OCPS Pocket Guide 2022-23

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POCKET GUIDE 2022-2023


ABOUT ORANGE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS VISION: To ensure every student has a promising and successful future.

MISSION: With the support of families and the community, we create enriching and diverse pathways to lead our students to success.

SUPERINTENDENT: Dr. Maria Vazquez EIGHTH-LARGEST school district in the nation Maria Vazquez, Ed.D. Superintendent

2 | Orange County Public Schools

FOURTH-LARGEST school district in Florida


SCHOOL BOARD OF ORANGE COUNTY OCPS is led by an

eight-member school board. Seven are elected from singlemember districts; the chair is elected countywide. All board members serve staggered, four-year terms.

Teresa Jacobs Chair

Maria Salamanca Angie Gallo Vice Chair | District 1 District 2

Alicia Farrant District 3

THE superintendent is appointed by the School Board.

Pam Gould District 4

Vicki-Elaine Felder District 5

Dr. Karen C. Dentel District 6

Melissa Byrd District 7

2022-2023 Pocket Guide | 3


NTS

EME HIEV

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OCP

IN 2021-22, Orange County Public Schools was rated a “B” school district by the Florida Department of Education. OCPS received 60.7% of the possibe points – the cutoff for an “A” was 62%. The district’s results maintained or improved in 10 of the 11 components or areas reported. FOR the 2022-23 school year, more than 203,137 digital devices have been distributed.

4 | Orange County Public Schools

IN 2022, 130 graduating seniors from 19 of our traditional high schools were accepted into top-20-ranked universities, liberal arts colleges or U.S. service academies ranked by U.S. News & World Report. THIRTY seniors from 11 high schools were chosen as winners in the 2022 National Merit Scholarship Program. The organization also selected 22 semi-finalists from nine high schools. MORE than 16,736

students took at least one AP test and scored 3, 4, or 5.


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2022-2023 Pocket Guide | 5


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6 | Orange County Public Schools


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YEES O L EMP nal

9 14,34 7 5,93

stem ol sy scho rgest y t n la u e Co Florida’s taff 2,125 l rang ort S he O f Centra T Supp s o t one ers. the stan i is s s 5 y % of 77 ng A p 59 i mplo u e h e c Tea mak . hers ce s* Teac workfor ve ator 13 r 6 t s i S rs ha n i P f f C m a O ache % have t e S Ad t l S a 3 :3 CP ion % rees of O fess 495 35% ced deg es, and 2 rate r Pro e n e h a r t v g octo O d e d a d d * ’s t an ter 94* mas pecialis e 24,2 -Tim ve s . t a r h a P the ees % of nal, s degr ly 71 ating uctio istrator e r t t s a r in el in AL roxim (ope t-lev level adm TOT App al fund istric r d for s. es d hoole e c d s s n lu e u d t g is *Inc 2 l an enefi get) , 202 tiona bud s and b ct. 17 struc of O ie r nonin la **As sa

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8 | Orange County Public Schools


. alar y as e s 00 b 54 , 830. 4 , 8 $ 4 n a $ chers is a s e ar n al cher OCPS te a e t ditio e ad ement, ning y for g a in a p r g e v Be etir age an a 1 for for r aver utes 5 3 0 ce , $ 1 , 4 6 T he ntrib fit s: $6 , n o c a r ard ene insu nce . ol b o for b r health s ur a s ch o e a ch e r fo life in r 9 t T he o 8 f y): r 2 9 salar , $ 9, 13 pe d $3 bas e $21 , 5 for FIC A efit s an o t d 94 r b en adde $4 ,1 o th e nt s ( leme p p u s 05 $3,4 4 gre e r’s – d de as te t – $ 5 , 2 2 ance M v d A ialis ,888 Spec rate – $6 to c o D

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AMS

R ROG ET P

N MAG

OUR 46 magnet

programs provide a challenging and stimulating environment for learning that enables students with special talents and interests to gain knowledge and skills in their areas of interest.

