 Month done C/W Gulfstream Dallas 6/09, Excellent Interior, New Exterior Paint 2009

aerosmithpenny.com 40

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

World Aircraft Sales Magazine as an account director for the U.S. Pre-Owned Aircraft sales market. Karen has held a variety of senior positions throughout the aviation industry. Her contact details can be found on Page 8 of this issue.

Paul C. Wood – is named as new director of Sales & Support for Sierra Industries. Since 2008, Wood served as general manager for Landmark Aviation in the Los Angeles, CA & Asheville, NC locations.

www.AvBuyer.com

KAREN SCHAEFER WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES

Aircraft Index see Page 4

BusAviationNewsJuly12_Layout 1 20/06/2012 12:43 Page 6

6

BizAvRound-Up

Not just a tug.

EVENTS

THE ROYAL INTERNATIONAL AIR TATTOO July 7 – 8 Fairford, Glos., UK / www.airtattoo.com

FARNBOROUGH INT’L AIRSHOW July 9 – 15 Farnborough, UK / www.farnborough.com

EAA: AIRVENTURE OSHKOSH July 23 - 29 Oshkosh, WI, USA / www.airventure.org

LABACE Aug 15 – 17 Sao Paulo, Brazil / www.abag.org.br

ILA BERLIN AIRSHOW Sept 11 – 16 Berlin, Germany / www.ila-berlin.de

SIBAS (SHANGHAI INT’L BUSINESS AVIATION SHOW) Sept 4 – 7 Shanghai, China / www.shanghaiairshow.com

BUSINESS AIRCRAFT EUROPE (BAE) Sept 12 – 13 London Biggin Hill Airport, UK / www.miuevents.com

BUSINESS & GENERAL AVIATION DAY (BGAD) Sept 18 Cambridge, UK / www.bgad.aero

NBAA: BUSINESS AVIATION REG FORUM Sept 20 Seatlle, WA, USA / www.nbaa.org

AIRCRAFT INTERIORS EXPO Sept 25 – 27 Seattle, WA, USA` / www.reedexpo.co.uk

INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT EXPO Sept 25 – 27 Las Vegas, NV, USA / www.iaema.org

INTER AIRPORT CHINA Sept 26 – 28 Beijing, China / www.interairportchina.com

JETEXPO Sept 27 – 29 Moscow, Russia / www.jetexpo.ru

SAFETY STANDDOWN-USA Oct 8 - 11 Wichita, Kansas, USA / www.safetystanddown.com

8800 Series

It’s a

.

AOPA AVIATION SUMMIT Oct 11 – 13 Palm Springs, CA, USA / www.aopa.org

800-535-8767 / 503-861-2288 w w w. l e k t r o. co m / s a l e s @ l e k t r o. co m

NBAA: MEETING & CONVENTION Oct 30 – Nov 1 Orlando, FL, USA / www.nbaa.org

HELISHOW DUBAI Nov 6 – 8 Dubai, UAE / www.dubaihelishow.com

AIRSHOW CHINA 2012 Nov 13 – 18 Zhuhai Guangdong, China / www.airshow.com.cn

CENTRAL EUROPE PRIVATE AVIATION EXPO (CEPA) Nov 29 – 30 Prague, Czech Republic / www.cepa.aero

AEROMART TOULOUSE Dec 4 – 6 Toulouse, France / www.bciaerospace.com

GENERAL AVIATION IN THE MIDDLE EAST Dec 5 – 6 Dubai, UAE / www.miuevents.com

MEBA 2012 MIDDLE EAST BUSINESS AVIATION Dec 11 –13 Dubai, UAE / www.meba.aero

If you would like your event included in our calendar email: sean@avbuyer.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

41

AirCompAnalysisJune12_ACAn 19/06/2012 10:34 Page 1

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS HAWKER 800XP

HAWKER 800XP

LEARJET 60

Hawker Beechcraft 800XP by Michael Chase n this month’s Aircraft Comparative Analysis, information is provided on a selection of pre-owned business jets in the $2.0 - 4.7m price range for the purpose of valuing the pre-owned Hawker 800XP aircraft. We’ll consider the productivity parameters - specifically, payload and range, speed and cabin size - and consider current and future market values. The aircraft compared with the Hawker 800XP is Bombardier’s Learjet 60.

I

BRIEF HISTORY The Hawker 800XP is a derivative from the

42

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

design of the UK-built de Havilland/Hawker Siddely and British Aerospace 125 that was first built in 1962. The Hawker 125 evolved into the Series 400 to 800, produced up to 1993 when Raytheon purchased the Series 800 program and the aircraft was renamed the Hawker 800. The 800 series has a number of modifications and changes over the 700 series, including improved payload capabilities, updated systems, and enhanced performance from an improved wing (incorporating new outer wing sections). 292 Hawker 800 aircraft were built until final production in 1995 when the 800XP entered service. (The 800A (230 built) www.AvBuyer.com

was specifically built for the US market and the 800B (62 built) for non-US markets.) The Hawker 800XP features an uprated engine, enhanced aerodynamics, increased weight and system upgrades on preceding models. The Hawker 800XP was manufactured between 1995 and 2005, and the number of units built in that timeframe totaled 426 aircraft, with 422 still in service today. The Hawker 800XP features Honeywell TFE-731-5BR-1H engines with a thrust of 360 lbs. It is RVSM certified from the factory after serial number 258359, or when service bulletin SB-34-3110 (Honeywell) or SB-34-3166 ❯ (Collins) is complied with. Aircraft Index see Page 4

LEAS July_LEAS 20/06/2012 10:06 Page 1

Exterior File Photo

2005 Hawker 800XP s/n 258703 • Very Late Model - Engines on MSP Gold • APU on MSP • Dual Collins Proline 21 Avionics Suite • Avionics Enrolled on CASP • Aircell ST-3100 Iridium Phone w/ Cordless Cockpit & Cabin Handsets • Aircraft Maintained and Operated Part 135 • One Owner Since New

Specifications subject to verification upon inspection, aircraft subject to withdrawal from the market.

L E A D I N G E D G E AV I AT I O N S O L U T I O N S

Te l i n U S : 2 0 1 . 8 9 1 . 0 8 8 1

AIRCRAFTSALES@LEAS.COM

W W W. L E A S . C O M

AirCompAnalysisJune12_ACAn 19/06/2012 10:35 Page 2

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS HAWKER 800XP

PAYLOAD AND RANGE

TABLE A - PAYLOAD & RANGE

Model

MTOW (lb)

Max Fuel (lb)

Max Payload (lb)

Avail Payload w/Max Fuel (lb)

Max Fuel Range (nm)

Max P/L w/avail fuel Range (nm)

Hawker 800XP

28,000

10,000

2,050

1,750

2,620

2,285

Learjet 60

23,500

7,910

2,228

1,068

2,418

1,745

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker, Orleans, MA, USA; JETNET: B&CA May 2012 and Aug. 2011 Operations Planning Guide

Hawker 800XP

453

1,000

500 Cubic Feet

TABLE B - GPH CONSUMED

Fuel Usage (GPH)

Model

Hawker 800XP

300

Learjet 60

229

COST PER MILE COMPARISONS Chart B (left) details ‘Cost per Mile’ and compares the Hawker 800XP to its competition factoring direct costs and with all aircraft flying a 1,000nm mission with an 800 pound (four passengers) payload. The Hawker 800XP has higher cost per mile at $5.17 per nautical mile, which is more expensive to operate by 20.5% than the Learjet 60 at $4.29 per nautical mile.

Source ACC - www.aircraftcostcalculator.com

CHART B - COST PER MILE *

TOTAL VARIABLE COST COMPARISONS

$5.17

Hawker 800XP

‘Total Variable Cost’ illustrated in Chart C (right) is defined as the cost of Fuel Expense, Maintenance Labor Expense, Scheduled Parts Expense and Miscellaneous trip expense. The total variable cost for the Hawker 800XP at $2,137 per hour is more expensive to operate by 15.4% than the Learjet 60 at $1,852 per hour.

$4.29

Learjet 60

$2.00

$4.00

$6.00

US $ per nautical mile *1000nm, 800LBS PAYLOAD MISSION COSTS

44

According to Conklin & de Decker, the cabin volume of the Hawker 800XP - 604 cubic feet - is more than that offered by the Learjet 60 (453 cubic feet) as shown in Chart A (left).

As noted above, the Hawker 800XP has two Honeywell TFE731-5BR engines each offering 4,660 pounds of thrust. The Learjet 60 has two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW305A engines with thrust at 4,600 pounds each. Table B (left), sourced from the Aircraft Cost Calculator (ACC) shows the fuel usage by each aircraft model in this field of study. The Hawker 800XP (300 gallons per hour GPH) burns more fuel than the Learjet 60 (229 gallons per hour). Using data published in the May 2012 B&CA Planning and Purchasing Handbook and the August 2011 B&CA Operations Planning Guide we will compare our aircraft. The nationwide average Jet A fuel cost used from the August 2011 edition was $6.04 per gallon at press time, so for the sake of comparison we’ll chart the numbers as published. (Note: Fuel price used from this source does not represent an average price for the year.)

604

Learjet 60

$0.00

CABIN VOLUME

POWERPLANT DETAILS

CHART A - CABIN VOLUME

0

The data contained in Table A (left) is published in the Business & Commercial Aviation’s May 2012 issue, and is also sourced from Conklin & de Decker. A potential operator should focus on payload capability as a key factor. The Hawker 800XP ‘Available Payload with Maximum Fuel’ at 1,750 pounds is greater by 682 pounds (64%) than that of the Learjet 60 at 1,068 pounds.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

AirCompAnalysisJune12_ACAn 19/06/2012 16:35 Page 3

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS HAWKER 800XP

The points in Chart D (middle, right) center on the same group of aircraft. Pricing used in the vertical axis is as published in Vref. The productivity index requires further discussion in that the factors used can be somewhat arbitrary. Productivity can be defined (and it is here) as the multiple of three factors. 1. Range with full payload and available fuel; 2. The long range cruise speed flown to achieve that range; 3. The cabin volume available for passengers and amenities. The result is a very large number so for the purpose of charting, each result is divided by one billion. The examples plotted are confined to the aircraft in this study. A computed curve fit on this plot would not be very tight, but when all aircraft are considered the “r” squared factor would equal a number above 0.9. Others may choose different parameters, but serious business aircraft buyers are usually impressed with Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size. After consideration of the Price, Range, Speed and Cabin Size we can conclude that the Hawker 800XP is competitive with the Learjet 60. The Hawker 800XP has a larger cabin, greater payload capability and offers greater range. However, the Hawker 800XP operates at a slower speed, costs considerably more to operate per mile and the variable cost as well as its fuel burn usage is greater than the Learjet 60. Table C (right) contains the retail prices from the latest Vref edition for each aircraft. The prices shown are for 2003, the last year of Learjet 60 manufacture. The number of aircraft in-operation, percentage ‘For Sale’ and the number ‘Sold’ over the past 12 months are from JETNET. As shown, the Hawker 800XP has the lower percentage of the in-operation fleet ‘For Sale’ at 11.4% (buyer’s market) compared to the Learjet 60 at 15.9%. Over the past 12 months the Hawker 800XP is showing an average of ten sold per month. This sales activity highlights many opportunities for the savvy dealer/broker specializing in the Hawker 800XP.

BY CONTINENT The majority of the wholly-owned Hawker 800XP aircraft in operation (377) are located in North America (74.1%), followed by Asia (9.3%) and Europe (8.5%) for a combined 91.9% of the wholly-owned fleet, see Chart E (right). There are 38 fractional and seven shared owners of the Hawker 800XP aircraft ❯ in operation in addition to these. Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

CHART C - VARIABLE COST

$2,137

Hawker 800XP

Learjet 60

$1,852

$1,000

$0

$2,000

$3,000

$4,000

US $ per hour

CHART D - PRODUCTIVITY $8.0

Price (Millions)

PRODUCTIVITY COMPARISONS

$6.0

Hawker 800XP $4.0

Learjet 60

$2.0

$0.0

0.0000

0.4000

0.2000

0.6000

0.8000

Index (Speed x Range x Cabin Volume / 1,000,000,000)

TABLE C - COMPARISON TABLE Average sold per month (past 12 months)

Long Range Cruise Speed

Cabin Volume (Cu Ft)

Max P/L w/avail Fuel Range (nm)

Vref Retail Price $m

In Operation

% For Sale

Hawker 800XP

402

604

2,285

$4.2 ’03

422

11.4%

10

Learjet 60

423

453

1,745

$3.8 ’03

314

15.9%

4

Model

Data courtesy of Conklin & de Decker; JETNET; B&CA May 2012 and Aug. 2011 Operations Planning Guide

CHART E - HAWKER 800XP IN-OPERATION BY CONTINENT 1% Australia South Am Africa 4% 3%

Asia 9% Europe 9%

North America Europe Asia

North America 74%

South America Africa Australia

SOURCE: JETNET STAR REPORTS

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

45

AirCompAnalysisJune12_ACAn 19/06/2012 10:36 Page 4

AIRCRAFT COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS HAWKER 800XP TABLE D - HAWKER 800XP PRICE TRACKER AVERAGE ASKING PRICES

Year

Table D (right) offers an eight-year summary to provide the historical perspective of the Hawker 800XP aircraft sales activity trends from June 2004 to May 2012. The table is divided between the four years prior to the economic melt-down (6/2004–5/2008) and the four years since (6/2008-5/2012). The largest decline in the average asking prices occurred from 6/2008-5/2009 and 6/2009-5/2010, when the value dropped from $8.91m to $5.81m. At that time the average asking prices declined significantly by $3.1m and the average days on the market (DOM) nearly doubled. However, pre-owned sales increased to 90, reversing the trend of declining sales noted from the previous time periods from 81 (6/2007-5/2008) to just 64 (6/2008-5/2009). Over the past 12 months the Hawker 800XP aircraft has shown the highest number of full retail sales transactions of ALL preowned business aircraft, primarily as a result of the large decrease in the average asking prices by $2.05 million to $3.76 million as reported by JETNET. However, the length of time that the Hawker 800XP remains on the

6/2004 –5/2005 6/2005 –5/2006 6/2006 – 5/2007 6/2007 – 5/2008 6/2008 – 5/2009 6/2009 – 5/2010 6/2010 – 5/2011 6/2011 – 5/2012

Avg. Asking For Sale 12 Months Full Retail Avg. Price $ mil Sale Transactions DOM * May May $9.08 19 104 230 $9.67 24 68 146 $10.05 29 64 181 $9.51 27 81 240 48 64 135 $8.91 $5.81 55 90 251 $4.37 66 81 267 $3.76 53 125 272

Source: JETNET Evolution program; * DOM = Average Days on the Market

market before a sale remains stubbornly high. Clearly, the Hawker 800XP aircraft continues to be very popular within the pre-owned market today, but continues to face the new pre-owned market realities that have resulted in substantial asking price reductions and longer periods of time before selling.

a buying decision, however. The Hawker 800XP evidently fares well among its competition, so those operators in this market should find the preceding comparison of value. Our expectations are that the Hawker 800XP will continue to do well in the pre-owned market for the foreseeable future.

SUMMARY

❯ For more information: Michael

Within the preceding paragraphs we have touched upon several of the attributes that business aircraft operators value in a jet. There are of course other qualities such as airport performance, terminal area performance, and time to climb performance that might factor in

Chase is president of Chase & Associates, and can be contacted at 1628 Snowmass Place, Lewisville, TX 75077; Tel: 214-226-9882; Web: www.mdchase.com

Need Help Navigating Aircraft Operating Costs? Conklin & de Decker products and consulting services are like having a “GPS” for your aircraft acquisition decision or budgeting process.

Aircraft Cost Evaluator The perfect tool for benchmarking variable & fixed costs, performance and specification data for more than 460 aircraft.

Life Cycle Cost A budgeting and financial analysis tool to understand the true cost of owning and operating an aircraft.

www.was.Conklindd.com

+1- 508-255-5975 46

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – June 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

Wright Brothers November 24/10/2011 15:01 Page 1

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title is a provider of aircraft title management and escrow services for all types of aircraft. Doing business both domestically and around the globe, Wright Brothers offers quick, personalized service from Debbie Mercer, always with the utmost of confidentiality. Available 24.7.365

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title 9075 Harmony Drive Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73130 Telephone: (405) 680-9289 Toll-Free (within the US): (866) 217-5700 Fax: (405) 732-7457 e-mail: dmercer@wbaircraft.com

Title Search Title Clearing Escrow Services Registration Services Accident / Incident searches Preparation of Documents Domestic and International Services

Boardroom guide 1 July12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 14:38 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

It’s Just Transportation For Directors who may be constrained by the pejorative rhetoric of politicians concerning Business Aviation, consider the use of business aircraft by federal, state and local governments, advises Jack Olcott.

Possibly the world’s most recognized expert on the value of Business Aviation, Jack Olcott is a former Editor and Publisher of Business & Commercial Aviation magazine and Vice President within McGraw-Hill’s Aviation Week Group. He was President of the National Business Aviation Association from 1992 through 2003, and today Jack’s network and personal knowledge of Business Aviation uniquely qualifies him to oversee Business Aviation and the Boardroom. More information from www.generalaerocompany.com

study conducted by Washington, DCbased Nexa Advisors entitled Government Use of Aircraft: A Taxpayer Value Perspective should dispel concerns Board Members might have that Business Aviation is off-limits when they are considering transportation policy. Distributed recently by the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), the report examines the use of over 2,000 non-military aircraft owned or leased by federal, state and local governments to transport civil servants and accomplish necessary services on behalf of taxpayers.

A

Bottom line: Business aircraft provide benefits to taxpayers that are unavailable from other forms of

transportation such as automobiles, trains or scheduled airlines. Researching a multitude of government and commercial databases as well as interviewing relevant organizations such as the National Association of State Aviation Officials, Nexi Advisors identified a large number of public sector agencies and departments that use business aircraft to accomplish official duties. Nexi Advisors found that within the public sector, the drivers for using aircraft mirrored the reasons why companies in the private sector selected Business Aviation. In all cases the underlying

IF IT’S GOOD ENOUGH FOR GOVERNMENTS, IT’S GOOD ENOUGH FOR YOUR KEY PERSONNEL

48

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

Boardroom guide 1 July12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 14:39 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation need to be satisfied related to the transport of people, cargo, or specialized equipment needed for surveillance, security or environmental studies. Consider President Obama’s use of government aircraft. Air Force One allows the U.S. President to be more effective than would be possible if he were restricted to fly via scheduled air carrier. Since the Boeing 747 that transports the President is indeed a flying command center—an airborne White House, so to speak—he and his staff are working on behalf of the nation and its taxpayers while traveling to engagements that range from official state functions to political campaigns (the President’s political party reimburses the government for use of the jumbo jet). Also, the Secret Service can provide a far higher level of security on Air Force One.

SERVING CITIZENS AND SHAREHOLDERS ALIKE Such use by the U.S. President is identical in concept to the way businessmen and women use business aircraft. Business people, like the President, need to manage their time efficiently and effectively for the constituents they serve—shareholders in the case of corporations; citizens in the case of the U.S. President.

a Federal Aviation Administration or any established federal agency for aviation. Several states have no scheduled airline service for intrastate travel; they must fly out of state in order to connect to a scheduled airline flight linking intrastate cities. As stated by an official from the Kentucky Department of Aviation, “A primary function of [our department] is to provide safe and cost effective in-state and out-of-state transportations to all state employees.” Local governments benefited from the access to business aircraft, especially helicopters used by police departments. The Nexa Advisor report concludes that policy makers are well advised to recognize that dedicated use aircraft are valuable tools for serving taxpayers. That message aligns with the positive case for Business Aviation in the private sector. When operating a dedicated aircraft is the most efficient means of completing the task for which it is responsible, government as well as private industry demonstrates good governance by selecting Business Aviation.

“Business aircraft, like Air Force One, enable leaders and professionals to be productive while traveling.”

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Business aircraft, like Air Force One, enable leaders and professionals to be productive while traveling. Security—be it industrial security or personal protection—is an issue for business as it is for government. Thus the drivers that lead the U.S. Government to own civil aircraft are identical to the factors that motivate companies to embrace Business Aviation. At the end of the day, it’s just transportation, albeit a unique form of transportation that is not provided by scheduled air carriers. There are, however, several government applications that do not have a direct parallel in the private sector. Public-use aircraft (the official designation of aircraft owned by the government) are employed for supporting law enforcement, fighting forest fires, providing border patrol and adding to the surveillance and counterterrorism functions of the US government. Another application that is unique to the government is the transport of federal prisoners, of which 60 percent are moved via aircraft. In total, there are 12 federal agencies that operate public-use aircraft, and their activities are overseen by the Government Services Administration (GSA). Not including the fighters, bombers and transports used by the military services, approximately 1,300 aircraft are included in the federal fleet; nearly 60 percent are fixed-wing airplanes and about 40 percent are helicopters. State governments also are significant users of business aircraft. In fact, states have been employing business aircraft for decades, long before there was

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Government and Industry: The Fundamental Need for Transportation Government—like industry—needs efficient, effective and secure transportation. Like industry, government employs Business Aviation to serve its travel needs, observes Jack Olcott. he federal government of the USA operates the world’s largest fleet of business aircraft. It does so for essentially the same reasons that thousands of US companies own and operate business jets, turboprops, piston-powered airplanes and helicopters—the fundamental need for transportation.

T

parts in various cultures, thereby expanding commerce and improving quality of life. Transportation is an enabling technology for serving society in its ongoing quest for economic growth and improved quality of life.

To return the greatest value from the use of limited resources—and time itself is the most finite of those limited resources—society must continually strive for optimum productivity, which requires the efficient and effective use of people and time.

As shown in the accompanying figures, federal and state governments embrace the use of business aircraft to fulfill their obligations to the nation’s citizens. Directors of public as well as private corporations can rest assured that they are fulfilling their fiduciary responsibilities when they consider Business Aviation objectively as an accepted travel option.

Throughout history, transportation has enabled people to engage with increasing levels of efficiency in commerce and interact effectively with their counter-

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

FEDERAL & STATE USED AIRCRAFT - BY TYPE

AIRCRAFT USED BY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

AIRCRAFT USED BY STATE GOVERNMENT

SOURCE: JETNET LLC, DECEMBER 2011

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Aircraft Index see Page 4

Aircraft Services Group July copy 18/06/2012 16:46 Page 1

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BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Endowed Aviation Services: Managing Your Aviation Services As A Business Unit Aviation services are either endowed from on high or they are managed as a business unit. Which approach you are using may be the difference between the short- and long-term success of the department and its impact for the company, observes Pete Agur. Peter Agur Jr. is managing director and founder of The VanAllen Group, a business aviation consutancy with expertise in safety, aircraft acquisitions, and leader selection and development. A member of the Flight Safety Foundation’s Corporate Advisory Committee and the NBAA’s Corporate Aviation Managers Committee (emeritus), he is an NBAA Certified Aviation Manager. Contact him via www.VanAllen.com.

52

n endowed Aviation Department performs at the pleasure of its master. I once asked the chairman of a company with an endowed Aviation Department if they were service-focused. He responded, “Indeed they are. And the higher I got within the company, the more focused they have been.” Endowed aviation services reflect the personality and vision of that master - royal barge or egalitarian.

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As in the case above, the master of endowed aviation services is usually the CEO. Due to the time constraints experienced by most top executives, the daily administrative tasks of the department may be assigned to a mid-level manager, but there is no doubt to whom the department reports. For better or worse, that reporting point removes the department from many of the corporation's normal checks, balances and resources.

Aircraft Index see Page 4

Boardroom guide 3 June12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 14:44 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation The consequences of endowing aviation services include taking their existence and their performance off the formal corporate agenda. The top management team is expected to accept Business Aviation services as a given. The senior executive sanctions their costs and results. A visionary leader surrounded by operationally-focused executives may use endowment as a way to settle discussions about aviation services.

PROFIT CENTER

The operational risks of endowment are directly affected by the strength and competence of the Aviation Department manager. If he or she is an experienced and strong professional, there should be little concern. If the manager is immature or weak, however, there is reduced oversight and support to assure the performance of safety and efficiency of the department. Additionally, there may be unchecked pressures to push operational safety limits to achieve service results.

Furthermore, Business Aviation often is an integral element in achieving the company’s strategic objectives and implementing its business model. But, assignment of real revenue dollars to aviation department activities is difficult.

The organizational risks of endowment may be insidious and can have long-term effects. During the leadership term of the endowing executive, resentment among senior and second level managers can build due to their perception of elitism and waste. This negative atmosphere may be aggravated if the aviation manager flaunts his or her associative power. On the other hand, an insightful and skilled manager can build informal bridges to the rest of the company. The ultimate risk of endowed aviation services is they will be buried with their master. This is especially tragic when aviation services have substantive benefits to the company, despite the former master's style. If aviation services are not endowed, they are likely managed as a Profit Center, Cost Center or Service Center.

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The Profit Center approach to managing aviation services typically is considered inappropriate because the department is normally not in the primary business of directly creating revenues. Some departments are used to facilitate sales (Steelcase, Hillenbrand Industries and IBM are well documented historic examples).

Some companies charter their aircraft out to defray their overall costs. However, that does not make the aviation unit a Profit Center. Therefore, traditional Profit Center approaches to managing aviation services are rarely used.

COST CENTER Cost Center management is the most common approach used for aviation services. The goal is to achieve the desired outcomes while achieving controlled or minimal costs. Considering these goals, the Aviation Department may report to a financial manager, like the CFO or Controller. One benefit of having aviation managed as a Cost Center includes the perception that the apparent high costs of this non-core business unit are being effectively managed. This approach works best when a strategically-focused CFO assures that the benefits of aviation services and use of company resources are aligned with the Board’s fiduciary responsibilities to shareholders. U

www.AvBuyer.com

“The Profit Center approach to managing aviation services typically is considered inappropriate because the department is normally not in the primary business of directly creating revenues.”

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

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Boardroom guide 3 June12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 14:45 Page 3

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM An operationally-focused CFO can place extreme operational and service pressures on aviation services. As an example, the multi-million dollar aircraft can be viewed as a sunk cost while the staffing and development of the department can be managed as incremental costs that must be minimized.

“I want five things from our aviation services: Safety, Safety and Safety. I then want service that is in keeping with our business objectives and our corporate culture. Finally, I will treasure every nickel they save making that happen.”

The risk here is for the department to be understaffed, which can lead to aircraft being ready to fly but no one being available to fly them. Or, the staff (out of a sense of service or job responsibility) will fly the aircraft even when they are fatigued. When headcount is considered a cost to be contained, you can easily end up with department managers acting as key parts of the operational team. The result is a department that may not be effectively managed on a daily basis.

