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WILLY RIZZO

PUBLISHED TO ACCOMPANY THE EXHIBITIONS IN NEW YORK AND LONDON

929 Madison Avenue at 74th Street New York10021

9 Albermarle Street London W1S 4BL

4-13 October 2007

15-24 November 2007

Front cover: Willy Rizzo and model, Milan 1962. “I had just finished a photo shoot with this model for Vogue Italy. This image was part of a series for Vogue photographers photographing one another.”

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allett and Paul Smith are embarking on a unique experiment. This October we are mounting a joint selling exhibition in Mallett’s shop in New York and the following month in Paul Smith’s shop in London. Nearly a year ago Nicholas Chandor and I were having a discussion about who in the world of design and period furniture we really admired but who was also not as famous as they should be. Nicholas Chandor is the Head of Interiors of the clothing empire Paul Smith. I am a director of the London and New York antique dealers Mallett. We both immediately thought of Willy Rizzo whose career is discussed in full on the following pages. Willy Rizzo is well known to the 20th century dealing fraternity but outside that world he has been woefully neglected. He is a superb portrait photographer working for many years for Paris Match and a designer whose imagination and severe neo-classical style defines the Italian style between 1965 and 1980. The range and quality of his work is truely outstanding and has and will stand the test of time. His legacy is a body of work which is both pleasing to the eye and stimulating to the intellect. We have been able to source many items that have never been on the market before as they have come from the Rizzo’s themselves. There are two experimental designs from the 1970’s that were never produced commercially. The furniture is accompanied by a selection of some of Willy Rizzo’s finest portraits. We are delighted to say that Willy has designed exclusively for the exhibition a frame for his photographs, something he has never done before. Both these frames and the images are being produced in a limited edition of eight. We are very excited by the forthcoming exhibitions which will be accompanied by this catalogue which will publish some of Willy Rizzo’s furniture work for the first time. Thomas Woodham-Smith

Left: Willy in St. Tropez in 1969 with Casa Vogue

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illy Rizzo is best known as a photographer and his career began during the golden age of photojournalism. Having first worked for the Black Star Agency in America during the post-war 1940’s he began an illustrious twenty year career with Paris Match in late 1948 that would see him photograph some of the greatest names of the age. Married as he then was to actress Elsa Martinelli, Rizzo had unparalleled access to the stars and his constellation of sitters would include such greats as Brigitte Bardot, Sofia Loren, Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, Jane Fonda, Gene Kelly, Fred Astaire, Salvador Dali and Pablo Picasso. His assignments would take him to the Nuremberg trials and the French Indochina war. Hergé even based the character of Paris-Flash photographer Walter Rizotto in The Castafiore Emerald on his real-life Paris Match counterpart. His photographic work is well known and well documented, but less so his design. In the late 60’s Rizzo put down his camera and focused instead on furniture design, a field in which, though he had no experience, he would go on to enjoy considerable success.

As Rizzo describes, it all began in a Salon de Coiffure in the Piazza di Spagna in Rome in late 1966, and unfolded in the space of about an hour. While his wife was having her hair done they discussed moving to Italy, as their respective careers demanded them being there so often. He liked the area the salon was in so asked the Coiffure if he knew of a local real estate agent. His response was “sure, there’s one around the corner, but you’ll need a miracle to find an apartment around here.” Undeterred he saw the agent, whose response was as predicted; no apartments. He did however have a second floor shirtmaker’s shop in the Piazza Mignanelli just in front of the Spanish Embassy that looked on to the Piazza di Spagna, but it was a run down one room commercial space with no facilities and was practically uninhabitable. He signed a six month lease on the spot and returned triumphant to the salon, all in about 45 minutes. There still remained the question of redecoration, and not wanting the usual antique, Scandinavian or psychedelic looks, he decided, before the hour was up, to start from scratch, a decision that would lead Rizzo to become one of the most sought after modernist designers of the era.

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With the help of the Coiffure, Rizzo found a small group of local artisans and set about transforming the shirt maker’s into an apartment: “Once the essentials were finished we started on the decoration. I wanted the walls to be brown and gold so we painted them brown and while the paint was still wet I blew handfuls of gold powder against them. It sounds crazy but it worked and after that the guys knew exactly what I was looking for. The kitchen was silver, all the floors and ceilings black and we built all the furniture from scratch; a stereo cabinet, sofa, coffee table, consoles, everything. It was a lot of fun making the ‘Salon de Rizzo’ in Rome, and the result was very chic.” Rizzo had never intended to become a furniture designer, but as his friends saw what he had done in his own apartment they wanted him to do the same in theirs, and he had some impressive friends. Ensconced as he was within the glamorous worlds of film and fashion, Rizzo was very much a part of the high society scene from which he would receive the majority of his commissions.