Elementary

Academy of Arts | Howard

Advanced Curriculum Academy | Hungerford

Arbor Ridge 6-8 Option

Aviation and Aerospace | Sally Ride Foreign Language | Hillcrest Orlando Gifted Academy STEAM Career Academy | Bay Meadows STEM Magnet | Orange Center Two-Way Dual Language | Hunter’s Creek, Tildenville, Union Park Visual and Performing Arts | Maxey

10 | Orange County Public Schools

Middle

Cambridge Middle School Academy | Liberty Center for the Advancement of Science and Engineering | Lockhart Middle Years International Baccalaureate | Carver, College Park, Roberto Clemente, Memorial, Robinswood Two-Way Dual Language | Hunter’s Creek World Language Academy | Lakeview


High 3DE by Junior Achievement | Oak Ridge

Criminal Justice, Law & Finance | Boone

Laser Photonics Academy | Wekiva

Academy of Culinary Arts | Wekiva

Digital Media and Gaming | Oak Ridge

Medical | Jones

Advanced Engineering Applications | Apopka

Engineering, Science, and Technology | Edgewater

AgriScience Academy | Wekiva

Entertainment Production and Management Academy | Evans

Aviation and Aerospace Engineering | Oak Ridge Cambridge Program | Colonial Center for Future Educators | Edgewater Center for International Studies | Dr. Phillips

Medical Careers | Apopka NAF Information Technology | Colonial Performing Fine Arts | University

First Responders Academy | East River

Veterinary Animal Science and Service | Colonial

Hospitality Management | Oak Ridge

Visual and Performing Arts | Dr. Phillips

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme | Cypress Creek, Evans, Jones, University 2022-2023 Pocket Guide | 11


TION A C DU

E ICAL N H C D TE

R AN

EE CAR

ORANGE Technical College is one of Central Florida’s leading providers of comprehensive secondary and postsecondary technical education, serving more than 55,491 students a year at the district’s technical college campuses, 22 high schools, 40 middle schools and various community learning sites. GRADUATES also can earn future college credits in most CTE programs, as well as valuable work experience for immediate employment in various technical fields.

12 | Orange County Public Schools

2021–2022

60

programs

1,761 graduates 9,577

industry certificates earned by secondary students


DUAL ENROLLMENT

Through dual enrollment, 3,732 high school juniors and seniors are taking postsecondary coursework with their academic studies. Students simultaneously earn credit toward high school completion and industry certification in their field of study. In 2021-22, OCPS high school juniors and seniors enrolled in at least one dual enrollment course earned 9,577 industry certifications.

ARTS ENROLLMENT

During the 2021-22 school year, 154 students earned the Advanced Placement Capstone Diploma and 42 students earned the AP Seminar and Research Certificate.

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S

ION RAT E P SO

OCP

SERVING more than 55,000 students, OCPS operates the largest public transportation system in Central Florida. In compliance with Florida Administrative Rule 6A.3, transportation is provided to students who live two miles or more from their zoned school.

14 | Orange County Public Schools

OCPS operates one of the largest food systems in Central Florida, serving more than 39 million meals a year, which exceeds 213,000 meals per day. In response to COVID-19, meals were made available to all students.



ES

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AL: 5 C O L

16 | Orange County Public Schools

sts g co ratin e t p n O tude per s

4 $9,15


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$2,4 utility c orward nd | benefits; des carry-f u F l clu and era ,898 ts Gen for salaries uipment; in c ,694 q $285grant proje | Used s and e nd d other lie u F supp ue l an even edera ,675 ial R d service, f c e 8,173 an debts p o 3 S o 2 f r $ lo fo | and Used und nds 4 ice F ent of bo 15,71 modeling v r e e 96,6 aym tS $2,5 ation and r Deb for the rep | red -insu nov Fund Used d, re s r self t n o f c la s 1 , d e 62 ool boar peration roj struction ,173, o h n ital P $385 by the sc g services Cap for new co | d ld in t e n d h e in u r s y F U ne dp s an rvice of mo al Seccounting sualty claim n r e a Int the a rty/c for rope Used costs, p h healt

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OUR RE Y

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illion .01 b ding 2 $ ear’s xclu this y udget, e billion F O ting b ools, $1.56 a oper orwards, ed for sch -f ts rk carry s earma e studen i v ) r e % (76 hat s eds and ers t rict cent ial ne d by dist or c e p s e s with s manag artment l p o e o d h sc es. nal uniti uctio instr g comm in learn

18 | Orange County Public Schools

ents 79 c nt on e is sp ing, h teac orting, sp n a tr ng rvisi supe and eling s coun nts. e d u t s


nts 10 ce toward goes ring, i acqu ting a r e p o d ng an taini main l o scho ies. it facil

nts 7 ce d e s u is y brar for li ials, r e mat staff ng and i train ulum . ic curr opment l e v e d

nts 4 ce toward s e o g nd , ral a cent services l a c s fi ral n gene istratio in m t d a ic distr and ology. n tech

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E LLAG

I 23 M 2 2 20

A mill = $1 of taxes for every $1,000 of the taxable value of a property. Required Local Effort: Set by the Florida Legislature. School districts must levy this amount in order to receive state funding. Basic Discretionary: Maximum set by the state and school district’s decision to levy. Additional Voted: Approved by Orange County voters in August 2022 and in effect through June 2027. Capital Improvement: Used to build and renovate schools. The maximum levy is set by the state.

