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ZACH SCROGGINS ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


ARCHITECTURE

DESIGN WORK

ARTWORK


LTL

LEWIS TSURUMAKI LEWIS

LTL’s work with the College of Wooster began in 2001 with an extensive feasibility study of the residential campus plan that culminated in recommendations for substantial changes in the density and configuration of several student halls. Contrary to the prevailing trend at residential colleges toward apartment-style living, extensive discussions with students, residential life staff, and college administration led to the unanticipated conclusion that a double-loaded corridor type actually encourages the greatest degree of socialization and the most positive student experiences. Urban where the apartment type is suburban, the spatial format of the corridor building facilitates exchange among students and provides opportunities for diverse levels of interaction. At a time when students arrive on campus with an increasing array of insulating personal technologies--ipods, computers, gameboys-- this seemingly outmoded type offers a social mixing chamber for the cultivation of a collective collegial identity.


LEADING-EDGE DESIGN COMPETITION


SITE PLAN

This project was done for the Leading-Edge Design Competition to design a zero energy co-housing community. The project program was to have 12, 3-bedroom/2 bath units, a common house that would be shared between the units, 3 retail spaces, and a gym that would be used by the public and the co-housing tenants. The site for the project was located north to south so getting adequate solar gain to the units was going to be difficult. Solar access is needed not only for light but primarily for heat gain through the southern facing materials. Orienting the units in a line only allowed for the units on the southern end to have southern facing facades. Since this project requires all the units to be zero-energy this became the main driving issue that led my design. I placed the units in a line of three with a second story mimicked above, with an-

SOUTH-EAST ELEVATION

other set parallel to these. I knew that this tight space between the cohousing forms would be a shady space so I wanted to minimize the exterior circulation so that there would be minimal overhang in between forms. I placed four cores located at the points where each unit meets another, two staircases and two elevators. I then connected each elevator with the stair on the opposite unit. This created just two bridges, accessing three units each, spanning the gap. The placement of these vertical circulation cores allowed for the space directly behind them to be utilized in a unique way. I carried the forms of the cores back through the units to create a sun space and stack ventilation space. It became clear that this space would function best serving the bottom units. But this brought up the question of how to get solar access and stack ventilation to the


FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

top units. After studying the roof plans I was able to place two smaller versions of the solar access spaces and stack ventilation spaces above the main living spaces on the top units. This allowed for both units to get adequate solar heat gain in the winter and proper stack ventilation in the summer. In further study of how these spaces would work I understood that since each design strategy would occupy the same space then each strategy would need to be able to be “deactivated� so that only one would be utilized at a time. This understanding made the stack ventilation side to be operable louvers and the southern facing glass to have operable blinds inside the glass. This allows for the unit owners to choose what they want the space to be when they need it. The final question was how to get the heat that would be gained from the south-

ern facing glass space down into the unit below. This brought about the need to change to structure of these walls to be a hollow concrete mass that would bring the heat down through the wall and into a fan system to push the heat through the second level floor and then down into the space below. Because the stack ventilation space is located away from the half of the unit the question arose of how to allow the flow of air during stack ventilation to move across these rooms. It was then decided that the interior walls, being nonload-bearing, would have vents in the top of the wall to allow the air to flow from room to room until it was pulled up through the stack ventilation tower.


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SOLAR GAIN 3 5

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STACK VENTILATION

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ROOF MEMBRANE TAPERED INSULATION STACK VENTILATION LOUVER METAL COPING ROOF MEMBRANE ADHERED MEMBRANE 8K1 OPEN-WEB JOIST IN-GLASS SHADE WINDOW TO TOP UNIT WINDOW TO TOP UNIT RAIN GUTTER CMU BLOCK WOOD FLOORING CONCRETE SLAB METAL DECKING CONCRETE U-BEAM 12K1 OPEN-WEB JOIST WINDOW TO BOTTOM UNIT BOARD SIDING WOOD FLOORING CONCRETE SLAB GRAVEL CONCRETE FOOTING EARTH

