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The

Red Hook StarªRevue

THROUGH DEC. 1, 2012

SOUTH BROOKLYN’S COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

FREE

RED HOOK RENEWS ITS SPIRIT WITH A SUNDAY JAM

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by George Fiala

fter two weeks of shock and bewilderment, followed by a lot of hard work, Sunday, November 11 turned into a day of celebration. A merry band of minstrels brought music and light into our darkened village. Restore Red Hook helped organized the bluegrass parade through Red Hook. The afternoon began with an opening jam inside Bait and Tackle. After an hour, singer/songwriter Jan Bell, guitarist Seth Kessel and Jonathan Hull on washboard led fellow musicians and travelers up and down Van Brunt and finally to Sunny’s Bar. This could have been parade day in the New Orleans French Quarter except for our law against the public consumption of alchohol. The musicians and their followers marched up to Hope and Anchor singing the traditional American song “Goin’ Down the Road Feeling Bad.” All sorts of instruments were crossing Wolcott Street: guitars, harmonicas, washboards, mandolins, fiddles and even an accordion. Sunny’s, Red Hook home to many of these musicians, was the eventual destination, but there were many stops in between. Kessel took the lead for a couple of tunes. He creates a rich mellow tone on his acoustic Gibson guitar. The sound of the guitar was a perfect bed to the music. Kessel could make anyone forget the venue, busy Van Brunt Street. He is part of many Brooklyn bluegrass jams, including those at Mary’s Bar in the South Slope, Freddy’s, and of course, Sunny’s. The ensemble broke into “When the Saints Go Marching In,” followed by “Sitting On Top of the World,” while gathered in front of the beloved Red Hook eatery that miraculously avoided any major flood damage. Huoll, another Sunny’s regular, played the pone percussion instrument - a washboard. later in the afternoon, the lanky Hull showed off his skills on the harmonica, which he is more well know for in the Brooklyn based bluegrass band, Jones Street Station. Red Hook Slim, a talented local harmonica player and a regular at blues jams throughout the city including the Union Street Star Theater, was just one of many mouth harpists that joined in. Fort Defiance was the next stop on the map. St. John was brewing a spicy apple cider in front of his restaurant, which is now under renovation. At this point, Jan Bell became the ad hoc musical (continued on page 4)

Sunny and Tone welcomes their Red Hook friends with a heartfelt tear of joy. (photo by George Fiala)

Damage at Red Hook Houses is unprecedented On Sunday, November 11, the streets of Red Hook bustled with utility trucks, medical mobile units and contractors. Neglected Red Hook was finally getting assistance after nearly two weeks of very little forward progress. The community had stood strong and was getting a huge national spotlight in the media. Newspapers, TV anchors and radio broadcasts painted a picture of a strangled neighborhood on the edge of starvation and death. But I knew of the community that reached within its own pockets to provide during the disaster. Why was the rest of the world seeking out the worst of the worst in Red Hook?

by Kimberly Gail Price were on our doorsteps, working together. The community was grateful, not angry or desolate.

National Grid began assessing the damage on Tuesday, October 30. After speaking with a crew foreman on Van Brunt, he informed me that he and his teams will be out working around the clock until every last customer has gas restored. National Grid expects all residents in Red Hook should have their cooking Maybe Red Hook had run out of resourc- gas back by Monday, November 12. es. Maybe frustrations had turned neigh- They have opened up 34 man holes along bors against each other. Maybe help Van Brunt. Section by section, they have was too late and we were beyond repair. been working to push water out of the How far away from normality were we? pipes. Once that is complete, plumbers Assistance took a while to get here. Longer than it should have. But when it arrived, the community was still standing as one. And the companies that could turn the lights back on and restore heat

must come and inspect the equipment. He said that once the electronic equipment goes under water, it all must be replaced. Once everything is approved, gas can be restored. However, heat will not

return before the power does. Most of their equipment lies underground. The friendly foreman said the only way to prevent water in the gas lines is to prevent flooding. Customer Service was also out in the neighborhood on Monday to assist with inspections of equiptment that was either damaged or submerged. Verizon had several trucks in the area. (continued on page 3)

The

Red Hook StarªRevue

NOVEMBER 16-30 2012

SOUTH BROOKLYN’S COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

People

VOLUME 3 NO.22

Table of Contents

People................................ 2 Thanksgiving............. 12 Bluegrass .................... 1,4,5 Resource Direc.......... 13 Van Brunt businesses..... 8,9 Arts Calendar............. 18 Spoof............................... 10 Classifieds................. 19 Crossword....................... 11 School Benefit........... 20

STAFF

Kimberly G. Price.......................................Editor/Publisher George Fiala.......................................... Graphics/Publisher Alexandra Gillis..................................................... Reporter Vince Musacchia..................................................Cartoons Erik Penney...................................................... Restaurants Eric Ruff............................................................... Calendar Matt Graber...............................................Special Projects Sara Saldutti............................................Retail Advertising Harold Boynes..................................Corporate Advertising

Contributors

Mary Anne Massaro, Mary Ann Pietanza, Brian Clancy

Member @RedHookStar

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718.624.5568 - Editorial & Advertising 917.652.9128 News Tips 101 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231 editor@redhookstar.com

Star-Revue Community Calendar

Red Hook’s Michelle Clark served as a poll inspector on Election Day as Barack Obama swept Brooklyn with over 80% of the votes and was re-elected President.

COMMUNITY BOARD 6: ALL MEETINGS AT 6:30 PM

Mon. Nov. 19 Economic/Waterfront/Community Development and Housing Committee: Presentation and update from representatives for the Trust for Governors Island (formerly the Governors Island Preservation and Education Corporation) on planned and contemplated Capital projects, programs and events on Governors Island. Long Island College Hospital, 339 Hicks Street, Room A

OTHER MEETINGS Tue, December 4 Boerum Hill Association Board Meeting, 7:00pm – 8:30pm Bishop Mugavero Center, 155 Dean Street, Brooklyn, NY 11217 Tue, November 27 Cobble Hill Park volunteer cleanup 7:15am – 8:15am, Cobble Hill Park, Clinton and Congress Streets Wed, November 28 Red Hook Civic Association: monthly meeting 7:30 PS 15 auditorium Sat., November 17 PS 58’s own Brownie Troop 2440 will be holding a book drive this Saturday to benefit PS52 in Staten Island. PS52 was hard hit by hurricane Sandy and lost everything. We are trying to help re-stock their book shelves. Citibank, 375 Court Street (1st Pl.)

Fort Defiance owner St. John takes time out from his rebuilding to be interviewed by the Financial Times (photo by George Fiala)

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Through December 1, 2012

Neighbors taking care of neighbors in Red Hook Houses (continued from page 1)

They were high up on telephone pole lines repairing and replacing satellites and phone lines, so starting a conversation with them was a little difficult. Several mobile Red Cross medical units were set up around Coffey Park and the Houses. Although the lines receded as the evening wore on, their hands were still busy long after my departure. A NYCHA employee who wished to remain anonymous watched as I climbed down from a fence post. I was snapping pictures of a massive pile of garbage that loomed more than 7 feet in the air. When I reached terra firma, he asked why I had gone to such great lengths for the photo.

land, the Rockaways and Staten Island until the job is done. Con Edison had a significant presence among the Houses as well. They were working with Five Star, an outside electrical company to locate boxes, connect power under the streets and then link it to the housing units. Five Star is working side by side with the energy provider to replace all of the damaged electrical equipment. Both companies have been working 14 hour days. As I walked by one of their sites, a Con Ed worker was repeatedly thrusting a stick into the soft earth. My curiosity beckoned and I stopped for a look. The power was on under the street. He was looking for the circuit box that connects to the housing unit.

Seven foot piles of garbage are common. (photos by Kimberly Price)

He said he has worked for NYCHA for a number of years, and he and the Housing Authority have never seen this kind of damage on such an enormous scale. NYCHA was completely unprepared for this kind of a disaster. It is by far the largest amount of power outages they have ever experienced due to flooding. All of the electrical equipment will have to be replaced, which could take months and will cost millions. In the meantime, NYCHA is doing what they can to return heat and power to their tenants as quickly as possible. They have hired a number of outside contractors to install temporary boilers and other equipment to provide heat, hot water and electricity. Many NYCHA employees were evacuated; others stayed behind, sleeping on cots inside the buildings to help out where they could. This particular worker was one who had moved to higher ground. When he returned, he was stunned at the severity of the situation. WDF was one of the independent contractors that NYCHA outsourced. Over in a courtyard at the West Houses, John Ruckel had some friendly answers to my questions, where he and his team were setting up a temporary boiler that would service all of the buildings without heat. Their job was to install the boiler and hook up water and gas. When that phase was complete, another contractor would come in and connect steam. A third contracting team would connect the boiler to the temporary generator that had previously been installed. Then, the boiler could be turned on and would provide heat for the entirety of Red Hook Houses West. They anticipated the entire operation would be complete and functioning within 24 hours. WDF is also working around the clock to provide these systems in Coney Is-

