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Carl Garner

The godfather of Greers Ferry Lake

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A Letter from the President Another academic year is coming to an end, and we face the bittersweet prospect of saying farewell to a fine group of bright young men and women. It is bitter because we have gotten to know them and appreciate the many talents they have brought to our campus over the past years. It is sweet because we are excited to be launching them in graduate schools and professions, knowing that wherever they go they will represent Lyon College well. Thus, they advance from being Lyon students to being Lyon ambassadors. We know that they will increase in their appreciation of the advantage of being under the tutelage of Lyon’s strong and dedicated faculty. We also know that a new group of similarly gifted young men and women will arrive next fall to find their places in the classrooms, the laboratories and the recital hall, on the playing fields, and in our homes. It is a cycle that we have experienced again and again, and each time the bittersweet time of graduation is followed by the excitement of a new class showing up at our door. Other transitions will take place this year as well. Our chairman of the Board of Trustees, Mr. Raymond LaCroix Jr., will retire from our board at the end of June. He has been a true blessing to Lyon during his service as a trustee. I have especially benefited from his keen insight and wise counsel. Thankfully, he lives in Batesville and will not be far away when we need his sage advice in the future. The entire Lyon family is grateful for his years of solid service and dedication to the College. An upcoming, entirely positive move will be from The Temp to the new campus center, scheduled to be completed this summer. The importance of the re-establishment of the true heart of our campus was expressed by Mr. Jacob Didion, student body president, when he spoke to the President’s Council recently: “By the beginning of this year, nearly everything we lost in the fire had been replaced and relocated. And by that I mean we have a new gaming center, there is a new snack shop in the library, the student life and career development offices have been relocated, the Scot Shop has been moved, and we have a decent cafeteria. There are places where students can go to hang out again and build relationships. The problem is that they are so spread out that the sense of community still isn’t at the same level that it used to be.” That sense of community is a critical part of the Lyon College experience. The new campus center will be an even more inviting and accommodating facility than the one we lost in the fire. We all look forward to returning to campus in August and having this welcoming place to gather, break bread together, and cultivate new friendships. Sincerely,

Spring 2012

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Volume XXXVIX, Number 2

Carl Garner Legendary civil engineer, conservationist profiled

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Student Profiles High-achieving seniors are in the spotlight

13 Perry Wilson elected board chairman LaCroix stepping down as chairman, trustee

17 Faculty accomplishments Scholarly, creative work highlighted

22 New athletic conference Scots joining American Midwest Conference

24 Alumni News & Notes Piper Staff David Heringer, Vice President for Administration Gina Garrett, ’93, Director of Advancement Bob Qualls, Director of Communications, Editor Chandra Huston, Assistant Director of Communications Eleanore Tebbetts, ’07, Assistant Director of Marketing and Communication Taryn Hill Duncan, ’91, Director of Alumni and Parent Services Michele Howard, Advancement Data Manager Kay Hermansen-Pool, Administrative Coordinator for Institutional Advancement

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From athletics to life, Carl Garner achieved By BOB QUALLS Editor of The Piper What can I say about William Carl Garner that has not already been written? The lanky farm boy from Sulphur Rock became a legendary civil engineer and conservationist who has won more awards and honors than even he can count. He has been honored many times by his alma mater, Lyon College (it was Arkansas College when he graduated in 1938). He was inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame in 1986. He was a standout athlete in several sports, but was especially known for his basketball prowess. As a 6-foot-3 center, he led the Arkansas College Panthers to a state championship in 1938. He had previously been a basketball star for the Wildcats at Sulphur Rock High School. Back in those days, there was a jump ball after every basket, so The Sulphur Rock Wildcats high school basketball team. Carl’s 6-foot-3 height gave the Wildcats Carl Garner is at left on the front row. and Panthers an advantage. Carl says he won every jump ball except when they played He was the chief engineer for the Corps during Arkansas State Teachers College (now UCA) when the construction of Greers Ferry Lake, starting on the they had a 7-footer on the team. project before any trees were cut, he once said. When Carl also was named a Distinguished Alumnus at the lake was built, he decided he wanted to stay near AC in 1989 and was awarded an honorary Doctor of the beautiful blue lake he had created, so he successHumane Letters degree in 1994. fully sought the job as chief resident engineer at After graduating from AC in ’38, Carl went to Greers Ferry Lake, a position he held for 34 years. work for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, beginCarl Garner’s crowning achievement was the ning a career that lasted 58 years until he retired in Greers Ferry Lake and Little Red River Cleanup. By 1996. He had taken a course in surveying taught at 1970, millions of visitors had enjoyed the lake and its AC by John P. Morrow Sr. that helped him get the recreational attractions, leaving behind tons of litter. job. There were not enough funds to pay to clean up the 2

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President John F. Kennedy speaks at the October 1963 dedication of Greers Ferry Dam. This event was one of the highlights of Garner’s career. Kennedy was assassinated Nov. 23, 1963. area, so Carl got the idea of using community spirit and volunteerism to get the job done. He collaborated with the Greers Ferry Lake and Little Red River Association and other community and state leaders, attracted corporate sponsors, and worked countless hours to plan and promote the cleanup. The cleanup became an annual event, capped off by a picnic with big-name entertainers performing for the volunteers. The effort was so successful that it spawned the Great Arkansas Cleanup in 1979, which included all Corps of Engineers lakes in Arkansas and the Arkansas River. In 1984, using the Greers Ferry program as a model, Keep America Beautiful, Inc. initiated the first National Public Lands Day. The Senate approved a bill by U.S. Sen. Dale Bumpers in 1996 to rename the annual Federal Lands Cleanup Day in honor of Carl Garner. Bumpers said at the time, “Future generations will enjoy our nation’s public lands, and they should know that it was the vision and leadership of Carl Garner that were responsible for creating this national cleanup effort.” Spring 2012

The Sulphur Rock boy who was so bashful he had his brother read his valedictorian speech at high school graduation later became an able public speaker. When he received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from AC in 1989, he gave a gracious acceptance speech that enumerated what he had learned at the college. Among them, he said, was that he had “learned how to learn,” “learned how to win and how to lose,” and “learned the meaning of dedication, truth, and courage.” “All of these,” he said, “have served as a foundation for building a career and a life that has been so rewarding and satisfying to me.” Carl and his lovely wife, Jean, live near Tumbling Shoals on the lake that he built. His office is filled with memorabilia, and his walls are covered with the many awards and tributes he has been given. He remains active at age 96 and attends many events at Lyon College. Carl and Jean enjoy photography, and Carl has hundreds of photos he has taken, including many beautiful fiery sunsets over the lake that he loves. 3

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Surveying class at AC changed the course of Carl Garner’s life By CRAIG OGILVIE, ’68 tower and a porch. Carl signed on to Special to The Piper play baseball and basketball, both A quiet, competitive spirit has played outside in the dirt. The only been a driving force for Carl Garner indoor basketball court in the counfor most of his 96 years. Learning to ty at the time was at Arkansas become a winner probably started in College in Batesville. the boyhood games played on his parAlthough Carl could now ride to ents’ farm, six miles east of Batesville. school and back, he often ran the His brothers provided the competi2.5 miles home after school to keep tion in everything from picking cothis body in top shape for athletics. It ton to playing marbles. paid off, and news soon spread about Born William Carl Garner on the kid from Sulphur Rock who was June 1, 1915, he was the eldest of leading his “Wildcats” team to victoBert and Minnie Pearl Garner’s five ry over much larger schools. Sulphur children. The family farm, located Rock’s basketball team won the between Moorefield and Sulphur county championship his first year Rock in Independence County, proon the squad. vided the children with a variety of His excellent grades made him Carl Garner in outdoor activities, including farm Sulphur Rock’s valedictorian in a recent photo chores, fishing and hunting...and 1934, but Carl was so shy that he sports. The Garner home was a gathering place for asked his brother Charles, the class salutatorian, to neighboring children to play basketball, baseball, and make the graduation address. He accepted an athletic other games. It was not unusual for a dozen or more to scholarship to Arkansas College and lived at home congregate on sunny afternoons. during his first two years of higher learning. Carl and his brothers, Charles, Lynn, and Dean, Making the six miles to college became a daily and one sister, Lucille, attended Lone Oak School, a challenge for Carl. He could easily get a ride from one-room country school located next to the railroad someone traveling the road between Batesville and tracks along present-day Lonoke Lane. The family Newark, except when no one was taking the route. attended the Methodist Church in Moorefield. When Carl walked, trotted and ran to school on those days. they went to church or to town, they had a choice of He also worked on campus to help with extra costs walking or riding in a wagon pulled by two mules. not covered by his scholarship. By the time Carl had reached his teens it was Carl lived with an uncle during his junior year. clear that athletics would play a big part in his life. He still had daily farm chores, but his uncle worked He excelled in all sports available to him and when in Batesville and owned a car, so Carl finally had he reached the tenth grade, Carl wanted to play transportation to and from college. That year, Carl “real” school sports. A converted truck, serving as a was also the campus “postmaster,” picking up the mail school bus, started picking up children wanting to at the post office and placing it in student mailboxes. attend Sulphur Rock High School, and the Garner During his senior year, Carl lived in the boys’ dorkids made the switch. mitory so he could coach intramural athletics and Sulphur Rock had been an important educational officiate at high school games played on campus. He center during the late 1800s, and the district still used recalls that referees were paid 75 cents per game durthe original 1872 academy building. It was a large ing the post-Depression years. two-story frame building with the traditional bell Until 1954, the Arkansas College campus was 4

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Many friends in high places Carl Garner and a colleague in the Oval Office with President Bill Clinton, one of many officeholders who have honored Carl for his service.

located downtown, covering a city block between College and Boswell streets, starting at 7th Street. When Carl arrived in 1934, the newest building on the block was the W. J. Erwin Gymnasium, which continues to serve today as the Fellowship Hall of the First Presbyterian Church. Built of cut-stone blocks, now covered over with brick, the gym was tiny by today’s standards and did not provide a regulationsized court. However, it was among the best in the region when completed in 1913. It was the home of the AC “Panthers” until 1947. Carl’s athletic scholarship compelled him to participate in all sports, which included basketball, baseball, and football. He lettered in all three, but was glad the college decided to drop football in 1936. In basketball, Carl played center at 6-foot-3, and was named to the All-State team his junior year. The following season, as a senior, Carl’s team won the state championship and a trip to the national college tournament (now the NCAA) in Denver. Baseball was also a great love. Carl was a pitcher, one among many great players that came out of Arkansas during the 1930s. He was often matched against Preacher Rowe, a future major league star who was playing for Harding College at the time. Batesville merchants supported the college teams by Spring 2012

donating gasoline so the team could make out-oftown sporting events. The team usually drove back home after “away” games, regardless of the distance, because the school could not afford overnight accommodations. Today, Carl still expresses appreciation for the many friends he made at Arkansas College and recalls with gratitude the dedicated professors who guided and shaped his early years. One class that Carl decided to take due to curiosity changed the course of his entire life. Johnny Morrow’s surveying course was a natural fit and soon Carl was assisting Morrow on the field survey crew. When Morrow could not find time to teach the class, Carl would teach in his stead. Carl received his degree on his 23rd birthday, June 1, 1938. Fifteen days later, he was on the job with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. That non-credit surveying class at Arkansas College had landed him a dream career, and there was no looking back. His first Corps assignment was helping build levees in the Pocahontas-Corning regions of northeast Arkansas, and then levee repairs in Kansas. Next, Carl was part of a crew that staked out 10 potential dam sites in the White River basin and surveyed for new air bases at Stuttgart and Newport. He also helped with mapping on the White and Red rivers. 5