Hergé even based the character of Paris-Flash photographer Walter Rizotto in The Castafiore Emerald

One of his first would be for Ghighi Cassini, the American Hearst newspaper columnist and socialite who first coined the term “Jet Set” to describe the socialites and lifestyle that Fellini immortalized in La Dolce Vita. Cassini wanted a modern apartment in a traditional setting and having found rooms in the nearby Palazzo Torlonia, set about persuading Rizzo to design furniture sophisticated enough not to conflict with the palace’s neoclassical interiors. The commission was a great success and would be followed by others from a whole swathe of Italian high society, all of them worthy of the jet set title. Notorious playboys such as Rodolfo Parisi, Gigi Rizzi and Franco Rapetti were amongst his earliest clients, as were the movie directors Vincente Minelli and Otto Priminger. Salvador Dali commissioned a number of pieces as did Brigitte Bardot for the interior of La Madrague in St. Tropez. He furnished aristocratic apartments in the Palazzo Borghese and the Palazzo Ruspoli. Rizzo’s style defined the era. He was uniquely placed as a designer for the Dolce Vita, being a part of the world he was designing for. He was the consummate jet set playboy and his client list testifies to how close his furniture was to the mark.

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W I L LY R I Z Z O Above: Robert Mitchum (left) at the opening of Willy Rizzo’s Los Angeles shop in 1975

Facing page: Italian actress Virna Lisi photographed by Willy for the front cover of Queen in 1962

By 1968, demand for Rizzo’s work was such that he set up his own company. He established a factory just outside Rome at Tivoli which at its height employed as many as 150 workers, and would of course include the original team from the Piazza di Spagna. Throughout the following ten years he designed and produced more than thirty pieces of furniture, from steel banded travertine dining tables to bronze table lamps, all of which were hand made. He opened a Willy Rizzo store on the rue Fauborg Saint-Honoré and further boutiques across France and Europe, as well as points of sale in New York, Miami and LA. His work was illustrated in countless magazines and appeared on the cover of Maison et Jardin at least fifteen times. However in 1978 he gave it all up to return to his first love, photography. “I’d never intended to become a businessman and ultimately it began to bore me. I missed my bohemian life as a photographer so I sold the factory.” During those ten years, Rizzo developed a style that is easily recognizable today. An admirer of the sophistication of Mies van der Rohe and Le Corbusier as well as the understated luxury of Ruhlmann, his work brought the best aspects of these together. Typically his pieces combine clean, simple lines with bold geometric forms that are lightened by a delicate handling of materials, most notably his innovative inlaying of chrome with brass. Having come to furniture design somewhat accidentally, Rizzo’s lack of formal training placed him on the outside of Italy’s strong indigenous design traditions, a fact that made his style so unique at the time. While there is an obvious debt in Rizzo’s work to the existing modernist emphasis on functionality and simplified forms, the fascination with methods of mass production and modern materials is something he deliberately avoided. During the late 50’s the leading Italian designers such as Gio Ponti shifted their focus towards industrial design and the generation followed suit. While many of Rizzo’s contemporaries, particularly Magistretti and Colombo made great strides using modern plastics, Rizzo remained faithful to a doctrine of traditional materials and craftsmanship, his work being more a response to the contemporary cultural environment than current design trends.