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The elusive connector was probably under the last slab of sidewalk that lined the building. A jolly crewman asked if I might be interested in helping dig up that portion of concrete. My perplexed expression must have told him I was completely unfit for that job. I quickly walked away, as the crew discussed how to locate the circuit box. Health Outreach to Teens (HOT) is a Chelsea based medical support for homeless and HIV+ teens ages 13-24. The LGBT focused group was sent to Red Hook on Saturday by the City Council. City Council Speaker, Christine Quinn asked them to come back again on Sunday. After volunteering their services to hurricane victims, HOT was given daytoday assignments and did not know how long they would be assisting in Red Hook. They saw entire ranges to people, including a seventy year-old woman who had just left before I arrived. They helped fill the gaps for residents cannot get to their medical providers. HOT spent the day and evening treating chronic health conditions, giving flu vaccinations and treating minor injuries. They also had some medical prescriptions on board, but could provide runners to local pharmacies to pick up ones they did not have. The volunteers of HOT, Phyllis Pickens, RN; Elaine Chan, registration coordinator; Ronica Mukerjee, FNP; and Nelson Ponce, the driver welcomed me aboard their mobile unit and shared their stories with me. They said that a lot of people are still experiencing shock surrounding the disaster. Restoring the basic amenities was also hindering the problem. Many were eager to share stories with the volunteers or among the other patients. HOT did not know where they would be sent to next, but they were committed to

helping for as long as they were needed. A few hours after my encounter with the mountain of trash, I circled back around to Columbia Street. the Department of Sanitation had crews out working as well. By the time, I reached the mini landfill, they had cleared away more than half, leaving only puddles of seepage on the curb. After taking a few more pictures from ground level, I commended them for their efforts in the neighborhood over the past week and a half. Despite the masses the neighborhood built, it was always efficiently disposed of. Not only were they picking up all residential trash on a daily basis, but also sparing small businesses the burden of costly commercial fees to cart off extra waste caused by Hurricane Sandy. The two sanitation workers were “amazed at the amount of trash” they had collected in ten days. “It’s sad. To see people’s whole lives, it’s all garbage now.” Over at 21 Mills Street, young Luis Maldonato was standing outside He is a student at South Brooklyn High School on Imlay and Conover and has been doing his part to help out. His apartment never lost power. but some of his family members on the other side of the houses did. He says people are looking out for each other. I asked him about the national coverage that the Red Hook houses were receiving. “Mostly, people keep the houses clean, but there are always dirty people.” He also said that some places may be a mess, but for the most part, residents and NYCHA were working together to solve issues as they arise. From what I saw, he was right. The hallways were cleared of trash, except for the trash bags NYCHA had set up to replace the unusable incinerators. These garbage bags were removed on a daily basis. There was no foul odor in any of the houses I visited. Luis also told me about giving his time at a nearby shelter. A woman with her child was begging for an extra blanket, but the shelter had allocated one blanket per person. he gave her the thickest softest blanket he could find. I wandered up the darkened stairwells of 21 Mills Street, awaitnig the horrors I have read about in other media. I found nothing remotely close. Instead I encountered Margaret standing by the top floor window smoking a cigarette. She puts out candles night so that her elderly neighbor doesn’t fall. Another resident peeked out the door to tell me that the elevators were now running and I didn’t have to take the stairs. This particular building has power now, but the building does not. But spotlights have been placed in all of the courtyards. Lights shine through windows in stairwells giving off enough light to navigate, albeit slowly Over at the Dwight Street Houses, I spoke with two gentlemen outside, who did not want their names to be included. They were frustrated that power and heat were still not on. They told me stories about their families and children and not being able to provide for them. But neighborhood was taking care of all of the people, and they didn’t have to worry.

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They talked about how boiling water on the stove made the walls sweat, and everything inside was being ruined by condensation, but they were staying warm. When I mentioned wanting to go up on the roof, they warned me against it. It was very dark up there these days and trouble could be brewing up there. When I decided to go anyway, they offered to escort me with flashlights. I declined because I wanted to experience the darkness and heinous conditions the media has been reporting. Finally,

This hallways was lit by the giant spotlights outside.

they told me to call out for them if I was in danger; I promised I would. But once again, there was nothing inside the apartment building that warranted this reaction. Neighbors shared their candles along the darkened corridors, even though light was scarce inside the apartment walls. The building was clean; the only odors were from recently extinguished candles. The roof was extremely dark. But empty. Looking over the edge of the building, I didn’t see sick helpless people writhing in need. I saw groups of people laughing and sharing stories. I saw neighbors embrace neighbors. I saw a man helping a lady with her newly acquired supplies. All in all, Red Hook still has many needs. And all of the problems will not be solved when the lights come on. But this desolate picture America has painted of us is inaccurate. There are still many concerns. There are lots of reasonable complaints. The conditions without heat, water and electricity are miserable during a chilly November. But Red Hook is taking care of Red Hook. Neighbors. Friends. Family. Community. A woman on the 6th floor went to check on her elderly neighbor. They were conversing in Spanish and laughing as I came down the stairs. The younger lady’s husband came out to join her, at first in a protective way, but then in a friendly gesture, he began telling me about sleeping with five blankets at night to stay warm. He commented that under the blankets was warm enough, but getting up in the morning was very cold. “Shoo wee!” he laughed. Mostly, they talked about feeling lucky to be alive. They have no heat, no power, no running water. But they can survive all of that.

Through December 1, 2012 Page 3

Red Hook takes a day off (continued from page 1)

supervisor and group leader. Jan sings, plays guitar and writes songs with the Maybelles, a touring bluegrass band. Jan, who is originally from England, leads the band that plays not only at Bait and Tackle and Jalopy, but also venues such as Cafe Lena in Saratoge, Manhattan’s Rodeo Bar and Pete’s Candy Store in Williamsburg. Maybelles has played abroad in Jan’s home country. The musicians played “Tennessee Border” while marching down Van Brunt. This class country hit was first made

famous by Red Foley and Hank Williams, Sr. A long-running WKCR radio program also takes their name from the song. Kessel’s guitar sounded extra sweet, while Alex Mallet, of the band that bears his name, broke a string on his banjo.

Page 4 Red Hook Star-Revue

The next song appropriately accompanied the beautiful day. The state song of Louisiana “You Are My Sunshine” by

“Sunny looks genuinely affected, saying that “If I could cry the way I’ve cried today, I’d do it the rest of my life.” He was referring to tears of joy.” Red Hook Slim blasts a solo along with Hull in front of the Kentler Gallery

Hanging in front of Kentler

The owners of Good Fork listen in.

Bluegrass Jam takes to the streets of Red Hook second line style to benefit local businesses.”

The musicians began multiplying. Jan started calling out songs along with which key to play them in. She brought the crowd in front of Florence Neal’s Kentler International Drawing Space for a few songs. Kentler is a Red Hook icon that opened on Van Brunt Street 22 years ago. Florence emerged, excitedly snapping pictures. She immediately posted one of them to the gallery’s Facebook page. Her caption read: “Music to the ears of Red Hook! Sunny’s

former governor Jimmy Davis was right on target at the Red Hook love fest. The bluesy “I Know You Rider” followed, featuring blistering harmonica solos from Red Hook Slim and Hull. The scene was ensconced in front of the gallery where Nancy Dean Hunt, an art specialist in Carroll Gardens flanked Hull. Her oversized smile was reminiscent of Joni Mitchell’s. Her husband Andrew, who was playing guitar, explained that she sang pretty well herself, although on this day she remained

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a happy onlooker. “The Sun Will Shine in My Back Yard, Someday” was next as we all began marching down the block and across the street towards the Dry Dock Outpost. Dry Dock’s original location on the corner of Van Brunt and Van Dyke was flooded and being repaired. In the interim, they have rented the former Added Value space across from Hope & Anchor and have set up shop there. (continued on next page)

Through December 1, 2012

to celebrate strength and rebirth Mary stressed that this was for now simply an ‘outpost.’.

Next stop: Dry Dock Outpost

Owner, Mary Dudine Kyle was enjoying the music, banging away on boxes and a mailbox as she kept time to the music. “Dirty Old Town,” written by Ewen MacColl, became famous to modern generations by the Pogues. The song mentions gas works, docks and factories - all seemingly appropriate to the day. “Today we are all celebrities. Not survivors, not victims,” Mary said. Woody Guthrie’s, “This Land is Your Land” drew lots of singing accompaniment as the parade moved on to The Good Fork. Van Brunt’s premier restaurant is still closed, so Jan took the group to the fence next door. Owners Ben, and Sohui came out to listen as Jan called for the classic “Bury Me Beneath the Willow.” One thought of the Van Brunt willow that came down during the storm. Afterwards Jan announced that the police were giving tickets for drinking in

public. It was true, according to an onlooker who verified this with the StarRevue. Later on that day, the cops complained to Sunny about whiskey being

the crowd “It is touching my heart to see you here.” Sunny looked genuinely affected, saying that “If I could cry the way I’ve cried today, I’d do it the rest of my life.” He was referring to tears of joy.

Heartland’s traveling smoker has been all over the place.

Afterwards Sunny spoke quietly on many topics, including his amazement at the outpouring of help he’s received. “The first responders were friends and neighbors,” he said. Cradling a glass of cider with perhaps a shot, he spoke of his days in the Air Force, where he went from being a mechanic to being the base gardener; the days when he operated as a private club where the

A hearty band of citizens accompanied the musicians all afternoon.

honor system was used for payment; and a touching story about how he met his wife and partner, Tone. As the sun set on a lovely Sunday in Red Hook, the generators kicked in, giving the bar a gorgeous red hue.

drunk in the street. The time for the pilgrimage to Sunny’s, was the final stop of the day. The crowd sang “May the Circle Be Unbroken,” while the Star-Revue chatted with young banjo player Doug Goldstein. He heard about this day via musician wordof-mouth, as did many others who came to play. He looked much like a fresh faced Tim Buckley, evoking an earlier time as he wore a felt hat he had bought in Oregon, . His band, Party Folk, has played Sunny’s and Manhattan’s Rodeo Bar. A very large mobile meat smoker with two large tires sat across the street from Sunny’s Bar. The ubiquitous Billy Durney was busy doing what he’s been doing nonstop since the hurricane: barbecuing. Today’s menu was pork and brisket. He has been donating his time while Fairway and others have donated the meat. For a donation, people ate a delicious sandwich of meat and raw onions. “This is barbecue done right,” Billy said. “Barbecue and Bluegrass.” Billy’s restaurant, Hometown, which will open on the corner of Reed and Van Brunt sometime next year, is already well known due in large part to Billy’s generosity and good nature.

Doug Goldstein strikes a classic banjo pose. (all photos by Fiala)

Red Hook Star-Revue

The meat was accompanied by hot cider dished out in front of Sunny’s. Sunny came outside along with his Norwegian wife, Tone. Tone announced to

After a while, singer Jan Bell more or less led the traveling band of musicians.

