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GREENVILLEJOURNAL

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, May 17, 2013 • Vol.15, No.18

Bouncing

BACK

By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

INSIDE UBJ:

BUYING IN TO BRANDING

New home construction gains momentum When it comes to new singlefamily residential construction, Greenville is almost like a tale of two cities. There’s Hollingsworth Park, a roughly 300-acre portion of Verdae, the 1,100-acre planned development off Interstate 85 and Woodruff Road on land amassed by the late textile magnate John D. Hollingsworth. That section is devoted to primarily single-family detached homes. Land there – near the outer edges of the city limits – is plentiful and lots are build-ready. Then there’s the rest of the city, where large swaths of developable land is scarce, meaning developers and builders have to purchase old houses with large yards or cobble together enough adjoining parcels to build subdivisions with a handful of houses. Both have been equally important to Greenville’s housing market – a market that has fared better than many others across the country and has held a prominent slot on a lengthening list of the country’s improving housing markets since last June. Greenville homebuilders are responding to a shrinking inventory of existing houses for sale and the subsequent growing demand by building. Increasingly, that construction includes spec houses, a subset that had disappeared from the housing market during the depths of the recession. CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

GREG BECKNER | STAFF

Travis Davis, with Davis Framing, uses a level to check a wall in the home he is framing within the Hollingsworth Park at Verdae development.

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Cindy Landrum clandrum@communityjournals.com April A. Morris amorris@communityjournals.com Charles Sowell csowell@communityjournals.com

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Worth Repeating They Said It

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“It’s a very good time to build.” Tom Dillard, founder of Dillard-Jones Builders.

Miles that driver Johan Schwartz spent drifting around curves at the BMW Performance Center – a new world record

Quote of the week

Rick Sumerel, president and chief operating officer of Verdae Development Inc., on the health of the housing market in Greenville.

“I’m glad to hear the president say this is wrong. And again, saying it’s wrong doesn’t mean anything if somebody is not held accountable.”

Greg Beckner / Staff

Greg Beckner / Staff

“If interest rates stay steady, I think Greenville, not just us in Verdae, will be in pretty good shape. We’re pragmatically optimistic.”

2,513 Homes sold so far this year in Greenville

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U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, on revelations that the IRS targeted conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status for special scrutiny.

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Employment in the Upstate is improving, and manufacturing leads the way! Meet employers, apply on the spot and learn how to qualify for thousands of high-paying jobs with

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4 THE Journal | MAY 17, 2013

JOURNAL NEWS

Health Events

Johan Schwartz broke the world record for drifting around curves on a wet BMW Performance Center speedway.

BMW instructor shatters world record

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Professional driver Johan Schwartz didn’t just break the world record for drifting around curves, he shattered it last weekend at the BMW Performance Center track near Greer. Race car drivers drift through curves on the big oval speedways with the front end of the car pointed toward the inside of the curve and the rear end canted toward the outer side. Essentially, Schwartz put his specially set-up BMW into a controlled slide around a short oval track, called the pad, as sprinklers Schwartz soaked the pavement. He did it for 322.5 laps, or 51.278 miles. The previous world record was 6.95 miles. Hundreds turned out to watch the event, which was judged by a panel who kept official statistics on Schwartz’s attempt. The numbers will be certified and sent to the Guinness Book of World Records. A native of Denmark, Schwartz began his racing career as a child on the family farm there. In 2001, he made it his full-time career when he started Endurance Karting, an arrive-and-drive karting program, which holds events up and down the East Coast. He has raced SCCA and Grand Am, and this year will be campaigning a MINI in World Challenge support series for Indy Car. Schwartz has been a driving instructor at the BMW Performance Center since 2011. CHARLES SOWELL | STAFF

csowell@communityjournals.com

Meet the Midwives Tues., May 21 • 6-8 p.m. • Greenville Midwifery Care Find out about GHS’ nurse-midwifery program and how a midwife can enhance the birthing process. Free; registration required. National Cancer Survivors Day Sun., June 2 • 3-4:30 p.m. • TD Convention Center Cancer survivors and their families are invited to celebrate survivorship. Free; registration required. Facts on Skin Cancer Tues., June 18 • Noon-1 p.m. • Verdae Y Get the facts on skin cancer from GHS dermatologists Harriet Van Hale, MD, and Angela Hutcheson, MD. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Detect and Prevent Lung Cancer Tues., June 18 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. • GHS Life Center Join GHS thoracic surgeon William Bolton, MD, to learn symptoms and treatment of lung cancer. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. Is Arthritis Pain a Handful? Wed., June 26 • Noon-1 p.m. • GHS Life Center Hand specialists will discuss the causes of hand pain and treatment options. Lunch provided. Free; registration required. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, please visit ghs.org/healthevents or call 1-877-GHS-INFO (447-4636).

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MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 5

JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Lights, camera, action With the governor’s reluctant signature last week, South Carolina is back in the chase for those coveted “filmed on location in South Carolina” credit lines in TV shows and big budget movies like “Forrest Gump” and “The Big Chill.” The new incentives bill Gov. Nikki Haley signed into law increases the cash rebates the state will pay film companies that spend at least $1 million in South Carolina. Previously, the state has rebated production companies 15 percent of the total spent on wages and supplies purchased in state. The change increases the rebate for supplies to 30 percent and for wages to 20 percent for non-state workers and 25 percent for any South Carolinians hired. Supporters hope the juicier subsidies will renew the state’s competitive edge against Georgia and North Carolina, where richer incentives have lured a huge comparative investment from the entertainment industry. Private film investment in North Carolina totaled $376 million in 2012 and Georgia’s topped $1.3 billion – compared to $25 million in the Palmetto State, reports the Motion Picture Association of America. The economic value of film incentives is far from settled, however. Several recent studies in other states question the wisdom of paying millions to film producers for short-lived projects that give the best positions to nonresidents and create few if any permanent state jobs. Dueling South Carolina studies have taken opposite views: a 2008 College of Charleston analysis said the state loses 81 cents on every dollar rebated, while a University of South Carolina study that same year found every dollar spent on wage rebates generated $1.30 in return, while every dollar in supply rebates produced $3.68. The discrepancy is about perspective. The College of Charleston study focused solely on taxes, concluding the state loses money because film producers did not replace, dollar for dollar, the tax subsides they received. The USC study calculated the effect of spin-off spending in the local economy for a positive return of almost 4 to 1. A third, more recent study by global consulting firm AECOM split the difference: The state treasury loses 69 cents for every taxpayer dollar given the film industry, but the spin-off economic impact is major. The nine film and TV productions that qualified for rebates from 2007 through 2011, plus a smaller number of non-incentivized projects, generated $86.9 million in sales to S.C. businesses and paid $48.5 million in wages to S.C. residents, AECOM found. This really is about perspective. The film industry can’t be judged like a BMW or Boeing. Production companies don’t build factories; they make TV shows and movies. The tourism industry is a better comparison – except, as House Speaker Bobby Harrell noted in a guest column in The (Columbia) State, these tourists arrive “with a $60 million budget they want to spend in two months.” That’s hotel rooms and rental housing, restaurant meals and equipment rentals. And with competitive rebates now guaranteed by law, months could stretch into years with the hoped-for arrival of more TV series like Lifetime’s “Army Wives,” now on its seventh season filming in Charleston. As permanent incentives attract more productions to South Carolina, local crews will accumulate more experience, snagging more higher-paying industry jobs. This is a creative and lucrative win for South Carolina.

Come get your Scots on – the games are back Scots HATE to be taken for granted, so lest they get peckish, we at the Greenville Scottish Games thought it high time we saluted them for all their many contributions to our culture. And it’s much more than even we realized! Bluegrass music, for example, is straight out of the Scottish Highlands, and the wider genre of country music owes a great deal of its foundation to the Scots. This year – in addition to our Celtic rock bands – we have a premiere bluegrass band, Seven Handle Circus, who will not only stomp your ears flat, but will talk about the origins of their music as it was played centuries ago. There is so much more we owe to the Scots – Scottish drovers, long before there was an America, herded Heilan Kye to markets in England, and much of our cowboy history was shaped by their descendants as they flooded the American West. Halloween, golf, flushing toilets (my personal favorite), fierce clan/family loyalty, and on and on. We will have lots of interactive heritage-themed activities going on. Check out our Heritage Tent for fun stuff that came out of those mist-covered mountains, including an old (not working, at least on Games Day) still. We are continuing our tradition of the Joint Military Salute, in which we honor our Armed Forces and our Scottish Allies. Our Opening Ceremonies have become famous in their own right, and veterans and their families come from all over the region to be part of this outstanding occasion. South Carolina’s Adjutant General, Maj. Gen. Robert Livingston, will be with us along with Upstate S.C. National Guard units; they will join forces, literally, with a contingent of eight Royal Highland Fusiliers (our Honor Guard), each of whom has served alongside our warriors in Afghanistan. There will be so much fun for the children packed into Wee Scotland, we’re calling it “Whee! Scotland.” A flock of Scottish Woods Faeries from all over the country is flying in, no airplanes re-

IN MY OWN WORDS by DEE BENEDICT

quired, and will be on hand for a Faerie Tea Party and reading fairy tales. Our own brave Scottish Princess, with her Queen Mother and little brothers, will be fending off suitors at the Princess Archery Range, and your children may want to help her out. We have our wonderful all-day Border Collie sheep and duck herding, and after safely securing the smaller animals, we will have the Raptors swooping down for two riveting demonstrations of the Art of Kings. We hope they don’t tangle with the Faeries. And 400-plus pipers, clans from all over, the Heavy Athletes throwing boulders and telephone poles around, demonstrators, axe-throwing and longbow shooting, re-enactors, parachutes dropping in from the sky and Scottish stuff all over the place. There’s even a moonshine tasting for those of you (over 21) so inclined in the Entertainment Tent. To get you in the mood, we are providing entertainment for The Piedmont Natural Gas Downtown Alive event Thursday, May 23, and our world-class Great Scot! Parade will take over Main Street at 6 Friday evening May 24. Our Great Scot! Ceilidh is on the TD Stage at the Peace Center amphitheater immediately following the Parade, so if YOU follow the Parade, you won’t miss a thing. Albannach is back! Our many Scots at the Games should be in a good mood, so please make your plans to join them on Games Day. You can thank them in person; they’ll love it and you. Advance tickets are available on our website at Gallabrae.com. All active-duty military personnel admitted free upon showing their ID. Gates open for the Games at 8 a.m. Saturday, May 25. Dee Benedict is president of the Greenville Scottish Games.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT EXECUTIVE EDITOR SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM.

6 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

JOURNAL NEWS

OPINION VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

Working to breathe easy An asthma attack is a scary experience, with coughing, wheezing and chest tightness. If you have never experienced this, imagine what it must feel like, especially for a child. Now, imagine what parents feel when their child has trouble breathing or is unable to run and play freely. Asthma cases in the United States have more than tripled since 1980, affecting an estimated 7 million children. Asthma/bronchitis is the most common chronic disease of childhood and the leading cause of hospitalization in Greenville County for children under the age of 18. An untreated asthma attack can be deadly. The Center for Pediatric Medicine, an outpatient extension of the Greenville Health System’s Children’s Hospital, expanded its asthma program and formed the Asthma Action Team in 2008 to address increasing asthma prevalence, emergency department visits and growing asthma disparities in the Upstate. Our work has proven to be a success as we have reduced emergency department visits, even though the number of children diagnosed with asthma at our office has increased. The families of children participating in our program utilize urgent health care less often and miss fewer days of school and work because of asthma. Now, the Environmental Protection Agency has recognized us with its 2013 National Environmental Leadership Award in Asthma Management. Although there is currently no cure for asthma, this chronic disease can be controlled. In fact, people following a plan prescribed by a doctor might rarely have a flare. Families and children who learn to control asthma can have a better quality of life, but this takes time and education. Caregivers must learn the importance of different inhalers and medications, how to use them properly and how to recognize and respond to an asthma attack. They also benefit from learning how obesity, allergies, reflux and overall fitness may contribute to asthma control. Parents have embraced the program and have invested many hours in getting this education. Our multidisciplinary team includes

IN MY OWN WORDS by LOCHRANE GRANT, M.D.

nurses, respiratory therapists, pediatricians, certified asthma educators, physicians in training, social workers and interpreters. This has made it possible to educate and assist families at multiple points of care with a consistent message, while developing personalized Asthma Action Plans for each child. We also have an electronic tracking system that allows staff to follow emergency department visits and hospitalizations in real time. The Center for Pediatric Medicine has extended evening and weekend hours, same-day service to children experiencing asthma exacerbations, and an afterhours telephone triage line that all play a key role in reducing emergency department visits. We are proud of our work, but it has been helped greatly by many in our community. First, the parents of the children in the program have invested many hours in receiving education. There are also parents trained through Project Breathe Easy of Family Connection, who visit families in their homes, schools and daycares to identify and mitigate allergens that could trigger an asthma attack. The Greenville Pediatric Asthma Community Collaborative works with children at higher risk and intervenes with school and home visits for more intensive management. Other partners include South Carolina Asthma Alliance and Greenville County Schools. The city of Greenville’s smoking ordinance was also a wise decision in improving the quality of life for people with asthma. Together, we are improving the quality of life for children diagnosed with asthma. Lochrane Grant, M.D., is a pediatrician, Certified Asthma Educator and the medical director of the Asthma Action Team at the Greenville Health System’s Children’s Hospital’s Center for Pediatric Medicine.

What’s Right in Health Care Gene-based Technology is Transforming Cancer Care GHS is collaborating with Selah Genomics on a new gene-based diagnostic test called PrecisionPath. This test will be used to obtain genetic information about a patient’s tumor, allowing doctors to connect the patient with a more precise and potentially more effective treatment for their specific cancer than ever before. Healthy Workplace Award Greenville Health System was the only company to receive a Gold Level Healthy Workplace Award at LiveWell Greenville’s inaugural Healthy Workplace Expo and Awards Luncheon. GHS and nine other organizations were recognized at the event as leaders in supporting employee health and cultivating healthy work environments. Nurse Named Leader of the Year The South Carolina Organization of Nurse Leaders named GHS’ Carol Moody the 2013 South Carolina Nurse Leader of the Year. This award is presented to a nurse who demonstrates leadership in improving nursing professionalism and the nursing work environment. YMCA Partners with Nutrition Solutions GHS’ Nutrition Solutions now manages the café at the GHS Family Y in Simpsonville and will soon provide takeout meals, nutrition education, screenings and classes for both members and non-members. Keeping Kids Safe Kohl’s Cares awarded GHS’ Safe Kids™ Upstate with $111,368 to support its On the Way program, which provides free car seat inspections across Greenville, Pickens and Oconee counties.

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MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 7

JOURNAL NEWS

A time to build From Verdae to Southernside, construction of new homes is looking up in Greenville CONTINUED FROM COVER During the first quarter of this year, 1,011 building permits were issued in the Upstate, a 21 percent increase over the 830 issued during the same period last year, according to a report by The Market Edge. “I really believe we’re in a five-year cycle at least,” said Tom Dillard, founder of Dillard-Jones Builders. In Greenville, 59 building permits for single-family homes have been issued so far this year. Much of the demand has been prompted by low interest rates and a shrinking inventory of existing homes for sale. Home sales in Greenville were up sharply in April, according to data released by the Greater Greenville Association of Realtors this week. Multiple Listing Service sales totaled 787 last month, a 35 percent increase over the 582 sales made in April 2012. So far this year, 2,513 homes have been sold in Greenville. That’s up from 2,057 during the first four months of 2012. Increased sales have resulted in a drop in available inventory. There were 5,488 units listed for sale in Greenville as of last Friday. That’s a 5.6 percent drop from May 2012.

IMPROVING CONDITIONS

Greenville has appeared on the National Association of Home Builders/ First American Improving Market Index since last June.

The index is designed to track housing markets throughout the country that are showing signs of improving economic health. The index measures analyze employment growth from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, house price appreciation from Freddie Mac and single-family housing permit growth from the U.S. Census Bureau. The first index was published in September 2011 and included one dozen markets. Greenville was among 80 markets on the list last June. The latest index, released less than two weeks ago, included 258 markets. A metro area must see improvement in all three measures for at least six consecutive months following those measures’ respective troughs – or low points – before being included on the improving markets list. Greenville’s inclusion on the list is no surprise to homebuilders. “There are so many people who want to live in Greenville,” Dillard said.

SPREAD ALL OVER TOWN

Between 2010 and 2012, Greenville had issued 234 single-family residential construction permits. Construction was spread throughout the city. District 4, which includes Verdae as well as a portion of Augusta Street and East Faris Road, had 76 permits totaling nearly $24.3 million. The bulk of the construction occurred at Verdae.

2010-2012 SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PERMIT MAP – Single Family Residential Permits

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Tony D’Anna, with Davis Framing, uses a nail gun to tack a temporary support beam into place while framing a home within the Hollingsworth Park at Verdae development.

But the district with the most permits – 95 – was District 2, an area that includes West Faris Road, a portion of Augusta Street, part of Academy Street, Pendleton Street, West Stone Avenue, Pete Hollis Boulevard, West Washington Street and Dunbar Street. District 2 includes some of the city’s special emphasis neighborhoods where construction of affordable housing is a push. District 3, an area that contains East Washington Street, Interstate 385, McDaniel Avenue, South Main Street and Church Street, had 49 permits totaling $7.7 million. The area of the city with the fewest permits was District 1, which includes North Main Street, part of Wade Hampton Boulevard, Chick Springs Road, Rutherford Road, East North Street and part of Haywood Road. Fourteen permits were issued in 2010, 2011 and 2012 in District 1. The houses were valued at $3 million.

VERDAE TURNAROUND

2010 was a major turnaround for Verdae, said Rick Sumerel, president and chief operating officer of Verdae Development Inc. That’s when Verdae reacquired Ruskin Square and repositioned the development to address de-

8 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

mands in the middle part of the housing market from the $200,000s and up. Before Verdae re-acquired Ruskin Square, 11 lots had been sold and 11 homes built. “That strategy was absolutely correct,” Sumerel said. Demand for lots has increased as the number of foreclosure properties in Greenville continues to shrink and the attractiveness of city living grows. Last fall, four builders bought lots and built spec homes in the development, Sumerel said. “That means either the economy is going great, Verdae is going great, or both.” Today, more than 80 lots have been sold, houses built or have plans under review, he said, adding the first section of Ruskin Square is running out of available lots. A land development plan for a new subdivision was approved by the city planning commission last week. In Verdae, about 45 percent of the residents are people who already lived in the Greenville area and 55 percent are new to the area, Sumerel said. Potentially, there are another 350 to 400 lots available for single-family residential in the rest of the development, he said. “At the end of the day, there is a segment

JOURNAL NEWS

SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION PERMITS

SOURCE: CITY OF GREENVILLE

of the population who has to move,” he said. “If interest rates stay steady, I think Greenville, not just us in Verdae, will be in pretty good shape. We’re pragmatically optimistic.”