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As Rizzo explains, the style was at first defined by the clients and the type of interiors they wanted to furnish. “It was never about recreating classic styles in modern furniture, that wasn’t the point. It was about creating something new for a traditional setting.” While his clients wanted a modern look, brightly coloured plastics were simply not suited to the neoclassical interiors of Europe’s grandiose palaces and villas, hence Rizzo’s reliance on noble materials such as brass, steel and stone. His hand crafted designs had enough strength and substance to successfully integrate into such interiors, but it was more than just a question of materials; it was also a matter of space. “The starting point for all of my earlier designs was the space for which the piece was intended. Whether for my own apartment or Ghighi’s or whoever, it was the needs of the actual space that defined the final result. That’s why Architects often make the best furniture designers; they have a better awareness and understanding of interior space.” Comfort and convenience also played a significant part in Rizzo’s designs. His modular sofas were an essay in luxury, covered in coloured pig skin suede and equipped with control panels in the arms to adjust everything from the lighting to the volume on the stereo. The doors in his apartments could be opened and closed at the sound of a clap and there were cocktail cabinets concealed in his coffee tables. This really was design for a leisured lifestyle and Rizzo, who was at the time Art Director for Playboy Italia, knew his market well. The success of his approach is evident today in the longevity and versatility of his designs. It has been said that the key to Rizzo’s photographs is their simplicity. In his own words: “Photographs without fussy details survive better than the others.” The same is surely true of his furniture; it works as well in contemporary interiors as it ever did, and this is due in part to their simple, classic nature. When describing his design process, Rizzo likens the experience to men’s fashion: “If you made furniture like women’s dresses it would look awful. For a Couturier it’s far easier to design something new for a woman; there’s so much more room to experiment and take artistic liberties. It’s much more difficult when designing for a man. You can’t do overly elaborate things; there is a line that must be respected and only a limited amount of space for experimentation.”

Clockwise from top left: Some of the font covers Willy photographed include, French actress Nicole Maurey, 1944; Elsa Martinelli, 1961; Sophia Loren, posing shortly before her departure for Hollywood in late 1958; Gina Lollabrigida, aged 33, photographed in Moscow in 1961

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Of course there is also the question of originality. Rizzo “made it a point of honor never to copy or collaborate” and as such developed a style that was both distinctive and influential. Jansen acquired and produced a number of his designs, and he had an undeniable effect on Cardin’s work. The abundance of furniture to be found in dealers inventories either attributed to or in the manner of Willy Rizzo further attests to the distinct character of his style. As interest in design from the period increases so too does the fascination with Rizzo’s work. His furniture is now widely exhibited, most recently in a retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. A collection of his photographs was published in the book Mes Stars in 2003, and an exhibition of his work in Indochina is soon to be held at the Niepce museum in Chalon-sur-Saone. Having returned to furniture design for a period in the late 80’s he does so now again, this time in collaboration with Paul Smith and Mallett. For all his achievements, Rizzo remains as laid back as ever, the epitome of dolce vita style.

Left: an example of Willy Rizzo advertising. All advertising was devised and overseen by Willy himself. Editors were always keen to use his material as it was fun and innovative.

This article was written by Nick Kilner following an interview with Willy Rizzo in Paris in April 2007.

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P H OTO G RAP H S

For this exhibition, Mallett and Paul Smith have made a small selection from the extensive oeuvre of Willy Rizzo. Many of these images have been previously published in Paris Match, for whom Willy shot over 170 covers. There are a selection of both colour and black and white images which show the breadth of his work but not the range or quantity. This is a taste of the work of a prolific portrait photographer. The following images are all silver-gelatine prints of a larger size than Willy has hitherto produced and are in editions of eight. Each print will be signed and numbered. Especially for this exhibition Willy Rizzo has designed and produced a new design of frame which will be both signed and numbered in the same edition size as the photographs. Each of the frames has been made under the controlling eye of Willy Rizzo and offers a unique opportunity to enjoy the fusion of artist and designer that is Willy Rizzo.

THE WILLY RIZZO FRAME These are a new design made of bronze patinated brass sandwiching a filet of polished brass. They are signed and numbered, and are exclusive to the exhibition and catalogue. Height: 43in (109cm) Width: 39in (99cm)

Left: Willy Rizzo outside Arnold de Contade’s Château Montgeoffroy in 1972

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Brigitte Bardot, St.Tropez 1958 ‘She was having a siesta on a friend's fishing boat. I called to her, and the only way she could come out to me was on all fours. I couldn't resist.’

Jean-Paul Belmondo, Willy’s studio, 1965 ‘I wanted a nude photograph. He would not do it. I suggested half-nude – why not? I said, nude torso like a body builder; he said ‘banco’ as in bacarat – in other words deal done. He had a great sense of humour.’

Yves Saint-Laurent and Pierre Cardin, 1965, Paris ‘I invited them to my studio without making them aware of each other's presence, as they were not then on very friendly terms. They mellowed later.’