Get your holiday advertising locked in today by calling SARA SALDUTTI of our advertising department at 718 624-5568, or emailing her at Sara@RedHookStar.com Missed opportunities are profits lost forever

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We are across from Coffey Park (718) 923-9880

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Through December 1, 2012

Gowanus BOA takes advantage of brownfield designation

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long with the Gowanus’s Superfund status, the industrial zoned surrounding areas have been declared a brownfield as of 2003. A brownfield is a former industrial site that has seen significant damage from contamination. With the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) involved with the@ cleanup of the Gowanus, as well as several private sector organizations doing their part to help, it seems as though a lot of parties have things to say on what should be done to improve the area. The Brownfield Opportunity Areas Program (BOA) gives the Gowanus area a chance to utilize New York Department of State (DOS) funds through a survey that is set up for areas like itself. The Steering Committee for the Gowanus BOA Program includes several green organizations already involved

by Alexandra Gillis with the Gowanus area. These include vey “support green and gray infrastrucThe Gowanus Canal Conservancy, ture product,” which would include Southwest Brooklyn Industrial Devel- some of the “old fashioned” ways of hanopment Corporation, and the Gowanus dling storm water. The EPA explains Alliance, along with Starr Whitehouse gray infrastructure as handling storm as their consultant team. As partner and water so it “takes the waste water away landscape artist, Steve Whitehouse ex- from our fields, parks, homes and busiplains, the committee has not yet begun nesses,” instead of diluting it. The EPA making recommendations for the sur- also says that contrary to popular belief, vey. But so far it seems as though each “the idea that ‘dilution is the solution to organization has aspirations to see posi- pollution’ is not a way to get away from stormwater and its pollutants.” tive changes to the Gowanus Area. Rich Kampf of the Gowanus Canal The Gowanus Alliance along with havConservancy explains that when it ing a green perspective, has a strong comes to the survey, the “key focus is on focus advocating the industrial use of the objectives that surround economic the Gowanus area. Their online misdevelopment.” The conservancy’s sion statement speaks to those who run special projects have a strong focus on industrial businesses around the Gowagreen improvements like their efforts to nus. “The manufacturing base that exmake floating gardens, bioswales, com- ists in our area is vital not only to you as post, and so forth. a business or property owner, but also to The Conservancy aims to help the sur- our city’s future ability to endure hard

A Child Grows In Brooklyn by Mary Anne Massaro

“8 million stories out here in the naked.” ~A quote from rapper, Jay Z on his Empire State Of Mind album Well it’s true, everyone has a story to tell. Mine began in Red Hook, Brooklyn. I was born in 1960 in an apartment building at 148 Conover Street. My mother, Theresa and father, Andrew already had 2 sons, Andyben and Tommyboy. I can remember how they would tell me what a joy it was when the doctors said “it’s a girl!” Though a lot of my memories of those days are not very vivid, some are planted in my mind as though it were just yesterday. Photographs of childhood are few for many people who grew up back then. Ask people for childhood photos and they will tell how cameras were luxuries and not necessities for most families. This is why I was so overjoyed to receive this old photo recently from a dear, old friend whose family lived one floor above us in that same building on Conover Street. As I recall, it was her aunt who drove my mother to the hospital on the day she went into labor with me. My mother would tell me the story of how she insisted that my mother name the baby after her if it were a girl. And so I went from being called Evelyn in the womb to being named Mary Anne in the nursery after my Godmother. I carry a lot of memories like that from my childhood in Red Hook. We were all like one big family back then. There was one school and one church, so we all met up somewhere at sometime in the neighborhood. I don’t think we had car service or taxis there was always a neighbor to help out with a ride when we needed it. We all lived together, played together, loved together in the small neighborhood at the end of Brooklyn that most people didn’t even know existed!

economic times.” Paul Basile, President of Gowanus Alliance explained the need for a survey of industrial infrastructure. “It’s going to be harder and harder for the industrial zone to have resources,” he said. This is partially due to a shift in infrastructure priority created by spot residential rezoning in the area, Paul said that when it comes to the industrial zones, “we’re trying to make sure we don’t get left behind.” What decisions will be made from the BOA Program are still uncertain. Discussions between the BOA Program, Steering Committee, and Department of State are just getting started. The collaboration of Brownfield and Superfund hopes to speed along improvements to Gowanus and those who still make use of its surrounding areas.

Mary Anne Massaro and her brother Tommy outside the house they grew up in at 148 Conover Street in 1964. (photo courtesy of Bubbles Silvetti)

Pathmark shuts down as storm waters invade

Fairway was not the only area supermarket to close due to storm damages. Both Pathmark and Fine Faire suffered lost days. Local bodegas and the Met Foods all report extra business. (photo by Kimberly Gail Price)

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Through December 1, 2012 Page 7

Van Brunt businesses take a big Sandy hit by George Fiala

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fter a day of shock and commiseration, the business people of Red Hook got down to real recovery work on Wednesday, October 31. The streets were full of garbage bags. The sound of gas generators spraying water out of basement pumps was everywhere. Friends of Firefighters’ Nancy Carbone points out her damaged industrial refrigerator in the darknews.

Uhuru owner Jason Horvath in his damaged showroom

The Hamilton Avenue Chase Bank opened Wednesday for the first time that week. Around noon, there were very few customers. One of them was the owner of a Red Hook graphic design firm that lost all their equipment and most of their files. She told the bank manager that she couldn’t go through all of this again, and was looking to move her business out of Red Hook - away from the water. This was not what we heard from most of the other places we visited. Another customer was Brooklyn Crab owner, John Czar. He reported little damage or loss from the storm. They were spending their off time helping out neighbors, including Perch and Steve’s Key Lime Pie. They were helping Amy from Perch save as much merchandise as possible. Czar said he thought many of her ceramic sculptures could be saved. They were all picked up by the floodwaters and found floating around the shop. Walking up Van Brunt from Hamilton, we encountered furniture makers, Uhuru. Owner, Jason Horvath reported that the second floor space - where most of the manufacturing is done suffered no damage. However, the first floor was host to over four feet of water during the relatively short time of high tide.

Trying to save Uhuru’s wood.

Stumptown had to do a total cleaning.

The remnants of household goods and business merchandise were all over.

Page 8 Red Hook Star-Revue

Their first floor space is divided into a showroom and a storage room for the unique woods that they use to produce their custom tables. In the storage room, a crew of men were working to stabilize the large slabs used to make tabletops. Horvath did not know whether the efforts to save the wood will be successful. Jason was curious about how FEMA worked, and was anxious for more information. Finished pieces in the showroom were awaiting shipment to customers. Many had been damaged by the water. Jason reported that a 5,000 pound slab of wood floated to the other side of the room. The caustic seawater is dangerous to wood furniture. Another potential problem here is mold. Uhuru was not entirely prepared because no one could believe how high the waterline rose. “Nobody had any idea this was coming. No one expected this,” he said. Coach Bus Repair, the looming space next door, experienced a flood high enough to cover the bus engines that were in their shop waiting to be repaired. Sean, one of their mechanics, said they were not worried. “Fixing buses is what we do!” In addition to the buses, they suffered damage to their

lifts and power tools. The enormous shop was buzzing with activity as everyone showed up for work - despite the subway shutdown. They were busy getting everything back in order, including liberal use of the power-vacuum to suck up all the remaining water. “The waters were everywhere,” said Sean. Jim Totten is a cabinet and furniture maker, who rents space in the historic Van Brunt Street firehouse. He has spent the past three months carefully building cabinets for a new Stumptown coffee outlet that will be opening in the Village. On Friday he boarded up all the windows. Sunday morning he came back to further prepare. Hearing the predictions of the storm surge, he returned on a whim Sunday night to place his current project on a high table. The last minute action was his saving grace, because the cabinets survived unscathed. The water spoiled about $4,000 worth of plywood, some large machinery tools and everything else in the shop that was stored below the four foot water line. A small outside alcove in the back, which was a repository for all sorts of wood and metal building materials, was “once a storage area, now a disaster area.” Next door, red headed Nancy Carbone, Founder and Executive Director of the Friends of Firefighters, explained their biggest loss - the expensive industrial kitchen in the back of the first floor. The water went up past sink level, ruining a large refrigeration unit and gas range. “This is a problem because we use it a lot.” The oversize refrigerator was brand new. They also lost historic books and magazines, as well as boxes of T shirts. But, she said with a big smile, “It’ll take a lot more than this to push me out.” Across the street, Sergi’s Images was a scene of devastation. Water flooded the entire 6,000 foot warehouse. Much of the space was a complete loss. By October 31, they had already taken down all the walls in the front and were putting up new ones. The fetid water compromised the sheet rock. They lost expensive polishing machines, etchers and supplies. The foreman, Ubaldo, pointed to damaged hi-lo’s, dumpsters full of destroyed equipment and broken glass doors that were being made for clients, like Chase Bank. Worst of all, the motors of their three specialized trucks designed to carry the the glass were damaged beyond repair. In front, towering mounds of fresh garbage awaited pick up by the Department of Sanitation. At the Pioneer Supermarket, owner Carmen pointed to the water mark that was two shelves high. All of the merchandise below was ruined. Friends were walking around with garbage bags collecting the spoiled goods to add to the garbage mountains all over the sidewalks. “I spoke to my insurance agent, and he already told me that what they couldn’t pay for, I should ask FEMA about. You see - the insurance compa-

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Jim Totten points to the water line outside of his Van Brunt shop.

Totten and partner with one of the cabinets they were able to save.

Sergi’s, a Van Brunt manufacturer, took huge losses of equipment.

Sergi’s foreman shows how high the water reached.

The shop was almost a total loss. The flood caused almost $2 million worth of damage.

Through December 1, 2012

On the Wednesday after the storm, Van Brunt’s restaurants created a free community barbecue for all the volunteers and workers. (photos by George Fiala)

nies - they will pay when there’s a fire, but they don’t like to pay for water,” Carmen told the Star-Revue. Mark’s Pizza was busy pumping out their basement. Owner, Tony Kokale explained that his generator had broken down, so he was using his car battery to power the pump. The basement was a complete mess, just as most businesses along Van Brunt were. He lost his complete stock of soda, which he estimated at $2,500. His air conditioning compressor sitting in the back yard was most likely unusable. He had recently spent $5,000 on a computerized motor for the walk in freezer that blew up when Con Ed flipped on the power for a split second. “I ran to the back to shut it off, but it was too late.” He got there just in time to see it smoking. Kokale is hoping to reopen as soon as he gets some financial assistance from his insurance company and FEMA. “I put everything up high before the storm, but nobody expected the water to come up as high as it did.” Sandbags placed by the door were no help. “The water rushing down Van Brunt was like a tsunami,” he said. On Tuesday, he fed volunteers with left over pizza. For now, he cannot make any more. Baked avoided first floor flooding. Matt, one of the owners, is on vac duty.