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Carl Garner (right) with Grandpa Jones of Hee Haw fame. During World War II, Carl was part of a crew of 30 civil engineers mapping the U.S./Canadian border in the eastern lakes region. He headquartered at Batavia, N.Y., for two years, then helped finish the project back in Little Rock. After the war, Carl worked on the Bull Shoals Dam near Mountain Home and Table Rock Dam at Branson, Mo. He came to Heber Springs in 1959 as chief of the Engineering Division for the Greers Ferry Project. As the dam took shape, Carl realized that this was the perfect place to settle down and call home. When the power plant was nearing completion, he applied to 6

be the first resident engineer for the Greers Ferry Lake and Dam project. “If you give me this job, I’ll make it the best project in the nation,” Carl told the Corps shortly before he got the position. The highlight of his long career came on Oct. 3, 1963, when Carl welcomed President John F. Kennedy to the dedication of the lake project. After months of planning, the program went smoothly, and Carl will never forget riding in the official car with the president during the event. Carl has said numerous times that the annual cleanup on the lake and Little Red River was the most important program started

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during his career. Co-sponsored by the regional tourist association, the all-volunteer cleanup was launched in 1970, after Carl became alarmed by the litter accumulating on the 300 miles of shoreline and 25 miles of river. The program was so successful that it became a federal mandate that all federal lands should have a litter removal program. The Great Arkansas Cleanup also came from the idea, with city and state parks joining the campaign against litter. Carl and the cleanup program have received well over 30 state and national awards. The project has also captured more than a dozen Keep America Beautiful Awards, including the very first Iron Eyes Cody Award in 1988. (Cody was an American actor who portrayed the “crying Indian” in a legendary public service spot for Keep America Beautiful.) In 1993, Congress renamed the lake’s visitor center the “William Carl Garner Visitor Center.” Since its completion in 1983, the center has been operated and staffed by employees and students from Lyon College under a contract with the Corps of Engineers. Donna Glascock serves as the center’s administrator. After 34 years of keeping his promise to Greers Ferry Lake, Carl retired from the Corps of Engineers in 1996. He served a total of 58 years with the Corps, a near-record for any civil servant. However, retirement and age hasn’t stopped him from working on projects that are dear to his heart. Carl and his wife, Jean, reside on the shores of their beloved lake. They have three adult children and two grandchildren. The Piper

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By mid-April, brick work on the new building was almost complete and drywall installation had begun on the first floor. The facility is scheduled to open to students in August.

Campus center construction continues Progress continues on the new 44,000-square-foot campus center at Lyon College. The center will replace Edwards Commons, the dining hall and student union that was destroyed by fire in 2010. Crews are working day and night to finish the campus center by the fall of 2012. The two-story student center includes a 352-seat dining hall, a kitchen, a deck, The Scot Shop, a game room, meeting spaces, student mailboxes, and a bistro. Student Life offices also will be housed in the building, including health and wellness facilities, counseling offices, and the career development center. The College broke ground on the campus center Oct. 21. Crews from East-Harding Construction Co.

Spring 2012

of Little Rock began work on the structure shortly after the groundbreaking ceremony. They also razed the remaining portion of Edwards Commons. The building’s architects are Roark Perkins Perry Yelvington Architects (RPPY) of Little Rock. The project is expected to cost approximately $9.6 million. Funding for the new student center will come from insurance proceeds from the Edwards Commons fire and from donations. Students are currently being fed in a 270-seat temporary facility known as The Temp. To make a donation toward the new student center, please contact the president's office at (870) 3077201 or donate by using our secure site http://www.lyon.edu/support-lyon-donate.htm.

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’12 honor graduates are profiled Andrew Todd

Kelsey Ward

Andrew Todd of O’Kean (Randolph County) describes himself as a “goal-oriented lover of problem solving, unwilling to settle for less than the doctorate level of academic achievement,” and his past four years as a Lyon College student testify for this hard-working nature. Todd will graduate with a major in mathematics and minors in computer science and physics. He has racked up several awards in the past few years, such as the Bausch and Lomb Science Award in 2007, the Roberta Thomas Dorr Brown Endowed Scholarship in 2009, a Lyon College Community Involvement Award, and first place in the 2012 SCARF competition. He is a member of Alpha Chi National Honor Society and Sigma Delta Pi, the national college honor society for Spanish. In the Lyon College community, he serves as a member of Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity, Baptist Collegiate Ministry, and the Math Club, which he founded two years ago. He also has worked as a Supplemental Instruction (SI) leader for math, chemistry, physics, and Spanish. Todd has worked with Dr. David Pace, Dr. Stuart Hutton, and Dr. Jeremy Chapman in faculty-supervised research. His most recent work is a presentation he gave with fellow student John Pope, called Curves in 2-Dimensional Vector Spaces over Finite Fields. Todd and Pope gave the presentation at the 2011 MAKO Undergraduate Math Research Conference, the 2012 Posters at the Capitol, and the 2012 Lyon College Student Creative Arts and Research Forum (SCARF), where they won the first-place prize. He said he has enjoyed his time at Lyon College, noting the “level of quality of the professors.” “It’s been a worthwhile challenge,” he said. “I have no regrets.” Todd will be pursuing graduate studies at the University of Missouri at Columbia this coming fall.

Kelsey Ward of Ramona, Okla., has succeeded at every facet of college life. Ward, a major in biology, has been involved in research work at Lyon College and elsewhere, and she has managed this while maintaining key roles in many campus organizations. Ward worked as an undergraduate researcher at the University of Oregon in the summer of 2011. Ward also worked as an undergraduate researcher at Lyon from 2009-2011, where she determined the bacterial and algal biodiversity of cave systems. She attended the University of Mississippi’s Trent Lott Leadership Institute in 2008. Along with fellow senior Madeline Boyd, Ward received a grant in 2009 from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to work with microbial diversity in Ozark Region Caves. She helped with research for the publication “A biological inventory of Meacham Cave (Independence County, Arkansas),” which was published in the Journal of the Arkansas Academy of Science in 2011; she also helped present the article. Ward has given many other presentations, such as “The Effect of the BAF Chromatin Regulator in Heart Valve Maturation of Mus Musculus” for the Summer Program for Undergraduate Research (SPUR). Ward credits Lyon College with her success. “Deciding to attend Lyon is a choice that I will never regret. I know that if I had attended a larger university, I would have been lost among the other students in my classes. At Lyon, the professors make an effort to know who you are and what you want to do,” she said. Ward has been the vice president and intramural chair for Phi Mu for the past two years, and she is the vice president of Spanish Club and the secretary of National Speleological Society’s local Grotto. She was a freshman mentor and she volunteers at the Christian Health Center in Batesville and as a

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Student profiles Sunday School aide at Batesville’s Fellowship Bible Church. Ward also worked as an ambassador in Lyon’s Office of Admission. She will work as a camp counselor for children with attention issues this summer in Pennsylvania, and she plans to work and travel for a year before beginning a Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) to get her M.D./Ph.D. Ward wants to be a physician who does research that complements her specialty.

Nancy Love Originally from New Orleans, La., Nancy Love says she immediately fell in love with the beauty of Arkansas and the Lyon College campus when she travelled here in 2006 to compete in the pipe band competition at the Arkansas Scottish Festival. “I began school here as a non-traditional student in the fall of 2008, and now live here with my husband Kenton Adler, a cat, and a giant dog,” Love said. She’s had a busy time at Lyon. She’s a double major in Psychology and English, and will be the first ever Scottish Arts minor. She has been part of five honor societies: Alpha Chi (president 2010-2011), Mortar Board (president 2011-2012), Psi Chi, Sigma Tau Delta, and Chi Beta Phi. She is also the student representative on the Friends of the Library officer’s board. “I feel lucky to have had the benefit of an excellent faculty and staff, and to share the campus and classroom with high-caliber students,” she said. “With the support and encouragement by others, I’ve experienced wonderful personal success on campus.” She has received several leadership awards from Student Life, a book award from the English department, and creative writing prizes in prose, poetry, and humor from The Wheelbarrow and The Highlander. “My largest time commitment outside of the classroom has been in music, as a member of the Lyon College Pipe Band, Flute Choir, and the Batesville Spring 2012

Choral Society,” she said. “I have loved every minute of being part of these great ensembles. I’ve especially loved playing for the processionals that are part of so many Lyon College ceremonies.” She plans to study for a master’s in either occupational therapy or creative writing. “I hope to establish a career in either and begin to participate in the larger community of Batesville and Arkansas. I’m also looking forward to contributing meaningfully to Lyon College so that future students can enjoy the opportunity for an excellent education and college experience.”

Jacob Didion Jacob Didion says that he has “learned so much at Lyon.” His college career has encompassed so many leadership roles and awards that one cannot help but wonder if Lyon hasn’t learned something from Didion as well. Hailing from Fort Smith and a graduate of Subiaco Academy, Didion will graduate with a biology degree. He was awarded a Brown Scholarship when he came to Lyon. He was named Mr. Lyon College last fall and has served as president of the Student Government Association and as the student representative to the Board of Trustees this academic year. He also has served as Alpha Xi Delta’s Xi Man of the Year and Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity’s Top New Member. He has also received the Hall of Leaders Award and is included in Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. Didion is a member of Alphi Chi National Honor Society, vice president of Mortar Board, and treasurer of Chi Beta Phi. He has been the president and secretary in the past for Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity. He conducted research for Dr. Floyd Beckford that has been published in three journals and he presented his research to Alpha Chi last year and won a national scholarship. 9

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Student profiles “I have pushed the boundaries of what I thought I could accomplish and discovered a lot about myself,” Didion said of his time at Lyon College. “I’ve made some great lifelong friends. I am leaving Lyon ready to take on the challenges of the future.” Didion will attend medical school at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), and this summer he will marry Lyon graduate Monica Day, ’11, currently a student at the Bowen School of Law at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

Maci Powers Maci Powers of Lexington, Tenn., will graduate with a bachelor of science, but her biology degree only tells a small percentage of her time at Lyon College. The rest can be seen in her work ethic and her adaptability to constantly changing conditions. In the last four years, Powers has received the Above and Beyond Award, the American Chemical Society Organic Chemistry Award, and the Chemistry Student of the Year Award, as well as being awarded Dean’s List honors several times. She is a member of the Honor Council, Student Government Association, Alpha Chi Honor Society, Mortar Board National College Senior Honor Society, Chi Beta Phi, Phi Mu sorority, LEAP, and Club Med. Powers has worked as a resident assistant, a teaching assistant, a student mentor, an undergraduate researcher in cellular biology, and a tutor for Upward Bound Math-Science. She is a certified scuba diver and also has certifications in first-aid, CPR and AED. During the second semester of her junior year, Powers traveled to Spain with the Conahec Student Exchange Program. “It was probably the best decision I ever made,” Powers said of the semester abroad. According to Powers, “living independently shines a light on your true self for discovery.” She said that navigating through Spain on her own allowed her to realize who she wants to become. 10

Because of her time abroad, Powers has decided to take off a year to travel. She plans to attend medical school after returning from her travels. “Lyon College has given me the confidence and drive to pursue all my endeavors,” Powers said, “It has provided opportunities to pursue more than I ever dared to dream up.”

Elizabeth Fuller Elizabeth Fuller is the definition of well-rounded. During her time at Lyon College, she has managed to achieve a major in psychology and minors in philosophy and Spanish, all while maintaining leadership roles in campus organizations and her position on the Scots women’s soccer team. Fuller, from Wichita, Kan., has been on the Dean’s List every semester of her college career. She serves as membership director for Mortar Board and secretary for Psi Chi, and she is a member of Phi Sigma Tau, Alpha Chi, and Sigma Pi Delta. She has been awarded second place in the SCARF competition, and received the TransSouth Scholar Athlete award, the Dak-Stats NAIA Scholar Athlete award, and the Involved Athlete of the Year Award. “Lyon College provided me with an array of classes to develop not only my education but my personal outlook on life,” Fuller said, noting her professors pushed her to develop better critical thinking skills. Fuller is a member and three-year captain of the women’s soccer team, PanHellenic Delegate for Phi Mu sorority, and a research assistant at White River Pain Clinic. “Having opportunities as an undergraduate to assist with research in a professional setting as well as develop my own research for presentation and possible publication has benefited me greatly,” Fuller said. She will be studying this fall at one of the top doctoral programs for criminology, Florida State University.

