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Still gaming: the day I met Ralph Baer Programmer Darius Kazemi makes cool things on the internet, blogs about games and online discourse, and is writing a book about Jagged Alliance 2 at crowdfunded publisher Boss Fight.

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On August 5th, 2008,

Ralph Baer spoke at the Boston Post Mortem, a monthly meetup group for professional game developers in Boston. Baer wasn’t far from Boston: at the time he lived in southern New Hampshire most of the year, wintering in Florida. New Hampshire is where he lived and worked most of his life, building the first videogame console prototype (the “Brown Box”) for Nashua-based Sanders Associates in 1968. I was one of the organizers of the meetup, and a few days prior, famed designer Steve Meretzky contacted me to ask if I could lend a hand: Steve was picking up Ralph from his home in New Hampshire, about an hour from Boston, but couldn’t drive him back. Could I perhaps drive Ralph home?

Um, yes Steve. Yes, I can drive home Ralph Baer, 86-year-old inventor of the videogame console. The meetup itself was packed to capacity, with 230 people crammed into the back room of an Irish pub. We craned our heads as Baer opened up a Word document that must have been 100 pages long, each page or two containing a name, a picture, and a brief text description. Each one of these was a project, usually game or toy related, that Baer had invented in his 60-year-long career. I learned that he invented Simon, the color-matching game. I had no idea. He showed a whole bunch of prototypes that never made it to market, including a kind of He-Man Castle type thing, where toys would behave differently and communicate with each other based on where you put them in the castle? Something like that? The whole thing was kind of amazing. Jason McIntosh has a good writeup of the talk on his blog. I don’t remember much else from the meetup. Of course, Baer was swamped with admirers afterwards. The pub kicked us out at 10pm, as always.

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Histories of games hardware  

Memory Insufficient volume one issue five

Histories of games hardware  

Memory Insufficient volume one issue five

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