Scott Pfaffman is an artist who has lived on Van Brunt for 22 years. About 50 large garbage bags full of art books were piled up on the street in front of his house. He showed me a waterlogged book on Picasso that was on top of one of the bags. “Look at those bananas,” he said as he pointed to a page. When asked if any of the books might be salvageable, and he replied “With any luck, I’ll put together a new library.” His friend Tania, who was staying in the back of his building, was helping out. They laughingly fought over who saved whom from the raging waters.

Nate’s Pharmacy was filling prescriptions as soon as the power on their block was turned on. Ida Lagoa is dressed for Halloween.

Pfaffman said inspectors from the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) were already in Red Hook by Tuesday, October 30 to check out over 40 basements. “Number 2 fuel oil is a killer,” Pfaffman said. When a burner leaks, the DEP will demand proof of soil remediation. “That could cost me $70,000 to $80,000 and I have no insurance for that.” Pfaffman mentioned that while most of Van Brunt took in floodwaters, for some reason the stores around Coffey Street were spared ground-level flooding. This included Baked and the Kentler Gallery. This area is being called “Coffey Heights” by some in the neighborhood.

Artist Scott Pfaffman was stoic.

Red Hook Star-Revue

Brett Underhill is an animator who has lived at 374 Van Brunt for three years. He did not evacuate along with many

other locals. He saw the water rush down Van Brunt Monday night around 8 pm, and then leave just as quickly a few hours later. He expected his power outage to last for as long as ten days. He was pleasantly surprised when his power came on around 1:30 pm on Halloween. Everyone had been told 4-10 days. He lives on an upper floor and said his life was halfway back to normal, just three days after Van Brunt Street was ransacked by Hurricane Sandy. But most others are not so lucky; after more than two weeks, many still do not have electricity. Further down the block, Nate’s Pharmacy was not only lit, but open for business. The white coated pharmacist was busy preparing medications in the back. An attractive woman, Ida Lagoa, dressed as a nun was handling customers. Actually, she was only a nun for the day, because it was Halloween. A large bowl full of candy sat on the counter, but Lagoa said that not one trick-ortreater had stopped by. She seemed a disappointed. She lives in the Red Hook Houses. As soon as the electric was turned on, she was called in to work and explained that while no water came through the front door, the basement was filled, with it and a cleanup was in full swing.

The Pioneer Supermarket lost their bottom three shelves of goods.

Brett Underhill was surprised that his power returned after less than two days. Others are not so fortunate.

Lagoa didn’t evacuate her home because with a mother and a daughter, it seemed too complicated. She said that everyone on the first floor left. While it was inconvenient with elevators and electricity, it still was home. She also said that she needed to get home before it got dark. Further up, Baked, Red Hook’s preferred coffee bar and bakery, suffered water damage only in the basement. All they lost was product, including a large supply of their cookbooks. Armed with electricity and a working kitchen, they were gearing up to open Thursday morning. Manager, Jordan Slocum said they had been giving coffee to the many volunteers helping get Red Hook back on its feet. “We’re very lucky,” said Slocum.

Mark’s Pizza was hit inside, outside, and in the basement below. Tony Kokale points to damages.

Kokale is hoping to reopen as soon as he gets some financial assistance from his insurance company and FEMA. “I put everything up high before the storm, but nobody expected the water to come up as high as it did.”

www.RedHookStar.com

Through December 1, 2012 Page 9

The

Blue Pencil Lunar Revue A spoof publication of the Red Hook Star-Revue, no information below is meant to be true or offensive.

I

n the wake of this year’s presidential election, the Blue Pencil Lunar-Revue would like to highlight a couple of candidates that may have been improperly represented in other media. We feel they are due their fair share of publicity, even if the votes have already been tal-

Sharky Shark Calamari

Party affiliation: Ill-Mannered Teapot Party Age: 34.5 Political past: Served 3 days of a 5 year sentnce for punching an elderly Democratic lady. He was pardoned as soon as Guliani took office Platform: Rescue the Economy Slogan: “Just print more dough!” Primary goal as president: Organize a million millionaires march to drop one billion counterfeit $1USD. Physical characteristics: wears a knock-off Armani suit and sports a handlebar moustache Favorite words: “yup” and “nup” Favorite food: boiled cabbage Most well known for: his tattoo of a unicorn on his fanny Pets: a 13 year old tarantula named Mrs. Robinson and a Smartphone that he affectionately calls Senorita Vibrato

Pippi Parsnip Strongbottom

Party affiliation: Frumpy Old Maid Party Age: 57 Political Past: She voted a record breaking 17 times in the 1992 election: 8 votes for Clinton; 7 votes for Papa Bush; and 2 votes for Mickey Mantel Platform: Extending Arbor Day to a month long mandatory fasting; Plants’ rights Slogan: “Artichokes have hearts, too.” Primary goal as president: Decrease the national deficit by raising taxes on all produce 3,000% - especially broccoli Past employment: modeled nose rings in her youth; later, she understudied the bearded Lady in an offoff Broadway Carnival, but could only grow hair on her chest Favorite meal: EZ cheese and root beer

MULLED MOCK TURKEY INGREDIENTS: • • • • • • • • • •

1 large pigeon, dead 3 pairs of dirty socks 3 teaspoons of boysenberry juice 1 garlic clove 3 quarts of turmeric 1 used stop sign 2 Christmas ornaments pinch of salt 1 Richard Nixon mask 14 eggs

1. Blue Pencil Lunar-Revue by Retarded Monkeys 2. Waterfront Edge Diner’s To-Go Menu by the owners of the Waterfront Edge Diner

DIRECTIONS: Cut the dirty socks into 1/4 inch squares, combine with turmeric and 7 eggs and blend in food processor set to mash-up for 15 minutes. Chill and set aside Cut the tail off of the pigeon and insert whole garlic clove into rear. Wipe pigeon with boysenberry juice. Pulverize Christmas ornaments, add salt and 7 eggs including shells. In a serving dish, place the pigeon on its feet, dish the sock mixture around it and bake in oven set at 414 degrees for 38 minutes. Remove from oven, sprinkle with salt and return to oven for another 15 minutes. Pour the Christmas ornament mixture into a blender and blend at high setting for an hour. Remove pigeon from oven, cover face with Richard Nixon mask. Serve with chilled Christmas ornament mixture (poured into crystal drinking glasses) and make sure to decorate with Stop sign just so you can tell your guests they were warned.

Page 10 Red Hook Star-Revue

3. Memoirs of the 76th Precinct: The Ill-Effects of Stop and Tickle by Captain Jeffery Schiff 4. George Fiala’s Death Certificate by the Kings County Coroner’s Office, circa 2047 5. The Act of Doing Nothing for Dummies by Faux News 6. 1988 Dodge Dynasty Owner’s Manual by whoever Justin Beiber was in his past life 7. The 50 Most Worse Grammerly Errs by Kimberly G. Price 8. A Pictorial Guide to Things I Found in my Belly Button by Branch Dickey 9. How Government Works by the Pizza guy who ran for president whose name nobody remembers 10. Riding My Imaginary Trolley by Bob Diamond

www.RedHookStar.com

Through December 1, 2012

Where is this? photo by Thomas Rupolo

T

he Star-Revue has tickets to the Big Apple Circus!  To win tickets, be one of the first five to

identify the location of this photo. Winners will be announced in our next issue. Submit entries to Red Hook Star-Revue, 101 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231, email circus@redhookstar.com, or send us a private message on our Facebook page. For more information, email Editor@redhookstar.com.

The

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YOUR AD COULD BE RIGHT HERE! Find out how by calling

SARA SALDUTTI (718) 624-5568 or emailing her at Sara@RedHookStar.com See your standing in the neighborhood instantly move up a notch as your friends and neighbors see you in print right here in their favorite newspaper! The

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STAR-REVUE PUZZLER #20 by George Fiala ACROSS

1. Toast topping 4. Joust 8. 24 cans of beer 12. Outrage 13. Opera feature 14. Landed 15. 60’s Pontiac 16. Legal matter 17. Drug detective 18. Trees do this in hurricanes 20. Buona _____ (Italian greeting) 22. No seats (abbr) 24. Sharon Jones’ Kings 25. West coast city (abbr) 27. Visits unexpectedly (2 words) 31. Lukewarm 33. Edge 34. Former Knicks star Jeremy 36. F line 37. Pond buildup 40. Bewails 43. To, or not to (Shakespeare) 44. Here, to Pierre 46. Number of little indians 47. Coney Island park 49. First man 52. Green fruit 55. Verve 57. Actor Torn 59. Legal claim 60. Council, old style 61. Early man, with Magnon 62. Chinese dynasty 63. Old style Russian leader 64. Take up

DOWN

1. This can be up 2. Goes with Sciences 3. Catspeak 4. Man-goat beings 5. Not amateur 6. Some put these on 7. X or R 8. Served at a party 9. Chicken ___ King

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Elton John’s title And so forth, abbr. Cleo’s slayer Kind of a fink May form a slick Found in laundry or bellybuttons Totals Colorless Annoy Holy Smokes online abbr. Nothing Brooch King Cole or Sherman

www.RedHookStar.com

25

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Not feeling well Old French coin More spiteful Finale Dead to the world Pub offerings Curved part of foot Mucky stuff Dutch airline Roman numberal 3 Small cyst Byron’s daughter Popular red juice

Through December 1, 2012 Page 11

The Red Hook Star-Revue would

like to wish our readers and their loved ones the happiest of Thanksgivings. May you find many blessings this holiday season!