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Student profiles Ellen Thornton Ellen Thornton of Hardy did not take the traditional path to college. Transferring to Lyon College from Ozarka College in 2009, Thornton balances working at the Hardy Police Department with her studies. “I live off campus and drive to Batesville everyday from Hardy, which is about 110 miles a day or approximately 54,780 miles of just driving to school,“ she said. “This equates to approximately $12,450 worth of gas during the past three school years. You can tell I am a math major!” Thornton will graduate from Lyon College with a major in mathematics and a concentration in secondary education. “I learned a great deal from my education classes and my secondary education professor Ms. (Kim) Crosby while at Lyon. I loved the program,” Thornton said, emphasizing the benefits of her yearlong internship in a classroom. She has maintained a 4.0 GPA throughout her time at Lyon College, even during a year in which she took eight math courses. Thornton credits Dr. Jeremy Chapman for her success, saying “Dr. Chapman and

his classes made sure that I am very experienced in the math content area, which will be a good asset when I start teaching.” Thornton took a Nichols trip to Switzerland in the spring semester of 2010, a trip she called “an amazing life experience.” She said that without the college’s help, she never would have been able to take a trip outside of the United States. “I have had a fantastic experience being a student at Lyon College, and I am grateful that I was able to attend college here,” Thornton said. She plans to find work teaching this fall.

Kalen Taylor Kalen Taylor of Turpin, Okla., is majoring in history and political science. He received departmental book awards in both political science and history. He is a member of Alpha Chi, Phi Alpha Theta, and Pi Sigma Alpha. He will serve as an intern with the Jewish Policy Center in Washington, D.C., and work in the area for a year. He plans to attend graduate school the following year.

Students receive numerous honors at convocation Several Lyon College students earned honors at the college’s annual Honors Convocation April 17. Various academic, athletic and student life awards were presented at the convocation. Students and their awards include: Alpha Chi Professor of the Year — Dr. Patrick Mulick, associate professor of psychology Long Bible Award — Chelsea Grider of Pleasant Plains Celtic Cross — Andrew Todd of Walnut Ridge Highlander Editor of the Year — Lilly Hastings of North Little Rock Spring 2012

Scot Yearbook Editor of the Year — Jessica Jones of Spring, Texas Ambassador of the Year Award — Caitlin Campbell of Batesville Supplemental Instruction Leader of the Year Award — Jonathan Dannatt of Bald Knob Sigma Tau Delta Senior Writing Award — Tyler Hudgens of Midland Abbie Snapp Arnold English Award — Amber Simpson of Paragould Theta Alpha Kappa Award — Will Belvin of Norman, Okla. 11

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Freshman Writing Award — Madeline Roberts of Little Rock Bart Lewis Scholarship Award Kaylin Cesarski of Batesville and Molly Young of Beech Grove Charles R. Oliver Memorial Scholarship Award — Jon-Michael Poff of Batesville Clarence Adams Award — Lauren Ramsey of North Little Rock Cassie Creighton Scholar Award — Brock Zuege of Tulsa, Okla. Freshman Chemistry Award — Jacob Haddock of Fort Smith James Alexander Shanks Chemistry Award — Marc-Andre LeBlanc of Little Rock American Chemical Society Organic Chemistry Award — Eamon Olwell of Mountain Home George Maxfield Evans Award — Paige Blades of Bono Roberta Thomas Dorr Brown Endowed Scholarship — Matt Coyle of Stockton, Mo. Fred Wann Intramural Participation Awards — Josh Dunham of Clarksville and Lauren Mills of Gentry

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New Blaine Best Actor — Victor Wilson of Barling Best Actress — Kelley Wyatt of Batesville Special Theatre Award for Continuing Service — Zeta Beta Tau Religion & Philosophy — Amber Simpson of Paragould History — Kalen Taylor of Turpin, Okla. Political Science — Kalen Taylor of Turpin, Okla., and Erica Downs of Batesville Accounting — Callie Hoyt of Little Rock Business Administration — Kyle Christopher of Cave City Economics — Emily Carter of Little Rock Early Childhood Education — Savannah Cousins of Pleasant Plains Secondary Education — Ellen Thornton of Hardy Psychology — Kaitlyn Patterson of Eugene, Ore. Anthropology — Lighla Whitson of Fort Smith Physical Education — Lauren Ramsey of North Little Rock Departmental Awards Biology — Madeline Boyd of Spanish — Elizabeth Fuller of Portland, Ore. Wichita, Kan. Chemistry — Jeff Goss of French — Summer Taylor of Batesville Walnut Ridge Mathematics — Ellen Japanese — Lighla Whitson of Thornton of Hardy and Andrew Fort Smith Todd of Walnut Ridge Journalism — Jessica Jones of Physics — Michael Cherry of Spring, Texas Austin, Texas English — Nancy Love of Physics — Andrew Todd of Batesville Walnut Ridge Art — Jordan Aliviado of Computer Science — Emily Torrance, Calif., and Kris Dunlap Ingram of Batesville of Batesville Student Life Awards Music — Diana Turnbo of Outstanding Student Leader — Mountain Home Theatre — Spencer Hall of Jacob Didion of Fort Smith and 12

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Nancy Love of Batesville Emerging Leader — Angelica Holmes of Little Rock Involved Athlete of the Year — Elizabeth Fuller of Wichita, Kan. Student Volunteer of the Year — Jordan Faulkner of Paragould Program of the Year — Baptist Collegiate Ministry and Fellowship of Christian Athletes Organization of the Year — Red Cross Club Student Entrepreneur of the Year — Charles Stice of Batesville LEAP Volunteer of the Year — Fred Kiffer of Little Rock LEAP Outstanding Trip Leader — Brianna Forbis of Burney, Calif. Hall of Leaders — Madeline Boyd of Portland, Ore.; Chin-Yee Chew of Vinita, Okla.; Tonya Clapp of Batesville; Landon Downing of Sidney; Aaron Farris of Mountain View; Jordan Faulkner of Paragould; Lauren Hill of Jonesboro; Tyler Hudgens of Midland; Jessica Jones of Spring, Texas; Jon-Michael Poff of Batesville; Maci Powers of Lexington, Tenn.; and Raylon Wilson of Hot Springs Above and Beyond — Caitlin Campbell of Batesville; Emily Carter of Little Rock; Josh Dunham of Clarksville; Tesla Fields of Conway; Maggie Hance of Batesville; Lilly Hastings of North Little Rock; Justin Holmes of Harleton, Texas; Fred Kiffer of Little Rock; Debbie Onukwube of Little Rock; Aurianna PrinceColbath of Bentonville; Caity Simpson of Cabot; J.D. Spahr of Dayton, Tenn.; Shane Tucker of Batesville; Lindsey Walters of Walnut Ridge; and Trent Weeks of Batesville

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Wilson elected chair of Lyon board Perry Wilson, a Little Rock attorney, has been elected chairman of the Lyon College Board of Trustees. The board elected him April 20 at its spring meeting. He succeeds Raymond LaCroix Jr. of Batesville, who is leaving the board June 30 after 17 years of service, six of them as chairman. Wilson joined the board in 2009 and is a member of the Executive Committee and is chair of the Institutional Advancement Committee. He is a member of the Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale law firm in Little Rock. He is the son of the late Mike Wilson, a longtime member of the Lyon board. The chairman position serves a five-year term. Other officers elected by the board are Stephen Williams, ’82, of Little Rock, vice chair; Ricky Davis, ’80, of Heber Springs, secretary; and Charles Whiteside III of Little Rock, treasurer. The board also elected two new trustees and reelected three current Synod trustees. Elected as a new Synod trustee is Carolyn Pieserich, ’95, of Little Rock. Mrs. Pieserich is a Batesville High School graduate and received her B.S. degree in biology from Lyon. She is a civic and

community leader. She is a fifth generation Lyon graduate and her mother, grandmother, and grandfather all served as trustees. She and her husband, John Pieserich, ’95, have three children. She will serve a four-year term beginning July 1. Elected to a three-year term as a new alumni trustee from Independence County is Chris Beller, ’98, of Batesville. He is a dentist at the Beller Dental Clinic, where he practices with his father, Bill Beller, ’63. A recipient of the 2008 Patterson Decade Award, Beller is chairman of the Vital Link Board of Directors and the Batesville Parks and Recreation Committee. He is a member of Central Avenue Methodist Church. Re-elected to four-year terms as Synod trustees are Vicky Crittenden, ’78, of Lexington, Mass.; W. Len Rayburn, ’91, of Maumelle; and Stephen Williams, ’82, of Little Rock. Also introduced at the board meeting was JonMichael Poff, ’13, of Batesville who was recently elected president of the Student Government Association for 2012-13. As the SGA president, Poff will serve as a student representative on the board.

LaCroix going off Board of Trustees after 17 years The Lyon College faculty, staff, and fellow trustees bid farewell – at least temporarily – to Raymond LaCroix Jr., who is rotating off the Board of Trustees on June 30. LaCroix has been chairman of the board since 2006 and board member for 17 years. LaCroix was one of seven trustees who were honored at an appreciation dinner for faculty and trustees April 19. Dr. Robert Young III, a current trustee and former chairman of the board, recognized LaCroix for his service to the board and to the college. He called LaCroix “a good guy” and described him as “respected, thoughtful, quiet, and effective.” LaCrox said, “It has been an honor to serve on the board, and as chairman.” During his tenure, he has seen the college change names (from Arkansas College to Lyon College in 1994) and the construction of the Derby Center, baseball field, and practice facility. As chairman, he led the board during financial challenges, the search Spring 2012

for a new president, and the current construction of the new campus center. “Although not the way we planned it,” he said, referring to the fire that destroyed Edwards Commons. “Thanks for your trust and confidence,” he said. LaCroix, of Batesville, first joined the board in 1995 and has served on several committees, including the Business and Finance Committee, Student Life Committee, Personnel Subcommittee, and the Buildings and Grounds Committee, which he chaired from 2000 to 2006. He is president of LaCroix Optical Co. and White River Scientific, Inc. He and his wife, Diane, are members of First Presbyterian Church in Batesville. Other trustees who will be leaving or rotating off the board are Bill Bristow, ’72, of Jonesboro; Martha Miller, ’73, of Little Rock; Paul “P. K.” Holmes III of Fort Smith; Tara Reynolds, ’95, of Batesville; Bridget Nutt, ’10, of Jonesboro; and Jacob Didion, ’12, the student representative and SGA President. 13

Ball raises $$$ for scholarships

Board of Trustees Chairman Ray LaCroix and wife Diane

More than $100,000 was raised for student scholarships at Lyon College’s first Black Tie Blue Jeans Ball Feb. 24 at the Cow Palace at Chimney Rock in Concord. Nearly 300 people attended the ball, which featured a gourmet dinner, silent and live auctions and a dance. The event was emceed by Congressman Rick Crawford, and Dr. and Mrs. Frank Lyon Jr. served as honorary chairs. More than 100 silent auction items ranged from a custom made Black Tie Blue Jeans duck call from Killer Kalls to student and faculty artwork. Live auction items included jewelry from Sissy’s Log Cabin and Jonathan’s Fine Jewelry; a duck hunt at Wingmead Farm in Stuttgart; deep sea fishing trip for six at Tiki Island, Texas; a weekend getaway at Summer Wind Farms and Keeneland Thoroughbred Racing; one-year membership to Cooper’s Hawk Golf Club; and a one-night stay including dinner and brunch for two at the Capital Hotel, Acadia, and Ashley’s in Little Rock and more. The auction even included a black angus heifer donated by RCI, Inc. in Batesville and an organically raised steer from Highrock Farms in Batesville. Students played an active role at the event, sharing their stories of why they chose Lyon College and how scholarships play a big part in their college careers. Lyon College awards $7 million annually in scholarships and grants to help students attend college. Vice President for Administration David Heringer said the ball was so successful he plans on making it an annual event. Next year’s Black Tie Blue Jeans Ball is scheduled for Feb. 22, 2013.