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DETAILED SECTION

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CROSS VENTILATION

UNIT PLAN

SECTION


A NEW NEIGHBORHOOD FOR THE CENTER-CITY


SITE PLAN

This design is an apartment complex located in downtown Knoxville, TN on a site that has been previously thought up by a landscape architecture studio. The design had us orient our buildings in a line looking over three large soccer fields. My design started with finding a way to have an apartment layout that would have an open common space with access from northern and southern light with the bedrooms on the corners allowing each one to have a light source. The back balcony is punched into the main building shape so that it would be shaded from the southern light. The northern facade of the building is a large curtain wall that overlooks the fields

SAMPLE FLOOR PLAN

bellow. This glass wall is open to the air acting as a visual barrier and not a conditioned space. The glass wall is divided into a grid pattern with a random pattern of empty panels, transparent panels and blue translucent panels. This is to allow privacy to the front doors of the apartment units. There are two ways to access to site. There is a street that comes directly off an adjacent street and runs right in front of the bottom level of the buildings which are retail spaces. The apartment owners come off the northern end of the site and park underneath the buildings in a large covered garage.


4 BEDROOM

LEVEL 2 FLOOR PLAN

2 BEDROOM

1/8” - 1’

SAMPLE FLOOR PLAN

1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS

2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS

CIRCULATION

SECONDARY SPACES

UNIT LAYOUT DIAGRAM

4 BEDROOM APARTMENTS

1 BEDROOM


SUMMER SUN

SECTION


EXTERIOR GLASS SHELL

INTERIOR FACADE

WEST ELEVATION


LEAP COLLABORATIVE


SITE PLAN N

The concept of this design is a steel structure bookended by two large brick on CMU shear walls. The steel structured “middle” of the design is layed out so that both north and south facing facades are curtain walls allowing maximum exposure to the exterior. The main office work spaces are centrally located on alternating double-height spaces oriented to the southern façade. Each floor’s office spaces have a direct outdoor balcony overlooking the landscape

SECTION

on the ground level. These balconies are cantilevered out form the main building shape. The executive offices and the conference rooms are oriented on the north façade encompassing the two middle structural bays. These two bays are bookended by outdoor balconies cut into the main building shape. These outdoor spaces allow for all major occupied spaces to have a landscape feature. These two main office spaces are divided by the main vertical circulation ele-


FLOOR PLAN

ments with staircases working in a switchback movement. Having the two large brick massing bookends on the building allows the “middle” of the building to look lighter because of its steel frame and comparison to the windowless brick. The column grid allows for an open plan for the office spaces. The outdoor balconies on the southern façade are also used to shade the southern curtain walls from direct sun, allowing for more than two-thirds of the façade to be in the shade at all times. This allows for a large sum of light to come into the office spaces but keeps direct sunlight off of the work stations. FLOOR PLATE DIAGRAM

SOUTH ELEVATION


BRICK ON CMU

METAL PANEL ROOF

2.5” x 5” METAL MULLION CURTAIN WALL

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM 4” BRICK WRAPPING OUTDOOR BALCONY

WALKWAY AROUND OPENING TO FLOOR BELOW

METAL HANDRAIL GUY

W12X26 WIDE FLANGE SECONDARY SUPPORT W24X162 WIDE FLANGE PRIMARY SUPPORT

HSS14X14X5/8 HOLLOW STEEL COLUMN

GRID SYSTEM 2” TERAZZO FLOORING 8” CONCRETE ON METAL DECK

SECONDARY WORKSPACES

4X4 ACOUSTIC CEILING

ELEVATORS

CIRCULATION

PRIMARY WORKSPACE 8” CAN DOWNLIGHT

BRICK WRAPPED STEEL COLUMN

SERVICE SPACES SPACE DIAGRAM

WALL SECTION DETAIL

1/2” - 1’

WALL DETAIL


EAST KNOXVILLE PAVILION


SITE PLAN

After studying the history and demographic of east Knoxville, TN our studio teacher challenged us to come up with a design that would benefit the area the most. After seeing people selling random items out of their trucks at a gravel parking lot I decided that a covered bazaar/pavilion would be the most beneficial addition to the area. This design is located in between a historic church and a large neighborhood. The horseshoe shape allows for a playground to fit nicely in the middle. The central area of the design has a long row of stalls for the general public to sell whatev-

WEST ELEVATION

er they choose. This is not intended to be something people would have to pay to use but a free area. The structure of the pavilion is a wood column and beam structure with large brick bases to the columns to tie the design to the large brick church next door. The roofs alternate in a slanting pattern to allow indirect light into the bazaar pathway. The two ends of the “horseshoe� are open spaces with some park benches and some open spaces to allow for the public to have some flexibility to how they want to use the spaces.