SERVICE CENTER The most effective management model is to structure the Aviation Department as a Service Center. The goal of a Service Center is to achieve its support objectives using clearly defined policies, resources, processes and standards while aggressively managing its incurred costs. One of our clients said it beautifully, “I want five things from our aviation services: Safety, Safety and Safety. I then want service that is in keeping with our business objectives and our corporate culture. Finally, I will treasure every nickel they save making that happen.” With those goals in mind, the most important factor in selecting the reporting point for aviation is the authority of the executive. Among others, the Chief Administrative Officer is a likely candidate. The benefits of managing aviation as a Service Center are apparent. The department is not being forced into a structure that is designed for the core business’ profit and cost units. Instead, it is being managed as a unit that leverages the success of the strategic activities of the company by creating exceptional time-place positioning for key individuals and teams. The results accelerate the achievement of strategic and operational corporate goals. In general, there are few risks associated with managing aviation services as a Service Center, but they are worth noting: There can be a lack of accountability due to the power of the passengers. Consider it an unearned halo effect. Another risk is, few aviation managers are strategic thinkers or business visionaries. Without those skill sets, the manager is apt to make operational decisions that are not necessarily supportive of the strategic direction of the company. The obvious responses to these risks are

for the reporting executive to provide strategic guidance and cultural balance. In closing, one of the most common complaints voiced by the executives to whom aviation services report is that this one department takes more of their time to oversee than any of their other responsibilities, by a large margin. This may be a direct reflection of trying to force-fit the department into an inappropriate management model, like a Cost Center. The vast majority of companies would be best served if their Aviation Department was managed as a Service Center. The results can have enduring positive impacts, strategically, operationally and organizationally. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

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Aircraft Index see Page 4

Charlie Bravo July 18/06/2012 16:49 Page 1

2007 Legacy 600 S/N 14500998, 2379 Hours

2010 Phenom 100 S/N 147, 265.8 Hours, EASA Configured

1998 Learjet 600 4819 T TT, T, 3123 C Cycles, ycles, B Belted Lav, Recent Recent 12-Year 12--Ye ear eltted Lav, Inspection Inspection

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Boardroom guide 4 July12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 14:57 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Celebrate Business Aircraft Shout It From The Boardroom Rooftops Are concerns about public perception toward Business Aviation still clouding your judgment about the longterm benefits of this mode of travel? They should not, advises Jay Mesinger.

Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Additionally, Jay is a Member of the Board of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA), and the Chairman of the Associate Member Advisory Council (AMAC). He also sits on the Jet Aviation Customer Advisory Board. Mr. Mesinger can be contacted at jay@jetsales.com

e have discussed ‘Optics’ and the associated negative perceptions surrounding use of business aircraft by today’s major corporations. At times recently the mere idea of embracing Business Aviation would force many Boards to sell their business aircraft or put off buying these productive assets to avoid being seen as excessive. Against the backdrop of the worst economic conditions in several generations, anything that even appeared to be an excess was at risk of being rejected by the very people who understood the high value of the assets they were shunning. Concern over shortterm optics was overshadowing the opportunity for long-term growth and efficiency.

W

There is no question that excess may have been one of the catalysts for the economic woes of this past downturn. I would challenge everyone, however, to step back and evaluate what was genuinely excessive and what may have just appeared excessive to outside viewers. Conducting such an evaluation, the Board can make better business decisions based on the reality, and not just the perception of ‘optics’. Recall that the Board discussions that originally resulted in acquiring a business aircraft were focused on return on investment and economic growth opportunity for the company rather than any notion of exuberant overspending and opulence. Originally, the Board may have focused on optics for a moment, but more than likely Directors reserved the most attention for discussions of cost, the purchase of the right aircraft for the expected missions, and whether the right travel solution was being implemented with or without the need for whole aircraft ownership. Instead of considering only 100 percent ownership, the choices of

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chartering, fractional, commercial travel or a hybrid arrangement of these options were evaluated as a way to accomplish the company’s growing business needs. U Aircraft Index see Page 4

A I R C R A F T SA L E S & ACQ U I S I T I O N S Duncan Aviation has been assisting companies around the world with the sales and acquisition of aircraft for over 50 years.

2008 Falcon 7X

s /n 0 3 3

545 Total Time. 233 Landings. ESP Gold. 13 Passenger Interior.

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s/n 5307

7,500 Total Time. 3,400 Landings. Excellent Paint and Interior by Duncan Aviation.

1984 Falcon 50

s/n 146

9,560 Total Time. Dash 3D. MSP. 9 Passenger. 2011 Paint by Duncan Aviation.

1996 Astra SPX

s/n 85

4,600 Total Time. 2,900 Landings. (2) UNS-1C+ FMS. Eight Passenger Interior.

2004 Citation X

s /n 2 3 6

2,500 Total Time. Engines on Corporate Care.

1985 Falcon 50

s/n 145

9,225 Total Time. MSP. 3D Engines. Collins EFIS 86. Dual UNS-1K.

1985 Falcon 50

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Two Fortune 500 Owners Since New. 12,900 Total Time. JSSI Engine Program.

2010 King Air 350i

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6/12/2012 2:05:11 PM

Boardroom guide 4 July12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 14:58 Page 2

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“ Be bold in telling ‘non-believers’ how business aircraft enable employees to reach new customers and maintain personal and positive relationships with existing ones.”

The idea of getting in front of your customer and ahead of the competition was the prime topic. The Board was already certain that making these proactive trips were needed, and Directors desired the benefits that business aircraft would bring to shareholders.

BUSINESS AVIATION VALUE NOW The need for Board Members to communicate the value of Business Aviation is now, when negative optics are swirling around. Citing examples, Directors must share why Business Aviation is important and why this unique form of transportation is beneficial for the company. Be bold in telling ‘nonbelievers’ how business aircraft enable employees to reach new customers and maintain personal and positive relationships with existing ones. If a company is benefiting from use of business aircraft, that fact should be proudly articulated to the Board as well as to their shareholders. Communicating the ‘good news’ of Business Aviation at Board meetings establishes a mindset that recognizes and accepts business aircraft as tools of productivity. Boards that discount business aircraft because of negative stereotypes or fear of bad optics are doing their shareholders a disservice. Companies need efficient and effective transportation for their employees; Business Aviation provides the resources, ranging from charter, block charter, fractional programs, timesharing, interchange agreements, joint ownership and full ownership, to provide such transportation. If we as a community are to keep business aircraft working successfully for shareholders and receiving reasonable access to airspace and airports, we must collectively spread the positive word to those who fail to see the advantages of Business Aviation.

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CARRY THE MESSAGE FORWARD Board members must join with their shareholders to be sure this important message—that Business Aviation brings benefits to American’s economy— gets out and has traction in the halls of city, state and national government. We must help government policy makers expand their understanding and remove this category of business tool from the perception of excess. It is up to us, the recipients of good business decisions involving business aircraft, to carry this critical message to those who are operating under a misconception. Business Aviation is not excess: It is a foundation of success in American business. How should a Board with limited time and many issues to address, support Business Aviation? Seek information that helps fellow Directors advocate their company’s use of business aircraft. Be proud of the Business Aviation community, which brings good jobs to rural America by providing US corporations with efficient access to areas where skilled labor is available and opportunities abound. Also, spread the word that the manufacture, maintenance and servicing of business aircraft account for many thousands of good jobs, and that the export of business jets contribute to our nation’s balance of trade. Business Aviation is a proud and important industry, and our nation needs this capability more today than ever before. So please, shout out your advocacy for business aircraft and their critical role in your business world. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

PRE-OWNED 2009 Hawker 4000 Engine/apu

Equipment

avionics

interior

Engine Model: P&WC PW308A LH SN# PCE-CE0025 RH SN# PCE-CE0026 LH TSN: 732.4 RH TSN: 732.4 LH CSN: 476 RH CSN: 476 APU Model: Honeywell GTCP-36-150(HH) APU SN#: P-114 TSN: 680.5

Mfgr: Hawker Beechcraft Model: Hawker 4000 Serial #: RC-12 Landings: 480

Model Year: 2009 Reg: N400MR Total Time: 732.4

Maintenance and Service Plans

CAMP Maintenance Tracking Warranty Start Date - June 25, 2009 Warranty - (from start date above) • Airframe Structure - 10 Years or 10,000 Hours • HBC and Supplier Parts - 5 Years or 5,000 Hours • Honeywell Avionics - 5 Years • Pratt & Whitney Engines - 5 Years or 3,000 Hours Times and cycles current as of March 8, 2012

performance

Ramp Wt: 39,700 Rcmd Cruise: Max Land Wt: 33,500 Max Cruise: MTOW: 39,500 NBAA Range: MZFW: 26,000 SVC Ceiling:

Honeywell Primus Epic Comm: Dual Honeywell RCZ-833 w/8.33 spacing Nav: Dual Honeywell RNZ-850 FMS: Dual Honeywell Primus Epic FMS w/Dual GPS & Dual IRS Autopilot: Dual integrated AFCS w/Auto Throttles Flight Director: Dual integrated AFCS Radar: Primus 880 Turbulence Detection Radar ADF: Honeywell RNZ-850 ADF DME: Dual Honeywell RNZ 850 DME’s Audio Panel: Dual Honeywell AV-850 Transponder: Dual Honeywell RNZ-851E Mode S w/EHS Radio Altimeter: Honeywell AA-300 TCAS: ACSS TCAS 2000-TCAS II CVR: ACSS FA2100 CVR-2 hour HF: Collins HF-9000 w/ SELCAL Phone: Aircell Axxess II Additional: 3rd VHF Comm, Honeywell CMF (AFIS), Honeywell Mark V EGPWS, Artex C406-2 ELT, FA-2100 Flight Data Recorder, Electronic Charts and Maps, Aircell ATG4000 High Speed Data (WiFi)

470 484 inspections 3,208 600 Hour Interval Inspection c/w at 573.3 Hours 45,000 1200 Hour Interval Inspection due at 1200 Hours 1800 Hour Interval Inspection due at 1800 Hours

Long Range Oxygen External Refuel Panel Belted Lav Seat Monitors XM Radio - 4 Channel CD/DVD Player LCD Touch Screen Controllers Cockpit Observer Chair with Dedicated Storage Airshow 4000 with Dual 15 In LCD Cabin Entertainment Luxurious seating for 9 passengers featuring a forward club four arrangement with a 3 place divan on the aft left side of the cabin and a two place club on the right side. A large fwd right side galley. Closets are located either side of the entry door. The lav at the rear of the cabin features a flushing toilet with external servicing and a vanity with hot and cold water. New Interior Soft Goods, August 2011 Walnut Satin Finish Veneer; Galley/Vanity Counter Top Aerostone; Headliner/Window Panels - Almond Ultraleather; Upper Side Panel - Spinneybeck ES 8054 Leather; Lower Side Panel - Pindler Citadel fabric; Cabin Seating - Spinneybeck Leather; Carpet - Moresque Loop; Plating - Brushed Crescent Gold Satin.

exterior

Custom Demo Paint Scheme August 2011; Overall Hawker White with Bermuda Tan and Black Stripes. Dutch Blue accent stripe. Hawk Head Logo on Vertical Stabilizer and Engine Nacelles in Nevada Tan. Hawker 4000 Upgrade and Enhancement Program Completed September 2011

2002 king air c90B engine

Engine Model: P&WC PT6A-21 LH SN#: PCEPE0463 RH SN#: PCEPE0464 LH TSN: 1160 RH TSN: LH Cycles: 925 RH Cycles:

1160 925

props

Prop Model: Hartzell 4-blade propellers w/auto feather LH SN#: HH1480 RH SN#: HH1496 LH TSN: 1160 RH TSN: 1160 LH TSOH: 236 RH TSOH: 236 Date of POH: 6/13/08 Date of POH: 6/13/08

Mfgr: Raytheon Aircraft Co. Model Year: 2002 Model: King Air C90B Reg: N126MM Serial #: LJ-1669 Airframe: 1160 BEW: 6880.92

warranty

inspections

No Warranty Times and cycles current as of May 2, 2012 Minor ramp incident in 2004. RH Aileron was removed and replaced with new.

performance Gross Wt: NBAA Range:

10,160 1040

Max Cruise: SVC Ceiling:

Date/Hours/Location Phase 1 Completed: 3-11-11/1100.8/KVNY Phase 2 Completed: 3-11-11/1100.8/KVNY Phase 3 Completed: 3-23-11/1153.3/KVNY Phase 4 Completed: 3-23-11/1153.3/KVNY Last Gear OVH Completed 6-13-08/923.6 hrs

avionics

Collins Proline II Comm 1: VHF-22C w/8.33 spacing Comm 2: VHF-22C w/8.33 spacing 246 Nav 1: VIR-32 VOR/LOC/GLS/MKR Nav 2: VIR-32 VOR/LOC/GLS/MKR 30000 FMS/NMS: Garmin GPS 400 Autopilot: APS-65H Flight Director: EFIS 84 Radar: RDR 2100VP displayed on KMD 850

Ed Berger Ph: +1.316.676.7065 | ed_berger@hawkerbeechcraft.com

Visit www.hawkerbeechcraft.com for a complete inventory list. © 2012 HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. HAWKER AND BEECHCRAFT ARE TRADEMARKS OF HAWKER BEECHCRAFT CORPORATION.

World_Aircraft_Sales_HB_Resale_Ad.indd 1

AVIONICS (cont) ADF: ADF-60A Mrkrbeacons: Dual VIR-32 Glideslopes: Dual VIR-32 DME: DME-42 Compass: MCS-65 RMI: RMI-30 Audio Panel: DBU Model 438 Gyros: EADI-84/EHSI-84 Transponder: Dual TDR-94 Inverters: Dual PC-250 Encoding Alt: Meggit 28007-11-01 Radio Altimeter: ALT-55B TCAS: TAS through KMH-880 Multi CVR: L3 A100S with 30 minute record time Accessories: Cockpit and Cabin Speakers Phone: Iridium Satellite Telephone Ground Comm: Yes SAT WX: Satellite WX through Garmin 400 Turn Bank: 2” Electric Additional Avionics: Traffic Advisory System and Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System (Class B TAWS) in KMH-880 Multi-Hazard Awareness System, Shadin ADC-2000 Fuel/Air Data Comp, Copilots Aerosonic Encoding Altimeter

Equipment

Two lateral tracking chairs; Flushing, recirculating toilet; RH AFT cabinet with four decanters in locked drawer and ice chest drawer on the bottom; Aft cabin partition with sliding panels separating baggage/toilet area from cabin.

interior

Headliner - Bisque IZIT Leather; Sidewall Inset panels - Cosmic Leather; Sidewall Rails, Cockpit Side Walls, Armrest and Chairs - Sand Leather; Cabin Sidewalls Marine Bamboo Fabric; Floor Covering - Sand Design Weave Carpeting; Laminate - Cognac Birdseye; Chair/ Belt/Harness - Fawn; Instrument Panel - Castle Tan.

exterior

Color Overall - Matterhorn/White; Color Stripe 1 - Deep Blue; Color Stripe 2 - Clarette; Color Accent Stripe - Gold Metallic.

6/18/12 12:24 PM

Boardroom Guide June12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 15:00 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

The Value of Time Supplementing time with transport alternatives A wise man once observed that we cannot save time, we can only spend it wisely. David Wyndham offers his perspective on this element of advice as it applies to Business Aviation.

David Wyndham is an owner of Conklin & de Decker where the focus of his activities is on aircraft cost and performance analyses, fleet planning, and life cycle costing for clients. Mr. Wyndham can be contacted at david@conklindd.com

n our private lives, we routinely assign a value to our time and act in ways we think reflects that value. Do we cook at home or order takeout? Should we mow the lawn or hire a lawn service? Shall I take the bus to work or drive?

I

In our business lives, we need to assess alternatives, particularly regarding transportation. The use of Business Aviation should be an extension of the same decision-making process we use in our private lives: given our limited time, how do we spend it wisely?

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In business, we have three critical resources in limited quantity: • Time • People • Money For a business to be successful, we must make the best use of those three resources. The business aircraft is a tool that enables your company to become successful as well as to expand upon its success. It is not just something to acquire once you’ve made it. To utilize Business Aviation fully, you need an understanding and acceptance of what the business aircraft can do. U

Aircraft Index see Page 4

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Boardroom Guide June12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 15:02 Page 2

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“ The business aircraft is a tool that turns longdistance travel from a ‘time drain’ to a productive or restful experience. The business aircraft reduces stressors and allows people to function more efficiently and effectively.“

62

Business aircraft enable an efficient use of time. Consider these typical scenarios we see when advising clients:

each other in order to communicate the most efficiently and effectively. Emails and video conferences do not close major deals.

The VP of Manufacturing for a major corporation spends about 250 days per year on the road. This person is responsible for maintaining a global group of companies all of which are involved in just-in-time manufacturing. His is a rough travel schedule to maintain. He’d love to grill out after mowing the lawn, but he’s in such demand that he is fortunate to get home two weekends per month. The business aircraft enables him to be in the office more, to work effectively while traveling via air, to attend his son’s graduation and to feel rested and refreshed when he arrives at his next destination. In return, his company gets the full benefit of his management and leadership skills.

Yes, the business aircraft is very comfortable, quiet and some can be quite luxurious—there is nothing wrong with that picture. You take care of the things that you value the most, such as your best and most productive employees. The business aircraft is a tool that turns long-distance travel from a ‘time drain’ to a productive or restful experience. The business aircraft reduces stressors and allows people to function more efficiently and effectively.

Few argue about the time ‘saved’ by business aircraft. But it is the use of time that is important. Consider another client who visits prospects with his sales and engineering team. Using the company’s business aircraft, the client and his team review their proposal and refine their presentation en route to the prospect. The sales and engineering team has the privacy on the aircraft it needs as well as the uninterrupted meeting time that is so hard to get at the office. In this scenario, not only does the business aircraft reduce travel time but it makes that travel time productive.

GETTING THE BEST, KEEPING THE BEST Companies all like to hire ‘the best’. But if we don’t make good use of the best peoples’ skills and attributes, we lose them. The business aircraft is a tool that the best people can use to stay at their best. Business travel is necessary because as humans, we need to be in personal contact with

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

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For an individual or team that generates millions in orders, an investment in Business Aviation is paid back several times over. I asked a small company owner how he could justify spending the money on his airplane. He jokingly said it was far cheaper than a divorce. He used that machine to fly to his business connections over a multi-state region. Driving was a chore, and with traffic, he never could be sure of his arrival time. The aircraft gave him peace of mind, time to think, and it allowed him to manage 10 major projects instead of three. Thus, he was able to employ more people. And yes, the airplane got him home to his family most nights. The cost of the business aircraft should be measured against the benefit of enabling our most valuable employees to be their most productive and effective. The wise and proper use of aircraft is something that can enable a company to be successful, sooner and to a greater degree than otherwise possible. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

BG6 July12_FinanceSept 20/06/2012 09:02 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Board Of Directors Briefing: Tax implications of using the company aircraft for personal and recreational purposes. Expenses that are ordinary, necessary and reasonable for the conduct of business are deductible as appropriate costs, but those three conditions have proscribed limits, cautions Attorney Troy Rolf.

Troy A. Rolf, a business aviation and tax attorney, manages the Minnesota office of GKG Law, P.C. Contact him via email at trolf@gkglaw.com.

E

xpenses associated with Business Aviation are generally deductible for federal income tax purposes provided the aircraft are used in an active trade or business, and the expenses are ordinary, necessary and reasonable. An expense is considered to be ordinary, necessary and reasonable if: • The expense is “appropriate” and “helpful” in carrying on the taxpayer’s trade or business; • The expenditure is a common and accepted practice in the taxpayer’s trade or business; and • The expense is reasonable in amount. Existing court precedents recognize that use of a corporate aircraft for executive transportation is a common and accepted practice in many industries.

However, when those same executives also use their corporate aircraft for personal or recreational travel, the tax rules get murky. Expenses incurred by an executive for personal, non-business transportation are generally not deductible. However, expenses incurred by corporations and other business entities to compensate executives for services rendered are generally deductible as long as such expenses meet the ordinary, necessary and reasonable standard. Consequently, when an executive’s compensation package includes use of his or her employer’s corporate jet for non-business travel, the expenses incurred by the employer arguably may be considered compensation expenses. U

TAX RULES BECOME MURKY WHEN JET USE MIXES BUSINESS AND PLEASURE

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Aircraft Index see Page 4

Jeteffect Inventory July 20/06/2012 10:11 Page 1

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Year

Model

Serial No.

1988

Astra 1125

012

1983

Challenger 601-1A

3010

1990

Challenger 601-3A

5066

1995

Citation Jet

525-0122

1997

Citation Jet

525-0198

1998

Citation Jet

525-0243

2008

Citation CJ3

525B-0263

1994

Citation V

560-0252

2005

Citation Sovereign

680-0015

1995

Falcon 900B

153

2003

Global Express

9085

2001

Gulfstream G200

015

1987

Gulfstream GIV

1006

1988

Gulfstream GIV

1057

2000

Gulfstream GIV/SP

1433

2004

Hawker 400XP

RK-370

1997

Hawker 800XP

258313

1999

King Air 350

FL-226

2006

Lancair LIV

566

1998

Learjet 31A

143

1981

Learjet 35A

392

1999

Learjet 45

052

1996

Learjet 60

085

2002

Learjet 60

244

2007

Learjet 60XR

320

2002

Piaggio Avanti P180

1050

1996

Pilatus PC-12/45

156

BG6 July12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 15:08 Page 2

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM In order for the employer to deduct expenses associated with an executive’s non-business travel, however, IRS regulations require that the executive either reimburse the employer for the fair value of using the aircraft or that the employer impute to the executive the fringe benefit income in an amount equal to the value of the transportation. Such imputed income is a liability on the executive’s personal tax return.

“...for purposes of this article it will suffice to say that the rules are byzantine in nature.“

Federal tax law and FAA regulations are not fully coordinated, however. FAA regulations typically prohibit executives from reimbursing their employers for the use of the aircraft for non-business travel unless the aircraft is operated under Part 135 of the FARs or pursuant to a time-sharing agreement. Consequently, most corporations impute the value of non-business travel to their executives as fringe benefit income.

Of these two methods, the SIFL method is far and away the most popular for several reasons. The SIFL formula usually (but not always) results in a smaller amount of income being imputed to the executive than the fair charter value method. Furthermore, the administrative burden of calculating values under the SIFL method is far less than determining the fair charter value of the flight.

ENTERTAINMENT, AMUSEMENT OR RECREATIONAL Unfortunately, imputing income to an executive for a personal flight does not always result in the expenses associated with operating the flight being deductible by the employer. Under the Internal Revenue Code, even when the values of personal flights have been properly imputed to executives, the employer’s ability to deduct the expenses, as well as the tax depreciation attributable to the flight, will be limited when:

CALCULATING THE COST IRS Regulations provide employers a choice of two methods for determining the value of using an employer’s aircraft for fringe benefit taxation purposes. The first method, known as the fair charter value method, requires that income be imputed in an amount equal to the cost that would have been incurred to charter a similar flight from a thirdparty commercial charter operator. The second method, commonly known as the standard industry fare level (SIFL) method, relies on a fixed mathematical formula that includes factors related to a flight, such as the distance flown, the weight class of the aircraft, the status of the executive as a “Control Employee” or a “Non-Control Employee,” and the number of family members and guests who accompany the executive on the flight.

• •

The flight was for an ‘Entertainment’, ‘Amusement’ or ‘Recreational’ purpose, and The executive is a ‘Specified Individual’.

The terms ‘Entertainment’, ‘Amusement’ and ‘Recreation’ mean any activity of a type generally considered to constitute entertainment, amusement or recreation. The term ‘Specified Individuals’ means any person who is the direct or indirect owner of more than 10% of any class of equity or security of the taxpayer, and any officer or director of the taxpayer. For such flights, the employer’s expense and tax depreciation deductions attributable to the flight will be limited to an amount equal to the amount that was imputed to the executive as income for the flight, even though the operating and depreciation costs of the aircraft for the hours flown might be higher. The IRS has established alternative passenger-bypassenger, and flight-by-flight methods for calculating the amount of expenses and tax depreciation to be allocated to business travel vs. Entertainment, Amusement and Recreational travel. While an explanation of the nuts and bolts of each of the various methods is beyond the scope of this presentation, for purposes of this article it will suffice to say that the rules are byzantine in nature. This article provides only a very brief introduction to the topic of federal taxation of personal and recreational use of corporate aircraft by executives. The tax rules governing personal use are very complex, and Boards of Directors should consult experienced aviation tax counsel before establishing any corporate policy concerning personal use of corporate aircraft by executives. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com

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Aircraft Index see Page 4

Corporate Concepts June 22/05/2012 15:26 Page 1

Like-New Boeing BBJ - 60 total hours

VAT Paid, State Room, Shower, Second Private Sleeping Area, Private Office, 18 seats, Crew Rest, 5950 nm range, Security Cameras, HUD, Low Cabin Modification, Humidifiers, Training/Warranties

2008 Legacy 600

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Gulfstream G-IV SP

Enhanced EEC and Corporate Care programs High Speed Internet Satellite phone system Current Pt. 135 New generation cabin with increased headroom L1/L2/L4/L8 inspections recently completed in April 2012 by Embraer Service Center in New York

■ ■ ■ ■

Current Pt. 135 16 passenger – Forward and Aft Lavs Engines On Condition Large flat screen monitors and 4 individual monitors ■ Dual zone entertainment – Emteq LED lighting ■ Inspections and ASB 469 scheduled in May 2012

Absolutely the Next Aircraft to Sell - Make Best Offer See www.flycci.com for details and additional aircraft and helicopters for sale or lease Dennis Blackburn

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+1 832 647 7581

+52 55 54077686

Chris Zarnik +96 65 33316842 +1 919 264 6212

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Boardroom guide HOPE June12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 15:11 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

‘PUNC’: Your Checklist For Insurance Coverage ‘PUNC’ (Pilots, Use, Named Insured and Contracts) is an acronym capturing the four most important areas of aviation insurance that result in the largest percentage of claims denials, asserts Stuart Hope. This month, we consider the Named Insured clause. Stuart Hope is a co-owner of Hope Aviation Insurance. His career as an aviation insurance broker began in 1979, and today he is a frequent speaker/author on insurance & risk management topics. He also serves on the NBAA Tax, Insurance and Risk Management Committee. Mr. Hope can be contacted at shope@hopeaviation.com

A

friend who is CEO of a small medical services firm recently shared with me one of those “horrible insurance company” stories that we all seem to fear. A financial audit discovered that the firm’s CFO had embezzled close to $3 million dollars from the company over a five year period. My friend submitted the claim to his insurance broker who in turn forwarded it to the insurance company for action. The carrier reported back there was no coverage for embezzlement since the medical firm had not purchased an employee dishonesty liability policy. Fortunately for my friend, however, 50% of his firm was owned by a much larger company that did have employee dishonesty coverage. Their broker had taken the time to properly structure the Named Insured clause to cover not only the parent company, but subsidiary companies as well. Coverage was subsequently granted under the parent company’s insurance policy.

SPECIFY THE NAMED INSURED Let’s look at what you can do to attack this weakness in the insurance defense system. The first thing you need to do is specify the Named Insured. There always seems to be confusion over the difference between a Named Insured and an Additional Insured. Without going into a great amount of detail, in layman’s terms the Named Insured is the owner of the policy, and as such is entitled to all coverage as well as the right to cancel, add or change coverage. The policy owner also has the right - and responsibility to coordinate with the insurer on any claim as well as receive claim checks, return-premium checks and cancellation notices.

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An Additional Insured, on the other hand, simply shares certain parts of your liability coverage, and does not have any other rights under the policy. Many owners make the mistake of simply listing the registered owner (often a sole-asset LLC) as the only "Named Insured" and possibly listing the true operating company or principal owner as additional insureds. U

Aircraft Index see Page 4

General Aviation July 18/06/2012 17:08 Page 1

Boardroom guide HOPE June12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 15:11 Page 2

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“ Properly structuring the Named Insured is crucial because the entities or persons who truly need the protection may not have it if the policy isn't written properly.”