Trustee Perry Wilson and mother Patricia Wilson of Little Rock 14

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Dr. Frank and Jane Lyon of Little Rock

Stacy and Tony Gunderman with daughter Lauren

Lyon College students (from left) Megan Holifield, Maggie Hance, Mattie Erby and Hannah Ellis

David and Chris Heringer of Batesville

Congressman Rick Crawford and Bridget Nutt, 始10 Spring 2012

Photos by Steve Sniteman and Robert O. Seat 15

Faculty-trustee appreciation dinner

Diane and Ray LaCroix with the chairman’s portrait

Dr. Terrell Tebbetts with Perry Wilson

Photos by Chandra Huston and Taryn Duncan

Tyler Hudgens, the new Young Alumni Trustee, with Gina Garrett Trustee Robert Young III and wife Mary

Trustee Bill Bristow was given a Lyon chair for his service. 16

Trustees Warren Stephenson and Charles Whiteside III with President and Mrs. Weatherman The Piper

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Lyon faculty’s scholarly, creative accomplisments in 2011-2012 August 15, 2011-March 15, 2012 (Names of Lyon student co-authors/presenters are marked with *.) Dr. Wesley Beal, Assistant Professor of English Paper Presentations: • “Philip Marlowe, Family Man.” Presented at the 36th Annual Meeting of the Society for Utopian Studies, Penn State University, October 2011. • “What's the Matter with Gotham City?: Ideologies of Crime and Punishment in Christopher Nolan's Batman.” Invited, inaugural lecture for the Campus Activities Board speaker series, Harding University, November 2011 Dr. Martha Beck, Professor of Philosophy Books: • Upon this Moral Law the World Depends: A Reading of Euripides’ Hecuba through the Categories of Aristotle, Global Scholarly Publications, 2011. • Essays on “Paideia”: Education for Practical Wisdom in Ancient Greek Tragedy and Philosophy: Finding the Connections between Tragedy, Plato, and Aristotle, Global Scholarly Publications, 2011. • “The gods . . . so ordained that fate should stand against fate to check any person’s excess”: Applying Aristotle’s Ethical and Political Theory to the Characters in Aeschylus’ Agamemnon, Global Scholarly Publications, 2011. • Civilized Killing: Maintaining a Strong Military in a Free and Open Society: A Reading of Plato’s Laches, Global Scholarly Publications, 2011. Articles: • “Jung and Plato on Individuation.” Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love. Adrienne Leigh McEnvoy, ed. Rodopi, 2011: 1993-2003. Dr. Floyd Beckford, Associate Professor of Chemistry Articles: • Nerissa A. Lewis, Fang Liu, Luke Seymour, Spring 2012

Anthony Magnusen, Travis R. Erves, Jessa Faye Arca, Floyd A. Beckford, Ramaiyer Venkatraman, Antonio González-Sarrías, Frank R. Fronczek, Don G. VanDerveer, Navindra P. Seeram, Aimin Liu, William L. Jarrett and Alvin A. Holder. “Synthesis, characterization and preliminary in vitro studies of vanadium(IV) complexes with a Schiff base and thiosemicarbazones as mixed-ligands”. Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. 2012 4 664 – 677. (DOI:10.1002/ejic.201100898). • Floyd A. Beckford, Jeffery Thessing,* Alyssa Stott,* Alvin A. Holder, Oleg Poluektov, Liya Li and Navindra P. Seeram. “Anticancer activity and biophysical reactivity of copper complexes of 2(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-ylmethylene)-N-alkylhydrazinecarbothioamides.” Inorg. Chem. Commun. 15 (2012) 225 – 229. (DOI: 10.1016/j.inoche.2011.10.032) NIHMSID:335774. • Floyd A. Beckford, Marc-Andre LeBlanc*, P. Canisius Mbarushimana*, Antonio Gonzalez-Sarrías and Navindra P. Seeram. “Coordination chemistry of polyaromatic thiosemicarbazones. 2. Synthesis and biological activity of zinc, cobalt and copper complexes of 1-(naphthalene-2-yl)ethanone thiosemicarbazone.” International Journal of Inorganic Chemistry Volume 2011, Article ID 624756 (DOI:10.1155/2011/624756). PMC3269312. • Beckford, F.A., Michael Shaloski, Jr.*, Jeffrey Thessing*, Jason Woods*, Diedra Dourth, Jacob Didion*, Vernon Crowell*, Nikolay Gerasimchuk, Antonio Gonzalez-Sarrías and Navindra P. Seeram. “Half-sandwich ruthenium-arene complexes with thiosemicarbazones: Synthesis and biological evaluation of [( 6-p-cymene)Ru(piperonal thiosemicarbazones)Cl]Cl”. J. Inorg. Biochem. 105 (2011) 1019 – 1029 (DOI: 10.1016/j.jinorgbio.2011.04.008) PMC3111060. Paper Presentations: • Beckford, F.A. “Towards the development of metal complexes potentially useful as therapeutic agents.” Presented at the 2011 Arkansas INBRE Research 17

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Conference, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. (Invited presentation). • Beckford, F.A. and Alyssa Stott*. “Benzene-ruthenium organometallic complexes: synthesis, characterization and biophysical reactivity”. Presented at the 2011 Arkansas INBRE Research Conference, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. (Paper #: C11U. This paper was also presented in the poster format) • Beckford, F.A. and Marc-Andre LeBlanc*. “Halfsandwich ruthenium(II) complexes with a 1,4,7trithiacyclononane face and ancillary thiosemicarbazone ligands; chemical and biochemical reactivity.” Presented at the 2011 Arkansas INBRE Research Conference, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. (Paper #: C19-U. This paper was also presented in the poster format, winning first place in the undergraduate chemistry division). • Beckford, F.A. and P. Canisius Mbarushimana*. “A comparison of half-sandwich ruthenium-thiosemicarbazone complexes with [9]aneS3 or p-cymene facecaps”. Presented at the 2011 Arkansas INBRE Research Conference, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. (Paper #: C13-U). Poster Presentations: • Justin R. Moreira*, Alvin A. Holder, Rosella M. Taylor, Rodney Ballard, Antonio Gonzalez-Sarrias, Tiffany B. Edwards, Navindra Seeram and Floyd A. Beckford. “A Novel Chemotherapeutic Agent of Copper(II) With a Thiosemicarbazone as Ligand: Structural and in vitro Studies.” Presentation at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students, St. Louis, November 2011. • Beckford F.A. “In pursuit of ruthenium complexes that are suitable for use as pharmaceutical agents.” Presented at the 2011 Southeast INBRE Regional Conference, New Orleans, LA, Sept. 22-24. (Paper #: CN4). Dr. Catherine Bordeau, Associate Professor of French Paper presentation: • “The Milieu in Baudelaire’s Le Spleen de Paris” at the Nineteenth-Century French Studies Colloquium, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 27 – 29, 2011. Dr. Lise Bouchard, Assistant Professor of Romance Languages Articles: 18

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• “A linguistic approach for understanding pain in the medical encounter” in Culture, Brain, and Analgesia: Understanding and Managing Pain in Diverse Populations, M. Incayawar and Knox Todd, Eds., Oxford Univ P (in press). Mr. Dustyn Bork, Assistant Professor of Art Exhibits: • 2012 Delta Small Prints Exhibition, Arkansas State University (Jan-March), a national exhibition looking at contemporary trends in the field of printmaking, juried by Roberta Waddell, Curator of Prints and Drawings at the New York Public Library. • One of eight artists invited by curator and artist Dwayne Butcher to participate in an exhibition at Marshall Arts Gallery in Memphis, TN, called “Connections,” December 2011. Ms. Andrea Hollander Budy, Writer-in-Residence Poems published in literary journals: • “Taffeta” and “Photograph of Her Grandmother as a Young Woman.” Posse Review 29 (Summer 2011). • “Other.” Spillway 17 (Fall 2011). • “The Inconsolable” and “Drive-in, 1962.” Snake Nation Review 24 (Fall 2011) Poems published in anthologies and textbooks: • “Postcard from Taos.” Wingbeats: Exercises and Practice in Poetry. Dos Gatos Press, 2011. • “In the Garden,” “Ex,” “Nineteen-Thirty-Eight,” and “Graveyard Shift.” The Autumn House Anthology of Contemporary American Poetry, 2nd edition, Michael Simms, Autumn House Press, 2011. • “Writing Studio.” Entering the Real World: VCCA Poets on Mt. San Angelo, Margaret B. Ingraham and Andrea Carter Brown, eds. Wavertree Press, 2012. Essays forthcoming in textbooks: • “Peter Abbs,” British Writers Series XIX. Jay Parini, ed. Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2012. • “Stephen Dunn, the Ice Traveller, and the Other,” A Better Way to Be Alone: The Mind and Poetry of Stephen Dunn. Laura McCullough, ed., 2013 Readings, Lectures, and Workshops: • St. Philip’s School, Writer-in-Residence, Coral Gables, Florida, January 23 - 27, 2012. • Association of Writers and Writing Programs, Featured Poet, Chicago, Illinois, March 1, 2012. • Stonehenge Studios Reading Series, Featured Poet, Portland, Oregon, March 11, 2012. The Piper

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Dr. Jeremy Chapman, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Paper Presentation: • “Curves in Two-Dimensional Vector Spaces Over Finite Fields” presented at the MAKO Undergraduate Research Conference, Missouri State University, Nov 12, 2011, with John Pope* and Andrew Todd*. (Todd and Pope gave a poster presentation of the same paper at the STEM Posters at the Capitol in Little Rock, Feb 15, 2012.) Dr. Michael Counts, Professor of Theatre Editor: • The Players Journal (online peer reviewed journal on the art and practice of acting). Director: • Harlequin Theatre’s The Sweetest Swing in Baseball, Lyon College’s Kennedy Center American College State Theatre Festival entry.

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Ms. Margaret Lejeune, Assistant Professor of Art Exhibits: • The Modern Day Diana (Solo invitational exhibits), Applebee Gallery, MacMurray College, Jacksonville, IL. and THEA Foundation, North Little Rock, AR • 10th Annual Joyce Elaine Grant Photography Exhibition, Texas Woman’s University, Denton, TX. • You are Making Me Uncomfortable (Invitational, five photographs in the exhibit), University of Nebraska, 2011. Awards and distinctions: • Arkansas Department of Heritage Sally A. Williams Grant • Embedded Media Photographer, documenting mobilization training and exercises, 1-211 Attack Recon Battalion, Fort Hood, Texas.