Marlon Brando, Tahiti, 1958 ‘The Chicago magazine Show Business asked him to sit for a photo shoot. He relied ‘Yes, but I want it to be with Willy Rizzo, as he takes very few photos and doesn't pester.’ So I took a half-photo of him.’

Maria Callas, La Scala, Milan, 1958 ‘Above all, it was necessary not to make her pose. Here she's beautiful and animated because she was caught unawares, while she was looking into the mirror.’

Courrèges style, 1965 ‘I love this picture, taken in 1965. Nothing distracts attention from the garments, whose lines and visual impact are so strong, they seem specifically designed for a photo.’

Coco Chanel, the Tuileries, 1958 ‘We had just had lunch in her dining room in the rue Cambon, and had gone for a walk in the Tuileries. She's smiling. That's very rare.’

Salvador Dali, 1950 ‘When I arrived at his place, I searched the apartment to find the best angle for the shot, but his face was so spectacular that when he asked me, ‘What are we going to do?’ I picked up the magnifying glass from the desk and just photographed him.’

Christian Dior, 1949, Atelier Dior ‘The revolution of the New Look in fashion, Christian Dior lengthened skirts; scandalous. This photo became famous everywhere.’

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Jane Fonda, Beverly Hills, 1961 ‘This is almost an historic document, because it's the first real photo session with Jane, who at that time was known thanks only to her name. She was filming Walk on the Wild Side with Bette Davis and Capucine.’

Kirk Douglas, Palm Springs, 1957 ‘Whenever I arrived in Hollywood, I'd call my friends the Douglas's. Anne, Kirk's wife, had been my secretary after the war. In this picture I lit Kirk with nothing but a cigarette lighter, as in one of the noir films that he was so often the hero.’

Marlene Dietrich, 1956, at the Paris hotel ‘I knew she liked to listen to music, so on the way I stopped in the shopping street behind the hotel to buy a TEPAZ record-player. She ended the shoot by saying ‘I want to be alone with my gramophone.’ She was capricious, over familiar and authoritarian, but she had enormous sex appeal.’

Le Corbusier, Paris, 1955 ‘We met at his apartment, and though it wasn't decorated it was nevertheless vivid. He knew about work and was clearly a professional when it came to sculpture, painting, and photography, so he was very cooperative.’

Gene Kelly, Paris, 1961 ‘He was living at the Plaza Athena. He came to my studio and I asked him to show me the new dance, so he demonstrated. He moved very naturally.’

Marilyn Monroe, Beverly Hills, 1962 ‘This picture was taken fifteen days before her death, at a friend's house. It was a chaotic meeting as she was in a fragile emotional state, but she was gentle with me.’

Jack Nicholson, Saint-Jean-CapFerrat, 1992 ‘What can I say about Jack? He's a very dear friend who in addition has the good luck to be photogenic. With him it's never planned; it happens anywhere, any way, at any time, often against his wishes and that works out fine.’

Oxford gentleman, 1954 ‘Oxford, a factory for manufacturing gentlemen. This eccentric, in camouflage pants, had his copy of the Times ironed every morning and walked around with a sword-stick that had poison in the tip.’

Pablo Picasso, Cannes, 1953 “We were at La Californie, his new house in Cannes. I asked him how he was going to arrange it. His answer: It's disarranging it that's going to be difficult.”

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Jean Seberg, Beverly Hills, 1959 ‘In 1957, despite the dictatorial direction of the great producer Otto Preminger, Joan of Arc bombed. Later, under the direction of JeanLuc Godard, a young producer at that time, Breathless made her famous.’

Gary Cooper, Beverly Hills, 1959 ‘Perhaps the most elegant actor in Hollywood, and also the most timid. He gave the impression that he didn't know he was an actor, that's how natural he was.’

Jean Cocteau in 1955 taken at his friend Francine Weissweiler's house at Milly-la-forêt ‘I was looking for an unusual picture. He doned this professorial cloak and with a very theatrical air said ‘I am an imposter’. After that all I had to do was find a corner and move the bird to finish the composition.’

Sophia Lauren and Carlo Ponti at their house in Rome in 1962 ‘This shot was taken after an excellent lunch and everyone was relaxed. I love this picture because Carlo Ponti's vicious expression. Sophia was at her most beautiful.’

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YSL, Maison Dior, 1953 ‘This was the first collection by the young couturier for Christian Dior. Such timidity...but what an act to follow.’