PROPERLY STRUCTURE YOUR NAMED INSURED If your policy does not already have it, add the broad form Named Insured clause. A sample clause might read: N123SH LLC, Maxwell Smith Manufacturing Inc., Maxwell M. Smith, and any wholly owned subsidiary company, including subsidiaries thereof, of the Named Insured and any other company coming under the Named Insured’s control and of which it assumes active management or has a financial interest. Subsidiary and affiliated companies appearing above means any company or entity of which at least fifty percent (50%) of the stock or, if a partnership, fifty percent (50%) interest in the partnership, is owned by the Named Insured or for which the Named Insured has assumed active management control. Properly structuring the Named Insured is crucial because the entities or persons who truly need the protection may not have it if the policy isn't written properly. Why? Because many of the ancillary coverages (including the use of non-owned aircraft) apply only to the Named Insured. For example, let’s imagine the owner's aircraft is on a flight and another executive of the company must therefore use charter. If the flight is chartered under the actual operating company's name, the coverage for use of non-owned aircraft would not apply, leaving the operating company exposed to a lawsuit in the event of an accident. You might think you need not worry about that situation and that your company could not be sued if

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

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all you did was charter an aircraft. As a matter of fact, if an accident occurs typically everyone involved in the loop of commerce for that flight will be brought into a lawsuit. Keep in mind that one of the great benefits of your liability policy is that it provides an attorney to defend you, even against a suit that is groundless. Examine the following clause from an insurance policy granting liability coverage for damage to a non-owned aircraft. Coverage D – Liability for Damage to Aircraft that are not owned - Notwithstanding the provisions of Exclusion (d) (APPLICABLE TO ALL PART I COVERAGES), the insurance afforded by Coverages B, C and G is extended to apply to property damage to any aircraft while in the care, custody or control of the Named Insured. Notice the coverage only applies for the benefit of the Named Insured. If the entity being sued is not a Named Insured, that party has no coverage under the policy. I trust you get it. Because the wording of aviation insurance policies is unique from one aviation insurance company to the next, it is critical you review your unique risk profile in depth with your aviation insurance broker so that he or she can help you properly structure your policy’s Named Insured clause before the event of a loss. The penalty for failing to do so could be your financial ruin. Take action now. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4

Jet Collection July 18/06/2012 17:12 Page 1

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Please allow us to match you with the perfect air craftt for your needs aircraft and budget. W e look l forward to We forward your phone call or o email inquiry. inquiryy.

2014 BBJ S/N TBD

1982 F FALCON AL ALCON 50 S/N 107

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2007 Hawker 850X 850XP P S/N 258836

1999 Lea Learjet rjet 45BR S/N 45-032

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SpeciямБcations and/or descriptions ar are e pr provided ovided as int introductory troductory information. They do o not constitute reprereprees of The Jet Collection. You You o sh hould rrely on of the aircraft. aircraft. sentations or warranties should ely on your own inspection inspectio warrantie

Boardroom Guide 8 July 12.e$S_FinanceSept 20/06/2012 11:15 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

Light Jets: Value leaders for their highest flexibility and lowest costs. Light Jets only in name, ultimately, where performance and value reign as dominant factors it is worth remembering there’s nothing lightweight about the value and flexibility of this category of corporate aircraft. ou’ll likely notice a pattern if you spend a little time perusing the marketing materials promoting Business Aviation: As business jets increase in size from light jets to the low end of the largecabin purpose-built models, the stated seating capacity tends to vary only slightly; six to eight seats dominates the standard configurations of many of the offerings across size-category lines.

Y

It’s true that as aircraft increase in size, headroom and leg-room similarly increase, even if available seating does not. It’s also true that for many models, full-fuel payload doesn’t seem to grow proportionally – although a model here and there does defy this typically true generality. Additionally, still-air range also seems to increase as you move up the categories - but ultimately, steps up in size and range also tend to reduce flexibility in an important, not-to-be-overlooked way: airport access. As jets get bigger and heavier their runway needs increase – often dramatically – with no appreciable gain in how many people can fly or how much equipment the jet can carry. Does that make bigger better? Not where value and flexibility rule.

THE VALUE QUOTIENT We know many feel an emotional aversion to aircraft too small for their sensibilities; people want to equate “bigger” with “safer” in a way that the physics belie. The realities of the physics aside, however, the next step up in size seldom results in a major improvement in seating capacity, let alone in full-fuel cabin load. In reality, the larger jets need more power which means more fuel to cover the same ground

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

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at about the same speed – so cabin capacity changes minimally where maximum-range trips are concerned. That returns us to that maximumrange leg fixation: Why do we so covet range capabilities seldom, even rarely, needed?

BUSINESS AVIATION REAL-WORLD STYLE A light jet fully-fueled and flying a typical Business Aviation mission departs with fuel for the mission, including reserves – in some cases sufficient fuel to return home without adding more. And that maximum-fuel jet can often barely carry the typical passenger load of three persons making the trip – unless one or two of them also doubles as a crew member. With the average mission length under 750 miles and the nominal maximum-range of light jets around 1,200 miles, the crew enjoys the option of flying lighter, saving fuel. (Note: The lower the total weight of the aircraft, the less fuel it consumes on the mission, all other factors being equal). Fueling for the mission, with NBAA reserves, allows a larger cabin load – making three or four, plus crew, possible. In most cases where a fuel stop is not required, the speed difference between a light, a mid-cabin and a large-cabin jet results in a leg taking only slightly longer to fly – but at the trade-off of higher direct operating costs of the larger jets. Any time gained – we’re talking a few minutes in most cases – is certainly insufficient to offset operating costs running 50 percent to 100 percent higher, or more. U Aircraft Index see Page 4

2 Kaiser Air July 18/06/2012 17:16 Page 1

1989 GULFSTREAM GIV N619A (S/N 1123) Make offer

AVIONICS

STATUS AS OF MAY 24, 2012 Registered Operator: KaiserAir, Inc. Aircraft Home Base: Oakland Int’l Airport (KOAK) Tail Number: N619A Serial Number: 1123 Total Time on Aircraft: 8,544 Hours Total Cycles: 6,221 Landings Date of Manufacture: 1989 Maintained on MSG-3 Schedule

ROLLS-ROYCE TAY ENGINES 611-SER Total Time Total Cycles Overhaul Completed 10 Year Due Total Time Since Overhaul

Left 8267 hours 6119 May 2008 May 2018 212.4 hours

Right 8450 hours 6193 Dec. 2007 Dec. 2017 479.7 hours

INTERIOR Newly Remodeled 2006: Beige interior with European Beach Wood with Gold Trim

EXTERIOR Newly painted 2006: Basic White with Blue Stripes

P.O. BOX 2626, AIRPORT STATION, OAKLAND, CA, 94614 PHONE: 510.569.9622, FAX: 510.635.3173 WWW.KAISERAIR.COM

Honeywell FZ-820 Flight Director 3 Collins VHF-422C VHF Comms Dual Collins VIR-432 Navs Dual Collins ADF-462 ADF Dual Collins TDR-94D Transponders Dual HF Comm Motorola Selcal Three Honeywell NZ-2000 Two Honeywell FMS CDU Model 820 Honeywell FMS Data Loader 950 Dual Honeywell Radio Altimeter Heads-Up Display HUD 2020 Dual Honeywell 12 Channel GPS Iridium SAT Phone (Wireless Handset Cabin and Cockpit) ICS 200 Dual Collins DME-442 Allied Signal EGPWS Honeywell SATCOM MCS 3000 Fairchild A 100 CVR Honeywell TCAS w/Change 7 Honeywell Cabin Management System CMS Three Honeywell IRU Laserefs Honeywell GP-820 Autopilot Honeywell 880 Radar RVSM Certified Honeywell ISDU

MISCELLANEOUS 16 Pax Custom Executive Interior. Forward Galley. Fwd Cabin Conference Table. Mid Cabin Divan and Two Chairs Aft Cabin. Forward and AFT Lavatory. Airshow w/Color Monitor. Full Entertainment Center. Apple Mini Mac Computer w/Wireless Mouse & Keyboard. Dual Coffee Makers. Toaster. High Temp Oven. Microwave. Apple iPod. Dual Honeywell DVD Players. Single Honeywell CD Player Specifications subject to verification upon inspection. Subject to prior sale or removal from the market without notice.

Boardroom Guide 8 July 12.e$S_FinanceSept 20/06/2012 11:15 Page 2

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM

“Five hundred to 750 miles at a maximum cruise speed of around 400 knots while carrying four passengers will generally cost less in a light jet than making the same trip in a mid-size jet at a 480-knot maximum cruise.”

So for most people, the question comes down to this: is a bit of headroom for a 100-minute typical mission really cost-justifiable? That brings us to the aspect of light jets in which they not only excel but cannot be beaten on: accomplishing the needed mission at the lowest overall cost.

SIZE COSTS Five hundred to 750 miles at a maximum cruise speed of around 400 knots while carrying four passengers will generally cost less in a light jet than making the same trip in a mid-size jet at a 480-knot maximum cruise; even more so than a large-cabin jet. The time difference between heavy and light business jets on a typical mission is small – about 10 to 12 minutes, overall - and is not a large time saving for costs that may be considerably higher for the larger aircraft. Further; beyond these speed-range-payload operational basics, airport fees tend to be larger for heavier aircraft. With airports and FBOs increasingly turning to weight-based ramp fees for revenue, a larger jet incurs a higher ramp fee; and even if a large-enough fuel purchase can bring a waiver of the fee, you’re still buying far more fuel. Additionally, the light jet crew will have the option of far more airports – often closer, more convenient and less expensive than what’s needed for the mid- and large-cabin jets. It’s hard to escape the heavyweight value edge of light jets. It should be noted, however, that ride qualities are impacted by the aircraft’s wing loading (the aircraft’s weight per square foot of wing area). The higher the wing loading, the smoother the ride in turbulence, all other factors such as the aircraft’s inherent stability being equal. Light jets achieve their lower take-off and landing distances, compared with heavy jets, by virtue of their lower wing loading.

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Workspace while traveling is another consideration. Decisions related to aircraft size are impacted by the needs of passengers to use their travel time productively.

WHAT MAKES A “LIGHT” JET? Today we consider a jet “light” when it’s Maximum Take-off Weight falls between 10,000 and 20,000 pounds. Up to about a decade back the Light segment represented the bottom rung of the business jet ladder… that was before the Entry Level Jets entered the market, differentiated by weights below almost everything ever built at less than 10,000 pounds. Ultimately, where performance and value reign as dominant factors, remember this: there’s nothing lightweight about the value and flexibility of these light jets.

LIGHT JET PRICE GUIDE The following Light Jets Retail Price Guide represents current values published in the Aircraft Bluebook – Price Digest. The study spans model years from 1993 through Summer 2012. Values reported are in USD millions. Each reporting point represents the current retail value published in the Aircraft Bluebook by its corresponding calendar year. For example, the Citation Jet CJ1 values reported in the Summer 2012 edition of Bluebook show $2.0 million USD for a 2002 model, $2.1 million USD for a 2003 model and so forth. Aircraft are listed alphabetically. With the reader’s knowledge of aircraft, equipment, range and performance, the following Guide allows the reader to determine the best value range for consideration.

Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: Jack@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4

Sentinel Aviation June 21/05/2012 17:25 Page 1

Retail Price Guide 8 July 12_PerfspecDecember06 19/06/2012 15:18 Page 1

BUSINESS AVIATION AND THE BOARDROOM LIGHT JETS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE - SUMMER 2012-1993 What your money buys today YEAR OF MANUFACTURE 2012 MODELS BEECHCRAFT PREMIER 1A

US$M

2011 US$M

2010 US$M

2009 US$M

2008 US$M

7.106

6.00

4.8

3.8

3.0

2007 US$M 2.6

2006 US$M

13.209

12.0

9.3

7.8

7.0

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40XR

10.838

9.5

7.3

5.6

5.1

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40

2004 US$M

2003 US$M

1.950

1.850

1.750

2.250

BEECHCRAFT PREMIER 1 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45XR

2005 US$M

6.4

5.7

5.4

4.9

4.3

5.3

4.8

4.5

4.2

3.8

4.5

4.1

3.7

4.0

3.7

3.3

3.0

BOMBARDIER LEARJET 31A

2.2

CESSNA CITATION V ULTRA 560 CESSNA CITATION V 560 CESSNA CITATION ENCORE +560

6.2

5.3

4.6

CESSNA CITATION V ENCORE 560

4.3

4.0

CESSNA CITATION EXCEL 560-XL CESSNA CITATION BRAVO 550 CESSNA CITATION CJ4 525C

8.923

8.3

7.8

CESSNA CITATION CJ3 525B

8.174

7.4

6.6

6.0

5.4

5.0

CESSNA CITATION CJ2+ 525A

7.040

6.5

5.8

5.1

4.8

4.5

CESSNA CITATION CJ2 525A CESSNA CITATION CJ1+ 525

4.8

4.3

3.7

3.3

3.1

3.8 4.7

4.3 2.5

3.1

2.9

2.7

4.8

4.6

4.4

4.1

3.7

3.5

3.4

2.9

2.7

CESSNA CITATION CJ1 525

3.6

3.2

3.0

2.3

2.2

2.1

2.0

1.8

CESSNA CITATIONJET 525 EMBRAER PHENOM 300

8.920

8.0

7.0

6.5

EMBRAER PHENOM 100

4.055

3.6

3.1

2.6

2.3

4.7

3.7

3.0

HAWKER 400XP HAWKER BEECHJET 400A NEXTANT 400XT

2.5

2.2

1.540 4.154

4.0 AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM

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Aircraft Index see Page 4

Retail Price Guide 8 July 12_PerfspecDecember06 19/06/2012 15:18 Page 2

What the Boardroom needs to know about Business Aviation LIGHT JETS AVERAGE RETAIL PRICE GUIDE - SUMMER 2012-1993 What your money buys today YEAR OF MANUFACTURE 2002 MODELS

US$M

2001 US$M

1.650

1.550

3.4

3.2

2000 US$M

1999 US$M

1998 US$M

1997 US$M

1996 US$M

1995 US$M

1994 US$M

1993 US$M

3.1

3.0

2.9

1.9

1.7

1.6

1.5

1.450

1.4

1.350

1.3

2.3

2.2

2.1

2.0

1.9

1.8

BEECHCRAFT PREMIER 1A BEECHCRAFT PREMIER 1 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45XR BOMBARDIER LEARJET 45 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40XR BOMBARDIER LEARJET 40 BOMBARDIER LEARJET 31A

2.1

2.0

CESSNA CITATION V ULTRA 560 CESSNA CITATION V 560

1.550

1.450

CESSNA CITATION ENCORE +560 CESSNA CITATION V ENCORE 560

3.3

3.1

CESSNA CITATION EXCEL 560-XL

4.1

3.8

3.5

2.1

2.0

2.9

2.8

2.7

2.0

1.9

1.8

CESSNA CITATION BRAVO 550

2.3

3.0 3.2

2.9

1.8

1.7

1.6

1.450

1.350

1.3

1.250

1.2

1.1

1.050

1.2

1.150

1.1

1.050

1.0

0.9

0.850

CESSNA CITATION CJ4 525C CESSNA CITATION CJ3 525B CESSNA CITATION CJ2+ 525A CESSNA CITATION CJ2 525A CESSNA CITATION CJ1+ 525 CESSNA CITATION CJ1 525 CESSNA CITATIONJET 525 EMBRAER PHENOM 300 EMBRAER PHENOM 100 HAWKER 400XP HAWKER BEECHJET 400A

1.450

1.350

1.250

NEXTANT 400XT AIRCRAFT BLUEBOOK DATA - CARL JANSSENS, EDITOR. EMAIL: CARL@JETAPPRAISALS.COM Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

77

Project1_Layout 1 21/02/2012 11:33 Page 1

– and more

1st Source Bank has more than 25 years of experience as a leading national aircraft lender, and almost 150 years as a full service bank. We know aircraft financing – and we know banking. The aviation lenders at 1st Source – experts in aircraft financing – can give you the right advice and the right financing to get you airborne fast. Our service is outstanding, and we have the full array of financial products and services to keep you coming back. Whether you are a first time buyer, trading up or refinancing your current aircraft, give us a call. Strong, stable and personal, we’ll keep your best interests in mind. Contact us at 574-235-2037 or by e-mail at marketing1stSource.com.

CAP July 18/06/2012 17:36 Page 1

‘Charleston Aviation Partners was established to promote a better understanding of the overall needs and requirements of aircraft owners. The services we offer go well beyond the basic concepts of marketing and selling your aircraft or helicopter� commented Bill Quinn, Managing Director of Charleston Aviation Partners.

Available Immediately 135 Ready/Management Programs Available

Co Tra ns de id s er ed

About Us...

2007 Citation Sovereign. S/N: 680-0120, N621CS. Total time, 2,829, landings 1,866. Aircraft is enrolled on Pro-Parts, ESP and Aux Advantage. Currently managed by CitationAir and operated FAR 135. Turnkey management options available.

Impeccably Maintained Two Owner Aircraft William J. Quinn Managing Director Charleston Aviation Partners LLC 103 Palm Boulevard, Suite 2-B Isle of Palms, SC 29451 +1 843 886-3313 (office) +1 843 743-6500 (mobile) +1 843 410-5698 (Fax) billquinn@charlestonaviation.com

Let us help you market and sell your aircraft. We know what it takes to get the job done.

1983 Challenger 601-1A. S/N: 3005. Total time, 12,655, landings, 7,215. Aircraft has only had two Owners. No known damage. Impeccably maintained. Thirteen place executive interior. US Registered and operated under FAR Part 91

Business Aircraft Transaction Specialists

ACSpecs IntroJuly12_AC Specs Intronov06 19/06/2012 14:19 Page 1

❯ August Issue:

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: MEDIUM JETS

Small Jets

❯ September Issue: Turboprops

❯ October Issue:

Aircraft Performance & Specifications

Ultra Long Range & Large Cabin

❯ November Issue: Long Range Jets

he World Aircraft Sales Magazine Guide to Aircraft Performance and Technical Specification Data is updated by Conklin & de Decker on a regular basis. The Guide is much more comprehensive and informative, providing more aircraft types and models and including variable cost

T

numbers for all models. This month’s category of aircraft Medium Jets – appears overleaf, to be followed by Small Jets next month. Please note that this data should be used as a guide only, and not as the basis on which buying decisions are taken. The data presents aircraft aged below 20 years of age only.

DESCRIPTION OF COST ELEMENTS

baggage volume not accessible in flight (nacelle lockers, etc.).

The following describes the content of each cost element used in The Aircraft Cost Evaluator. There are no sales taxes included in these costs.

CREW SEATS/SEATS EXECUTIVE This is the typical crew and passenger seating commonly used on the aircraft. This is not the maximum certificated seats of the aircraft. These numbers may vary for different operations (Corporate, Commercial, EMS, etc.).

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR Includes fuel, maintenance reserves for routine maintenance, engine/ propeller/APU reserves, and miscellaneous expenses. SPECIFICATIONS - GENERAL: CABIN DIMENSIONS Cabin Height, Width, and Length are based on a completed interior. On “cabin-class” aircraft, the length is measured from the cockpit divider to the aft pressure bulkhead (or aft cabin bulkhead if unpressurized). For small cabin aircraft, the distance is from the cockpit firewall to the aft bulkhead. Height and width are the maximum within that cabin space. Cabin Volume is the interior volume, with headliner in place, without chairs or other furnishings. Cabin Door Height and Width are the measurements of the main passenger cabin entry door.

WEIGHTS: • Maximum Take-Off Weight and Maximum Landing Weight are specified during aircraft certification. • Basic Operating Weight is the empty weight, typically equipped, plus unusable fuel and liquids, flight crew @ 200 pounds each and their supplies. • Useable fuel is the useable fuel in gallons x 6.7 pounds per gallon (Jet fuel) or 6 pounds per gallon (AVGAS). • Payload with Full Fuel is the useful load minus the useable fuel. The useful load is based on the maximum ramp weight minus the basic operating weight. • Maximum Payload is the maximum zero fuel weight minus the basic operating weight.

BAGGAGE Internal baggage volume is the baggage volume that is accessible in flight by the passenger. This amount may vary with the interior layout. External baggage volume is the

SPECIFICATIONS PERFORMANCE RANGE: • Range - Seats Full is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats

80

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

If there are any other ways in which we can improve the content or presentation of this information, please let us know. ❯ Tel: +44 (0) 208 255 4000; Fax: +44 (0) 208 255 4300; Email: editorial@avbuyer.com. © 2011 Conklin & de Decker Associates, Inc., P.O. Box 1142, Orleans, Massachusetts, 02653, Tel. 508-255-5975, www.conklindd.com

occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • Ferry Range - is the maximum IFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This uses the NBAA IFR alternate fuel reserve calculation for a 200 N.Mi. alternate. This is used for jet and turboprop aircraft. • VFR Range - Seats Full is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with all passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixed-wing aircraft. • VFR Ferry Range - is the maximum VFR range of the aircraft with the maximum fuel on board and no passenger seats occupied. This is used for all helicopters and piston fixedwing aircraft. BALANCED FIELD LENGTH BFL is the distance obtained by determining the decision speed (V1) at which the take-off distance and the accelerate-stop distance are equal (fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft only). This is based on four passengers and maximum fuel on board (turbine aircraft). For singleengine and all piston fixed-wing aircraft, this distance represents the take-off field length at Maximum Take-off Weight (MTOW). LANDING DISTANCE (FACTORED) For fixed-wing turbine aircraft, landing dis-

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tance is computed using FAR 121 criteria. This takes the landing distance from 50/35 feet (depends on certification criteria) and multiplies that by a factor of 1.667. No credit is given for thrust reversers. Configuration is with four passengers and NBAA IFR Fuel Reserve on board. For fixed-wing piston aircraft, this figure is the landing distance over a 50 foot obstacle. RATE OF CLIMB (Ft/Min) The rate of climb, given in feet per minute, is for all engines operating, at MTOW, ISA conditions. One Engine Out rate of climb is for one engine inoperative rate of climb at MTOW, ISA. CRUISE SPEED (Knots True Air Speed - KTAS) Max Cruise Speed - is the maximum cruise speed at maximum continuous power. This may also be commonly referred to as High Speed Cruise. Normal cruise speed is the recommended cruise speed established by the manufacturer. This speed may also be the same as Maximum Cruise Speed. Long Range Cruise is the manufacturer’s recommended cruise speed for maximum range. ENGINES The number of engines, manufacturer and model are shown. Aircraft Index see Page 4

Southern Cross July 18/06/2012 17:40 Page 1

 Aircraft Brokerage  Aircraft Acquisitions  Aircraft Sales

2008 Gulfstream G200 • s/n 187 • VP-BPH 740 TT, 400 TC, Engines on ESP Gold, Autothrottles, FDR, Jumpseat, SATCOM , Airshow, No Damage, One Owner Since New, Motivated Owner Seeks Offers

 Parts Sales  Excess Inventory/ Surplus Sales  MRO Services

Southern Cross Aviation Fort Lauderdale, Florida Charlotte, North Carolina Sao Paulo, Brazil Contact: Pat Hosmann, Jr. Office: +1 (704) 990 7090 Cell: +1 (954) 591 4490 acsales@scross.com Peter Hosmann Office: +1 (954) 377 0320 Cell: +1 (954) 328 0935 acsales@scross.com

2007 Gulfstream G150 • s/n 227 545 TT, 263 TC, Airframe / Engines / APU enrolled on JSSI Tip to Tail, Stunning Cosmetics, FDR, Loaded w Options, Motivated Owner seeks Offers

2000 Hawker 800XP • s/n 258464 • N810SC 4400 TT, MSP, Full Jar Ops, New Paint, New Interior, Fresh 48 Month, X-Rays and Landing Gear c/w 6/2012. Motivated Owner

www.scross.com www.twitter.com/SCrossAviation www.facebook.com/SCrossAviation

2001 Learjet 45 ALSO AVAILABLE:

4,100 TT, 3,700 TC, MSP, Dual FMS, FDR, Airshow, No Damage. Motivated Owner Seeks Offers or Trades

1996 King Air C90B Blackhawk - 3,500 TT, 2,760 TC, 800/800 Since New - 135A engines, Good Cosmetics & Pedigree 1981 King Air B200 - 6,900 TT, 5,700 TC, 1100 / 1100 SOH -42 engines, HF Gear, Ram Air, Body Strakes, No Damage 1993 Learjet 35A, s/n 674 -7,480 TT, Engines on MSP Gold, No Damage, 12 Year Inspection c/w 2004. Motivated Owner.

2010 King Air 350i • s/n FL-726 • N8126L ONLY 80 Hrs TTS, Raisbeck Wing Lockers & Dual Aft Body Strakes, Collins Proline 21 Avionics Suite, TCAS II, Tracked on CAMP, Warranties Include: Airframe-24 Months or 1200 Hours by Hawker Beech, Full factory warranties and transferable to Buyer

AircraftPer&SpecJuly12_PerfspecDecember06 19/06/2012 14:22 Page 1

BO M BA RD IE R LE BO AR M JE BA T RD 40 IE R LE BO AR M JE BA T RD 40 IE XR R LE BO A M RJ BA ET RD 45 IE R LE BO AR M JE BA T RD 45 IE XR R LE BO AR M JE BA T RD 60 IE R LE CE AR SS JE NA T 60 CI TA XR TIO CE N SS EX NA CE L CI TA TIO N SO VE RE IG N

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: MEDIUM JETS

MEDIUM JETS

$2,173.48

$2,089.10

$2,223.75

$2,132.89

$2,394.85

$2,371.94

$2,484.50

$2,755.79

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

4.92

4.92

4.92

4.92

5.71

5.71

5.7

5.7

CABIN WIDTH FT.

5.12

5.12

5.12

5.12

5.92

5.92

5.5

5.5

CABIN LENGTH FT.

17.67

17.67

19.75

19.75

17.67

17.67

18.5

25.25

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

368

363

410

410

453

453

461

620

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.8

4.8

4.8

4.8

5.3

5.3

4.54

4.58

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.5

2.5

2.5

2.5

2

2

2

2.5

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

15

15

15

15

24

24

10

35

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

50

50

50

50

24

24

80

100

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

6

6

8

8

7

7

7

9

MTOW LBS

20350

21000

20500

21500

23500

23500

20000

30300

MLW LBS

19200

19200

19200

19200

19500

19500

18700

27100

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

13718

13950

13890

14144

14772

14902

12500

18150

USEABLE FUEL LBS

5375

5375

6062

6062

7910

7910

6740

11223

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1507

1925

798

1544

1068

938

960

1177

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2282

2050

2110

1856

2228

2098

2500

2650

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1573

1547

1423

1679

2186

2044

1449

2620

MAX. RANGE N.M.

1707

1684

1968

1939

2418

2400

1839

3010

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

4330

4680

4350

5040

5450

5450

4060

3750

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4033

4060

4063

4105

5208

5317

4917

3867

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

2820

2820

2800

2630

4500

4500

3790

4016

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

710

394

590

589

714

718

699

1237

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

465

465

465

465

465

465

433

459

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

436

436

436

436

436

436

433

459

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

428

433

416

436

423

423

373

388

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

TFE 73120AR

TFE 73120BR

TFE 73120AR

TFE 73120BR

PW305A

PW305A

PW545C

PW306C

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

82

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

Jet Black May 25/04/2012 11:52 Page 1

Toll Free 866.983.9009 | Local 941.201.1211 info@jetblackaviation.com LOS ANGELES | SARASOTA

GU LF ST RE AM

CE SS NA

CI TA TIO N

CE SS NA

CI TA TIO N

XL S

VI I CI TA TIO N

VI CE SS NA

CI TA TIO N CE SS NA

XL S+

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: MEDIUM JETS

G1 GU 00 LF ST RE AM G1 HA 50 W KE R BE EC HA HC W RA KE FT R HA BE W EC KE HC R RA 10 FT 00 HA W KE R 75 0

AircraftPer&SpecJuly12_PerfspecDecember06 19/06/2012 14:23 Page 2

MEDIUM JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

$3,189.09

$3,203.64

$2,403.60

$2,373.43

$2,479.34

$2,333.56

$2,945.58

$2,865.41

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

5.7

5.7

5.7

5.7

5.6

5.75

5.75

5.75

CABIN WIDTH FT.