INFILL EVERYWHERE ELSE

Zeno Hawkins of Highland Homes said he’s scouting properties to buy for developments that would start in 2015. “It feels good to have the amount of traction we do,” he said. “It gives me confidence to move on projects that are a year or two down the road.” Hawkins looks to buy old houses on large lots that can be subdivided into small developments with four, five, eight or 10 smaller lots. “The Augusta Road and North Main areas are not like Verdae. They’re not new developments,” he said. “We have to create our own opportunities.” Hawkins acts as developer and builder, a combination that allows him to control costs and make the numbers work. “Not everybody wants to do what we do.” The demand is there, though. Buist at North Main is a 10-lot development that is sold out. The five-lot Mountainview development next door, with homes valued at $400,000 to $700,000, is also sold out. A four-lot development in the Augusta Road area, with homes valued at $600,000 to $800,000, is also sold out.

Rick Sumerel of Verdae Development talks about the progress of Hollingsworth Park at Verdae and other ongoing development by Verdae Development.

*as of May 14.

Hawkins said he and developer Tom Croft just released a pocket neighborhood called McBee Park – with smaller homes on smaller lots – at McDaniel and McBee avenues about a month ago. Six of the eight lots have already sold. “People are wanting to get back into town,” he said. Hawkins said he sees development moving to neighborhoods that had declined in recent decades but are now experiencing resurgence, such as the Hampton-Pinckney and Southernside areas. “I think people are looking for the convenience of being closer to downtown and are willing to be pioneers in neighborhoods they wouldn’t have considered before,” he said.

REMAINING OBSTACLES

Builders in Greenville and elsewhere have growing concerns about the supply of developed lots and labor as well as the rising cost of building materials. “I think the labor force is having a hard time adjusting. There’s a demand for skilled workers,” Dillard said. “You’ve really got to be careful about scheduling subcontractors because they are all working now.” National Association of Home Builders Chief Economist David Crowe said it takes time for building materials supply chains and the skilled work force to re-establish themselves after a recession. “Builders are feeling squeezed by higher costs and limited availability issues,” Crowe said. “That said, builders’ outlook for the next six months has improved due to the low inventory of for-sale homes, rock-bottom mortgage rates and rising consumer confidence.” Dillard said as long as interest rates and inflation are low, he’s very optimistic about Greenville’s housing market. “It’s a very good time to build.” CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Physician News GHS welcomes these new doctors & sites! Family Medicine Sean Bryan, MD Center for Family Medicine Greenville, 455-7800 Annie Gersh, DO Keystone Family Medicine Simpsonville, 454-5000 Pediatrics Robert Saul, MD Center for Pediatric Medicine Greenville, 220-7270 Alison Smith, MD Pediatric Ophthalmology 200A Patewood Dr. (New Site) Greenville, 454-5540 Angela Young, MD Pediatric Rapid Access 57 Cross Park Ct. Greenville, 220-7270 Podiatry & Limb Salvage Ryan Fitzgerald, DPM Vascular Health Alliance Greenville, 454-FOOT (3668)

NEW OFFICE SITES GHS Premier Surgical Services This Greenwood practice at 105 Vinecrest Ct. houses these offices: • Bariatric Surgery, 227-8932 • Breast Health, 227-8932 • Endovascular/Vascular Surgery, 227-8932 GHS Surgical Specialists– Anderson This practice at 105 Broadbent Way in Anderson houses these offices: • Bariatric Surgery, 226-2290 • Colon & Rectal Surgery, 226-2290 Hand Surgery Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas 6 Doctors Dr. Greenville, 797-7300 Midwifery Greenville Midwifery Care 35 Medical Ridge Dr. Greenville, 455-1600 Pediatric Gastroenterology Pediatric Sleep Medicine 1650 Skylyn Dr., Ste. 240 Spartanburg, 573-8732

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MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 9

journal news

Reading program takes aim at summer learning loss Goal is to get books in students’ hands, stabilize reading levels over summer Public Education Partnership’s pilot summer reading program goal isn’t necessarily to increase students’ reading ability over the three-month-long break from school, says the organization’s executive director, Grier Mullins. The goal is to have students come back to school in August with at least the same reading skills they left with in June. “The goal is to stabilize reading levels,” she said. “Summer reading loss is responsible for 80 percent of the rich-poor reading achievement gap.” Decades of research have confirmed summer learning loss is real. A RAND Corporation report released in 2011 showed that the average summer learning

loss in math and reading for American students is equivalent to one month per year. But the report also showed that summer learning loss disproportionately affects low-income students. These students – who often don’t have books of their own at home or the transportation to get to a public library – lose an average of two months of reading skills compared to their peers from higherincome families with plenty of reading material at home and access to enrichment camps and educational vacations. These children typically make slight gains over the summer. A study of students in Baltimore by researchers at Johns Hopkins University showed that two-thirds of the achievement gap between lower- and higher-income high school freshmen could be traced to summer learning loss during the elementary school years. Students who don’t read proficiently by third grade are four times less likely to graduate from high school. If those struggling readers are poor, they are 13 times likelier to be high school dropouts. This year, Public Education Partners is providing 15 free books to each child in nine elementary schools to take home, said Susan Shi, PEP’s program director. PEP will offer a Make Summer Count reading program in five of those schools: Alexander, Armstrong, Berea, Grove and Monaview. The summer program is

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an effort of five partners: PEP, the school district, the United Way, the Greenville County Library System and the Hispanic Alliance. One component of the summer reading program will be to give parents information on how to help their child select books that are best for the child, provide summer reading lists and information on how to get library cards. In addition, the schools will open their libraries during the summer and some will use their robocall systems to remind families to read. Students in the summer reading program will be encouraged to attend a summer learning day at the Upstate Children’s Museum in June and a special family reading night will be held in July. The summer program is not meant to compete with other summer reading programs run by other organizations such as the Greenville Drive, Shi said. “The five-school summer reading program effort is a small piece of a major reading program in Greenville County,” she said. The early-grades reading initiative in Greenville County includes using a balanced literacy approach that includes reading aloud, independent reading, guided reading, phonemic awareness and phonics instruction. CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

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Schools may require tax hike Greenville County taxpayers could see a tax increase of 3 mills under a budget that has received preliminary approval from the Greenville County School Board. The budget could change before a public hearing and second reading scheduled for May 30. The school district blames underfunded state mandates and growth in the student population for the increase. If the 3-mill increase becomes final, the owner of a $20,000 car would pay $3.60 more in property taxes. The general operating budget millage increase would have no effect on homeowners’ property taxes. The owners of rental houses and commercial property would see a tax hike. In addition, the school board is considering a 5-mill tax increase for debt service, a tax hike that would affect all county property owners. The debt service budget will be considered separately from the operating budget. District officials have said the debt service millage increase is necessary to pay for technology upgrades, building mainte-

nance, enhanced school security, career center renovations and athletic facility improvements. Superintendent Burke Royster recommended the 3-mill tax increase, which would generate $3.15 million. Royster also recommended using $10.7 million of the district’s fund balance to balance the budget. The budget includes a 2 percent pay raise for employees and increases in the employer-paid portion of retirement and health insurance. It also includes $3.85 million for additional teachers and school support staff positions needed to handle the extra 1,290 students expected to attend Greenville County Schools next year. In addition, the budget includes $291,000 for personnel needed to prepare for the August 2014 opening of Dr. Phinnize J. Fisher Middle School. Two new technical support positions are included. The budget calls for $750,000 in school security enhancements.

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Graham accuses White House of Benghazi cover-up

Greg Beckner / Staff

U.S. Sen. Lindsay Graham told reporters on Monday that the Obama administration covered up the Sept. 11, 2012, Benghazi attack to help the president’s chances in the election battle with Republican nominee Mitt Romney. If the American people had known the truth, “I think it would have made a difference in the election,” Graham said during a press event in his Greenville office. “Mr. President, quit spinning the American people, and quit stonewalling the Congress.” Graham said someone needs to be held accountable for “letting our consulate become a death trap before the attack,” failing to send requested aid and “manipulating the American people regarding what actually happened seven weeks before the election.” The senator said Al Qaeda “is on the march” and more attacks are coming. “This idea that bin Laden is dead and the war is over is, I think, a false narrative and a very dangerous narrative.” Someone should have been fired over Benghazi, Graham said. At about the same time Graham was

Sen. Lindsey Graham talks with reporters during a news conference in his Greenville office.  

making his accusations in Greenville, President Obama held a press conference in Washington where he scoffed at the GOP’s Benghazi claims. Speaking for the first time since the GOP-led hearings where Graham played a leading role, Obama called the Senate hearings “a sideshow” and said any accusation of a cover-up defies logic. “Suddenly, three days ago, this gets

spun up as if there’s something new to the story. There’s no ‘there’ there,” the president said during a news conference with British Prime Minister David Cameron. Graham also had harsh words in Greenville regarding revelations that the IRS targeted conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status for special scrutiny. IRS personnel “tried to intimidate those who were trying to give the alternative view to the Obama narrative, and this has to stop. This is dangerous,” the senator said. Obama said he learned of the IRS allegations from news media reports. He called the IRS actions “outrageous,” and on Wednesday announced the resignation of acting IRS Commissioner Steven Miller. “To Obama’s credit, he came out strong against this as soon as he heard of it,” Graham said. “I’m glad to hear the president say this is wrong. And again, saying it’s wrong doesn’t mean anything if somebody is not held accountable.” Meanwhile, The Washington Post reported Monday that IRS culpability reached well beyond the branch in Cincinnati that was initially blamed. Documents obtained by the Post show

personnel at the agency’s Washington headquarters sent queries to conservative groups asking about their donors  and other aspects of their operations. Officials in the El Monte and Laguna Niguel offices in California sent similar questionnaires to tea party-affiliated groups. IRS employees in Cincinnati also told conservatives seeking the status of “social welfare” groups that a task force in Washington was overseeing their applications, according to interviews with tea party activists. Graham also told reporters he expects immigration reform to pass in the Senate and is confident it stands a good chance of passage in the House. “If we, the Republicans, don’t find a way to settle this issue, we are in for a tough time as a party,” he said, citing a 20-point drop in support in the last presidential election. He also expects to see gun control to come up again in the Senate and pledged his continued support for Second Amendment rights.

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A slaphappy summer Welcome summer. Wet spring means a mosquito boom this summer. Upstate residents can look forward to more mosquitos this summer – a lot more, due to the unusually wet late-winter and spring weather, said Eric Benson, an entomology professor at Clemson who also works with the university’s extension service. Mosquitos can breed in the top of a softdrink bottle, Benson said. “I’ve found larva in a fold of a canvas cover in my backyard.”

Facts About DEET The protection time from mosquito bites for products containing DEET (N, N-diethyl-mtoluamide) depends on the concentration of DEET:

23.8% DEET = 5 hours 20% DEET = 4 hours 6.65% DEET = almost 2 hours 4.75% DEET = roughly 1.5 hours • Do not apply DEET to children under 2 months of age. • The maximum concentration of DEET currently recommended for ages 2 months and older is 30%. Concentrations higher than 30% do not provide significantly increased or longer repellent effect. Higher concentrations increase the degree to which DEET can become poisonous, which occurs when DEET is applied excessively, too frequently, or misused in a way that is not consistent with the label directions. • Though millions of people have used repellents without a negative reaction, people with known or suspected metabolic disorders should check with their physicians before using a repellent containing DEET. • DEET is the most effective insect repellent currently available. It has been used safely for more than 40 years by millions of people worldwide. • You can spray clothing with repellents containing Permethrin or DEET to help keep mosquitoes from biting through thin clothing SC Dept. of Health and Environmental ControL

More mosquitos can mean a spike in mosquito-borne disease, said Lindsey Evans, a spokeswoman with the state Department of Health and Environmental Control. “Increased periods of rain typically do mean increased numbers of mosquitoes.   From a scientific perspective, however, we cannot speculate as to whether we will have more problems with mosquitoborne illnesses this year,” she said. “One very important factor is an individual’s willingness to take preventive measures” like removing containers that collect water and filling in low places where water pools. A minute amount of water can produce a tremendous number of new mosquitos, he said. Mosquitoes find us through the carbon dioxide we breathe out, lactic acid and other components in our sweat, scents such as perfume, hair spray and deodorant, and dark-colored clothing. Some kinds of mosquitoes bite at any time of the day, especially in the shade, while others bite at dawn, dusk, twilight or night. All mosquitoes hatch from eggs and the immature stages develop in water, but adult mosquitoes fly free on land. DHEC’s public health department said the only mosquito-borne illness that is native to South Carolina is West Nile Virus. In 2012, 41 human cases of West Nile Virus in South Carolinians were reported to DHEC; one case was reported in 2010 and one case in 2011. In 2012 four persons died from complications due to West Nile. DHEC has an extensive program in place to keep track of mosquito-borne illnesses. An increased trapping/surveillance system will be put into place in any area where a case of an illness caused by a mosquito or other disease-carrying insect is found, Evans said. Links to sources of information on DHEC’s Website can be found below. The first link (bit.ly/scdhec1) gives advice on eliminating potential breeding area for mosquitos and the second (bit.ly/scdhec2) describes self-protection. CHARLES SOWELL | STAFF

csowell@communityjournals.com

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Parents sue GHS, MUSC, state over sex operation Parents of an 8-year-old boy filed lawsuits against Greenville Health System, the State Department of Social Services and the Medical University of South Carolina over what they say was a painful and unnecessary sexual assignment surgery performed on their child at 16 months old. Pamela and John Mark Crawford, who adopted the boy just after the procedure, cite notes from the medical file saying “there was no compelling reason that she should be made either male or female” at that time, yet they encouraged DSS to authorize it. The boy, named in the suit as “M.C.,” was born with both male and female internal sex organs and “ambiguous genitalia.” The lawsuits challenge the decision by government officials and doctors “to perform an irreversible, painful, and medically unnecessary sex assignment surgery” that gave M.C. female sexual characteristics. They say today, however, the child identifies as a male. The suit filed with the Richmond County Court of Common Pleas alleges medical malpractice on the part of

16 THE Journal | MAY 17, 2013

MUSC and GHS, and gross negligence against DSS for allowing the surgery without investigation while the child was in its custody. The family asks for compensation for damages for the child “through his life expectancy.” The lawsuit filed with the U.S. District Court of South Carolina accuses the parties of violating the child’s 14th Amendment right to due process. “We cannot comment on cases in litigation,” said Sandy Dees, a spokeswoman for the health system. A spokesperson from MUSC said, “MUSC’s general counsel and leadership will review the lawsuit through standard operating procedures for legal matters. MUSC will not be able to offer further comment on this pending litigation.” The federal case names MUSC doctors Ian Aaronson, James Amrhein and Yaw Appiagyei-Dankah; and Kim Aydlette, then director of DSS. Other DSS employees named are Meredith Williams, Candice Davis and Mary Searcy. Three others are unidentified. They are alleged to have “decided to remove M.C.’s healthy genital tissue and radically restructure his repro-

ductive organs in order to make his body appear to be female.” The Crawfords claim that the doctors knew there was a risk that the gender they chose could be later rejected by M.C. Four years before M.C. was born, Dr. Ian Aaronson formed the North American Task Force on Intersex in 2000 “in response to the growing debate over standards of practice for medical treatment of intersex children,” according to a statement from the Intersex Society of North America announcing the new group. Intersex is a general term for conditions where sexual anatomy is not clearly male or female. “We are committed to learn from past mistakes in order to offer the best advice and treatment to our patients in the future,” Aaronson said in the statement. Establishing guidelines for the management of children born with ambiguous sex anatomy was among the issues the task force planned to address. The plaintiffs say the defendants “interfered with M.C’s future ability to form intimate, procreative relationships” and risked rendering him sterile with limited

or absent sexual response. Samuel Smythiman, clinical psychologist and former adjunct professor at USC Upstate, has treated people with difficulties related to gender. Gender dysphoria – when people feel their bodies do not reflect their gender identities – can affect a person’s ability to form relationships, among other issues, he said. He said the general thinking today is that people should be able to choose their sexual identities. “Basically we as human beings do better when there is that alignment. When there is not that alignment between anatomy or DNA and what a person believes about themselves, it can lead to problems,” Smythiman said. “The question is, what direction do we go in?” The issue is extremely complex, he said, and therapists help individuals explore what makes the most sense to them. According to the Intersex Society of North America, rates of intersexuality range from 1 in 66 to 1 in 130,000 births, depending on the exact symptoms. JENNIFER OLADIPO | STAFF

joladipo@communityjournals.com

SC tea party chapters targeted by IRS

We are...

At least two tea party chapters in Greenville Tea Party spokesman Don South Carolina report they have come Rhodes said his organization heard under undue scrutiny from the Internal about the harassment given Belsom and Revenue Service, while other chapters other tea party chapters across the state decided not to pursue nonprofit status and decided applying for nonprofit stabecause they heard of the delays and ha- tus it wasn’t worth the hassle. rassment from IRS officials. “We decided we’d just keep on as we Joe Dugan, chairman of the Myrtle have, paying for things out of our own Beach Tea Party and an official with the back pockets,” he said. state Tea Party Coalition, said the Myrtle Karen Martin of the Spartanburg Tea ParBeach Tea Party ty said her organizacame under scrutiny “On behalf of many South tion has not sought from IRS officials, Carolina Republicans, I nonprofit status. starting in 2011 call on President Obama The Washington through the 2012 to immediately appoint an Post reported this presidential election. week that the Jusindependent counsel and “This had a tretice Department special prosecutor to mendous effect on has opened a crimius,” he told the Jour- investigate the political nal investigation to nal. “It affected our abuses at the Obama IRS.” determine if Interget-out-the-vote SC State Republican Party Chairman nal Revenue Service drives and educa- Chad Connelly employees broke tion programs. It the law when they affected donations. targeted conservaThe IRS was demanding lists of our tive groups seeking tax-exempt status. members, our donors. Not the kind of “The Obama administration using thing you want to give to the IRS, par- the IRS to target political opponents ticularly on the donor side of things.” and silence dissent is beyond reprehenThis affected voter turnout, which af- sible. It is dangerous for our constitufected the presidential race itself, he said. tional republic and must not be toler“The presidential election could well ated,” state Republican Party Chairman have turned on this,” he said. Chad Connelly said earlier this week. Dianne Belsom, chair of the Laurens “On behalf of many South Carolina County Tea Party, said her organization Republicans, I call on President Obama filed for nonprofit status in June of 2010 to immediately appoint an independent and the case is still pending with the IRS. counsel and special prosecutor to investi“The thing just dragged on and on,” gate the political abuses at the Obama IRS.” she said. “The IRS wanted lists of our Also earlier this week, President members, asked for information on our Barack Obama said the allegations closed Facebook page, our donors, just against the IRS are outrageous, if true. CHARLES SOWELL | STAFF all kinds of stuff. So far we have not gotcsowell@communityjournals.com ten the 501-c status.”

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2nd

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A Distinctive Academic Community Worth Discovering for Nearly 175 Years. Erskine feels like a second home to generations of graduates who’ve experienced it. As South Carolina’s first private Christian college, Erskine equips students to flourish through academic excellence and a family-like learning environment. It’s a rare college experience. But since it’s in the Upstate, going away to college doesn’t have to mean going far. So while Erskine may be a little harder to find, you’ll always know where you belong.

KNOW. BE KNOWN. visit.erskine.edu Due West, South Carolina From Forbes, August © 2012 Forbes. All rights reserved. Used by permission and protected by the Copyright Laws of the United States. The printing, copying, redistribution, or retransmission of this Content without express written permission is prohibited.