T

hanksgiving is generally thought of as an American holiday. The tradition of Thanksgiving stems from the tales of the first settlers surviving their first year in the New World. But many other countries celebrate in various ways. Canada Jour de l’Action de grâce is celebrated on the second Monday in October to give thanks at the end of the harvest season.

Germany Erntedankfest occurs in early October and generally encompasses the Bavarian beer event, Oktoberfest. Japan Kinr Kansha no Hi is a national holiday celebrated on November 23, which was adopted during American occupation during WWII.

Grenada Thanksgiving Day, celebrated October 23, is the celebration of the US-led invasion in 1983 that resulted in the execution of Prime Minister Maurice Bishop.

Liberia

I

n the first founding years of our country, adversity was an obstacle; enduring meant survival. Our communities have faced many hardships, especially in the past weeks. But we have continued moving forward into our future. Days pass and often we forget to be grateful for all of those things that often go without thanks. For our readers, we’ve compiled an astonishingly long list. The editor has compressed that list into 30 things, one for each day of the month of Thanksgiving. 1. That first shower after spending 3 days and nights at the office on deadline 2. Heated Community Board 6 meetings

Thanksgiving Day began in 1820 when former slaves from the US colonized in the west African country and is commemorated the first Thursday of every November.

3. $5 Highbeams at the Ice House (Miller Highlife and a shot of Jim Beam)

The Netherlands

4. Personal talks with Sunny at Sunny’s Bar

A non-denominational church service is held every year on the American Thanksgiving Day in the Pieterskerk - a Gothic church in Leiden - in honor of the hospitality the Pilgrims received on their way to the New World.

China August Moon Festival falls on the 15th day of the 8th lunar month because the Chinese the moon is brightest on this night. Under the moonlight, lovers confess their hearts; friends and relatives give gifts of mooncakes.

Rome Cerelia, the Roman harvest festival, honors Ceres, goddess of corn, on October 4 and includes music, parades and sports.

Brazil The Brazilian ambassador brought Thanksgiving to his homeland after being inspired by a visit to the US. They celebrate their gratitude of an plentiful harvest with an much-admired Carnival.

Korea Chu-Sok begins on the 14th night of August and continues for three days, as people gather under moonlight to remember their ancestors and forefathers.

Australia Several harvest related festivals are held to celebrate communal harmony including the Lavender Harvest Festival during the first three weeks of January, The Hops Festival throughout February and March, the Apple and Grape Festival for 3 to 4 days in March, the Renmark Orange Week Festival in either August or September, the Cane Festivals happening from June through December, and the Wheat Festival that takes place in December.

Greece The Festival of Thesmosphoria was held in ancient Greece every autumn to honor Demeter - goddess of harvest - in the hopes that she would grant a fruitful harvest.

Page 12 Red Hook Star-Revue

5. Splitting dinner during sunset at Brooklyn Crab 6. A full pot of coffee round the clock 7. Community barbecues 8. Our amazing staff and contributors that give so much character to this paper 9. Kayaking in the East River 10. Gorgeous waterfront views while strolling down Valentino Pier 11. Representing the best group of artisans Brooklyn has ever seen 12. The vibrant youth of this community 13. The support, resources and smiling faces South Brooklyn shares with us daily 14. Letters to the editor 15. Friends who pop by the office 16. Springtime arrival of the food vendors, little league games in the ball fields, fall rugby practice and end of the year tree lightings

www.RedHookStar.com

17. Distributing papers on the streets to our faithful readers 18. All of the amazing events we have been a part of 19. 2 am diner meetings to originate the next wacky spoof page 20. Being inducted into the New York Press Association 21. The pages and pages of future issues we look forward to creating 22. Being inspired by the human spirit that lives among us 23. George’s old beat up Taurus that brings thousands of papers from Connecticut to Brooklyn, barely 24. The first look at the freshly printed papers hot off the press 25. Growing and thriving, knowing the best is yet to come 26. Ordering dessert after splitting a foot tall burger at Hope & Anchor 27. A VFW Post that always has their door open for us 28. Facebook fans and friends that share their stories with us 29. Delicious burgers at the Waterfront Edge Diner around the corner from the office 30. Jumping on the couch screaming “Song of the South” at 4 am to keep each other energized

Through December 1, 2012

Red Hook StarÂŞRevue

Red Hook Star-Revue

www.RedHookStar.com

Through December 1, 2012 Page 13

(continued on next page)

Page 14 Red Hook Star-Revue

www.RedHookStar.com

Through December 1, 2012

The Big Apple circus worth a trip to Manhattan by Brian Clancy

T

he Big Apple Circus has delighted children and adults alike from its 1977 beginnings in a lower Manhattan loft in Lincoln Center to its home in Damrosch Park in 1980. This is their 35th anniversary production. It is spectacular from the opening Charivari, that paraded all of the afternoon’s performers to the finale, where they all return to dance and wave goodbye to the spectators. The show had an engaging and inclusive atmosphere. Despite the brilliance of its performers, the whole tone seemed to say that this circus troupe regarded the audience as the star performer. What struck me in particular was the sense of nostalgia that this show seemed intent on creating for us. Between acts, the Ringmaster, John Kennedy Kane made reference to days gone by in New York City and its relationship with the Circus. In his tales, twenty-one elephants paraded across the newly built Brooklyn Bridge, reassuring citizens that this marvelous engineering feat was indeed safe. The challenges in building the Erie Canal that linked the Atlantic Ocean with the Great Lakes of the Mid West. This season’s production, “Legendarium” sets out to meld classical circus acts with some of the best contemporary circus artists and performers from around the world. This circus featured the best contortionist - Elayne Kramer - that I have ever seen. I was amazed to see her hold her entire body weight over her head using only her teeth. She then ended her act by firing a bow and arrow with her feet, while maintaining a beautiful grace and elegance in her movement. Watching Daniel Cyr was also mesmerizing, as he performed acrobatics with a large ring called a Cyr Wheel. The image of him sitting in the centre of the ring as his wheel came to rest around him while

the lights faded was one of the best moments in the show. Afterward, the Ringmaster announced that we had just witnessed an act executed by the man who invented it - that is now performed by hundreds of performers worldwide. The Dogs of Central Park followed which was clearly a favorite of the younger audience members. The dog handlers all wore Victorian period costumes as they walked the dogs into the ring, bringing that old-world feel back again. After being amazed at the dog’s funny performance, I was particularly charmed to hear from the Ringmaster that the dogs were all rescues from the city’s animal shelters. Although all the acts were incredible, my favorite one was on the aerial silks. It is always a beautifully graceful act to watch. What set this act apart was the wonderful lighting design that accompanied it. Katarina moved as though she was swimming deep underwater like a dolphin or some other worldly creature of the deep. The Blues and greens that shone down from the apex of the big top created the illusion that beyond the darkness of the rooftop tent was the light of the surface of the Erie Canal. Sounds bizarre, I know. But that’s how enchanting this circus really was. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, I think a lot of New Yorkers need to believe that there is light beyond these darker days.

These pictures show the performers of the Big Apple Circus.

The Star-Revue has tickets to the Big Apple Circus! To win tickets, be one of the first five to identify the location of the photo on page 11. Winners will be announced in our next issue. Submit entries to Red Hook Star-Revue, 101 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231, email circus@redhookstar.com, or send us a private message on our Facebook page. For more information, email Editor@redhookstar.com

We have been serving Brooklyn Businesses & institutions since 1988. Where have you been? Services Offered: • Lettershop • Political Mailings • Non-Profit Fundraising Letters • Postcards • Brochures & Newsletters • Presort Services • All mailings go out at the lowest possible postal rates

101 UNION STREET

Brooklyn, NY 11231 718 624-5568 www.selectmail.com george@selectmail.com Red Hook Star-Revue

www.RedHookStar.com

Through December 1, 2012 Page 15

Star-Revue

Guide to area restaurants

Images of Red Hook

Red Hook BAKED 359 Van Brunt St., (718)222-0345.

This art deco structure provides ventilation for the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, completed in 1950. Robert Moses’ opposed the tunnel, his plan was to build a gigantic bridge that would have eradicated large portions of Red Hook and battery park. Moses hated tunnels, calling them a “hole in the ground . . . merely a tiled, vehicular bathroom smelling faintly of monoxide.” Powerful interests tried to halt the bridge’s construction, but it took the full power of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his wife Eleanor, to finally force Moses to build a tunnel.

Columbia Waterfront District

THE BROOKLYN ICE HOUSE 318 Van Brunt St., (718) 222-1865. BOTANICA 220 Conover St (at Coffey St), (347) 225-0147. DEFONTE’S SANDWICH SHOP 379 Columbia St., (718) 855-6982. DIEGO’S RESTAURANT 116 Sullivan St., (718) 625-1616. F&M BAGELS 383 Van Brunt St., (718) 855-2623. FORT DEFIANCE 365 Van Brunt St., (347) 453-6672. THE GOOD FORK 391 Van Brunt St., (718) 643-6636. HOME/MADE 293 Van Brunt St., (347) 223-4135. HOPE & ANCHOR 347 Van Brunt St., (718) 237-0276. IKEA One Beard St., (718) 246-4532. JOHN & FRANKS, 367 Columbia Street, (718) 797-4467 KEVIN’S 277 Van Brunt St., (718) 5968335. MARK’S PIZZA 326 Van Brunt St., (718) 624-0690. NEW LIN’S GARDEN RESTAURANT 590 Clinton Street, (718) 399-1166 RED HOOK LOBSTER POUND 284 Van Brunt St., (646) 326-7650. ROCKY SULLIVAN’S 34 Van Dyke St., (718) 246-8050. STEVE’S AUTHENTIC KEY LIME PIE, 204 Van Dyke St, (718) 852-6018 SUNNY’S BAR IN RED HOOK, 253 Conover Street, (718) 625-8211

ALMA 187 Columbia St., (718) 643-5400.

(photo and text from the book IMAGES OF RED HOOK, published October 2012. For more info and bonus content or to purchase a copy of the book visit www.ImagesofRedHook.com)

BAGEL BOY CAFE 75 Hamilton Avenext to Chase, (718) 855-0500. CALEXICO CARNE ASADA Union St., (718) 488-8226.