5.5

5.5

5.5

5.5

4.75

5.75

6

6

CABIN LENGTH FT.

18.4

18.4

18.5

18.5

17.1

17.7

24.4

21.3

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

438

438

461

461

375

465

680

604

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

5

5

4.54

4.54

4.3

4.33

4.25

4.3

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2

2

2

2

2.08

2.1

2.25

2.25

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

-

-

10

10

9

25

50

47

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

61

54

80

80

55

55

22

32

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

7

7

8

8

7

7

8

8

MTOW LBS

22000

23000

20200

20200

24650

26100

31100

27000

MLW LBS

20000

20000

18700

18700

20700

21700

25000

23350

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

13800

14250

12800

12800

14365

15100

18150

16250

USEABLE FUEL LBS

7329

7330

6740

6740

9365

10300

11440

8500

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1071

1620

860

860

920

850

1510

2200

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

1600

2250

2300

2300

2635

2400

2150

2200

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

1770

1693

1539

1528

2550

2760

2970

2050

MAX. RANGE N.M.

2000

1824

1989

1976

2910

3130

3150

2200

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

5630

5170

3940

3940

6000

5640

6000

4900

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

4208

4500

4738

4738

4362

4050

3917

3803

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3699

4315

3500

3500

3400

3340

3577

3500

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

805

510

800

800

493

606

797

530

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

427

452

433

440

474

470

470

447

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

427

452

433

440

459

459

440

430

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

418

417

373

373

430

430

400

402

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

TFE 731-3B

TFE 731 -4R-2

PW545B

PW545C

TFE 731 -40R

TFE 731 -40AR

PW305B

TFE 7315BR

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

U

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

84

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

ACS July 18/06/2012 17:44 Page 1

AVIATION CONSULTING SERVICE

presents

FALCON 2000LX Serial Number 83

1800 TT Falcon Care Delivered with a fresh C check Impeccable condition

Aviation Consulting Service Queenstown, Maryland USA Tel: +1 443 262 9182 Fax: +1 443 262 9182 bruce@aviationconsultingservice.com

MPLANES Geneva, Switzerland Tel: +41 22 557 62 47 Cell: +41 76 381 36 65 jason.mulcock@mplanes.com

BE EC HC HA RA W FT KE R HA BE W EC KE HC R HA 80 RA W 0 FT KE R HA BE W EC KE HA HC R 80 W RA KE 0S FT R P HA BE W EC KE HC R HA RA 80 W F 0X T KE H P R AW BE KE EC R HA HC 80 RA W 0X KE FT Pi R H BE AW EC KE HA HC R W RA 80 KE FT 0X R H PR BE A W EC KE IA H CR IA R 85 AF ST 0X RA T H P AW SP KE R 90 0X P

AircraftPer&SpecJuly12_PerfspecDecember06 19/06/2012 14:24 Page 3

HA W KE R

AIRCRAFT SPECIFICATIONS: MEDIUM JETS

MEDIUM JETS

VARIABLE COST PER HOUR $

$2,930.81

$2,862.21

$2,938.48

$2,938.48

$2,875.37

$2,951.52

$2,653.55

$2,696.89

CABIN HEIGHT FT.

5.75

5.75

5.75

5.75

5.75

5.75

5.75

5.6

CABIN WIDTH FT.

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

4.75

CABIN LENGTH FT.

21.3

21.3

21.3

21.3

21.3

21.3

21.3

17.1

CABIN VOLUME CU.FT.

604

604

604

604

604

604

604

375

DOOR HEIGHT FT.

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

4.3

DOOR WIDTH FT.

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.25

2.08

BAGGAGE VOL. INT. CU.FT.

48

48

48

49

50

50

50

9

BAGGAGE VOL. EXT. CU.FT.

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

55

CREW #

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

SEATS - EXECUTIVE #

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

7

MTOW LBS

27400

27400

28000

28000

28000

28000

28000

24650

MLW LBS

23350

23350

23350

23350

23350

23350

23350

20700

B.O.W. W/CREW LBS

16000

16000

16250

16250

16500

16330

16500

13400

USEABLE FUEL LBS

10000

10000

10000

10000

10000

10000

10000

9345

PAYLOAD WITH FULL FUEL LBS

1520

1520

1750

1750

1620

1790

1620

2055

MAX. PAYLOAD LBS

2000

2000

2050

2050

1950

2120

1950

3600

RANGE - SEATS FULL N.M.

2390

2560

2470

2470

2733

2525

2733

2330

MAX. RANGE N.M.

2570

2740

2620

2620

2929

2710

2929

2780

BALANCED FIELD LENGTH FT.

6300

6300

5640

5640

5258

5641

5258

6400

LANDING DIST. (FACTORED) FT.

3787

3787

3803

3803

3805

3810

3805

4362

R.O.C. - ALL ENGINES FT PER MIN

3500

3500

3415

3415

3415

3415

3415

3700

R.O.C. - ONE ENGINE OUT FT PER MIN

532

532

470

470

570

470

570

1010

MAX. CRUISE SPEED KTAS

442

442

449

449

452

452

452

460

NORMAL CRUISE SPEED KTAS

429

429

430

430

430

430

430

448

L/RANGE CRUISE SPEED KTAS

389

389

402

402

402

402

402

414

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

TFE 731-5R

TFE 731-5R

ENGINES # ENGINE MODEL

TFE 731-5BR TFE 731-5BR TFE 731-50R TFE 731-5BR

TFE 731-50R TFE 731-3C

I

Airplane performance and specification numbers can vary depending on how they are measured. Please note this data should be used as a guide only, and not the basis on which buying decisions are taken.

86

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

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Aircraft Index see Page 4

Wentworth July 21/06/2012 10:06 Page 1

Executive BOEING 757 757--200 SERIAL NUMBER 24923

UNDERGOING FRESH C CHECK! 7220 H / 2554 C, Rolls Royce Engines, Winglets, Exec SNEW, 40-Pass. Executive Interior.

VVIP BOEING Super 27 27--100 SERIAL NUMBER 20533

VVIP BOEING Super 27 27--200REW SERIAL NUMBER 22825

NEW PRICE! Last -100 Built, - 200 Landing Gear with 0 SMOH, Fresh C, EFIS, Winglets, -200 Wing/Fuel Tanks, Re-Eng Mod.

5400H / 3300C, Valsan –217C Engine Retrofit with Winglets, Fresh C & LG Overhaul, 45-Pass. VIP Interior with Stateroom.

VIP BOEING 727 727--100 SERIAL NUMBER 20371

HAWKER 800SP SERIAL NUMBER 258050

Fresh C of A, -9A Engines 31-Pass. Interior, Great Layout. Master Stateroom + Convertible Sitting Room/2nd Bedroom.

Phone 1.301.869.4600 Sales@Wentworth.Aero

7134 H, MSP Gold, Blended Winglets, Paint and 10-Pass. Interior New 2010 with New CMS/Entertainment/Sat Phone.

• •

Fax 1.301.869.2700 www.Wentworth.Aero

GA Airports_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 11:25 Page 1

GA AIRPORTS

GA Airports:

ithout a viable airport, municipalities stand cut off from a global air transportation system that transcends national, political and geographic barriers like no other mode of travel. You’d think that was fairly basic knowledge, wouldn’t you? Perhaps it’s not so basic to everyone. Airports seem as misunderstood by the masses as Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity – yet airports are much simpler to decipher than Einstein. The FAA offered some significant help towards understanding with a new report released in May examining and categorizing General Aviation airports and at the same time stressing their importance to the country, the users and the communities that host them. And lest there be any doubt, the FAA heralds what anyone who uses private aircraft should already know: “General Aviation Airports: A National Asset.” The study groups the nation’s airports into four main categories: National, Regional, Local and Basic, using activity level of the airport and the number and type of based aircraft as the main factors. (Due to the wide variety of other available factors the agency ignored those such as the number and lengths of runways or whether the field hosts an Air Traffic Control tower. Unstated is one factor of constant interest to business aircraft operators and Business Aviation proponents: for the vast majority of Business Aviation flights these non-commercial airports serve as the launch points, the landing points, and often both.

W

Ports of call for aviation are an at-risk commodity. by Dave Higdon

TIME WARP Before the FAA released the May report on its latest, 18-month study of General Aviation airports, the agency hadn’t focused on them in four decades. In that time thousands of small, medium and sometimes large General Aviation airports disappeared. Too much time has passed costing us too many runways between assessments. But in “General Aviation Airports: A National Asset,” the FAA seems to be renewing its ❯

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

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GA Airports_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 11:26 Page 2

GA AIRPORTS

interest in preserving, promoting and expanding airports. That’s one critical to the future of private aviation…and far more so than to the outlook for commercial flying. Why so? Commercial-service airports – which today number fewer than 380 – enjoy constituencies that General Aviation airports often lack: airline passengers, for example, and the commercial carriers themselves - plus the support-service providers and the hotels, restaurants and other businesses that tend to gravitate to commercial airports. Almost anybody, in any town, anywhere with one such commercial-service airport can tell you at least a little about it. This seems true whether it’s one of the bestknown in the nation or otherwise. General Aviation airports provide similar services to a broader strata of users, and often broader services and connections to all those other airports that aren’t among that approximately 380-commercial airports. For more than 4,600 locales, the General Aviation airport is the main, primary or only access to the nation’s air-transportation network, meaning in the main no airport, no skyway off-ramp or on-ramp.

PUBLIC BENEFIT Let’s not neglect the ‘public benefit’, a phrase 30 years ago that was strongly disputed by the White House Administration. Today the argument seems to never arise and the public benefit of General Aviation enjoys widespread acknowledgement – at least from a cadre of savvy public officials,

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if not the general public itself. General Aviation airports are centers of commerce for their communities – even those places that don’t readily recognize the economic impact because they know littleto-nothing about their local airport’s functions. According to the FAA’s report, General Aviation contributed $38.8 billion in economic output in 2009. Factor in manufacturing and visitor expenditures and General Aviation accounted for an economic contribution of $76.5 billion. Consider the many ways those benefits manifest themselves – and the fact that most of them require an airport at some point.

THE “IMPORTANT SOCIETAL NEEDS” GA SERVES General Aviation carries its definition well: It includes ‘all of aviation’ except military or commercial. That’s ‘all of aviation’ except two narrow specialties: flying goods and people for hire, and protecting the country’s security. Those General Aviation airports also support other public-service activities: law enforcement, aerial fire-fighting, agricultural functions, border control, emergency medical services, flight training, maritime security, time-sensitive air cargo services, non-scheduled charter services and, of course, business and personal travel. Only relatively few of those approximately 380 commercial service airports provide the full breadth of these services along with the many others left unmentioned. Interestingly, the size of the airports, traffic www.AvBuyer.com

level and runway length have less influence on what airports can provide than they do over what aircraft can use them. But thanks to the extreme variation in General Aviation aircraft, machines are available for almost any runway length – and in some cases, useable where no runways exist. As FAA’s report notes, “Having a welldeveloped system of General Aviation airports throughout the country supports commerce while also providing a safety net of airports to support emergency aircraft diversions when necessary due to mechanical problems, medical emergencies, deteriorating weather conditions or other unforeseen circumstances. The rationale for continued Federal involvement in the system is that these General Aviation airports assist communities and their residents in meeting the needs that would otherwise be too costly or impossible to provide.” You have to love a sentence like the second one in that preceding graph. An acknowledgement of the public value of General Aviation decades after the Reagan Administration sought to end a publicly sourced share of FAA funding on the basis that “aviation provided no public benefit” to the country. To help planners and airport managers, local municipalities and FAA staff, the report categorized General Aviation airports into one of four groups with various functions in all four. These are: • •

National, which number 84; Regional, numbering 467; Aircraft Index see Page 4

Action Aviation July 21/06/2012 15:02 Page 1

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THE CITATION VII IS A VERY CAPABLE AIRCRAFT FOR A REMARKABLY LOW ACQUISITION COST: · Range with six passengers and reserves: 2220 nm (4110 km) · Max range with two passengers and reserves: 2500 nm (4600 km) · Max Cruise Speed 476 kts (881 km/hr) · Up to 8 passengers with a stand-up cabin and enclosed lavatory at back · 700 lbs of externally accessible baggage (8-10 medium soft bags) · Engines on Honeywell Gold MSP · Aircraft on Cessna Pro-Parts program · Fresh Annual Inspection · JAR OPS 1 Compliant, RVSM THE CITATION VII WAS CESSNA’S CULMINATION OF THE C650 LINE OF AIRCRAFT AND ORIGINALLY SOLD FOR $11M IN 1996

TTSN: 7580. Cycles: 5560. Honeywell SPZ 8000 dual digital flight director/autopilot system comprising: 5-Tube EFIS · Dual Honeywell FMSs · EGPWS · TCAS II · CVR · FDR · RAD ALT · HF Radio - Dual Mode-S RNZ-850 transponders · Dual RNZ-850 ADFs · Honeywell Primus Color Radar · ELT · Cabin Airshow For Further Information: Europe: +44 20 7266 2845 or Middle East: +971 4397 1828

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GA Airports_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 11:27 Page 3

GA AIRPORTS

• •

Local, the largest group at 1,236; and Basic, the second-largest group with 668. A fifth category of “uncharacterized” holds almost 500 facilities that didn’t nicely fit into the prior four.

THE BAD NEWS/GOOD NEWS EQUATION According to the FAA, the United States boast more than 19,000 airports, heliports, conventional landing facilities, seaplane bases and back-country airstrips, private airpark runways, private fields open to the public and public airports. About 3,300 of those made the list, all of them on the FAA’s National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems (NPIAS), a decades-old document that attempts to organize the public-use, typically publiclyowned airports into a true network – an integrated airport system. Funding to help communities underwrite improvements and expansion largely comes from the Airport Improvement Program (AIP), a trust fund fed by the excise taxes paid on General Aviation and airline fuels, airline passenger tickets and cargo waybill values. Here’s the good news: a decades-long decline in airport numbers seems to have slowed considerably. More and more communities today protect their airports from threats such as incompatible growth around the airport, to investing in improvements, to working to create buffers between airports and later-arriving neighbors – neighbors who too often demand that neighboring air-

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ports close because they now live nearby. In other areas communities are working to build new airports or replace constrained facilities. But, the bad news remains: Pressures on airports continue – from businesses which covet the real estates, developers who seek the same, and NIMBY neighbors who feel that irrespective of their history within the community, the local airport should not be allowed to exist next to them. Thirty years ago the number of airports on the NPIAS list was far larger, by a couple thousand. Pressures like those mentioned above brought about the demise of most; in other instances, public-access, privatelyowned fields went away because the family stopped supporting what their forbearers built. There’s no question though - doing away with an airport is far easier than creating a new one. To that end, however, the dozens of endorsements of General and Business Aviation served up by various governors, mayors and county officials indicate to many that the public’s support of General Aviation airports is on an upswing. So where does this all lead?

local governments to help guide future system and airport planning decisions using those categories. While those General Aviation airports that meet statutory definitions of commercial and reliever airports will continue to be classified as such – within the four new categories and the agency plans to periodically review and adjust those airports in the NPIAS according to their changing levels of activity. Additionally, the agency plans to continue identifying General Aviation airports that are important to the national transportation system through the formulation of the NPIAS. According to the report, the FAA will do this “in concert with state aviation agencies, airport sponsors and local planning organizations.” And starting with the 2013-2017 NPIAS report to Congress the FAA will incorporate the new General Aviation airport categories developed in this report. The FAA will: 1.

2.

TAKING THE NEXT STEPS According to FAA sources, their report, 18 months in the making and requested by members of the General Aviation Caucus of the Congress, the new General Aviation categorization provides a baseline from which to gauge changes in airport operations and airport needs. The FAA wants to encourage state and www.AvBuyer.com

3. 4.

Incorporate these categories into the process for identifying the national airport system’s 5-year development and funding needs; Work with airports and state agencies to assess the 497 General Aviation airports not classified that could not be placed into one of the four new categories; Update the existing FAA guidance to reflect these new categories; Re-evaluate the General Aviation airports biennially, in conjunction with the FAA’s report to Congress to capture changing conditions, needs and roles; ❯ Aircraft Index see Page 4

Action Aviation July 21/06/2012 15:23 Page 2

Boeing 727-100 VIP/1966/36 PAX $4 million USD

MSN 19006. ENG #1 S/N HRS./CYC P-649607B HRS.35573,33 CYC.29297. ENG #2 S/N HRS./CYC P-653362B HRS.35642,33 CYC.30609. ENG# 3 S/N HRS./CYC P-653358B HRS.36157,33 CYC.28286. ENG.TYPE JT8D-9A Pratt & Whitney. APU TYPE GTCP85-98 CK. APU S/N HRS./CYC P-15639 HRS.5873. UPDATE 23-10-07. MAINTE.INSPE EXCELLENT CONDITION GACA CERTIFIED. FRESH C5-C6. AD ALL (AD) UPDATE TILL 2010/2011. COLLINS TCAS II SYS AND TDR-94D MODE S TRANSPONDERS ST094155C. COLLINS WXR-700X FORWARD LOOKING WINDSHEAR ST09107SC. COLLINS EFIS-86B (4/14) 5-TUBE ELECTRONIC FLIGHT ST09106SC. INSTRUMENT SYS SINGLE ALLIED/SIGNAL GNS-XLS FLIT MANAGE.SYS ST09343SC. DUAL HONEYWELL AZ-800 /AIRDATA COMPUTERS ST09106SC. DUAL HONEYWELL BA-141 ALTIMETERS DUAL HONEYWELL FZ-500 FLIT DIRECTOR SYS & SINGLE HONEYWELL AL-801 ALTITUDE ALERTER DUAL HONEYWELL AZ-800/AIRDATA SYS FOR ST09364SC. REDUCED SEPARATION MINIMUMS (RVSM) AIR SHOW 400, SATCOM, HUSK KIT FAA APPROV/SA3NM

EFIS SYSTEM - INSTRUMENT LAY AUT – ( TWO DPU - ) SEMI GLASS( SEMI GLASS ). TWO INERTIAL NAVIGATION SYSTEMS. ONE FMS – GNS – XLS ( HONEYWELL ). COLOR WEATHER RADAR ( MFD ) TWO HF- SYSTEMS. VOR- ILS – FM – IMMUNITY. VHF – 2- 8.33 SPACING. MODE S TRANSPONDER. TCAS INSTALLED. WIND SHEER PROTECTION. A/C RVSM QUALIFIED. G.P.W.S – INSTALLED. B727 AUX. FUEL TANK ( DE- ACTIVATED )

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GA Airports_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 11:27 Page 4

GA AIRPORTS 5.

6.

Review policies related to providing Federal money to privately-owned airports (included in the NPIAS); the role they play in the national transportation system; and the types of protections necessary to safeguard public investment in these airports over the long-term; and Continue to work with aviation stake holders to address investment and regulatory questions concerning Part 139 certification, grant assurances, airport requirements, funding eligibility and entitlement programs, and revenue use and diversion.

In addition, as required by the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, the FAA will evaluate the formulation of the NPIAS and provide Congress with a report on the findings.

SO WHAT GOOD COMES OF THIS? For the first time in decades the FAA acknowledged both the importance of, and public benefit from General Aviation - and through the window of this report, the value of the airports serving General Aviation, from national to community level. After years of fighting to stay noticed, the FAA’s legacy of Randy Babbitt’s all-toobrief tenure as Administrator continues in the added awareness he had for General Aviation issues. And as a basis for building more support, local, state and federal, for the majority of our airports – the non-airline airports – the FAA’s report serves as a solid launch point for reversing the decades of decline in airport numbers. With the economy a prime issue this year and for years to come, who can argue with the prospect of more jobs and added economic growth that would come from a robust program to rebuild and renew America’s air connections to the world? The hometown airport: It could be on a comeback trail. Now, let’s talk about pulling down these ill-advised security fences that serve largely to keep out honest people interested in flying…

❯ More information on The FAA Report: http://www.faa.gov/airports/planning_capacity/ ga_study/media/2012AssetReport.pdf ❯ More information on Categorization: http://www.faa.gov/airports/planning_capacity/ ga_study/

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com 94

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

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Aircraft Index see Page 4

AIC Title February 23/01/2012 16:05 Page 1

Ethics&Trust_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 12:14 Page 1

ETHICS & AIRCRAFT SALES

Aircraft Sales: The Importance of Ethics. by Lori Johnson

usiness ethics has been a topic of discussion - and controversy - for decades. Companies find themselves in the worldwide spotlight when something goes wrong because someone acted on their behalf in an unethical manner. Whether it is harassment charges, creative book and ledger entries, or secret telephone audiotaping, unethical behavior is more common than we like to admit. Unfortunately, the aircraft sales profession is no different. Following, a selection of industry professionals discuss the importance of ethical behavior, how ethical behavior is defined in aircraft sales, and how to be confident that your representative is on the up and up. In his capacity as Chairman of National Aircraft Resale Association, Paul Kirby, Managing Partner of Cerretani Aviation Group, LLC insists members commit to, and abide by a Code of Ethics that provide standards of business conduct regarding aircraft transactions. Aircraft brokers and dealers buy and sell very expensive business tools that can

B

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significantly affect the productivity, bottom line and employee safety of major businesses. Aircraft are highly complex and there are virtually no two in the market that are completely alike. Their values are based on their flight history, maintenance history, ownership history, equipment, their care and their use. Determining the real value of an aircraft can be difficult, especially when certain items are valued more by some than by others. In addition to guiding clients as they sift through information or representing a client’s aircraft when it is up for sale, the typical broker regularly works with millions of dollars. They also handle and direct large sums of money all over the world. “One of the most important roles of a dealer/broker is the management of a client’s expectations in the fulfillment of their objectives,” Kirby says. “Without honesty and complete transparency, this becomes almost impossible.” Rick Smith, Vice President of Business Aircraft Leasing, Inc. (BALI) agrees, adding that an ethical broker will disclose all pertinent facts about an aircraft, including (but not www.AvBuyer.com

limited to) any damage history or questionable incident in the aircraft’s past as well as the broker’s relationship with the buyer or seller”. An unethical broker, he says, may withhold information, leaving it to the buyer to investigate for themselves in hopes that they will not discover something that may reduce the aircraft’s value or the buyer’s decision to purchase the aircraft. Deliberate omissions can be as devastating to a client or transaction as outright misrepresentation of an aircraft. Both need to be avoided at all costs. “On a number of occasions,” Smith continues, “I have had to defend myself and the industry in general due to the actions of a few. If a customer discovers or catches their broker/dealer in a lie, then they automatically begin to question everything that broker/dealer has said. That is really too bad because we believe we have a fiduciary responsibility to our clients. Giving false or misleading information to clients or customers is ultimately contrary to this relationship.” Michael O’Keeffe, Senior Vice President of Banyan Air Service, elaborates that because of Aircraft Index see Page 4

Ethics&Trust_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 12:15 Page 2

ETHICS & AIRCRAFT SALES the highly specialized nature of a turbinepowered aircraft, owners/operators can become easy prey for an unscrupulous broker. It’s imperative that entities considering the acquisition or sale of an aircraft retain a reputable and experienced agent to assist them in avoiding the pitfalls associated with a less ethical agent.

ENSURING YOUR TRANSACTION IS HANDLED ETHICALLY As we’ve already stated, aviation is no different than every other industry and there are some who are less than ethical in their business dealings. So just how do you ensure that you do not become part of such a transaction? • Demand transparency in the transaction: “Determine the transparency and the ready availability of information,” advises Kirby. “Generally speaking, a prospective aircraft buyer or seller should know who is buying or selling the airplane, the price of the transaction, and all commissions being paid to facilitate the transaction. The engagement of an ethical broker/dealer to exclusively represent one party in a transaction provides a level of clarity and value not necessarily found in all deals.

“Full disclosure should be a given in an aircraft transaction, and in the dealings leading up to that transaction. Granted, there are times when a confidentiality agreement is understandable and warranted, but accurate and full information about an aircraft should be required.” • Trust your “gut” instinct: Do your homework and follow your gut, says BALI’s Smith. “Watch out for false advertisements, ‘bait and switch’ tactics and any advertisement that does not include the serial number or other identifying feature of a specific aircraft. A reputable and ethical broker can be a big help in weeding through muddy listings.” • Determine a broker’s reputation and check references: Banyan Air’s O’Keeffe says the only real tool an aircraft broker has to convey his level of trustworthiness is his reputation. “We encourage our clients to review our list of references and to take the time to speak to our clients.” • Ask questions (and don’t be afraid to ask your broker specifically about ethics): “Ethics play a significant role in every aircraft transaction,” O’Keeffe says. “The purchase or

sale of an aircraft is a complicated transaction conducted on an even more complex piece of machinery. In many cases, the actual purchasing or selling entities lack a complete understanding of the mechanical condition of the aircraft and must rely on sound counsel from professional, ethical representatives to ensure a smooth transaction where the needs of both parties are met.”

THE GOLDEN RULE Just as it has been taught to children and adults alike for hundreds of years, ethics can best be summed up by one Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.  Lori Johnson has nearly 20 years of experience in Business Aviation and is currently the Marketing Communications and Programs Manager with Duncan Aviation, the largest family-owned MRO provider in the world. She also works closely with the National Aircraft Resale Association, an organization of turbine aircraft brokers, dealers and support service providers.

Find an Aircraft Dealer Business Aviation Whether buying or selling an aircraft our directory can help you find a dedicated sales professional with a global network of relationships and resources to secure you the best deal.

The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today avbuyer.com/dealers Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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Inside Maintenance July12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 12:40 Page 1

INSIDE MAINTENANCE - OLDER GULFSTREAMS

Wisdom Of The Ages Weighing older Gulfstreams and the maintenance to keep them flying. by Dave Higdon here’s no way around it, age and mileage take their toll on the airplanes we fly. Hours flown, cycles completed, years since rolling out of the factory – they all factor into the aging of our aircraft and, by extension, the TLC required to keep them airworthy and ready to fly. These facts warrant remembering in these days when a plethora of older (albeit well maintained) business jets beckon operators eager to find cost-conscious solutions to lift requirements (and in some cases get more space for the money). When it comes to popular appeal and aura those jets carrying the ‘Gulfstream’ badge garner more than their share. Gulfstream Aerospace continues to support all its jets from the first, the GII through the company’s game-changing GIV, the globe-

T

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trotting GV and all the non-Romannumeral-designated models to the newest, the advanced and highly sophisticated G650. These days’ pre-GV airframes often appear commanding bargains to the potential buyer who sees an opportunity to buy into a cabin-size comparatively unaffordable if made this side of the GV’s 1995 introduction. The GII, GIII, GIV and GV (that last one among the original world-class distance travelers) still ply the skies, and represent the foundation on which the company built its current, expansive line of jets – all characterized by their cabin sizes and oval windows. The potential for the older aircraft remains good for the operator undeterred by the increased demands of maintaining and fueling the older models. www.AvBuyer.com

IT ISN’T THE AGE, IT’S THE MILEAGE… When looking at any older aircraft – in this case let’s say two decades and older – the prospective owner should consider the many ways age and use are measured. The calendar alone impacts aircraft less when cared and tended for, and stored in warm, dry hangars when not in use. A Gulfstream that sits more than it flies incurs little wear and tear, although even when properly sheltered its seals, bearings and gaskets can in time deteriorate to the point of becoming non-functional. Flight hours alone will incur wear, particularly for engines and avionics but also on airframes in relation to the time spent aloft. Flight cycles, however, impact all the systems – airframe in particular, as the pressure vessel that is the fuselage/cabin swells under ❯ pressure when climbing to cruise altitude Aircraft Index see Page 4

Banyan June 21/05/2012 17:39 Page 1

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Inside Maintenance July12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 12:47 Page 2

INSIDE MAINTENANCE OLDER GULFSTREAMS before shrinking back to normal upon relief from the pressure differential of high-altitude pressurization. Flight cycles are related to engine cycles, which, in turn, invoke some wear issues with each starting process and shut-down cycle. More than any others, these are the areas of interest when maintaining any aircraft – and cycles, as well as hours, can trigger specific maintenance requirements. Given that the youngest GIVs are pushing 20 years old today, it’s worth considering the aggregate of flight hours, flight and engine cycles and age.