FLOOR PLAN

SECTION


DESIGN WORK

This design titled “Movement” was made for a Presentation Design professional elective. We were first tasked to come up with a design using twenty black and gray rectangles to show movement. We were not allowed to have them overlap each other. We then had to mimic our design using as little text as possible in any different fonts, overlapping allowed.

The success of the double-loaded corridor as a catalyst for college social life is predicated on several important conditions: 1) the scale of the hall unit--the total number of rooms served by a single corridor--should be neither too small nor too large, as this resulted either in isolation or institutional anonymity, 2) the corridor should be wide enough to function as an ad-hoc social space and connect to or incorporate other collective spaces, and 3) the corridor should be integrated with the main circulation paths through the building.

LTL

The generative brief for Bornhuetter Hall, a new 47,500 sq. ft. residence hall comprising 185 beds, was derived from this research. Sited on the northern edge of a liberal arts campus, Bornhuetter Hall encourages social interaction by transforming the conventions of the double-loaded corridor and enriches student experience by providing a balance between private spaces for study and public gathering areas for communal life and discussion.

The diagram for the building was a product of resolving conflicting pressures. The college requested a single building not to exceed four floors. Therefore, each floor needed to hold 46 students. Yet, the ideal hall unit needed to be limited to twenty-five to thirty students. The residence hall is actually two buildings, which share a ground floor mechanical system. Within each wing, the hallways flare at their ends and embraces lounges, a kitchenette, and more intimate sitting areas. A collective outdoor courtyard is created by this split. This exterior room functions as the public center of the building. It is an unusual space, simultaneously at the heart of the building and at the ends of each wing. It contains both social and private spaces. It provides a sequence of entry into the building and passage through to a park framed at the rear of the building. Wood-clad study nooks cantilever, like box seats, into the theatrical space of the courtyard, producing a dynamic entrance to the building and establishing private study areas in a collective setting. The

LEWIS TSURUMAKI LEWIS

LTL’s work with the College of Wooster began in 2001 with an extensive feasibility study of the residential campus plan that culminated in recommendations for substantial changes in the density and configuration of several student halls. Contrary to the prevailing trend at residential colleges toward apartment-style living, extensive discussions with students, residential life staff, and college administration led to the unanticipated conclusion that a double-loaded corridor type actually encourages the greatest degree of socialization and the most positive student experiences. Urban where the apartment type is suburban, the spatial format of the corridor building facilitates exchange among students and provides opportunities for diverse levels of interaction. At a time when students arrive on campus with an increasing array of insulating personal technologies--ipods, computers, gameboys-- this seemingly outmoded type offers a social mixing chamber for the cultivation of a collective collegial identity.

Enriches student experience by providing a balance between private spaces for study and public gathering areas

daily activity of coming and going from the residence hall is turned into a public event The hall is sited at the northern edge of the campus and abuts an under-utilized park. The courtyard provides both the major collective space for the building, while also forming a link between the campus and the landscape beyond. One can move through the building to the park–from outside to outside–without passing through a door

The building is conceived as two copper clad boxes, wrapped by two veneers of brick. The brick skins unify the building, while the details at the edges, window and joints of the building explicate the interplay between the brick surfaces and the copper volume

Wood-clad study nooks cantilever, like box seats, into the theatrical space of the courtyard, producing a dynamic entrance to the building

“ENRICHES STUDENT EXPERIENCE BY PROVIDING A BALANCE BETWEEEN PRIVATE SPACES FOR STUDY AND PUBLIC GATHERING AREAS FOR COMMUNAL LIFE AND DISCUSSION”

Another design for the Presentation Design professional elective. We were tasked with creating two double-page spreads for a bulding and firm of our choice. We had to find ways of connecting all of the pictures and the text accross all pages.


ARTWORK


ZACH SCROGGINS - 865.603.3938 - 6001 GLENMAY DR. KNOXVILLE TN, 37921


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Architecture Portfolio  

University of Tennessee Knoxville College of Architecture and Design B. Arch Prortfolio.