122

CASA DI CAMPAGNA 117 Columbia Street (718) 237-4300. CASELNOVA 214 Columbia St., (718) 522-7500. FERNANDO’S FOCACCERIA RESTAURANT 151 Union St., (718)855-1545. HOUSE OF PIZZA & CALZONES 132 Union St., (718) 624-9107. JAKE’S BAR-B-QUE RESTAURANT 189 Columbia St., (718) 522-4531. KOTOBUKI BISTRO 192 Columbia St., (718) 246-7980. LILLA CAFE 126 Union St., (718) 8555700. MAZZAT 208 Columbia St., (718) 8521652. PETITE CREVETTE 144 Union St., (718) 855-2632.

SOUL SPOT 302 Atlantic Ave 718 5969933

TEEDA THAI CUISINE 218 Columbia St., (718) 643-2737.

SAVOIA, 277 Smith Street, 718-797-2727

Carroll Gardens/ Cobble Hill

ABILENE, 442 Court Street, 718-5226900, ANGRY WADES, 222 Smith Street, (718) 488-7253 BACCHUS, 409 Atlantic, (718) 852-1572 BAR BRUNO, 520 Henry St., 347-7630850, BAGELS BY THE PARK, 323 Smith Street, (718) 246-1321 BAR GREAT HARRY, 280 Smith Street (718) 222-1103 BOMBAY DREAM, 257 Smith Street (718) 237-6490 BOURGEOIS PIG, 387 Court Street, (718) 858-5483 BROOKLYN BREAD CAFE, 436 Court Street (718) 403-0234 BUDDY’S BURRITO & TACO BAR, 260 Court Street, 718-488-8695, BUTTERMILK CHANNEL, 524 Court Street (718) 852-8490 CASA ROSA, 384 Court Street, 718-7971907 CHESTNUT, 271 Smith St., (718) 2430049 COBBLE GRILL, 212 Degraw Street, (718) 422-0099

Page 16 Red Hook Star-Revue

COBBLE HILL COFFEE SHOP, 314 Court Street, (718) 852-1162 CODY’S ALE HOUSE GRILL, 154 Court Street, 718-852,6115 COURT STREET GROCERS, 485 Court Street, (718) 722-7229 CRAVE, 570 Henry Street, (718) 643-0361 CUBANA CAFE, 272 Smith Street (718) 718-858-3980 DOWNTOWN BAR & GRILL, 160 Court street, 718-625-2835 DUBUQUE, 548 Court Street, (718) 5963248 EM THAI KITCHEN, 278 Smith Street, (718) 834-0511 ENOTICA ON COURT, 347 Court Street, (718) 243-1000 F LINE BAGELS, 476 Smith Street (718) 422-0001 FIVE GUYS, 266 Court St., 347-799-2902 FRAGOLE, 394 Court Street, (718) 6227133 FRANCESCO’S RESTAURANT, 531 Henry Street, (718) 834-0863 FRANK’S LUNCHEONETTE, 365 Smith Street, (718) 875-5449 GHANG, 229 Court Street, 718-875-1369 GOWANUS YACHT CLUB, 323 Smith Street, (718) 246-132,Closed til spring HANA CAFE, 235 Smith Street, (718) 643-1963 LE PETITE CAFE, 502 Court street, 718596-7060 LING LING YOUNG, 508 Henry Street, (718) 260-9095 MARCO POLO RISTORANTE, 345 Court Street, 718 852-5015 MAMA MARIA’S RESTAURANT, 307 Court Street, (718) 246-2601 MEZCALS Restaurant, 522 Court Street, 718-783-3276 NATURES GRILL, 138 Court street, 718852,5100, NINE-D, 462 Court Street, 718-488-8998, OAXACA TACOS, 251 Smith Street (718) 222-1122 OSACA RESTAURANT, 272 Court Street (718) 643-0055 P J HANLEYS, 449 Court St, 718- 843-8223 PALO CORTADO, 520 Court St, 718407-0047 PRIME MEATS, 465 Court Street, 718254-0327 or 0345, PALMYRA, 316 Court street, 718-7971110 RED ROSE RESTAURANT, 315 Smith Street, (718) 625-0963 SALS PIZZA, 305 Court Street, (718) 852-6890 SAM’S RESTAURANT, 238 Court Street, 718-596-3458

www.RedHookStar.com

SEERSUCKER RESTAURANT, 329 Smith Street, (718) 422-0444 SMITH & VINE, 268 Smith Street (718) 243-2864 SOUTH BROOKLYN PIZZA, 451 Court Street, 718 852-6018 STINKY BROOKLYN, 261 Smith Street, 718 522-7425 SWEET MELISSA, 276 Court Street, (718) 855-3410 TRIPOLI, 156 Atlantic Ave, 718 596-5800 VINNY’S OF CARROLL GARDENS, 295 Smith Street, 718 875-5600 VINNY’S PIZZERIA, 455 Court Street, 718 596-9342 VINO Y TAPAS, 520 Court Street, 718407-0047 ZAYTOONS, 283 Smith Street, 718 875-1880

Gowanus MICHAEL AND PINGS, 437 Third Avenue, (718) 788-0017 COTTA BENE PIZZA, 291 3rd Ave, 718 722-7200 LITTLENECKS, 288 3rd Ave., (718) 522-1921 CANAL BAR, 270 3rd Ave, (718) 2460011

Through December 1, 2012

Court Street’s Seersucker hosts RHI benefit by Erik Penney

I

like Seersucker and I have for a while; let me get that out of the way right off the bat. I’ve had brunch there a few times, lined the stomach with excellent grits and eggs, and then headed next door to the Gowanus Yacht Club for outdoor beers on sunny Saturday afternoons. But their Southern-inspired menu of comfort food favorites deserves a more extensive treatment than I am prepared to give here. Today, I would like to talk a bit about one particular evening I had at Seersucker last week. This evening wasn’t about food or even good times, but instead about doing something small to help an organization in need, and a neighborhood that’s been brought to its knees. We all know about the hurricane. All of us who live in Red Hook have been affected by it, some more than others. Many homes and apartments were flooded, their contents destroyed, the inhabitants reeling and - in many cases - left with little help from the City. Our neighborhood went dark and cold for days on end, and as we all followed the news of neighborhoods and subway lines being restored throughout Manhattan, I know we couldn’t help but wonder whether anyone remembered we were still here, and still in trouble. In the middle of this, stood the Red Hook Initiative (RHI) - an organization well known to all of us as a valuable pro-

vider of health and education services for the underserved youth in our congenitally underserved neighborhood. In the storm’s aftermath, RHI seamlessly went from their traditional mission into full-blown disaster-recovery mode, providing hot meals, blankets, clothing and personal products, water and medicine to many, many Red Hook residents, as they continue to do. This was all unanticipated and stretched a thin budget even thinner. It was in this context that I heard of the fundraiser at Seersucker to benefit the Red Hook Initiative. This was called “Pork for New York,” and Seersucker was selling four pulled pork sliders with green tomato BBQ sauce for $10, Victory Prima Pils draft beer for $5, and cups of caramel corn for $3 to munch on while we waited. There was also a very large and prominently displayed tip jar on the bar, the

Red Hook Star-Revue

contents of which were to be earmarked for the RHI. We got there shortly after the official 6:30 pm start; there was already a line to get in. Truth be told, it was hard to tell whether the people there came for the cause or the cheap food, though I suppose it doesn’t matter much – money is money. The line never shrank, and by the time we left at around 7:30 the restaurant had run completely out of pork and was offering fried chicken instead. The tip jar was being filling with $20 bills. The bartender was slinging beers and popcorn as fast as he could. This all gave me a good feeling to be a part of, but I still felt detached, knowing that Red Hook - just blocks away - was still without power or heat. Many resi-

ing. It was eerie, shadowy, but not entirely pitch black as we walked south along Van Brunt Street. There was an odd ambient light, a gloaming, which was totally out of place. It wasn’t until we got closer to the source that I realized what it was. There was a police spotlight attached to a generator extending far into the sky. This was the only source of light for blocks - the generator’s persistent hum, the neighborhood’s new white noise. It reminded me of the scene in Apocalypse Now when Captain Willard reaches the last US Army outpost upriver, a post where a scattered, decimated and undersupplied group of soldiers are defending a bridge, but it’s clear that they have been overrun and defeat is certain.

“In the middle of this, stood the Red Hook Initiative (RHI) an organization well known to all of us as a valuable provider of health and education services for the underserved youth in our congenitally underserved neighborhood.”

dents were struggling mightily to make it through another cold night. The sliders were excellent. I ordered two sets of four for myself, one more for my guest, and beers and popcorn while we waited. The pork was excellent. These were big chunks of juicy, earthy pork shoulder, slowly smoked for hours and hours until they gave way at the slightest touch. The flavor was heightened by the tangy, fruity sauce and served on a deliciously mushy potato bun. Simple and perfect, and they were dealing them like blackjack cards from the bar. The sliders were piled high and the whole thing was worth more than $10. So, like many I dumped some substantial overage into the tip jar, never feeling like it was enough to address the enormous financial deficit that existed all over the neighborhood.

There is no organization; the noose is tightening. It’s every man for himself. Every soldier that Captain Willard encounters as he searches for the commanding officer is mad by having confronted his own mortality. This is how it felt that night. We had been forsaken by the City in the same way that those soldiers had been forsaken by the army at that bridge. All trappings of a civil, orderly society had been lost. It was surreal, and it should not happen here.

us still have a big hole to dig ourselves out of. But I keep reminding myself that in many small ways, the people in our neighborhood banded together to help each other. I have since heard of so many little fundraisers, benefits and food & clothing drives for Red Hook. I’ve seen people who have been devastated by the storm volunteering to help others. When I see that, I realize how lucky I am to live where I do, know the people I know, and why it will take more than a hurricane to hold us back. Seersucker 329 Smith Street (corner of Carroll) www.seersuckerrbrooklyn.com

I made it to my apartment in total darkness, let myself in, looked around and found that everything was safe, locked the windows and left. But the mood has stayed with me ever since. Most of us have power back now, but most of

And then we headed on foot towards Red Hook. You see, ever since the storm I had been staying in a largely untouched part of Manhattan; I hadn’t really seen the neighborhood at night. I needed some things. I needed to make sure my unattended apartment was still secure. I needed to make sure it was closed and shut against the nor’ easter that was in the forecast for the following day. But I also needed to see my home, my ground-floor apartment that held 2 feet of water just days before, and the possessions I left behind, and in a way to reclaim ownership of what I had. I just needed to see it again and feel myself enter the neighborhood. I needed to re-establish control. We walked from Smith down a well-lit Union Street towards Columbia, then down President Street into Red Hook. At that point, the lights stopped work-

www.RedHookStar.com

Hours: Noon to 10:30 pm Tues.to Thurs.Noon to 11pm Friday.4pm to 11pm Saturday & 4pm to 10:30pm Sunday.