18 THE Journal | MAY 17, 2013

Journal community

FIGHTING

ADDICTION

T

FAVOR seeks to give voice to those in recovery

he members of FAVOR intend to put a face on addiction recovery – and a voice, too. If they get their way, long gone will be the days of silent suffering, and the faces of those who are used to sneaking in the basement doors of churches for 12-Step meetings will become well known. FAVOR, or Faces and Voices of Recovery, is Greenville’s newest addiction recovery program. Two weeks ago, FAVOR packed the Gunther Theatre at the Peace Center for a preview of the film “The Anonymous People.” Recovering addicts lined the aisles, cheering the film’s message of activism within the recovery community and without. The world of recovery has changed and is coming out of the closet, they say. “We conduct ourselves in accordance with the 12 Traditions in regard to anonymity,” said Jane Pressly, interim executive director of FAVOR Greenville. “We can and do say we are in long-term recovery; we don’t reveal anyone else. That’s up to them.” And there are a lot of “them” in this country; 23.5 million people in active recovery, by one estimate, Pressly said. “I went to a math major and we worked out what that number would be for Greenville – it’s 29,000 people.” Put another way, 29,000 voters plus their families, who intend to put their weight behind issues that affect them. There are another 36,700 people in Greenville County who are currently in active addiction. FAVOR was founded in Greenville in 2004 after people in recovery loFAVOR continued on page 20

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• Stay at hotels that are eco-friendly (visit www.greenhotels.com for options) • Use a digital camera instead of a disposable camera • When renting a car, choose a hybrid or the smallest car • Walk or rent a bicycle while sightseeing • Use mobile phone applications to search for directions, restaurants and tourist attractions instead of purchasing guidebooks or maps • Reuse plastic bags or pack your own cloth or string bag to carry any purchases

MAY 17, 2013 | The Journal 19

Spanish Spring By: Richard deBondt There are many wine regions with excellent spring and summer time favorites, but no place comes by its warm weather wines more naturally than Spain. While winter is a real thing in most of Spain (Barcelona is at about the same latitude as Niagara Falls, New York), summer is long, hot, and dry. No surprise that there are many wonderful light wines to go with warmer weather and casual food. Cava is the “hottest” Spanish wine category these days. Cava is a regulated name for bottle fermented sparkling wines. There is an abundance of ordinary (inexpensive) Cava, but even ordinary is generally clean and refreshing. As with most of the world’s sparklers, “brut” is the indicator of Cava almost totally free of sugar, that is, truly dry. The most interesting Cava generally employs the traditional grapes; macabeu, parellada, and xarel-lo, as these grapes tend to retain acidity even in warm growing regions. Exquisite sparkling rosé can be made from trepat and garnacha (and sometimes pinot noir). In recent years much of Spain has modernized its white wine making. Fresh, crisp, moderate alcohol (and generally oak-free) whites are coming from virtually every part of Spain. The justifiably famous white wine regions of Spain are Rías Baixas, Rueda, and Basque Country. Each produces its own distinctive wines, dependent on the peculiarities of each growing region and distinctive traditional grapes (Albariño, Verdejo, and Hondaribbi). Regions best known for red wine also can contribute successful whites. Rioja has had particular success with a variety of whites both traditional and modern. There are still producers who offer long aged whites in a style that dominated 100 years ago. Then there is rosé, the great mealtime wine for warmer weather. All over Spain, red wine producers offer fine dry rosé. The best examples tend, as always, to be made from traditional regional grapes.

Northampton Wines www.northamptonwines.com 211-A East Broad Street • 271-3919 20 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

FAVOR continued from PAGE 19

cally heard of a new group that advocated activism on recovery issues. It was mainly located in the North and Midwest, as was the original 12-Step recovery program that started the whole concept of sobriety as a way of life. “We intend to be a gateway for people getting out of treatment,” Pressly said. “They now have a place to go to get information and help in learning to live clean and sober lives.” The organization recently completed a $1.5 million fund drive and purchased their “welcome to recovery” center at 355

Woodruff Road. Pressly is many years away from active addiction. Many of the active FAVOR members are recovering people. Others are the people who suffer and watch as their loved ones drift away or die due to addiction. Steve Grant is one of those people. Addiction cost him both his sons. He isn’t a FAVOR member, but his Chris and Kelly’s HOPE Foundation is dedicated to working with people not yet in recovery in the hope they can prevent some of the 100 deaths a day from drug overdoses in this country. The state has a need for young people measured in thousands and not nearly enough low-cost public beds available. “We don’t do nearly enough to help young people in South Carolina,” Grant said. FAVOR is currently pushing to start a high school recovery charter school, Pressly said. “It would be a safe place for young people to be sober; a place where peer pressure doesn’t push kids to drink and drug.” Surrounding states all have addiction-safe college dorms and high schools for young people in recovery. South Carolina has none. Stewart Spinks is a major contributor to FAVOR. His family’s issues with addiction stretch across decades and generations. Some chemical changes in the brain only exist in addictive people, Spinks said, and the addict doesn’t ask for those genetic predispositions. “I think it is important for people to understand that addiction isn’t a moral lapse, but a real disease with symptoms and physiological signs,” he said. People in recovery are equally trapped by society’s preconceived notions about drug and alcohol abuse, FAVOR members say. One of the most popular misconceptions is carnage on the highways due to teen drinking, they say. To be sure, drunk driving costs society billions of dollars each year. However, drunk driving isn’t the only alcoholrelated killer. Mothers Against Drunk Driving recently reviewed 2010 data from the FBI, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Pre-

PHOTO BY TESHA MCKINLEY PHOTOGRAPHY 2011

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

vention on deaths related to underage alcohol use. According to an April report in USA Today, MADD estimated 32 percent of these deaths were traffic fatalities; 30 percent were homicides, 14 percent suicides, 9 percent alcohol poisonings and 15 percent other causes. The common factor is that 100 percent of those young people are dead, and alcohol played a role. CHARLES SOWELL | STAFF

csowell@communityjournals.com

FAVOR

FA C E S A N D VOICES OF RECOVERY

GREENVILLE 23.5 MILLION PEOPLE in active recovery, in the US, by one estimate. That number for Greenville would be 29,000 PEOPLE

Another 36,700 PEOPLE in Greenville County who are currently in active addiction.

$1.5 MILLION raised by FAVOR from a fund drive to purchase their “welcome to recovery” center on Woodruff Road.

journal community

Mackey is… Greg Beckner / Staff

Dr. Matthew Miller of Greenville Dermatology is the first in the Carolinas to have a MelaFind device and has already used the technology on nearly a dozen patients.

Space-age machine can help detect melanoma First in Carolinas. Upstate dermatologist uses new technology. Skin cancer is one of the most common cancers, according to the American Cancer Society, and melanoma will account for more than 76,000 cases this year. A dermatologist visually assesses a mole that could be melanoma, but will often do a biopsy, taking a sample of the mole and sending it off for testing. MelaFind, a new technology approved in Feb. 2013 by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is a scanning device that uses light waves to analyze suspicious moles. Dr. Matthew Miller of Greenville Dermatology is the first in the Carolinas to have a MelaFind device and has already used the technology on nearly a dozen patients, he said, some from Columbia, S.C., and North Carolina. Connected to a screen to read the results, MelaFind uses a handheld device that resembles a hairdryer that is placed over the mole and scans it. The MelaFind can detect a mole’s shape and color down to about 2.5 millimeters below the skin’s surface. “It’s like an iceberg and you can’t see what’s underneath the water, but this machine uses multispectral analysis to analyze the mole beneath the skin,” Miller said. The device

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Dr. Matthew Miller of Greenville Dermatology

Olivia Griffin Photography

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compares the scanned mole with a database to determine if it has irregular features. The new technology is not designed to detect melanoma, but to use on those moles that are in the “gray area,” having some of the characteristics of melanoma, but not suspicious enough to biopsy, said Miller. “This gives us a sort of second opinion,” he said. It must be used on moles and “still requires a person to determine which lesions can be analyzed and which can’t,” Miller said. If a biopsy is required, knowing how Let us show you nature’s beauty deep the mole goes is also instrumental in the staff at The Embassy have the experience and Frank Ogletree and knowing how deep the biopsy should be, creative edge you need when planning special event, adding a seasonal flair to your home, or sending a gift to a he said. MelaFind will be aespecially benefifriend or client. The Embassy Flowers has been serving cial for children who won’t have tospecial undergo Greenville businesses and residents since 1985. Let us show you nature’s beauty unnecessary biopsies. We are a full-service florist and deliver in the Greenville area. at The Embassy have the experience and Do you have any molesFrank on Ogletree your and theInstaff addition to scanning the mole, Miller creative edge you need when planning 1922 Augusta Street @McDaniel Village body that look like these? photographs it patient’s recordaand a864.282.8600 a special event, adding a seasonal flair to for yourahome, orGreenville, sending gift a SC to www.embassy-flowers.com uses the MelaFind machine to Frank Ogletree and the staff at The Embassy have the experience and special friendtechnician or client. The Embassy Flowers has been serving mark where on the body the mole appears. Greenville businesses and residents since 1985. Frank Ogletree and the staff at The Embassy have the experience andcreative edge you need when planning According manufacturer, about We are a full-service floristto andthe deliver in the Greenville area. a special event, adding a seasonal flair to your home, or sending a gift to a need when planning 200 MelaFind machines are in use nation- creative edge youspecial friend or client. The Embassy Flowers has been serving 1922 Augusta Street @McDaniel Village a special event, adding a seasonal flair to your home, or sending a gift to a wide. Greenville businesses and residents since 1985. Greenville, SC 864.282.8600 www.embassy-flowers.com “It gives us something do without first The Embassy Flowers specialtofriend or client. has been serving WeGreenville are a full-service florist and deliver in the Greenville area. Since 1985 resorting to cutting,” Miller said. Greenville businesses andServing residents since 1985.

Let us show you nature’s beauty

Let us show you nature’s beauty

The images above are examples of irregular moles. If you have moles like these, see your dermatologist immediately.

12 Sevier Street Just off Augusta

1922 Augusta Street @McDaniel Village We are a full-service florist and deliver in the864.282.8600 Greenville area. | www.embassy-flowers.com

APRIL A. MORRIS | STAFF

amorris@communityjournals.com

Greenville, SC 864.282.8600 www.embassy-flowers.com

1922 Augusta Street @McDaniel Village Greenville, SC 864.282.8600 www.embassy-flowers.com

MAY 17, 2013 | The Journal 21

journal community

GHS asthma program honored by EPA The Greenville Health System’s asthma children, and disproportionately affects management program for children and low-income and minority communities. adolescents has been honored by the En- The economic costs of asthma amount vironmental Protection Agency as one of to more than $56 billion per year, which three leading programs in the nation. includes both direct medical costs and The GHS program is a multidisciplinary, multilingual, family“Today one out of every 12 people centered program that is able to, with partner suffers from asthma – and the numbers collaboration, provide are increasing year after year.” medical care, case manEPA Acting Administrator Bob Perciasepe agement, school/daycare visits and environmental control home visits for more than 4,000 indirect costs, such as missed school children and adolescents with asthma, and work days.  especially those who have limited access   “Today one out of every 12 people to health care, the EPA said. suffers from asthma – and the numbers The hospital system said in a release are increasing year after year,” said EPA that GHS Children’s Hospital is honored Acting Administrator Bob Perciasepe. to be one of three asthma management “With President Obama’s support, EPA programs in the U.S. to be recognized. has taken common-sense steps towards According to the EPA, asthma is a cleaner air, which translates to fewer national epidemic that affects nearly 26 asthma attacks and instances of other million people, including seven million respiratory diseases.”

Join us on Saturday, May 25th for…

Run or walk where no race was held before... down a Greenville Downtown Airport runway! Help raise money to add playground equipment to the new community aviation themed park at the airport. Details and registration information can be found at: http://book-events.com/takeflight5k/

22 THE Journal | MAY 17, 2013

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Small fry enjoy Trout in the Classroom Trout fingerlings, just before their release into Carrick Creek.

Christ Church Middle School students help Ranger Ed Moorer test the creek water at Table Rock State Park.

Deborah Davis’ Christ Church Middle School science students trekked up to Table Rock State Park last week to deliver a precious cargo: brook trout fingerlings raised from eggs at the school. Gordon Anderson, of the Mountain Bridge Chapter of Trout Unlimited, said the Trout in the Classroom program sponsored by his organization has been one of the great success stories they have had in conservation education. “The kids get the chance to monitor vital water quality measurements while the eggs hatch and the young fish grow,” he said. “Once the fry have absorbed their egg sacs, they are ready to be released into the wild.” The wild, in this case, is Carrick Creek, which feeds the main lake at the park. The stream starts high between Pinnacle and Table Rock mountains and is a good spot to stock the environmentally endangered brookies, Armstrong said. Once the kids arrived at the park, they headed upstream from the lake, led by Park Naturalist Scott Stegenga, and released the young fish at Carrick Creek Falls. The tiny fingerlings quickly spread out and the group divided into two groups – an environmental education session led by Stegenga, and a hands-on lesson in measuring stream water quality led by Ranger Ed Moorer. Armstrong said the program has been so popular with the two schools now participating that Trout Unlimited plans to expand the program to other schools in the district. CHARLES SOWELL | STAFF

csowell@communityjournals.com

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Henry’s Smokehouse is following Fuddruckers’ lead and rolling out a new food truck – to be called “the Mystery Machine” – to serve customers in addition to its brick-and-mortar restaurant. “We literally just bought the truck, but have been working on it since September,” said Tiger O’Rourke, general manager at the Wade Hampton Hen-

24 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

ry’s Smokehouse. The truck’s former life was as a Lance delivery truck. “It’s going to take two months to get it outfitted with a kitchen and passed by the city. We plan to serve the full menu with other items such as hamburgers and hot dogs, but it will function as a rolling food truck and catering truck.” Fuddruckers is currently running two trucks.

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Mike Rawson knows South Carolina is football country, but the CEO for the European-based 22ft Basketball Academy thinks there room for his sport, too. “Even though this is football country, the ACC (Atlantic Coast Conference) presence here will benefit Division I-level basketball players,” Rawson said. On Monday, 22ft Basketball Academy announced that Greenville will be its United States base and its students will attend Shannon Forest Christian School. 22ft Basketball Academy got its start in France in 2006, targeting athletes who want to play Division I collegiate basketball, Rawson said. It also has locations in Holland, Spain

and South Africa. Twenty-four student-athletes ranging from 12 years old to high school seniors will attend Shannon Forest in the fall under the partnership. Rawson said the academy has been looking at locating in Greenville for about three years. Academy students will not play on the Crusader basketball teams, but Shannon Forest athletes will have a chance to train with the athletes. The academy’s “elite” team will play a national schedule, Rawson said. Shannon Forest Athletic Director David Thompson said the arrangement will benefit Shannon Forest athletes. Rawson said the academy is partnering with Shannon Forest because of the school’s size and quality of the academic program.

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MAY 17, 2013 | The Journal 25

JOURNAL COMMUNITY PHOTOS PROVIDED BY RICEBOWLS.ORG

Group lunch in Viskhapatnam, India.

Rice Bowls connects Upstate to orphans around the world It’s easier than you think to “be a small part of something big.” That’s the premise behind Rice Bowls, an Upstate charitable organization that turns pocket change into meals for orphans around the world. Rice Bowls began in 1980 when Spartanburg physician Dr. Alastair Walker and two friends took a mission trip to India. The poverty they saw made an indelible impression on Walker, and when he returned to Spartanburg he and members of his church started Rice Bowls. They created plastic coin banks, shaped like bowls of rice, to collect money for the fight against world hunger. For more than 25 years, Rice Bowls sold

its banks to churches, which filled the banks and donated the money to the Southern Baptist World Hunger Fund. But in 2007, Rice Bowls restructured, refocusing its efforts exclusively on feeding orphans through direct partnerships with children’s homes. Today, Rice Bowls gives away its plastic banks, and churches, schools, clubs, businesses and other organizations fill them. The money raised goes to Rice Bowls’ partner orphanages around the world. The organization wanted to “branch out” and include all denominations, as well as be more accessible to businesses, schools and community organizations, says Johnny Ra-

Today, Rice Bowls supports

52 orphanages in 8 countries and provides approx. 1.7 million meals a year for about 1,700 children. mantanin, director of operations. Dodd Caldwell, the organization’s president, says Rice Bowls also wanted to have more direction over how its funds were used. Caldwell believes long-term partnerships with orphanages where children have

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a stable home, education and medical care are the way to “really impact the community.” It’s an “awesome opportunity for generational change,” Caldwell says. Today, Rice Bowls supports 52 orphanages in eight countries and provides roughly 1.7 million meals a year for about 1,700 children. Educating Americans about the needs of children around the world is the other side of Rice Bowls’ mission, says Ramantanin. Many in the U.S. don’t understand the true extent of the orphan crisis, because we think of an orphan as someone who’s had two parents die, he said. In the developing world, however,

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journal community many children lose parents to poverty, disease, drugs, war and crime. Sometimes a mother will leave her child at an orphanage because she has no way to feed him. Many children surviving on their own have biological parents living somewhere, yet have no one to care for them. If “orphan” is defined in this way, Rice Bowls says almost 163 million children worldwide live as orphans. “Kids helping kids” is one of Rice Bowls’ priorities. Caldwell estimated 80 percent of the plastic bowls end up in the hands of children. Filling a rice bowl with change is a tangible way for children in the U.S. to help other children. Rice Bowls also pro-

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bowls so far. Makayla Springsteen, service event coordinator for the Upstate Homeschool Co-op, helped lead a Rice Bowls project at UHC during the fall semester of 2012. The coop’s approximately 220 families collected $4,000.58. “The amount of giving was awesome,” says Springsteen. Many in the U.S. don’t realize that a dollar a day will feed a child in many parts of the world, Ramantanin says. That explains what Rice Bowls calls the “magic” that has turned pocket change into tens of millions of dollars since the organization’s inception. SHANDI STEVENSON | CONTRIBUTOR

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vides educational materials on its website, ricebowls.org, and will shortly unveil an interactive game at hungercrunch.com that educates children about world hunger as they battle the “hunger monster.” Rice Bowls offers many other opportunities for individuals and business to contribute through events, online donations, corporate sponsorships, trips to Rice Bowls’ partner orphanages, or simply keeping a Rice Bowl bank beside the cash register. “It works out great,” says Amy Lee, manager of Southern Barbeque. Lee has kept a Rice Bowl beside the register for a year. “A lot of customers ask about it,” she says, and Southern Barbeque has filled at least five

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Charleston Cooks! at 200 N. Main St. in Greenville will kick off summer with a Porch Party May 18 from 1-3 p.m. Whites Appliances will join Charleston Cooks! on the porch and will provide grilling demonstrations on their top-of-the line grills. For something sweet, lead culinary instructor Mark Pollard will be making ice cream. For more information, visit charlestoncooks.com. The nationally syndicated radio program “eTown” has selected Upstate Forever Executive Director Brad Wyche as one of its “E-Chievement Award” winners this year. The broadcast featuring Wyche will air locally on WNCW on May 19, at 6 p.m. or online at wncw.org. Other affiliate stations nationwide will air the show between May 15 and 21. The show is streamed online at etown. org, where listeners can also access the podcast.