P H OTO G RAP H S

WILLY RIZZO’S CAREER BEGAN WITH THE BLACK STAR AGENCY IN AMERICA DURING THE POST-WAR 1940’S. IN LATE 1948 HE STARTED WORK FOR PARIS MATCH FOR WHOM HE WOULD PHOTOGRAPH SOME OF THE GREATEST NAMES OF THE AGE.

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JEAN-PAUL BELMONDO ‘HE HAD A GREAT SENSE OF HUMOUR.’ BRIGITTE BARDOT ‘I CALLED TO HER, AND THE ONLY WAY SHE WOULD COME OUT TO ME WAS ON ALL FOURS. I COULDN'T RESIST.’

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YVES SAINT-LAURENT AND PIERRE CARDIN ‘I INVITED THEM TO MY STUDIO WITHOUT MAKING THEM AWARE OF EACH OTHER'S PRESENCE, AS THEY WERE NOT THEN ON VERY FRIENDLY TERMS. THEY MELLOWED LATER.’

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MARLON BRANDO ‘YES, BUT I WANT IT TO BE WITH WILLY RIZZO, AS HE TAKES VERY FEW PHOTOS AND DOESN'T PESTER.’ MARIA CALLAS ‘BEAUTIFUL AND ANIMATED.’

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COURREGES ‘I LOVE THIS PICTURE.’ COCO CHANEL ‘A RARE COCO SMILE.’

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SALVADOR DALI ‘WHEN I ARRIVED AT HIS PLACE, I SEARCHED THE APARTMENT TO FIND THE BEST ANGLE FOR THE SHOT, BUT HIS FACE WAS SO SPECTACULAR THAT WHEN HE ASKED ME, “WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO?” I PICKED UP THE MAGNIFYING GLASS FROM THE DESK AND JUST PHOTOGRAPHED HIM.’

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CHRISTIAN DIOR ‘THE REVOLUTION OF THE NEW LOOK IN FASHION, CHRISTIAN DIOR LENGTHENED SKIRTS; SCANDALOUS. THIS PHOTO BECAME FAMOUS EVERYWHERE.’

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KIRK DOUGLAS ‘I LIT KIRK WITH NOTHING BUT A CIGARETTE LIGHTER, AS IN ONE OF THE NOIR FILMS IN WHICH HE WAS SO OFTEN THE HERO.’ JANE FONDA ‘THE FIRST REAL PHOTO SESSION.’

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MARLENE DIETRICH ‘I KNEW SHE LIKED TO LISTEN TO MUSIC, SO ON THE WAY I STOPPED IN THE SHOPPING STREET BEHIND THE HOTEL TO BUY A TEPAZ RECORDPLAYER. SHE ENDED THE SHOOT BY SAYING “I WANT TO BE ALONE WITH MY GRAMOPHONE.” SHE WAS CAPRICIOUS, OVER FAMILIAR AND AUTHORITARIAN, BUT SHE HAD ENORMOUS SEX APPEAL.’

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LE CORBUSIER THE LEGENDARY ‘LE CORBU’ AND HIS EQUALLY LEGENDARY GLASSES

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GENE KELLY ‘HE CAME TO MY STUDIO AND I ASKED HIM TO SHOW ME THE NEW DANCE.’

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MARILYN MONROE ‘THIS PICTURE WAS TAKEN FIFTEEN DAYS BEFORE HER DEATH, AT A FRIEND'S HOUSE. IT WAS A CHAOTIC MEETING AS SHE WAS IN A FRAGILE EMOTIONAL STATE, BUT SHE WAS GENTLE WITH ME.’

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JACK NICHOLSON ‘WHAT CAN I SAY ABOUT JACK? HE'S A VERY DEAR FRIEND WHO IN ADDITION HAS THE GOOD LUCK TO BE PHOTOGENIC.’ 38

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OXFORD GENTLEMAN ‘THIS ECCENTRIC, IN CAMOUFLAGE PANTS, HAD HIS COPY OF THE TIMES IRONED EVERY MORNING.’

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PICASSO ‘IT'S DISARRANGING IT THAT'S GOING TO BE DIFFICULT.’ JEAN SEBERG ‘IRREPRESSIBLE AND TRAGIC.’

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YSL ‘SUCH TIMIDITY... BUT WHAT AN ACT TO FOLLOW.’ GARY COOPER ‘HE GAVE THE IMPRESSION THAT HE DIDN'T KNOW HE WAS AN ACTOR.’