Through December 1, 2012 Page 17

Art & Community Calendar If you have an event you would like listed in the Red Hook StarRevue calendar, please email redhookstarcalendar@gmail.com.

CHILDREN

Bethel Baptist Day Care Center 242 Hoyt St. (718) 834-9292 ACD funded Early Childhood Education Programs, Family Services, and Day Care Services for the Gowanus Community. Call for more info. Kentler International Drawing Space—353 Van Brunt St. (718) 8752098, kentlergallery.org FREE Weekend Art Workshops for Families. Ages 4 & up. Every 1st & 3rd Sat. Noon-1:30pm register in advance: sallie@kentlergallery.org Who’s On First? 46 1st Place, Clinton/ Henry (718) 243-1432 whosonfirstkids. com A nurturing and supportive environment focusing on self esteem, problem solving, socialization, conflict resolution and free expression through art, music and creative movement. For children “from birth to 7 yrs..

CHURCH/ SYNAGOGUE

Kane St. Synagogue 236 Kane St. (718) 875-1530 kanestreet.org Torah Study every 2nd Shabbat of the Month 11am-Noon. Every Fri. &/or Tues. St. Stephen’s R.C. 108 Carroll St. (718) 596-7750 delvecchiorc.com & brooklyncatholic.blogspot.com Every Wed. 6:30pm Choir rehearsal, if interested contact jlake@delvechiorc.com or evelyntroester@gmx.net Visitation of Our Blessed Virgin Mary R.C. 98 Richards @Verona (718) 6241572 Every Thurs. 6pm Choir Practice w/ Emiliana In-Home Blessings and Masses, by appointment. Languages available: English, Spanish, Italian, German. Contact: Lori Burkhard at (917) 971-5522.

CLASSES/ WORKSHOPS

Brooklyn Collective Gallery 212 Columbia St. (Union/Sackett) (718) 5966231 brooklyncollective.com. Gallery Hours: Thur.- Sun. 11am-8pm, Sat. 11/17 5-8pm Hidden Places & Hidden Spaces: Book Release Party w.Glogg & Canapes. Brooklyn General—128 Union St. (718) 237-7753 brooklyngeneral.com Classes and Workshops for all things Sewing. Call or contact their website for more info. Carroll Gardens Association 201 Columbia St. Sackett/Degraw (718) 2439301 carrollgardensassociation.com Christmas Toy Drive For Red Hook Children through 12/6, The Gowanus Studio Space 166 7th Street (347) 948-5753 www.gowanusstudio.org Cora Dance 201 Richards St. (Coffey St./Van Dyke St.) #15 (718) 858-2520 coradance.org Classes resumed as of 11/7. Ger-Nis Culinary & Herb Center 540 President St., 3rd/4th Ave. (347) 4220337 ger-nis.com Sat. 11/17 11am-2pm Sweet Breakfast Treats $50. 4-7pm Fall Solo Cooking Guide $65. Sun. 11/18 1-4pm Make YOr Own Dim Sum & Beer $65. 6-9pm Rejuvenating Ramen $65. Fri. 11/24 10am-1pm The Rustic Bread Baker $40. Thu. 1130 6:30-9pm How TO Make Gnocchi Like An Italian Grandmother $65. The Intercourse 159 Pioneer St. (718) 596-3000 theintercourse.org Sat 11/17 Noon-3pm There Will Be Blood: Cooking The Odd CUts $75. Mon. 11/19 7-9pm Electronic Voices $30. Thu. 11/29 7-9pm The Steaming Screen: History of The Sex Scene in Hollywood $15. Jalopy Theatre and School of Music 315 Columbia St. (718) 395-3214, jalopy. biz SUn 11/18 Noon Vocal Harmony Basics $20. 2pm Vocal Harmony Duos & Trios $25. Both, $40. YWCA Brooklyn 30 3rd Ave (Atlantic Ave/State St.): (718) 488-1624 ywcabklyn.org

Galleries

440 Gallery 440 6th Ave. (Park Slope) (718) 499-3844 440gallery.com Gallery

Page 18 Red Hook Star-Revue

Hrs. Thu., Fri. 4-7pm, Sat. 11am-7pm, or by appointment. Through 11/25 Richard Eagan-Art of the Coney Island Hysterical Society. Brooklyn Collective Gallery 212 Columbia St. (Union/Sackett) (718) 596-6231 brooklyncollective.com Gallery hrs. Thur. - Sun 1pm-8pm through 11/31 New Collections of Local Artists FREE. Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition 499 Van Brunt St. (718) 596-2506 bwac. org Open every Sat. & Sun 1-6pm The CUrrent Accepted Works From THe National Juried Show. Falconworks Kidd Studio 135 Richards St. (718) 395-3218 falconworks.com redhooktheater.org The Invisible Dog 51 Bergen St. (347) 560-3641 theinvisibledog.org 11/14-17 7pm,11/18 6pm Take Her To See The Maco Lights/theater/Superwolf $15. Thu. 11/15 7:30pm Cine Club: Black Cat, White Cat $5 donation. Sat. 11/17 5-10pm Dither Extravaganza: Music. Kentler International Drawing Space—353 Van Brunt St. (718) 8752098, kentlergallery.org Gallery hrs. Thu.-Sun. noon-5pm. Through 12/16 Beyond Lines, Beyond Surface: Tamiko Kawata. Paper Optics: Joan Grubin. Sun. 11/18 4pm Artists’ Talk. Look North Inuit Art Gallery—275 Conover St. Suite 4E, (347) 721-3995, looknorthny.com Polar Light: Greenland. The Greenland photography of Rena Bass Forman and the Greenland drawings of Zaria Forman. A climate change awareness exhibition held in conjunction with Al Gore’s “The Climate Project”. Sweet Lorraine Gallery 183 Lorraine St. (Clinton & Court St) (347) 409-8957 screwballspaces.com, fernbar@yahoo. com Through 11/25 Peter Patchen: Migration. Sunny’s Bar Backroom 253 Conover St. (Beard/Reed St.) (718) 625-8211 sunnysredhook.com & Sunny’s Bar on facebook. Open Wed, Fri, and Sat 8pm-4am.

MUSEUMS

Micro Museum 123 Smith St., Pacific/ Dean (718) 797-3116 micromuseum. com Through 12/20/13 Every Sat. 127pm Above & Beyond: A 3yr. retrospective of the art of William & Kathleen Laziza $2 donation. Every Sat. through 3/2/13 12-7pm Lucky 7’s, 8’s, 9’s $2 donation. Say “I like Red Hook Star Revue” and get a free gift bag! The Waterfront Museum Lehigh Valley Barge No.79, 290 Conover Street. (718) 624-4719 ext. 11 www.waterfrontmuseum.org. Free boat tours & open hours all through the year. Thursdays 4 - 8 pm and Saturdays 1 - 5 pm. Juggling For Fun Wkshp. Call (718) 624-4719 x.11 David Sharps.

MUSIC

Bait & Tackle 320 Van Brunt Street (718) 451-4665 redhookbaitandtackle. com No Cover. Unless otherwise noted, everything starts @ 9pm. Fri. 11/16 Jesse Kilgus. Sat. 11/17 Bebe Requin. Sun 11/18 Tin Roof Trio. Fri. 11/30 Sullied Accolades. Hope & Anchor 347 Van Brunt St.(718) 237-0276. Every Wed. 7pm, Jazz Jam w/The H & A House Band! Every Thurs. through Sat. from 9pm-1am Karaoke. Issue Project Room 110 Livingston St. (718) 451-4665 issueproject room.org Thu 11/15 7:30 pm Reza Negarestani & Florian Hecker: The Non-Trivial Goat and the Cliffs of the Universal @ Abrons Playhouse, 466 Grand Street NYC. Fri 11/16 8pm Mind over Mirrors: Miguel Gutierrez @ Actors’ FUnd, 160 Schemerhorn St. BK. Sat 11/17 Mind Over Mirrors: Zelienople & The Ashcan Orchestra @ Actors Funs 166 Schemerhorn St BK. FrTue. 11/27 6:30pm Sergei Tcherepin: Massage Performance. Thu 11/29 7pm Evan Calder Willims @ Artists Spcae 55 Walker St. NYC. Fri 11/30 8pm Swedish Energies:: EMS in NYC Night 1 @ Clemente Soto Velez 107 Suffolk St NYC. Sat. 12/1 7pm Swedish Energies: EMS in NYC Night 2 @ clemente Soto Velez 107 Suffolk St. NYC. Jalopy Theatre and School of Music 315 Columbia St., (718) 395-3214 jalopy. biz. Every Wed. 9pm Roots & Ruckus w/Feral Foster FREE. Thu. 11/15 9pm Gaucho, Tamar Korn & Friends $10. Fri. 11/16 6pm Ukubiqiitous Robin Hoffman closing art reception FREE, 8pm Melody

Alegra Birthday Party, The Berger Sistersa, Margaret Glaspy, BowSmack $10. Sat, 11/17 3pm FREE Old Time Jam w/ Harry Bolick. 9pm Mike & Ruthy, Spuyten Duyvil $12 adv. $15 dos. Sun. 11/18 8pm The Homemade Supper Show $10. Wed. 11/21 7pm A Benefit To Restore Red Hook starring Roseanne Cash @ the Bell House. 9pm Roots & Ruckus. sat 11/24 9pm Doug Skinner FREE. Fri 11/29 9pm Kale Records Presents: Charles Mansfield Band, Buffie ROseanne Brian Speaker, and others: Part 2 of the Red Hook Recovery Benefits. Sat. 11/30 9pm Flight Feathers, The Strung out String Band, The Flanks $10. Montero’s Bar 73 Atlantic Ave. @ Hicks St. (718) 534-6399 monteros-bar@facebook.com Karaoke w/Amethyst and the beautiful Andy at the bar. every Fri. & Sat. 10pm. Every Wed. after. 8pm - Midnight. The raucous musical concoctions of The Red Hook Irregulars. All Acoustic. Guest Players invited. Rocky Sullivan’s—34 Van Dyke St., (718) 246-8050. No Cover Every Mon, Tues, Wed 8pm Live Irish Music Every Last Wed 8pm Readings By Authors.Every. Thurs. 9pm Rocky’s World Famous Pub Quiz. Every Mon 9/17 7pm Chris Byrne’s Beginner’s Tin Whistle Class. Trad. 8pm Irish Music The Star Theater Acoustic Jam & Hootenanny 101 Union St. ( Columbia / Van Brunt) (718) 624-5568 Every Monday Night 8pm. C&W to Jazz (with a healthy dose of Blues in the middle). Bring your Axe & Your Favorite Beverage!