CYCLICAL INSPECTIONS The engineers at Gulfstream Aerospace in Savannah, Georgia know the airplanes better than anyone – as you’d expect from the people who had a hand in the creation of a specific aircraft. One way to deal with known problems and cut off new ones before they become actual issues is the major inspection – and Gulfstream has a program for period inspections that carries well in the fight against aging aircraft and the aeronautical infirmities they contract. Thankfully, the popularity and utility of the Gulfstream line helps support a large network of shops capable of handling the needs. For example, Duncan Aviation and Kaiser Air both offer ranges of inspections and maintenance services. And examining their individual menus of services provides worthy insight into the issues facing owners of older Gulfstreams, whether specific to the airfoil surfaces – from the load wear of vertical and horizontal stabilizer surfaces - to the corrosion issues in fuel tanks and other areas of the airframe. Periodic inspections, phase inspections and level checks all come with type-specific and inspection-specific agendas and items of focus. Specialists are worthwhile.

POWER BY THE DECIBEL The early Gulfstreams through part of the production run of the GIII sported what today are called Stage II engines; the short way around that would be “loud”, and the world was already moving toward quieter Stage III powerplants about the time that Gulfstream introduced the GIV in 1987. Though many Stage II aircraft fly still today their window of existence was narrowed with legal language decreed for Stage II to leave the aviation stage. Retrofits, hush kits and alternatives exist to bring older Gulfstreams into Stage III noise compliance. Those avenues are best pursued - say maintenance experts - when the existing engines are due to be pulled for some other reason such as teardown, inspec-

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tion or an airframe Phase inspection that requires removing the nacelles. Any consideration of older aircraft should factor the options to make powerplant changes. In many instances none will exist. All the while, the long-term expectations for fuel costs and future maintenance needs should be kept in mind. An aircraft may seem a reasonable cost-solution to your desire to utilize a large-cabin jet, but how close is it to an overhaul, or how near is an off-airplane inspection for those two RollsRoyce powerplants? How about the costs of the inspection, the teardown, or any other remove-and-replace process? Don’t forget to investigate the time involved for any of the above: Will the airplane be down for a day, several days or longer? (Weeks are not unusual.)

TIME IS NOT ON YOUR SIDE When the page of your calendar flips to certain months, it matters little how many hours the airplane flew since its last special inspection. Such months come along relentlessly, and not always in 12-month intervals: 9 month, 12, 18, 24, 72, 96 month inspections - they are cumulative as well as progressive, and each one takes downtime. Perhaps a 5,000 landings inspection is on the cards, and during this detailed project may be a good time to consider enhancements to the airplane. Specialty needs and any Airworthiness Directives are worthy of consideration for inclusion in these phase and periodic inspections to minimize further downtime and further expense.

REFURBISH TO NEW IF YOU CHOOSE Aside from the more-demanding physical maintenance of older airplanes, the living and flying spaces within the fuselages are easily upgraded to standards closer to today. For example, avionics facelifts with digital, all-electronic hardware can get the flight crew much of the same functionality and www.AvBuyer.com

utility as today’s new aircraft. Packages with Electronic Flight Instrument System (EFIS) functionality can transform more and more aircraft today. Ditto for the back cabin, where everything from the seat surfaces to the entire interior package can be removed, refurbished and replaced to better-than-new condition. New LED lighting, new computer-system connectivity and in-flight entertainment – again, it takes vendors familiar with the work and specialized in the aircraft type, but it’s possible to keep these work packages as reasonable as possible. Let’s not neglect the part of the airplane that always gives passengers their first impression: the exterior accoutrements, paint and windows. Windows can be replaced or refurbished, something best done when the rest of the interior is coming out. Some options exist to install improved windows with new functionality – like electronic dimming control, but again, whatever combination of these jobs you pick, downtime will be involved. Again it is work that can be piggybacked on other work needs – say a C- or D-Phase check that already removes the interior and carpeting.

WHEN IT’S ALL DONE… Keeping up with required maintenance will demand a lot of time, effort and familiarity with the asset. Specialty expertise is absolutely the best approach to assure yourself of both the best advice and the best-quality outcome. Corrosion, wear and tear, pressurization cycles, landing-gear cycles, engine cycles, the loads of takeoff, the higher loads of landings – these issue all apply to all other aircraft…they’re universal, but keeping up with them in any given aircraft requires certain expertise, a specific background, just to be able to recognize bad from good. The older the plane in general, the more expensive the work required to keep it Aircraft Index see Page 4

Inside Maintenance July12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 12:47 Page 3

INSIDE MAINTENANCE OLDER GULFSTREAMS

airworthy and up-to-date on required maintenance, inspections and Airworthiness Directives will be. Older engines, unless they can be swapped out for something newer, will always be somewhere short of their peak efficiency; always less efficient than newer engines; and usually will be louder – and more expensive to overhaul or inspect. But the fact that the older generation

Gulfstreams continue to fly stands as graphic testimony to the quality of the airplane, the appeal they have with many people, and the belief that older and more expensive-to-fly aircraft can result in lower flying costs – overlooking the higher maintenance needs, perpetually higher fuel demands and unrelenting assault of the calendar. With a knowledgeable crew, a savvy director of maintenance, and a relaxed

approach to fuel costs, however, an older Gulfstream does have the benefit of costing less to start and - just maybe - balancing out over several years, until it’s time to acquire a slightly newer-old Gulfstream arrives.

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

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JMesingerJuly12_JMesingerNov06 19/06/2012 11:05 Page 1

THE AVIATION LEADERSHIP ROUNDTABLE

Not Just Another Article About The Market... was preparing to make a speech in early June in Teterboro, NJ about aircraft transactions in an evolving market and the steps for success. It was to be given at the NBAA Regional Forum. The event was standing room only, and although I am not so sure I can claim to be a Rock Star, I do believe the topic was so important, given what still looks like a rocky road ahead. The crowd was clearly topic-driven. In preparing for this speech, I was not only able to draw on my own company experiences but the experiences of other key players in our industry - including this very publication. By having World Aircraft Sales Magazine aggregate such great writers, I could just flip through the publication and find all I needed to begin to weave the industry tapestry together. Amstat and JETNET are both very solid inventory reporting publications, Brian Foley a respected industry trend spotter, and ARGUS one of the finest industry trackers of operations by individual operators and charter providers, and all have prominent views of our industry from which to draw. So now let’s slice, dice and reassemble what I read in preparation for the speech. Amstat and JETNET reported on available inventory and they both looked at it on the basis of year-over-year as well as month- and year-to-date. Both companies reported interesting findings. It seems that available inventory by category is down; however the corresponding transactions for those categories are not up, indicating that inventory is being removed from the market rather than selling. The root cause of this phenomenon could be a very positive sign, and most likely means that the individuals who had placed this inventory for sale are now perhaps finding the health and strength of their own companies improving, and the solid foundation for the reason to have purchased aircraft originally is being felt again. The business tool is back in play! The other reason aircraft were on the market for sale may have been due to purely opportunistic sellers thinking they could sell for a higher price than was possible. With today’s market conditions not allowing for

I

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overpriced listings, those offerings have been pulled from the market. The reason could, of course, be a combination of the two. “If I cannot sell for that price, let’s put the asset back to work.” Both reasons result in less available inventory for sale. Now let’s discuss the segmentation of the global inventory. Europe is just starting to acknowledge what we in the United States acknowledged in 2008. Too much debt, too little growth, and companies that were the pillar of the business foundation have eroded possibly beyond salvation. This is a terrible combination of circumstances. One in five aircraft registered in Europe are for sale with a “for sale” inventory amount by category in excess of 19%. There is no way so much excess capacity can be re-absorbed into that single region of the world, and so some great buying opportunities may present themselves for us in this part of the world. The danger here is that anytime you have an abundant amount of inventory it all suffers price wise. So let’s discuss the effect of all this inventory, and its resulting effect on price. Luckily for the Europeans they will most likely not see a value reduction like we did in 2008 because that reduction has already been accounted for in a global adjustment of price. Exceptions would be for those owners who purchased prior to 2005 through 2007. With all that being said, I am still seeing price fluctuations and reductions every day. These are minimal by comparison to 2008-2009, however. I get emails daily that say, “Drastic Price Reduction”, “Must Sell”, “Next to Sell”! Typically, these fall on deaf ears. Usually it takes more than an announcement of a price reduction, or a statement of desiring to be the next to sell to get the needed attention of the market. If it were that easy everyone would come to the market on day one and proclaim their airplane will be the next to sell. The old fashioned hard work of marketing and awareness must still be an overriding factor above a price reduction alone. We regularly pick up the phone and call a list of about 85 dealers and brokers around the world to discuss in great detail our offerings. (We must help the sales partners we have in the market differenwww.AvBuyer.com

tiate our offering from the myriad of other offerings.) So often the aircraft on the market start to all look the same. Only model year and hours separate most from each other. That, of course, is a huge marketing mistake if anyone selling leaves the unique features of an aircraft up to the buying side of the transaction to discover. There are so many factors that one should use to try to positively separate a listing from all the others. The problem for us all is the large amount of available inventory for sale and the corresponding smaller market to sell into, coupled with a fluid pricing platform. The solution is harder work and greater effort if you are to get your particular aircraft sold. I do not mean to minimize price in the equation, but price alone or a simple “Next to Sell” statement is not enough. Hard work, constant calls to the buying brokers and dealers, and clear marketing makes sales happen. Don’t be discouraged by our market, be encouraged to get out ahead of your competition and set the stage for success. ‘Robust’ would be an exaggeration if used to describe our market, but ‘Alive’ is not a big enough word. ❯ Jay Mesinger is the CEO and Founder of J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales, Inc. Jay is on the NBAA Board of Directors and is Chairman of AMAC. He served on the Duncan Aviation Customer Advisory Board for two terms and is now on the Jet Aviation Customer Advisory Board. Jay is also a member of EBAA and the Colorado Airport Business Association (CABA). If you would like to join in on conversations relating to trends in Business Aviation, share your comments on Jay’s blog www.jetsales.com/blog, Twitter and LinkedIn. More information visit www.jetsales.com Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Aircraft Index see Page 4

Boutsen July 19/06/2012 10:24 Page 1

© GULFSTREAM AEROSPACE CORP

Niche Jets July12_Gil WolinNov06 20/06/2012 10:37 Page 1

PHOTO

BIZAV’S NICHE JETS

Finding That Diamond In The Rough Understanding more about those ‘off the radar airplanes’ by Andrew C. Bradley efore you turn the page thinking this is yet another self-serving article in defense of brokers written by a broker, consider the following. Choosing a broker inand-of itself isn’t nearly as important as choosing the correct broker. We all know the value of having a broker assist in the complex process of purchasing or selling a multi-million dollar asset. With the increasing complexity of transactions in these uncertain economic times and the emergence of cross-border, cross-country and even crosscontinent transactions, having professional representation is a no-brainer. With that being said, we have all run into situations where the client is extremely satisfied with the actual transaction process only to be dissatisfied

B

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

months later after finding the aircraft is not meeting their requirements, or possibly upon their realization that another aircraft type would have met the requirement at a lower price.

AIRCRAFT LOST OFF THE RADAR I’ve had the distinct privilege over the past few years to get both myself and my clients acquainted with several aircraft that are often overlooked, or in some cases are virtually unknown in the marketplace. These include primarily Gulfstream variants (the G300, G350, and G400/G500 to name the most prevalent), the Legacy 600 and Falcon 900C and to a much lesser extent Bombardier’s Global 5000. All of these fill certain “niche” markets and www.AvBuyer.com

sometimes come close to matching nearly 95% of what the buyer/operator is looking for, but at a large discount to the more popular/better known variants. In some cases they may exactly match the buyer’s mission profile. Many of these lesser known, overlooked models trade at large discounts relative to the more popular variants. A defining characteristic of many of these ‘forgotten models’ is that many were produced for a very short period of time and in very limited quantities. According to JETNET only 13 G300s were produced, followed by 11 G350s, 23 G400s and only nine G500s. Dassault’s Falcon 900C, based on the popular Falcon 900 platform (of which more than 489 have been produced), only 25 Falcon 900C ❯ models are in service and you’d be hard Aircraft Index see Page 4

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1981 KING AIR F90

S/N BY-48 Only 195 Hours Total Time Since New. Aircraft loaded with $275K in options including BLR Winglets, Raisbeck Crown Wing Lockers, HF with Selcal, Aircell ST3100 Flite Phone, and Aft Jump Seat.

S/N LA-121 6,893 Total Time Since New, 3404/3404 SMOH, 231/231 SHS by Pratt & Whitney, 428/428 SPOH, EFIS-50, Dual Raisbeck Lower Aft Body Strakes, Frakes Exhaust Stacks, and No Damage History. Owner Motivated!!!

2006 TBM 850

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Only 695 Hours TTSN. Equipped with RVSM, 2-Tube Bendix EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s with WAAS, Garmin GMX-200 MFD with Chartview, TAS/TAWS, WX-500, Garmin GDL-69A Real Time Weather, and Garmin GTX-327 & GTX-330 Transponders.

2001 TBM 700B

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1991 TBM 700A

S/N 200 1,595 TTSN, 718 SHS, 405 SPOH, Honeywell/ Garmin Avionics incl. 2-Tube EFIS, Dual Garmin 530’s, KGP-560 EGPWS, Sandel SN 3308 EHSI, WX-1000E Stormscope, Annual and 10-Year Inspection c/w January 2012 and NDH.

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Niche Jets July12_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 16:30 Page 2

BIZAV’S NICHE JETS

pressed to find someone to explain exactly what differentiates the 900C from an older 900B or a newer 900EX. Thus, one can easily see why these aircraft are rarely on anyone’s radar. The second defining characteristic of these aircraft is that they usually trade at a large discount relative to their more popular brethren. In many cases these aircraft might be able to match 95% of the mission profile of the more popular model but trade at 5-15% discount when compared to the more popular model variant.

The second defining characteristic of these aircraft is that they usually trade at a large discount relative to their more popular brethren.

IT’S ALL ABOUT PERCEPTION Take, for example the recent sale of a Gulfstream G400: The airplane is essentially a continuation of the legendary G-IVSP, but rebadged starting at S/N 1500. The most common mistake made about this model is where people believe it to be a “detuned” or “deoptioned” G450 – a confusion that stems from the larger G500/G550 product. The G500 is indeed a “de-optioned” G550, but the G400 was not a “de-optioned” G450, but rather a G-IVSP. After a few months of weak activity, the subject G400 was remarketed as “a very late model G-IVSP” and very quickly afterwards was placed under contract. The point of this example is that the G400 designation meant many people didn’t give the aircraft a second look, confusing it for a less desirable G450 variant rather than the newest, fully-loaded late model G-IVSP. The

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eventual buyer of the aircraft flew away with a newer G-IVSP (2003 model), and paid approximately $2 million less relative to a 1400-series late model G-IVSP! Likewise, turning to the G300, this airplane is in essence a G-IVSP with a slightly reduced range of 3,600 nautical miles according to Gulfstream’s website, but operators of this aircraft often know from experience that these numbers are very conservative. Again, misconceptions exist – but the reality is that the G300 can do almost 95% of what a G-IVSP/G400 can do and can often come better equipped (most G300s have HUD/EVS, BBML and/or some form of SAT TV and are a year newer). Another reality is that a low-time G400 will run somewhere in the neighborhood of US$17-19 million, a slightly older, late-model www.AvBuyer.com

G-IVSP with a fair amount of options will run somewhere in the neighborhood of US$16+ million, while a late model G300 can be had in some cases for between US$14.5-15.5 million. Simply put, if your mission profile doesn’t extend up to 4,000 nautical miles and you’ve done your homework to include the ‘off-theradar airplanes, your chances of buying a perfect fit for your mission at a very attractive price will increase significantly. The Gulfstream G350 and G500 are other examples representing strong value when compared to their better known sister ships the G450 and G550. Both the G350 and the G500 have less options and slightly less range but in some cases under the right market conditions sell for millions less than the G450 and G550. They are rarely on anyone’s radar, though.

OTHER OEM “NICHE” ALTERNATIVES Of course, this article isn’t exclusive to Gulfstream’s niche models. Some that initially can fail to garner much attention or market exposure don’t always fit the mold of being the “in-between” or “detuned” OEM variant of another, more popular model. A perfect case in point is the Embraer Legacy 600, based on the popular ERJ 135 regional jet model. Fairly recently, a jet owner decided they wanted to move up into a G450, leaving a just-delivered Legacy 600 (capable of carrying 16 passengers over 3,300nm) in need of a new owner. Aircraft Index see Page 4

Niche Jets July12_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 14:16 Page 3

BIZAV’S NICHE JETS Typically when prospective buyers are targeted for an aircraft, they will be flying an aircraft that is a natural step-down from the aircraft being marketed. For example, G-IV prospects tend to come from the older GIII market, or historically G450 owners have tended to upgrade to a G550 or a competing Bombardier Global XRS. The Legacy 600 is somewhat unique in this regard… it has a very large cabin relative to its operating cost. It has the range of a G200 but can seat nearly twice as many occupants and more importantly has nearly the same operating cost as the much smaller G200. It was interesting, then, that when several G200 operators were contacted regarding the availability of a Legacy 600, the common questions raised were “what is a Legacy 600” or “why would I upgrade to a Legacy 600?” Interest grew as knowledge of an aircraft previously not on the radar screens of the prospects grew – not least the fact that a Legacy 600 with less than 100 hours of total time could be purchased for somewhere in the region of US$20 million. Many late-model G200 owners had paid close to US$17-18 million for their airplanes before the financial crisis took a chunk out of those price points.

Needless to say that as understanding of a lesser known airplane on the market grew, it didn’t stay there for long.

KEEPING AN OPEN, INQUISITIVE MIND As stated previously other lesser known and less well understood models include the Falcon 900C, Bombardier Global 5000, and several less popular variants of the Hawker Beechcraft line (such as the Hawker 750). Many more exist too – and hopefully readers and prospective buyers don’t overlook the valuable points raised by the case samples above. There are models at good values that may more closely match your mission profile while saving you millions of dollars over the more popular models if you enter the market with an inquisitive and open approach. Ultimately, a good broker or consultant granting professional representation should consider all of these models in the course of an in depth financial and operational evaluation of a client’s mission profile. These “niche” aircraft are not for everyone, and many will point out that the discount saved may very well be given back when selling - but why shell out more money than one

needs to for either range, size or options that exceed the mission requirement and may not even get used. In today’s economy where we all have to justify both our existence and that of the aircraft we operate, seeking education on every option available is just common sense. ❯ Andrew C. Bradley is senior vice president, Global Sales & Acquisitions at Avjet Corporation, an international provider of aircraft charter and management solutions. The company is headquartered in Burbank, California, and maintains a global presence in Washington D.C., Seoul, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, Moscow and other locations around the globe. To learn more about the company, visit www.avjet.com

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

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Regional Sales Tax July12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 16:22 Page 1

REGIONAL SALES & USE TAX FORUM

Regional Sales And Use Tax Forum Regional update on the Mid-Western United States. by Christopher B. Younger his column is the fourth installment in the fourth annual series of quarterly columns describing recent changes to aviation-related state sales and use tax issues and, where pertinent, other aviation related tax issues in various regions of the United States. As was the case with the last series of quarterly columns, we focus on a particular region of the United States each quarter – namely the Northeastern, Southeastern, Mid-Western or Western States. In this column, we review any recent changes to state sales and use taxes in the states located in the western region of the United States - namely Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. Additionally, we will discuss whether or not each state has an exemption from its sales and use tax for casual, isolated or occasional sales of aircraft. An exemption for casual, isolated or occasional sales of aircraft typically permits a buyer of a used aircraft to take delivery and/or use such aircraft in a state with such an exemption without paying that state’s sales or use tax provided that the specific conditions of the exemption are met. Those conditions, which vary from state-to-

T

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state, typically require that either or both of the seller and buyer not be habitually engaged in the sale of aircraft or - in some instances - of any tangible personal property; that the seller and buyer be affiliated business entities; or, in the case of individual buyers and sellers, that they have a certain family relationship with one another. Following is a summary of aviation related sales and use taxes within the individual states and any changes introduced, or due, within said state.

to decrease to 5.6% and, effective July 1, 2021 the rate is scheduled to decrease to 5%. Certain counties also impose additional countywide sales tax. Casual sales of aircraft are exempt from Arizona transaction privilege tax. A “casual sale” is defined as an occasional transaction of an isolated nature made by a person who is not engaged in the business of selling, within or without Arizona, the same type or character of property as that which was sold.

CALIFORNIA ALASKA Alaska does not have state sales and use tax. However, some local jurisdictions impose local sales tax. Municipal sales tax rates typically range from a low of 3% to a high of 6%.

ARIZONA Arizona has a state sales tax, which is referred to as the transaction privilege tax. The transaction privilege tax is not a true sales tax because it is not imposed on each sale of tangible personal property; its base is generally the gross receipts from such sales. The statewide transaction privilege tax rate is 6.6% from June 1, 2010 through May 31, 2013. After May 31, 2013, the rate is scheduled www.AvBuyer.com

California has a state sales and use tax imposed at a rate of 7.25%. In addition, California has many special taxing jurisdictions that are funded by sales and use tax at a rate of up to 2.5% that is added to the new 7.25% rate. Sales of aircraft are specifically excluded from the California exemption for occasional or isolated sales of tangible personal property.

COLORADO Colorado has a state sales and use tax imposed at a rate of 2.9%. In addition, Colorado localities may impose additional sales and use tax at rates between 1% and 6%. Colorado does not provide a sales tax exemption for casual sales of aircraft. Aircraft Index see Page 4

Regional Sales Tax July12_FinanceSept 19/06/2012 16:24 Page 2

REGIONAL SALES & USE TAX FORUM HAWAII Hawaii has a state sales tax (which is referred to as the general excise tax and is actually a tax on a seller’s gross receipts from sales of tangible personal property), and a state use tax. Each tax is imposed at a rate of 4% (4.5% in Oahu). A casual sale is not subject to Hawaii general excise tax. A "casual sale" is an occasional, isolated, irregular, infrequent, or incidental sale or transaction involving tangible personal property that is sold by a person who is not required to obtain a general excise tax license or that is not ordinarily sold in the business of a person who is regularly engaged in business.

6.85%. Additional local sales tax may be imposed at a rate up to 1.25% in addition to the statewide sales and use tax rate. An isolated or occasional sale of aircraft not held or used by the seller in a manner which requires a seller's permit is exempt from Nevada sales and use tax provided such sale is not one of a series of sales which would require a seller's permit. A person making more than two retail sales within any 12month period is a retailer and is thus not entitled to this exemption.

NEW MEXICO

Idaho has a state sales and use tax imposed at a rate of 6% plus a local sales tax (at rates up to 3%) that is imposed by certain resort cities. Sales of aircraft are specifically excluded from the Idaho exemption for occasional or isolated sales of tangible personal property.

In New Mexico, the sales tax is referred to as the “Gross Receipts Tax” (GRT) and the use tax is referred to as the “Compensating Tax” (CT). The GRT rate is 5.125% to 8.6875% and the CT rate is 5.125%. Isolated or occasional sales of aircraft are exempt from the GRT and CT provided that the seller is not engaged, and does not hold itself out as being engaged, in the business of selling or leasing aircraft.

MONTANA

OREGON

Montana does not have state sales and use tax.

Oregon does not have state sales and use tax.

IDAHO

TEXAS NEVADA Nevada has a state sales and use tax. The general statewide Nevada sales and use tax rate is

Texas has a state sales and use tax imposed at a rate of 6.25%. In addition, Texas counties and localities may impose additional sales

and use tax at rates not to exceed 2%. Texas exempts occasional sales of aircraft from its sales and use tax. An “occasional sale” is one made by a person who does not habitually engage in the business of selling taxable items and who sells no more than two taxable items during a twelve-month period.

UTAH Utah has a state sales and use tax imposed at a rate of 4.7% plus additional local sales and use tax of up to 3.65%. Isolated or occasional sales of aircraft are specifically excluded from the Utah exemption for isolated or occasional sales of tangible personal property except where the transfer is of less than 20% of the ownership of the aircraft.

WASHINGTON The statewide sales and use tax rate in Washington is 6.5%. Washington also has a wide variety of local sales and use tax. As a result, notwithstanding the 6.5% statewide rate, actual rates vary from 7.0% to 9.5% depending on location. Casual and isolated sales of aircraft are exempt from Washington retail sales tax unless made by a person who is engaged in a business activity that is taxable under the business and occupation tax, or the public utility tax. However, casual and isolated sales are subject to use tax unless another exemption applies under the use tax law. “Casual or isolated sale” means a sale made by a person who is not engaged in the business of selling the type of property involved.

WYOMING Wyoming imposes a statewide sales/use tax at a rate of 4% plus local sales/use tax at rates between 0.5% and 2%. Wyoming does not provide a general sales tax exemption for casual sales of aircraft. ❯ Christopher B. Younger is a member of the Business Aircraft Group at GKG Law, P.C. He is a tax and FAA specialist concentrating in the areas of corporate aircraft transactions and aviation taxation. ❯ Mr. Younger can be reached at the firm’s Washington, DC office, 1054 31st Street, NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20007, telephone: (202) 342-5295, facsimile: (202) 342-5203, e-mail: cyounger@gkglaw.com. Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

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Pre-OwnedJuly12_Pre-Owned Sales Jan06 19/06/2012 11:52 Page 1

PRE-OWNED A/C SALES TRENDS

Pre-Owned Aircraft Sales Trends What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger... by Fletcher Aldredge s the aviation market ‘Still crazy after all these years?’ We don’t think so. This marketplace, perhaps even the larger economy, looks about as normal as possible considering the lack of unbridled lending and unbridled spending. Yes, we are also tired of hearing the term, but this may be the real new normal. We (and lots of others) were wrong when we said it was the new normal back in 1993, then again in 2003. This could be what normal looks like with responsible lending and careful spending – except for the nearly $16 trillion of National Debt. That’s not too responsible or careful, but probably better than European-style austerity. There is a bright side to all of this. The prolonged downturn coupled with a paltry recovery has forced change in the industry – closing the door on the old ways forever. As a former baseball coach used to say, ‘If it doesn’t kill you it makes you stronger.’ We’ll expound later.

I

PISTON SINGLES & TWINS These have exhibited remarkable price stability quarter after quarter. That is not to imply

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

that everything is selling - nor is it easy to sell. There is no shortage of airplanes on the market, and it is estimated we can see only about half of them. Much like the unemployed, many sellers have given up and stopped advertising. The thought of taking less than the loan amount or the amount they have invested is too hard to swallow. Activity is limited to the better airplanes and the better prices...and the owners who really want to sell. The proverbial sweet spot seems to be in the $100k-200k airplanes. Demand is good for Bonanzas, 210s, Senecas, or just about anything if it’s priced right and squawk-free. As one buyer puts it, “Where are you going to put your money? The stock market?” Now that’s a scary thought.

TURBOPROPS We wouldn’t dare lump this category in with the piston market. However, King Airs, Conquests and Twin Commanders share something in common with Cessna Cardinals and Piper Archers – namely their long-term price stability. It might even be safe to say the average turboprop has reached the bottom. This equiwww.AvBuyer.com

librium is probably due to perceived value. No airplane is cheap, but just look at what you can get for $1m+/- in the turboprop market: early model King Air B200s and 300s; not-so-early-model C90Bs, F90s and Piper Meridians; and most Conquest Is, Cheyennes and Twin Commanders. Obviously times and condition have a lot to do with value, but there is a lot of opportunity in this segment.