Dr. Patrick Mulick, Associate Professor of Psychology Dr. Jennifer Daniels, Assistant Professor of Articles: • Mulick, P. S., & Wright, L. W. (2011). The Psychology Biphobia Scale a decade later: Reflections and addiPaper Presentation: • “How does violence matter?: Videogame violence tions. Journal of Bisexuality, 11, 453-457. exposure and problematic gaming” with Yonts, N., • Wright, L. W., Bonita, A. G., & Mulick, P. S. Mulick, P. Presented at the annual conference for the (2011). An update and reflections on fear of and disSoutheastern Psychological Association. New crimination against bisexuals, homosexuals, and individuals with AIDS. Journal of Bisexuality, 11, 458-464. Orleans, LA, February 2012. Paper Presentation: Dr. Gloria Everson, Associate Professor of • “How does violence matter?: Videogame violence exposure and problematic gaming” with Yonts, N., Anthropology Mulick, P. & Daniels, J. Presented at the annual conPaper presentation: “Theoretical Perspectives on Space and Place: ference for the Southeastern Psychological Association. New Orleans, LA, February 2012. Construction of Meaning in Archaeology,” presented at the 1st Global Conference on Space and Poster Presentation: Place, Mansfield College in Oxford, England, fall • Brown, C.*, Soule, J,*, Boyd, M.*, Mulick, P., & Roulier, S. “Assessment of Quality of Health and 2011 Health Needs in Chimalhuachan, Mexico.” Editor: Selected as editor for the proceedings of the 1st Presented at the annual conference for the Arkansas Global Conference on Space and Place conference, Psychological Association. Little Rock, AR, October 2011. which will be published as an e-book. Dr. Bradley Gitz, William Jefferson Clinton Professor of International Politics Paper Presentation: • “Huntington, Fukuyama, and the Arab Spring.” Presented at the Georgia Political Science Association, November 2011. Spring 2012

Dr. Han Ong, Assistant Professor of Biology Article: • Thomas D.J., Boyd M.*, Curtwright A.E.*, Foll M.N.*, Kuehl M.M.*, McQueen V.M.*, Middaugh C.R.*, Moore V.M.*, Moreno M.G.*, Morgan C.A.*, Powers M.P.*, Reeves K.M.*, Robinson G.*, Ward K.R.* and Ong H.C. A biological inventory of 19

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Meacham Cave (Independence County, Arkansas). Journal of the Arkansas Academy of Science, 65, 2011. Poster Presentations: • Moreno M.*, Boyd M.*, Kuehl M.*, McQueen V.M.*, Powers M.*, Ward K.*, Ong H.C. and Thomas D.J. Microbial diversity in Ozark region caves. 19th Annual Arkansas Space Grant Consortium Symposium, Morrilton, AR, 2011. • Ward K.*, Boyd M.*, Curtwright A.*, Foll M.*, Kuehl M.*, Middaugh C.*, Moreno M.*, Moore V.*, Morgan C.*, Powers M.*, Reeves K.M.*, Robinson G.*, Schram M.D., Ong H.C. and Thomas D.J. A biological inventory of Meacham Cave (Independence County, AR). 19th Annual Arkansas Space Grant Consortium Symposium. Morrilton, AR, 2011.

Dr. Mark Schram, Associate Professor of Biology Articles: • Thomas, D.J., M. Boyd*, K.M. Kroll*, A.E. Curtwright*, M.N. Foll*, M.M. Kuehl*, V.M. McQueen*, C.R. Middaugh, V.M. Moore*, M. Moreno*, C. Morgan*, M. Powers*, G. Robinson*, M.D. Schram, K. Ward* and H.C. Ong. “A biological inventory of Meacham Cave (Independence County, Arkansas).” Journal of the Arkansas Academy of Science 65:1-7 (2012). • Schram, M.D. and P.G. Davison. Irwin Loops. “A History and Method of Constructing Homemade Loops.” Accepted and scheduled for publication spring 2012 in The Transactions of the Kansas Academy of Science.

Dr. Joel Plaag, Associate Professor of Music Conducting: • Conducted the Lyon concert chorale and band in an all-Renaissance concert last October. • Conducted the Lyon Concert Band and Concert Chorale, and Batesville’s Choral Society in Handel’s Messiah at Christmas. • Conducted the Batesville Choral Society with the Concert Chorale for the homecoming service in October, and for the Arkansas Presbytery Service in February. • Prepared the Concert Chorale for performances with the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra in Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 in February.

Dr. Russell Stinson, Josephine E. Brown Professor of Music Book: • J. S. Bach at His Royal Instrument: Essays on His Organ Works. In press at Oxford Univ. P, expected out fall 2012. Paper Presentation: • “César Franck’s Reception of Bach’s Organ Works,” an invited paper at Stetson University in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the concert organ there.

Dr. Amy Schmidt, Director of Supplemental Instruction Article: • “‘Nearly White’ and Clinging to ‘Bits of Finery’: Jim Crow Logic, Brazil, and Evelyn Scott’s Escapade.” Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal. (Special issue on Women and Travel). Forthcoming, April 2012. Presentation: • “Horses Chomping at the Global Bit: Nationalism, Systemic Injustice, and Resistance in Zora Neale Hurston’s Tell My Horse.” National Association of African-American Studies Conference. Baton Rouge, LA. February 2012.

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Dr. Terrell Tebbetts, Martha Heasley Cox Chair in American Literature Articles: • “Postmodern Faulkner? Father Lie and Mother Death in As I Lay Dying.” Philological Review 37.1 (Spring 2011): 35-47. • “Treasure in the Ground: Getting Mother’s Body’s Dialogue with As I Lay Dying.” Teaching Faulkner 29 (Fall 2011): 1-7. • “Faulkner’s Ghost in Nordan’s The Sharpshooter Blues.” Lewis Nordan: Humor, Heartbreak, and Hope. Ed. Barbara Baker. U of Alabama P, 2012: 83-103. Paper Presentation: • “‘The Death of a Toad’ and the Annihilation of Man” at the fall 2012 Arkansas Philological Association.

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Dr. David Thomas, Professor of Biology Article: • D.J. Thomas, M. Boyd*, K.M. Crowell*, A.E. Curtwright*, M.N. Foll*, M.M. Kuehl*, V.M. McQueen*, C.R. Middaugh*, V.M. Moore*, M. Moreno*, C. Morgan*, M. Powers*, G. Robinson*, M.D. Schram, K. Ward* and H.C. Ong. A biological inventory of Meacham Cave (Independence County, Arkansas). Proceedings of the Arkansas Academy of Sciences, 65: 126-132 (2012). Mr. Garry Wann, Associate Professor of Business Administration Article: • Garry Wann and Dr. Christi Wann. “The History of Payday Lending in Arkansas.” Forthcoming in March-April 2012 in The Journal of Academy of Business and Economics.

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Dr. Virginia Wray, W. C. Brown Professor of English and Dean of Faculty Paper Presentation: • “Flannery O’Connor and the Necessity of Charity.” Presented at the South Central Modern Language Association, October 2011 at Hot Springs, AR. Dr. Nikki Yonts, Assistant Professor of Psychology Paper presentation: • Yonts, N., Mulick, P., & Daniels, J. “How does violence matter?: Videogame violence exposure and problematic gaming.” Presentation at the annual conference for the Southeastern Psychological Association, New Orleans, LA, February 2012.

Beckford promoted to full professor of chemistry Dr. Floyd A. Beckford has been promoted to Professor of Chemistry at Lyon College. The Lyon Board of Trustees approved the promotion at its meeting Feb. 24. Beckford came to Lyon College in 2001 as an assistant professor of chemistry. He was promoted to associate professor in 2007. The Promotion and Tenure Committee first approved the recommendation for promotion, which then went to Dean of Faculty Virginia Wray and President Donald Weatherman before going to the board for final approval. Dr. Weatherman said in his recommendation to the board’s Education Committee that “Dr. Beckford is an exemplary teacher, fine scholar, a person of faith, and a dedicated servant to the College and community.” Beckford has a Ph.D. and a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica. He was a visiting assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Toledo and a lecturer at the University of West Indies and Texas A&M University before coming to Lyon. Spring 2012

He has served on a variety of college committees and has chaired the Curriculum Committee, Faculty Personnel Committee, and Promotion and Tenure Committee. He was a member of the steering committee for the College’s recent self-study. His community service includes serving as a board member for Habitat for Humanity in Independence County, a soccer coach in the ICYAA leagues, and a soccer referee for both high school and ICYAA (Independence County Youth Athletic Association). He is a member of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. He is a prolific researcher with a long list of scholarly publications and presentations. 21

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Lyon College to join American Midwest Conference on July 1 Lyon College will join the American Midwest Conference effective July 1. Competition will begin in all sports for the 2012-13 academic year. The American Midwest Conference Council of Presidents voted unanimously to admit Lyon to the conference. The addition of Lyon will increase AMC membership to 10 institutions. Most of the AMC schools are in Missouri; one is in Illinois and another in Arkansas. “The Presidents of the American Midwest Conference are pleased to welcome Lyon College to the American Midwest,” said Dr. Dianne Lynch, chair of the AMC Council of Presidents and president of Stephens College. “Lyon College is a prestigious academic institution with a strong athletic tradition and a culture similar to our current institutions.” Lyon President Dr. Donald Weatherman said, “While Lyon has enjoyed its association with the colleges in the TranSouth for over a decade, we are excited about our move to the AMC. We are delighted to receive an invitation to join this fine group of colleges and universities and look forward to developing healthy rivalries within this new conference.” With the move to the AMC, Lyon is ending its affiliation with the TranSouth Athletic Conference. Lyon joined the TranSouth Conference in 1997, competing against schools mostly in Tennessee. The TranSouth has been losing members, however, with Union University, Cumberland University, and Trevecca Nazarene University scheduled to leave the conference after this year. Lyon Athletic Director Kevin Jenkins explained that a conference must have at least six members competing in a sport in order to qualify for post-season tournaments. With the loss of the three members this year, only six schools would remain, but not all of them compete in all varsity sports. “We believe the American Midwest Conference will provide us with more stability and allow our athletes to compete in post-season play,” Jenkins said.

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Jenkins said, “We are excited about the opportunity to join the AMC, which will provide great competition for all our teams and allow each sport to compete in conference championships immediately. The AMC has strong institutions that provide quality educations to student athletes as well as great competition on the playing courts and fields. The comfort level we saw in the AMC is outstanding for us. Those are the kind of characteristics we are looking for.” AMC Commissioner Lowell Pitzer said, “I am pleased to officially welcome Lyon to the AMC family on behalf of our presidents, athletics directors, students, and fans. Lyon is an outstanding academic institution with a strong athletic program. We look forward to having the Scots compete in our league starting in 2012.” Members of the AMC are Benedictine University (Springfield, Ill.), Columbia College (Columbia, Mo.), Hannibal-LaGrange University (Hannibal, Mo.), Harris-Stowe State University (St Louis), Missouri Baptist University (St. Louis), Park University (Parkville, Mo.), Stephens College (Columbia, Mo.), William Woods University (Fulton, Mo.), and Williams Baptist College (Walnut Ridge, Ark.). The Scots sponsor nine varsity sports. Men’s sports include baseball, basketball, golf, and soccer. Women’s sports include basketball, golf, soccer, softball, and volleyball. Lyon participates in every sport sponsored by the AMC except men’s and women’s cross country, men’s and women’s indoor track and field, and men’s and women’s outdoor track and field.

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President Donald Weatherman presents Coach Jenkins with a ball commemorating 200 wins.

Jenkins wins 200th basketball game Lyon College’s Men’s Head Basketball Coach Kevin Jenkins reached his 200th coaching victory Jan. 30 against conference opponent Blue Mountain College, winning 62-58. “The milestone is something you don’t think about often, but I am very thankful to all the players who have played a role in me being able to gain 200 victories,” Coach Jenkins said. “I have been blessed to work with some very talented players during my career at Lyon.” Jenkins has been a part of the Lyon community for almost 28 years as a player, coach, and athletic director. This year marks his 26th year of coaching for the institution and his 17th as men’s head basketball coach. Jenkins was also inducted into the Lyon College Athletic Hall of Fame last September. Jenkins currently sits third in the Lyon College all-time winning record book for coaching victories at Lyon College. R. C. “Dick” Winningham is first with

Spring 2012

227 wins and Terry Garner is second with 224. Jenkins played basketball for Arkansas College from 1984-1986, graduating with a bachelor of science degree in business management in 1986. Jenkins has been employed at Lyon College since 1986, holding numerous positions including residence hall director, women’s basketball coach, men’s and women’s track coach, instructor of physical education, sports information director, cross country coach, assistant men’s basketball coach, compliance officer, and advisor to the Student Athlete Advisory Organization. In addition to serving as men’s head basketball coach, Jenkins is director of athletics. Coach Jenkins was selected as the TranSouth Coach of the Year for Men’s Basketball in 2006. He and his wife, Kristie, ’92, have two daughters, Kessie and Kamie. Kristie was elected to the Lyon Athletic Hall of Fame in 2006.