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Dairy Fresh, located in North Carolina, is recalling some its IGA-brand vanilla and chocolate ice cream because those products actually contain the flavor “Heavenly Hash.” The problem is that Heavenly Hash contains almonds, coconut and soy. Dairy Fresh said the wrong packaging was used by mistake and as a result the labeling does not contain warnings for people who may be allergic to those foods. The company is voluntarily recalling the IGA Brand Vanilla and Chocolate in the 1.75 quart package. The ice cream has plant code “3783” and a SELL BY date of 8-13-13. Dairy Fresh said the company is also recalling any packages with a sell-by date between June and that point. Dairy Fresh says the recalled ice cream was sold in Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. The Armed Forces Day Parade and Celebration will be May 18 at 5 p.m. on Main Street from McBee Avenue to Markley Street in Greenville. All active duty members, reserves and veterans of the armed forces and local community members who support them are invited. The Honor Flight Upstate South Carolina will be highlighted in both the parade and celebration, as its World War II honorees participate in the day’s festivities. Honor Flight Upstate South Carolina has flown nearly 800 World War II veterans to Washington, D.C., to see their memorial since its founding in 2007. For more information, visit greenvillearmedforcesday.com. Bon Secours St. Francis is sponsoring skin cancer screenings on May 18, 9 a.m.noon, at St. Francis downtown’s Outpatient Center, 3 St. Francis Drive, Greenville. For more information, call 864-255-1043. Please wear a swimsuit under your clothing. Greenville Technical College will host a Manufacturing Job and Training Fair on May 21 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at McAlister Square, 225 South Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville. For more information, visit gvltec.edu. Bring your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “If You Hold a Seed” by Elly Mackay on May 23 at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 864-675-0540. The 25th Annual Alzheimer’s Association Upstate Education Conference, “Owning the Journey,” will be on May 21, 8 a.m.-4:15 p.m., at the Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St., Greenville, and will include a light breakfast and exhibits. Cost is $65 for professionals seeking CEUs (social work and long term care administrators) and $30 for all others. The registration deadline is May 17. For more information, call Jill Smith or Joyce Finkle at 864-542-9998 or visit alz.org/sc.  At the May 21 meeting of the SC Native Plant Society, David Ouellette, manager of Musser Fruit Farm, will discuss pawpaws, “America’s forgotten fruit.” The meeting is at 7 p.m. at Founders Hall in Dining Commons, Southern Wesleyan University in Central, and the public is invited. For more information, visit scnps.org.

OUR COMMUNITY

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

Hatcher Garden & Woodland Preserve will host “Carolina Artists Create: Getting Back to Nature H2” on June 1 from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. It will be a day of workshops and demonstrations for artists and photographers, and will be held at both Hollywild Animal Park and Hatcher Garden & Woodland Preserve. There is a $125 registration fee, which includes the workshops and demonstrations by area artists, a boxed lunch and a bonus of free admission to Hollywild on June 2. The deadline for registering is May 20. For more information or to register, visit hollywild.org or hatchergarden.org, or call 864-472-2038. The Apple Valley Model Railroad Club will hold an open house in the Historic Hendersonville, North Carolina, Train Depot at 850 Maple Street on May 18 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are greatly appreciated. For more information, call 828-890-8246 or visit avmrc.com. The Upcountry History Museum will host “Lunch Counters and Legal Challenges: A 50-Year Retrospective of Peterson v. Greenville” on May 20 at 11 a.m. Admission is free for members, $5 for guests. Reservations are suggested. For more information, visit upcountryhistory.org or call 467-3100. The Upcountry History Museum presents “Scots in the American Revolution” as part of their Lunchbox Learning series on May 23 at noon. Admission is free for members, $5 for guests. Lunch may also be purchased for $6. For more information, visit upcountryhistory.org or call 467-3100. Bring your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “That Is Not a Good Idea!” by Mo Willems on May 30 at 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 864-675-0540. Campobello potter Jim Cullen will be the guest speaker at Spartanburg Regional History Museum’s monthly Lunch & Learn event on May 24, 12:30-1:30 p.m. at Chapman Cultural Center. Bring your own lunch and learn about local pottery. The cost is $5. For more information, call 542.ARTS. The Blue Ridge Agility Club of Western North Carolina will host an American Kennel Club (AKC) agility trial May 24-26. The event will be held at the Western North Carolina Agricultural Center McGough Arena in Fletcher from 8 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. each day. Spectators are welcome to attend and admission is free. Please leave your dogs comfortably at home. The FAST (Fifteen and Send Time) class will be offered on Friday and Saturday. In addition, AKC’s newest class, Time 2 Beat (T2B) will be offered on Friday and Sunday. For more information, visit blueridgeagility.com or call 828-713-3278. Submit entries community@communityjournals.com.

ANTIQUE AUCTION To benefit Center for Community Services

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MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 29

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our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

On May 17, Kylie Odetta will perform at the Greenville Relay for Life at J.L. Mann High School around 9:45 p.m. Christ Church Episcopal School students Virginia Kate Kirby, Kevin Connaughton, Margaret Kirby, Lucie Jenkins and Marisa McGrady were selected to perform in the South Carolina Honors Choir for this fall. St. Mary’s Middle School’s spirit night will be held at Sully’s Steamers from 5-7:30 p.m. on May 19. The St. Mary’s School Golf Classic and Gala will be held on May 31 at Verdae Greens. There are still spots for teams of four in the golf tournament as well as tickets for the evening gala and auction. For more information, call 864-271-2870.

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Denise Brinson’s fourthgrade class at Mitchell Road Christian Academy had fun using Hershey chocolate bars while studying fractions. Pictured is Hendley Welch.

Registration is now open for Legacy Charter School’s two sessions of youth basketball camps led by the high school’s basketball players and B.J. Jackson, athletic director and head basketball coach. The sessions will run June 3-7 and June 10-14 and are designed for boys and girls of all skill levels between the ages of 7 and 14. The camp will run Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Early drop-off and late pick-up times are offered. The camp will be held at Legacy Charter Elementary School, located at 1613 West Washington St. The cost is $45 per child and $35 per additional sibling. Participants will receive a $10 discount for attending both sessions. The Governor’s School for Science and Mathematics is hosting two free iTEAMS camps June 17-20 and June 24-27 at Hughes Academy for Greenville County students. iTEAMS camp is a day-camp for rising seventh-, eighth- and ninth-graders who have an interest in technology and entrepreneurship. Online applications are available at scgssm.org/iteams. The student applications are accepted on a rolling deadline until camps are full. College Prep Genius will be offering a Master the SAT Class at Shannon Forest Christian School, July 17-18, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. This two-day course will give rising ninth-12th graders tools for the SAT and PSAT/NMSQT. Registration is available at shannonforest.com. Huntington Learning Center of Greenville is kicking off its annual Reading Adventure program for children kindergarten through eighth grade, which will run from May through August. The program encourages students to think of reading as a way to explore new ideas, interests, places and people. For more information, contact Mark Brugger at 864-627-1300 or brughlc@aol.com, contact Huntington at 1-800-CAN-LEARN or visit huntingtonhelps.com.

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SUNROOMS WINDOWS CONSERVATORIES PORCH, PATIO, AND DECK ENCLOSURES SOLARIUMS & MORE!

A group of fourth-grade students from A.J. Whittenberg Elementary School of Engineering were invited to represent North America at an international robotics competition. Fluor provided a funding challenge – matching all monies raised dollar-for-dollar – and funds were raised in record time. The AJW team is one of only three from North America invited. The 9- and 10-year-olds will compete against students up to age 15 from China, India, Russia, Brazil, Germany, Spain and 50 other countries.

journal community

our schools

activities, awards and accomplishments

Greenville Technical Charter High School recently presented the Charter Champions award to Lisa Stevens, Dr. Robert Nash, Lynda Leventis-Wells and Dr. Robert Wilson. The award is given to individuals in the community who have been instrumental in improving education in Greenville County. Each year, a select group of Shannon Forest juniors have the honor of attending the Palmetto Girls and Boys State Leadership Program sponsored by the American Legion and the American Legion Auxiliary. Palmetto State is a one-week leadership and citizenship training program created to educate outstanding high school students about state and local government and citizenship. The delegates, who are rising seniors in high school, are selected for the program based on the leadership skills and involvement they have shown in their respective schools and communities. Students honored this year include: Kyle Bradley, Elizabeth Ellis, Seth Garrison, and Savannah West. Adam Long will also be attending Boys State in North Carolina.

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Maria Parrini, 15 years old and a junior at Wade Hampton High School and at the Fine Arts Center of Greenville County, won the piano division of the Annual Young Artist Competition at Limestone College in Gaffney, the Senior Division of the Laurence Hamilton Morton Memorial Piano Scholarship established by the Greenville Music Teachers Association, and the Frank Brasington Memorial Piano Scholarship established by the Greenville Woman’s Music Club. She was also selected to participate in the Southeastern Piano Festival at the University of South Carolina this June, and she plans to attend the 2013 Brevard Music Center on a scholarship as winner of the 2012 Jan and Beattie Wood Concerto Competition. Maria studies piano with her parents, Fabio and Sherry Parrini, and cello with Martha Brons. Maria and Fabio Parrini are scheduled to perform together in Poulenc’s Two Piano Concerto with the Clemson University Symphony Orchestra and the Fountain Inn Symphony Orchestra in 2014.

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Karate students at St. Anthony’s School showcase some of their skills. The karate classes are part of the afterschool program at St. Anthony’s School and are instructed by PE teacher and 7th degree Black Belt, Carlos Howard.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

THE GOOD

EVENTS THAT MAKE OUR COMMUNITY BETTER

Family Connection will host its 5th Annual Charity Event to benefit children in South Carolina who have special needs at 7 p.m. on May 24 at the Marriot in Greenville. The event will feature 20 football greats, including Heisman Trophy winners George Rogers, Mike Rozier and Johnny Rodgers and former Clemson coach Danny Ford. All proceeds from the event will benefit Family Connection, a statewide nonprofit organization that supports families who have children with disabilities, special healthcare needs or chronic illnesses. For more information on the event, email sfields@FamilyConnectionSC.org or call 800-578-8750. Sponsored by Bojangles’ Star Leadership Program and Aloft, children receiving care at the Center for Developmental Services got to experience a hot air balloon last week. Children were able to meet a balloon pilot, explore a hot air balloon and enter into a wheelchair-accessible basket in order to learn about flight. BI-LO customers donated $339,383.44 to 12 nonprofit organizations within the grocer’s operating area during a six-week period when making grocery purchases. All the funds raised will benefit local community organizations. The twelve nonprofit organizations benefitting from the last community donation program include: American Heart Association, American Red Cross, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (Charlotte), Medical College of Georgia’s Children Hospital, McLeod Children’s Hospital, Meals on Wheels (Anderson), Meals on Wheels (Greenville), Medical

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University South Carolina Children’s Hospital, Miss South Carolina Scholarship Organization, Mission Hospital, Muscular Dystrophy Association (South Charlotte), Paul Anderson Youth Home. The next community donation campaign is occurring now to June 11 in which customers can make donations at store registers. For more information, visit bi-lo.com and winn-dixie.com. Contributing more than $110,000 to local arts and cultural programs alongside United Way agencies, Allen Tate Realtors and employees supported the Tate Cares campaign. Held in early October, the Tate Cares campaign combines a Cultural Campaign and United Way fund drive as well as an annual FUNDAY event in order to raise money for public education.  Six-time Stellar Award-winner and Grammy Award-nominated gospel recording artist VaShawn Mitchell performed at Spartanburg’s 35th annual spring fling on May 5. Mitchell is an ambassador for the Big Brothers Big Sisters’ Mentoring Brothers in Action initiative, who donated a portion of the proceeds from the sale of his latest CD, “Created for This,” to Big Brothers Big Sister of the Upstate. The organization provides children facing adversity with strong and enduring professionally supported one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better. For more information, visit BigBrothersBigSisters.org. In recognition of Roger and Nita Milliken, Hatcher Garden and the Spartanburg community, Hatcher Garden & Woodland Preserve dedicated the Milliken Memory Garden to these contributors. Hatcher Garden became a nonprofit organization in 1998, in which the Millikens were supporters of the garden and contributed to garden From left: Alice Hatcher Henderson, Robin Vollmer, Dr. Nancy Milliken projects as well as genand Doug Nash in the Milliken Memory Garden at Hatcher Garden & eral operations. The MilWoodland Preserve. liken Memory Garden is located in the Garden of Hope and Healing whose purpose is to honor philanthropists who support Hatcher Garden as well as advocate for local endeavors such as The Spartanburg Day School, Converse College, Wofford College, The Chapman Center, and the Noble Tree Foundation. MARYS House, a nonprofit organization provides emergency shelter, services, and spiritual guidance to women and children fleeing domestic violence. Since October 2008, MARYS House has sheltered over 300 women and children and provided services to more than 80 area families. The organization is in need of several receptions that can donate a few hours a week, as well as several volunteers to do housekeeping. Volunteers for these positions must be willing to commit a minimum of three to four hours per week and must pay $6 and agree to a criminal background check. For more information, visit maryshouse.com or call 864-855-1708. Send a letter of qualifications to: mh-director@bellsouth.net with a copy to mh-pam@bellsouth.net. Submit entries community@communityjournals.com.

32 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

JOURNAL CULTURE S T A G I N G

SHAKESPEARE Upstate Shakespeare Festival wants to stage all of the Bard’s work It took Upstate Shakespeare Festival producing director John Fagan 15 years to tackle “Hamlet,” considered by many the greatest play written by the world’s greatest playwright. Now, as he and the cast go through the final rehearsals of the play that will open the festival’s season on May 23, he wonders what took him so long. “‘Hamlet’ is considered the masterpiece of Shakespeare, and when you have to attack a masterpiece you ask yourself, ‘Am I man enough to do it?’” Fagan said. “Now, I’m asking myself ‘Why did I wait so long?’ It is a wonderful piece of drama to wrestle with.” “Hamlet” dramatizes the revenge Prince Hamlet exacts on his uncle Claudius for murdering his father, King Hamlet. Claudius succeeds his brother to the throne and takes Gertrude, King Hamlet’s widow and Prince Hamlet’s mother, as his wife. The play has overwhelming grief, seething rage, treachery, revenge, incest and moral corruption. Fagan, who has a reputation for putting a unique spin on the Bard’s works, said Hamlet has enough crazy twists and turns on its own. “I was intimidated by (Hamlet), but it is a wonderful piece of drama to wrestle with,” he said. Fagan plans to stage “Hamlet” in contemporary clothing and with a very stark set. The play is much more than a revenge story, he says. “It’s a family drama, not a political story. It’s a story about how families can get destroyed by the poison of another. People can relate to it because everybody’s got their ghosts. Some we laugh at, some we just don’t talk about.” Fagan said the play has been edited down to two hours, but still contains all of the famous speeches. “We’re telling the story,” he said. “And it’s just a great story.”

NEED FOR SHAKESPEARE

SHAKESPEARE continued on PAGE 34

A scene from Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” performed during a previous Upstate Shakespeare Festival.

PHOTO BY TIFFANY HART

This isn’t the first time the Upstate Shakespeare Festival has staged “Hamlet,” but it’s the first time with Fagan as director. Round One was in 1998, the year before Fagan took over the struggling festival in what was supposed to be a “one and done” assignment. “We were going to give it a good Viking funeral,”

MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 33

JOURNAL CULTURE

SHAKES PLAYS

From its beginning in 1995 through this summer’s season, the Upstate Shakespeare Festival has performed 23 of Shakespeare’s 39 plays.

SHAKESPEARE

JOHN FAGAN

All’s Well that Ends Well Antony and Cleopatra A Midsummer Night’s Dream As You Like It Coriolanus Cymbeline Double Falsehood Hamlet Henry IV, Part I Henry IV, Part II Henry V Henry VI, Part 1 Henry VI, Part 2 Henry VI, Part 3 Henry VIII Julius Caesar King John King Lear Love’s Labour’s Lost Macbeth Measure for Measure Much Ado About Nothing Othello Pericles Prince of Tyre Richard II Richard III Romeo and Juliet The Comedy of Errors The Merchant of Venice The Merry Wives of Windsor The Taming of the Shrew The Tempest The Two Gentlemen of Verona The Two Noble Kinsmen The Winter’s Tale Timon of Athens Titus Andronicus Troilus and Cressida Twelfth Night

–– –– A Midsummer Night’s Dream As You Like It –– Cymbeline –– Hamlet Henry IV, Part I –– Henry V –– –– –– –– Julius Caesar King John King Lear Love’s Labour’s Lost Macbeth –– Much Ado About Nothing Othello Pericles Prince of Tyre –– Richard III Romeo and Juliet The Comedy of Errors The Merchant of Venice The Merry Wives of Windsor The Taming of the Shrew The Tempest The Two Gentlemen of Verona –– –– –– –– –– Twelfth Night

SHAKESPEARE continued from PAGE 33

Fagan said. But something surprising happened. Audiences began to turn out – they averaged more than 100 people per performance – and some of the actors told Fagan they wanted to do it again next year. Now, the festival averages 400 people per night and the show runs have expanded from two weekends to four each. “It’s important that Greenville have a free Shakespeare festival,” Fagan said. “Any city worth its salt, and I truly think Greenville is, has a variety of cultural events available for its citizenry. A lot of people who come to the shows have never been exposed to theater before and have not been exposed to Shakespeare before.” And Shakespeare is meant to be performed, not just read in a high school English class. “Shakespeare needs to be alive. Shakespeare wrote them to be played, to be acted,” Fagan said. “People need to be exposed to all this wonderful writing. I think the Upstate Shakespeare Festival helps people look at these plays a different way.”

PLACE FOR COMEDY People who attend the USF’s second production of the summer, “The Comedy of Errors,” will see Shakespeare differently. In the play, which opens July 11, female cast members will play male parts, while male cast members will play the female parts. Fagan staged the play that way – something that he calls “one of those 2 a.m. ideas” – the first time he produced it in 2004 as a way to deal with the play’s misogynistic tone. “‘Comedy of Errors’ was not one of my favorite plays,” he said. “It’s more misogynistic than ‘Taming of the Shrew.’” Audiences loved it, and Fagan said it could have run all summer. “We’ll do it again that way this year, but it will have a whole different cast of people in it. It will be different, but it will have the same sort of silliness.”