20 | Orange County Public Schools

Required Local Effort . . . 3.214 Basic Discretionary . 0.748 Additional Voted . . . . . . . . . 1.000 Capital Improvement . 1.500 Total . . . . . . . . 6.462


WHAT the owner of a $265,100 home with a $25,000 homestead exemption will pay in school taxes this year (compared to last year): ASSESSED Value: HOMESTEAD Exemption: TAXABLE Value: 2022-23

6.462 (Mill rate) x $240,100 $1,552

$265,100 $25,000 $240,100 2020-21

6.737 (Mill rate) x $240,100 $1,618

Total change in taxes (assuming no change in assessed value of home)

Decrease of $66

S TAXE L O HO

SC

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t s. uden RK O our st t W fi e n T at b e RS A m s th A L rogra p L r a DO x-doll ed ta TAX pprov R a r U e YO t y vot Coun i The d

a pp st r i c t

ange tes Or recia

One Mill

A one mill property tax was approved by voters in 2010, re-approved in 2014, 2018 and 2022, and expires in 2027. It pays for essential operating expenses, including compensating teachers and support staff, preserving academic programs, arts, athletics, and student activities; and also supports charter schools. In fiscal year 2022, $162.9 million was generated to support the district’s needs.

22 | Orange County Public Schools

Sales Tax

A half-penny sales tax capital campaign was passed by voters in 2002, re-approved in 2014 and is funded through 2025. The monies pay to renovate or replace aging schools and site acquisition, build new schools to accommodate growth, new digital technology in classrooms, and capital renewal. From January 2003 through June 2022, sales tax collections totaled over $3.9 billion.


APPROXIMATELY $742 million in

budgeted Capital Improvement school projects were, are or will be in construction during Fiscal Year 2023. This includes more than $446 million for new relief projects and nearly $296 million for the replacement or renovation of existing schools. Though the full value of project budgets is accounted for, some projects may be in the construction phase for more than a single year.

Grant Funding

OCPS monitored compliance for more than $887 million in grant funding during the 2021-22 school year in support of 268 special projects. The funding represents local, state, federal and foundation grant awards generated through the efforts of OCPS teachers and district leaders in collaboration with numerous community partners.

SINCE 2003, the district has opened 64 new schools. Another 132 schools have been renovated or replaced. Over the next five years, the district plans to open seven new schools, including four elementary, two middle and one high school.

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TERY T O DA L

I LOR F E TH

FLORIDA voters approved the lottery in 1986 on the premise

that its revenues would be used to enhance education. Proceeds distributed to Orange County are used as required by law.

SCHOOL Recognition Awards, at a rate of $185.45 per student,

go to A-rated schools or those that improve by one letter grade or more. The money is used for teacher and staff bonuses, nonrecurring expenses or temporary instructional support. Remaining funds, if any, are distributed to every school at a rate of up to $5 per student for the School Advisory Committee to implement school improvement programs. In 2022-23, $15 million was allocated to OCPS for the School Recognition Lottery Program.

24 | Orange County Public Schools


2022-2023 Pocket Guide | 25


S

OCP R O ON F

ATI UND

FO

THE Foundation for OCPS invests in our children today to strengthen our community tomorrow. In 2021-22, FOCPS raised or managed $4.8 million to build educational equity. In addition, invested funds held by the Foundation to benefit OCPS students, teachers and programs grew to $5 million.

26 | Orange County Public Schools

THROUGH ADDitions volunteering opportunities, family and community members work with their chosen school(s) to meet needs in ways that match their interests. In 2021-22, 42,290 school volunteers contributed more than 262,813 hours.

PARTNERS in Education

businesses and organizations strengthen schools by providing expertise, volunteer hours, financial resources and products. OCPS had 2,661 business community partners in 202122, whose support equated to more than $5 million in additional school resources.



445 West Amelia Street | Orlando, FL 32801 | 407.317.3368 | www.ocps.net Prepared by OCPS Public Relations The School Board of Orange County, Florida, does not discriminate in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in its programs and activities, on the basis of race, color, religion, age, sex, national origin, marital status, disability, genetic information, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or any other reason prohibited by law. The following individuals at the Ronald Blocker Educational Leadership Center, 445 West Amelia Street, Orlando, Florida 32801, attend to compliance matters: Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Officer & Title IX Coordinator: Keshara Cowans; ADA Coordinator: Jay Cardinali; Section 504 Coordinator: Tajuana Lee-Wenze. (407.317.3200)

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