JETS Activity comes at a price – literally. Almost every broker we spoke to over the last quarter was, and is very busy. Sure, the Dog Days of Summer started in January for some of the older, needier airplanes – but latermodel and realistically-priced jets are moving. Nevertheless, it is a little disconcerting that prices continue to slip for many (if not most) jets. The Vref Light Jet Index fell 2.5% in the past quarter, Mid-Size Jets were off 8%, and Large Jets lost 3.8% in value. See more details at VrefOnline.com. There is indeed some momentum building in the late model (2008 and newer) large cabin market. Some dealers are optimistic this could spread to other markets. Aircraft Index see Page 4

Pre-OwnedJuly12_Pre-Owned Sales Jan06 19/06/2012 16:11 Page 2

PRE-OWNED A/C SALES TRENDS This may be one of the most prolonged downturns and probably the sketchiest recovery in memory. It might be time to rethink the 10% rule – ‘it’s more of a guideline actually.’ In a normal market, defined by an adequate supply of willing buyers, sellers and lenders, we’ve often thought when inventory falls below about 10%, prices tend to move up. However, in this new normal world it all depends on demand. If there is only one airplane available and there are no buyers, the market is flooded. Most importantly in this market, every time prices fall, new demand is created.

mation was actually printed backwards – just in case it ‘fell into the wrong hands.’ It’s easy to understand how some brokers and manufacturers had some anxiety related to the modern day information overload. Thanks to the Internet and 24/7 cable news, there are no secrets. That is not to say that all information is correct information – far from it, actually. Consumers are much better informed than ever before. Has this helped or hurt the industry? Clearly, it has helped. Five years into a persistently soft marketplace we are happy to say the industry has thoroughly adapted. With an open exchange of information and no artificial tampering (or help from the government) airplanes are selling. Buyers and sellers have come to terms and are doing business. Even in very tough times, airplanes are wanted and needed. The recession didn’t kill us, it made us stronger. This capitalism/free market thing appears to be a good idea after all.

ANOTHER VICTORY FOR THE FREE MARKET When the market collapsed at the end of 2008, there was a lot of concern about the information that buyers seemed to have. Basically, they thought the market was flooded and prices were tumbling. If that was so obvious to buyers (and every other person on the planet), why did sellers seem so conflicted? As recently as the mid-1990s, aircraft price guides were kept out of the hands of retail customers. Some of you might remember the days when wholesale pricing infor-

persistently soft marketplace we are happy to say the industry has thoroughly adapted.

❯ More information from www.vrefonline.com Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

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device so popular that it’s moved from cockpits into panels, the iPad serves many masters with a myriad of functions and applications – or “apps” as Apple calls them. Apps have become increasingly popular in aviation. One company, built the Cub-like Zlin Savage iCub it (http://icub.aero/?p=21), but around aircraft most aviation users take their iPad into their cockpits, apps loaded and ready to work in a myriad of ways. Apps serve as flight planners and record keepers, weather resources and more. Go online to the Apple iTunes store or Google the Internet: aviation apps are a growing segment of the iPad marketplace, and pilots up and down the scale are embracing the touch-screen tablet. With the standard caveats about not trying to learn to use new tools in the airborne cockpit, following is a run-down of what (by a non-scientific consensus) seems to be the top ten must-have products for the iPad for pilots – all available through Apple’s iTunes

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ust a few years ago, anyone walk throug could h a Genera l Aviation airport FBO lobby and see pilots passing corporate the time as ed for the return of their passen they waitstack of little gers with a brown binders of papers in front of them. and large piles made up of One pile was the sheets that out of the binders had been ripped and the other pristine, neat, pile was new stack, ready to repopu a the little brown late industry knows binder. Anyone from the that these were navigation Jeppesen charts, and the updati for the pilots was time consum ng process never-ending. ing and Now, with new digital systems, it be done by can hitting the download button all just wonde r what .I their day while pilots are doing now to fill sitting in a without any remote FBO, Jeppes There are severalen charts to update. Advisory Circula issued by the rs FAA to help explain vide guidan and proce on the Paperle which is now ss Cockpit, commonly known as the

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Global Markets July12_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 11:41 Page 1

GLOBAL MARKETS - ASIA PACIFIC

Asia Pacific Industry Round-Up China continues to dominate region’s activity. by Mike Vines he People’s Republic of China continues to dominate Business Aviation activity in the Asia Pacific region. Cessna through a plethora of partnerships looks likely to become the first western country to set up business aircraft assembly lines in China. Meanwhile, a new dedicated Business Aviation airport is to be built at Beijing and OEMs are increasing their visibility in the country and across the Asia Pacific region generally so as to be closer to their customers.

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CHINA China’s first dedicated Business Aviation and flight training airport is being developed from a green field site at Ping Gu, just half an hour’s drive due east of Beijing Capital Airport. Work on the eleven-square-kilometer site is being developed by Beijing General Aviation (BGA) which is wholly owned by the Beijing Government. The airport will probably be known as Beijing General Aviation Airport. The first phase of development calls for a 1,800 meter long runway which is expected to take around six months to complete, according to David Tang who is acting as a consultant to the new airport. Tang is hopeful that permission will be granted to extend the runway to 2,000 meters making it better suited to the operation of Gulfstream/Global Expresssized aircraft from the start. Phase two calls for the runway to be extended to 2,600 meters. BGA’s traffic won’t conflict with Beijing Capital’s, Tang outlined. The authorities want to find a suitable western FBO operator and also to attract OEMs to set up MROs there. “The FBO will probably be an exclusive deal,” Tang outlined. ❯

CESSNA TO BE THE FIRST WESTERN OEM TO SET UP ASSEMBLY LINES IN CHINA ?

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www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

Jetfina July page_Layout 1 20/06/2012 09:33 Page 1

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S/N 525-0435, G-CJAD, 2020 TT, RVSM, TCAS I, Engines on TAP Elite, Pro Parts, Cescom, NDH, Doc10 - 7/2010, Two Owners Since New, Total Time Airframe Since: New: 2063 / Landings: 1630 Asking 1,925,000 USD EEC VAT paid LH Engine Model: Williams International FJ-44-1A on TAP Elite. RH Engine Model: Williams International FJ-44-1A on TAP Elite. LH Engine Total Time: 2007/ TBO:3500/ Cycles:1579. RH Engine Total Time: 2063/ TBO:3500/ Cycles:1622 Avionics: Coms: Honeywell KY-196 Comms/8.33 KHz. Navs: Honeywell KN53 Navs/FM Immunity. DMEs: Honeywell KN63 DME/Chelton DM441B DME. ADF: Honeywell KR-87 ADF. Transponders: Dual Garmin GTX-330D Mode ‘S’. Weather Radar: Collins RTA-800 Colour Radar. Radar Altimeter: Collins ALT-55B Rad/Alt Options: Thrust Attenuators, Oxygen System, EROS Crew Oxygen Masks, Skitube baggage compartment, Sunshield covers, Rosen Sunvisors, German Kit with dual stick shaker. JAR OPS & EASA Compliant. B&D Cabin Information Display. Cockpit Curtain Exteriors: Overall White with Dark Brown, Gold and Coral Red Accent Stripes. Exterior in very good Condition Interiors: Five place executive interior having a forward side facing seat and a club four setting with fold out sidewall tables. All seats upholstered in light tan leather with the upper sidewalls in a co-ordinated patterned design History- Maintenance and Records: Maintained on CESCOM with Pro Parts. HSI on engines c/w 2/09 Location: LSZA - Lugano - Switzerland ALL LOCATED IN EUROPE * ALL OFFERS INVITED See Specs at WWW.JETFINA.COM or Call for more details

Global Markets July12_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 11:42 Page 2

GLOBAL MARKETS - ASIA PACIFIC Over the last few months Cessna has unfolded plans to prosper in China with news that it is to build Caravans, Citation Sovereigns and eventually Latitudes there. Cessna and Aviation Industry Corporation of China (AVIC) signed two strategic agreements to jointly develop General and Business Aviation in the PRC, paving the way for a range of business jets, utility single-engine turboprops and single-engine piston aircraft to be manufactured and certified in China. Cessna has also signed with AVIC Aviation Techniques Co. and the Chengdu Government to establish a joint venture to produce mid-size Cessna business jet models, as well as a potential new product for the business jet market. Whether this will include the EBACE-unveiled Longitude remains to be seen. The Cessna Caravan assembly deal is in conjunction with the China Aviation Industry General Aircraft Company Ltd., and the Shijiazhuang Municipal Government. The cooperation framework for this eventual joint venture includes aircraft sales and customer support for Caravans in China and for the Chinese market. “Not only does this continue Cessna’s involvement in the development of General Aviation in China, but it also paves the way for aircraft sales to which we would not have otherwise had access,” Mike Shih, vice president, China Strategy and Business development at Cessna remarked. “These aircraft will be manufactured in Kansas, and sent to Shijiazhuang, China, to undergo final assembly and then be sold in China.” Furthermore, Cessna has appointed Beijing DINGSHI GA Tech Service Center (CFIC) as a

DAVID TANG AT PING GU AIRPORT SITE

Citation authorized service facility. It will provide maintenance services on the Citation XLS+ family, Citation Sovereign and Citation X aircraft throughout northern Asia, and Cessna has also signed a preliminary agreement to appoint Shanghai Hawker Pacific as an authorized service facility to cover support for Citation Sovereigns operating in northern Asia. Dassault Falcon is also setting up a new operation in Shanghai to support its growing Chinese fleet. Dassault Falcon Aircraft Services (China) will be established by the end of the second quarter in partnership with Shanghai Hawker Pacific at the Shanghai Hawker Pacific complex at Hongqiao International Airport, and will play a key role in supporting the Falcon fleet that is expected to triple there by the end of 2012.

DASSAULT IS SETTING UP AN OPERATION IN SHANGHAI

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The Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) recently granted a Part 145 repair certificate for Hawker Pacific as well as a Part 145 approval for the Falcon 7X. Approvals for the Falcon 900LX and Falcon 2000LX models are expected within six months. And CAE has become the first independent training provider to be qualified as a CAAC approved training organization (ATO) for maintenance training for Dassault Falcon aircraft under China's CCAR-147 regulation. The approval enables CAE to deploy maintenance training courses in China for all in-production Dassault Falcon aircraft. The CCAR147 is part of the CAAC’s policy to accelerate the development of civil aviation maintenance mechanics there. Meanwhile, Embraer and China’s ICBC Financial Leasing Co., Ltd. have signed a MoU for both commercial and business jet aircraft financing and leasing. Under the MoU total program support could amount to as much as $2.5 billion over the next five years. China’s Minsheng Financial Leasing Co., Ltd. (MSFL) recently took delivery of its first of 13 Legacy 650s from Embraer. The milestone follows the July 2011 MoU between Minsheng and Embraer, covering the full range of Embraer’s executive jets which was shortly followed by MSFL’s 13-aircraft Legacy 650 order. At the 2012 Singapore Airshow, Embraer and Minsheng announced an additional agreement for three Lineage 1000s. Finally, Greenwich AeroGroup and ExecuJet have expanded their relationship to include ExecuJet Haite Aviation Services (based at Tianjin). The renewed agreement enables ExecuJet to represent Greenwich AeroGroup parts distribution, repair and overall services at all of its locations. Company officials say access to these newly added Greenwich AeroGroup services, as well as incentive-based discounts will result in ❯ added benefits for customers. Aircraft Index see Page 4

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Global Markets July12_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 16:18 Page 3

GLOBAL MARKETS - ASIA PACIFIC HONG KONG A new pan-Asian aviation consultancy group has been formed and it’s definitely not a one man, one country brokerage shop. Named Asian Sky Group, it is backed by SEACOR Capital (Asia) Ltd and Avion Pacific Ltd., and recently signed a Strategic Partnership Agreement with Avpro allowing for cross referrals; joint marketing and promotions of both company's services and exclusive aircraft listings to clients and prospects; and the placement of employees in Asia and the US to work alongside each other. Capitalizing on SEACOR Capital’s and Avion Pacific’s considerable investments and business development initiatives in Asia Pacific and its partnership with Avpro, Asian Sky is offering new or pre-owned aircraft sales and acquisitions; aircraft management and flight planning services; aircraft completions and refurbishments; MRO/FBO usage; financial solutions; flight crew/ maintenance training; and supplemental lift and aircraft charter. (Asian Sky’s Managing Director Jay Shaw is also the co-founder of Business Aviation Asia (BAA) in Hong Kong and Asia United Business Aviation (AUBA), a fully integrated business aircraft services company.) Gama Group, meanwhile, is to open a Hong Kong operating base that offers complete turn-key facilities to existing and potential customers. Mirroring operations in Europe, USA and the Middle East, Gama is now able to offer its clients aircraft management and charter services throughout Asia. In working together with Gama Charters Inc., Gama Asia provides operations through its inhouse FAA Part 135 Approval. Futher, Jet Aviation Hong Kong has opened a new interior shop in Tsuen Wan in the Kowloon area of Hong Kong. The 5,200 sq. ft. shop will add comprehensive interior refurbishment capabilities to the company’s maintenance facility with broad support for upholstery, carpeting, faux finishing and spray-painting. And Hong Kong-based Metrojet is opening its first overseas venture, Metrojet Engineering Clark Ltd, an MRO facility at the Diosdado Macapagal International Airport (DMIA) 40 miles north of Manila in the Philippines. The company says this marks the beginning of an international expansion program designed for heavy and business jet line-maintenance capabilities. Metrojet has also become the first RollsRoyce Authorized Service Centre for BR710 engines in Asia, providing full line maintenance support for engine and component installation and removal of Rolls-Royce BR710s. This includes Gulfstream GV and Bombardier Global Express series aircraft. Later this year the line maintenance support

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Centers across the country. A third of all Asia Pacific Embraer executive jets are based on the sub-continent and Embraer says the Bangalore move complements the role of Embraer’s Singapore Regional Distribution Center, where a master stock of parts for all of Embraer’s executive jets are held. In addition, Bell Helicopter has opened a new office in New Delhi to cover its operations in India. Currently there are two Bell Helicopter Customer Service Facilities in the region: Deccan Aviation in Bangalore and Air Works in Mumbai. Bell Helicopter also has full-time Customer Service representation there.

JAPAN JEFFREY LOWE, ASIAN SKY GROUP’S GM

will be extended to cover the Rolls-Royce Tay series engine that powers the Gulfstream GIV, and the BR725 engine that powers the G650. Additionally, a strategic alliance between US-based Solairus Aviation and Metrojet has been formed to offer both aircraft management services and comprehensive aircraft charter service solutions for clients in Asia. The partnership will capitalize on Solairus’ extensive experience in aircraft management, as well as Metrojet’s respected name and brand.

INDIA Embraer has signed an MoU with Air Works India Engineering Pvt Ltd to create a parts hub for all its in-service executive jets there. This covers Phenom 100, Legacy 600/650 and Lineage 1000 parts to be housed at Air Works’ facility in Bangalore. Parts will be dispatched to Embraer’s eight Authorized Service

Airbus has won its first corporate jet sale in Japan, for an Airbus ACJ318 which has been ordered by an undisclosed customer. Back in March Airbus demonstrated an ACJ318 at the opening of Tokyo Narita’s Premier Gate FBO, the first dedicated business jet terminal in Tokyo.

AUSTRALIA Mahindra GippsAero successfully completed the first flight of its ten seat GA10 250shp turboprop utility aircraft from Latrobe Airport, Victoria, on May 1. They’re not exactly VIP aircraft, but these rugged machines will have the capability to fly customers into remote areas. The multi-role aircraft will eventually be introduced to the Indian market says Hermant Luthra, President Mahindra Systech Aviation (owner of GippsAero).

❯ Do you have any questions or opinions on the above topic? Get them answered/published in World Aircraft Sales Magazine. Email feedback to: editorial@avbuyer.com

EMBRAER SIGNS A DEAL IN INDIA TO CREATE A ‘PARTS HUB’ THERE

www.AvBuyer.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

RASF WAS July 19/06/2012 10:29 Page 1

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Safety Matters June12_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 14:29 Page 1

SAFETY MATTERS - PILOT FATIGUE

Avoid Nodding Off: Managing Fatigue Risk In Private Aviation. by Dave Higdon or pilots flying scheduled airlines the debate about fatigue remains a controversial topic – but largely from the regulatory perspective, debating whether the FAA’s new rules provide the guidance considered scientifically justified. The agency tacitly acknowledged the impact of cost-benefit consideration when deciding to exempt cargo carriers. Similarly, most professionals in aviation know that ongoing debate about leaving cargo out prompted the FAA to review the issue for cargo crews’ rest and duty rules. Safety and fatigue experts concur: Fatigue in safety-critical jobs applies regardless of what’s carried - cargo or people.

F

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They also note that the issue remains an important one in General Aviation, whether it’s the on-demand charter commercial element, the private pilot flying a piston airplane, or a professional pilot flying a private jet under FAR 23. As one safety inspector explained, “It makes no difference, a tired body and fatigued mind make for a dangerous combination…behind the wheel of a truck, in the hospital operating room and most certainly at the controls of an airplane.” Yet exactly how companies and crew manage their rest and work cycles isn’t regulated like it is for airline crew. It’s mostly a matter of recognizing the problems that occur when crew fly exhausted, and then www.AvBuyer.com

self-imposing limits to prevent those issues from impacting operations. The major Aviation Organizations offer materials and courses to members to help them to understand and manage flying time and rest time, but it’s still ultimately up to operators to recognize and act on fatigue. That can sometimes be a difficult call for smaller flight departments and single-plane, single-pilot Business Aviation operators. And that’s where concerns arise. A cooperative study of Corporate Aviation by NASA, the Flight Safety Foundation and the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) gives us some solid insights into the pervasive, insidious ❯ nature of fatigue as a flight-safety issue. Aircraft Index see Page 4

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Safety Matters June12_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 14:30 Page 2

SAFETY MATTERS - PILOT FATIGUE fatigue symptoms. Ditto for acute illnesses (viral or bacterial infections) which may spur temporary sensations of exhaustion. A common symptom of depression is fatigue. And don’t forget that various common, over-the-counter medications produce the effects of fatigue, among them antibiotics and medications for hypertension, antihistamine-based hayfever and cold medications. Allow fatigue to go unresolved for long enough, say six or more months, and other symptoms may emerge as an indicator of something called chronic fatigue syndrome, characterized by many of the symptoms of influenza – soar throat, muscle weakness, pain, and swollen lymph nodes. Yet if identifying fatigue seems easy from the above, think again: we often do our most to deny being at our worst and in the process we often defeat our need to simply rest.

THE CUMULATIVE EFFECT

• Within a population of corporate pilots predominantly flying in Part 91 operations, 90 percent name fatigue as a moderate or serious safety issue from their experience. • A telling 75 percent of those pilots admitted involuntarily nodding off while flying a business flight previously. Anecdotal evidence from the piston-pilot community (many of them regular business flyers making 500-miles-plus flights hints at more than half struggling to stay awake, or involuntarily napping in-flight to the point of missing a radio call. Reports from the NTSB contain numerous instances in which fatigue was in evidence as a factor in accidents and incidents – several of them high-profile, many less prominent because thankfully no accident occurred or the incidents didn’t rise to the level of making the headlines.

A WIDESPREAD PROBLEM, ON AND OFF Fatigue - we know it even when we don’t

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recognize it or its cause. As one definition notes, causes vary. The Free Dictionary’s Medical Section defines the phenomenon this way: “Fatigue is physical and/or mental exhaustion that can be triggered by stress, medication, overwork, or mental and physical illness or disease.” That’s six causal factors. All appear regularly in accident and incident reports in all modes of transportation; aviation, however, stands alone as the only mode for which the operations effected occur in four dimension – with time, the fourth dimension, itself a contributing factor. We usually attribute inadequate rest as the most-common environmental factor in fatigue, but in reality the problem frequently results from other environmental causes, among them work and home stress, poor dietary habits, poor physical condition, or as a symptom of other chronic medical conditions or disease processes we suffer. Heart disease, low blood pressure, diabetes, endstage renal disease, iron-deficiency anemia, narcolepsy and cancer, for example, may contribute to long-term, ongoing www.AvBuyer.com

Fatigue happens subtly, insidiously…but not without warning. By the time we’re so fatigued that we show obvious symptoms we’ve passed the point where even a “good eight-hour sleep” is sufficient. In fact, we’ve been accumulating a rest deficit for some while, maybe even weeks. But as little as sleep cycles being disrupted for two to three days allows us to begin accumulating a rest deficit – and “rest” versus “sleep” is the operative word, because not all sleep is restful, and time needed to feel rested often takes more than sleep time alone. Think of rest as an account that must ultimately be balanced – and ultimately will balance itself - time, place or our will to sleep notwithstanding. In even mild instances, the most-common manifestation of fatigue comes by way of lack of focus, inability to execute known tasks, short-term memory issues, up to and including spontaneous nodding off at inappropriate times – say in the cockpit of a business jet as inappropriate a time for a pilot as the operating room for a surgeon. That’s when lives are most at stake. And it’s to prevent crew from ever reaching that point that most fatigue countermeasures are structured.

FATIGUE IGNORED CAN COST YOU DEARLY Do you think the idea of managing flight crews to avoid fatigue issues too expensive for your operation? Think of the costs of a preventable accident – particularly one in which human factors such as fatigue play a role. Then consider the simplicity of making a mindset change, as well as the benefits to other aspects of our lives. Life and dietary changes to habits that are Aircraft Index see Page 4

Safety Matters June12_Gil WolinNov06 19/06/2012 14:31 Page 3

SAFETY MATTERS - PILOT FATIGUE more fatigue resistant serves as one form of anti-tiredness strategy; living and working more regular hours and eating smarter takes only individual commitment to put into action. And we live healthier. Corporate policy also helps – particularly in operations with established flight departments, safety management systems and other support mechanisms less common to single-plane/singlepilot and owner-pilot operations. Conversely, constraints exist on pilots’ and mechanics’ abilities to limit other factors. For example, long, odd hours are something of a staple in Business Aviation; it’s unlikely they can be managed away completely. Likewise for some of the stresses of serving as flight crew on business aircraft. And for the ownerflown business aircraft operation, the issues can be compounded by the dual responsibilities of running a business and piloting an aircraft. That doesn’t mean that fatigue can’t be effectively managed or mitigated. The first step amounts to nothing more than simple recognition of the issue; that’s all it takes. Step Two comes about with the solid commitment to manage flight operations to avoid fatigue from becoming an issue and/or a commitment to take the steps necessary to mitigate the problem once manifested. But it doesn’t stop with the boss telling the pilot to go home, catch up on sleep and come back tomorrow. Sometimes fatigue comes into play by fits and starts, a little at a time; losing an hour’s sleep one night, starting early the next day, ending the flying day early, but then continuing in a work mode on whatever, with the pattern continued over the course of as few as three or four days – that’s enough to seriously disrupt rest cycles and start an accumulating rest deficit. Throwing in more variables makes the picture more complicated, and the solution more complex (for example, a week of out-of-syncwith-sleep-patterns trips marked by a couple of time-zone changes), and the crew can be well on its way to a rest deficit requiring more than a mere weekend to counter it. Square the potential for problems if that weekend lacks actual rest on normal cycles or the pilot has to travel a time zone or two just to get to the homestead. Savvy operators who acknowledge and act do so out of their own desire to maintain a safe flight operation – arguably the best and most-effective motivation there can be. Help is out there for private operators who haven’t yet recognized the potential for fatigue problems, however.

PART 91: SELF-MITIGATION EFFORTS ABOUND NBAA offers guidance, and notes that more than 300 flight departments apply fatigueAdvertising Enquiries see Page 8

management recommendations in the International Standard for Business Aircraft Operations (IS-BAO), a compendium of industry best practices and a focus on self-regulation. Self-regulating issues addressed by agencies in Commercial Aviation helps counter pressures to regulate private operations and assists flight departments worldwide in reaching levels of safety and professionalism on par with more-regulated operations. IS-BAO offers general insights on fatigue management and gives operators latitude to establish practices and policies suitable for their particular operation – and we all understand that Business Aviation operations are as diverse in their make-ups as there host companies are in their types of business. But even at more than 300 flight departments, that leaves a lot of other operators either whistling past the graveyard or, alternately, using other ways to manage their fatigue risks. For some operations that means limiting work days for crews starting earlier than normal; for others it means pre-positioning crew to relieve pilots pushing the company’s work-, flight- and travel-time limits, themselves selfimposed. And many flight-department management packages and safety management systems, such as Jeppesen’s Fatigue Risk Management Portfolio, provide guidance and tips business-aviation-using companies can tailor to their needs. The bottom line, according to safety experts, is to recognize and act on the potential as a regular part of flight operations – right on a par with annual and 100-hour inspections, recurrent training, and keeping software, charts and plates up-to-date. Think of fatigue management as another cost of business with the payback of safer operations, healthier crew and the lower insurance costs of going years without an incident or reportable accident. Safest practices in aviation are something of which we should never grow tired. www.AvBuyer.com

HOW THE OTHER HALF FLIES: Although the FAA doesn’t mandate work and rest hours, weekly, monthly or annual flighttime limits, some of what the FAA adopted last December may have application in some Part 91 flight departments. For reference, take a look at the “science-based” standards set by the FAA in its revised work/fly/rest requirements for airline pilots published last December. http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/ rulemaking/recently_published/media/ 2120-AJ58-FinalRule.pdf

AMONG THE PROVISIONS ARE REQUIREMENTS STATING: •

Pilots must be allowed a minimum of 10 hours of rest every day, up from the old rule’s eight-hour requirements;

Pilots must get a minimum of 30 consecutive hours each week free from work duties, up from the old rule’s 24hour standard;

Depending on when the duty day begins, pilots are limited to eight or nine hours of flight-time each day – and there are more limits on the length of the duty day, which includes nonflying work time.

Although the FAA initially demurred from applying these same standards to the cargo airlines, the agency since has started a review of the decision, and is reconsidering whether the rules should apply to carriers flying goods rather than people. Regardless of views on that, there’s no escaping that the science has become clearer on the cause and effect of fatigue – and it’s seldom, if ever good.