DOING THEM ALL Over the years, USF has staged 23 of the 39 plays written by Shakespeare. Fagan wants to eventually do them all, even though some will present challenges to stage in a public park. “‘Troilus and Cressida’ and ‘Measure for Measure’ are dark, scabrous plays that present challenges for us,” Fagan said. ‘Titus Andronicus’ is very violent but very doable in the park.” “Titus Andronicus” is set during the latter days of the Roman Empire and tells the fictional story of Titus, a gen-

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SO YOU KNOW WHAT: Upstate Shakespeare Festival WHERE: Falls Park amphitheater WHEN: “Hamlet,” May 23-June 16 “Comedy of Errors,” July 11-Aug. 4 Performances are at 7 pm, Thursdays through Sundays ADMISSION: Free, donations accepted INFORMATION: 864-787-4016 eral in the Roman army, who is engaged in a cycle of revenue with Tamora, Queen of the Goths. It is Shakespeare’s bloodiest and most violent work and one of his least-respected plays. “It is one of Shakespeare’s more insane plays, and people will say, ‘Oh, come on. Really?’ Fagan said. “I can see us doing it at some point.” Attendees are encouraged to bring blankets, lawn chairs and picnic baskets. CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

journal culture

WORK BY JANE TODD BUTCHER

WORK BY LARRY SEYMOUR

WORK BY TERI PENA

MAC exhibit highlights local artists Exhibit gives art lovers one-stop look at Open Studios Back in 2006, the Metropolitan Arts Council was looking for a way for more local art to be seen during Artisphere. It decided to have an exhibition featuring all of the artists who have participated in Greenville Open Studios, a weekend where Greenville artists invite

the public into their studios to see where and how they work. MAC’s One Stop Open Studios exhibit has become an annual event that spotlights Open Studios. “Open Studios has really become the premier sales and marketing event for visual artists in Greenville County,” said Alan Ethridge, MAC’s executive director. Friday is the deadline for artists to sign up for this year’s Open Studios, held the first weekend in November. Ethridge

said he expects 140 to 150 artists to participate. The inaugural Open Studios event was held in 2002 and had 59 participating artists and a budget of $7,000. It has nearly tripled in size – 142 artists is the record – and now has a budget of more than $200,000. “Everyone realized how important the visual arts are to the vitality of the city,” Ethridge said. “It has such a loyal following locally and out of the market.”

So you know

WORK BY ANNE HILL BARRY

What: One Stop Open Studios Who: A retrospective exhibit of Open Studios artists, 2002-2012 Where: Metropolitan Arts Council gallery, 16 Augusta St., Greenville When: through June 4; 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Mondays through Fridays Cost: Free Information: 864-467-3132

More than 80 artists are included in the One Stop Open Studios exhibition, which features works of 12 by 12 inches. The exhibition is open through June 4.

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

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MAY 17, 2013 | The Journal 35

JOURNAL CULTURE

‘Les Miz’ gets top billing for upcoming GLT season

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That’s not all. The rest of the schedule is too good to miss, director says Like a superstar actor, “Les Miserables” is garnering all the headlines when it comes to the Greenville Little Theatre’s 2013-14 season. But the other plays in the theater’s upcoming season lineup are more than just supporting casts. “‘Les Miz’ is obviously a big show for us, but the whole year is a pretty big undertaking for us,” said Allen McCalla, the theater’s artistic director. “We’re fired up about it. This is one of those seasons where we’re really excited about all of the shows. I think they are all really good plays.” GLT is saving the best for last in 2013-14. “Les Miz,” the world’s second longest-running musical, which

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tem for its “Amazing Read” program. The theater’s Christmas show will be “It’s a Wonderful Life,” a big hit for the theater last year. “Spider’s Web,” an Agatha Christie mystery, will open in February 2014. Christie wrote the classic whodunit for the English actress Margaret Lockwood, McCalla said. The play tells the story of Clarissa, the second wife of Henry Hailsham-Brown, who is adept at spinning tall tales for their bored diplomatic circle. A murder takes place in her drawing room and she finds live drama much harder to cope with, especially when the victim turns out to be the man who broke up her husband’s first marriage. April 2014 will bring “Don’t Dress for Dinner,” which McCalla calls one of the funniest plays ever written. “It’s a true door-slam farce,” he said, about a man who plans a weekend with his mistress at a French farmhouse. He’s packing his wife off to visit her mother, arranged for a cook to prepare gourmet delights and has invited his best friend to provide an alibi. Suffice it to say, the weekend doesn’t go as planned. “It’s pure farce at its best,” McCalla said. The theater also has two special shows planned: “The Return,” a Beatles tribute in April 2014, and a Valentine’s Day concert by Emile Pandolfi.

AI

was recently made into a movie, is set in 19th-century France and tells the story of Jean Valjean, a man who spent years on the chain gang after stealing a loaf of bread and is now hunted by a policeman after he breaks parole. Valjean agrees to care for the orphaned daughter of a factory worker. “It’s a mammoth undertaking for us,” McCalla said. Even so, GLT was “built to do plays like that,” he said. The key to the production’s success is casting, which is “crucial,” McCalla said. “I think there are enough talented people in the area to be able to do it.” A second challenge will be the set, which, according to the contract terms, cannot be on a turntable. The 2013-14 season opens in September with “The Marvelous Wonderettes,” a musical that features some of the greatest hits of the 1950s and ’60s. The play opens at the 1958 Springfield High prom and ends at group’s 10th-year reunion. “It’s been a hit everywhere it plays,” McCalla said. Next up in October and November is “Walking Across Egypt,” which tells the story of 78-year-old Mattie, whose decision to befriend a juvenile delinquent changes both their lives for the better. “It’s a great story for us,” McCalla said. The play, which is set in North Carolina, is based on the Clyde Edgerton novel that was chosen by the Greenville Library Sys-

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MAY 17, 2013 | The Journal 37

JOURNAL CULTURE

LISTEN UP

BEST BETS FOR LOCAL LIVE MUSIC 5 / 1 7 , M A I N S T R E E T F R I D AY S

Jamie Wright Experience Soulful R&B singer. 5:30 p.m., admission is free. 5/21, PEACE CENTER

Crosby, Stills & Nash Legendary rock trio. Tickets $65-$85. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 5/23, THE HANDLEBAR

Carolina Chocolate Drops Fascinating roots-acoustic combo. Tickets: $18. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 5/30, DOWNTOWN ALIVE

The Soulfeathers Greenville quartet plays American Soul. 5:30 p.m. Show is free. 5/30, THE HANDLEBAR

Todd Snider with HalleyAnna Wry troubadour brings distinctive tunes. Tickets: $21. Call 864-233-6173 or visit handlebar-online.com. 5/30, PEACE CENTER

Steve Martin & the Steep Canyon Rangers Veteran comedian indulges his banjo-playing side. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 5 / 3 1 , M A I N S T R E E T F R I D AY S

Groove Planet R&B cover band. 5:30 p.m., admission is free. 6 / 7 , P E A C E C E N T E R T D S TA G E

Jake Shimabukuro The Hendrix of the ukulele. Tickets: $25. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org. 6/13, DOWNTOWN ALIVE

Outshyne S.C. country band on the rise. 5:30 p.m.; admission is free. 6 / 2 0 , P E A C E C E N T E R T D S TA G E

Cowboy Mouth New Orleans rock ’n’ roll ’n’ preachin’ ’n’ shoutin’. Tickets: $21. Call 864-467-3000 or visit peacecenter.org.

38 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

journal culture

sound check

with vincent harris

Crazy good Andy Lehman spent two years on “Badlands” album and gave it away for free If you were an up-and-coming musician like the Upstate’s own Andy Lehman, reliant mostly on touring for your revenue and on social media to let people know about you, the decision Lehman and his band made in 2011 will probably sound crazy. Fresh from promoting their album “Low Country,” they sat down to plan their next move. “When we put out ‘Low Country,’ we were touring and trying to be little social media darlings,” Lehman says. “But for this album, we kind of sat down and said, ‘Hey, what if we just quit doing all that stuff and just made the absolute best record that we have in us right now?’ And we Who: Andy Lehman unanimously agreed Where: The Channel, 221 N. Main St., Greenville yes, that’s what we’re doing. From start When: Saturday, May 18, 8 p.m. to finish, that took information: 864.552.1945 or andylehman.com about two years.” The album that came from that decision, “Badlands,” was released earlier this year, and it’s an impressive, unified work. The basic sound is powerful, combining anthemic, hard-hitting rock with instantly memorable melodies, but what’s startling about “Badlands” is how seamless it sounds. The album, produced by Rick Beato (needtobreathe, Jump Little Children) is radioready right off the bat, but doesn’t seem overly labored or fussed-over. “I had just bought a new house in Simpsonville and was renovating it, and we pretty much wrote the record in the house,” Lehman says. “This sort of arc was formed between building a house and building a record. The idea was, ‘Who cares if we’re the most obscure band in the world, let’s just make a really great record.’ We took our time with it. We got together every week and wrote and tweaked and worked on songs. We started going to Atlanta and recording a few songs at a time.” Lehman says that the decision to focus on the album alone was not an easy one. “It was a hard decision to make. There’s second-guessing on a lot of different facets of what we did. But someday I’ve got to look back and say either, ‘I’ve got these really great memories of playing in front of huge crowds,’ or ‘I’ve got these really great memories of making great records.’ And I would choose making great records. Obviously, we’re hoping for the huge crowds, but priority No. 1 is making really great art. I don’t feel like the big crowds can come without great art.” Lehman has taken another risk by making “Badlands” available for free on his website, but that decision was far easier for him to make. “I think, honestly, album sales are done,” he says. “I think we’re circling the drain. I love the fact that our content is readily available, and what I’m hoping is that that forces record labels and bands and whoever else to level the playing field, and hopefully the best records will start rising to the top. “So the decision to give it away for free was something we embraced. We wanted as many people to hear it as possible, so we opened the door as wide as possible.” VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

WEDDINGS  ENGAGEMENTS  ANNIVERSARIES

Make your announcement to the Greater Greenville Area

WEDDINGS

1/4 page - $174, Word Count 140 3/8 page - $245, Word Count 140

ENGAGEMENTS

3/16 page - $85, Word Count 90

For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@communityjournals.com

vharris@communityjournals.com

MAY 17, 2013 | The Journal 39

JOURNAL CULTURE

SNL Alums bringing their comedy to Upstate Carvey is also known for his comedic impersonations of President George Bush, H. Ross Perot, Jerry Brown and David Duke. Nealon played the other half of Hans and Franz and took over from Miller on the “Weekend Update” anchor desk. Miller has his own nationally syndicated radio show, “The Dennis Miller Show,” and is a regular contributor for “The O’Reilly Factor” on the FOX News Channel. He’s a five-time Emmy award winner for his live talk show “Dennis Miller Live,” which had a nine-year run on HBO. Miller has appeared in movies, has written four books and even had a twoseason stint in the broadcast booth for ABC’s “Monday Night Football.” Nealon has appeared in more than two dozen comedy films and has starred in two Showtime stand-up specials. He recently received critical acclaim for his role in the Showtime series “Weeds.” CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

In cooperation with Rolling Green Village

MAY 16 - JUN 8 THU-SUN

Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. Originally produced at Signature Theatre, Arlington, VA, October 2010 Eric Schaeffer, Artistic Director Maggie Boland, Managing Director

www.centrestage.org • 40 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

FOR TICKETS

233-6733

BLACK FRANCIS WITH REID PALEY AT THE HANDLEBAR, MAY 10

VINCENT HARRIS / CONTRIBUTING

The calendar says Oct. 18 is a Friday, but it will seem more like a Saturday night in Greenville. That’s because three of the most prominent alums from “Saturday Night Live” – Dana Carvey, Dennis Miller and Kevin Nealon – are teaming up for a comedy tour that will stop at the BI-LO Center that night. Tickets go on sale Friday at 10 a.m. at the BI-LO Center ticket office, through ticketmaster.com or charge by phone at 800-745-3000. Starring together on SNL from 1986 to 1991, the trio is largely credited with saving the iconic show that was nearly canceled because of poor ratings. They also were responsible for some of the show’s best-known characters. Carvey, who appeared on the show for seven years, is best known for the Church Lady, Hans of the body building duo Hans and Franz, the Grumpy Old Man of “Weekend Update,” and Garth, Wayne Campbell’s excellent co-host on “Wayne’s World.”

CONCERT REVIEW

Cult icon delivers Former Pixies frontman gave adoring crowd what it came to hear A few years back, I read a piece about The Replacements’ Paul Westerberg, in which the writer discussed Westerberg’s transition from Next Big Thing to Beloved Veteran without the usual stop at Really Famous Pop-Star. You could say the same for Black Francis, the singer, guitarist and main songwriter for the critically acclaimed late-’80s/early-’90s band The Pixies. The Pixies have a massive cult following, as proven by their sold-out reunion tours a few years back. But in a pre-Nirvana era, a band that layered corrosive guitars over nonsensical lyrics delivered in a sourpuss yowl was never going to achieve platinum status for albums like “Doolittle” and “Bossanova,” no matter how beguiling the melodies underneath the noise were. But one of the upsides of cult success is an adoring audience that believes you can do no wrong, and it was a crowd of those believers, several hundred strong, that awaited Black Francis when he walked onstage last Friday night at The Handlebar. But first, a quick word about Francis’ opener, Reid Paley. Paley delivered a series of dark, self-flagellating tales of romance gone wrong in a deep, Nick-Cavestyle baritone, accompanied only by his battered acoustic guitar. It was an excel-

lent set of great songs. But on to the main attraction: Dressed in a sleeveless shirt and jeans, the burly, bald musician spent his evening much as I expected he would, coaxing odd chord changes out of his Fender Jaguar like a contortionist and spinning lyrical tales with meanings known only to him. His onstage presence was both odd and slightly distant, but sly humor crept in, as well. At one point, Francis implored the audience to “stay in the room for the whole 90 minutes, even if you have to lie down,” and he confessed, somewhat peculiarly, that he “wasn’t used” to playing electric guitar. But it was his songs that the crowd came for, and he obliged in spades, mixing in tracks from his 23 solo releases with Pixies classics like “Wave Of Mutilation,” “Monkey’s Gone To Heaven,” and “Where Is My Mind.” For the most part, the crowd was as worshipful and reverent as you’d expect; I’m not sure I even heard many shouted song requests. In the end, Francis played some blistering guitar, worked his cat-in-heat howl for all it was worth, and remained an enigmatic but gifted performer and songwriter. Exactly what a cult icon is supposed to do. VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

journal culture

scene. here.

Marguerite Wyche.

THE NAME TO KNOW.

the week in the local arts world

The Art Haven at the Fountain Inn Center for Visual and Performing Arts, 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn, will hold an Art Show and Sale on May 19 from 2-5 p.m. “Walnut Grove Plantation: 250 Years of History with Balsam Range” will be held May 18, 4-8 p.m., at Walnut Grove Plantation. Along with the concert, which features Donovan Brooks as the opener, visitors may tour the Moore family home and see demonstrations of colonial life. Concessions will be available for purchase and parking is free. Tickets are $5-$12 and can be purchased in person at Walnut Grove Plantation in Roebuck, at Spartanburg Regional History Museum or at Hub City Bookshop. Tickets can also be purchased by calling 864-576-6546. To learn more, contact Zac Cunningham at 864-576-6546 or walnutgrove@spartanburghistory.org. Boys & Girls Clubs of the Upstate has a photography exhibit on display at Chapman Cultural Center from now until May 30. The exhibit is a part of the ImageMakers Project. More than 200 club members in grades four through eight participated in this project from January-May. There are more than 150 original prints on display. The opening reception is at the Chapman Cultural Center on May 17, 4-6 p.m. The Young Appalachian Musicians Evening Music Program will begin the week of June 3. This program is designed to teach students to play Appalachian music with acoustic instruments. Lessons are open to all ages (third grade through adults). Instruments include guitar, mandolin, fiddle and banjo. The six-week sessions will be held at the following locations: Easley First Baptist Church in Easley on Tuesday nights; Pickens Senior Center on Monday and Thursday nights; Saint Paul UMC in downtown Greenville on Thursday nights; and in Clemson at a location and day to be announced. The cost is $60 per six-week session and instrument rental is available for $25 per six-week session. The enrollment period is from May 20-June 3. To sign up, contact Susan Ware-Snow at 864-979-9188 or susu9196@gmail.com for Easley and Greenville; Steve McGaha at 864283-4871 or blindpunkin54@yahoo.com for Pickens, or Ryan Wilson at 864-360-4763 or bipryan@gmail.com for Clemson. For more information, visit YAMupstate.org, call 864878-4257 or e-mail mcdanibw1@gmail.com.

Marguerite R. Wyche, President 16 W. North Street Greenville, SC 864.270.2440 www.wycheco.com This unique house on Paris Mountain began as a summer retreat, but was later transformed by architect Willie Ward into a year-round residence with the addition of a bedroom wing and guest house. Situated on 9+ acres overlooking the city of Greenville and Furman University, this home has 3 large bedrooms and 3 baths, cypress paneled den, vaulted ceiling living room, dining room, kitchen and sunroom. A charming guest house includes a large chestnut paneled bedroom/ living area with a fireplace, spacious kitchen and bath. A 20’x40’ pool and patio is a perfect spot to entertain or watch the sunsets. Lots of extras including built-in storage, basements and a workshop. 641 Altamont Rd., Greenville $799,500

Book Your Lunch with debut Southern author Rhonda Riley on May 29 at Twigs Tempietto. Tickets are $25 per person and must be purchased in advance at bookyourlunch.com or by calling Fiction Addiction at 864-675-0540. If you cannot make the event, you can reserve a personalized copy of “The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope” by contacting Fiction Addiction in advance at 864-675-0540 or at info@fiction-addiction.com. Flat Rock Playhouse has announced that their upcoming musicals “Evita” and “Les Miserables” will feature Rob Evan and Anna Eilinsfeld. “Evita” will be at the Playhouse Mainstage, June 5-30. “Les Miserables” will be at the Playhouse Mainstage July 10-Aug. 18. All tickets for both shows are $40 and can be purchased by calling 828-693-0731, 866-7328008 or online at flatrockplayhouse.org. Playhouse Mainstage is located at 2661 Greenville Hwy., Flat Rock, N.C.

It’s Everybody’s Business

Music by Léon Boëllmann and J. S. Bach will be featured during an organ concert at St. John in the Wilderness in Flat Rock on June 9, given by highly respected Atlanta organist Daniel C. Cherrix. Immediately following the 4 p.m. concert, there will be a Choral Evensong showcasing Cherrix and members of the choirs from St. John in the Wilderness and St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Atlanta. Explore the Arts will be held June 17-21 at The Fine Arts Center. Classes are held 8:30 a.m. to noon, Monday through Friday. Classes offered for rising elementary and middle school students include painting on canvas, drama, sculpture, guitar, drums and shakers, Japanese art, creative writing, ballet, drum set and snare drum and cartooning. Classes available for high school and adults include printmaking, digital photography, metals and ballet. The cost to attend is $125 for elementary and middle school and $150 for high school, college and adult workshops. Some partial scholarships are available. Students who register for the ballet workshop receive a $25 discount. To print a registration form, visit fineartscenter.net/explore or contact the Donna Shank at dshank@greenville.k12.sc.us or 864-355-2574.

Send us your arts announcement. Email: arts@communityjournals.com

POOP ETIQUETTE: Picking up pet waste isn’t fun, but it will save your lawn, your shoes and your local water bodies from phosphorus, nitrogen and fecal bacteria!

Learn more at

www.BeFreshWaterFriendly.org MAY 17, 2013 | The Journal 41

journal culture

A r t s Calendar M AY 1 7 - 2 3 Main Street Fridays Jamie Wright Experience May 17 ~ 232-2273

100 Chamberlain Court One of Greenville’s finest neighborhoods, Chanticleer. Spectacular views of the fairways, a green and a pond. Top of the line finishes. Kitchen is Brand New with a vaulted ceiling, custom cabinetry, granite countertops, 2 sinks, 6 eye gas range. Screened porch with fireplace and large deck. Exceptionally gracious living spaces. Master Suite on Main with Bath. Theater Room, Pool Table Room and a Rec room. Lower level has great in law or nanny suite. Upstairs features 3 Br ‘s each with own private bath, plus a flex room.