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Note from the President of the Alumni Association Dear Fellow Alumni: I am writing to you as president of the Alumni Council because I believe that most of you also possess an undying love for our alma mater, Lyon College, previously Arkansas College. This beautiful campus tucked away in the foothills of the Ozark Mountains combined with the incredible faculty and caring staff has given us a wealth of lessons and experiences that have served us extremely well as we have built our lives and our careers after passing forth from these our “hallowed halls.” Lyon continues to be that place where strong young minds can come to realize the potential found deep inside each individual student. I am certain that all alumni realize that the current times are a great challenge culturally, politically, and economically for everyone. Lyon experiences these challenges daily. While the work on the construction of the new campus center continues to progress as expected, the challenges of raising the remaining needed funds continues to confront Lyon, its leaders, and its supporters, including alumni. Lyon faces an additional challenge for residential space as the student body continues to expand. There is also increased pressure on the evolution of on-campus living spaces to better meet the lifestyle that current and future generations of young adults want to experience, especially in the junior and senior years of their education at Lyon. As we all know, a large part of the Lyon experience is the residential nature of the campus. This fact alone places increased pressure on the residential resources of the college that less residentially focused colleges and universities do not face, but their students miss out on the residential experience as well. The construction of the new campus center and the historic residential student body growth opportunity represent current capital investment demands that cannot be ignored. Lyon is also faced with the need for regular annual support from all of us, its alumni. The annual alumni support provides for scholarships, facilities, and programs, and it also makes a significant mark in favor of Lyon when submitting proposals to foundations and other institutional donors to help Lyon meet capital

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and other long-term investments in its institutional future. It is very important for the alumni to note that even the smallest financial gift to Lyon College will have an increased ripple impact when combined with the gifts of other alumni because each and every gift, large or small, indicates the strong support Lyon enjoys from its alumni. I invite you to visit the Lyon College website at http://www.lyon.edu/support-lyondonate.htm for more information and to make a donation. While you are visiting the site, please take a few moments to check out the wealth of information and news about our alma mater available there. The Lyon promise remains unwavering to all the new students that it welcomes through its doors each term. It will always strive to provide an education of unequaled value to all the students that it serves, regardless of the origin of those students or the current challenges that face the institution, the nation, or the individual. Lyon’s strong foundation combined with the vibrant community of alumni and friends provide an excellent beginning of the next chapter of the individual lives it has touched as they exit these hallowed halls, newly earned diplomas in hand. I hope that you will join me in welcoming the next class of Lyon alumni into the community of alumni. As Lyon alumni, I think we should see our calling as very special to return the support we have already received to the next generations through our continuing support of Lyon, in good times and in challenging times as well. Currently we have historic opportunities to make a lasting investment in the future growth of Lyon and in the realization of a shared vision of the future of Lyon. Most importantly, it takes action by each of us to answer the call. I sincerely believe that if we answer this call we will make a discernible difference in the future of Lyon. Sincerely,

Donald Rogers, ’88 President, Alumni Council

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Frances Stevens, ’56, writes, “With son and daughter and their children and spouses, Cal and Frances celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in Paso Robles, CA, over the Labor Day weekend.” The Rev. Larry M. Gerber, ’66, retired in June 2011 after serving the United Methodist Church for 39 years. Gerber began his career in the fall of 1964 as an unpaid Associate Minister at First United Methodist Church in Batesville while attending Arkansas College. In his senior year (1965-66) he served four small churches northeast of Batesville as an unofficial “student pastor.” Gerber and his wife, Jane, now live in Las Vegas, Nev., where they enjoy spending time with two of their three children and seven of their 10 grandchildren. Bruce Berry, ’68, writes, “My wife, Linda Eaheart Berry, ’68, retired from 38 years of teaching high school English three years ago and moved with me to our retirement home in Clayton, NC. I will retire on February 1, 2012, after a 11month interim pastorate. We have tickets for two basketball games during the Olympics in London where our oldest daughter lives with two granddaughters. Our other daughter lives in Fayetteville, NC, with her two children and a Special Forces Army husband.” Shayneh (Horwitz) Schott, ’69, writes, “We are now both retired and have our first grandchild so we moved to Virginia to be together as a family. Our granddaughter’s name is Naomi Elizabeth Bruce.” Spring 2012

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Herman Hammerschmidt, ’70, writes that his daughter Meggan and her husband Mikal in Greensboro, N.C., announced his first grandchild, Isabelle, born in October. He further reports that he is still employed as the Executive Director of the New Jersey Podiatric Medical Society, and is single again and living in Lawrenceville, N.J. E-mail: HHammerschmidt @NJPMS.com Steve Orick, ’76, writes, “I recently was named Senior Vice President of Sales after serving as Senior Vice President of Operations for Actronix, Inc. I am now traveling North America again. I have worked for Actronix since 1991.” Donna S. (Rutledge) Hines, ’81, writes, “In September 2011, I received a Master of Science in Accountancy degree from the University of Phoenix. I currently serve as the Chief Financial Officer of Midland Valley Christian Academy.”

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“I will be receiving my J.D. from Jones School of Law in May and plan to take the Florida bar exam in July.” Dr. Brad Austin, ’94, Associate Professor of History at Salem State University in Massachusetts, is one of the three editors of a new series of history texts being published by the University of Wisconsin Press. The Harvey Goldberg Series for Understanding and Teaching History has six initial titles already planned, including volumes on “Understanding and Teaching” the Vietnam War, American slavery, the Great Depression, the Age of Revolutions, GLBT issues, and the Industrial Revolution. Brad himself is co-editing the volume on the Vietnam War. He also has agreed to publish his book on college athletics during the Great Depression with the University of Arkansas Press.

LaGina Swetnam Austin, ’94, has been named a Senior Appraiser and the Director of Appraisal and Auction Services for Skinner Karen (Hagle) Bailey, ’85, writes, Auctioneers & Appraisers of “My husband Kenneth and I are Antiques and Fine Arts in Boston. retired. We are enjoying traveling Start looking for her on Antiques and have been to Europe twice and Roadshow. Hawaii once since retirement. We have visited the following coun- Rebecca S. Perrin, ’99, writes, “I tries: Germany, Austria, was selected as KAIT’s May Switzerland, Liechtenstein, France, Teacher of the Month for 2011. Spain, England and the Azores. Every month the local television We are now looking forward to our station selects one teacher from next adventure.” hundreds of nominations from all over Northeast Arkansas and Gene Crawford, ’85, writes, “I was Southeast Missouri to feature as recently promoted to President & their Teacher of the Month. I was CFO of First National Bank of nominated by a parent who felt Crossett.” that I made a significant impact on her daughter's success as a reader.” Sonya Catherine Platt, ’92, writes, 25

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Andrew Brock, ’00, “is happy to report that my wife and I have relocated back to Batesville after spending several years in Searcy. My wife is a local APN and I manage commercial lending at a local bank. Together we have four children ages 20-4 months, so life is crazy and busy!” Yavanna Brownlee, ’01, writes, “I have been an Adjunct Lecturer in English at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for just over five years now, since I graduated in 2006 with an MFA in Creative Writing in Poetry. I am currently in the process of applying to Ph.D. programs in Composition and Rhetoric. I am applying to Purdue, Madison, Syracuse, Ohio University, and Michigan Tech. And I am keeping my fingers crossed. I also have two little boys who keep me busy. Torin will be 5 in November, and Zacur is 2.” Robin Youngblood, ’01, writes, “I have a new job at St. Ambrose that began in August: Director of Online Content and Training. I help manage the organization of the University’s website and the actual text and messaging on each web page. Despite that thrilling description, I am having a lot of fun and I enjoy every day! It definitely puts to task the attention to detail I procured at Lyon and the newspapers. My coworkers call me the ‘grammar queen.’ What else.... my son, Lane (7), started first grade. He will start Boy Scouts this month. He is an excellent student with very neat penmanship. I am particularly proud of his unbridled desire to learn. He will talk your ear off about dinosaurs, race cars, animals of any kind, and the little girl in his class who always gets her 26

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name on the board. Ha ha.”

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(‘04) and I are doing great. We are in Oklahoma City where I'm doing my orthopedic surgery residency. I have one year left. Misty is teaching elementary school. We have two kids: 5-year-old daughter, Savannah, and 18-month-old son, Caden. When we are done here in Oklahoma, we are headed to Hot Springs.”

Elizabeth Rowe Cummings, ’02, has been named a Rising Star in the area of Employment Litigation – Defense by Super Lawyers Magazine, Mid-South Edition. Each year, no more than 2.5 percent of the attorneys in Arkansas are named to the Rising Stars list, which is comprised of attorneys under the age of 40 who have been Kristy (Hood) Dunn, ’04, writes, practicing for less than 10 years. “I am still at St. Theresa’s in Little Elizabeth is a fifth-year associate Rock. This year marks my 8th year attorney at Cross, Gunter, teaching. I did, however, make a Witherspoon & Galchus, P.C., in change from 4th grade to Little Rock. She and her husband, 6th/7th/8th grade grammar, along Jason, built a house in the country with a few other subjects with my (Saline County) last year and live 7th grade homeroom. This is my there with their two Jack Russell 3rd year in the junior high wing. I terriers. love it! We have a diverse student body and some really generous parWill Lassiter, ’02, writes, “I’m in ents. I’m especially proud of a commedical school. I started out in pilation of memoirs I edited for our pre-med at Lyon and went on to 50th anniversary celebration. I also other things. I finished my pre-reqs have many students to be proud of. at UA and was accepted early to Last year, we sent an outstanding UAMS last January. I was commis- class of 8th graders on to Catholic sioned in the U.S. Army last April High and Mount Saint Mary. I’ve as a 2nd Lieutenant, with promo- helped Mikayla (current 7th gradtion to Captain on earning my er) craft excellent poems, one of M.D. Mary and I will have been which won 3rd place in a statewide married 7 years this March.” contest sponsored by the AG's office. Two weeks ago, we visited Elizabeth Gabbard, ’03, writes, “I the public library adjacent to our am back in Fort Smith. This past campus; the students now know year has been kinda crazy for me – how to access hundreds of online my grandparents and mom died, databases for research. It’s fulfilling and I needed some time. So now work, as you know, but I will comI'm the Administrator for Western plete a Master’s in Education Arkansas Ballet and I love it.” Administration through the University of Dallas in the next Trevor Lay, ’03, and wife, Tonya, few years. I feel a call to perhaps be welcomed their first child, son a principal someday.” Taven Robert, last June. Trevor has just been named Clinic Director Jessica Riedmueller, ’04, writes, “I for Ascent Children’s Health moved to Chicago in April to Services in North Little Rock. attend Dominican University's Master of Library and Information Brandon Byrd, ’04, writes, “Misty Science program. I’m in my second

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semester and hope to graduate in 2013. I’m focusing on public and special libraries. Chicago is great! There is so much to do.” Noah Williams, ’04, writes, “I graduated from the Indiana University Maurer School of Law last spring. Passed the bar exam. Working at the county Public Defender's office in Bloomington, IN.” Melanie (Morrison) Buchanan, ’05, writes, “Over the summer I illustrated a children’s book that my mother wrote, titled The Pathway to the Moon. It is now available for purchase at Crossbooks.com. It will be available at Barnes and Noble, Amazon, and LifeWay bookstores. The book follows the imaginative journey a mother and her young children take through the world of books. They travel from the seaside, to the moon – where they discover a magical fairy world – and back again.” Peggy Ford, ’06 writes, “I am excited and honored to share that I have been selected as one of 2012 Northwest Arkansas’ Finest Young Professionals by the NWA Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Board. On May 4th I will be recognized at the Walk this Way with the Finest Fashion Show. I have agreed to help raise money to support the CF Foundation and I need your help! Cystic fibrosis is a devastating genetic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system. For nearly six decades, the mission of the CFF has been to assure the development of the means to cure and improve the quality of life for those affected by this disease.