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

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Northern Air N412ET June 19/06/2012 12:17 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2007 Learjet 40XR • Extended Range Fuel Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

45-2083 N412ET 2134 1827

Airframe Factory Warranty Through Sept. 2012 Smart Parts Engines Both Engines 2134 hours TT \1827 Cycles Enrolled on MSP Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight • Director & Autopilot System • 4-tube 8x7” EFIS, • Dual Universal UNS1 L FMS • Dual Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Honeywell HF 1050 Comm • Dual Nav and RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Single ADF • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter • Cockpit Voice Recorder

• Radio Altimeter • XM Satellite Weather Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Black and Platinum Stripes. Interior Fire-blocked Six passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for a seventh passenger. Two Left and one Right executive tables with Elm Burl gloss inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Balsam leather with Milkweed lower sidewalls, and finished Elm Burl wood gloss laminate. Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • Airshow Cabin Audio/Video System • XM Satellite Radio • Extended Range Fuel

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512

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www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net Aircraft Index see Page 4

Northern Air N959RP June 19/06/2012 12:20 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Learjet 40XR • Extended Range Fuel Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

40-2100 N959RP 1895 1538

• Extended Range Fuel Airframe Factory Warranty Smart Parts Engines Left Engine 1907 / Right Engine 1899 MSP Gold Avionics • Honeywell Primus 1000 Integrated Flight • Director & Autopilot System • 4-tube 8x7” EFIS • Dual Universal UNS1 L FMS • Dual Comm radios with 8.33 Capabilities • Honeywell HF 1050 Comm • Dual Nav and RMI • Dual Mode S Transponders • Dual DME • Single ADF • Honeywell TCAS II • Honeywell Mark VII EGPWS • Honeywell Primus Radar 660 • ARTEX 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter

• Cockpit Voice Recorder • Radio Altimeter • XM Satellite Weather Exterior Overall Matterhorn White with Blue and Yellow Stripes Interior Fire-blocked Six passenger executive interior in a center club configuration with an aft belted seat for a seventh passenger. Two Left and one Right executive tables with Imbuia gloss inlays in the center club. Seating is finished in Almond Crunch leather with Surfside lower sidewalls and finished Imbuia wood gloss laminate Optional Equipment • Freon Air Conditioner • AOA w/Indexer • Iridium Satellite Flight Phone • Cabin/Cockpit Fire Extinguishers • Interior 110V AC • Lead Acid Battery • Tail Cone Flood Lights • RVSM Capable • Airshow Cabin Audio/Video System • XM Satellite Radio • Extended Range Fuel

Northern Air, Inc. Mark Serbenski Gerald R. Ford International Airport 5500 - 44th Street, SE • Grand Rapids, MI 49512 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 800 262 4953 Tel: +1 616.336 4737 Cell: +1 616 648 2656 Fax: +1 616 988 4164 mserbenski@northernair.net www.northernair.net WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

125

2000 Global Express July 19/06/2012 12:22 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2000 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

9067 N67RX 7160 2125

As owner, Japat AG offers for sale its 2000 Bombardier Global Express, Serial Number 9067. This aircraft features: • Honeywell Avionics • 8C-Check and Landing Gear Overhaul just completed • New soft goods and white paint

Airframe Empty Weight: 49,696 Lbs, Max Gross Weight: 96,000 Lbs, Max. Landing: 78,600 Lbs. . No Known Damage History. Engines BR710A2-20 on Corporate Care. Left: S/N-12235, TT: 7160.1 Hrs, TC: 2,125 Cycles. Right: S/N-12246, TT: 7160.1 Hrs, TC: 2,125. All Inspections Current. APU: RE-220(GX). On MSP Avionics DU-870 EFIS, Honeywell FMS, Honeywell IC800 Flight Director & Autopilot, GPS-550 GPS, RNZ-850 NAV, ADF, & DME, RCZ-833K VHF, HF-9000/Selcal HF, RCZ-833 Mode S Enhanced Transponder, Primus-880 Radad, TCAS, FDR, CVR, ELT

Interior Original, 14 seat interior. Baker Cabin Management System. Electric Window Shades. 4 Club Seats in Forward Cabin, 2 Club Seats plus 4-Seat Dining Group in Mid Cabin, 2-Seat Divan plus 2 Club Seats in Aft Cabin. Fwd and Aft Magair Toilets. DVD, CD, & VCR. 6-6.5” Seat Monitors. Crew Rest has built-in PMAT plus 10” Monitor. Fax. TIA Oven. Freezer. Chiller. Microwave. Aircraft will be delivered with fresh soft goods in June 2012. Color can still be decided by buyer. Exterior It is coming out of 8C with fresh soft goods. Aircraft has an all new white paint Aircraft Located in Morristown, New Jersey Price: Please Inquire

Japat AG Daniel Stieger

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www.AvBuyer.com

E-mail: daniel.stieger@novartis.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

2001 Global Express March 19/06/2012 12:30 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2001 Bombardier Global Express Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

9086 M-MNAA 6370 2229

As owner, Japat AG offers for sale its 2001 Bombardier Global Express, Serial Number 9086. This aircraft features: • Honeywell Avionics • 8C-Check and Landing Gear Overhaul in October 2012 • Buyers Choice of new Interior and Paint Colors

Airframe Empty Weight: 49,545 Lbs, Max Gross Weight: 96,000 Lbs, Max. Landing: 78,600 Lbs. Engines BR710A2-20 on Corporate Care. Left: S/N-12287, TT: 6370.19 Hrs, TC: 2,229 Cycles. Right: S/N-12286, TT: 6370.19 Hrs, TC: 2,229. All Inspections Current. APU: RE-220(GX). On MSP Avionics DU-870 EFIS, Honeywell FMS, Honeywell IC800 Flight Director & Autopilot, GPS-550 GPS, RNZ-850 NAV, ADF, & DME, RCZ-833K VHF, HF-9000/Selcal HF, RCZ-833 Mode S Enhanced Transponder, Primus-880 Radad, TCAS, FDR, CVR, ELT. Interior Original, 14 seat interior. Baker Cabin Management System. Electric Window

Shades. 4 Club Seats in Forward Cabin, 2 Club Seats plus 4-Seat Dining Group in Mid Cabin, 2-Seat Divan plus 2 Club Seats in Aft Cabin. Fwd and Aft Magair Toilets. DVD, CD, & VCR. 6-6.5” Seat Monitors. Crew Rest has built-in PMAT plus 10” Monitor. Fax. TIA Oven. Freezer. Chiller. Microwave. Aircraft will be delivered with fresh soft goods in October 2012. Color can still be decided by buyer. Exterior July 2002 Paint. Overall White with Blue and Gold Stripes. Aircraft will be delivered with new, October 2012 Paint. Color can still be decided by buyer. Aircraft Located at Basel-Airport, Switzerland Price: Please Inquire

Japat AG Daniel Stieger

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

E-mail: daniel.stieger@novartis.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

127

Remo Investments July 21/06/2012 14:59 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1991 Hawker 1000B Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

259004 M-ACPT 3946 2328

• 8.33 VHF • FN Immune Navs • RVSM approved • MNPS approved • 3000 nm with 8 Pax • One owner since factory Engine Engines Hours/Cyc: Left: 3374 TTSN. 1968 TCSN. Right: 3109 TTSN. 1809 TCSN Engines – ESP Silver APU Solar T-62T-40C8D-1 Total Hours: 1355 Avionics Dual Honeywell SPZ-8000. Dual Honeywell EDZ818 Dual Honeywell DFZ-800 Nav (RNZ 850/ADZ 810/RCZ 850 Mode S.) Dual Honeywell SRZ-850 Corn. Dual Honeywell Laseref III / with GPS. EGPWS Honeywell Mk V TCAS 2000 Dual Honeywell FMZ-900 FMS Honeywell Primus 870 W/Radar Honeywell AA-300 Rad/Alt. Racal H690/4 Pax/Crew Telephone Fairchild CVR Dual King KHF-950 HF with S/CAL. FDR – Provisions NZ 2000

Interior 8 place with 5 individual chairs, including fwd. club 4, aft 3 place divan all in leather. Dual fwd. galley with cooking oven, 'fridge, hot water/coffee pot and sink unit. Aft toilet. Baggage hold aft of toilet. Aft slimline wardrobe, Fwd wardrobe/baggage with tambour door & 3rd crew jump seat stowage. Light veneers & gold plated fittings. New Head and Window liner to dado in Ultra Leather in 09 Exterior Overall white, silver & red scheme. 2008 Weights Max. Ramp Max. Take off Max. Landing Zero Fuel Op. Empty

31300 lbs 31100 lbs 25000 lbs 20300 lbs 17734 lbs

Options Rohr Thrust reversers Exterior toilet servicing. Exterior access to aft baggage hold. Engines on Pratt & Whitney ESP Notes MNPS approved. Factory Mods have been incorporated to late production aircraft status

Remo Investments

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Tel: Email:

+44 (0) 7860 307638 1peterprescott3@o2.co.uk

Aircraft Index see Page 4

Heeren GIV July_Heeren Cit Ultra sep 19/06/2012 12:37 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1988 Gulfstream IV Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1062 N619ML 6688 2878

Engines Rolls Royce TAY 611-8. Total Times: Engine #1: 6580 Cycles: 2836 TSO: 1084 Engine #2: 6580 Cycles: 2836 TSO: 1084 APU Honeywell GTCP 36-100 Total Time:4406 Avionics Are protected under the Honeywell HAPP Avionics Exchange Program Communications Transceivers: Dual Collins VHF422 w/ 8.33 Spacing Navigation Receivers: Dual Collins VIR-432 w/ FM Immunity Auto Pilot: Honeywell SPZ-8000 Transponder: Dual ACSS 7510700-951 Mode S Auto Direction Finder: Dual Collins ADF 462 Distance Measuring Equip: Dual Collins DME-442 Air Data Computer: Dual Honeywell AZ-810 Flight Management System: Dual Honeywell FMZ-2000 Version 6.0A Global Positioning System: Dual Honeywell HG2021GD02 Auto Flight Info Service: Global 400-045500-001 SAT COM: ICS-200 Iridium High Frequency Com: Dual Collins HF-190

Flight Director: Dual Honeywell SPZ 8000 Radar: Honeywell Primus-870 Encoding Altimeter: Yes Radio Altimeter: Dual Honeywell RT-300 Terrain Collision Avoidance Sys: Honeywell TCAS II, Change 7.0 Enhanced Ground Prox. Warning: Honeywell Mark 5 EGPWS Long Range Navigation: Allied Signal AD97-53GNS-XLS Cockpit Voice Recorder: Fairchild Enhanced Flight ID: Yes Radio Tuning Units: Dual Collins 822-0730-332 Thumb Drive Data Loader: Honeywell 7016600901 Inertial Reference Units: Triple Honeywell AFIS: Honeywell Global AFIS Printer: TELPAR Satcom: ICS – 200 Irdium w/ two handwired handsets, and one wireless handset RVSM Compliant: Yes FM Immunity Interior 1/6/05. Tan/Beige. Two sets Four Club Seats with executive table: a three place divan; and two seats facing each other across from credenza. Metal hardware finished in gold. Aft Galley with Convection Oven, Microwave, 2 coffee pots, and a Expresso Machine . There are two lavs: one forward and one aft. There is an entertainment center with 1400 movies, DVD Player, CVR Player, 2 iPod docks, Airshow 4000. Three Rosen 14”monitors. Access to baggage area through the aft lav

HEEREN AVIATION CONSULTANTS 620 Newport Center Drive, Suite 1100 Newport Beach, CA 92660 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Exterior 1/6/05. White with 4 thin burgundy stripes 1HONEYWELL EXCHANGE PROGRAM – In effect until July 12, 2012 BRITE PARTS – in effect Maintenance “C” Check and Corrosion inspections Completed 3/2012. The ASC 469 waterline upgrade is presently being completed ASKING PRICE: $6,995,000 USD

Tel: (949) 830-1961 Email: Virginia Barton: vbarton@heerenaviation.com Edward Heeren: edheeren@heerenaviation.com

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129

ASW Air-Service March 19/06/2012 12:39 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Asking price 12.9Million US$ 1991 Mystere-Falcon 900 B Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

101 VP-CAB 3950 3480

• One owner since new (private owner) • No damage history • Maintenance by JetAviation Basel • Perfect condition interior and exterior • CAT II equipped and approved by CAA • Complies with JAR OPS 1 • Cayman Island registration, formerly on German registration • CAMP access can be granted • A/C delivered with fresh A check

Engines Engines TFE731 5BR1C Honeywell (with MSP Gold Serviceplan) Consecutive serial numbers, engines supplied with aircraft upon delivery MPI/CZI due in 300HRS, cost covered by MSP. APU GTCP 36-150 F HSI C/W in 2005 Avionics FDR CVR

Tri- band ELT EGPWS Single Rad Alt Mode S TCAS Dual VHF 8,33khz RVSM BRNAV HF Selcal Single GPS Dual FMS/ IRS Weather Radar with Dual Controller Stormscope CAT II certified. Interior Hot air oven and coffeemaker. 14 Pax config. with fabric (wool) armrest and seatbase leather. Cabin LED lighting. CD Player. Special Equipment Cabin LED lighting Ice detector Battery charger Iridium sat phone Towbar installation USB data loader Third flight deck crew seat N1 DEEC’s Maintenance 3C check C/W 2009 ASW Air-Service Werkflugdienst GmbH & Co.KG Flughafen, Gebäude 347 22335 Hamburg, Germany

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Tel: + 49-(0)40-59 88 46 Fax: + 49-(0)40-59 64 09 Cell: + 49-(0)170-8383330 E-mail: Falcon@bauermedia.com

Aircraft Index see Page 4

Jetsales May 19/06/2012 12:44 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2007 Eurocopter 135P2+ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT:

0561 SP-KOT 300

• Immaculate and VIP configuration • Lowest time on market • One owner • This as new beautiful Eurocopter EC135P2+ has black paint with matching gold stripes. • Since new it has one owner and was only for private use. The SPKOT has a dedicated hangar in which it is kept and taken care of. • All inspections are to date and all SB are complied. • This helicopter is configured for single pilot VFR day and night as also IFR Flights. • There are 7 seats (5+2) in a VIP configuration. • This EU registered helicopter is located in EPPO (Poznan, Poland)

Avionics Glass cockpit Autopilot Stormscope WX500 2xGarmin GNS430 NAV/COM/GPS 10” copilot instrument panel Garmin GTX Mode S Transponder DME DMS44A Other features Bleed air heating, safe battery, 450W landing and search light, copilot flight controls, windscreen wipers, standby horizon, AL804DC with backup Passenger comfort VIP Interior Air conditioning 7 Bose X Headsets Enhanced sound proofing Other options include Ground power plug, Hydraulic handling

Engines 2x Pratt & Whitney

Jetsales Ltd

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +44 (0) 777 14 33 999 Email: sales@jetsales.pl

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

131

Florida Jet July 20/06/2012 15:06 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1988 Gulfstream IV Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1085 N423TT 8312 3836

Engines Engine Model: Rolls Royce TAY MK611-8 Rolls Royce Corporate Care Program Engine #1: Engine #2: TSOH: 1133 Hours 1133 Hours CSOH: 544 544 APU Model: Garrett GTCP36-100 TSHSI: 1524 Hours: 6246 Maintenance 12, 24, 72 month items complied with May 2012 by General Dynamics PBI Gulfstream Computerized Maintenance Program Additional Features RVMS Allied Signal EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II With Change 7 Honeywell Sat AFIS Baker Audio Control System XM Radio Baker Passenger Briefing System Artex C-406-1 ELT Fairchild A-100 Cockpit Voice Recorder Motorola NA-135 SELCAL

Avionics • Dual Honeywell SPZ-8000 EFIS • Iridium Satphone • Triple Honeywell FMZ-2000 w/5.2 software • Dual Collins HF-190 • Triple Collins VHF-422D Comms • Dual Collins VIR-432 Navs • Dual Collins ADF-462 • Dual Collins DME-442 • Dual Collins TDR-94D Transponders • Honeywell Primus 870 Color Radar • Triple Honeywell Laseref II IRU • Dual Honeywell GPS • Honeywell Lasertrak • 3rd Standby Nav/Comm CTL-23 Exterior White with blue and silver stripes Re-striped January 2007 Interior and Cabin Features Refurbished soft goods and wood January 2007 Replaced carpet & recovered Divan May 2012 13-Passenger Executive Seating Forward crew only & Aft Lavatory Airshow 400 Three 17" LCD Video Monitors

Florida Jet 1516 Perimeter Road, Suite 201 Palm Beach International Airport West Palm Beach, FL 33406

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Tel: +1 (561) 615-8231 Fax: +1 (561) 615-8232 Email: info@flajet.com www.FlaJet.com Aircraft Index see Page 4

Mente Citation VII & Falcon 2000 July 19/06/2012 12:47 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1995 Citation VII Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

650-7059 N14DG 4,456.4 3,504

• LOW TOTAL TIME, 4,456.4 HOURS • MSP • XM RADIO • HERMISTATIC DOOR SEAL TO REDUCE CABIN NOISE LEVEL • 2 LARGE MONITORS & 5 INDIVIDUAL SEAT MONITORS Engines Garrett TFE - 731-4R-2S MSP Gold Left: S/N: P102227. 4,220.5 Hours. 3,337 Cycles Right: S/N: P102228. 4,267 Hours. 3,329 Cycles

Kyle Foddrill Tel: +1 (817) 372-4527 E-mail: kfoddrill@mentegroup.com APU Honeywell S/N: 36-150. 2,459 Hours On MSP Avionics • Honeywell SPZ-8000 Avionics Suite • Honeywell SPZ-8000 IFCS • Honeywell Primus 670 • Dual Collins VHF 22A • Dual Collins DME 42 • Dual Collins ADF 452 • Collins TDR -94 • Collins ALT-55 • Honeywell TCAS-II • Fairchild GA-100 Cockpit Voice Rec. • Dual Honeywell NZ-2000 • King KTR-953 with SeCal • Honeywell Mark VIII

AirCell 3100T with dual handsets. Airshow 400. RVSM Compliant. VHS and CD player. Hermistatic Door Seal Interior Six passenger configuration features a forward four place club with two fold out executive tables and two forward facing aft seats. The aircraft features a belted aft lavatory. Soft Goods Refurbished November 2008; New Carpet November 2008 Exterior New Paint November 2008, by Jim Miller Additional Features 5 Individual monitors. XM Radio IPod docking station. Camera 14" Monitor in the forward right cabin 10" Monitor in the forward left cabin Hermistatic Door Seal to reduce cabin noise level

Two Corporate Owners Since New

2001 Falcon 2000

Mark Payne Tel: +1 972-897-3246 E-mail: mark@mentegroup.com

Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

Interior Eight passenger interior consisting of a four place aft cabin package including left hand dining/coffee table and two sets of dual passenger seats, two individual 18” wide passenger seats. Jumpseat (ERDA). Crew seat sheepskin inserts. Aircraft flight/performance box. Aircraft logbook holder. Forward right hand galley annex (15”). Right hand galley(46”) with pop-out work surface, high temp oven, Tia coffee maker, and Tia microwave oven. Forward left hand entryway closet/entertainment cabinet with 15” LCD monitor on cabin side. Headliner lighting system. Galley pocket/sliding door Exterior Last Painted: January 2011. By: Duncan Aviation White (Jetglo snow white) with blue (Jetglo light blue) and black (Jetglo gloss black) stripes. Dry bay mod complied with prior to repaint

131 N707MM 5,187 3,010

• Exterior Paint in January 2011 • Engine Program: 100% JSSI • One Owner • Fortune 500 Owned & Operated Airframe Camp Maintenance & Tracking Program Engines CFE 738-1-1B 100% JSSI Left: S/N P105379, 5,068 Hours, 3,010 Cycles Right: S/N P105387, 5,066 Hours, 3,010 Cycles APU S/N P-243. 2,679 Hours. APU is not on a Program

Avionics • Four Tube Collins 4000 EFIS • Dual Collins VHF-422C Comm • Dual Collins VIR-432 NAV • Dual Collins ADF-462 ADF • Dual Collins DME-442 DME • Dual Collins TDR-94D Mode S TDR • One Collins TWR-850/2 Cntrls Radar • Dual Collins FMS-6000/CDU-6100 FMS • Dual Collins 4000 GPS • Dual Honeywell Laseref IV • Dual Collins 9000 w/ Selcal HF • Dual Collins ALT-55B Rad Alt • Meggitt LCD Secondary Flight Display • Collins 4000 w/ Chng 7 TCAS II • Collins APS-4000 Autopilot • Socata 97 Tri Band Elt

Mente Group, LLC 15303 North Dallas Parkway Suite 1320, Addison, TX 75001

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: 1 214 351 9595 www.mentegroup.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

133

Welsch Avitaion July 19/06/2012 15:15 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

1999 Gulfstream IVSP Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

1366 N404XT 6,899 4,558

Engine Rolls-Royce Tay 611-8 on MSG-3 Schedule #1 - 6,747 Hours Since New - 1,837 Hours Since Midlife in 11/2007 #2 - 6,812 Hours Since New - 3,359 Hours Since Midlife in 01/2005 APU GTCP 36-150G - 2,773 Time Since New - On MSP Avionics Honeywell SPZ-8400 Package Triple Collins VHF-422 Comm w/ 8.33 Spacing Dual Collins VIR-432 Nav w/ FM Immunity Dual Collins ADF-462 ADF Dual Collins DME-442 DME Dual Collins HF-822-0102-001 Dual Collins TDR-94D Transponders w/Mode S Flight ID Triple Honeywell LaserRef II IRS Dual Honeywell NZ-2000 FMS Dual Honeywell RT-300 Radio Altimeters Honeywell Primus WU-880 Color Radar Honeywell LASERTRACK Honeywell TCAS II w/ Change 7 Honeywell EGPWS Honeywell AFIS Iridium Aircell P-12023 Satcom L3 F-1000 Digital FDR S-800-2000-00 Fairchild CVR 2100-1020-00 Airtext ELT-406

Features Honeywell HUD RVSM, RNP-5 & RNP-10 Pulse Landing Lights Wingtip Taxi Lights LED Nav Lights [ASC-466] Entertainment Airshow 400 • Three 14” Monitors • DVD and VCR Players • CD Player/Changer • Cabin Stereo Speakers • Cockpit & Cabin 110V AC Outlets Interior 12 Passenger with Aft Galley and Single Aft Lav • Fwd cabin - 4 place club configuration with dual fold-out tables • Mid cabin - 4 place conference group with opposing credenza w/ non-belted seat • Aft cabin - 4 place club configuration with dual fold-out tables • Aft Full Galley • Aft Full Lav w/ Belted Seat • Original 1999 w/ New Carpet Exterior Oyster White with Blue and Gold stripes • New November 2005 Maintenance Aircraft is maintained under the MSG-3 Schedule 12, 48, 144 month inspections c/w 10/2011 Honeywell Avionics covered under HAPP Program ASC-469 Ribbon Heater c/w 11/2010 ASC-485B APU Thermal Barrier c/w 02/2011 Price Make Offer

Contact Robert Hart Tel: +1 (0) 912-964-7727 Mob: +1 (0) 912-695-1555 Email: rhart75546@aol.com www.welschaviation.com

Since 1949

WELS WELSCH SCH S CH A V I A T I O N ®

Aircraft Sales & Acquisitions A

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Aircraft Index see Page 4

CAI Socata TBM700B July 19/06/2012 15:19 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2002 TBM 700B Serial Number: 239 Airframe TT: 1,675 Engine PRATT & WHITNEY PT6A-64 (3,500 Hr. TBO) 322 Hours Since Hot Section Propeller HARTZELL 230 SPOH - Nov. 2008 Avionics NAV/COMM: GARMIN GNS-530W AP/FD: KING KFC-325 (W/PRESELECT) DME: KING KN-63 XPNDR: DUAL GARMIN GTX-327 ALTIMETER: KING KEA-346 R/ALT: KING KRA-405B EGPWS: KING KGP-560 (ON GMX-200) R/ALT: KING KRA-405B AUDIO: GARMIN GMA-340 GPS: DUAL GARMIN GNS-530W EFIS: TWO-TUBE BENDIX EFS-40 MFD: GARMIN GMX-200 W/CHARTVIEW RADAR: KING RDR-2000 (ON GMX-200) S/SCOPE: WX-500 TCAD: SKYWATCH HP Wx: GARMIN GDL-69 (DOWNLINK) Features THREE OWNERS SINCE NEW, GASEOUS OXYGEN SYSTEM, ROLL STEERING UPGRADE FOR MORE PRECISE AUTOPILOT CONTROL FOR APPROACHES, UPGRADED THE EFIS 40 TO COUPLE WAAS VERTICAL (LPV) APPROACHES, ETM 700 ENGINE TREND MONITOR, FULL COPILOT

INSTRUMENTS: KING KI-525 HSI, AIRSPEED & VERTICAL SPEED INDICATORS, ALTITUDE INDICATOR, ELECTRIC ARTIFICIAL HORIZON, ELECTRIC TRIM CONTROL, ALTIMETER AND AIRSPEED INDICATOR. KEITH FREON AIR, TRI BAND ELT, KNOWN ICING (DE-ICE BOOTS, ELECTRIC PROP, ELECTRICALLY HEATED RIGHT HAND SIDE WINDSHIELD, PITOT/STALL, INERTIAL SEPARATOR), ELT, OAT GAUGE AND NO DAMAGE HISTORY Maintenance ANNUAL INSPECTION COMPLIED WITH FEBRUARY 2012 BY SOCATA AIRCRAFT, LANDING GEAR ON 10 YEAR LONG LIFE INSPECTION PROGRAM WHICH INVOLVED REBUILDING THE ACTUATORS TO 10 YEAR SPECS, REPLACING ALL THE TORQUE LINK PINS AND BUSHINGS IN ALL THREE GEAR AND RESEALING THE GEAR, NEW WING BOOTS NOVEMBER 2008. Interior PLATINUM EDITION, HIGH COMFORT BEIGE LEATHER SEATS, GOLD METAL FINISH FOR READLING LIGHTS, BEIGE ALCANTARA WALLS, WOOD OVERHEAD PANEL, EXECUTIVE WRITING TABLE, AND HIGH GLOSS CHERRY CABINETRY. Exterior WHITE UPPER FUSELAGE AND WINGS, LOWER FUSELAGE BLUE WITH SILVER, BLUE AND RED ACCENTS The aircraft is based in Europe

J.P. Hanley Corporate AirSearch Int'l Inc. Palm Beach, South Florida

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Palm Beach Tel: Fax: Cellular: Email: Website:

(561) 433-3510 (561) 433-3842 (561) 289-3355 jp@caijets.com www.caijets.com

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Albinati Citationjet 2+ February 19/06/2012 15:22 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2008 Cessna Citationjet 2+ Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

525A-0385 HB-VOP 1439 1409

Engines on TAP Elite Williams International FJ-44- 3A-24 FADEC Controlled LH: S/N 216179 1439 TT / 1409 CSN RH: S/N 216178 1439 TT / 1409 CSN Avionics Collins Proline 21 Avionics System with 3 (8x10 inc) color, active matrix liquid crystal displays. AHRS 2 Collins AHC-3050 ADC 2 Collins ADC-3000 IFIS 1 Collins IFIS-5000 FMS 2 Collins FMS-.3000 (incl. DME II) GPS 1 Collins GPS-4000A w/12-Channel RTU 2 Collins RTU-4200 NAV 2 Collins NAV-4000 and NAV-4500 ADF 1 Collins ADF DME 1 Collins DME-4000 VHF 2 Collins VHF-4000 w/8.33KHz spacing XPDR 2 Collins TDR-94 Mode S TCAS II 1 Collins TTR-4000 TCAS II EGPWS Mark V EGPWS with RAAS Radar 1 Collins WXR-800 ESIS GH-3000 ESIS CVR Provisions for installation of L3 connection FA 2100 CVR ELT 1 Artex C406-N w/3 freq. ELT MDC 1 Collins Maintenance Diagnostic System

Additional Equipment Gnd Com Dispatch Switch (powers 1Radio, 1 RTU and both audio panel) Pulselight System with interface to TCAS II Tail Log Lights Nose Landing Gear in/protection boot Installation Jeppesen Electronic Charts on MFD Crew Seat Sheepskin Slipcovers 110V Ac Universal Electrical Outlet w/500W Inverter Monorail Sunvisors – Entry Step Upgrade to Airstair Style Steep Approach Option Interior Two (2) Cockpit, six (6) Cabin passengers seats. Four executive club chairs with two fold-out executive tables. RH Fwd Refreshment Center. Aft Divider Assembly with sliding door Aft Low Boy storage cabinet with drawer One Aft Potty Belted Seat. Townsend Leather Satin finished wood veneer – Australian Walnut Brushed Aluminium Hardware Finish. Exterior Overall white with dark grey stripes JAR OPS 1

Asking Price: Make Offer

ALBINATI AERONAUTICS SA P.O. BOX 44 1215 GENEVA 15 AIRPORT SWITZERLAND

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WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: Mob: E-mail: Web:

+41 (0) 22 306 1060 +41 (0) 79 2005265 info@albinati.aero www.albinati.aero Aircraft Index see Page 4

John Hopkinson Ultras July 19/06/2012 15:28 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Cessna Citation Ultras Avionics Honeywell Primus 1000 3 - Tube EFIS Honeywell GNS-XLS FMS Honeywell MKVII EGPWS Honeywell TCAS II w/Change 7 L3 Cockpit Voice Recorder Global-Wulfsberg AFIS Interior Seven Passenger Interior & Belted Lav Seat Aft Tailcone Baggage w/Ski Tube. Zephyr Air Conditioning. Recently refreshed Interior Exterior Recently completed Permaguard sealed Exterior Maintenance Fresh Phase 1 - 5 completed by Landmark, Scottsdale Zero Engine Option follow us on twitter@HopkinsonAssoc

John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd. 1441 Aviation Park NE, 2nd Floor, Box 560, Calgary, Alberta, T2E 8M7

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: (403) 291 9027 Fax: (403) 637 2153 sales@hopkinsonassociates.com www.hopkinsonassociates.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

137

Eurojet July 20/06/2012 15:04 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

2000 Citation Bravo Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

550B-0917 G-IDAB 2780 2341

• On Power Advantage & ProParts • EU-Ops Compliant • Fresh Phase I through V just completed Engines Eng 1 (L): 2,780 SNEW - 4,000 TBO - 2,341 CSN Eng 2 (R): 2,780 SNEW - 4,000 TBO - 2,341 CSN Avionics Avionics Package: Honeywell P-1000 Flight Director: Primus 1000 Autopilot: Primus 1000 FMS: Honeywell GNS-XLS Communication Radios: Dual King With 8.33 Spacing Navigation Radios: Dual King DME: Dual King ADF: King CNI-5000 Transponder: Honeywell MST-67A Mode S enhanced TCAS: Honeywell CAS-67A TCAS-II TAWS: Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS Hi Frequency: Bendix/King KHF-950 Weather Radar: Collins RTA-800 CVR: Fairchild FDR: Fairchild

Additional Equipment and Options Rosen Monorail sun visors EROS Crew Masks 50 Cubic Foot Oxygen Bottle Large SAFT 43 Amp Battery Overwater Life Vests Honeywell Mark VIII EGPWS Artex ELT w/triple channels Camino window inserts Exterior Matterhorn with navy blue & burgundy stripes Interior Attractive lightly appointed interior features grey leather seating with Elite style tailoring and high gloss laminate cabinetry. Full LH Galley with hot liquid and storage cabinet Executive writing tables. Non belted flushing lavatory. Indirect lighting, and an aft divider. Price Reduced

Current owners trading up Excellent aircraft for either private or charter purposes In exceptional condition

Tel: +44 (0) 121 782 1700 Fax: +44 (0) 121 782 1711 Email: aircraftsales@eurojet.eu.com

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Aircraft Index see Page 4

JetFlight Ltd July 19/06/2012 15:29 Page 1

S H O W C A S E

Photo: Natalie Bruggemann

2008 Falcon 2000LX Serial Number: Registration: Airframe TT: Landings:

141 G-WLVS 1325 695

New to market EASA certified Main features • 10 Seats • Delivered April 2008 • 1275 hours only, 675 landings • No damage history • Engines on ESP • Immaculately maintained • Range 4000nm at MO.8 and 6 pax • Lowest DOCs in class • Full specifications Cockpit • 3rd Honeywell TR866B VHF Voice and AFIS Data Comms System • 3rd Honeywell AV-900 Audio System • Aircell ST3100 Iridium Satcom • Honeywell “EASy” Comms Management Function • Miltope Flightdeck printer • Honeywell DFDR Flight Data Recorder • KGS Electronics Auxiliary 115VAC 60Hz Power • Teleflex Tail Recognition Light System • Al Electroluminescent Entertainment Controls • Honeywell 20 inch monitor

• Rosen Plug-In 8.4 inch seat monitors • 3rd Flight Crew Seat Cabin • Sony Stereo Headsets • Airshow 410 Cabin Display System and Worldwide maps • Custom wood veneer side ledge • 30 inch LH entryway closet “rounded styling” • DASC increased height seating with hidden headsets and electrical lumbar • 2 Recliner type leg rests Galley • 46 inch galley “rounded styling” • 15 inch galley annex “rounded styling” • 3 Atlas Tray Carriers and 3 Storage Drawers • Extra-wide high temperature oven plus TIA microwave oven • Ice drawer, trash drawer, cold storage drawer • Galley pocket sliding door Other • 115 cubic feet oxygen bottle • Telescopic towbar Price US$23.75m Subject to contract / Subject to prior or withdrawal from sale

JetFlight Ltd

Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Tel: +44 (0) 1353 661636 or +44 (0) 7785 245400 Email: JetSalesUK@aol.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

139

D e d i cat e d to h e l p i n g b u s i n e ss ac h i e v e i ts h i g h e st g oals .

SAVE THE DATE! NBAA Regional Forums: Supporting Business Aviation at the Local Level NBAA Business Aviation Regional Forums bring an array of business aircraft owners, operators, manufacturers and customers together for a one-day event at the most esteemed airports and FBOs in the nation. Let NBAA help you meet your business objectives on a regional basis. Plan now to exhibit at the 2012 NBAA Business Aviation Regional Forums. Learn more at www.nbaa.org/forums

2012 Regional Forum Dates February 2 – New Orleans, LA • Landmark Aviation April 12 – Van Nuys, CA • TWC Aviation & Maguire Aviation June 7 – Teterboro, NJ • First Aviation September 20 – Seattle, WA • Clay Lacy Aviation

Marketplace July12 20/06/2012 13:58 Page 1

Marketplace Boeing 737-300 VIP

European Skybus Ltd Year:

1990

S/N:

24570

TTAF:

53457

Reg:

N470AC

Location: United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0) 1531 633 000

This Boeing 737-300 has recently undergone extensive maintenance and engineering work and has been converted to a VIP configuration in February 2011. The aircraft has been completely refurbished to the highest standards. The new owner will benefit from the millions of dollars and thousands of man hours that have gone into completing this VIP conversion. Winglets have been fitted to improve the aircraft performance and range. Price: Please call

Dornier 328

EPSN Year:

1998

S/N:

3095

TTAF:

2011

Reg:

PH-EVY

Location: Netherlands

Tel: +31 (0) 629 560 272 Aircraft in Executive lay-out 12 pax. Exceptionally wide corporate cabin arrangement with forward kitchen and aft Wardrobe/Lavatory room (wider then e.g. G V or Falcon 900). Kitchen with oven, coffeemaker, wash bin, ample stowing cabinetry. Cabin with moving map display, video/audio system. Wardrobe / lavatory area with large wardrobe space. With access to the aft baggage compartment. Fresh Phase V inspection, Fresh LG Overhaul. EASA JAR/OPS1 equipped. Dual S-Transponder. RVSM mod c/w. Price: Please call

Socata TBM 700B

Avia Source, Inc. Year:

2001

S/N:

208

TTAF:

3939

Reg:

LX-JFE

Email: trevorw@euroav.com

Email: hwac@kpnmail.nl Tel: +1 626-584-8170

Engines are 220 since overhaul. Take advantage of the best value available in the 700Bs. This fine aircraft is one owner since new, has updated Garmin avionics, Socata maintained and Extensive 10 year inspection is completed. The interior and exterior are in excellent condition. Price USD$1,200,000

Location: Switzerland ✈

Pilatus PC-12/47

Avia Source, Inc. Year:

2006

S/N:

732

TTAF:

1550

Reg:

M-ZUMO

Email: jason@aviasource.aero Tel: +1 626-584-8170

This excellent PC-12/47 is equipped with the Second Battery, Large Oxy System and Additional Air Conditioning. It has the 8 passenger interior with the 6 seat BMW Platinum Upgrade and two additional standard seats. Price USD$2,675,000

Location: United Kingdom ✈

Cessna Conquest I

King Aviation Dallas Year:

1981

S/N: TTAF:

700

Reg: Location: USA

Tel: +1 (214) 352-2401 700 SMOH / 700 SMOH. NEW PAINT & INTERIOR, BRAND NEW GLASS AVIONICS: Dual 750 Touch screens, G 600 Glass, SynVision, Traffic, Sat-Weather, Charts, BonusTax Writeoff, fresh 2, 3 D inspections, SID COMPLIED. Dry Country Based-no corrossion Last owner owned it 14 years-TOP condition and maintenance history-one of the best 425's flying today! ONLY 700 hours on 3600TBO P & W -112 engines! Only 10 hours on new 4 blabe quiet Fan Props with new Hubs! 260 KNOTS FAST (300 MPH) thats 40 KNOTS faster than a C90 and on 20% less fuel per hour than the C90! Lease or purchase

✈ Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: jason@aviasource.aero

Email: sales@kingaviationdallas.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

141

Marketplace July12 20/06/2012 13:59 Page 2

Marketplace Hawker 800A

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

1995

S/N:

258273

TTAF:

6615.3

Reg:

N337WR

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Exceptional Hawker 800A "Built for the speed of business". Full true worldwide capability with NAT/MNPS, RNP-10 Approval, 8.33MHz, dual KHF-950 w/SELCAL onboard Magnastar fax option, and galley. All this with a 2,600 nautical mile range, offered at US $3,975,000.

Location: USA jetphotos.net

Bell 206L4

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

2002

S/N:

TBD

TTAF:

1700

Reg: Location: USA

justice to the helicopter, and the colors are very vibrant, it is ready for immediate work. It has had both a Bell/Edwards completion and maintenance with immaculate records, of course no damage of incidents. 1695 TTSN, Two corporate owners. US $1,975,000.

1981

S/N:

33017

TTAF:

15265

Reg:

N554AL

Location: USA

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Recent ‘no expense spared’ ($800,000) airframe refurbishment at Acro Helipro within the last 100 hours 15,265 total time, most components over 50% remaining. Both engines are fresh Pratt and Whitney overhauled. Immediate delivery, Meticulous records. Current with medical interior and 13 passenger utility interior are included, aircraft is ‘turn-key’. Fresh annual / Export C of A. Price US $3,875,000 ✈

Bell 212

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Leonard Hudson Drilling Year:

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

We are offfering our 2002 Bell 206 L4. Pictures do not do

Bell 412 EMS

Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Tel: +1 806-662-5823

Seven, Late Model, Bell 212s In 'Off Shore Configuration' Now Available. Ask for pricing for one or all seven.

S/N: TTAF: Reg: Location: USA

Cessna Citation CJ2

Tel: +49 (0) 234 4595119

Klaus Union Year:

2001

S/N:

C525A-0043

TTAF:

2237

Reg:

D-IEKU

Location: Germany

Pro Line 21 3 Tube EFIS, Dual DME, CNI5000 Nav, Com, ADF, 8.33KHz Spacing and FM Immunity, Dual GTX330D diversity XPDR, WX-1000E Stormscope, RTA-800 WXRadar, HF Provision, ALT-55B Radio Altimeter, L-3 CVR, Mark VII EGPWS, UNS-1K with Permanent DTU, BF Goodrich TCAS, Garmin 400 WAAS GPS/movingmap interfaced to ProLine 21, RVSM, Belted toilet, N1-Computer, ELT 406MHz, 3 110V outlets, B&C15000 cabin display, deluxe refreshment center, Pax advisory system, Iridium SatCom w 2 handsets, on ProParts,Protech, TAP-Elite,Cescom Price: USD 2,950,000

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Email: ronfernuik@hotmail.com

Email: aircraft@klaus-union.de Aircraft Index see Page 4

Marketplace July12 20/06/2012 14:31 Page 3

Marketplace Eurocopter EC 135P2i Executive

Tel: +41 (0) 31 310 41 13

Europavia (Suisse) SA Year:

2011

S/N:

0938

TT Ferry fly. BRAND NEW EC135P2i Executive Immediately available, perfect configuration, Exceptional Price

TTAF: Reg:

HB-ZTJ

Price: Make offer

Location: Switzerland ✈

www.europavia.ch Eurocopter AS 332C1

Year:

1982

S/N:

2033

TTAF:

13,595

Location: Switzerland

Beautiful as New, G-Inspection in 2011, number of inspection on various equipment, complete documentation and maintenance, new perfect paint, provided with large number of spare parts and equipment, Immediately available ready for Operation, Transferable Turbomeca Engine Service Support Agreement. Contact directly Swiss Official Eurocopter Distribution Price: Make offer ✈

www.europavia.ch

Email: gtsilalidis@europavia.ch

Aerolineas Ejecutivas Year:

2007

S/N: TTAF:

1,428

Reg: Location:

Tel: +521 55 4140 5052

Avionics Package: Garmin - Comm Radios: Garmin GNS 530 & GNS - 430 - DME: Bendix/King KMD - 706A - GPS: Garmin GNS - 530 & GNS - 430 - Navigation Radios: Garmin GNS - 530 & GNS - 430 - Transponder: Yes. Exterior: Overall Silver-Black stripe. Interior: 6 passenger config. No damage history. Excellent condition. Asking Price: Make Offer ✈

www.aerolineasejecutivas.com Bell 206B

Tel: +41 (0) 31 310 41 13

Europavia (Suisse) SA

Reg:

Agusta/Westland A109S Grand

Email: gtsilalidis@europavia.ch

Email: m.toledo@aerolineasejecutivas.com

Apple International Year:

1973

S/N:

1153

TTAF:

10117.5

Reg:

C-GBSP

Location: United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0) 1508 533 180 This JetRanger has been carefully maintained, recently refurbished interior to include leather seats. Comes complete with Logs & Records. Ext: 8/10, Int: 8/10, Cream, Black & Tan quality leather seats with Tan thick pile wool carpets. Exterior Gold metallic with Black & Silver accents. Low skids, good avionics, particle separator, dual controls, heater. Recently imported from Canada. Excellent condition, fresh annual inspection, new TT straps, fresh Containment ring Mod. 100 to 1200 hour inspections completed. To be delivered with fresh British C of A. Export C of A is available at additional cost. Price: Sterling £259,950

www.407bell.com

Email: sales@407bell.com

Apple International Year:

Tel: +44 (0) 1508 533 180 Heli Mover in excellent condition, large enough for twin engine helicopters. Complete with Charger and Accessories. Located in UK.

S/N: TTAF:

Email for photos and full specification

Reg: Location:

£3,595.00 + VAT ✈

www.407bell.com Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

Email: sales@407bell.com WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

143

Marketplace July12 21/06/2012 12:54 Page 4

Marketplace Socata TBM 700B

JT Air Ltd Year:

2002

S/N:

230

TTAF:

1426

Reg:

N324JS

Location: United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0) 7957 106 952 An extremely well presented and cared for Example of a Socata TBM 700 B with recent Hot Section Inspection, Socata Service Centre Maintained, Annual Inspection Completed Dec 2011. Complete and Original Logs. No Exceedences. Always Hangared. VAT paid in Europe. Garmin 530, KMD 850 MFD, EFIS-40 EHSI & EADI, Annual 31 Dec 2012, Gear Inspection & Long Life Enrolled, Garmin 330 Mode S, Prop 260SN, Interior Flawless, 2 Drink /Storage Cabinets, 6 Place Bose, Crew/Pac Music. Full Detail www.jtair.net/n324js. Price: Please Call

www.jtair.net/n324js Cessna 208

Email: mail@jtair.net

CAAD Inc. Year:

2008

S/N:

2045

TTAF:

3,656.24

Reg:

Tel: +1 305 593 9929 Total Aircraft Cycles: 6,733. Configuration: 12 Pax Seats. Aircraft Status: OPERATIONAL Info. updated to: 31-Jan12. Out of operations 31-Jan-12. Propellers Type & Model: 3GFR34C703-B. Serial Number: 100940. Propeller TBO: 4000. Time Since New: 1063.30. Time Since Overhaul: 1068.30. Price: $1,650,000

Location: Costa Rica ✈

www.caadinc.com Cessna 208

Email: colinward@caadinc.com

CAAD Inc. Year:

2008

S/N:

2050

TTAF:

3,809.54

Reg:

Tel: +1 305 593 9929 Total Aircraft Cycles: 7,065. Configuration: 12 Pax Seats. Aircraft Status: OPERATIONAL Info. updated to: 31-Jan-12 Out of operations 31-Jan-12. Propellers Type & Model: 3GFR34C703-B. Serial Number: 110577. Propeller TBO: 4000. Time Since New: 437.14. Time Since Overhaul: 437.14. Price: $1,650,000

Location: Costa Rica ✈

www.caadinc.com Learjet 60 XR

Email: colinward@caadinc.com

Aviation Advisors Int'l, Inc. Year:

2008

S/N:

338

TTAF:

281

Reg:

TBD

Tel: +1 (941) 351-5400

The Learjet* 60 XR easily outpaces the competition in time-to-climb performance and operating altitude without compromising a class-leading low operating cost. With its cutting-edge cockpit technologies and stylishly redefined cabin space, the Learjet 60 XR across distances of up to 2,405 nm. with ease. A value at $7,5000,000

Location: USA ✈

Challenger 601-3A/ER

Email: BobD@aaisrq.com

Aviation Advisors Int'l, Inc. Year:

1992

S/N:

5121

TTAF:

8,949

Reg:

N328AM

Tel: +1 (941) 351-5400

A "no excuses" airplane. With all major inspections just accomplished . Fresh 6/12/24/60 /120 & 240 Month inspection c/w in 2011. Fresh HSI on left engine. Fresh gear overhaul and interior refurbishment. Priced to sell at $3,995,000

Location: USA ✈

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Email: BobD@aaisrq.com Aircraft Index see Page 4

Marketplace July12 20/06/2012 14:04 Page 5

Marketplace Cessna Citation CJ2

Aviation Advisors Int'l, Inc. Year:

2003

S/N:

144

TTAF:

4,112

Reg:

N144YD

Tel: +1 (941) 351-5400

Great history and a factory visit to do all inspections and squawks plus new paint and interior mean a great pedigree It is maintained on TAP Elite .The owner is moving up after spending the money to make it perfect. Flown less than 150 hours since this work you get the benefit. Priced at $3,195,000

Location: USA ✈

Par Avion Ltd

Email: PaulD@aaisrq.com +1 832 934 0055

Alberth Air Parts

Spare Parts

FALCONS • HAWKERS • LEARS

•BUY •SELL •TRADE

www.paravionltd.com

CESSNA LEARJET HAWKER WESTWIND FALCON GULFSTREAM

www.alberthaviation.com

SALES • ACQUISITIONS • CONSULTING

Fax: +1 832 934 0011

Find an Aircraft Dealer The World’s leading aircraft dealers and brokers - find one today

avbuyer.com/dealers

Next Issue copy deadline: Wednesday 18th July Advertiser’s Index 1st Source Bank.........................................................78

Corporate Concepts .................................................67

Kaiser Air ......................................................................73

21st Century Jet Corporation ...............................146

Dassault Falcon Jet Europe....................................2-3

Leading Edge Aviation Solutions............................43

Action Aviation.....................................................91, 93

Duncan Aviation..........................................................57

Lektro ............................................................................41

AeroSmith/Penny .......................................................40

Eagle Aviation..............................................................33

Mente Group ...........................................................133

AIC Title Services.......................................................95

EuroJet .......................................................................138

NBAA Corporate .....................................................123

Air 1st Aviation ..............................................................4

ExecuJet Aviation........................................................63

NBAA Business Aviation Forums ........................140

Aircraft Services Group ............................................51

Florida Jet Sales.......................................................132

New Jet International .................................................25

Albinati Aeronautics SA .........................................136

Freestream Aircraft USA ..........................................31

Northern Air......................................................124-125

Aradian Aviation..........................................................39

General Aviation Services........................................69

O’Gara Aviation Company .......................................21

Aviation Consulting....................................................85

Gulfstream Pre-Owned.............................................27

Par Avion.........................................................................5

Avjet Corporation .........................................FC, 12-15

Hawker Beechcraft....................................................59

PremiAir Global Aircraft Sales..............................115

Avpro ......................................................................18-20

Heeren Aviation Consultants ................................129

Remo Investments ...................................................128

Banyan..........................................................................99

Heliasset.com .............................................................30

Rolls-Royce .................................................................61

Bauer Verlag .............................................................130

Intellijet International .................................................6-7

Royal Saudi Air Force .............................................117

Bell Aviation...........................................................28-29

Japat AG ...........................................................126-127

Sentinel Aviation.........................................................75

Bombardier..................................................................89

J. Mesinger Corporate Jet Sales ......................16-17

Southern Cross Aviation...........................................81

Boutsen Aviation......................................................103

Jet Flight.....................................................................139

Survival Products .......................................................41

Bristol Associates ......................................................11

JetBlack Aviation ........................................................83

The Jet Collection ......................................................71

Central Business Jets .............................................147

JetBrokers..............................................................34-35

VREF Aircraft Values ...................................................4

Charleston Aviation Partners ...................................79

Jetcraft Corporation....................................22-24, BC

Welsch Aviation .......................................................134

Charlie Bravo Aviation...............................................55

Jeteffect ........................................................................65

Wentworth & Affilates................................................87

Conklin & de Decker..................................................46

JETFINA SA..............................................................113

Wiley Rein..................................................................107

Corporate Aircraft Photography .............................46

JETNET ......................................................................119

Wings of Hope .........................................................122

Corporate AirSearch Int’l .............................105, 135

Jetsales Ltd ...............................................................131

Wright Brothers Aircraft Title...................................47

John Hopkinson & Associates........................37, 137 Advertising Enquiries see Page 8

www.AvBuyer.com

WORLD AIRCRAFT SALES MAGAZINE – July 2012

145

21st Century May 19/06/2012 15:31 Page 1

Copyright of Leor Yudelowitz

When you own one of the Tri-Jets, you own the best built business jet In the sky; and the Federal Aviation Adminstration has certified them with no life limits for any part of the airframe structure. They exhibit noteworthy handling manners, superb poise throughout the operating envelope, and light but not oversensitive control feel. In addition, Tri-Jets have set world and national records for distance, speed, time to climb and sustained altitude. With efficient space management the Falcon 900 Series aircraft have a larger passenger seating area than the Gulfstream IV. These Tri-Jets weigh 15 tons less and are 22 feet shorter than the Gulfstream IV and provide a more beneficial ramp presence. The 900EX can speed across the Atlantic with all seats full at 0.84 IMN; and has 300 NM greater range than the Gulfstream IV-SP. Furthermore, the 900EX can fly from London to Kansas City, Buenos Aires to New Orleans and Anchorage to Seoul at 0.75 IMN, with eight passengers and NBAA IFR reserves. Revolutionary and the world’s first purpose built fly-by-wire (FBW) business jet, the Falcon 7X capitalizes on Mach 2 technology. FBW enables a MMO of .90 and enhanced low-speed handling, pitch and roll stability characteristics. The 7X can climb directly to FL 410 at ISA + 10° conditions. Two Hundred (200)+ very high speed, ultra long range Falcon 7X business jets have been ordered!

If you are considering the sale or acquisition of your business jet, call 21st Century Jet Corporation today for details before making a decision.

DISTINCTIVE BUSINESS JET SALES & ACQUISITIONS. INCORPORATED IN 1989 TEL: 1.775.833.3223

INTERNET: WWW.TRI-JETS.COM

E-MAIL: sales@tri-jets.com

CBJ July_CBJ November06 19/06/2012 15:34 Page 1

General Offices

Vienna Office

Minneapolis / St. Paul

Austria

TEL: (952) 894-8559

TEL: +43 660 549 1099

FAX: (952) 894-8569

FAX: +44 20 7900 2890

WEB: WWW.CBJETS.COM

WEB: www.cbjets.com

EMAIL: INFO@CBJETS.COM

EMAIL: erich@cbjets.com

2004 FALCON 2000 S/N 217

FALCON 900EX EASy S/N 121

US & EASA Certified, 10 PAX Interior, 100% JSSI, Less than 400 Hours since C Inspection

Former Falcon Demo, Only 2400 Hours TT, Most Systems are Triple, Satcom/HUD, Over $3M worth of Options, US & EASA Certified, Owners New 7X Has Arrived

FALCON 900EX EASY S/N 170

2008 HAWKER 900XP S/N 033

Single US Owner Aircraft, 1175 Hours TT, MSP Gold, Honeywell EVS, Triple IRS and FMS, 13 PAX with Fwd and AFT lav

853.31 Hours, MSP Gold, EASA / JAR Ops / FAA Certified, Standard 8 Place Interior, Dual FMS, Dual GPS, Dual AHRS, Etc…

2009/2010 HAWKER 4000 S/N RC-35

CITATION EXCEL S/N 5220

Upgrade and Enhancement Program Already C/W, HBC support plus program pre-paid up to 2000 Hours or 5 Yrs; Fully transferable 5 year warranty expires 12/23/2014, no damage history

Single Owner, Fresh Engine Overhauls, Power Advantage Engine & APU Program, Spectacular Cockpit including Dual NZ-2000’s and Honeywell RAAS, Aircell Access, XM Sat Weather… 9 PAX Interior

CITATION ENCORE S/N 646

1125 ASTRA SP S/N 49

Single US Owner Aircraft, Power Advantage with recent Engine Overhauls, Pro Parts, No Damage History

3322.1 TT; Fresh C Check, new paint & refurbished interior by Astra Service Center 08/11, MSP, CAMS, Dual Universal UNS-1E FMS w/ GPS, Increased Weight Mod

CITATION ENCORE+ S/N 756

SIKORSKY 76B S/N 344

Single US Owner Aircraft, Power Advantage Plus with Pro Parts, No Damage History

Fortune 100 Owned, 8 Place Executive, Fully Loaded EFIS Cockpit, Freon Air -conditioning

Just because you no longer have connecting flights

you no longer need connections.

The right aircraft can turn up anywhere—which means you need to know the right people everywhere. We’ve been cultivating worldwide connections for over 50 years, from legal and financial resources to the top aviation experts. Today our unmatched global network gives you eyes, ears and business savvy around the planet. A larger inventory of options. And fast, smooth, face-to-face transactions. Want the best value in the business? Just connect the dots. www.jetcraft.com I info@jetcraft.com I Headquarters +1 919-941-8400

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

FEATURED INVENTORY

2002 Challenger 604 - SN 5546

Impeccably Maintained - Exceptionally Equipped Recent 96 Month Inspection - Price Recently Reduced

2008 Citation XLS+ - SN 560-6006

Pristine Condition Aircraft - One Private Owner Since New All Serious Offers Considered

WAS_07.2012_back cover_Connections.indd 1

2001 Global Express - SN 9076

Available for Immediate Sale & Delivery RSVM Compliant - EASA/ JAR OPS1 Certified 2012 Airbus ACJ - Aug 2012 2011 Challenger 300 1988 Challenger 601-3A 2006 Challenger 604 2013 Challenger 605 2007 Challenger 850 2005 Citation CJ2 2003 Citation Excel 2001 Citation X 2003 CRJ-200XR

2008 Falcon 2000DX EASy 2003 Falcon 2000EX 2010 Falcon 7X 2013 Global 5000 2012 Global 6000 2007 Global XRS 2004 Gulfstream 550 1998 Gulfstream GIVSP 2005 Hawker 400XP 2008 Legacy 600

2008 Global XRS - SN 9250

Fully Programmed (JSSI, SmartParts, Honeywell MSP) EASA Compliant - 99,500 lbs MTOW Service Bulletin

2004 Falcon 2000EX EASy - SN 0029

Engines Enrolled on ESP Gold - APU Enrolled on MSP JAR-OPS Capable - Fresh ARCS & Inspections at Gulfstream

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

DOESN’T MEAN

6/13/12 2:11 PM


World Aircraft Sales Magazine July-12