MLS# 1258812

SC Children’s Theatre Caribbean Crush May 17 ~ 235-2885 The Warehouse Theatre A Little Night Music May 17-Jun. 8 ~ 235-6948

$1,275,000

Greenville County Museum of Art Southbound Through May 19 ~ 271-7570 Peace Center Crosby, Stills & Nash May 21 ~ 467-3000

233 Kilgore Circle Timeless architecture and exceptional floor plan for family living! This 5 BR 4 1/2 BA home has been beautifully updated. Gourmet Kitchen with travertine floors, granite counter tops and top of the line appliances that includes a gas Wolfe Range. Master Bedroom is on the main level. Master Bath features a new rain head shower and separate jetted tub and abundant closet space. Wonderful Den with fireplace opens to large deck. Gracious formal Living and Dining Rooms. Large Rec Room. Elegant home on beautiful grounds.

MLS# 1258010

$639,000

Sharon Wilson

Number One Coldwell Banker Agent in SC

Downtown Alive 2nd Division Marine Marching Bank, City of Greenville Pipes & Drums, Cleghorn May 23 ~ 232-2273 Upstate Shakespeare Festival Hamlet May 23-Jun. 16 ~ 235-69498 Metropolitan Arts Council One-Stop Open Studios Through Jun. 4 ~ 467-3132 Centre Stage The Fox on the Fairway Through Jun. 8 ~ 233-6733

327 Rice Street

109 Antigua Way

4 Beds, 3 Full Baths 3900 SqFt MLS# 1254877 $1,455,000

4 Beds, 5 Full Baths, 2 Half Baths 5900 SqFt MLS# 1245900 $995,000

101 West Court Street 1 Beds, 1 Full Baths 1100 SqFt, Being Sold Furnished MLS# 1258707 $315,000

Greenville County Museum of Art Sarah Lamb Through Jun. 2 ~ 271-7570 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage Photography by Tom Ebetino Through Jun. 14 ~ 233-6733 Main Street Real Estate Gallery Works by Julie Hughes Shabkie Through Jun. 30 ~ 250-2850

104 Ponce de Leon

623 N Main #6

3 Beds, 2 Full Baths 1900 SqFt MLS# 1258365 $329,000

3 Beds, 3 Full Baths, 1 Half Bath 2900 SqFt MLS# 1255418 $579,000

15 Pine Forest Drive 4 Beds, 3 Full Baths, 2 Half Baths 4300 SqFt MLS# 1255241 $769,000

Sharon Wilson- ABR ,CRS, GRI

111 Williams Street Greenville SC 29601 sharonwilson.net • swilson@cbcaine.com • 864.918.1140

42 THE Journal | MAY 17, 2013

Greenville Chamber of Commerce Artists of 10 Central Avenue Studios Through Jul. 12 ~ 242-1050 Greenville County Museum of Art William H. Johnson: Native Son Through Sep. 29 ~ 271-7570

JOURNAL HOMES

DETAILS

Featured Homes & Neighborhoods | Open Houses | Property Transfers

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

HOME INFO

Cottages at Chanticleer, Augusta Road Area New construction in The Cottages of Chanticleer, a sidewalk lined, gatedcommunity section in the prestigious, traditional neighborhood of Chanticleer. Home combines traditional craftsman architecture with modern luxuries and green technologies. Open plan with a Master Suite on the Main. This efficient floorplan has a great flow from the Kitchen to the Dining area through to a Great Room opening to a large Screened Porch. Amenities include hardwood floors, Granite countertops, gas fireplace, and Energy Star appliances including tank-less water heater, and high efficiency heating and air conditioning. Don’t miss this opportunity to become involved in the design of your very own newly constructed home in the convenient and established Augusta Road area.

Price: $475,000 | Square Footage: 2800+ Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3 full, 1 half Schools: Augusta Circle Elementary | Hughes Academy Greenville High Academy Patrick Franzen 864.250.1234 | patrickfranzen@msn.com Highland Homes 864.233.4175 | highlandhomessc.com To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

Agents on call this weekend

SANDY PATTERSON 421-4198 PELHAM RD.

LINDA BROWN 884-0966 SIMPSONVILLE

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

PHIL ROMBA 349-7607 WOODRUFF RD.

TAMMY ZURAW 879-4239 GREER

TRACIE TWILA KINGSMORE STAFFORD 525-6665 EASLEY/ 901-7676 PLEASANTBURG POWDERSVILLE

VICKI DUKE 979-8425 AUGUSTA RD.

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at

cdanjoyner.com.

MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 43

JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 19 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

ON THE MARKET

1202 SHADOW WAY, 1200 PELHAM $210,000 • MLS 1255576 Spacious 3 BR, 3.5 BA Townhome in one of Greenville’s most popular communities. Fantastic location, close to everything shopping, dining, hospital, I-385 and I-85. This charming unit is located at the back of the community so you’ll have lots of privacy and quiet. Generous screen porch on the first level over looks a wooded year yard. The walk out lower level has a large screened in patio. Incredible storage and closet space. Home has lots of potential and is priced for a quick sale. Seller is providing a 1 year Home Trust Warranty.

www.allentate.com/cynthiaserra Cynthia.Serra@allentate.com

J53

Cynthia Serra 864.304.3372

116 Bentwater Trail, Weatherstone

15 RED FERN TR. | $400,000 LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION! CUSTOM BUILT EXECUTIVE HOME - 4 or 5 BD, 3 Full BA’s + Home Of�ice w/French doors. NEW HARDWOODS IN DEN COMPLETES THE FLOW & ALL REFINISHED. Open �loor plan designed for entertaining. Gourmet kitchen with all the extras. Loft features library area for quiet reading. Great screen porch plus deck views private landscaped back yard. Full irrigation system. Circular drive plus extra parking. Prime location in sought out school district. Perfect Size, Perfect Location & PERFECT PRICE!! MLS#1240567

All brick, 2 story, 4 BR, 3.5 BA home with formal living & dining rooms, and family rm w/a gas fire place. Open kitchen, w/ granite, custom oak cabinets, & SS appliances. Breakfast area with bay window overlooks the manicured lawn. Master on main w/ a dble tray ceiling and spa like master bath w/ an oak furniture vanity w/ dble basins & granite, garden tub and separate shower. 3 BRs up, ea. w/ their own walk in closet & closet systems. Bonus room is ready for entertainment, studies, exercise or all 3. Deck w/ composite planks & wrought iron rails, hardwoods, tile & carpeted flrs, separate laundry room w/ custom cabinets, Arch. roof, 2 car garage; along w/ exterior landscaping that is green, pleasing &easy to maintain. Weatherstone- only 2 miles from shopping, restaurants & the interstates, yet it is years removed from the ordinary.

HOME INFO Price: $415,000 | MLS: #1238536 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3.5 Square Footage: 3000-3199 Schools: Fork Shoals Elementary Woodmont Middle | Woodmont High Kenny Reid | 864.293.9090 | k-reid.com Coldwell Banker Caine

MARCIA HANCOCK ARB, CRS, GRI, Broker Associate

864.270.1878 • mhancock@cbcaine.com

44 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

To submit your Featured Home: homes@greenvillejournal.com

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com

JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND PARKINS MILL

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 19 F R O M 2 – 4 P M CLAREMONT

5 BARKSDALE RD . $722,500 .

6 SABLE GLEN . $699,900 . MLS#1255400

4BR/5.5BA Gracious Family Home in best location in town. 5500 sq ft Private landscaped .7 acres. Pool & hot tub. Finished walk out bsmnt. w/ bath & kitchen. Tons of storage and extras. Don’t miss this one!

4BR/4BA Absolutely gorgeous home built by Woodland Builders in the exclusive gated Claremont community. Exquisite crown moldings throughout will leave you stunned at this price point.

Contact: SP McNamara (864) 918-9963

Contact: Charlotte Sarvis 864-346-9943 Carol Pyfrom Realty

THE OAKS AT ROPER MOUNTAIN

SPAULDING FARM

AUGUSTA ROAD AREA

225 W. FARIS RD . $535,000 . MLS#1244962

710 SPAULDING FARM ROAD . $599,000 . MLS#1258484

4BR/4BA New construction in maintenance free community. Hardwood floors, granite countertops, ss appliances, screened porch & more. 385 to Roper Mtn exit, cross Garlington, Left into SD.

5BR/3.5BA Old-style elegance, fully renovated! Two Master suites - one up and one down. Upscale Kitchen. Detached Bonus Room with Bath and Loft. GREAT NEW PRICE! Augusta Road to W Faris, L on Argonne.

5BR/3.5BA REDUCED over $25,000! 5BR 3.5BA home with in-ground salt water pool, hot tub, new vaulted pine ceiling outdoor room w/stacked stone fpl and wet bar plus an outdoor kitchen with SS appl’s and granite counter tops!

Contact: Cynthia Rehberg 884-9953 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Joe Stall 864-630-6464 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Kathy Piccione 864-979-5906 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

111 CHARLESTON OAK LN . $552,526 . MLS#1251473

COLUMNS @ ROPER MOUNTAIN

WEATHERSTONE

WEATHERSTONE

26 APPIAN CIRCLE . $478,900 . MLS#1257147

108 BENTWATER TRAIL . $429,900 . MLS#1256398

116 BENTWATER TRAIL . $415,000 . MLS#1238536

4BR/2BA/2HALF This beautiful home located on the Eastside in Columns at Roper will spark appeal before you ever walk in the door. Custom details like pavers on driveway entrance and gas lanterns set a warm tone.

4BR/3.5BA This home is truly amazing! It is a wonderful home built in 2011 and wonderful locationƒ. The location is awesome _ just minutes away from shopping and restaurants _ plus 385 and Laurens County.

4BR/3.5BA If every home is a castle, then this is a Royal Castle. Built by noted custom home builder, MG Profitt. Come visit during our Open House or schedule a private showing to see for yourself.

Contact: Mikel-Ann Scott 864-630-2474 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Carol Pyfrom 864-608-3312 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Kenny Reid (864) 293-9090 Coldwell Banker Caine

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 45

JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 19 F R O M 2 – 4 P M

FIVE FORKS PLANTATION

SYCAMORE RIDGE

22 OSSABAW LOOP . $389,500 . MLS#1256259 5BR/4BA Location, location, location! Just off Woodruff Road and minutes from shopping, dining, I-85 and I-385 this spectacular, bright, open, all brick, five bedroom, four bath home with a three-car garage. Contact: Halei Cox 864-346-9820 Carol Pyfrom Realty

GLEN MEADOWS

14 DENDON CT . $398,000 . MLS#1256032 4BR/3.5BA Beautiful custom brick home. Master on main. Inground pool. 385 South to Exit 27, Right on Fairview Rd, Right on Neely Ferry, Left into SD, Right on Dendon.

104 LEGENDS WAY . $382,900 . MLS#1257582 4BR/2.5BA Craftsmanship abounds at this all-brick custom built home on a half-acre lot. Lush landscaping and expansive rear grounds are equally impressive! Sycamore Ridge offers a robust amenity package including tennis, pool, clubhouse, sidewalks and 2 entrances. Convenient to downtown Simpsonville, I-385 and the Woodruff Rd/ Five Forks area.

Contact: Vivian Gorski 349-6090 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

STONEHAVEN

Contact: Melissa Morrell 864-918-1734 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

SUGAR CREEK

THE ARBORS

311 ENGLISH OAK RD . $373,500 . MLS#1258258

105 E. SHALLOWSTONE ROAD . $319,850 . MLS#0

208 GREEN ARBOR LANE . $317,900 . MLS#1248777

4BR/2.5BA Absolutely beautiful home. Open floor plan. Master on 2nd level. Wonderful details throughout. Screened porch. Woodruff Rd towards Five Forks, Right into SD, Right at Stop Sign on English Oak.

4BR/3.5BA All brick family home in a super location w/ walk out basement, large fenced back yard, wrap around front porch and tons of character. Pelham Rd. to Parkway, TL on Batesville, TL on Shallowstone #105.

3BR/2.5BA This is the one you’ll want! beautifully updated with open floor plan, master on main, formal dining room, sun room, fabulous kitchen,plantation shutters, blt in bookcases lots of storage, great yard.

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: JJ Bowers 483-6172 RE/MAX Realty Professionals

Contact: Patty Pfister (864) 630-0410 Keller Williams Main

46 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com

JOURNAL HOMES

OPEN THIS WEEKEND FOUNTAIN INN

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 19 F R O M 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 P M PEBBLE VALLEY

OAKMONT ESTATES

800 N MAIN STREET . $284,900 . MLS#1256025

14 BERNWOOD DRIVE . $269,500 . MLS#1257133

101 QUERCUS RUN . $259,900 . MLS#1256718

4BR/3BA What a fantastic home on almost an acre. Large bedrooms, formal LR & DR with bay window. 2 decks. 385 South, Exit 26, Left on Harrison Bridge Road, Right on N Main, Home on Left.

3BR/2.5BA This custom, all-brick home is located in the Pebble Creek area in the Pebble Valley subdivision. The main level features hardwood floors, a built-in bookshelf in the foyer and a beautiful fireplace.

4BR/2.5BA Great 4BR/2.5BR home. Subdivision built to accommodate those who desire large lots for either pools or privacy. Owner says great neighborhood with great neighbors. And, look at the property taxes!

Contact: Janie Gibbs 901-3403 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Mikel-Ann Scott 864-630-2474 Carol Pyfrom Realty

Contact: Ginny Scarboro 864-915-4840 Carol Pyfrom Realty

GILDER CREEK FARM

HUNT MEADOWS

GILDER CREEK FARM

304 GRIMES DR . $239,900 . MLS#1259060

318 HUNT ROAD . $214,900 . MLS#1256802

5 RED JONATHAN CT . $204,500 . MLS#1257008

4BR/2.5BA Elegant home in Fiver Forks Area that backs to Nature Preserve. Riverside/Mauldin Schools. Bonus room. Move-in ready. Woodruff Rd to Right on Shippers Lane, Right on Grimes, Home on Left.

3BR/2BA Craftsman style home on 1+/- acres.. I-85 to Exit 35, Hwy 86 toward Easley thru red light & 4-way stop joining Hwy 8 to Left on Hunt Road, From Easley, Hwy 8 toward Pelzer, Right on Hunt Rd.

4BR/3.5BA 1 story, move-in ready. GR with fireplace, granite, ss appliances. sun room, covered patio, irrigation, 2 car garage. Woodruff Rd past Five Forks Area, 2nd entrance into SD, Right on Red Jonathan.

Contact: Steve May 346-2570 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Joanne Beresh 505-1646 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Pat Norwood 420-1998 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

MORNING MIST

ADAMS RUN

SEVEN OAKS

4 ROXTON LOOP . $189,900 . MLS#1257688

9 E. INDIAN TRAIL . $185,000 . MLS#1254975

4BR/2BA Truly awesome ranch home. Bonus & sunrooms. 100% USDA. 385 South to West Georgia Rd Exit, Right on West Georgia Rd, Left into SD, Right on Cotton Hall, Home on Left.

3BR/2.5BA Fantastic home in great location. Master on main. Woodruff Rd to Five Forks Area, Right on Scuffletown, Right on Adams Mill, Left into SD, 2nd Right on Spring Lake, Right on Roxton.

4BR/2.5BA Large deck overlooking great backyard, perfect for entertaining. Wade Hampton Blvd to Edwards Mill Rd North, 1st Right on E. Indian Trail. Home on Left.

Contact: Carolyn Laws-Irwin 451-9407 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Linda Brown 884-0966 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

Contact: Mike Greene 288-6453 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

409 COTTON HALL CT . $196,900 . MLS#1256746

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 47

JOURNAL HOMES

OPE N H OU S E

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, May 19, 2:00-4:00PM

O P E N S U N D AY, M AY 19 F R O M 2 – 4 P M LONG CREEK PLANTATION

100 CROSSVINE WAY . $169,500 . MLS#1254727 4BR/2.5BA Nicely updated. 100% financing. Hurry! 385 South to Exit 27, Right on Fairview Rd, Right on Harrison Bridge, Left into SD, Left on Crossvine, Home on Right. Contact: Judi Tancibok 616-8740 Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co.

2 2 4 G L E N A B B EY WAY • MLS # 1257130 • $673, 500

This lovely home is located at the end of a cul-de-sac in a gated community off Batesville Rd. It has 4 beds with 4 1/2 baths, a very large back yard, and 3 car garage. Keeping room off kitchen/

GLORIA SEAVER 864.325.7081 | www.cbcaine.com

ON THE MARKET KELLETT PARK

breakfast area opens to screen porch. Two fireplaces. This home is surrounded by award winning schools and very convenient to GSP Airport, major highway, medical community, shopping.

PELHAM FALLS

FOUNTAIN INN

200 KELLETT PARK DRIVE . $557,000 .

217 ROCK ROAD . $269,900 . MLS#1258609

313 JENKINS BRIDGE ROAD . $259,900 . MLS#1250471

5BR/3.5BA PRESTIGIOUS, PRIVATE KELLETT PARK. Impeccably maintained, custom home w/pool and many upgrades. Offered below appraised value for immediate sale. Visit journalhomes.com for more photos. Appt only.

4BR/2.5BA Newly renovated!! This is a very spacious home that is move in ready! Some of the features include a 2 story foyer, gleaming hardwoods, arched column detail to entry of dining room. Don’t wait!

3BR/3BA A beautiful farm house located on a corner lot with tons of yard space for gardening, pets and children to run & play! The updates include: stainless appliances in 2010, roof in ‘02, HVAC 5 ton in ‘09.

Contact: Owner (864) 288-8463

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

COUNTRY WALK

WEATHERSTONE

2 LONG ACRE LANE . $65,000 . MLS#1255092

113 EBENWAY LANE . $64,500 . MLS#1249801

3BR/2BA A tranquil neighborhood located just off Fork Shoals Rd. This cozy split floor plan sits on a large 1.32 acre, level lot that is perfect for a game of football or pets to run about! Must See!

1/3 to 1/2 Acre Lots Weatherstone has released a limited number of builder ready lots- Ranging from 1/3- 1/2 acre & Priced in the mid to upper $60s. www.Weatherstone-Homes.com

Contact: Hilary Hurst (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Kenny Reid (864) 293-9090 Coldwell Banker Caine

48 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

SEARCH THE HOTTEST NEIGHBORHOODS.

JournalHOMES.com FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com

JOURNAL HOMES d. aR t s gu a Au Are

re atu n g Si

25 S. Laurens St. - Downtown

305 Jones Ave. #3 - Alta Vista

225 Meyers Dr. - Rockwood Park

$560,000 • 1259236 • Res. Or Com.