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Since its inception, the Foundation has made tremendous headway increasing the life expectancy for a child born with CF from just 5 years to the median age of 36.5. Remarkable, yes, but it’s still not good enough. Many scientists believe that we can see a cure in our lifetime. Advances continue to be made in finding a cure, but your help is needed to help keep up the momentum of this life-saving research. To learn more about CF and the CF Foundation, visit www.cff.org. Adam Long, ’06, who is expecting his Ph.D. in English at the University of Kansas this spring, has been appointed by Arkansas State University to be Associate Director and Facilities Manager of the Hemingway-Pfeiffer Museum and Educational Center. In addition to his responsibilities at the center, he will teach adjunct classes at ASU. Eric Bork, ’07 writes, “I have been appointed Exhibition Specialist at the University of Memphis.” Alex Huffman, ’08, writes, “I am the new Legislative Correspondent for Congressman Mike Ross, the same office I was previously interning for.”

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2011 I started as a staff auditor at Deloitte & Touche, LLP, in their St. Louis Office.” Lindsey Fry, ’10, moved to Greenville, N.C., recently to work at a TV station as a multimedia journalist, shooting video, writing scripts, reporting, and editing her own work. She wrote: “It’s the same type of TV gig I (did) in North Dakota ... I will just be doing it near a beach with MUCH warmer temps around people who talk like I do! I will work nightside ... AND as we all know, that’s when all the exciting crime happens! yay! SO excited.” Amber Grimsley, ’11, writes, “I wanted to let you know that I got that adjunct faculty job for the summer at Eastern Oklahoma State College, teaching Fundamentals of English and Developmental Reading. Both classes are remedial classes designed to prepare students for Composition I and II. I think I'll be the youngest instructor at EOSC; I’ll be 23 when the summer semester begins, and the youngest faculty member before I applied was 28!”

Kelsey Lack, ’11, writes, “I am living in Cincinnati now. I am working for GE as a desktop publisher. I Susan (Willis) Williams, ’08, take a PDF then convert it to writes, “I’m currently teaching lit- Word format. After that I format tle ones in Bloomington, Indiana. the document so that it can be I have also started a sewing and uploaded through a program specrafting business.” cific to GE Aviation. I work with Adobe, Microsoft Word, and Excel Vincent Moore, ’09 writes, “I mostly. I also make instructional passed the CPA exam in 2011 after manuals for GE explaining how to having completed my Master of use the program and process docuAccountancy degree from Saint ments through it. Though I love Louis University. In September Ohio, I really miss Lyon.“

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Bess (Millen) Wolf, ’30, age 103, of Batesville, died Feb. 27, 2012. Born in Esto, Fla., on June 16, 1908, Bess was the third child of John A. and Mattie Sam Millen’s four children. She grew up in Malvern, Ark., graduating from Malvern High School. She enrolled at Arkansas (now Lyon) College, where she received a B.A. degree in 1930. She pursued a master’s degree in Counseling and Guidance at the University of Memphis, which was awarded in 1965. In 1992, Lyon College conferred the honorary Doctor of Humanities Degree on Bess, in recognition of her contributions to the college and the Batesville community. As a student at Lyon, Bess met her future husband, John Quincy Wolf Jr. She was an accomplished pianist and organist. Bess shared a love of music and passion for antiquities with her husband. Beginning in the 1930s, they worked together to collect antique glass and furniture and to compile a library of ballads and folklore from the Ozarks that remains without equal. Following their marriage in 1931, Bess and Quincy Wolf spent several years in Baltimore, Md., where he pursued a Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University and she studied music at the Baltimore Conservatory. They settled in Memphis, Tenn., at Southwestern (now Rhodes College), where Quincy was named chairman of the English Department and Bess worked as Admissions Counselor. After Quincy’s death in 1972 and her subsequent retirement, Bess moved back to Batesville to work diligently to preserve Quincy’s folklore legacy. She was responsible for the publication of Life in the Leatherwoods, a compilation of stories written by John Quincy Wolf Sr. about his experiences as a young orphaned boy growing up in an Arkansas pioneering family. Bess worked tirelessly to open the Ozark Folk Center in Mountain View, and served as a founding member of the Committee of 100. For several summers, she taught classes in folklore through the Elderhostel Program at Lyon College. In recognition of these and other accomplishments, Lyon College named Bess its Distinguished Alumnus in 1982. Bess was a member of First Presbyterian Church and several social and civic groups in Batesville. She is survived by two daughters, Adele Wolf Grilli of Locust Grove, Ark., and Florence Wolf Calaway of Olive Branch, Miss.; three grandchildren, Samantha Long of Memphis, Florence Mullins of Olive Branch, and 28

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John Grilli, of Fayetteville, Ark.; four great-grandchildren, and a sister, Nancy Julius, of Houston, Texas. Ruth W. Garner, ’39, age 96, of Heber Springs died Jan. 9, 2012. Ruth was born June 16, 1915, in Moorefield, Ark., to Ernest and Lizzie Leggett Wade. Ruth enjoyed teaching children whether at school or within her church. She earned her B.S.E. degree from Arkansas College. Her teaching career included Pottsville, Mountain Home, Branson, Mo., and concluded with 25 years in Heber Springs. Ruth was an active member of the First United Methodist Church in Heber Springs, serving on its administrative board and as coordinator of children's work. She served in many leadership roles of the Medley Club helping with their civic projects. Ruth was preceded in death by her parents and her brother Hugh Wade. She is survived by her son, Carl Wade Garner and his wife Carole of Little Rock, and two granddaughters, Kirsten N. Garner and her husband Charles Brown of Little Rock and Lauren E. Garner of Fort Worth, Texas. Mary Lou Shell, ’41, age 99, was born in Cushman, Ark., on Oct.10, 1911, the daughter of Thomas Franklin and Annie Louise Shell. She died July 30, 2011, at Royal Oak, Mich., after a lengthy illness. Mary Lou became a school teacher after graduating from Cushman High School and attending Arkansas State Teachers College and Arkansas College. Mary Lou was a devoted member of the United Methodist Church and served on many committees with the church and the United Methodist Women. At age 16 she became pianist for her church in Cushman. After moving to Detroit in 1943, she gave up teaching at the advice of her physician and started a new career working for Ford Motor Co., a position she held for 30 years. The last 11 of those years were spent working in dealer audit at the Ford World Headquarters in Dearborn, Mich. Mary Lou was preceded in death by her parents; two brothers, Lyman M. and Don Franklin; and sister Tommie Jane (Howard) Tripp. She is survived by two sisters, Ann and Margaret. Elmalee Parks, ’43, age 90, of Batesville died on Dec. 24, 2011. She was a member of First Presbyterian Church in Batesville. She was born on

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April 14, 1921, at Jamestown, Ark., to George A. and Ethel Burks Parks. She taught school in Cleburne County and in Independence County, worked for Federal Compress in McCrory, and retired from Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service with the University of Arkansas after having worked there 42 years. After retirement, she worked for Dr. Jim Bob Harbin. She was pianist for Jamestown Presbyterian Church from 1934 until 1977, when she moved to Batesville. She enjoyed young people and motivated many of them to on to college. She also enjoyed flowers and was an avid African violet grower. Mrs. Fannie Mae (Burrell) Busby, ’44, age 94, of Oil Trough died October 12, 2011, at Batesville. She was born April 14, 1917, at Elmo, Ark. Mrs. Busby graduated from Bradford High School, and then attended Arkansas College in Batesville before transferring to Arkansas State Teachers College in Conway, where she earned her bachelor’s degree. Mrs. Busby was a school teacher, retiring after 30 years of service. Mrs. Busby was a member of the White River Baptist Church and was a pastor’s wife. She was a member of the Arkansas Education Association and the National Education Association, and enjoyed listening to gospel music, working crosswords, and reading her Bible. Mrs. Busby was preceded in death by her husband of 63 years, Rev. Lonnie Leon Busby; her parents; one brother, Cloice Burrell; and one grandson, Jonathan Busby. She is survived by three sons, Max Busby of Oil Trough, Lonnie Busby and wife Karen of Denver, Colo., and Rev. Rick Busby and wife Cyndi of Augusta, Ga; one daughter, Barbara Norris of Oil Trough; and four grandchildren. Byron McSpadden, ’45, age 94, was born Sept. 6, 1917, at Bethesda, Ark. He died Dec. 23, 2011, at a nursing home in Batesville. Byron attended public school at Bethesda. During his young adult life he worked on the railroad and was a farmer and woodsman. After hearing the call to preach the Gospel and affirming it, he studied at Arkansas College (now Lyon College) and graduated from Hendrix College. He was ordained an elder in the Methodist Church. Byron served as pastor to many churches throughout the North Arkansas Conference of the United Methodist Church

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including: Elmo and Oil Trough, Charlotte Circuit, Greenbrier, Ola, Mountain Home Parish, Truman, Corning, Jacksonville, Marked Tree, Forrest City, North Little Rock Gardner, Heber Springs, Moorefield and Cushman. After he retired, he and his wife Irene Brightwell McSpadden lived in Batesville in a house he had built (one of several he constructed over the years). In 2001 they celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary. In addition to serving as a pastor, Byron's great love was vegetable gardening. He also enjoyed woodworking. He is survived by Larry McSpadden and his wife Ginny; Lynn McSpadden and his wife Mary Catherine, all of Mountain View. Ernestine (Stalling) Burge, ’46, age 87, of Batesville died Dec. 23, 2011, in a Batesville hospital. Born Aug. 18, 1924, in McHue, she was the daughter of the late Ernest and Ida Haertlein Stalling. She was a retired teacher from Southside School District. She received a bachelors of arts in 1946 from Arkansas College (now Lyon College) and was of the Assembly of God Faith. Survivors include a son, Randal Burge of Vicksburg, Miss.; two daughters, Carlotte Brown and Kay O’Brien, both of Batesville; and eight grandchildren. She also was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, R.G. Burge. William Arthur Jones Jr., ’48, age 85, of Batesville died Nov. 8, 2011. He was born Oct. 9, 1926, to the late William Arthur Jones Sr. and Opal McClure Lucket Jones. Survivors include his wife, Bettye of the home; children, James Jones of Denison, Texas, Charles and Brenda Jones, both of Batesville; grandchildren, Erik Jones of Denison, Jon Jones of Batesville and Tara Nelson of Jonesboro; and five great-grandchildren. Gennell (Williams) Clinton, ’49, age 83, died Jan. 30, 2012, at the White River Medical Center. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband and brother. Survivors include her sons, Lanny Clinton (Jerrie) of Rosebud and Phillip Clinton (Billie) of Strawberry, five grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. Mrs. Betty (Winston) Priest, ’51, age 82, of Fayetteville died March 23, 2011, in Fayetteville. Born May 11, 1928, in Locust Grove, she was the 29