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JEAN COCTEAU ‘I AM AN IMPOSTER.’

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SOPHIA LAUREN ‘AFTER LUNCH IN ROME, CARLO PONTI SCOWLING.’

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FURNITURE

IT WAS NEVER ABOUT RECREATING CLASSIC STYLES IN MODERN FURNITURE, THAT WASN’T THE POINT. IT WAS ABOUT CREATING SOMETHING NEW FOR A TRADITIONAL SETTING.

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his exhibition of Willy Rizzo's furniture is a selection of his work. Sadly it is not a comprehensive survey but it is a representative group of pieces which show the imagination and flare that is Willy Rizzo. Many of these pieces have been sourced in the traditional way from the market but a significant majority come from Willy Rizzo himself. It was an extraordinary turn of events when speaking to him about this exhibition he announced that he had a reserve of stock which had been in storage since 1975. Pieces that are both new to the market and vintage are both very rare and contradictory. There are a few more pieces available but this is a unique opportunity to buy from a time capsule.

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FURNITURE

Above: A Hi Fi stereo unit; a unique piece designed by Willy Rizzo for Sergio Corbucci at Cinecitta in 1968 and included in the exhibition Facing page: example of an interior room

The furniture of Willy Rizzo is very particular in style. It is not just the grammar of the age, it summarizes the age. If one had to try to capture the key elements of the 1970's in Europe you would conjure up the clean classical lines and the highly polished surfaces of Willy Rizzo furniture. Coming from the classical tradition one can see his pieces used in any sort of environment, indeed even in his own publicity one sees conventional antiques acting as a backdrop for the austere modern designs he promoted. Alongside the severity of the Willy Rizzo style one sees the twin strands of quality and originality. The craftsmen he employed came from the traditions of fine cabinet making and metalwork and not from the manufacturing ethos that dogs and diminishes so much of modern design. In addition to the attention to detail and quality one is also aware of the playfulness so many of the pieces here illustrated. The bar cabinet is a good example of this as is the red white and blue bordered low table. Willy himself joked that it was ‘gout anglais' a joke on the British and American flag colours. We are very lucky that Willy Rizzo has agreed for the first time to design and have made a frame for his photographs and these will be signed and numbered up to eight, in line with the edition of his photographs. He has also adapted his frame design to become a wonderful pair of mirrors and these two are limited to an edition of eight, and also signed.

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FURNITURE

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A BLACK AND A RED LACQUER DINING TABLE WITH LAZY SUSAN Height: 27in (71cm) Depth: 59in (150cm)

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FURNITURE

WILLY TRIED TO REINVENT ‘THE TABLE’ WHEN HE DESIGNED THIS PIECE. HE LOOKED TO THE FAR EAST. THE DESIGN BEGAN WITH THE TWO DISCS AND THE COLUMNS. THEN HE FOUND THE MECHANISM.

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THE TRAVERTINE TABLE Height: 28in (71cm) Width: 43in (110cm) Depth: 40in (100cm)

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FURNITURE

‘THE TRAVERTINE TABLE WAS CREATED IN 1969. I WAS INTERESTED IN THE GEOMETRY OF THE ELIPSE. ONE OF MY FIRST CLIENTS FOR THIS PIECE WAS A BANK IN BERNE, SWITZERLAND, AND WAS EXHIBITED AT MOMA NY IN AN EXHIBITION OF ITALIAN ART.’

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RECTANGULAR STEEL COFFEE TABLE WITH BASIN (1968) Height: 13in (34cm) Width: 31in (80cm) Length: 55in (140cm)

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‘I WANTED TO MAKE MY TABLES USING NOBLE MATERIALS AND AT THE TIME STAINLESS STEEL WAS A VERY NEW BUT CLASSIC MATERIAL.THESE ARE NOT DESIGNED TO BE “GADGET” FURNITURE, THEY ARE DEFINITIVE AND INDESTRUCTIBLE PIECES MADE TO LAST THE TEST OF TIME.’