$395,000 • 1257507 • 3 BR/3.5 BA

$337,500 • 1255804 • 3 BR/3 BA

Res or Commercial – Block off Main St. ≈ 2300 sf. Potential for 3 floors of living space, wine cellar and 2-Car garage. No regime or HOA Fees. Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

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Sought after location, walking distance to dtwn, Great living space, lots of storage, Low maint. yd. Move in ready. Tom Marchant 864.449.1658

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109 Shadowood Dr. - Shadowood

508 Meyers Dr. - Augusta Rd.

$335,000 • 1258892 • 4 BR/3.5 BA + Bonus

$304,900 • 1258791 • 3 BR/2.5 BA

All brick on pvt, wooded acre lot! Fresh interior paint and updated light fixture. 3rd flr can be Kid/teen area (1BR,1BA & Bonus on 3rd floor). Barb Riggs 864.423.2783

Sought after street, ≈ 0.42 acres and 1990 sf, hardwoods, 2 fireplaces. Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

Charleston Style w/open flr pln & Florida rm off lrg kitchen. All Appl & Silestone C’tops. New paint and sod. Move in ready! Anne Marchant 864.420.0009 | Jolene Wimberly 864. 414.1688

6343 Highway 418 - Fountain Inn

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1001 S. Church St. Unit 403 - The Brio

25 Spring Park Dr. - Mountain Lake Colony

$205,000 • 1258401 • 2 BR/ 2 BA

$204,000 • 1257652 • 3 BR/2BA

Like new! Open floor plan, lots of light. Offers: balcony, pool, workout room and private gated parking. Valerie Miller 864.430.6602 | Chuck Miller 864.293.4778

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208 S. Moore Rd. - Fountain Inn $69,800 • 1258570

Beautiful building site on +/- 9 ac. Hdwds, stream, pond site drained, conv. to schools, Fairview Rd., Simpsonville & I-385.

$249,921 • 1252537 • 4 BR/3 BA

Spacious BRs, hdwd fls, FL. Rm and In-law Suite. Property has lrg wkshop w/rollup garage drs & cooled in summer. Conv.to Woodruff Rd. MUST SEE! Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

Historic mtn comm. 30 mins from Dtwn. Heart of pine flrs, lrg scr porch, ss appl., 2-C carport. Amenities. Tom Marchant 864.449.1658 | Gordon D. Seay 864.444.4359

101 Ramblewood Ave. - Wildaire $182,500 • 1250944 • 3 BR/2 BA

Cul-de-sac lot, hdwd flrs & built-ins, beautiful garden, convenient location. Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

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Custom Homesites - Montebello Starting at $69,000

1903 Spring Wood Ct. - Summer Woods $64,850 • 1253360 • 2 BR/ 1.5 BA

Private gated community, amenities, Spectacular mountain and city views.

Large downstairs living area, good size BRs, decorative patio, fenced back area, minutes to I-385/I-85.

Nancy McCrory 864.505.8367 | Karen Turpin 864.230.5176

Joan Rapp 864.901.3839

FANNIE MAE OWNED 127 W. Long Creek Ct. $111,900 MLS 1259186 21 McGill Rd.

$66,900 MLS 1259212

124 Goldfinch Ct.

$56,500 MLS 1257665

204 Rainbow Dr.

$52,000 MLS 1258230

www.Homepath.com Kathy Slayter • 864.982.7772

James Akers 864.325.8413

RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com

www.marchantco.com

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

|

864.467.0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Mary Praytor 864.593.0366

J53

Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future. MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 49

JOURNAL HOMES

Welcome to the Team! Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co., REALTORS is proud to announce new sales associates have joined the company.

REGINA SALLEY

VIVIAN GORSKI

LINDA BROWN

JAMES MOSER

Easley Cell 864-979-9646 rsalley@cdanjoyner.com

Simpsonville Cell 864-349-6090 vgorski@cdanjoyner.com

Simpsonville Cell 864-884-0966 lbrown@cdanjoyner.com

Simpsonville Cell 864-752-5862 jmoser@cdanjoyner.com

R E A L E S TAT E N E W S Metro Area Home Price Growth Trend Continues in First Quarter

Metropolitan area median home prices continued to rise in the �irst quarter, with the national gain showing the best year-over-year performance in over seven years, according to the latest quarterly report by the National Association of Realtors®. A companion breakout of income requirements to purchase a medianpriced home on a metro basis shows the typical buyer earns roughly double the income needed to buy a home in his or her area. The median existing single-family home price rose in 133 out of 150 metropolitan statistical areas1 (MSAs) based on closings in the �irst quarter of 2013 compared with �irst quarter last year, while 17 areas had price declines. In the fourth quarter of 2012, a comparable 133 areas showed price increases from a year earlier, greatly improved from the �irst quarter of 2012 when prices in only 74 metros were up. Bill Lawton, 2013 President of The Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS®, said many areas are experiencing a seller’s market. “The supply/demand balance is clearly tilted toward sellers in a good portion of the country,” he said. “Inventory conditions are expected to remain fairly constrained this year, so overall price increases should be well above the historic gain of one-to-two percentage points above the rate of in�lation. If home builders can continue to ramp up production, then home price growth is expected to moderate in 2014.”

At the end of the �irst quarter there were 1.93 million existing homes available for sale, which is 16.8 percent below the close of the �irst quarter of 2012, when 2.32 million homes were on the market. The national median existing single-family home price was $176,600 in the �irst quarter, up 11.3 percent from $158,600 in the �irst quarter of 2012. This is the strongest year-over-year price increase since the fourth quarter of 2005 when the median price jumped 13.6 percent. In the fourth quarter of 2012 the median price rose 10.0 percent from a year earlier. “Some of the previously hard-hit markets like Phoenix, Sacramento and Miami continue to experience a dramatic turnaround, while a new set of areas like Atlanta, Minneapolis and Seattle have begun to show strong signs of upward momentum,” Lawton said.

The median price is where half of the homes sold for more and half sold for less. However, some of the elevated median prices re�lect a shrinking market share of lower priced homes and greater activity in upper priced transactions. Distressed homes2 – foreclosures and short sales generally sold at discounts of up to 20 percent – accounted for 23 percent of �irst quarter sales, down from 32 percent a year ago. Total existinghome sales,3 including single-family and condo, edged up 0.8 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.94 million in the �irst quarter from 4.90 million in the fourth quarter, and were 9.8 percent above the 4.50 million pace during the �irst quarter of 2012. Sales were at the highest level since the fourth quarter of 2009, when they reached 4.95 million as buyers responded to tax incentives. According to Freddie Mac, the national

50 THE JOURNAL | MAY 17, 2013

commitment rate on a 30-year conventional �ixed-rate mortgage averaged 3.50 percent in the �irst quarter, up from a record low 3.36 percent in the fourth quarter; it was 3.92 percent in the �irst quarter of 2012. Lawton, said conditions remain favorable for buyers. “Even with rising home prices, there is still plenty of buying power in the market,” he said. “Historically low mortgage interest rates and home prices that remain well below their peak mean most buyers can purchase well within their means, assuming they meet ongoing stringent credit standards.” A separate breakout of qualifying incomes to purchase a median-priced existing single-family home on a metropolitan area basis demonstrates ample buying power in the current market. Income requirements are determined using several scenarios on downpayment percentages and assume 25 percent of gross income devoted to mortgage principal and interest at a mortgage interest rate of 3.5 percent. The national median family income was $62,200 in the �irst quarter. However, to purchase a home at the national median price, a buyer making a 5 percent downpayment would only need an income of $36,500. With a 10 percent downpayment the required income would be $34,600, while with 20 percent down, the necessary income is $30,700. In the condo sector, metro area condominium and cooperative prices – covering changes in 54 metro areas – showed the national median existing-condo price was $172,400 in the �irst quarter, up 10.4 percent from the �irst quarter of 2012. Thirty-nine metros showed increases in their median condo price from a year ago and 15 areas had declines.

Regionally, existing-home sales in the Northeast rose 4.4 percent in the �irst quarter and are 9.1 percent above the �irst quarter of 2012. The median existing single-family home price in the Northeast rose 2.9 percent to $234,000 in the �irst quarter from a year ago. In the Midwest, existing-home sales increased 1.2 percent in the �irst quarter and are 15.0 percent higher than a year ago. The median existing single-family home price in the Midwest increased 8.2 percent to $135,100 in the �irst quarter from the same quarter last year. Existing-home sales in the South edged up 0.7 percent in the �irst quarter and are 13.3 percent above the �irst quarter of 2012. The regional median existing single-family home price was $156,800 in the �irst quarter, up 9.3 percent from a year earlier. In the West, which is the region most impacted by limited housing supplies, existing-home sales slipped 1.1 percent in the �irst quarter but are 0.6 percent above a year ago. The median existing single-family home price in the West jumped 24.4 percent to $247,800 in the �irst quarter from the �irst quarter of 2012. The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® represents over 1,600 members in all aspects of the real estate industry. Please visit the Greater Greenville Association of REALTORS® web site at www.ggar. com for real estate and consumer information. “Every market is different, call a REALTOR® today.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION

JournalHOMES.com

G R E E N V I L L E T R A N S AC T ION S

JOURNAL HOMES

A P R I L 2 2 - 2 6, 2 013 SUBD.

PRICE

$1,800,000 $1,270,000 CHURCH STREET PARK $1,160,000 KINGSBRIDGE $745,000 $740,000 COACHMAN PLANTATION $708,000 $680,000 BRADLEY OAKS $670,000 $635,000 KINGSBRIDGE $579,500 MILLER’S POND $525,000 ALLEGHENY $508,000 RIVER HOUSE CONDOS $492,500 HOBCAW $490,000 $480,000 400 NORTH MAIN CONDOMINIUMS $455,000 TINSLEY PLACE $450,000 NORTH PARK $432,000 $430,000 CRAFTSMAN COURT $429,000 $418,000 ROCKWOOD PARK $404,000 $400,960 $400,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $394,800 THE VALLEY AT TANNER ESTATES $387,308 STONE HOLLOW $376,000 $375,000 MCBEE STATION RESIDENTIAL $365,000 COLLINS CREEK $360,000 COURT YARDS ON W GEORGIA ROAD $357,584 COURT YARDS ON W GEORGIA ROAD $354,525 VALLEY VIEW “GOLF COMMUNITY” $354,500 SINKING FUND COMMISSION $350,000 POINSETT CORNERS $350,000 STONEHAVEN $340,000 CARILION $338,200 ACADIA $329,000 FOREST HEIGHTS $325,000 HOLLINGTON $323,575 MELVILLE WESTERVELT $323,000 ELLINGTON PARK $317,600 ASCOT $310,000 SILVER RIDGE FARMS $309,000 FOXCROFT $305,000 COURT YARDS ON W GEORGIA ROAD $303,820 SWANSGATE $300,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $294,800 HEARTHSTONE AT RIVER SHOALS $285,890 DUNEAN MILL VILLAGE $285,820 $285,000 ENOREE TRACE $276,886 $275,000 CAROLINA OAKS $272,000 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $265,500 BOTANY WOODS $265,000 DOVE TREE $262,500 IVY GROVE $260,000 100 COURT ST CONDO $260,000 MCBEE BOOKEND $255,000 CREEKWOOD $245,000 BRIDGEWATER $244,000 ASHFORD $243,550 GREYSTONE COTTAGES $242,825 HEARTHSTONE AT RIVER SHOALS $241,690 HEARTHSTONE AT RIVER SHOALS $240,000 $238,000 NEELY FARM - HAWTHORNE RIDGE $232,500 GARLINGTON PLACE $230,000 RIVER DOWNS $230,000 CASTLEWOOD $229,000 STONE CREEK $227,000 RABON CHASE $224,000 MERRIFIELD PARK $223,450 FARIS OAKS $220,000 CROSSGATE AT REMINGTON $218,628 SHOALLY RIDGE $218,280 WARRENTON $216,000 PARK RIDGE $215,795 ONEAL VILLAGE $215,500 SILVERLEAF $215,000 THE LANDING AT SAVANNAH POINTE $211,545 $210,000 BROWNSTONE CROSSING $207,500 ROCKBROOKE NORTH $204,900 RIVERBANKS ENERGY CENTER $200,000 SUNRISE $200,000 GRESHAM PARK $197,364 FOXGLOVE $197,000 CASTLE ROCK $189,219 AUTUMN TRACE $187,000 THE VILLAGE AT WINDSOR CREEK $185,587 COUNTRY MEADOWS $185,000 HIGHLAND DEVELOPMENT $185,000 JONESVILLE LANDING $184,000 PLANTERS ROW $183,000 WINDSOR FOREST $182,000 TIMBERLAKE $180,000 AUGUSTA RD HILLS $180,000 SUMMERFIELD $177,000 GRESHAM PARK $176,900 $175,000 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $175,000 $174,000 COUNTRY MEADOWS $173,000 $173,000 LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON $166,900 $162,500 $162,000 LAKEVIEW PLANTATION $159,000 FAIRVIEW LAKE $157,000 RUSSTON PLACE $156,500 SHADOW CREEK $155,900

SELLER

BUYER

FUNERAL DIRECTORS LIFE I 50 BMG LLC CBNA-SC LLC ASSURED STORAGE OF SIMPS CHURCH AT HAMPTON LLC AUDERE EST FACERE LLC RAE JOSEPH E ANDERSON DIANE M (JTWROS RAMSAUR EDMUND A JR DODDS BRUCE L TI COACHMAN LLC D R HORTON INC HEGLAR RON W FERENCE JEAN A (JTWROS) DODDS BRUCE L DANIEL BENJAMIN RUSSELL HAGOOD ALBERT S SIMMONS DANIEL L MAULDIN KEITH A SANCHEZ SERGIO SMITH JAMES M MATHIS DONNA S (JTWROS) PARKER DAPHNE B FERGUSON JAMES D REEVES HAMILTON SCOTT SWEATT WILLIAM DAVID ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC GRAY ERIC C (JTWROS) EADES DAN TRUSTEE HOEFLIN DAVID A O’LEARY ROBERT J SHIFLET ANGELA BUZZETT ( WILLIAMS SUSAN L BROCK GREGORY D ALIFFI DANIEL JOSEPH HAMET AMANDA S MILLER DEBORAH M (L-EST) BURCHETT JOHN ARTFUL HOME DESIGNS LLC DAVIS JACLYN T THORNTON STANLEY TODD CARRILHO ALEXIS OGLESBY SONYA MARIE OUELLET NOEMIE DION (JTW CARRILHO ALEXIS MEILINGER MICHAEL E GEDOSCH STEPHEN J SR FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF NVR INC KILCOYNE MICHELLE C BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT DUNN CHARLES A COLE EMILY M LAWRENCE SCOTT E CONGAREE OFFICE CENTER L RADITZ ROBERT E LEA FRANCES J DIEHL GERALD JEAN (JTWRO COLLINS JOHN WALDROP SCHUETT LINDA VIRANI LLC ABEE JOHN R III VIRANI LLC WILK EDWARD H (JTWRSOS) CARSWELL SUSAN T BRANDA BRUCE N (JTWROS) TF1 PROPERTY LLC L&L VAZQUEZ LLC GENSHEIMER JAY R MORGAN HERBERT W (JTWROS MEWBORN KEVIN EDGAR MICHAEL E BRYANT NICHOLE RAE JOSEPH EDWARD (JTWRO ACADIA TOWNHOMES LLC COWART JODI M (JTWROS) HODGE FRANK RAMSEY REBECCA S BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT FLINT AVELINA M LUPO CHRISTOPHER I BERTALAN MICHAEL MARIE ( BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT CRESS JENNIFER MCKETTY DEBORAH MCPHERSON KERISEA S KLUCKHOHN JASON S WATWOOD DUNCAN N (JTWROS SPRAYBERRY MARK P FERGUSON JASON A VIRANI LLC 2009 FREUND FAMILY TRUST GOLDBERG LIVING TRUST SMITH LAURA SIMMONS NVR INC ZHANG YONGREN SC PILLON HOMES INC BRADLEY DAVID J (JTWROS) HOLLINGSWORTH ANTHONY SC BAGWELL ASHELY I NORTH GVILLE BAPT ASSOC T & S BRASS AND BRONZE W SK BUILDERS INC COLLINS ALLEN R (JTWROS) CATRON DOROTHY M CAMPBELL YOUNG LEADERS FISH CONNIE S BROOKFIELD RELOCATION IN WILSON DEREK R FERRERIS ALEXANDER GONZA BALLEW FAMILY LIMITED PA ANGELO STEPHANIE WILSON BILLY P COVINGTON KEITH DANTZLER LAND BANK HOLDING GROUP BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT MORGAN HERBERT W RAUCH CHRISTOPHER L (JTW ZORBAS FREDERICK SMITH GERALD NEIL BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT COOPER KRISTAN C BK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCT HUBBARD JAMES A MEDLIN BARBARA G TEACHEY BENJAMIN G ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC WATSON SANDRA W NVR INC ANTHONY CHRISTOPHER M FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG TAYLOR CHRISTOPHER JARED HUNTER W WALKER III BEESON JOSEPH MCLAURIN HOLLAND MARK L THOMAS JASON M MATT ERIKA B WALKER DOUGLAS S BURT ELIZABETH ADAMS-DEAN SHARON LEE (J FERGUSON JAMES D (SURV) MILLER DEBORAH M (L-EST) CROW DAVID A TRUSTEE HAMBRIGHT CHRISTINE (JTW EDMONDS PAMELA J FOX ADAM T (JTWROS) GRAY ERIC C DEMPSEY GABRIELLE (JTWRO ROWE MARK A HUGHES LAUREN ALEXANDRIA D R HORTON INC MCLANEY JEREMIAH FRANK STONEWOOD HOMES INC LAWS MEGAN L (JTWROS) KERNS RICHARD C JR HEAD MICHAEL WESLEY (JTW REMBREY CONSTRUCTION AND LEAPARD RONNIE L DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH LARSON PATRICIA J VIGNONE FRED JOHN JR GOETZ RICO (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC BREZEALE JEANETTE CHRIST ALBRECHT WILLODEAN BRIDWELL CHRISTINA H (JT GABLE C MORGAN EATON CHARLES ARTHUR (JT FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG REIDER CHRISTOPHER CHARL RAY NANCY J NORVELL PROPERTIES LLC CLIFF HAWK PROPERTIES LL CHANDLER-WILLS AMY JO (J EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL STAUFFER ROBERT S BLACKWELL MARCIA B NELSON MARION (JTWROS) NIEMITALO INC HINDMAN LUCAS ELLISON (J PHILIPP AMANDA S (JTWROS AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR EASTWOOD CONSTRUCTION LL HOVAN JOHN J DURRE ROGER J OBBINK LEE H (JTWROS) WILLIAMS ANTHONY E KANDEL MATTHEW K MCKINNEY JEFFERY L AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT PR BRUCHON JAN F STUMP CHRISTOPHER C (JTW JOHNSON TIMOTHY L AMERICAN HOMES 4 RENT BOLING FRANKIE R GATES DAVID W (JTWROS) PHILLIPS JO ANN LOCKABY HOLTZCLAW TRACEY FOTINOS HOLDING LLC SMITH JONATHAN E (JTWROS DAVIAN LINDA M SPERBER JACK BROWN DWAYNE S FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG NEWKIRK GEOFFREY CROUSE JUDY (JTWROS) REBER HENRY M JR GRIMMETT LYNDSEY R STRICKLAND CATHY E HOLLAND JOHN C (JTWROS) RALLIS RONALD D JR SPARROW HAWK LLC SMITH DEBORAH ANN (JTWRO BENNETT ADAM J MATHIS STEVEN MICHAEL MATHIS JOSHUA S BRIDWELL NADINE P BRIDWELL RICHARD E MOSS JESSE MILLER JERRY B (SURV) WATERS GLENN TERRY PRUTCH RACHEAL AIRYN (JT SHAHDADI ABBAS A EZZELARB ANGELA J (JTWRO SK BUILDERS INC HUTSELL MELISSA M (SURV)