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daughter of Robert and Loraine Massey Winston. She graduated from Arkansas College (now Lyon College) with a bachelor’s in education. She was retired from Batesville Public Schools, having taught for 37 years. She was a member of the Ladies Auxiliary to the Veterans of Foreign Wars and First United Presbyterian Church in Fayetteville. Survivors include her husband of 63 years, Sanford Priest; a son, Steve Priest of Columbia, Mo.; and a grandson, Will Priest. James “Jim” Andrew Hankins, ’52, age 82, of Mesa, Ariz., died Sept. 17, 2011. Mr. Hankins was born in Newport, Ark., on Dec. 16, 1928. He was a flight engineer for Trans World Airlines for 32 years and a retired master sergeant in the U.S. Marine Corps and Reserve. Survivors include his wife, Rose Marie Hankins (Crowder) and daughter, Leslie (Randy) Spencer. Jay P. Chism, ’53, age 81, of Jonesboro died Dec. 27, 2010, at St. Bernard’s Medical Center. He was born at Earle and had lived in Jonesboro since 1979, afteer moving from Forrest City. He was a retired truck driver for Jones Truck Lines and a U.S. Navy veteran of the Korean War. He was a member of Grace Missionary Baptist Church, senior class of Grace Missionary Baptist Church, American Legion Post No. 21, Nettleton Lions Club and The Gideons International. Survivors include his wife of 56 years, Georgia Chism of the home; four sons, Thomas J. Chism (Vivian) of Jonesboro, John Paul Chism (Tina) of Olive Branch, Miss., Phillip Chism of Springdale and Jimmy Chism (Stacey) of Paragould; one daughter, Janice Bradford (Charles) of Jonesboro; one sister, Maxine Thompson of Corinth, Texas; 15 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Jui-chuing Tao Tom, ’53, age 85, of Camden, known to friends and family as Ruby, died on Oct. 16, 2011. A native of Kunming, China, she came to the U.S. as a foreign student. She was the first Chinese co-ed to ever attend Arkansas College, where her American classmates dubbed her “Ruby” because they found her Chinese name impossible to pronounce. She planned to return to China, but the Chinese Revolution cut off her hopes of going home. From afar, through an exchange of carefully

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worded letters, she learned of the hardships suffered by her parents, whose large estate in Kunming was confiscated by the government. She never saw her parents again. After her marriage to Ernest B. Tom, Ruby settled in San Diego, where her difficulties as an immigrant inspired her to help other Chinese immigrants. Even while busily raising two children, she managed to earn a master's degree in Social Services at San Diego State University. In 1972 she co-founded the Chinese Social Service Center, now known as the San Diego Chinese Center. Thirty-nine years later, the organization she created continues to provide social services and cultural programs for the San Diego community. With the re-opening of China to tourists, Ruby was finally able to visit her homeland several times, and she was delighted to meet nieces she'd never seen. A fearless traveler, she often made bold and surprising choices in life -- including a decision to get divorced after 32 years of marriage and live by her own rules. After moving to Maine in 2008, she settled in Camden. She is survived by her daughter, novelist Terry (Tess) Gerritsen of Camden; her son, Dr. Timothy Tom, an anesthesiologist in Corpus Christi, Texas; and her grandsons, Adam and Joshua Gerritsen, and Christopher Tom. Irma Dean (Pickens) Bowers, ’54, age 91, of Batesville died Oct. 14, 2011, in a Batesville hospital. Born May 23, 1920, at Heber Springs, she was the daughter of Alva and Sophia Allen Pickens. She enjoyed cooking and all kinds of crafts, especially crocheting, knitting and making Christmas ornaments. She was a member of the storytelling troupe, a volunteer at West Batesville School and a Cub Scout leader and was active in the Extension Homemakers Club. She was a foster parent to 12 children. She was a member of First Church of the Nazarene in Batesville. Survivors include a son, Jimmy Bowers; a daughter, Linda Ivie; and six grandchildren. Jimmie Neil (Seery) Sexton, ’54, age 79, of Little Rock, died on Feb. 12, 2012, at Little Rock. She was born on Aug. 28, 1932, at Batesville, the only child of James and May Neil (Craig) Seery. Jimmie's husband, Buddy Sexton, who died on June 1, 2000, was as his name indicated a “buddy” to everyone. Jimmie and Buddy were both 1950 gradThe Piper

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uates of Batesville High School, then both graduated from Arkansas College. Buddy played both football and basketball at Arkansas College, served in the U.S. Army, and obtained a master's degree from the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville. He worked and managed five J.C. Penney stores and all the time utilizing Jimmie at each store at various needed situations. Buddy received high marks from J.C. Penney at all of his locations. Forever a faithful member at Central Avenue United Methodist Church in Batesville, Arkansas, Jimmie Neil was buried at Oaklawn Cemetery in Batesville, next to Buddy.

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Mr. Billy Tom Taylor, ’56, age 80, of Little Rock died Nov. 8, 2011. He was of the Baptist faith, a member of the Elks Lodge, VFW and was retired from the Sun Oil Co. He is survived by his soul mate, Fran, of Little Rock; two sons, Stephen T. Taylor of Winter Haven, Fla., and Ron (Elaine) Taylor of Camden, Ark.; sister, Lola (Norman) Sensabaugh, of Cave City; four grandchildren; eight great grandchildren and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins.

Retha Hall Stephens, ’59, age 90, of Batesville died Oct. 10, 2011, at Woodlawn Nursing Home. Born Jan. 7, 1921, in Concord, she was the daughWesley Stewart, ’54, age 77, of McHue died Jan. ter of Charlie and Etta (Cooper) Hall. She enjoyed 25, 2012, in a Little Rock hospital. Born March 8, gardening and canning vegetables. She enjoyed 1934, at McHue, he was the son of Hugh Allen cooking, especially chicken and dressing, rolls and and Glennie Victoria Jones Stewart. He retired chocolate cream pie. She also liked to read mystery from Batesville School District after serving 36 books. Survivors include a son, Charles Stephens of years in education. He served as a teacher, coach Locust Grove; two daughters: Sheila James and and assistant principal while at the Batesville, Marilyn Buschmann, both of Batesville; eight Newark, Floral, Oil Trough and Southside school grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; five districts. He raised cattle on his family’s farm and great-great-grandchildren; two brothers, Farrell enjoyed his family, hunting and NASCAR and was Hall of Locust Grove and C. C. Hall of Michigan; an avid sports fan. He was a trustee and charter and one sister, Lenora Gray of Michigan. She was member of Southside United Methodist Church. preceded in death by her husband, Rev. Burnell He was a Kyler Cemetery board member and was Stephens; a son, Fletcher Stephens; and a grandinstrumental in setting up the cemetery website. son, Scott Stephens. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Joann Crabtree Stewart; a son, Tim Stewart of McHue; Barbara (Barnett) Galbraith, ’65, age 68, of Bryant two daughters, Cindy Fulcher of McHue and Tracy died Feb. 13, 2012. She was born Dec. 4, 1943, in Lange of Moorefield; four grandchildren; two step- Arkadelphia. Barbara was a retired teacher/ grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; and four lLibrarian for the Bryant Schools, and a member of the Arkansas Education Association and the step-great-grandchildren. National Education Association. She was a memWanda Burks Johnston, ’55, age 78, of Batesville, ber of First Presbyterian Church in Benton where died Jan. 28, 2012, in a local hospital. She was she served as an elder and a deacon. Survivors born May 19, 1933, in Desha, Ark., and was the include her husband, Richard Galbraith of Bryant; daughter of Marshall Ellis Burks and Ura son and daughter-in-law, Russ and Aimee McCullom Burks. Wanda graduated from Arkansas Galbraith of Maumelle; daughter, Lisa Galbraith College in 1955. She worked 25 years as a legal sec- Mundy of Bryant; sister, Judy Jennings of Denton, retary and bookkeeper for the Murphy-Arnold Law Texas; and four grandchildren. Firm. She was a member of the First Presbyterian Church and served as an elder, deacon, and church George B. “Chip” Dietrichsen, ’71, age 62, hustreasurer for 18 years. Survivors include her hus- band of Diane Matlock Dietrichsen of Meriden, band, Norman E. Johnston of Batesville; two Conn., died Jan. 31, 2012, at his residence, surbrothers, Charles Alva Burks of Little Rock; and rounded by his family after valiantly battling canDr. Arvil W. Burks of Conway; a sister, Ura Fae cer for nine years. Born in Garden City, N.Y., Dec. 13, 1949, Mr. Dietrichsen had been a litigation Kramer of Batesville; and 20 nieces and nephews.

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consultant in the insurance industry for many years presently working with Arrow Point Capitol in Farmington. He was a member of the Door of Hope Church in Wallingford. Besides his wife, he is survived by his stepmother, Edna Collins, of Southington; his children, Kristen GklarosStavropoulos and her husband, Chris, of Mountain View, Calif., Matthew Dietrichsen and his wife, Kimberly, of Manchester; Megan Dietrichsen of Cromwell and Christopher Dietrichsen and his wife, Stephanie, of Middletown; and five grandchildren. Norris Durward McGaha, ’72, age 86, of Searcy, died Nov. 5, 2011. Durward was born Oct. 16, 1925, in Stella, Ark.. to the late J.M. McGaha and Thelma McGaha. He was a member of the College Church of Christ in Searcy. Durward attended Arkansas Tech in Russellville for one semester in 1942 prior to enlisting in the Navy to serve in World War II. After being honorably discharged from the Navy in May 1946, he resumed his college education at Arkansas State Teachers College in Conway where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Education in 1950. He received his Master of Science in Education degree from Arkansas State College in Jonesboro in Augus, 1965. Durward married Sue Bridgman on Dec. 20, 1952, in Batesville. Throughout his professional life, Durward focused on helping others achieve their goals. He began by educating and coaching high school athletes for four years in Cave City, two years in Newport and 10 years in Batesville where he built life-long relationships with his students and players. He served as Director of Admissions at Arkansas College in Batesville and Harding University in Searcy before finally directing Career Planning and Placement at Harding. He was dedicated to local residents as he served 14 years on the Searcy City Council following his retirement from Harding. His abilities and passion athletics were evidenced through his being a threesport letterman in college and playing semi-pro baseball during the summers of the 1940s. This passion continued through his later years as he trained for and competed in Senior Olympics until the age of 77. Durward is survived by his wife of 59 years,

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Sue McGaha; two sons, Mike (Kimberly) McGaha of Plano, Texas and Patrick (Sarah) McGaha of Searcy; one sister, Shirley King of Wenatchee, Wash.; and four grandsons. Mrs. Lynn (Runyan) Schmidt, ’78, age 56, of Batesville died Jan. 2, 2012. Born May 19, 1955, in Banbridge, Md., she was the daughter of Jerry and Rosemary Moellers Runyan. She was a member of the Central Arkansas Rose Society. She enjoyed rose gardening, having gone to many competitions, both as an exhibitor and a judge, from Oklahoma to Tennessee; and needlepoint, cross stitching and crocheting. She was a member of Foothills Literacy Council and St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. Survivors include her husband of 36 years, Michael Schmidt; a brother, Jerry Stuart Runyan of Harmony Grove; and three nieces. Richard Walter Scoope, ’96, age 62, of Poughkeepsie died Jan. 21, 2012, in a Batesville hospital. Born Oct. 18, 1949, in Pueblo, Colo., he was the son of Leslie Scoope Jr. and Alice M. Demmel Short. He was a former automobile mechanic. He enjoyed working on and tinkering on old trucks, woodworking, collecting guns and antique tools, playing the guitar, singing funny songs and family reunions. He was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, having previously served as branch president in the Batesville branch. Survivors include his mother of White Hall; his stepfather, Sam Short of White Hall; his wife, Joann Durbin Scoope; three sons, Mike Short of Albuquerque, N.M., Matthew Scoope of Phoenix and Dalton Scoope of Poughkeepsie; three daughters, Diane Short Krum of Phoenix, Amanda Scoope Davis of Pleasant Grove, Utah, and Sarah Scoope Dayley of Provo, Utah. Dr. William Howard Kryder, 86, a former Arkansas College trustee (July 1, 1968 – Sept. 23, 1971) died on March 16, 2012, in Anniston, Ala. He was awarded a Honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lyon College. Ordained in 1947, his ministry included positions in six states, culminating as pastor at First Presbyterian Church in Anniston in 1988.

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