TR-CASS (1972) Cassia side table. Double structure in stainless steel. Finish in laminate with two drawers. Black glass top. Height: 16in (40cm) Width: 31in (80cm) Depth: 20in (50cm)

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TQ-CASS Cassia square coffee table. Double structure in stainless steel. Finish in laminate with two drawers. Black glass top Height: 15in (38cm) Width: 47in (119cm) Depth: 47in (119cm)

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‘I LOVE LAMPS BECAUSE THE LIGHT IS SO FAVOURABLE TO FLIRTING. IT'S ALSO A PROGRESSIVE LIGHT. IT MOVES BETWEEN BRIGHTNESS AND SHADOW AND HAS A SENSE OF MYSTERY.’

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LAMP-Q SEQUOIA (1970) Sequoia square lamp in sequoia brier wood lined in copper, with dimmer. Height: 27in (70 cm) Depth: 14in (36 cm)

overleaf, left

LAMP-Q Square stainless steel lamp. Lined in copper with dimmer. Height: 27in (70 cm) Depth: 14in (36 cm)

overleaf, right

LAMP-RO Round stainless steel lamp. Lined in copper with dimmer. Height: 25in (65 cm) Depth: 13in (35 cm)

Willy Rizzo original promotional image

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‘THE TRG WAS CREATED IN 1969 FOR THE INTERIOR DESIGN OF THE APARTMENT OF GIGI CASSINI IN PALAZZO TORLOGNA, THE ROOM WAS ROUND SO I CREATED A ROUND TABLE AND ROUND CANAPES.’

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FURNITURE

TRG Circular revolving coffee table. Cloudy brown lacquer with brass basin. Height: 13in (34 cm) Depth: 45in (115 cm) This table is found in a number of colours and in steel.

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BACKGAMMON Tric trac table. Game table with reversible top and drawer. The board in leather, the reversible top framed in steel and brass. Height: 30in (76cm) Width: 33in (85cm) Depth: 33in (85cm)

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‘THE FASHION OF THE BACKGAMMON WAS AT ITS HEIGHT IN 1973. I DIDN'T WANT THE CLIENT TO HAVE TO SACRIFICE THE SPACE THE WHOLE TIME. THE SOLUTION WAS TO MAKE THE TABLE DUAL PURPOSE THUS ALLOWING THE ‘TRIC TRAC’ NOT TO OCCUPY THE SPACE IN A PERMANENT WAY.’

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A PAIR OF BLACK AND A PAIR OF RED LACQUER AND STEEL COMMODES Chest with ten graduated drawers. Finish in satin stainless steel. Height: 27in (71cm) Width: 47in (120cm) Depth: 17in (45cm)

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MBC Three door refrigerator buffetbar. Finish in satin stainless steel and brass. Height: 27in (71cm) Width: 53in (136cm) Depth: 17in (45cm)

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‘I DESIGNED THIS IN 1969 FOR MY APARTMENT IN THE PLACE D'ESPAGNE IN PARIS. IT ENJOYED A LOT OF SUCCESS ESPECIALLY FOR OFFICES AND POOL HOUSES.’

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TQ-FRANCIA Lacquered coffee table in three colours: white, red, blue. Height: 12in (31cm) Width: 47in (120cm) Depth: 47in (47cm)

‘I CREATED THIS IN 1975 FOR THE VILLA OF OTTO PREMINGER IN SAINT JEAN CAP FERRAT.’

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MIRROR A pair of bronze limited edition mirrors. Height: 79in (201cm) Width: 39in (99cm)

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A BLACK AND STEEL BREAKFAST TABLE (1972) Steel and black laminate. Height: 30in (75cm) Width: 51in (129cm)

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SQ Square chair in polished stainless steel. These chairs are now covered in a Paul Smith design fabric. Height: 31in (80cm) Width: 18in (48cm) Depth: 16in (42cm)

‘THE KEY TO THE FORM IS SIMPLICITY AND CLASSICAL DESIGN.’ 73

A PAIR OF FLAMINIA SIDE TABLES Stainless steel and brass with smoked glass shelves. Height: 30in (76cm) Width: 55in (140cm) Depth: 16in (40cm)

‘THESE SIDE TABLES WERE ONE OF MY FIRST

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FURNITURE

CREATIONS IN 1968. I WAS INSPIRED BY THE ROLEX WATCH.’

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Milan Furniture Fair 1973

COPYRIGHT All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publishers. TERMS AND CONDITIONS All business transactions are subject to our standard terms and conditions of sale, copies of which are available on request.

Š Mallett & Son (Antiques) Ltd 2007 Designed by Sinclair Communications Printed in England by Crucial Colour

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Mallett - Willy Rizzo Exhibtion