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ADDRESS 1040 WOODRUFF RD 2540 BRIGHTON-HENRIETTA TOWNLI 1088 N CHURCH ST 5 MITCHELL SPRING CT 516 WATTS AVE 8800 ROSWELL RD STE 100 BLD B 704 MOUNTAIN CREEK RD 306 WOODBRIDGE WAY 517 WATTS AVE 304 CRESTHAVEN PL 31 MILLERS POND WAY 31 ALLEGHENY RUN 154 RIVERPLACE UNIT 203 35 HOBCAW DR 190 DEEPDALE DR 400 NORTH MAIN STREET STE 304 104 TINSLEY CT 1012 N MAIN ST 4 CHESTNUT HILL PL 507-B TOWNES ST 381 BEECHWOOD DR 502 MEYERS DR 351 CHASTAIN HILL RD 3 HEDGE ST 702 PAWLEYS DR 2 ALLWOOD CT 4 STONE HOLW 439 CONGAREE RD 400 E MCBEE AVE 1 PARKINS POINTE WAY 105 MALIBU LN 205 MALIBU LN 40 LAURELCREST LN 142 CLUB VIEW DR PO BOX 177 701 CARRIAGE HILL RD 6 MAITLAND DR 111 FATHERS DR 108 FARIS CIR 236 ABBEY GARDENS LN 31 MELVILLE AVE 9 FITZGERALD WAY 11 STEEPLE RIDGE CT PO BOX 143 101 W RED FOX TRL 208 MALIBU LN 207 ROBIN LN 204 RIO GRANDE PL 15 TIPPECANOE ST 10 BARLIA WAY 27 S MAIN ST 125 SAFFRON WAY 104 BROADUS AVE 16260 N 71ST ST STE 60 5 LYNELL PL 10 BOTANY RD 4 SUGARBERRY DR PO BOX 1039 100 W COURT ST UNIT 2A 111 E MCBEE AVE UNIT 201 443 RIVER SUMMIT DR 366 BRIDGE CROSSING DR 205 CHETSWORTH LN 107 ASHLER DR 26 SANTEE CT 100 SANDUSKY LN 108 W FARIS RD 805 FARMING CREEK DR 214 W HYPERICUM LN 105 SHETLAND WAY 8 MIDDLEWICK CT 206 HICKORY HILL LN 112 RABON CHASE CT 115 GLENWAYE DR 411 W FARIS RD 203 KINGS HEATH LN 15 BARRIER WAY 2 WOODSMOKE CT 217 BRENLEIGH CT 401 WICKER PARK AVE 13 CROSSWINDS WAY 220 PAQCOLET DR 4796 N HIGHWAY 14 2 UPPER MEADOW WAY 101 REDWATER WAY 19 DONATELLO CT 40 ABERDEEN DR 15 ALDERSHOT WAY 5 ANGEL WING CT 26 JADEN CT 23815 STUART RANCH RD 102 PENRITH CT 301 OAK WILD CIR 149 BLYTHE DR 23815 STUART RANCH RD 6 CHARLESTOWN CT 23815 STUART RANCH RD STE 302 21 TIMBERLAKE DR 216 CAMMER AVE 3 TANNER CHASE WAY 4 ALDERSHOT WAY PO BOX 650043 5 MINERT CT 24 E FARIS RD 405 OAK WIND CIR 121 UPCOUNTRY LN 230 MAREFAIR LN 19 ROBERTSON WAY 35 TURRENTINE CIR 10 MELISA CT 505 FAIRVIEW LAKE WAY 3 ASHLEY LN 101 SEDGEBROOK DR

80 years of helping first-time homebuyers turn dreams into reality. The real estate professionals of the Caine Companies have always known real estate is about more than buying, selling or leasing houses and buildings. It’s about helping people come home—which we’ve been doing for the past 80 years. Let us help you find your dream home—visit cbcaine.com.

MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 51

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the week in photos THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA LEGAL NOTICES Only $.79 per line

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SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT C. A. NO.: 2013-DR-23-1739 Chad Edward McCoy and Rebecca Lynn McCoy, Plaintiffs, vs. Tamera Passwaters, Katherine Taylor And John Doe, a minor under the age of fourteen (14) years, Defendants. To: The Defendant(s) abovenamed: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Complaint on the undersigned at her office, Richmond Callaway Law Firm, LLC, Woodruff Road Corporate Center, 112 Lovett Drive, Greenville, South Carolina, 29607 within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Amy Richmond Callaway, Esq. #12582 Richmond Callaway Law Firm, LLC Attorney for Plaintiffs Woodruff Road Corporate Center 112 Lovett Drive Greenville, South Carolina 29607 (864) 234-7304 Dated: April 24, 2013 SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF CLARENDON South Carolina Department of Social Services, Plaintiff, vs. James Walls, Kathy Tutein, AND: Malachi Walls DOB: 02/02/96 Defendants. Docket No.: 2013-DR-14-18 TO: THE DEFENDANT KATHY TUTEIN: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, the original of which has been filed in the Office of the Clerk of Court for Clarendon County, on the 18th day of January, 2013, a copy of which will be delivered to you upon request; and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Complaint upon the undersigned, Attorney for the Plaintiff, at Post Office Box 186, Darlington, SC 29540, within thirty (30) days following the date of service upon you, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the said Complaint within the time stated, Plaintiff will apply for Judgment by Default against said Defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint. The Final Hearing in this matter is scheduled for APRIL 1, 2013 AT 9:30 A.M. NEWTON I. HOWLE, JR. Attorney for Plaintiff S. C. Bar No. 2729 100 St. Johns St. Post Office Box 186 Darlington, SC 29540 Telephone: 843-395-1519 March 21, 2013 Telefax: 843-393-0342

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: IFB# 49-06/04/13 Gravely Road Storm Drainage Improvements, June 6, 2013, 3:00 P.M. A mandatory pre-bid meeting and site visit will be held at 10:00 A.M., May 23, 2013 in the Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SHERIFF'S AUCTION NOTICE The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office is holding an auction to dispose of found and seized property. The auction will be held at 657 Keith Drive June 8th 2013 The gate will open at 8:00 am the auction will begin at 10:00 am. The pre-viewing will be Friday June 7th from 9am -3:00pm. The auction will consist of Misc household items, jewelry (no guarantees), misc electronics, (cameras, stereo equipment etc), tools (new and used), lawn mower, weed eater. The cars are as follows: 1995 OLDS CUTLASS 1GWH52M35D300661; 1999 AUDI A4 WAUCB28D5XA213313; 1994 FORD TEMPO 1FAPP36X7RK227435; 2008 SAMSUNG MOTORCYCLE L8YTCKPD38Y041021; 1993 TOYOTA CAMRY 4T1SK12EXPU264892; 2001 FORD RANGER 1FTYR14E71TA74231; 1992 NISSAN JN1FU21PDNX890345. If you have any questions please call Ellen M. Clark Monday- Friday 864-467-5224.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Chuy’s Opco, Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1034B Woodruff Road, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 26, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Summit Hotel TRS 105, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 108 Carolina Point Parkway, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 26, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

52 THE Journal | MAY 17, 2013

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Greektown Grille, Inc., intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 400 McBee Street, Suite 101 Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than June 2, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Stallings Food Mart, LLC, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1320 Stallings Road, Greenville, SC 29609. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 19, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Officer photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

ABC NOTICE OF APPLICATION Only $145

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP# 50-06/05/13 Drop Deck Flatbed Trailer, June 5, 2013, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org or by calling (864) 467-7200.

look who’s in the journal this week

Officers salute the flag during the Greenville County Law Enforcement Fallen Officer Memorial Service.

The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office Honor Guard raise the flag to full-staff then lower it to half-staff during the Greenville County Law Enforcement Fallen Officer Memorial Service at the Law Enforcement Center. The annual service recognizes the sacrifice of all Greenville law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty since 1797.

Kemet employees worked on a home in Simpsonville last weekend as part of Habitat for Humanity's Golden Strip Coalition project.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Crescent Mountain Vineyards, LP D/b/a Hotel Domestique | Restaurant 17, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 10 Road of Vines, Travelers Rest, SC 29690. To object to the issuance of this license/permit, written protest must be received by the S.C. Department of Revenue no later than May 26, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Chase Cale, far right, of Greenville, won second place in the Hurricane Junior Golf Tour's Augusta Junior Shootout last weekend at the Bartram Trail Golf Club in Augusta, Ga.

Crossword puzzle: page 54

Sudoku puzzle: page 54

journal culture

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Visual performing artist Brian Olsen works on a portrait during his first of thirteen performances on the Wells Fargo Art in Action Stage at Falls park during the 10th annual Artisphere in downtown Greenville.

Graduates from Greenville Technical College pose for a photo at the BI-LO Center shortly before their recent commencement exercises. More than 600 people participated in the ceremony. Paula Harper Bethea, executive director of the South Carolina Education Lottery, was the speaker. Local woodworker Michael McDunn carves a fleur-de-lis during a demonstration on Main Street in the Michelin Artist Demo Row during Artisphere.

The Northwest Little League Gators, here visiting with Reedy Ribbit, were honored guests at last week's Clemson vs. Furman game at Fluor Field. Their anti-smoking video won first place in the "Field of Dreams" video contest sponsored by the Greenville Family Partnership.

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artisphere photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

People attending the 10th annual Artisphere walk down Artist Row on South Main Street in Greenville.

MAY 17, 2013 | THE Journal 53

journal culture

figure. this. out.

TES A M

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By Alan Arbesfeld

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54 THE Journal | MAY 17, 2013

Across 1 Within 5 Earthy tone 10 In the neighborhood 15 Riot control weapon 19 Grabber’s cry 20 Kansas City athlete 21 Cole Porter classic from “Can-Can” 23 It’s designed not to be noticeable 25 Lawman who killed Billy the Kid 26 Single 27 Significant ones? 29 Bad-mouthed 30 Ibsen play with music by Grieg 32 Rulers in a line 36 -y plus -y? 37 Subject with no depth? 43 Dewlapped critter 47 Grafton’s “__ for Alibi” 48 Bistro 49 Battery that’s 8.3 millimeters in diameter 50 Former park near the Harlem River 53 Fun-loving female 56 Env. directive 57 Wise 58 “Angela’s Ashes” sequel 60 Jewish campus organization 61 Begets

63 Swollen 65 Dummy 67 Union in D.C., e.g. 68 Where to see an inflation index? 71 Support 74 Vex 75 Political theorist Hannah 76 Have a feeling 78 Actress Dahl 81 School in Big D 82 River isles 84 “Don’t look at me!” 85 Co-chair of John McCain’s 2007-’08 presidential campaign 88 View from Kuwait City 91 French suffix with jardin 92 Scottish turndowns 94 PC key 95 Dud 96 Hardly luxury boxes 100 Ticked off 101 Toledo time-outs 102 Military monetary scale 107 Petulance 111 More cool, man 114 Caught congers 115 Court quarterback 119 Fictionary, e.g. 121 “You had your chance” 122 Leadoff hitter’s asset 123 Egyptian deity 124 Winter Palace resi-

dent 125 Bold type 126 Mitigated 127 Insurance policy contingency Down 1 Energize 2 Pooh penner 3 Amazed 4 Block 5 Web address ending 6 Ratio indicators 7 __ Regency 8 Not at all patient 9 Ultimatum ending 10 Fake it, in a way 11 Motor add-on? 12 Crash site? 13 Part of DJIA: Abbr. 14 Result in 15 Romans’ 16-Down 16 Greeks’ 15-Down 17 Ticket 18 Founded, on signs 22 Rainbow maker 24 Trim 28 Nutrition letters 31 Quite a spell 33 They follow springs by about seven days 34 Former Belgian camera brand 35 One looking ahead 37 Yearning ones 38 Cause of some ‘60s trips 39 Giant rival

40 Follow 41 Outback order 42 Dixie group? 43 “No thanks” 44 “I follow” 45 Extreme 46 Exceptional 47 What “8” may stand

Medium

for 51 Like granola 52 Mounting aid 54 Hood with a rod 55 “Egad!” 59 Auteur’s starting point 62 Smack-dab 64 Largest of the Mari-

ana Islands 65 Cruel type 66 All, in scores 69 One wishing for a real-life “undo” button? 70 Really cool 71 Actress Aimée 72 Agave fiber 73 Respect and then some 74 Oscar winner Mirren 77 Ga. Tech grad 78 “Edith, you’re __”: Archie Bunker 79 South Korea’s first president 80 Former capital of Italy 81 Process, as ore 83 Skewered Thai dish 86 Auréole wearer 87 “The Valachi Papers” author Peter 89 Hammer home? 90 Poker? 93 Bad-mouth 97 Be of __: help 98 Self-important authority figure 99 Computer terminal? 100 1986 Best Actress Matlin 102 One of three 1994 Peace Nobelists 103 Fit for a king 104 It shares its airport shuttle with National 105 Distributions to DJs 106 Idyllic places 107 Jutting shoreline formation 108 Kitchenware 109 Alaska senator Murkowski 110 __’acte 112 Recess near an altar 113 Spanish snack 116 Form follower 117 Rhine tributary 118 Way to get there: Abbr. 120 Perplexing Crossword answers: page 52

Sudoku answers: page 52

JOURNAL CULTURE

PAST AND PRESENT WITH COURTNEY TOLLISON HARTNESS, PH.D.

50 years later, civil rights impact of Kress protest still felt On Aug. 9, 1960, 14 AfricanAmerican teenagers walked calmly into Greenville’s S.H. Kress variety store and sat quietly at the lunch counter while whites throughout the store glared. Their actions were shocking but not unprecedented: They followed a pattern that had been established on at least five prior occasions, in which young African-Americans held sit-ins at S.H. Kress, W.T. Grant and Woolworth’s. This time, however, was different. Within minutes, the manager of the store, George W. West, called the police, who arrived at the corner of Main and McBee (currently occupied by CVS) in four squad cars. The 14 teens were arrested and taken to city police headquarters. Most of those arrested were students at Sterling High School, Greenville’s segregated high school for African-Americans. Four of them were under the age of 16 and thus were considered juveniles and handled more leniently. The remaining 10 ranged in age from 16 to 19 and were tried as adults. They were charged with “trespassing after warning” and spent almost three hours in jail until each was released on $100 bond ($786.40 in today’s dollars), which was posted by M.D. Tolbert, vice president of the Greenville chapter of the NAACP. Their actions were considered trespassing because they violated the city’s segregation ordinances. The Kress manager did not request arrest, and only reluctantly called the police, because he too would have been in violation of the law had he served them. In the 1960s and for many decades prior, local laws regulated race relations and limited African-American freedoms. In this case, they limited white freedoms as well. Greenville’s segregation ordinances at the time prohibited hotels and restaurants from serving “white per-

sons and colored persons in the same room, or at the same table, or at the same counter,” unless separate facilities were furnished. “Separate facilities” were defined as “separate eating utensils and separate dishes … all of which shall be marked by some appropriate color scheme.” They also required “separate tables, counters or booths” with a distance of at least 35 feet to be maintained between these areas. In the kitchen, all eating utensils and dishes had to be washed in distinct and separate areas. The arrests were upheld by the Municipal Court of the City of Greenville and sustained by the state Supreme Court. The case eventually reached the United States Supreme Court, and the justices heard James Richard Peterson, et. al. v. City of Greenville on Nov. 6-7, 1962. Attorneys for the 10 students included Matthew J. Perry, for whom the federal courthouse in Columbia is named, and Willie T. Smith of Greenville. On May 20, 1963, the justices offered their opinion. The justices wrote that Greenville’s segregation ordinances violated the equal protection clause and citizenship protections provided for in the 14th Amendment. The grounds? These young people were deemed to be trespassing because of their race and their racial identity alone. Furthermore, the ordinance also denied personal freedoms to the manager of the store, for he had no choice but to call the police for reasons based solely on race. The justices overturned the 10 convictions and nullified Greenville’s segregation ordinances. The case desegregated lunch counters across the country and effectively provided judicial ground for overturning all local and state ordinances requiring discrimination on the basis of race. The justices used this decision to resolve several other cases pending

that asked the same judicial question. On May 21, 1963, the front page of The Greenville News published an article from the Associated Press which compared the impact of this case to that of Brown v. Board of Education (1954): ”It was a decision with more far-reaching impact on racial relations in daily life than any since the school desegregation decrees of nearly a decade ago.” For the next year, the justices referenced the Greenville case when similar issues arose. When Congress passed the 1964 Civil Rights Act, a provision in it nullified all state and local laws requiring discrimination on the grounds of race or religion. After the Greenville case, individuals could not be discriminated against, and could not be forced to discriminate, on the basis of race. Immediately, the Greenville Chamber of Commerce’s bi-racial committee began organizing an integrated gathering. In early June, L.P. “Dr. Pete” Hollis, former superintendent of Parker District Schools, and Alex A. Chambers of Israel Metropolitan CME Church had breakfast together at the lunch counter at Woolworth’s on Main Street. Their breakfast was carefully planned, executed flawlessly, and unfolded without incident. The actions of these two community leaders indicated that the laws had now changed, and that this community would adjust without further resistance. Decades later, civic leader Sam Zimmerman said, “I think the whole thing about this community was that there was a lot of boosterism.

We expected bigger things. They said, ‘We’re going to grow and we have to do that without disruption.’ I think on both sides, there was a lot of forbearance.” Local historian Judy Bainbridge said racial injustices created among blacks “a resolve that such injustices would cease.” White community leaders resolved that racial changes would occur in a manner that would not be detrimental to Greenville’s economic progress. Racial change in our community was not well received by many whites, but when African-American efforts succeeded in removing the last obstacles to progress, AfricanAmerican and white community leaders worked together to ensure that the initial attempts at desegregation were smoothly executed. African-Americans who would not have been able to dine at the Kress lunch counter 50 years ago have cause to celebrate. Whites whose dining companions were unfairly regulated by local and state laws also have cause to celebrate. Monday is the 50th anniversary of this historic decision. There is no historic marker commemorating this event, but across the street from the CVS, the Sterling Square memorial (temporarily shrouded by a protective construction shed) honors the young Sterlingites who helped desegregate Kress, and whose actions leave a long, national legacy. Dr. Courtney Tollison Hartness is an assistant professor of history at Furman and museum historian at the Upcountry History Museum.

SO YOU KNOW The Upcountry History Museum will commemorate the 50th anniversary of Greenville’s role in the civil rights movement with a public lecture by Dr. Tollison on this topic to be held on Monday, May 20, at 11 a.m. The lecture is free for members and $5.00 for guests. Reservations: 864-467-3100 or info@upcountryhistory.org.

MAY 17, 2013 | THE JOURNAL 55

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May 17, 2013 Greenville Journal