The

The Star Theater Electric Jam 101 Union St., (Columbia / Van Brunt )Every Thur. Night 8pm Hard rock, Jazz, Blues. Full Back Line. Refreshments provided. Donations accepted. Sunny’s Bar 253 Conover St. (Beard/ Reed St.) (718) 625-8211 sunnysredhook.com & Sunny’s Bar on Facebook. Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays, live local roots music.. Every Sat. 10pm Bluegrass/Folk Country Jam. Union Hall 702 Union Street @5th Ave (718) 638-4400 unionhallny.com Every Sun. 7:30pm Pretty Good Friends. Comedy host by Eugene Mirman $7. Every Fri. Midnight Karaoke Killed The Cat FREE. Every Sat. 11pm CRAZY $INCE DA 90$ FREE.

TASTINGS

Botanica—220 Conover St (@ Coffey St) 347-225-0147. New cocktails, specialty liquors & Exotic Chocolates featuring Cacao Prieto Chocolate. Sat-Sun: Afternoon cocktails. Now Open!! Dry Dock Wine & Spirits Outpost Across from Hope and Anchor (718) 852-3625 drydockny.com ALL TASTINGS ARE FREE! Thu. 11/15 6-8pm Beaujolais Noveau. Fri 11/16 Jack From Brooklyn: Christmas drinks. MikNik Lounge 200 Columbia St. (917) 770-1984 ‘Rebel! Rebel!’ (Gay Night) every First & Third Thurs. 9pm - 2am Cheap Beer, $6 well drinks, friendly crowd.

TOURS PUBLIC MEETINGS WALKING A Tour grows in Brooklyn 1212 64th Brooklyn Greenway Initiative 153 Columbia St.(Kane/Degraw) (718) 5220913 brooklyngreenway.org The Ceramic Arts of Kathryn Robinson-Miller. 30% of the proceeds will go to support BGI’s work.

Brooklyn Public Library - Carroll Gardens 396 Clinton St. @ Union St. (718) 596-6972 brooklynpubliclibrary.org/ locations/carroll-gardens Knitting Club (all ages) Every Tues 4pm mezzanine. Memoir Writing (adult) Every Wed. 6pm Chess Club (all ages) Play and improve your game. Bring your own clock. Mon. 6/4 11:30am Babes & Books w/ 1st RIF. Tue. 6/5 3-5pm English Conversation: English for ESOL students.

St.(212) 209-3370 brooklynwalkingtour. com A historical walking tour of Brownstone Brooklyn featuring the childhood home of Al Capone, the history of the Williamsburg Bank, and the Revolutionary War battle site The Old Stone House. Real Brooklyn Pizza Lunch included. Daily 10am-1pm, $40 Urban Oyster (347) 618-TOUR (8687) urbanoyster.com Every Sat.Noon-3:30, Brewed in Brooklyn Tour (Williamsburg) $60 Adv. sales only. Every Sat. Brewing, Bottling, & bootlegging in historic Williamsburg. Samples, pizza and fresh lager lunch included. $65, adv. sales only. Every Sat. & Sun Navy Yard Full Tour 2:30-4:30pm.$30, adv sales only.

Red Hook StarªRevue

Dear Readers, The Red Hook Star-Revue is your newspaper. Our mission is to provide Red Hook and its adjacent communities with the news that is needed for a community to understand the world immediately around us. An informed populace can’t be fooled. During this extraordinary emergency we have seen our community come together as no one xpected. No one except those of us who live here and who report on the amazing community that we are. We are proud to be your community newspaper, or ‘neighborhood rag,’ as St. John has called us. Our pages are open to you. We invite and encourage letters, opinions, suggestions and even rotten tomatoes. You can reach us easily enough by email, phone and snail mail. Email: editor@redhookstar.com Phone: (718) 624-5568 Mail: Red Hook Star-Revue, 101 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231 We work through the nights often to find as many events to list in our calendars as possible. You can help us be letting us know of your event. Calendar listings are a free public service. Publishing the Red Hook Star-Revue is a labor of love. Over the past two weeks we have lived in our offices, putting as much into these last two issues as we possibly could. As we are the paper of record for Red Hook. Again, we thank you for your readership and loyalty. Sincerely,

Kimberly Gail Price & George Fiala , Publishers www.RedHookStar.com

Through December 1, 2012

Here’s My Card

Introducing Business Card Classifieds. Your card categorized as below. The Star-Revue is read by over 10,000 individuals in zip code 11231 every two weeks, as it is the leading source of community news. We offer highly affordable rates - contact Sara Saldutti at 718.624.5568 or Sara@redhookstar.com to get your card in our next issue.

Your Cost: 2 months $400; 4 months $750; 6 months $1000; one year $1750. Take an extra 5% off if paid all in advance. We take all charge cards.

MOVERS

FOR SALE “Large oil painting A contemporary work of approximately 6 by 8 feet.It is painted in a loose expressionistic style.The image is of a seahorse” with other images of sea life around it. The artist used complementary colors of blue and red.The painting is livey, colorful and joyful. $1,000.00 or best offer. Vall Sr. Rosanna at Visitation Church 718 624-1572

CAR SERVICE

LEASING

Put Your Ad Right Here by Calling Sara at

718 624-5568 CALL RIGHT NOW Don’t Miss Out!!!!!!!!!

FRAMING

Star-Revue Classifieds HELP WANTED Freelance Writers: The Red Hook Star-Revue is looking for freelance writers for both the arts and news sections.We want to buttress our news as well as local theater and arts coverage.Email Kimberly @ redhookstar.com Outside Salesperson: The Red Hook Star-Revue seeks an ambitious person who likes to walk, talk and make friends in the neighborhood to sell display advertising.Commission to start - work around your hours, no pressure.Call 718 624-5568 and speak to Kimberly or George.

Hair Dresser with Following.Licensed hairdresser needed for huge opportunity in very modern and elegant Van Brunt Street Salon.Opposite PS 15.Call Nayda at 718 935-0596 for more details. Day or afternoon grill man new diner on Columbia Street seeks a grill man with diner experience.Please call 718 855-1400.Columbia Street Diner.

Movers

COOL HAND MOVERS Friendly local guys that can relocate your life, or just shlep your new couch from Ikea.We’ll show up on time, in a truck or van if necessary, and basically kick ass -- you might even have a good time! Call for a free estimate at (917) 584-0334 or email at coolhandmovers@gmail.com Customer reviews on YELP.COM

Space Available

Warehousing and office space available in Brooklyn, Sunset park area, anywhere from 1,000 to 7,000 sq.ft @ $8.00 per sq.foot.Please call Frank Monday through Friday 9:00am to 5:00pm at 718260-9440 or 718-797-4000.

No job too big or too small

Toilets, Boilers, Heating, Faucets, Hot Water Heaters, Pool Heaters.

B & D HEATING 507 Court Street 718 625-1396

The Red Hook Star-Revue publishes twice a month - classified advertising is one of the best and least expensive ways to get your message across.Special yearly contracts available for service businesses such as plumbers, electricians for as little as $500 annually.Email Sara@redhookstar.com or call (718) 624-5568

BUILDING CORP.

Serving Red Hook for over 25 years

Specializing in Construction and Historic Preservation • New construction • Renovations, additions and extensions • Masonry specialist • Concrete floors/radiant heated • Concrete/bluestone sidewalk repair • Flue linings, chimneys and fireplaces • Demolition and waste removal • Violation removals • Landmark Preservation contractor

Jim & Debbie Buscarello PHONE: (718) 852-5364 Fax: (347) 935-1263 www.jabusbuildingcorp.com jabusbuildingcorp@gmail.com HIC License #0883902 Trade Waste License #1135

Licensed Electrical Contractors Commercial • Residential • Industrial Free Estimates

Violations Removed All Types of Wiring Emergency Service EMERGENCY SERVICE 137 King Street Brooklyn, NY 11231 Fax: (718) 935-0887

Vito Liotine (718) 625-1995 (718) 625-0867 aliotine@aol.com

101 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231 advertising@redhookstar.com Red Hook Star-Revue

JABUS

www.RedHookStar.com

718 624-5568 www.RedHookStar.com Through December 1, 2012 Page 19

The

Red Hook StarªRevue

THROUGH DEC. 1, 2012

SOUTH BROOKLYN’S COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

FREE

SAVE THE DATE!

Sunday, December 16, 2012 Fundraiser for Red Hook Public Schools 2 pm until 10 pm

music and dancing

THE RED HOOK STAR-REVUE THEATER 101 Union Street

between Columbia and Van Brunt

101 Union Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231 advertising@redhookstar.com Page 20 Red Hook Star-Revue

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718 624-5568 www.RedHookStar.com Through December 1, 2012


Red Hook Star-Revue November 16